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HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN

Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management


Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
Page 2 of 74

Document Control Data
Revision
No
Revision
Date
Page or
Section
Reason For Revision
1 April 2014 Various Code of Practice Review and Update. Removal of CoP from
Volume 3 Occupational Health and introduction to Volume
1: HSE Administration and Management












Copyright
The copyright and all other rights of a like nature in this document are vested in Abu Dhabi National Oil Company
(ADNOC), Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. This document is issued as part of the Manual of HSE Codes of Practice
(the Manual) and as guidance to ADNOC, ADNOC Group Companies and independent operators engaged in the Abu
Dhabi oil & gas industries. Any of these parties may give copies of the entire Manual or selected parts thereof to their
contractors implementing HSE standards in order to qualify for award of contracts or for the execution of awarded
contracts. Such copies must carry a statement that they are reproduced by permission of ADNOC, and an explanatory
note on the manner in which the Manual is to be used.
Disclaimer
No liability whatsoever in contract, tort or otherwise is accepted by ADNOC or any of its Group Companies, their
respective shareholders, directors, officers and employees whether or not involved in the preparation of the Manual for
any consequences whatsoever resulting directly or indirectly from reliance on or from the use of the Manual or for any
error or omission therein even if such error or omission is caused by a failure to exercise reasonable care.
All administrative queries must be directed to the Manual of HSE Codes of Practice Administrator in:
Health, Safety &Environment Division
Abu Dhabi National Oil Company,
P.O. Box : 898, Abu Dhabi,
United Arab Emirates.
Telephone : (9712) 6023782
Fax: (9712) 6668089

Internet site: www.adnoc.com
E-mail: hse@adnoc.ae


HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
Page 3 of 74

TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Purpose 7
II. Definitions & Glossary of Terms 7
III. Existing Legislation 8
1 Introduction 9
2 Provision of Drinking Water 10
2.1 Basic Requirements 10
2.2 Management Responsibilities 10
2.3 Prescribed Concentrations & Values [PCV] 10
2.4 Monitoring of Water Supplies 11
2.5 Water Sampling & Testing 11
2.6 Water Quality Incidents 11
2.7 Record Keeping 12
3 Food Hygiene 13
3.1 Introduction 13
3.2 Responsibilities 13
3.2.1 Food Business Operators [FBO] 13
3.2.2 Line Management 14
3.3 Food Safety Management System [FSMS] 14
3.3.1 Good Agricultural Practices 15
3.3.2 Good Manufacturing Practices 15
3.4 Control of Operations 17
3.4.1 Control of Food Hazards 17
3.4.2 Key Aspects of Control Systems 17
3.4.3 Incoming Material Requirements 18
3.4.4 Packaging 18
3.4.5 Water 18
3.4.6 Management and Supervision 18
3.4.7 Documentation and Records 18
3.5 Maintenance and Cleaning 19
3.5.1 Cleaning procedures and methods 19
3.5.2 Cleaning Protocols 19
3.5.3 Pest Control Systems 20
3.5.4 Waste Management 20
3.5.5 Monitoring Effectiveness 20
3.6 Personal Hygiene 21
3.6.1 Health Status 21
3.6.2 Illness and Injuries 21
3.6.3 Personal Cleanliness 21
3.6.4 Personal Behaviour 21
3.6.5 Visitors 21
3.7 Transportation 22

HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
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Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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3.7.1 Requirements 22
3.7.2 Use and Maintenance 22
3.8 Training 22
3.9 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point - HACCP 23
3.9.1 Management Commitment 23
3.9.2 Preliminary Procedures 23
3.9.3 Application of the HACCP Principles 24
3.9.4 Validation of the HACCP System 26
3.10 Caterers Health Guidelines 26
3.10.1 Pre-Employment Medical Examination 27
3.10.2 Government-issued Food Handlers Certificate 27
3.10.3 Six-Monthly Medical Examination 27
3.10.4 Return from Leave Medical Examination 27
3.10.5 Exclusion of food handlers 28
3.11 ISO-22000 28
3.12 Nutritional Considerations 29
3.12.1 Background 29
3.12.2 Balanced Diet 29
3.12.3 Food Groups 30
3.13 Food Incidents & Crisis Management 34
3.13.1 Types of Food Incidents 34
3.13.2 Responsibility for Management of Level 1 & 2 Incidents 34
4 Accommodation 36
4.1 Introduction 36
4.2 Living Accommodation 36
4.3 Sleeping Areas [Cabins & Rooms] 37
4.4 Additional Facilities 40
4.4.1 Offshore 40
4.4.2 Unmanned Installations 40
4.4.3 Temporary Accommodation 41
4.4.4 Onshore Facilities 41
4.4.5 Temporary Camps 42
4.5 Community Facilities 43
4.6 Leasing or Renting Existing Camps 43
4.7 Layout for Workers Camp Areas 44
4.7.1 The Site 44
4.7.2 Roads and footpaths 46
4.7.3 Hard Standings (base supports for units) 46
4.8 Fire Safety 47
4.8.1 Fire Service Main 47
4.8.2 Means of Escape 47
4.8.3 Fire Fighting Preparedness 47
4.8.4 Fire Fighting, Personnel Protective Equipment and First Aid 48

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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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4.8.5 Fire Warning System 48
4.8.6 Fire Hydrants 48
4.8.7 Firefighting Appliances (Portable extinguishers) 48
4.8.8 Fire Fighting Equipment 49
4.8.9 Maintenance 49
4.8.10 Fire Notices (to BS 5499 and BS ISO 3864 Pictorial design) 49
4.9 General Fire Hazards 49
5 Pest Control 50
5.1 Introduction 50
5.2 Accountabilities and Responsibilities 50
5.3 Pest Prevention and Control 50
5.3.1 Design, Maintenance & Proofing of Buildings 50
5.3.2 Good Housekeeping 51
5.3.3 Correct Storage 51
5.4 Action in Case of Suspected or Known pest infestation 52
5.5 Pest Control Contractors 52
6 Laboratory Standards Analytical Methods & Equipment 54
6.1 Analytical Methods 54
6.2 Equipment and Equipment Maintenance 54
7 Contractor Welfare 55
7.1 Welfare Management Plan 55
7.2 Welfare Inspections and Audits 55
7.3 Welfare General Requirements 55
7.4 Personnel Engagement 56
7.5 Salary/ Wages 56
7.6 Overtime Payment 56
7.7 End of Service Benefits 56
7.8 Leaves, Work Rotation and Time Off 56
7.9 Entitlement to Sick Leave 56
7.10 Security 57
7.11 Medical Services/Health Insurance 58
7.12 Medical Emergencies, First Aid Facilities and Training 58
7.13 Transportation 58
7.14 Laundry 58
7.15 Recreation Facility 58
8 Medical Services & First Aid Facilities 59
8.1 Medical Emergencies, First Aid Facilities and Training 59
8.2 Emergency Medical Plan 59
8.3 Emergency Medical Equipment 59


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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
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Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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8.4 First Aid 59
8.4.1 Assessment of First Aid Needs 60
8.4.2 First Aiders 60
8.4.3 First Aid Resources 61
8.4.4 First aid / Emergency Room 61
8.4.5 First aid Training and Competencies 62
9 Other Facilities 64
9.1 Barber Shops 64
10 References 66
11 Appendices 67
Appendix 1: Drinking Water Prescribed Concentrations and Values 68
Appendix 2: Recommended Illumination Levels in Food Areas 71
Appendix 3: Mandatory Guidelines for Microbiological Quality of Foods 72


HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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I. PURPOSE
This Code of Practice provides Group Companies &contractors with food and welfare
standards and best industry guidance to ensure that the health and welfare of employees,
contractors and visitors are not affected.
The provision of wholesome food, clean water and good living conditions are fundamental
requirements for any employer that also has responsibilities for catering and
accommodation. This document establishes the requirements that must be applied to
ensure that these fundamental needs are met.
In addition to the basic elements of clean food and water, this Code of Practice also
addresses other key aspects of employee welfare that include accommodation and camp
facilities, public health, medical emergencies, first aid facilities, and control of pests.
Monitoring of compliance with standards will usually require sampling and laboratory
analysis of field samples. As a result, a set of standards for laboratory analytical methods
and equipment is included in this COP.
Unless otherwise stated, all of the requirements set out in this Code of Practice are
Mandatory and it is the responsibility of senior management to ensure that these are
implemented throughout the facilities that fall under their sphere of influence and, that
contractors working on their facilities are fully aware and compliant with these requirements.
II. DEFINITIONS & GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Accommodation A room or building in which an individual may live or stay.
ADFCA Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority
Drinking Water Water intended primarily for human consumption, either directly, as
supplied from the tap, or indirectly, in beverages, ice or foods
prepared with water. Drinking water is also used for other domestic
purposes such as bathing and showering.
DWSP Drinking Water Safety Plan
Employer Any natural or juridical person employing one or more workers in
consideration of a remuneration of any kind whatsoever.
Employment
Contract


Any Agreement, whether for a limited or for an unlimited period,
concluded between an employer and an employee under which the
latter undertakes to work in the service of the employer and under
his management or control against a remuneration payable to him by
the employer.
Food Safety Hazard Biological, chemical or physical agent in food, or condition of food,
with the potential to cause an adverse health effect. This term
includes allergens.
FSMS Food Safety Management System
HACCP Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point.
PCV Prescribed Concentrations and Values
Recreation An activity that people engage in during their free time that is
recognized as having socially redeeming values.
Remuneration Whatever is given to the employee in consideration of his services
under the employment contract.
RSB Regulation and Supervision Bureau [Abu Dhabi]

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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
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Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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Welfare Availability of resources and presence of conditions required for
reasonably comfortable, healthy and secure living.
WHO World Health Organisation
Work Any human effort, be it intellectual, technical or physical, extended
against remuneration whether the said work is permanent or
temporary.
Worker Any male or female person who receives remuneration of any kind
for work performed thereby in the services of an employer and under
his management or control.
III. EXISTING LEGISLATION
Water Quality Regulations (2013) Final Draft Consultation, Regulation and
Supervision Bureau for the Water, Wastewater and Electricity Sector in the Emirate
of Abu Dhabi; www.rsb.gov.ae. The draft Water Quality Regulations (2013) will
supersede the 2009 regulations and came into force on 1/1/2014.
Regulation No (6), Food Hygiene throughout the Food Chain, Abu Dhabi Food
Control Authority, 2010.
Federal Law No 8 (1980), Chapter V: Safety, Protection, and the Health and Social
Care of the Employees; Articles (91, 93, 94, 96, & 101).
Cabinet Decision No. (13) of 2009 Approving the General Standards Manual for
Group Labour Accommodation and Related Services.
Code of Practice No (6), HACCP for Manufacturing Sector, Abu Dhabi Food Control
Authority, 2011.
Code of Practice No (13), Food Safety & Hygiene Guide to Catering Sector, Abu
Dhabi Food Control Authority, 2011.
Health conditions regulations for men's grooming salons and kids salon, 1st edition
(2011); Municipality of Abu Dhabi City, Public Health Division, Health Control
Section, www.adm.gov.ae

Group Companies must ensure that their activities comply with all relevant Federal
and Abu Dhabi laws and regulations at all times, including any that may be
introduced after the publication of this Code of Practice.


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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
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Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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1 INTRODUCTION
The activities of Operating Companies and some of their contractors are carried out in
diverse areas ranging from onshore to offshore; some of which are accessible while others
are remote. Irrespective of location of its activities, any operating company or its
contractors have a Duty of Care to ensure that all reasonable and practicable steps are
taken to maintain the on-going welfare, wellbeing and health of its employees, contractors
and visitors.
Food and water are basic needs for human survival and are major determinants of the
health and well-being of any person. Consequently, one of the aims of this CoP is to
provide the frameworks that enable a company to maintain the health and wellbeing of
individuals who consume food and water that are produced, processed, prepared,
transported, served or otherwise handled within the companys facilities. These
frameworks are based on compliance to the legal requirements of the Abu Dhabi Food
Control Authority [ADFCA] that are enshrined in Regulation 6 (2010) and its appended
Codes of Practice; the Water Quality Regulations (2013), and other regulations issued by
the Abu Dhabi City Municipality and other regulatory frameworks.
ADNOC expects all companies, to as a minimum meet, or else exceed the requirements of
these regulations in any way that is applicable to their specific facilities and operations.
Human welfare must also take into consideration living environments and attendant
services. Consequently, all accommodation facilities and welfare arrangements must
achieve the minimum requirements set out in this CoP, in order to avoid adverse physical
and moral effects on personnel.
Conversely, Public Health, Emergency and First Aid facilities must be suitable and sufficient
to meet the needs of employees, contractors and visitors at any location.


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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
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Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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2 PROVISION OF DRINKING WATER
2.1 Basic Requirements
All water supplied for the purposes of drinking, washing, cooking or food production must
be wholesome. In order to achieve wholesomeness it is essential that the water [Ref: 1]:
Does not contain any element, organism or substance (other than a permitted
property, element, organism or substance) at a concentration or value which would
be detrimental to the health of the consumer;
Does not contain any element, organism or substance (whether or not it is a
permitted property, element, organism or substance ) at a concentration or value
which, in conjunction with any other element, organism or substance it contains
would be detrimental to the health of the consumer; and
Does not contain concentrations or values of the permitted property, element,
organism or substance that are in excess of the Prescribed Concentrations or
Values listed the Tables A.1 to A.8 presented in Appendix 1.
2.2 Management Responsibilities
The Company management is responsible for developing a Drinking Water Safety Plan
[DWSP] that cover the potential areas of contamination risks associated with external and
internal factors and in situations where a Prescribed Concentration or Value has been
exceeded during water production, transmission, distribution and supply. This is to ensure
that the good drinking water supply practices developed by the World Health Organisation
[WHO] are followed and that they are based on employing comprehensive risk assessment
techniques.
The key components of the DWSP are:
Hazard identification & Risk assessment;
Application of appropriate control measures;
Application of remedial action;
Management of operational monitoring;
Communication protocols;
All of the standard procedures, plans, communication protocols, remedial actions and
supporting programmes must be documented, reviewed and regularly updated.
Important Note: Presented in the following subsections is a summary of the main
requirements stated in the Water Quality Regulations (2013). However, because it is
neither permissible nor practical to reproduce the legislation in the CoP, it is the companys
responsibility to ensure that it has reviewed the original regulations at www.rsb.gov.ae and
that it has established which sections and requirements are relevant to its specific activities.
2.3 Prescribed Concentrations & Values [PCV]
The detailed lists of prescribed concentrations and values [PCV] for a property, element,
organism or substance in drinking water are presented in tables A.1 to A.8 in Appendix 1.
These are reproduced from the Water Quality Regulations 2013 [Ref.1], and it is the
responsibility of the company to ensure that that they are referring to the latest version of
the PCV.
Group companies and contractors must ensure that water supplied for drinking, washing,
cooking or food preparation do not exceed these PCVs.


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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
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2.4 Monitoring of Water Supplies
Where the Company supplies [including through a road tanker] or produces water for
drinking, washing, cooking or production of food, it must determine for each of its water
supply networks, an appropriate number and location for sampling points to ensure that
analysis of these samples for the parameters outlined in Appendix 1 will produce data
which are representative of the quality of the water supplied.
Where the company intends to supply water from a new source [e.g. a new plant] or from a
plant that has not been in use for more than 3 months, the company must take appropriate
samples from that source to:
Establish that water can be supplied from that source without breaching the
requirements set out in the Water Regulations; and
Determine what treatment is necessary to ensure that the water supply complies
with the requirements set out in the Water Regulations.
Samples taken from a new source must be tested for each of the parameters stated in
Appendix 1; as well for any other parameter which in the Companys opinion might cause
the supply to breach the requirements of the Regulations.
2.5 Water Sampling & Testing
In order to meet the requirement for water quality monitoring [refer to Section 2.4] the
company must establish a Water Sampling Programme [WSP] which satisfies the following
criteria:
Sampling frequencies from the predetermined locations are set to occur at equal
intervals over the year;
Samples are representative of the quality of water at the time of sampling;
Samples are not contaminated during sampling or transportation;
Samples are preserved at temperatures and conditions that cause no material
alteration of the concentration or value of the parameters being investigated;
Samples are analysed as soon as practicable after they have been taken:
o By or under the supervision of a person competent to conduct such task;
o With equipment which is fit for that purpose;
o Using recognized analytical systems and methods [e.g. the Standard Method
for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, or any other method approved
by the Abu Dhabi Regulation & Supervision Bureau and capable of establishing,
within acceptable limits of deviation and detection, whether the sample contains
concentrations or values which are in breach of Prescribed Concentrations or
Values.
Sample collection and handling must be either in accordance with ISO-5667 on Water
Quality Sampling [Ref. 2] or to a comparable international best practice on sample handling
and preservation technique. Water quality samples must be analysed at a laboratory which
is accredited to ISO-17025 [Ref. 3] for the range of parameters under investigation.
2.6 Water Quality Incidents
In the event that the test results value of one or more of the Parameters included in Tables
A.1 to A.8 lies outside the Prescribed Concentration or Value (PCV) limit, particularly those
in Table A.6, the Company must take immediate remedial action in accordance with the
Operating Code of the Water Distribution &Transmission Code [Ref. 4].

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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
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Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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2.7 Record Keeping
The company producing or supplying water for the purposes of drinking, washing, cooking
or food production must maintain for each of its water plants and networks a record
containing:
(a) The name and unique identification of the water plant, desalination plant, pumping
plant, or water tanker;
(b) An estimate of the population supplied, volume of water distributed, or the capacity
of water storage; water tankers and the water plant;
(c) Details and description of the water plant processes and water treatment chemicals
used at the plant;
(d) Water sampling programme and schedule
(e) The test methods used to determine compliance with the PCVs outlined in
Appendix 1
(f) Copies of the water testing data
(g) Any other information that is deemed relevant to the plant [e.g. maintenance
records, breakdowns, etc.]

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Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
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3 FOOD HYGIENE
3.1 Introduction
Every company must provide food that is suitable for human consumption. Every Group
Company or contractor who is responsible for ensuring that the legal requirements of UAE
food laws are met within their facilities or at the facilities/food businesses under their control
is defined as a Food Business Operator [FBO].
Food hygiene requirements within the Emirate of Abu Dhabi are controlled by Regulation 6,
2010 and administered by the Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority [ADFCA]. Regulation 6
and the 111 articles set within it apply to any Food Business Operators who is responsible
for primary production, processing, preparing, manufacturing, packing, transporting, storing,
distribution, displaying, servicing, donating or selling food to consumers.
In principle, the ADFCA is based on the development; implementation and maintenance of
a food safety management system [FSMS] based on the Hazard Analysis and Critical
Control Point [HACCP] principles.
3.2 Responsibilities
3.2.1 Food Business Operators [FBO]
The Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority [ADFCA] sets out several clear responsibilities on
any Food Business Operator. A summary of the principal responsibilities placed on the
FBO is presented below.
Articles FBO Responsibilities
[3 to 6] Abide by the licensing requirements of ADFCA;
Abide by the regulations pertaining to Food Traceability and Recall;
Must ensure that food handlers are trained and that they demonstrate
knowledge and skills in food safety and good hygiene practices as
applicable to their assigned tasks, and have also obtained certification
to an official food safety training program;
When assessing the health status of food handlers, must ensure that:
They are medically fit to work and maintain records of absence for
infected employees or carriers of any disease that may pose a risk to
food safety;
Food handlers suffering from or being a carrier of a disease, to
immediately report any symptoms that may pose a risk to food safety;
Resumption of duties is not allowed until food handlers are medically
examined prior to returning to work, for 48 hours after symptoms have
ceased for the diseases and symptoms stated in bullet point (d);
Food handlers are free from infectious gastrointestinal illnesses;
tuberculosis; infected skin lesions or cuts on exposed parts of the body;
any discharge from the eyes, nose or mouth; or acute streptococcal
sore throat, including symptoms of jaundice, diarrhoea, vomiting and
fever.



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Conversely, the following table signposts Articles (7) to (111) relating to specific sections of
the Regulation. It is the responsibility of every FBO to establish the requirements of articles
that are most relevant to their food business.
Section Articles Section Articles
Primary Production 7 to 11 Location, Design and Structure 12 to 21
Equipment 22 to 24 Personal Hygiene 25 to 28
Temperature Control 29 to 41 Food Handling Areas 42 to 55
Food Reception &
Storage
56 to 61 Heat Treatment 62 to 64
Water Supply 65 to 70 Food Packaging 71 to 75
Food Transportation 76 to 85 Food Display 86 to 93
Food Waste 94 to 98 Food Safety Management System
[i.e. HACCP]
99 to 104
Mobile & Temporary
Food Establishments
[including marquees &
tents, etc.]
105 to 107 Additional Closing Provisions 108 to 111
The detailed requirements of Regulation (6) 2010 and any supporting specific Codes of
Practice must be accessed through the ADFCA website www.adfca.ae
3.2.2 Line Management
It is the responsibility of line management in individual group companies and at contractors
working on their premises, to ensure the safety of food that is processed, prepared,
manufactured, packed, transported, stored, distributed, displayed, serviced, donated or sold
to employees, contractors or visitors at Group Company facilities.
In order to eliminate or minimize the likelihood of introducing a hazard which may adversely
affect the safety of food, or its suitability for consumption, robust and traceable systems
must be implemented to maintain acceptable standards in food hygiene. In that respect,
the Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system must be implemented at
all Group Companies and, where relevant, to their Contractors
3.3 Food Safety Management System [FSMS]
For Operating Companies and contractors with responsibilities as FBO, relevant pre-
requisite programmes such as Good Agricultural Practices [GAP], Good Manufacturing
Practice [GMP] and Good Hygiene Practice [GHP] must be working effectively within a
supply system before HACCP is applied.
If these pre-requisite programmes are not functioning effectively then the introduction of
HACCP will be complicated, resulting in a cumbersome, over-documented system. A brief
outline of these pre-requisite systems is outlined below.





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3.3.1 Good Agricultural Practices
Primary food production must be managed in order to ensure that food is safe and
wholesome for the consumer. Production will start on the farm or in the sea and it is
essential that land used for crop production, horticulture or animal breeding is fit for purpose
and should not have previously been contaminated with heavy metals, industrial chemicals
or environmental waste. In the context of FBOs associated with ADNOC facilities, GAP is
relevant inasmuch that sourcing of raw materials and produce from suppliers who apply
GAP and good storage practices is strongly recommended.
3.3.2 Good Manufacturing Practices
Design and Facilities
Location of
Establishments
Food establishments must not be located anywhere where there is
a threat to food safety or suitability. Specifically, food
establishments must not be located in environmentally or
industrially polluted areas or areas prone to flooding and pest
infestations.
Location of
Equipment
Equipment must be located such that it permits adequate
maintenance and cleaning; and it should operate according to its
intended uses. The location of the equipment must not impede
good hygiene practices and/or monitoring.
Premises &
Rooms
Design and layout must permit robust food hygiene practices,
including protection against cross-contamination between and
during food operations processing.
Premises must be used exclusively for food processes. Group
Companies & Contractors must define minimum hygiene
standards for employees to utilise the food service areas (e.g.
mess hall, meeting rooms, and kitchenettes) such that
acceptable hygiene standards are maintained.
Internal structures and fittings must be built of durable
materials, be easy to maintain, clean and where appropriate,
be disinfected. Particular attention must be given to wall
surfaces, partitions, floors, ceilings, windows and window sills,
doors, and other working surfaces in the food preparation
areas.
Equipment











Equipment, containers & packaging (with the exception of
single use, disposable) coming in contact with food, must be of
a design and construction which ensures that they can be
adequately cleaned, disinfected and maintained (e.g.
equipment capable of being disassembled for cleaning and
inspection).
Equipment, containers & packaging must be made of materials
that have no toxic effects when used as intended.
Equipment used for cooking, heat-treatment, cooling/freezing,
storing food must be designed to rapidly achieve and maintain
the required food temperatures. Such equipment must have
effective & traceable means of controlling and monitoring
temperature, humidity, air-flow and any other parameter or
property which is likely to impact on the safety or suitability of
food.

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Containers used for waste, by-products and inedible or
dangerous substances, must be made of impervious materials,
be clearly identifiable, and where appropriate, be lockable.
Facilities An adequate supply of potable water [refer to Section 2 of this
CoP] with appropriate facilities for its storage, distribution and
temperature control, must be available to ensure the safety
and suitability of food.
In cases where the potable water is transported to a work
location, it must be obtained from an acceptable approved
source, delivered in a properly designed and dedicated water
tanker used for no other purpose. This water must meet the
same Quality & Suitability standards set out in Section 2 of this
CoP].
Adequate drainage and waste disposal systems and facilities
must be provided. These must be designed and constructed
such that there is no risk of contaminating food or the potable
water supply.
Adequate & specifically designated facilities must be provided
for cleaning food, utensils and equipment. These facilities
must have adequate supplies of hot and cold potable water.
Personnel hygiene facilities such as wash basins with soap,
hot and cold water, hygienic means for drying hands, lavatories
and changing facilities must be available to ensure that an
appropriate degree of personal hygiene can be maintained and
to avoid contaminating food.
Toilets/lavatories must not open directly into any food
preparation, cooking or eating area.
Storage lockers must be provided in changing rooms.
Adequate facilities must be available for heating, cooling,
cooking, refrigerating and freezing food, and for storing
refrigerated or frozen foods, monitoring food temperatures, and
when necessary, controlling ambient temperatures.
Adequate means of natural or mechanical ventilation must be
provided to minimize airborne contamination of food, control of
ambient temperature and odours, and control humidity.
Ventilation systems must not provide air from contaminated to
clean areas and they must be easy to clean and maintain.
Ventilation rates must provide between 10 &20 air changes per
hour. Extractor hoods and canopies, as well as grease filters
over cooking areas must be subject to regular maintenance,
cleaning& disinfection.
Adequate natural or artificial lighting must be provided
especially in food preparation and service areas.
Lighting fixtures must be enclosed or otherwise protected to
ensure that food is not contaminated by falling debris or
breakages. The recommended illumination levels are given in
Appendix 2.



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Adequate & segregated facilities for storage of food,
ingredients and non-food chemicals (e.g. cleaning materials,
lubricants, fuels) must be provided.
Food storage facilities must permit adequate maintenance and
cleaning, avoid pest access and harbourage, allow effective
protection from contamination, and provide an environment
which minimizes the deterioration of food.
Separate, secure storage facilities for cleaning materials and
hazardous substances must be provided.
3.4 Control of Operations
3.4.1 Control of Food Hazards
The HACCP system outlined in Section 3.5 must be implemented by all Group Companies
and Contractors to eliminate or minimize food hazards.
3.4.2 Key Aspects of Control Systems
Time &
Temperature
Control
Inadequate food temperature control is one of the most
common causes of food borne illness or food spoilage. Such
controls include time and temperature of thawing, cooking,
cooling, processing and storage. Systems must be in place to
ensure that temperature is controlled effectively where it is
critical to the safety and suitability of food. Cooked foods that
need to be chilled must be kept at 5C (41F) or below. Foods
that are being kept hot before serving (hot-holding) must
remain at or above 63C (145F). Temperature recording
devices must be checked at regular intervals and tested for
accuracy.
There are occasions when foods can be kept outside these
temperatures for a limited period, for example to be served or
displayed, when food needs to be handled during or after
processing, and when equipment is being defrosted or
temporarily breaks down. Such systems must also specify
tolerable limits for time and temperature variations.
Thawing of frozen raw meat, fish and poultry must be carried
out in a controlled manner (i.e. in a cold room or refrigerator
with the temperature not exceeding +5C, using a microwave
oven, or a defrosting cabinet).
Hot and cold storage facilities/equipment must be capable of
maintaining the required temperatures and must have
temperature recording devices for regular monitoring.
Deep freezers must operate at minus 18C or below, chillers at
minus 1C to +3C, and refrigerators at +1C to +4C.
Microbiological
Specifications




Where microbiological, chemical or physical specifications are
used in any food control system, such specifications must be
based on sound scientific principles and state, where
appropriate, monitoring procedures, analytical methods and
action limits. A mandatory guideline for the microbiological
quality of food is included in Appendix 3


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Microbiological
Cross-
Contamination
Raw, unprocessed food must be effectively separated, either
physically or by time, from ready-to-eat foods, with effective
intermediate cleaning and disinfection. This can be
accomplished by using different work surfaces for raw and
cooked food during preparation, e.g. colour-coded cutting
boards.
Surfaces, utensils, equipment, fixtures and fittings must be
thoroughly cleaned and, if necessary, disinfected after handling
or processing raw food, especially meat and poultry.
Disinfection can be accomplished by cleaning or immersion in
50 200 ppm of hypochlorite solution (for optimum effect,
solution temperature must be less than 40C with contact time
of up to 20 minutes).
Physical &
chemical
Contamination
Systems must be in place to prevent contamination of foods by
foreign bodies such as glass, metal shards from machinery,
dust, harmful fumes and hazardous chemicals.
3.4.3 Incoming Material Requirements
Raw materials must only be purchased from reliable sources after ensuring that suppliers
follow a GAP therefore maintaining acceptable standards of hygiene. Raw material or
ingredient must be rejected if it contains parasites, undesirable microorganisms, pesticides,
veterinary drugs or toxic, decomposed or extraneous substances which will not be reduced
to acceptable levels by normal sorting and/or processing. Where appropriate, prior to
procurement, specifications for raw materials must be set out and applied accordingly.
Temperature requirements of delivered goods must be verified. Measures must be in place
to prevent cross-contamination between raw materials and the prompt and proper storage
of temperature-sensitive supplies.
Raw materials, ingredients or food additives must be inspected and sorted before
processing. Canned foodstuff must be discarded if cans show evidence of damage (i.e.
heavily dented, blown can, punctured, damaged seams, or rusty).
Stocks of raw materials and ingredients must be subject to effective inventory and stock
rotation.
3.4.4 Packaging
Packaging materials must be non-toxic, must not pose a threat to the safety and suitability
of food, and must provide adequate protection for foods from contamination and damage.
Reusable packaging must be durable, easy to clean and disinfect.
3.4.5 Water
Only Potable Water, as defined within Section 2 of this COP, must be used in all food
processes and related activities e.g. steaming.
3.4.6 Management and Supervision
Managers and supervisors should have sufficient knowledge of the principles of food
hygiene and practices to enable them to judge potential risks, take appropriate preventive
and corrective action, and ensure that effective monitoring and supervision takes place.
3.4.7 Documentation and Records
Records of food processing, production and distribution must be kept and retained for a
period that exceeds the shelf-life of the product. Documentation is an essential component
of the food safety control system.

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3.5 Maintenance and Cleaning
Establishments and equipment must be kept in an appropriate state of repair and condition.
Cleaning must remove food residues and dirt that can be sources of contamination. The
appropriate cleaning methods and materials will depend on the nature of the food
establishment. Disinfection may be necessary after cleaning.
Cleaning chemicals must be handled and used carefully and in accordance with
manufacturers instructions and stored separated from food, in clearly identified containers
to avoid the risk of contaminating food.
3.5.1 Cleaning procedures and methods
Cleaning can be undertaken by separate or by the combined use of physical methods [e.g.
heat, scrubbing, turbulent flow, vacuum cleaning] or other methods that avoid the use of
water and chemical methods employing detergents, alkalis or acids. Cleaning procedures
must effectively remove gross debris from surfaces and must include disinfection, where
necessary.
Where cleaning chemicals are considered necessary only approved chemicals must be
used.
Note: Most cleaning chemicals contain hazardous ingredients and must therefore be used
and stored according to manufacturers recommended procedures and the precautions set
out on Materials Safety Data Sheets.
3.5.2 Cleaning Protocols
Protocols for cleaning and disinfection must ensure that all parts of the establishment are
appropriately cleaned. Also, this must include cleaning of cleaning equipment.
Cleaning and disinfection procedures must be regularly and thoroughly monitored for their
suitability and effectiveness; and where necessary, this must be documented.
Where written cleaning procedures are applied, these must specify the following:
Areas, items of equipment and utensils to be cleaned.
Responsibility for particular tasks.
Method and frequency of cleaning i.e. routine cleaning, deep cleaning etc.
Monitoring arrangements.


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3.5.3 Pest Control Systems
Good hygiene practices must be employed to avoid creating an environment which is
conducive to the presence, infestation and proliferation of pests and their wastes. Good
sanitation, inspection of incoming materials and good monitoring can minimize the
likelihood of infestation and thereby limit the need for pesticides. The following guidelines
must be taken into account:
Preventing
access
Pest access to buildings must be prevented and potential
breeding sites eliminated.
Harbourage&
infestation



Availability of food and water encourages pest harbourage and
infestation.
Potential food sources must be stored in pest-proof containers
and/or stacked above the ground and away from walls.
Areas that are inside and outside food premises must be kept
clean.
Refuse must be stored in covered, pest-proof containers.
Monitoring &
detection
Establishments and surrounding areas must be regularly
examined for evidence of infestation.
Eradication Treatment with chemical, physical or biological agents must be
carried out by licensed and authorized pest control agencies.
Treatment methods & materials must not pose a threat to the
safety or suitability of food.
3.5.4 Waste Management
Adequate provision must be made for the removal, storage and disposal of waste. Waste
must not be allowed to accumulate in food handling, food storage, and other working areas
and the adjoining environment.
Waste management standards are provided in ADNOC Code of Practice on Waste
Management [Ref. 21].
3.5.5 Monitoring Effectiveness
Sanitation systems and food contact surfaces must be monitored for effectiveness and
periodically verified by other means such as auditing, operational inspections or,
microbiological sampling, where appropriate. The system must be regularly reviewed and
updated to take account of any changed circumstances or conditions.


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3.6 Personal Hygiene
3.6.1 Health Status
People known, or suspected to be suffering from, or carriers of a disease, condition or
illness likely to be transmitted through food, must not be allowed to enter any food
processing area. Equally, any person who is affected as described above must
immediately report illness or symptoms of illness to their line management.
Medical examination of all food handlers must be carried out as per ADFCA requirements.
3.6.2 Illness and Injuries
Food handlers must report to their line management any physical injuries, signs or
symptoms of illness. Such injuries or illness may require temporary exclusion from food-
handling activities.
3.6.3 Personal Cleanliness
Food handlers must maintain a high degree of personal hygiene, and wear suitable
protective clothing, head covering, and footwear, as deemed appropriate to their food
activities. All food handlers must wash their hands whenever personal cleanliness may
affect food safety, for example:
At the start of food handling activities;
After handling raw food or any contaminated material, where this could result in
contamination of other food items [e.g. ready-to-eat food]; or
Immediately after using the toilet.
3.6.4 Personal Behaviour
All food handlers must refrain from behaviour which could result in food contamination e.g.
smoking, spitting, chewing or eating at work, and sneezing or coughing over unprotected
food.
Personal effects such as jewellery, watches, pins or other items must not be worn or
brought into food handling areas.
3.6.5 Visitors
Visitors to food processing or handling areas must wear protective clothing and adhere to
the personal hygiene & behaviour provisions outlined in Sections 3.6.3. & 3.6.4.


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3.7 Transportation
Food must be protected during transport. The type of conveyances or containers required
depends on the nature of the food and the conditions under which it has to be transported.
3.7.1 Requirements
Conveyances and bulk containers must be designed and constructed so that they:
Do not contaminate foods or packaging.
Can be effectively cleaned and, where necessary, disinfected.
Permit effective separation of different foods or foods from non-food items during
transport.
Provide effective protection from contamination, including dust and fumes.
Can effectively maintain the temperature, humidity, atmosphere and other conditions
necessary to protect food from harmful or undesirable microbial growth and
deterioration likely to render it unsuitable for consumption.
Allow any necessary temperature, humidity and other conditions to be checked.
3.7.2 Use and Maintenance
Conveyances and containers for transporting food must be kept clean, and in a good state
of repair and condition. Particularly in bulk transport, containers and conveyances must be
designated and marked For Food Use Only.
3.8 Training
Food handlers must have the necessary knowledge and skills to enable them to
hygienically handle food. Also, personnel who handle strong cleaning chemicals or other
potentially hazardous chemicals must be instructed in safe handling techniques and use of
personal protective equipment.
Managers and supervisors of food processes of Group Companies and Contractors must
have the necessary knowledge of food hygiene principles and practices to be able to judge
potential risks and take the necessary action to remedy deficiencies.
Programmes must be in place to provide training that is appropriate to the nature of the
food and the food establishment, including HACCP training and task-specific training for
personnel with assigned critical tasks.
Periodically, training and instruction must be assessed for their effectiveness, and this must
be sustained by routine supervision and checks to ensure that procedures are being
effectively carried out.
Training programmes must be routinely reviewed and updated, in accordance with
changing national and international standards, as well as changing food producing
conditions. Systems must be in place to ensure that food handlers remain aware of all
procedures necessary to maintain the safety and suitability of food.
The following qualifications from the Royal Society of Health or their equivalent are
recognized by ADNOC as providing appropriate evidence of acceptable competencies:
Managers: Diploma in Food Hygiene and evidence of recognized training in
HACCP.
Supervisors: Certificate in Food Hygiene Management (Intermediate) and evidence
of recognized training in HACCP.
Food Handlers: Certificate in the Essentials of Food Hygiene.

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3.9 Hazard Anal ysis and Critical Control Point - HACCP
HACCP, which is a science-based and systematic programme [Ref. 6], which:
a. identifies specific hazards and
b. measures for their control to ensure the safety of food.
Consequently, HACCP is a tool for assessing hazards and for establishing control systems
that focus on prevention, rather than on end-product testing.
3.9.1 Management Commitment
Commitment from Management is essential for implementing and maintaining an effective
HACCP system and this commitment must be communicated to all personnel. It must be
clear from the outset who is responsible for the development of the HACCP plan, and
ideally a HACCP coordinator could be nominated.
Management commitment must extend to the provision of appropriate training for managers
themselves and staff in basic food hygiene and HACCP to a level commensurate with their
responsibilities, as well as validation of the elements of the HACCP plan, to ensure that the
plan is effective when implemented.
3.9.2 Preliminary Procedures
Team Approach to HACCP
The traditional approach to HACCP advocates a team approach, utilizing both in-house and
external expertise to design the HACCP plan. In some companies, the full range of
expertise may not be available in-house and hence external support may be necessary.
Describe the processes and products to be covered
In applying HACCP, the scope of the HACCP plan has to be clearly defined. This could
mean including some or all of the following:
Specific individual products.
Groups of products with similar characteristics (e.g. presenting similar risks).
Processing steps that are used for a number of similar products.
It may be appropriate to individually focus on products and identify relevant food safety
information, such as composition, physical/chemical structure, treatment, preservatives,
etc., on a product-by-product basis. However, in multi-product facilities, such as catering
operations, it may be simpler to focus on products with similar characteristics. Products
must be correctly and clearly categorized.
Describe and confirm processes
In order to apply HACCP, the processing steps must be described [i.e. through using a flow
diagram, which could be drawn for each product]. Where such an approach is not practical,
the diagram may instead describe the processing of products grouped according to risk
categories and to which similar processes will be applied.
Another approach to describing the processing operations may be achieved without specific
attention to product types. In this case, the diagram may focus on operational procedures
such as the receipt of materials, handling, storage, preparation, thermal processing and
serving of food, providing that the risk profile of the different products are similar [e.g. a
variety of hot soups utilizing different ingredients and where the risk profiles are similar].
In addition to flow diagrams, a schematic plan of the establishment could also help highlight
potential areas of cross-contamination.

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3.9.3 Application of the HACCP Principles
Principle 1: Conduct a Hazard Analysis
Hazards recognized as significant and likely to occur at any step of the process must be
identified. These may be of a microbiological nature (e.g. pathogenic organisms), a
chemical nature (e.g. pesticide residues), and/or a physical nature (e.g. pieces of glass).
Principle 2: Determine the Critical Control Points (CCPs)
Determination of Critical Control Points (CCPs) must follow a logical consideration of all
steps where hazards can be controlled. When determining whether a step or process is a
CCP, the team must consider whether control can be applied at that step or process and if
a loss of control at that point will result in a potential hazard in the finished product.
There may be more than one CCP at which control can be applied to address the same
hazard. The determination of a CCP in the HACCP system can be facilitated by the
application of a decision tree. However, training may be needed to use it successfully.
A decision tree may not be applicable to all situations, but its use may facilitate
transparency and verification.
Principle 3: Establish Critical Limits
Critical limits must be specified for each critical control point for safety. The critical limits of
each CCP must be realistic, yet sufficient to provide the necessary food safety assurances.
Measurable and observable criteria used to set critical limits may include measurements of
temperature, time, pH, and level of available chlorine. Specific Industry guides can be
instrumental in identifying the most appropriate criteria for the critical limits as well as
setting the limits themselves.
Principle 4: Establish a system to monitor control of the CCP
Monitoring is essential in ensuring that critical steps are under control, because it will
identify where a loss of control has occurred or if there is a trend towards a loss of control.
Monitoring will also identify the required corrective actions to the process to restore or
maintain control.
Monitoring procedures must be able to detect loss of control at the CCP. The frequency of
monitoring must be sufficient to guarantee that no unsafe product reaches the consumer.
Results from monitoring must be recorded and evaluated by a suitably competent person
trained to carry out corrective actions.
While Group Companies may have to resort to outside expertise in performing the first
three principles, monitoring remains the responsibility of the individual Group Company and
Contractor. In establishing the monitoring procedure, the following questions need to be
addressed:
Which parameters are measured and what are the critical limits?
How is it monitored?
When and how often will the CCP be monitored?
Who will be responsible for monitoring?
Is the monitoring procedure practical and reliable?
Employees must be trained to carefully follow the procedures, monitor CCPs, and take
corrective action if critical limits are not met.

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Principle 5: Establish the corrective action to be taken when monitoring indicates
that a particular CCP is not under control
Specific corrective actions must be developed for each CCP. Corrective actions must
specify what needs to be done to bring the CCP under control and ensure that consumers
are not exposed to potentially unsafe products. Corrective actions include steps to correct
the problem and to deal with the affected product.
Any corrective measure undertaken with regard to a specific step must be easily
implemented and understood by the employee performing the activities. Corrective actions
must be documented and communicated to management to enable the system to be
modified, if necessary, and reoccurrence of the problem prevented.
Whenever a critical limit is not met, a corrective action must be carried out immediately.
Therefore, training of all staff is essential to prevent delays. Corrective actions may be
simple, such as continuing to heat food to the required temperature or reconditioning of the
food. Sometimes it may be necessary to take more severe steps, such as rejection of a
load of incoming ingredients. External support may be necessary to make such a
judgment.
Principle 6: Establish Verification Procedures
Verification is required firstly, to determine if the HACCP system is working correctly and
eventually to highlight deficiencies that need to be rectified. Verification may also be
initiated for other reasons, e.g. changes in the processes with potential safety
consequences.
Verification is usually performed by someone other than the person who is responsible for
performing the activities specified in the plan, e.g. monitoring. In order to have workable
verification procedures, the methodologies must be simple to perform and easy to record.
In that respect, verification activities must:
Ensure that prescribed practices are consistently followed.
Ensure that the personnel have the tools and facilities for proper personal hygiene
and sanitary practices (e.g. hand-washing facilities, sanitizing equipment, cleaning
supplies, temperature measuring devices, and sufficient gloves).
Ensure that calibrations have been conducted as needed and according to the
requirements of the equipment.
Ensure that control procedures are being followed.
Principle 7: Establish Documentation Concerning All Procedures and Records
Relevant to the HACCP Principles and Their Application.
Accurate documentation and record keeping are essential to the application of a HACCP
system. Documentation and record keeping must be appropriate to the nature and size of
the operation.
Documentation and records must be sufficient to enable Group Companies and their
Contractors to be confident that controls are in place and being maintained. All practices
and actions of the HACCP system must be documented to aid Group Companies or their
designated external auditors, in their verification activities.




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Examples of documentation required include:
Hazard analysis.
CCP determination.
Critical limit determination
Examples of records required include:
Monitoring activities, e.g. recorded temperature.
Corrective actions taken.
Verification procedures performed.
Modifications to the HACCP system
3.9.4 Validation of the HACCP System
Validation of the elements of the HACCP system must be carried out at all stages. This will
include, for example, confirmation that critical limits are appropriate and that identified
hazards are reduced to acceptable levels or eliminated.
Validation data can be internal (within the ADNOC Group) or from external sources (e.g.
legal requirements, national standards, international standards, i.e., Codex Alimentarius
Standards
3.10 Caterers Health Guidelines
Food related illness or conditions can be categorised under three main classes, as
described below:
Class 1: Diseases caused by biological agents [usually infectious or toxic] that
enter the body through ingestion of contaminated or spoilt food or produce;
Class 2: Allergic reactions caused by individual intolerances to certain food groups
known as allergens [e.g. nuts, seafood, chocolates, preservatives, etc.]; or
Class 3: Physiological disorders [e.g. diabetes, hypertension, obesity, etc.] which
are linked to over consumption of food groups that are typically high in salt,
saturated fats and/or sugars. There is neither an implied or actual suggestion that
the food consumed and leading to this class of illness/condition is not prepared
under hygienic and appropriate conditions.
Realistically, every person is at risk of food borne illness or conditions, but the extent of that
risk is dependent on several inter-related parameters such as the quality of supplies
[especially the water quality and condition/age of the raw ingredients]; environmental
factors [e.g. the location and conditions under which food is prepared]; hygiene factors
[e.g. cleanliness of the environment; washing, cleaning and disinfection routines] and a host
of human and cultural factors [staff hygiene, awareness, dietary habits, life styles, etc.]
While most food borne diseases are sporadic and often not reported, food borne disease
outbreaks can have very serious consequences. Group Companies must put in place a
system for the management of food borne illnesses. This must include control,
investigation and reporting of such incidents, as well as management of mass casualty
situations, i.e., mass food poisoning."
Group Companies and Contractors must establish systems to ensure the health of catering
staff in order to prevent the transmission of infectious diseases through food.
All catering crews employed by Group Companies are subject to medical examinations as
stipulated in the ADNOC Medical Guidelines. Medical examinations must include the
examinations given in the subsections below.

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3.10.1 Pre-Employment Medical Examination
New catering employees, both food handlers and non-food handlers must undergo
medical examination prior to appointment.
Medical examination protocol must conform to the ADNOC Medical guidelines on
pre-employment medicals with a strong emphasis on examination of potential
communicable disease sites (e.g., skin, ears, upper respiratory tract and
gastrointestinal tract).
Individuals with any of the conditions listed in Table 3.1 are unacceptable until
satisfactorily treated and re-assessed.
Contracted catering companies must submit proof of medical fitness of catering staff
assigned to any work location.
Table 3.1: Infectious Diseases Conditions for Exclusion of Food Handlers
1 Excretors of Salmonella typhi or Salmonella paratyphi
2 Acute gastroenteritis, including acute diarrhoea
3 Excretors of the etiological agents of Cholera, Amoebic Dysentery, or Bacillary
Dysentery.
4 Hepatitis A or Hepatitis E and all other forms of acute hepatitis until diagnosed
not to be Hepatitis A or Hepatitis E.
5 Intestinal parasitism.
6 Tuberculosis (in the active, infectious state).
7 Skin infections (skin abscess, infected wounds, etc.)

3.10.2 Government-issued Food Handlers Certificate
All food handlers must be in possession of a valid ADFCA-issued Food Handlers
Certificate while on duty at any location. This certificate must be periodically renewed as
per ADFCA requirement.
3.10.3 Six-Monthly Medical Examination
Food handlers and employees who are likely to handle food (including waiters) must
undergo medical evaluation every six months.
Medical evaluation shall include, but not be limited to, a thorough physical
examination and routine stool examination.
3.10.4 Return from Leave Medical Examination
Catering staff, both food handlers and non-food handlers, who are returning to work
from home country leave, must undergo routine medical examination prior to
resumption of duties.
Medical examination shall include, but not be limited to a thorough physical
examination, throat swab and routine stool analysis.


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3.10.5 Exclusion of food handlers
Restriction or exclusion of food handlers suffering from a disease or medical symptom listed
in Table 3.1 is necessary because of the increased risk that the food being prepared will be
contaminated with a pathogenic organism transmissible through food.
It is the responsibility of line management in Group and Contractor Companies to report
and exclude from work any food handler who exhibits signs or symptoms of infectious
diseases. In particular:
Food handlers, who, in the course of routine examination, are found to have any of
the conditions listed in Table 3.1, must immediately be excluded from work in order
to undergo further medical evaluation and treatment.
Food handlers who show the following signs or symptoms must be excluded from
work to undergo further medical evaluation and treatment:
o Respiratory tract: fever, cough, colds, sore throat.
o Intestinal tract: fever, vomiting, diarrhoea, jaundice.
o Skin: boils, infected wound, infected skin rash, especially on hands or arms.
Re-instating a food handler excluded due to an infectious illness will require a
medical fitness certificate.
3.11 ISO-22000
In 2005, the international standards organisation (ISO) issued ISO-22000: Food safety
management systems - Requirements for any organization in the food chain [Ref. 7]. This
standard integrated the principles of HACCP with application steps developed by the WHO
Codex Alimentarius Commission in which Hazard Analysis is the key to an effective food
safety management system, because it assists in organizing the knowledge required to
establish an effective combination of control measures [Ref. 5].
The standard requires all hazards that may be reasonably expected to occur in the food
chain, including hazards that may be associated with the type of process and facilities used,
are identified and assessed. Thus, it provides the means to determine and document why
certain identified hazards need to be controlled and why others need not.
Through hazard analysis, the food business operator is responsible for determining the
strategy that will be used to ensure hazard control through combining PRPs, operational
PRPs and the HACCP plan [Ref. 7].
It is important to state that, unlike the mandatory requirements of ADFCA Regulation [Ref.
6] 2010, the implementation of, and eventual certification to ISO-22000 are entirely
voluntary for any Group Company of contractor.


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3.12 Nutritional Considerations
3.12.1 Background
Diet can have a major impact on health. Over the past ten to fifteen years, there has been a
trend for people to eat more saturated fat, salt and added sugar and too little fruit,
vegetables, oily fish and fibre. Obesity alone can have a severe impact on peoples health,
increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and heart and liver disease. There is
also a significant burden on the medical services and being one of the causes of dropped
productivity.
According to Abu Dhabi Health Statistics 2011 the following potential diet-related
cardiovascular indicators have been observed within the Emirate of Abu Dhabi [Ref. 8].

Fi gure 3.1: Overvi ew of Cardi ovascul ar Indi cators i n Abu Dhabi 2011 [Ref. 8]
Whilst it is common knowledge that eating a healthy diet is important, it is not always easy
to access and understand the information available about nutrition and food choices. The
purpose of this sub-section is to provide a compilation of information on nutrition and
healthy eating and to help caterers with provision of health options to personnel.
3.12.2 Balanced Diet
Eating a healthy, balanced diet is an important part of maintaining good health, and can
help a person feel their best. The two keys to a healthy diet are:
A person must eat the right number of calories for how active they are, so that they
balance the energy consumed with the energy used. The average man needs
around 2,500 calories a day. The average woman needs 2,000 calories.
A person must eat a wide range of foods to ensure that they are getting a balanced
diet and that the body is receiving all the nutrients it needs.


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i
o
n

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Obsesity
Hypertension
Diabetes
High Lipids

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The following are simple tips to follow for healthy eating & wellbeing [Ref. 13]
Meals must be based on starchy foods Diet must have lots of fruit and vegetables
Meals must include more fish Meals must be low in sugar & saturated fats
Salt intake must be reduced Lifestyle must include more exercise and
balanced calorie intake
Body must be adequately hydrated Breakfast is the most important daily meal
The eat-well plate presented in Figure 3.2 [Ref.9] is a guide for getting the food balance
right because it shows how much of what proportion from each food group is recommended
for a normal healthy meal.




Fi gure 3.2: The Eat -wel l Pl at e
3.12.3 Food Groups
There are five main food groups, and this section presents a description of which foods
belong to each and why, what benefits do they have and how much of each must be
consumed every day [Refs.10]
Fruit & Vegetables
Fruit and vegetables are low in energy and packed with vitamins, minerals, protective plant
compounds and fibre, so they're a great source of nutrients and vital for a healthy diet. Due
to their nutritional and health benefits, it's recommended that fruit and vegetables form the
basis of the diet, with a minimum intake of five portions each day - about a third of the daily
food consumption.
Fruit and vegetables must be incorporated into every meal, as well as being the first choice
for a snack. Studies have shown that people who eat a lot of fruit and vegetables may have
a lower risk of chronic disease, such as heart disease and some cancers. Health benefits
can be gained from fresh, canned (in natural juice), frozen, cooked, juiced or dried versions.
However, potatoes do not count since they are categorized under starchy foods.

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Starchy Food
These foods are all produced from grains, such as wheat, corn or rice. They must be a part
of all meals, filling about a third of the plate. In general, starchy foods are served either as
refined or unrefined (often known as whole grains).
Refined grains have been stripped of their outer bran coating and inner germ during the
milling process, leaving only the endosperm. They include white rice, white bread and white
pasta. On the other hand, with the whole grain the bran, germ and endosperm are all still
present.
Bran is an excellent source of fibre; the germ is a source of protein, vitamins and minerals;
and the endosperm supplies most of the carbohydrates, mainly in the form of starch.
Unrefined or whole grain forms provide far more nutrients than their refined counterparts.
Whole grains are rich in phyto-chemicals and antioxidants, which help to protect
against coronary heart disease, certain cancers, and diabetes. Studies have shown people
who eat three or more servings of whole grains a day are less likely to suffer from heart
disease.
Most people get their whole grain from whole-meal bread or whole grain breakfast cereals
such as porridge, muesli or whole wheat cereals. Food choice must be made for whole
grain varieties over processed or refined grains, and care must be taken when adding sugar
or salt. Other whole grain foods include: Brown rice; Whole barley; Rye bread; Rye
crackers; Oatcakes; and Popcorn
Fats & Sugars
Although these foods are an important source of energy, they often contain few other
nutrients; hence it is healthier to limit their consumption. This group includes cakes,
biscuits, sweets, sugar-sweetened drinks and crisps
Fat is a concentrated source of energy. J ust 1g provides nine calories - more than double
the calories in 1g of protein or carbohydrate. This means that it is much easier to consume
too many calories when eating high-fat foods. People trying to manage their weight must
reduce fatty foods to help cut calories. Listed below are some essential facts about fat:
Fat transports the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K around the body
It can often improve the flavour and perception of foods, increasing their palatability
It supplies essential nutrients such as fat-soluble vitamins and essential fatty acids
(EFAs)
EFAs must be supplied from the diet, and are thought to have a positive effect on
heart health and the immune system
It has a key role in membrane structure
It cushions, and so protects, the internal organs
It's stored in adipose tissue (a thick layer of tissue under the skin) as a long-term
fuel reserve. Excess fat may also accumulate around your organs, especially in the
abdominal cavity





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Fat can be divided into two main groups, namely saturated and unsaturated. Saturated fat
is generally solid at room temperature and is usually from animal sources. It is found in
butter, hard margarine, cheese, whole milk and anything that contains these ingredients,
such as cakes, chocolate, biscuits, pies and pastries. It's also the white fat seen on red
meat and underneath poultry skin.
Trans-fats, or hydrogenated unsaturated fats, are used in food preparation, but are
increasingly recognised as being unhealthy.
Unsaturated fat is usually liquid at room temperature and generally comes from
vegetable sources. Monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats are both included in
this group. Unsaturated vegetable oils are generally a healthier alternative to
saturated fat and can be found in sesame, sunflower, soya, olive and rapeseed oil,
soft margarine and in foods such as oily fish, including mackerel, sardines, and
salmon.
The value of saturated and unsaturated fat in our diets is not fully understood yet but
generally, eating too much saturated fat is associated with increased blood cholesterol
concentrations and an increased risk of heart disease. Eating less helps to minimise the
risks it poses to heart health. Polyunsaturated fats contain inflammatory omega-6 fatty
acids and its the balance of these with omega-3s which is important.
Protein
Protein is a vital part of human diets, regardless of whether it is from animal or plant
sources. Foods containing protein include:
Meat, poultry, fish, shellfish and eggs
Pulses, nuts and seeds
Soya products and vegetable protein foods
From hair to fingernails, protein is a major functional and structural component of all human
cells. Protein provides the body with roughly 10 to 15 per cent of its dietary energy, and is
needed for growth and repair. Proteins are large molecules made up of long chains of
amino acid sub-units. Some of these amino acids are nutritionally essential as they cannot
be made or stored within the body and so must come from foods in the daily diet. Although
all animal and plant cells contain some protein, the amount and quality of this protein can
vary widely.
Protein from animal sources contains the full range of essential amino acids needed from
an adult's diet. But red meat, in particular, must be eaten in limited amounts due to the high
level of saturated fat it contains, which may raise blood levels of 'unhealthy' LDL , better
known as cholesterol. A high intake of saturated fat can lead to an increased risk of
cardiovascular disease and other related disorders. As an alternative source of animal
protein, poultry, fish and shellfish must be chosen instead of red meat.
The 2007 World Cancer Research Fund report recommended meat eaters limit their
consumption of red meat to no more than 500g a week (cooked weight), which is equivalent
to around 700-750g raw weight, with very little processed meat, as these have both been
linked to certain forms of cancer [Ref. 11].
Fish is a good source of animal protein. Oil-rich fish such as salmon, mackerel, herring,
tuna, and sardines are all rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which help to reduce the risk of
developing cardiovascular disease. Shellfish is also a good source of protein and is low in
fat.
Eggs contain all eight essential amino acids, making them a perfect source of protein. They
should be included as part of a balanced and varied diet.

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Milk & Dairy Products
This food group includes milk and milk products such as cheese, yoghurt, and Rayeb
[fermented milk] but does not include butter, margarine or cream. Milk is distinguishable by
its fat content, as follows:
Whole or full-fat milk typically contains ca. 3.5 % fat.
Semi-skimmed contains ca. 1.7 % fat.
Skimmed milk contains between 0.1 and 0.3 % fat.
Even whole milk is relatively low in fat and certainly semi-skimmed milk can be labelled as a
low-fat food. Contrary to popular belief, lowering the fat content in milk does not affect the
calcium content, so an adequate calcium intake can still be obtained from lower-fat dairy
products. However, low fat milk contains less energy and lower amounts of fat soluble
vitamins.
Cheese contains the same beneficial nutrients as milk, but most cheeses contain much
more saturated fat and high levels of added salt, so it's important to only eat full-fat cheese
occasionally and in small portions.
Yoghurt is rich in protein and vitamin B2: which are essentially the same nutrients as in
milk. Some varieties contain living bacteria (probiotics) that are healthy for the digestive
system. Yoghurt can be made from whole or low fat milk and fruit yoghurts often contain
added sugar. A good diet option is to mix fruit with natural, low fat, unsweetened yoghurt.
Salt
Salt, also known as sodium chloride, is made up of 40 per cent sodium and 60 per cent
chloride and it is mainly found in pre-prepared foods. Excessive salt consumption has been
linked with high blood pressure and stomach cancer, and can exacerbate osteoporosis and
asthma. The sodium component of salt is vital for controlling the amount of water in the
body, maintaining normal pH of blood, transmitting nerve signals and helping muscular
contraction. Salt is present in all foods in varying degrees, but almost all processed foods
[e.g. pizzas, burgers, and ready-meals] contain added salt.
Unlike all other minerals, sodium is generally over-consumed, with dietary intake of salt for
most people being far in excess of the recommended daily requirement. Adults are advised
to consume no more than 6g salt per day (about one teaspoon); however, the current intake
is at least about 9g per day which is 50 -100 per cent higher than is recommended for good
health [Ref 12].
People who have high blood pressure must follow a low-salt diet and take advice from their
occupational health professional or doctor. Reducing sodium has been proven to be one of
the most effective ways of lowering high blood pressure, especially when this is done in
combination with broader dietary changes.


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3.13 Food Incidents & Crisis Management
3.13.1 Types of Food Incidents
Food incidents can be categorized under three 3 levels, as outlined below [Ref. 22]:
Level 1 Routine: food incidents that have limited food distribution, low risk
characteristics and are likely to be easy to control by one or more department.
Level 2 Major: food incidents that have wider food distribution, medium to high
risk characteristics and more than one department or facility are likely to be involved
in managing the investigation and control measures. There is also the potential for
level 2 incidents to cause some disruption to normal activities as resources are
diverted to deal with the incident.
Level 3 Crisis: food incidents that have high risk characteristics, and are likely to
have wide scale food distribution and the capacity to control the incident is beyond
the normal capabilities of the Company. A food crisis has the potential to cause
significant disruption to routine work activities and there is the likelihood that the
incident will take some time to control and will need extra resources allocated to
deal with it.
3.13.2 Responsibility for Management of Level 1 & 2 Incidents
All Food Business Operators [Group Company or Contractor] must be aware of their legal
obligations set out in Food Law Number (02) of the year 2008 regarding the handling of
unsafe food, the tracing of food, and the withdrawal/recall of unsafe foods from any location
within the Emirate of Abu Dhabi.
Where a food business operator within a Group Company or as a Contractor considers or
has reason to believe that a food which it has imported, produced, processed,
manufactured or distributed may be injurious to human health or is not in compliance with
the relevant legislations it must withdraw the unsafe food from the location or facility without
delay and notify ADFCA and ADNOC OH HSED.
Where the food product may have already reached the consumers the Group Company or
Contractor must initiate procedures to recall the food. It is important that food business
operators use effective and accurate means to inform the consumer about food recalls.
UAE Regulation (1), 2008 in respect of Description of Violations related to food &its
handling outlines the offences and violations for handling food which does not comply with
the specific regulatory controls and provides delegated officers with judicial powers to seize,
detain, and condemn food which do not comply with the relevant legislation.
In respect to the Management of Food Incidents, the FBO must:
Take all necessary measures to protect the health of consumers;
Maintain and test an effective and efficient recall and traceability system;
Maintain all process documentation and product testing and traceability documents
Notify ADFCA & ADNOC HSED of incidents or potential incidents without delay;
Initiate the withdrawal and/or recall of food products as necessary;
Provide all necessary assistance and co-operation to ADFCA and ADNOC HSED;
Ensure timely release of information relevant to an investigation;
Review and update information as it becomes available and ensure ADFCA and
ADNOC HSED are notified during incidents;

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Prevent the distribution of food which does not comply with the provisions of any
regulation applicable to that particular food; and
Prevent the misused of any recalled food.
For more detailed guidance on FBO responsibilities and reporting of food incidents refer to
Ref. 22.


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4 ACCOMMODATION
4.1 Introduction
The effects of adequate sleep, good living accommodation, hygiene and comfort on human
performance are well established. In fact, an organisation that provides functional,
comfortable, and pleasant living environments and coordinates that with appropriate
occupational health and safety must expect a significantly enhancement in the performance
and productivity of its workforce.
There are several international standards and guidelines that encompass good offshore
practice. The UAE has itself legislated through Cabinet Decision 13, [refer to Section III]
that it is a requirement for any establishment operating in the UAE and having a group
labour accommodation for 500+ labourers to ensure that the conditions of such
accommodation are in accordance with the articles set out in the Cabinet Decision.
The aim of this section of the CoP is to provide the ADNOC Group Companies with general
information and goals and to assist them achieving these goals. For further information, it
is recommended that the references set out in Section 11, are reviewed and consulted.
In general terms, accommodation must satisfy the following basic goals [Ref. 14]:
Provide safety of personnel in the event of a breakdown, fire, or other hazards;
Layout for communal and recreational areas must encourage communication and
avoid isolation;
Where possible, all rooms must be fitted with windows;
Design and layout must ensure the needs for individual privacy. This must include
meeting the right of a person for rest from noise and visual distractions; ablution
facilities; and internal and external communication requirements;
Design of accommodation must take into account the movement of people and
communication during all working conditions (i.e. night shifts, weekend working,
etc.);
Design must take into account cultural differences, be appropriately signed, and
labelled.
Design must provide for safe and easy cleaning, replenishment of consumables;
routine and non-routine maintenance; and safe access; and
Design must consider all aspects of personnel wellbeing [i.e. high quality indoor air;
pest free environment; and hygienic toilet facilities] to enable the accommodation to
be functional, comfortable and pleasant for its occupants.
4.2 Living Accommodation
Facilities provided by Group Companies vary considerably from location to location, and
depending on the activities being carried out. For the sake of this CoP, the facilities
covered include:
On shore fixed location [e.g. fixed and permanent structures; villas, and cabins];
Drilling rigs, or drilling ships;
Super-complexes [i.e. offshore production and processing platforms];
Accommodation vessels;
Construction, pipe laying and maintenance barges; and
Any other structure or vessel where living accommodation and other facilities are
provided.

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A living accommodation is taken to only mean the locations, areas, or facilities tabulated
below.
Sleeping cabins Lounges TV, leisure & games room
Prayer rooms Gymnasium Recreation Areas
Corridors Library Clubs & leisure meeting
rooms
4.3 Sleeping Areas [Cabins & Rooms]
General Requirements
Areas must be located in groups on dedicated floor levels or in separate corridors
away from traffic areas and noisy activities.
Areas must be arranged to provide a basis for uninterrupted sleep, rest, quietness
and personal hygiene needs.
Areas must be furnished to include storage for required safety, survival equipment
[as required by the facilitys safety standards]; clothing and personal belongings.
Areas must provide opportunity for reading, writing and relaxation. Beds in areas
where there is more than one bunk must be fitted with bed curtains to enable privacy
and protection from light and direct view.
All berths must be immediately adjacent to an aisle or access-way leading directly to
an escape route from the accommodation.
Occupancy
In determining cabin occupancy for any facility, the main objective is to ensure that
all personnel can get adequate quality sleep. In addition, factors such as shift
patterns must be properly considered to ensure the risk of sleep disruption (e.g.
through effects of people entering and leaving the room) is minimised.
Two-berth cabins with en-suite shower, toilet, and washroom facilities shared
between two cabins is considered to be the typical arrangement or norm for the
design of new intermittently-manned and normally-manned facilities.
Single berth cabins are recommended where space allows because they provide
optimal privacy and comfort.
Four-berth cabins, in most circumstances, will not provide reasonable privacy and
comfort. This arrangement is considered below standard for new facilities, or for
existing facilities undergoing accommodation refurbishment in which upgrade to a
two-berth, or single-berth cabin arrangement is reasonably practicable.
Four-berth cabins are acceptable on existing facilities where it is not reasonably
practicable for them to be upgraded because of lack of space or other technical or
severe economic limitations. Ideally, no more than two beds must be occupied
during any particular shift.
Four-berth cabins may provide a practicable solution for temporary and emergency
accommodation on not-normally manned facilities. However, where stays of
extended duration are anticipated, e.g. for maintenance campaigns and
modifications, the benefits of two-berth or single berth cabin arrangements must be
given proper consideration by the facility operator.
Hot bunking is unacceptable for any facility.

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Room or Cabin Design
Cabin design must preferably be standardised across the facility. In new and refurbished
facilities, a modular prefabricated cabin or structure is recommended to ensure consistency,
acoustic performance, ease of cleaning, and ease of replacement over the life of the facility.
The room/cabin layout and furniture must be of an ergonomic design in order to facilitate
housekeeping and maintenance, and to enhance the comfort and usability for occupants.
The layout must provide unrestricted access to beds, bunks, desks and lockers. At offshore
facilities, the outside corners of berthing bulkheads, doors or edges that personnel may
accidentally walk into must be reduced to minimise the risk of injury.
At offshore vessels or facilities, berths should, where possible, be facing fore and aft and
not port and starboard, regardless of cabin orientation, to reduce movement and motion
induced sickness. This is especially important at vessels where length is much greater than
the beam.
Berths must be designed such that making beds and changing linen is easy to do and does
not expose housekeeping personnel to risk of injury through prolonged poor postures,
excessive mattress handling or contact with sharp edges when tucking in sheets.
Wherever possible, beds must be placed on the floor for ease and safety of access and
use. Beds must be sized to comfortably accommodate personnel, thus must have the
following minimum dimensions:
Width =900 mm; Length =2100 mm
Top of mattress =550 600 mm above floor
If there is a requirement for upper level bunks then the top bunk must have a dustproof
bottom constructed of suitable material. Head clearance between the top of a bunk and
any overhead obstruction must be a minimum of 900mm to enable the person to sit up
without bumping their head. Robust ladders, grab bars and safety rails must be provided
for access to upper berths. Proprietary pull-down bunks may be considered where these
are required temporarily for peak manning periods.
Sleeping areas must have a clear ceiling height of not less than 2400 mm, and in
washrooms, not less than 2200 mm.
Aisle widths in sleeping areas must be at least:
600 mm between a single berth and the nearest obstruction;
900 mm between facing berths; and
1000 mm when joining two or more aisles.
The size or a room or cabin must be assessed based on the facilities provided and
adequate free circulation space for occupants. As a rule, it is recommended that internal
area must be not less than 4.5m per person for onshore installations and 3 m per person
for offshore installations.
The information provided above is the minimum requirements for rooms, cabins and
furniture sizes quoted in internationally accepted standards and available information. It is
however, the duty of Group Companies to demonstrate that cabin sizing and clearances are
either adequate or have been exceeded to provide a better standard of living
accommodation.



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Storage Space
Each room/cabin must have sufficient, identifiable storage space for the occupants
luggage, bag or hold-all, clothes, personal items, and a lockable storage space for
valuables.
Storage provision must also consider the need to minimise requirements for people to enter
multiple-occupancy rooms while others are sleeping.
Drawers and doors must be arranged to prevent inadvertent opening and closing due to
movement on floating facilities.
A kick space of at least 100 mm high by 100 mm deep must be provided around accessible
faces of cabin furniture including lockers and berths.
Noise Levels
Excessive noise within the accommodation area can have an adverse impact on
recreational and rest activities and have an impact on the health and welfare of onshore
and offshore workers. This can lead to lower performance and productivity as well as
potential safety issues, particularly when noise affects sleep or communication. Therefore,
controlling noise levels within accommodation areas is essential in providing a safe and
healthy environment for all onshore and offshore workers [Ref. 14].
In order to achieve a satisfactory acoustic environment for personnel living within the
accommodation areas, the following factors must be addressed:
Overall noise levels, must be as low as reasonably practicable to provide a safe and
healthy workplace;
Noise characteristics such as tonality, impulsiveness, excessive low frequency
content can be significantly more intrusive than broadband, continuous noise;
Acoustic privacy between rooms; and
Speech intelligibility in rooms used for recreation.
The table below presents the recommended A-weighted noise levels [Refs.18 & 23],
averaged over a representative period T, (LA
eq,T
) within accommodation areas for fixed and
mobile facilities. Note: The time of the day during which the noise level must be measured
must be at the typical time that the accommodation is being used for its intended purpose.
Limits for Noise Levels in Accommodation
Sound Pressure,
On-shore, dBA
[see Note 1]
Sound Pressure,
Offshore &
Vessels, dBA
[see Note 2]
Sleeping Cabins and Hospital 45 60
Mess Rooms 50 65
Recreational Areas, Indoors 50 65
Recreational Areas, External - 75
Offices 50 65
Control Rooms 60 60
Note 1 According to ADNOC Technical Guidance Note V3-07
Note 2 According to SOLAS Chapter II-1 on Noise Code [Ref. 23]

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4.4 Additional Facilities
4.4.1 Offshore
Toilet and Wash-Rooms
It is essential that there must be at least one basin with hot and cold water supply for every
six people; a water closet (not a urinal) and a bath or a shower for every eight people.
At least one bath and water closet must be available at all times for first-aid purposes in the
vicinity of the sick bay.
Where facilities are provided for the exclusive use of the occupants of particular rooms,
these must be discounted when considering the requirements for any remaining persons.
Laundry Rooms
A separate room containing laundry facilities must be provided. This must be in addition to
the personal washroom facilities referred to above.
Mess Room and Galley
There must be a mess room and galley of adequate capacity to cater at one time for at
least half the number of people on board. Also, there must be adequate storage facilities
for food and potable water.
Recreation Room
If there is a recreation room it shall be large enough to provide seating at one time for at
least half the number of persons on board.
Sick Bay
All normally manned installations must contain a sick bay sufficient for the number of
personnel.
The sick bay must measure at least 2 x 3 meters if no more than 25 persons are regularly
at work in the installation, at least 5 x 7 meters if more than 25 persons are regularly at
work, and larger than this if the number is greater than 100 [Ref. 24].
4.4.2 Unmanned Installations
On installations that are not manned, it is normal to assign a small team of men on board
for short periods to undertake routine maintenance/operational work.
A suitable shelter must be provided and visits must be planned to avoid the possibility of
overnight stays. It is a mandatory requirement to provide for the health, safety and welfare
of people during these short stay periods, and minimum facilities must be provided. Where
practicable, the shelter must contain separate clean and dirty areas to enable changing and
storage of clothing. At least one wash-basin must be provided for every six persons and a
water closet (not a urinal) for every eight persons [Ref. 25].
A mess area should be provided with seating for the maximum number of people at any
one time. The mess must have facilities for storage and preparation of hot and cold food.
A store of potable water must also be provided.
A clean area (not in an operational or machinery room) with suitable equipment for sleeping
would need to be provided for the eventuality that personnel might in an emergency (e.g.
poor weather conditions) be forced to stay overnight on the installation.

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4.4.3 Temporary Accommodation
Facilities for temporary accommodation may be provided, subject to their suitability for use
on the particular installation and the ability of the installation to carry them.
The temporary accommodation will need to be compatible with the same requirements as
to habitability, materials, construction and location as the permanent accommodation.
Temporary accommodation will need to be removed at the end of the specified period of
use.
4.4.4 Onshore Facilities
Shelter
Accommodation requirements for onshore operations must comply with the following:
Every shelter in the camp shall be constructed in a manner which will provide
protection against the elements.
Each room used for sleeping purposes must comply with the specifications set out in
Section 4.3.
Beds, cots, or bunks, and suitable storage facilities such as wall lockers for clothing
and personal articles must comply with the specifications set out in Section 4.3.
The floors of each shelter must be constructed of wood, asphalt, or concrete.
Wooden floors must be of smooth and tight construction. The floors must be kept in
good repair. All wooden floors must be elevated not less than 300 mm above the
ground level at all points to prevent dampness and to permit free circulation of air
beneath.
All living quarters must be provided with windows. The total number of windows
must not be less than one-tenth of the floor area. At least one-half of each window
must be constructed such that it can be opened for ventilation.
All exterior openings must be screened with 16-mesh material. All screen doors
must be equipped with self-closing devices.
Water Supply
Adequate and convenient water supply must be provided in each camp for drinking,
cooking, bathing, and laundry purposes. The water supply will be deemed adequate if it is
capable of delivering 95 litres per person per day to the campsite at a peak rate of 2 1/2
times the average hourly demand.
Where water under pressure is available, one or more drinking fountains must be provided
for each 100 occupants or fraction thereof. Common drinking cups are prohibited.
Toilet Facilities
Toilet facilities adequate for the capacity of the camp must be provided. Urinals must be
provided on the basis of one unit for each 25 men. Where water under pressure is
available, urinals must be provided with adequate water flush. Urinal troughs in privies
must drain freely into the pit or vault and the construction of this drain must be such as to
exclude flies and rodents from the pit.
Each toilet room must be lighted naturally or artificially by a safe type of lighting at all hours
of the day and night. An adequate supply of toilet paper must be provided in each privy,
water closet, or chemical toilet compartment.

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Privies and toilet rooms must be kept in a sanitary condition. They must be cleaned at least
daily. In camps where public sewers are available, all sewer lines and floor drains from
buildings must be connected thereto.
In the case of common bathrooms, one toilet must be provided for every 8 persons, and
any common bathroom must have at least 2 toilets.
Common bathrooms shall be provided at a conveniently located distance of not
more than 100 feet from the furthest habitable room.
Laundry, Hand washing and Bathing Facilities
The following are the minimum requirements for washing facilities:
Hand washbasin per six persons in shared facilities.
Showerhead for every 8 persons.
Laundry tray or tub for every 30 persons where centralised facilities are not
available.
An adequate supply of hot and cold running water must be provided for bathing and
washing laundry purposes. Facilities for drying clothes must be provided where
necessary
4.4.5 Temporary Camps
All temporary camps and buildings, including facilities for contractor workers, must be
constructed in accordance with the guidelines given in the subsections below. In addition,
the following must be applied [Ref. 26]:
All sites used for camps must be adequately drained. The camp must be located so
the drainage from and through the camp will not endanger any domestic or public
water supply. All sites must be graded, ditched, and rendered free from depressions
in which water may become a nuisance.
Fly-tight, rodent-tight, impervious, cleanable or single service containers must be
provided for the storage of garbage.
Each habitable room in a camp must be provided with at least one ceiling-type light
fixture and at least one separate floor- or wall-type convenience outlet. Laundry and
toilet rooms and rooms where people congregate must contain at least one ceiling-
or wall-type fixture.
Light levels in toilet and storage rooms must be at least 200 lux (20 foot-candles) 30
inches from the floor. Other rooms, including living quarters, must be at least 300
lux (30 foot-candles) 30 inches from the floor.
A properly constructed kitchen and dining hall adequate in size, separate from the
sleeping quarters of any of the workers, must be provided in connection with all food
handling facilities. There must be no direct opening from living or sleeping quarters
into a kitchen or dining hall.
Temporary building(s) on construction sites, must be separated from the building
under construction or refurbishment and other permanent buildings to provide a fire
break, which must be at least 10 (ten) meters wide.
All new camp sites (including new Seismic and drilling locations onshore), existing
sites to be re-occupied or changed, to include extensions to sites, shall be subject to
a Health, safety and Environmental Impact Assessment (HSEIA). The siting of the
temporary camps must be fully investigated to ensure that the camps do not expand
to within 5 km of any industrial site or local singular hazard that creates a grave risk
to human life e.g. Gas pipeline.

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Particularly in the case of Seismic or drilling camps it will be incumbent upon the
operator to demonstrate that an investigation has been carried out and recorded to
identify any local hazards which may affect the Health & Safety of the workforce
during the period of the operation.
The size of the building plot for the siting of camps must take into consideration the
habitable space provision required for each individual worker.
The individual minimum space requirement for each worker regardless of grade is
4.5m
2
gross.
The number of caravans per hectare (ha) shall be no more than 60. (e.g. 60 units
with 4 persons/unit =240 persons). This excludes the spacing requirement for the
roads and amenities.
When planning a major site the plan must include roads, utilities and some basic
amenities.
The extrapolation of the minimum space requirement computes to the total gross
area per worker for the site, then the minimum standard is 60m
2
per resident [refer
to example below]
Example: 300 man Camp
300x60 m
2
=18,000 m
2

Once acre =4,046.85 m
2

18,0004,046.85 =4.5Acres
Divide by 2.471 to obtain hectares (ha); 4.52.47 =2 ha (approximately)

60 hect ares =148 acres = 30x300 = 9000 personnel
4.5 Community Facilities
When planning for workers camps, the impact on the local community facilities must be
addressed. There may be an impact on local services/supplies within local townships (e.g.
shops). Providing alternative services within the local townships or in the camp boundary
may relieve the burden on existing local facilities.
Therefore, the planning for sports and entertainment, banking, security, fire services and
telecom as well as supply stores and retail outlets must be included.
4.6 Leasing or Renting Existing Camps
Where a Contractor plans to lease/release or rent an existing worker camp site, or intends
to relocate used cabins from local or external sources, to house workers for ADNOC
employ or other workers employed by a contractor to ADNOC, it must be the duty of both
parties to ensure that the standard of the site meets the ADNOC requirements in terms of
structure, layout, facilities and other HSE elements of design.
All camps, regardless of the state of ownership or extent of lease period, must be expected
to meet the ADNOC requirements.
In situations where it is impossible to implement some items of this Code of Practice, due to
financial, logistical or other constraints, a grace period to phase in the requirements may be
granted on a case by case basis. This will require thorough and careful deliberation of the
dispensation request of concerned entity.
Such dispensation requests may be submitted to ADNOC HSE Division for study and
consideration.

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4.7 Layout for Workers Camp Areas
4.7.1 The Site
Residential Caravans/Cabins (typical size 10m x 3.5m)
Every caravan or unit must not be less than 6 meters from any other unit and not less than
3 m from any carriage way/road. The distance (separation) between each caravan/unit may
be reduced to 4 m. This will only be acceptable if the exterior coat of the building meets the
British Standard (BS) 476 part 22 (fire resistance to 30 minutes) and no openings,
(Windows, split A/C vents) are provided in adjacent facing of the buildings or light panels in
the adjacent roof.
If a vision (glazing) panel is provided in a separating or dividing wall or door then it must not
reduce the fire resistance required for the surrounding structure and must accord to the
appropriate provisions of BS 6262.
Where the firebreak is less than 4 meters, or temporary building(s) are to be arranged in a
back to back or end to end design then they must be constructed with materials that do
not significantly contribute to the growth of a fire or the propagation of smoke and/or
corrosive fumes. They should meet the following criteria:
Class 1 surface spread of flame performance in BS 476 Part 7 (UAE Civil Defence
regulation chapter 1/55 mode of testing) to all internal wall and ceiling surfaces
and to external surfaces of walls. External surface of roof to meet Class AA in BS
476 Part 3; e.g. aluminium faced fibre insulating board
Employing this standard will ensure that the materials can be expected to prevent a
rapid spread of flame in the event of a fire. The standard for the roof (tested from
inside) will slow down the fire spread and restrict the flame from jumping from one
roof to effect the next or adjacent cabin.
Walls and roof to achieve 30 (thirty) minutes Fire Resistance (integrity and
insulation) to BS 476 Parts 20 and 22; roof to be tested from below. In the case of
building formed in the back to back or end to end, configuration then the fire
resistance of the compartment walls between units must be 60 minutes fire
resistance. The specification for the 60-minute separating wall, including details of
the materials used in manufacture, must form part of the contract details, and be
available for Company inspection.
Doors and windows to achieve 30 (thirty) minutes Fire Resistance (integrity) to BS
476 Parts 20 and 22.
Where Temporary Building(s) are vertically stacked, (i.e. 2 storey), the roof/floor
assembly, and members supporting it must achieve at least 30 (thirty) minutes fire
resistance (integrity, insulation and load-bearing capacity) to BS 476 Parts 20 and
21 and have a fire alarm system to BS 5839: Part 1: 1988.
However, the distance from the caravan/unit to the roadway will not be reduced. The area
between the caravan/unit and the boundary whether it be a road or adjacent camp
perimeter must be kept clear at all times and storage, placing of machinery or other
services are not permitted.
It is often necessary to erect temporary accommodation within a building under construction
or refurbishment when space is severely restricted. In such instances the temporary
accommodation must meet the fire performance characteristics stated in the section above.
Temporary accommodation should be erected in locations, which provide ease of access
for the Civil Defence and easy evacuation for personnel. In this respect locating temporary
accommodation within basements or on upper floors, i.e. at a height in excess of 7.5 (seven

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and a half) meters from site access level must be avoided. Where this is not practical other
suitable precautionary measures must be adopted after consultation with the relevant HSE
Department of the responsible Operating Company of ADNOC.
These measures must be maintained during the course of construction and until a time
when the temporary accommodation can be relocated within the lower floors.
Temporary accommodation located inside a building under construction or refurbishment or
inside another permanent building; OR within 6 (six) meters of such building(s), must be
fitted with a Fire Detection System.
When considering the separation distance and access, it shall be considered to include the
requirement to enable emergency response vehicles to enter and access all parts of the
camp particularly accommodation but not excluding storage and lay down areas. The
typical turning circle of a Civil Defence truck is approximately 5 meters.
3 m
3 m 6 m
4 m
Camp Layout
3 m
Fire Resistant Coating to
BS476 Part 20 & 21
[30-min Rating]
4 m
Fire Resistant Coating to
BS476 Part 20 & 21
[30-min Rating]

Fi gure 4.1. Camp Layouts

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4.7.2 Roads and footpaths
Roads of suitable material must be provided so that no caravan/unit or toilet blocks, is more
than 45 meters from a road. Single-track, one way roads must not be less than 5 meters
wide or, if they form part of a two-way road each lane to be 3 meters wide with a total road
width of 6 m.
Each unit and toilet block should be connected to a road by a footpath with a hard non-slip
surface. Footpaths should not be less than 0.75 meter wide. See example below.

F
o
o
t
p
a
t
h
45 m

Fi gure 4.2. Roads & Footpaths
4.7.3 Hard Standings (base supports for units)
Every caravan/unit must be positioned on a hard base of a suitable material (concrete)
which must extend over the whole area occupied by the caravan placed upon it or on
concrete blocks.
All cabins must be provided with a fine metal mesh skirt to stop materials and rubbish
accumulating under the units.


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4.8 Fire Safety
4.8.1 Fire Service Main
A fire service main must be provided in all camp facilities, new or existing. The option to
provide the minimum standard can be as follows:
A mobile vehicle driven water tanker capacity minimum 13500 L, a centrifugal pump
capacity, skid or trailer mounted, capacity 227 L/min and 250 m supply of delivery
hose (10 lengths of 25 m each) 25 mm internal diameter terminating in a nozzle with
an internal diameter of 19 mm. The nominal discharge of the nozzle must be 730
L/min. (operation time approximately 18 minutes); or
Provide a fire service main. The fire main must meet the appropriate British
Standard or International Equivalent Standard [IES] e.g. NFPA. The size of the pipe
for the main must be a minimum of 150 mm diameter. The system must be
inspected and tested on a monthly basis by the camp management.
4.8.2 Means of Escape
Ideally, persons must be able to turn their back on a fire and walk away to a place of safety.
In the planning stage for the buildings the following factors must be considered:
The nature of the occupants (different nationalities/sleeping).
Number of people attempting to escape
The distance they have to travel to safety
Access to a place of safety
Caravans, which provide a window that can be opened, as well as a door, are preferred.
This provides a second option in the event of the exit being obscured or restricted by fire or
products of fire.
A single exit door, less than 750 mm, for each unit is acceptable where fewer than 5
persons occupy the room as long as the travel distance is no more than 9 m. In all other
cases the minimum door width is 750 mm.
In all areas that occupy more than five personnel (e.g. common areas, canteens, cinemas,
etc.) the number of exits must be sufficient to evacuate the building in 2 minutes (40
person / minute through each 750 mm door).
4.8.3 Fire Fighting Preparedness
Camp Managers and their deputies are responsible for ensuring that all personnel receive
training in the following:
Action to take in case of fire.
Arrangements for calling the Civil Defence.
Means of fighting the fire including chemical & fuel fires.
Fire control.
Arrangements for identifying the hazards for firefighting; particularly those from
chemicals (MSDS Awareness).
A training record is to be kept on all personnel.


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4.8.4 Fire Fighting, Personnel Protective Equipment and First Aid
All sites must have a First Aid Post. The site must make arrangements locally, for dealing
with medical emergencies and Notices must be displayed so that all staff knows what
action to written in all appropriate languages.
In remote operations, it must be necessary to include the procedure for Medevac stating
authority and responsibility for mobilization. In high risk areas (e.g. presence of flammable
gas, or H
2
S) appropriate gas detection devices, respiratory protection and clothing must be
provided for those personnel expected or designated as firefighting team members.
Where personnel are expected to deal with hydrocarbon fires and are remote from
immediate medical response then Burn Kits (water jel type) are to be considered. All
requirements of the MSDS for chemical first aid must be provided.
The PPE and first aid equipment must be checked on a monthly basis by the camp
management and a record of such checks must be recorded and kept by the Site Manager.
4.8.5 Fire Warning System
A means of raising the alarm in the event of fire must be provided. A bell, gong or siren
(manual or electric) must be provided. The travel distance that any person has to travel to
raise an alarm must not exceed 45 m.
Whether an automatic fire alarm system is provided or a manual alternative, the warning
device must be audible at all locations within the camp area. The warning system must be
tested once per week.
A practice fire drill must be conducted once in every three months. One of these drills must
be conducted during the hours of darkness.
A record of such drills shall be maintained by the Camp Manager and must be available at
all times for inspection by the Group Company.
4.8.6 Fire Hydrants
All sites [new or existing], must be provided with a hydrant system. The water supply must
be of sufficient pressure to provide a 6 m jet of water at the furthest hydrant point from the
fire pump.
The system must meet the water flow requirements and provide the minimum of 730 L/min.
The requirement is to install a fire hydrant within 100 meters of every caravan/unit.
The hydrants must be inspected and tested monthly. A record of such tests must be
maintained by the Camp Manager and must be available at all times for inspection by the
Group Company.
4.8.7 Firefighting Appliances (Portable extinguishers)
Each caravan/unit must be provided with one portable 9 L (13A) stored pressure water
extinguisher (Standard to BSEN 3-1 to 3-6, 1996) mounted externally in a cabinet or
protective frame, located at the front entrance to the unit.
The carrying handle of the extinguisher must be positioned at 1.2 meter height from the
floor level. The extinguishers must be red in colour and any cabinet or shade provision must
also be red in colour. Other types of extinguishers must be provided for the different risks.
All extinguishers must be provided with a pictorial design (how to use) instruction label.
Each unit must be provided with a maintenance inspection label, which must be of the gum
type, (not tied to the extinguisher, but stuck to the extinguisher). The extinguishers must be
inspected on a monthly basis and all manufacturers requirements for discharge and
hydrostatic testing shall be applied. A record of such tests must be maintained by the
Camp Manager and must be available at all times for inspection by Group Company.

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4.8.8 Fire Fighting Equipment
At each fire hydrant, an equipment cabinet for fighting hoses and nozzles must be provided.
This is termed a fire point. At each fire point there must be 5 x 25 m lengths of 45 mm
delivery hose. A small hand operated brass/nylon/plastic type control nozzle is to be
provided. Hoses must be housed in a box painted red and marked Fire Hose written in
Arabic and English or other appropriate language for the occupants of the camp. A pictorial
sign is to be provided in addition to the written words. The sign must meet BS 5499-1 2002.
All fire equipment must be inspected and tested on a monthly basis by the Camp
Management. A record of such tests must be maintained by the Camp Manager and must
be available at all times for inspection by Group Company.
4.8.9 Maintenance
All alarm and firefighting equipment must be maintained in a good working order and tested
as required in the sections above. The records of such inspections and tests must be
available at all times for inspection by the Group Company.
4.8.10 Fire Notices (to BS 5499 and BS ISO 3864 Pictorial design)
A clearly written and conspicuous notice must be provided and maintained at each fire point
to indicate the action to be taken in the event of fire and the location of the nearest
telephone. This notice must include:
On discovery of fire:
Ensure the caravan/unit or site building involved is evacuated.
Raise the alarm.
Call the site office or Civil Defence.
Attack the fire using the fire equipment provided when it is safe to do so.
It is expected that all residents and workers, as well as visitors to the site, will be familiar
with the above routine and the method of operating the fire alarm and firefighting
equipment.
4.9 General Fire Hazards
The following items must be addressed within a formal Safety program and a record of
camp inspections must be available at all times for inspection by the Group Company.
Cooking is not permitted in private rooms. The catering facilities are to be used.
The area underneath the cabins must not be used for storage.
Flammable materials must be stored separately in an appropriate metal container
and must be clearly labelled.
Where flue/exhaust pipes run through the structure of the cabins e.g. laundry,
kitchen, the pipe work must be adequately insulated.
Carelessly drying clothes cause fires. Coat stands and drying racks must be firmly
positioned at a safe distance from heaters, which should be thermostatically
controlled and have enclosed elements.
All heaters and cooking appliances must be installed, and ventilation provided, to
manufacturer recommendations. Electrical or gas cookers are to be provided. The
use of large portable type gas rings used for cooking are not permitted unless they
are fixed to a wall or floor and at the appropriate height for cooking.
Temporary Building(s) must not contain more than the minimum of furniture and
fittings made from synthetic materials.

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5 PEST CONTROL
5.1 Introduction
Pests can endanger health; contaminate food and the environment and damage property.
Pests require food, shelter, warmth and continuity; consequently, the elimination or
minimisation of these factors will prevent their survival. This form of control is known as
environmental control and is the first line of defines against possible infestations and re-
infestations.
Environmental controls require the co-operation and vigilance of all building occupiers but
that may not be entirely successful in which case additional steps must be taken to
remove/destroy any pests which gain access to premises used for any food related
purpose; working environments and for rest and accommodation.
All company and contractor premises must be designed, constructed, kept clean and
maintained in good repair and condition in order to avoid the risk of harbouring pests,
contaminating foodstuffs, equipment, furnishings and fixtures.
Effective pest control requires rapid identification of the species causing concern, a
knowledge of its lifecycle and the most economical, rapid and safe way of eliminating it.
5.2 Accountabilities and Responsibilities
Under Federal Law No. 8 (1980) every employer has a legal obligation to ensure the health,
safety and welfare of employees, contractors and visitors to their premises. Consequently,
the Company has an obligation to ensure that all personnel on its premises are provided
with appropriate environments in which to eat, drink, work and rest.
The presence of an infestation of certain pests could result in unsafe working conditions or
the facilities being unfit for purpose. Therefore, Managers, Supervisors, Camp Bosses, and
contractors must ensure facilities which they use are appropriate and fit for purpose and
they are kept free from pests.
All staff and residents have a responsibility for ensuring that standards are maintained, by
their own actions in accordance with this CoP.
Department Managers and Contractors are responsible for reporting issues regarding pest
control, cleaning and maintenance to Building, Estates and Facilities Departments.
5.3 Pest Prevention and Control
5.3.1 Design, Maintenance & Proofing of Buildings
Harbourage in food premises is provided in dark, undisturbed areas as well as within the
very structure of some buildings. Boxing or ducting of pipes creates ideal conditions for
harbourage and should normally be avoided. All parts of the structure should be capable of
being easily cleaned. No gaps should exist around pipe work passing into cupboards.
All structural damage such as holes in walls, broken windows, loose tiles and damaged
insulation should be repaired immediately to prevent its potential for insect harbourage.
Silicon mastics are particularly useful for sealing small gaps.
All buildings should be adequately proofed: doors should be close fitting and external doors
provided with metal kick plates. Defective drains both above and below ground must be
made good. All external ventilation vents must be provided with wire balloons fixed in the
top of each pipe. All ventilation openings must be adequately proofed to avoid insects
gaining access, for example, air bricks should be fitted with metal gauze. It should be noted
that if a pencil can pass through a gap, so can a young mouse.

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Rats drink three times the amount they eat; hence denying sources of water will therefore
assist control. Dripping taps, defective gutters, leaking roofs and puddles are all examples
of common sources which must be removed.
Lift shafts must be regularly inspected to remove debris and sources of food.
Fixtures and fittings should be at least 50mm above the floor to facilitate cleaning.
5.3.2 Good Housekeeping
Despite all proofing precautions pests will inevitably get into a building at some time.
However, there is a large difference between an occasional invader and the establishment
of a stable population of certain pests.
To reduce the risk of an infestation it is important to deny the lone invader the conditions it
likes, and in particular all occupiers and users of buildings must ensure that:
Their rooms are clean and tidy to reduce sources of food and harbourage. Attention
must be paid to locker rooms, changing, dining, stores, record stores, and waste
compounds;
Co-operation between occupiers, users and cleaners of premises and pest control
contractors is essential, to ensure baits are not moved, re-positioned or washed
away;
Spillages are cleared away promptly;
Food is kept in rodent proof containers, lids are always replaced;
Unused equipment, packaging, materials, leaflets, stores and similar articles must
be rotated and checked frequently as rodents prefer living in undisturbed areas;
Special attention must be paid to waste disposal. Receptacles should be of
adequate capacity to avoid overflowing and should be provided with tight fitting lids
or covers.
Waste must be removed promptly and efficiently and refuse areas kept clean.
Receptacles themselves must be cleaned after emptying to prevent deposits
providing breeding sites for flies
5.3.3 Correct Storage
The correct storage of goods is essential to reduce pest incidence. The following principles
must be adhered to by occupiers and users of premises:
All areas must remain accessible for cleaning and inspection, which should be
carried out at frequent and regular intervals;
Damage to storage containers must be minimized to reduce spillage;
All goods must be kept clear of the walls, windows and ventilators;
All goods must be kept off the floor, taking care enough room is left to clear
spillages;
All areas must be well ventilated and lighted;
Storage areas must be in good repair and effectively proofed against pest entry;
Storage space should be cleaned and inspected before new stock arrives


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5.4 Action in Case of Suspected or Known pest infestation
A pest control programme must be implemented to ensure regular monitoring by
Specialist Pest Control Operatives, to ensure prompt identification and treatment of
pests.
Occupants and users of premises must report any incidence of pests immediately to
the Buildings, Estates and/or Facilities Department for advice and action as
appropriate. Note: in conjunction with any remedial pest control eradication taking
place, standards of maintenance and housekeeping must be reviewed. For
example:
o Filling holes/ repairing drains and preventing further entrance of pests;
o If rooms are congested, pest control operators may not have sufficient access
to treat effectively, so rooms must be tidied/ re-organised as required;
o Re-infestation will rapidly occur if ideal conditions are maintained for pests;
o All non-essential equipment, files, leaflets etc. must be removed from food and
other rooms.
Where pests have been identified, clear information must be obtained, including
details of numbers, dates, descriptions, reasons for concern. Occasional insects
may enter buildings, e.g. ants, but unless they find ideal conditions they will not stay
long enough to warrant treatment, however, where insects find food and suitable
harbourage, e.g. spilled drinks, discarded fruit, they may rapidly multiply and
become an infestation.
Isolated observations or signs of rodents such as hairs, droppings, gnawing,
damage, must be taken seriously and action taken immediately.
5.5 Pest Control Contractors
Pest control contractors must provide a comprehensive preventative, reactive (i.e. as
requested) and on-call (i.e. out of hours) service arrangements, using personnel who are
fully trained, qualified and able to provide high quality professional and practical advice.
Regular and frequent [minimum two] planned preventative site assessments must be
carried out at night, one in the winter months and one in the summer months. In addition to
the pest control service, the contractor must provide emergency pest control advice to the
Company; an on-call emergency service facility must apply in and outside normal working
hours for dealing with non-routine, urgent and emergency requests. The Pest Control
Service must respond, if requested, visit the facility site(s) and take the appropriate action.
The Pest Control Contractor must undertake all work in a safe and effective manner which
reduces to an absolute minimum the risk in terms of safety, food hygiene, infection control,
damage to assets, and loss of work activity caused by pest infestation.
Pest Control Contractor must provide safe and efficient methods of catching, destroying
and safely disposing of pests (e.g. adopting safe and humane procedures in all instances).
The Pest Control Service must ensure all insect and rodent control systems are tamper
resistant.
Pest Control Contractors will be expected to use chemical treatments only with the
Companys consent and where other forms of prevention are ineffective in controlling pests.
The Pest Control Contractor must ensure the use of chemicals, including pesticides, are
strictly controlled and monitored and fully compliant with the ADNOC & Federal
Regulations.


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If the Pest Control Contractor wishes to use any other form of chemical product which has
not been formally authorized by the Company in writing, it must obtain written authority prior
to use. In all cases no chemicals must be used by the Pest Control Contractor that may
come into contact [directly or indirectly] with employees, residents or visitors of the
Company.


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6 LABORATORY STANDARDS ANALYTICAL METHODS & EQUIPMENT
All laboratories which carry out analyses on behalf of Group Companies or contractors must
be able to demonstrate that they are sufficiently competent to perform the required testing.
Laboratories must be accredited by a relevant international body such as the UKAS (United
Kingdom Accreditation Service), the AIHA (American Industrial Hygiene Association) or
equivalent. Formal accreditation to ISO 17025:2005will also satisfy this requirement.
The following principles must apply to all laboratories within Group Companies that carry
out routine and non-routine analysis.
6.1 Anal ytical Methods
Six principles are important for laboratories making analytical measurements [Ref. 15]:
Analytical measurements must be made to satisfy an agreed requirement.
Analytical measurements must be made using methods and equipment which have
been tested to ensure they are fit for purpose.
Staff making analytical measurements must be both qualified and competent to
undertake the task.
There must be regular independent assessment of the technical performance of a
laboratory.
Analytical measurements made in one location must be consistent with those made
elsewhere.
Laboratories making analytical measurements must have well defined quality control
and quality assurance procedures.
Laboratories must use appropriate methods and procedures for all tests within the scope of
this and other related Codes of Practice, including sampling, handling, transport, storage
and preparation of items to be tested [Ref. 3].
The laboratory must have a QA/QC sampling plan and procedures for sampling when it
carries out sampling of substances, materials or products for subsequent testing or
calibration. The sampling plan, as well as the sampling procedure must be available at the
location where sampling is undertaken.
6.2 Equipment and Equipment Maintenance
Equipment and its software used for testing, calibration and sampling must be capable of
achieving the accuracy required and must comply with specifications relevant to the tests
concerned.
Calibration programs must be established for key quantities or values of the instruments
where these properties have a significant effect on the results.





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7 CONTRACTOR WELFARE
7.1 Welfare Management Plan
A detailed Welfare Management Plan shall be proposed for implementation, by all
contractors prior to Contract award. The Welfare Management Plan shall include as a
minimum the following:
A written statement signed by Contractor management demonstrating the
commitment to workers welfare and compliance with UAE laws regarding working
hours, wages, overtime & overtime rates, leave entitlement and rest days.
Detailed Camp Facilities Health / Hygiene, Safety, Environment and Security Plan;
The plan should outline and describe the actions to provide and maintain
accommodations to comply with the relevant standards including but not limited to
all the facilities for recreational, medical and medical insurance coverage, food
preparation & delivery as well as to ensure a minimum of food variety, quality and
nutritional requirements in line with ADNOC Codes of Practice;
Group Companies shall ensure that the submitted plan complies with ADNOC
Standards, Project Contractual requirements, applicable UAE Laws and ADNOC
COPs.
7.2 Welfare Inspections and Audits
Every Group Company and their contractors / sub-contractors should have a focal point for
welfare management.
Camp Welfare inspections shall be conducted by the Group Company on a monthly basis
and audits on a quarterly basis. Records shall be maintained and copied to ADNOC HSE
Divisions Sustainability & Social Responsibilities Department after completion of each
inspection or audit. Based on the audits and inspections, a welfare actions tracking register
shall be maintained in the camp welfare management office in order to track the status of
close-out actions. The inspection / audit by the Group Company should include the
following:
Meeting contractual requirements with respect to employees rights (wages,
overtime, rest, recreation etc.)
Contractors and their sub-contractors personnel accommodation,
Camp facilities and amenities
Quality and quantity of food and water provided
7.3 Welfare General Requirements
Employers under contract with ADNOC Group Companies shall treat their employees as
per the requirements dictated by the different labour laws and regulations of the UAE and
reflected in the ADNOC Codes of Practice. The employees shall also be informed about
their rights and duties. The employer shall provide the following, as a minimum:
Initial and periodic medical examination at no cost to all employees
Employer to demonstrate that human rights are preserved throughout recruitment,
placement, work and return of their employees by exerting appropriate level of due
diligence
Do not allow or tolerate any forced, compulsory labour, child labour, human
trafficking, or other violations of human rights;
Create a safe, healthy and worker-friendly working and living environment;

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Treat all employees equally and fairly, irrespective of their nationality, gender, ethnic
origin, race or religion;
Ensure that employees receive equal pay for equal work;
Do not allow or tolerate retaliation against employees for exercising any of their
rights under the Law.
7.4 Personnel Engagement
Following mandatory UAE and Abu Dhabi Emirate legal requirements related to the
engagement of workers/personnel for work shall be undertaken:
Visas required for working in the emirate of Abu Dhabi
Health Insurance
CICPA Security Passes, as applicable
Emirates I.D
Labour Card (With copy of labour contract provided to personnel)
Compliance shall be demonstrated by the Employer with other applicable UAE and Abu
Dhabi Emirate legal and regulatory requirements.
7.5 Salary/ Wages
All employees shall be paid with their salaries and other entitlements without delay as
specified in the employment contract.
7.6 Overtime Payment
All "Overtime" dues shall be paid to the employees along with their monthly salary.
Payment of "Overtime" shall be in accordance with the U.A.E. Labour Law and ADNOC
Group HR policies and contract agreements.
7.7 End of Service Benefits
The end of service benefit, if applicable, shall be calculated in accordance with the U.A.E.
Labour Law and paid separately to all employees within fifteen calendar days from end of
their service or end of assignment of the Project.
A proof of payment to ADNOC Group Companies welfare specialists shall be issued for the
end of service benefits all employees.
7.8 Leaves, Work Rotation and Time Off
Provision shall be made for replacement of staff during leaves, work rotation and time-off,
on one to one basis, of equal status and grade, in order to continue the work without
interruption or disruption. Employees shall not be transferred or removed without prior
written approval of Group Company Project Management. The CVs of such replacement
staff shall be submitted for Group Company review and approval. Leaves, work rotation and
time off schedules of all workers shall be planned in such a way that personnel going on
leave, work rotation or taking time off is released only upon arrival of their leave relief at
work site. A leave, work rotation and time-off schedule shall be provided to Group Company
site representative upon official request.
7.9 Entitlement to Sick Leave
The entitlement of sick leave for Contractors employees shall obey as a minimum the
requirements of UAE labour laws. This should be clearly reflected in the contract between
ADNOC Group Companies and the Contractors.

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7.10 Security
The UAE Federal Labour Law specifies certain provisions for employee safety and health
care, stipulated under Article 91 to Article 101. The provisions of the law require the
following measures and procedures to be adhered to:
Every employer should provide his employees with suitable means of protection against
injuries, occupational diseases which may be contacted during work, fire and hazards which
may result from the use of machinery and other work equipment. The employer shall apply
all the other precautionary measures specified by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs.
The employee however, has to use the safety equipment and clothes given to him for this
purpose. He shall also follow his employer's instructions which aim to protect him from
danger.
Every employer shall display in a permanent and prominent place at the work site, detailed
instructions regarding the means of preventing fire and the means of protection of
employees from hazards to which they may be exposed during work. These instructions
shall be in Arabic and if necessary another language understood by the employee.
Every employer shall make available a first aid kit or kits containing medicines, bandages
and other first aid material as directed by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs.
Every employer shall keep the place of work clean and well ventilated. These places should
have adequate lighting and be provided with water suitable for drinking, and bathrooms.
An employee shall assign one or more physician to examine thoroughly those of his
employees who are exposed to the possibility of contracting one of the occupational
diseases listed in the schedule attached to this law. At least once every six months, these,
"at risk" employees should be examined and results recorded on their files.
An employer shall provide his employee with the means of medical care up to the standard
determined by the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs in consultation with the Minister of
Health.
The employer or his deputy shall inform the employee of the dangers of his job and the
means of protection that he has to take. He shall also display detailed written instructions
concerning that at work premises.
No employer, his deputy, or any person who has authority over employees shall bring or
allow others to bring any kind of alcoholic drinks for consumption on work premises. He
shall also not allow any person to enter the establishment or to remain in it, while he is
intoxicated.
Every employer employing employees in remote areas not served by public means of
transportation shall provide his employees with the following services:
Suitable transportation.
Suitable accommodation
Suitable sanitation
Suitable drinking water
Suitable food
First aid services
Means for entertainment and sports activities


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7.11 Medical Services/Health Insurance
Employees shall be provided with health insurance. Costs of issuance and renewal of
Health Insurance for all employees shall be borne by their employers at no cost to the
employees. The provided health insurance shall be accepted at all government hospitals in
UAE, as applicable.
7.12 Medical Emergencies, First Aid Facilities and Training
First aid and first aid facilities shall be provided in the camp location. Such facilities shall
conform to the laws and regulations of the UAE, Emirate of Abu Dhabi (e.g. HAAD) and
requirements of ADNOC Codes of Practice.
7.13 Transportation
All vehicles shall be safe, in good condition, fit for the weather and shall be air conditioned,
with when applicable an "In Vehicle Monitoring Device" (IVMD). These means of
transportation shall meet the Transportation of Personnel Regulations of UAE (e.g. safety
belts). All vehicles shall be properly maintained. Refer to ADNOC COPV4-11 [Ref. 27].
No driver shall work for a continuous period of more than twelve (12) hours and there
should be no more than eight (8) hours continuous driving within the twelve (12) hours
period. Off duty rest shall not be taken in the vehicle unless the vehicle has bunker facilities.
7.14 Laundry
Laundry services may be outsourced.
If laundry services are not outsourced, the employer shall:
Provide laundry services according to an announced schedule and appoint a person
to be in charge of these services;
Or provide the unit with communal laundry facilities;
The communal laundry facilities should be on the ground floor of the residential unit.
The communal laundry facilities should be provided with all the required services
such as hot and cold water connections, ventilation and air conditioning, drainage
system and sufficient lighting.
Provide a designated and safe area for drying clothes
7.15 Recreation Facility
Physical fitness Gymnasiums and Courts should be provided for the employees who
wish to exercise in their free time.
Each residential unit should have a barber shop and a grocery store to be used only
by the residents and not by the public. In case a grocery store exists, it shall not be
allowed to sell food that spoil fast or that needs to be cooked before consumption.
The compound should be provided with an ATM where a bank is not available. The
employer should provide adequate facilities so that the contractors employees can
transfer / exchange money, as and when required.


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8 MEDICAL SERVICES & FIRST AID FACILITIES
8.1 Medical Emergencies, First Aid Facilities and Training
Injuries and illnesses can occur in the workplace. Whether these are work-related or not
does not matter. What is important is that they receive prompt and appropriate attention.
Having the right emergency and first aid facilities and trained personnel to use them can
save lives and prevent minor injuries becoming major ones. Group Companies are
responsible for making arrangements for the immediate management of any illness or injury
suffered by a person at work.
8.2 Emergency Medical Plan
Each Group Company must have a written plan to provide emergency medical services.
The plan must specify the means of implementing all applicable requirements, including
contact emergency medical services and physicians, communication and transportation
needs.
Where different Group companies operate in the same location or have overlapping
jurisdiction, a single emergency plan should be prepared jointly in consultation with ADNOC
Medical Services which will assist in promoting a coordinated approach and/or controls over
managing medical Emergency, so as to ensure integration with all applicable standards
including ADNOC HSE, Health Authority Abu Dhabi and other relevant stakeholders. The
Emergency Medical Plan must include details of the Medical Major Incident Response Plan.
The emergency plan must be adequately communicated to all personnel in the work
location. Emergency numbers to call must be conspicuously posted in different areas.
8.3 Emergency Medical Equipment
The type and quantity of emergency medical equipment shall be proportionate to the
hazards and risks in the workplace. Emergency medical equipment may include
emergency wash stations, stretchers, blankets, respirators, and other supplies to treat
anticipated hazards and/or emergency medical situations. Emergency equipment must be
strategically located.
8.4 First Aid
First Aid at work is the emergency treatment administered to an ill or injured person at the
work place before professional medical care is available.
It is the responsibility of the organization to ensure that the designated work place First
Aiders are sufficient in number, appropriately distributed in the work place and are
appropriately trained and that they hold valid certificates for the provision of First Aid and
the use of AEDs. The organization must also ensure that the first aid services are rendered
in line with the applicable laws, regulations and guidance relevant to that organization.


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8.4.1 Assessment of First Aid Needs
The extent of first aid provision in a particular workplace depends upon the circumstances
of that workplace. There are no fixed levels of first aid and each work location must be
assessed as to the appropriate level of personnel and facilities required. When assessing
first aid needs, the following must be considered:
The hazards and risks in the workplace.
The size of the organization.
The history of accidents in the specific location.
The nature and distribution of the workforce including shift work
The distance from the workplace to emergency medical services.
Traveling, distant and lone workers needs and requirements.
Annual leave and other absences of first aiders and appointed persons.
8.4.2 First Aiders
Ratios of first aiders to number of employees /clients must be in line with the workplace
environment and needs of the employer/organisation and the employees/clients and the
requirements in specific to the identified risks. The trained First Aiders must be identified
and designated to the role and appropriately distributed in the work place [Ref. 28].
Table 8.1 provides recommendation on the optimum number of first aiders to be present, in
addition to any medically qualified professional in a work location.
Table 8.1: Suggested Numbers of First Aid Personnel
Category of Risk No of People
Employed
No of First Aid Personnel Needed
Low Risk, e.g. offices Fewer than 25 At least 1 appointed person
25-50 At least one trained first aid person
More than 50 At least one trained first aid person
for every 100 people
Medium or High Risk Fewer than 5 At least 1 appointed person
5-50 At least one trained first aid person
More than 50 At least one trained first aid person
for every 50 people
Where there are hazards that
require additional first aid skills
In addition to the above, at least one
first aider trained in the specific
emergency action
Refresher courses must be provided to ensure First Aiders have current and valid
certification.





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8.4.3 First Aid Resources
There is no standard list of items to put in a first-aid box. Consequently, the contents will
depend on what the likely needs are. Tablets or medicines must not be kept in the first-aid
box; however, as a guide, and where there is no special risk in the workplace, the minimum
contents of an industrial-type first aid kit are shown below in Table 8.2 [Ref. 28].
Table 8.2: Contents of a First Aid Kit
1. A leaflet giving general guidance on first aid
2. Twenty (20) individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to
the type of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary)
3. Two (2) sterile eye pads
4. Two (2) individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile
5. Six (6) safety pins;
6. Two (2) large sterile individually wrapped un-medicated wound dressings
7. Six (6) medium-sized sterile individually wrapped un-medicated wound dressings
8. At least, three (3) three pairs of disposable gloves
Note The above stated kit content should be considered as minimum requirements. First
Aid kits must contain equipment which reflects and is compatible with the first aid
training that was provided
When larger operations or multiple operations occur at the same location, the need for
additional first aid kits at the work site must be determined, including additional types of first
aid equipment and supplies, and additional quantities and types of supplies and equipment
in first aid kits. Determination of type and quantity of first aid supplies and equipment must
be done in consultation with a health professional or other qualified person.
In addition to the above, the following requirements must also be met:
Motor vehicles, aircraft and watercraft must carry first aid kits.
First aid kits must be inspected at least weekly by designated personnel.
Consumable items must be replenished as needed. All inspections must be
recorded.
8.4.4 First aid / Emergency Room
A suitable room, e.g., sickbay, must be made available for first aid purposes. Such rooms
must have sufficient first aid resources, be easily accessible to stretchers, and be easily
identifiable. Names and contact numbers of emergency and/or first aid personnel must be
displayed on the door of the first aid room / sick bay.


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8.4.5 First aid Training and Competencies
Basic First Aid Training
Personnel trained in first aid must be available at all Group Company facilities, including
remote field operations. The numbers of trained personnel required will depend on the size
and nature of the facilities in question, but must be not be fewer than 2 people.
First Aid training must satisfy the minimum learning requirements for Levels 1 and 2 First
Aid, as identified below in Modules 1 and 2.
Module 1: Minimum Learning Requirements Level 1 [min. 6 hours training]
Learning Outcome 1: Demonstrates the application of First Aid procedures
Sub-outcome 1.1: Apply First Aid Basics (e.g. rescue duties, victim and rescuer
safety, finding the problem)
Sub-outcome 1.2: 1. Review the First Aid steps for Medical/Health
Emergencies: Breathing problems, choking, allergic
reactions, heart attack, fainting, diabetes and low blood
sugar, stroke, seizures, shock and drowning.
2. Review the First Aid steps for emergencies with injuries
Visible bleeding, head-neck-spine injury, broken bones
and sprains, burns and electrocution
3. Review the First Aid steps for Environmental
Emergencies: Bites and stings from snakes, insects,(bee,
spider etc.) jellyfish, temperature-related and poison
emergencies
4. Know the protocol to administer an epinephrine pen for
allergic reactions
Learning Outcome 2: Demonstrates understanding and skills pertaining to
cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
Sub-outcome 2.1: Perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a mask (hands-on
with manikin) to an adult and child.
Sub-outcome 2.2: Perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a mask (hands-on
with manikin) to an infant (Optional)
Learning Outcome 3: Demonstrates understanding and skills related to airway
obstruction.
Sub-outcome 3.1: Identify signs and symptoms of airway obstruction and
dislodging techniques for an:
Adult and child
Infant (optional)







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Module 2: Minimum learning requirements level 2
Learning Outcome 1: Demonstrates the application of First Aid procedures.
Sub-outcome 1.1: Apply First Aid Basics (e.g., rescue duties, victim and rescuer
safety, finding the problem)
Sub-outcome 1.2: 1. Review the First Aid steps for Medical/Health
Emergencies: Breathing problems, choking, allergic
reactions, heart attack, fainting, diabetes and low blood
sugar, stroke, seizures, and shock and drowning.
2. Review the First Aid steps for emergencies with injuries:
Visible bleeding, head-neck-spine injury, broken bones
and sprains, burns and electrocution
3. Review the First Aid steps for Environmental
Emergencies: Bites and stings from snakes, insects, (bee,
spider etc.) jellyfish, temperature-related and poison
emergencies.
4. Know the protocol to administer an epinephrine pen for
allergic reactions.
Learning Outcome 2: Demonstrates and recognizes the early warning signs of
respiratory and cardiac arrest and identifies the signs and
symptoms of stroke.
Learning Outcome 3: Demonstrates understanding and skills pertaining to
cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the use of an
automated external defibrillator (AED)
Sub-outcome 3.1: Perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a mask (hands-on
with manikin) to an adult and child
Sub-outcome 3.2: Perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a mask (hands-on
with manikin) to an infant (optional)
Sub-outcome 3.3: Use an automated external defibrillator accurately for victim
Learning Outcome 4: Demonstrates understanding and skills related to airway
obstruction.
Sub-outcome 4.1: Identify signs and symptoms of airway obstruction and
dislodging techniques for an:
Adult and child
Infant (optional)



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9 OTHER FACILITIES
9.1 Barber Shops
Where a barber service is provided, the facility must comply with the Abu Dhabi Municipality
and any other applicable UAE Public Health requirements as outlined in Health Conditions
Regulations for men's grooming salons and obtainable from www.adm.gov.ae [Ref. 16]
In addition to these requirements of the regulations, listed in the subsections below are a
few critical health and safety issues that must be observed in Barber Shops [Ref 17].
Risk Assessment
A risk assessment of what the hazards are in the Barber Shop must be prepared, and this
must include what control measures will be put in place to ensure no-one is harmed.
Customer health issues
Customers may be allergic to the products that are used or to latex gloves. A check must
always be made with customers to establish if they have any known allergies or damage to
their scalp.
Products must always be made up to the correct concentrations following the instructions,
and left on for the correct time. Proper neutralising is also important. Some customers are
allergic to latex which is another reason non-latex gloves must be used.
Hygiene of equipment and razors/clippers
Equipment such as razors and clippers may accidentally cut or graze customers or staff
and draw blood. If they are not properly cleaned there is a risk of blood borne infection
being passed from one person to another.
All equipment must be properly cleaned with a specialist sterilising solution after use.
Solutions must be made up according to the instructions and changed every day to ensure
they are still effective.
Dermatitis
Dermatitis occurs when skin comes into contact with substances that irritate it, for example
hair dyes and perfumes. It can also be caused by wet work which is when skin is in
contact with water for more than two hours a day. Symptoms of dermatitis include dryness,
itching and redness which can develop into flaking, cracking, blistering and swollen skin. It
can be extremely painful and can affect health and wellbeing. Fortunately dermatitis is
preventable by taking a few simple precautions, as follows:
Step 1: Wear disposable non-latex gloves when rinsing, shampooing, & colouring.
a longer-length glove must be chosen, while folding the cuff back to stop water
running down the arms
A smooth glove must be used, to stop hair snagging
Different sized gloves must be available to ensure a good fit
Staff must know how to remove gloves by peeling them down from the cuff, while
avoiding touching skin with the outside of the used gloves
Gloves must be worn for cleaning spills and equipment




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Step 2: Drying hands thoroughly with a soft cotton or paper towel.
Soft cotton or paper towels must be used for drying hands
It is important to observe thorough hand drying.
Step 3: Creaming hands after washing, as well as at the start and end of each day.
Moisturising cream must be provided in a dispenser for staff use
Fragrance-free and nut-oil free moisturisers, must be used, since some people can
be sensitive to perfumes and nuts
Step 4: Change gloves between clients.
Staff must not re-use disposable gloves since the skin can be contaminated if they
try to put them back on
Staff must change gloves between clients, since this gives the skin a chance to air
and dry out.
Step 5: Check skin regularly for early signs of dermatitis.
Staff must be encouraged to checking their own skin regularly.


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10 REFERENCES
1. Water Quality Regulations (2013), Water Quality Regulations (2013) Final Draft
Consultation, Regulation and Supervision Bureau for the Water, Wastewater and
Electricity Sector in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi; www.rsb.gov.ae.
2. ISO 5667-3, Sampling - Part 3: Preservation and handling of water samples, ISO,
2012.
3. ISO/IEC 17025, General requirements for the competence of testing and
calibration laboratories, International Organization for Standardization, Switzerland,
2005.
4. Water Distribution Code, Version 3.0, J uly 2010, Regulation and Supervision
Bureau, http://www.rsb.gov.ae/uploads/WaterDistributionCodeVersion03.pdf
5. Codex Alimentarius, International Food Standards, WHO, 2003.
6. Code of Practice No (6) of 2011 On HACCP for Manufacturing Sector, ADFCA,
www.adfca.gov.ae.
7. ISO-22000 Food Safety Management Systems. Requirements for any
Organisation in the Food Chain, ISO, 2005, ISBN 0 580 46684 1
8. Abu Dhabi Health Statistics 2011, Abu Dhabi Health Authority, 2012; www.haad.ae
9. Nutrition, British Broadcasting Corporation, www.bbc.co.uk.
10. Nutrition, US Centre for Disease Control, 2012; www.cdc.gov.
11. Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global
Perspective, World Cancer Research Fund & American Institute for Cancer
Research, 2007.
12. Salt Reduction Targets for 2012, Food Standards Agency, www.food.gov.uk
13. Eight tips for health diet, NHS Choices, www.nhs.uk
14. Technical Report Offshore Petroleum Facility Accommodation, Rpt01-1052468-
Rev1-14 J uly 2011, SVT Engineering Consultants for Australian National Offshore
Petroleum Safety Authority
15. Guidelines for the Accreditation of Laboratories Engaged in Test Method
Development & Evaluation and Non-Routine Testing, CAN-P-1595, National
Standards System, Canada, J uly 2001.
16. Health conditions regulations for men's grooming salons and kids salon, 1st edition
(2011); Municipality of Abu Dhabi City, Public Health Division, Health Control
Section, www.adm.gov.ae.
17. Hairdressing, UK Health & Safety Executive, www.hse.gov.uk, 2012
18. ISO 15138: Petroleum and natural gas industries -- Offshore production
installations -- Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning, International Organization
for Standardization, Switzerland, 2007.
19. Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality, 3
rd
edition, incorporating 1
st
& 2
nd
addenda,
WHO, Geneva, 2008.
20. Guidelines for Microbiological Quality of Ready-to-Eat Foods Sampled At Point of
Sale, Communicable Disease and Public Health, Vol. 3(3), Public Health
Laboratory Service, London, 2000

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21. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice & Technical Guidance Notes (TGN): Waste
Management, ADNOC CoPV2-05.
22. Food Incidents & Crisis Management Plan, Code of Practice No. (3)/2009, ADFCA.
23. Adoption of the Code on Noise Levels on Board Ships, Annex 1, Resolution
MSC.337(91), (adopted on 30 November 2012).
24. The Offshore Installations and Pipeline Works (First Aid) Regulations 1989: SI
1989/1671, London, 1989.
25. Living Accommodation, OTR 2001/067, Health and Safety Executive, HMSO, 2002
26. Temporary labour camps, 29 CFR 1910.142, Occupational Safety and Health
Administration, Washington, 1998.
27. ADNOC Manual of Codes of Practice & Technical Guidance Notes (TGN): Road
Safety, ADNOC CoPV4-11.
28. First Aid at Work, The Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981, L74 (3rd
edition), 2013
11 APPENDICES
Appendix 1: Drinking Water Quality Guidelines Relevant to the ADNOC Group
Companies and their Facilities
Appendix 2: Recommended Illumination Levels in Food Areas
Appendix 3: Mandatory Guidelines for Microbiological Quality of Foods



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Appendix 1: Drinking Water Prescribed Concentrations and Values
Table A.1: Physical Parameters [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value& units
Colour 15 mg/l Turbidity [incl.
suspended solids]
4 NTU
Odour [incl. H
2
S] Unobjectionable Taste Unobjectionable
Total dissolved solids 100 (min) 1000 (max)
mg/l
Calcium hardness, as
CaCO
3

200 mg/l @ 25
o
C
Total hardness, , as
CaCO
3

300 mg/l @ 25
o
C Langlier Saturation Index 0.0 (min ) 0.5 (max)
pH 7.0 (min) 9.2 (max) Residual chlorine, as Cl
2
0.2 (min) 0.5 (max)
mg/l
Note 1 TDS will be measured using the Guide to TDS calculation which is the Summation Method
(Anions and Cations) measured according to the Standard Method at a frequency specified in the
Guide for the establishment of K factor. The K factor is the ratio adopted in determining the TDS
from the measurement of Electric Conductivity in ( ohms / cm). Where the TDS (by summation
method) =k x EC in mg/l. Where K can be only is in the range of 0.55 to 0.8
Note 2 The optimum level of the produced water for pH, calcium hardness and total hardness or
hydrogen bicarbonate contents (HCO
3
) will be according to the water quality specification of the
plants design condition to meet remineralisation requirements and to ensure that non-aggressive
water is produced.
Note 3 Residual chlorine ideal concentration is between 0.2 to 0.5 mg/l. However this may increase to
1.00mg/l or above in situations where the Supplier or Transmitter requests a higher value for the
purpose of controlling possible bacteriological contamination.

Table A.2: Inorgani c Chemicals [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value & units
Aluminium, as Al 0.2 mg/l Ammonia, as NH
4
0.5 mg/l
Chlorides, as Cl 250 mg/l Copper, as Cu 1.0 mg/l
Iron, as Fe 0.2 mg/l Magnesium, as Mg 30 mg/l
Nitrate, as NO
3
50 mg/l Nitrite, as NO
2
3.0 mg/l
Potassium, as K 12 mg/l Phosphorus, as P 2.2 mg/l
Sodium, as Na 150 mg/l Sulphates, as SO
4
250 mg/l
Total organic carbon, as
C
1 mg/l Zinc, as Zn 5 mg/l
Note 4 Normally observed value of TOC in distribution networks is between <1 and 2 mgC/l. Any
increase over these values requires further investigation








HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
Page 69 of 74

Table A.3: Trace Elements [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value & units
Arsenic, as As 10 g/l Barium, as Ba 700 g/l
Boron, as B 2400 g/l Cadmium, as Cd 8 g/l
Chromium, as Cr 50 g/l Fluoride, as F 1500 g/l
Lead, as Pb 10 g/l Manganese, as Mn 400 g/l
Mercury, as Hg 6 g/l Nickel, as Ni 70 g/l
Selenium , as Se 40 g/l Tin, as Sn 20 g/l

Table A.4: Pesticides & Other Organic Chemi cals [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value & units
Aldrin 0.03 g/l Chlordane 0.2 g/l
Cyanide 70 g/l DDT 1 g/l
Dieldrin 0.03 g/l 2,4 dichlorophenoxy
acetic
Acid
30 g/l
Endrine 0.6 g/l Heptachlor 0.03 g/l
Heptachlor epoxide 0.03 g/l Lindane 2 g/l
Methoxychlor 20 g/l Phenols 0.5 g/l
2,4,5 trichlorophenoxy
propionic acid
9 g/l Total pesticides 0.5 g/l
Note 5 Total Pesticides is the sum of all individual pesticides detected and quantified in the monitoring
procedure. Those pesticides can be from the list of individual parameters in the table above or
outside it. Pesticides can be, but not limited to, organic insecticides, herbicides and fungicides.

Table A.5: Organic Chemicals [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value & units
Benzene 10 g/l Benzo(a)pyrene 0.7 g/l
Chlorobenzene 300 g/l 1,2-Dichlorobenzene 1000 g/l
1,4-Dichlorobenzene 300 g/l 1,2 Dichloroethane 30 g/l
1,2-Dichloroethene 50 g/l Dichloromethane 20 g/l
Tetrachloromethane 3 g/l Tetrachloroethene 40 g/l
Trichloroethene 20 g/l Toluene 700 g/l
Vinyl Chloride 0.3 g/l





HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
Page 70 of 74

Table A.6: Microbiological [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value & units
Total coliforms 0 per 100 ml E.coli or thermotolerent
Faecal coliform bacteria

0 per 100 ml
Enterococci 0 per 100 ml Total Bacterial Count
[non-pathogenic]
Not to exceed 100 per
100 ml
Pseudomonas
aeruginosa
0 per 100 ml
Note 6 Immediate action must be taken if either E.coli or Total coliform bacteria are detected.
Note 7 Legionella and Sulphite reducing bacteria testing needs to be conducted randomly in the in the
distribution network as an indicator for detecting possible contamination or observations
associated with taste, odour and colour problems. Target of both should be Zero organisms.
Note 8 Drinking water must be free at all times from algae, mould, parasites, insects and their eggs,
larvae, protozoa including Amebae




Table A.7: Radionucl ides [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value & units
Gross () 0.5 Bq/l Gross () 1 Bq/l
Note 9 Initial screening for gross / or gross activity to determine whether the activity concentrations
are below levels at which no further action is required. If initial screening levels exceed the above
then investigation and monitoring of individual radionuclide should follow immediately.
The limits for the individual radionuclide should be in accordance with guidance level stated in
WHO Water Quality Guidelines [Ref 19].

Table A.8: Disinfection Products & By-Products [Ref. 1 & 19]
Parameter Value & units Parameter Value & units
Bromate 0.01 mg/l Bromoform 0.1 mg/l
Bromodichloromethane
(BDCM)
0.06 mg/l Chlorate 0.7 mg/l
Chlorite 0.7 mg/l Chloroform 0.3 mg/l
Dibromochloromethane
(DBCM)
0.1 mg/l THMs 1 mg/l
Note
10
Water supply must maintain bromide ion concentration to less than 0.05 mg/l and sample
according to the same sampling frequency as Bromate.
Note
11
The sum of detected concentration of Chloroform, Bromodichloromethane (BDCM),
Dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and Bromoform is as calculated using the equation below:
THM =
()
()
+
()
()
+
()
()
+
()
()
1

HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
Page 71 of 74

Appendix 2: Recommended Illumination Levels in Food Areas
Area / Location Illumination
(Lux)*
Area / Location Illumination
(Lux)*
Ablution Block 200 Office Area 500
Bakery 300 Recreation Room 300
Dining Room 300 Stairways (Interior) 150
Exterior Area (Compound) 50 Storage Areas 200
Galley 500 Toilets 200
Hallways 150 Walk In Freezers 100
Kitchens 500 Stairways (Interior) 150
*Measurement taken 1.2 meters above floor



HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
Document No. ADNOC-COPV1-10
Page 72 of 74

Appendix 3: Mandatory Guidelines for Microbiological Quality of Foods
Food
Category

Criterion Microbiological quality
(Colony Forming Units or CFU per gram unl ess stated) [Ref. 20]
Satisfactory Acceptable Unsatisfactory Unacceptable /
potentiall y
hazardous
Aerobic colony count (

) 30C/48h
1 <10
3
10
3
-<5x10
3
>5x10
3
N/A
2 <10
4
10
4
-<5x10
4
>5x10
4
N/A
3 <10
5
10
5
-<5x10
5
5x10
5
N/A
4 <10
6
10
6
-<5 x10
6
5 x10
6
N/A
5 N/A N/A N/A N/A
Indicator organisms (

)
1 5 Enterobacteriaceae

<50 >50 N/A


1 5 E. coli (total) <10 10 N/A
1 5 Listeria spp (total) <1 >1 N/A
Pathogens
1 5 Salmonella spp not detected
in 25g
detected in
25g
1 5 Campylobacter spp not detected
in 25g
detected in
25g
1 5 E. coli O157 & other
VTEC
not detected
in 25g
detected in
25g
1 5 V. cholerae not detected
in 25g
detected in
25g
1 5 V. parahaemolyticus

<20 20-<100 100-<10


3
10
3

1 5 L. monocytogenes <20** 20-<100 N/A 100
1 5 S. aureus <10 10 10
4

1 5 C. perfringens <10 10 10
4

1 5 B. cereus and other
pathogenic Bacillus
spp
#

<10
3
10
3
-<10
4
10
4
-<10
5
10
5

1 5 Yeast and mould <10 10 N/A
Guidelines for aerobic colony counts may not apply to certain fermented foods for example,
salami, soft cheese, and unpasteurized yoghurt. These foods fall into category 5. Acceptability
is based on appearance, smell, texture, and the levels or absence of indicator organisms or
pathogens.
On occasions some strains may be pathogenic
Not applicable to fresh fruit, vegetables and salad vegetables.
Relevant to seafood only.
# If the Bacillus counts exceed 10
4
CFU/g, the organism must be identified.

HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
April 2014
Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
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Food
Category

Criterion Microbiological quality
(Colony Forming Units or CFU per gram unl ess stated) [Ref. 20]
Satisfactory Acceptable Unsatisfactory Unacceptable /
potentiall y
hazardous
** Not detected in 25g for certain long shelf-life products under refrigeration
N/A Not Applicable
The terms used to express the microbiological quality of the ready-to-eat foods are:
Satisfactory - test results indicating good microbiological quality
Acceptabl e - an index reflecting a borderline limit of microbiological quality
Unsatisfactory - test results indicating that further sampling may be necessary and that
environmental health officers may wish to undertake a further inspection of the premises
concerned to determine whether hygiene practices for food production or handling are
adequate or not.
Unacceptable/potentiall y hazardous - test results indicating that urgent attention is needed to
locate the source of the problem; a detailed risk assessment is recommended.

Food
group
Product Category Food
group
Product Category
Meat Beef burgers 1 Seafood Taramasalata 4
Kebabs 2 Smoked fish 4
meat meals
(shepherds/cottage pie,
casseroles)
2 Other fish (cooked) 3
meat pies (steak and
kidney, pasty)
1 Seafood meals 3
meat, sliced (cooked
tongue)
4 Molluscs and other shellfish
(cooked)
4
meat, sliced (beef, poultry) 3 Herring/roll mop and other
raw pickled fish
1
poultry (unsliced) 2 Crustaceans (crab, lobster,
prawns)
3
Sausages 2 Dessert Cakes, pastries, slices, and
desserts - with dairy cream
1
Sausages (smoked) 5 Cakes, pastries, slices, and
desserts - without dairy
cream
1
Cheesecake 5
Vegetable Coleslaw 1 Mousse/dessert 1
Fruit and vegetables (dried) 3 Tarts, flans, and pies 1
Fruit and vegetables (fresh) 1 Trifle 2
Prepared mixed salads and
crudits
2 Dairy Cheese 5

HSE Management Manual of Codes of Practice &TGN
Volume 1: HSE Admini stration & Management
Version 2,
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Code of Practice on Food & Water Safety & Welfare
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Food
group
Product Category Food
group
Product Category
Rice 2 Ice cream, milk shakes
(non-dairy)
1
Vegetables and vegetable
meals (cooked)
2 Ice lollies, slush, and sorbet 1
Savoury


Bean curd 5 Yoghurt/frozen yoghurt
(natural)
5
Bhaji (onion, spinach,
vegetable)
1 Ready-to-
eat meals
Pasta/pizza 2
Cheese-based bakery
products
2 Meals (other) 2
Fermented foods 5 Sandwiches
and filled
rolls
With salad 1
Flan/quiche 2 Without salad 2
Homous, tzatziki, and other
dips
2 With cheese 5
Mayonnaise/dressings 1
Pat (meat, seafood, or
vegetable)
2
Samosa 2
Satay 2
Spring rolls 2