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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Student Teachers Name:

Brianna Leinon

Date: September 24, 2014


Lesson Title:

What is Congress?

Subject:

Government

Instruction time: 47 minutes


Students level by grade: Sophomores
Standard(s) to be addressed:
SS.912.PSCL.3-Essential Concept and/or Skill: Understand the purpose and function of each of the
three branches of government established by the Constitution.
Learning Objectives for this lesson:
Students will compare and contrast various perspectives regarding the creation of the United States
Congress.
Students will discuss what the best solution is in creating a fair congress.
Identified student needs and plans for differentiation:
a. Worksheets that are more prompted or filled out
b. Brackets around certain parts of the reading
Specific resources needed for this lesson:
a.
b.
c.
d.

Copies of reading
Copies of Worksheet
PowerPoint outlining main points
Projector on white board (able to outline main points)

Lesson Sequence:
Opening:
Story with a Hole (5 min)
a. Students will be read a story from one of the books entitled Story With A Hole.
b. Students will then be given the opportunity to ask yes and no questions in order to figure out how the story
makes sense. Once they have arrived at the conclusion the answer from the book will be read.

Lesson:
1. OpeningActivityPlanningHomecomingAssembly
a. HavestudentswriteonethingdownthatwouldmakeaperfectHCassembly
b. Allowstudentstogetinagrouponbothsidesoftheroom,creatingtwogroups.Assign
onepersonfromeachgrouptotakechargeandconstructonefinallist.(5min)
i. Groupswilldiscusswhattheperfectassemblywouldlooklike.

ii. Groupswillputtheirlistonthefrontboardforeveryonesviewing.
c. Discussion: Lets Compromise and make one assembly
i. As a large group (both groups together) create one final list through compromise.
1. Read each list on the board to the class.
2. Explain that students will need to decide on only five things for their
assembly and that is all they are allowed. This will include the host, two
main events, food, and one miscellaneous item that they feel is
absolutely necessary for the perfect pep assembly.
Transition: Ask students why they think they did the opening activity. Once they throw some ideas out,
direct them to the fact that they were trying to compromise.

2. What Is Compromise?
a. Ask students what they believe compromise is. Have a brief discussion on how to define
compromise.
b. Define compromise together and write definition on the board.
c. Brief question to ask the class: Why is compromise necessary?
i. Once a few answers have been acquired, move on to reading.

3. Reading -What was the Great Compromise? (10 min)


Students will read this silently while pulling main points from the text so that they may add
opinions later.

4. Pulling the Information- What do we need to pull from this? (10-15 min)
Ask each question to the students. Allow them to explain what they understood from the reading,
correct any errors, and then go into detail about each topic.
a. What was the Virginia Plan?
b. What was the New Jersey Plan?
c. What did they do to make this compromise?
d. With this compromise, what was decided about each part of the congress?
i. Federalist Paper #62

5. Exit Slip- If one of the State plans (Virginia or Rhode Island) had been chosen, which do you
think would have been more effective in making a productive and functioning congress?
a. Collect these before students leave the room.

WhatisCongress?
TheProposal
VirginiaPlan

NewJerseyPlan

TheSolution
Who?
What?
Why?
Thisisknownas______________________________________________.
OurGovernmentToday
Houseof
Representatives
Howmany
representativesperstate?
Howmany
representativestotal?
Qualifications

Senate

TheGreatCompromiseof1787
ByRobertLongley
PerhapsthegreatestdebateundertakenbythedelegatestotheConstitutionalConvention
in1787centeredonhowmanyrepresentativeseachstateshouldhaveinthenewgovernment's
lawmakingbranch,theU.S.Congress.Asisoftenthecaseingovernmentandpolitics,
resolvingagreatdebate,requiredagreatcompromise.Inthiscase,theGreatCompromiseof
1787.EarlyintheConstitutionalConvention,delegatesenvisionedaCongressconsistingof
onlyasinglechamberwithacertainnumberofrepresentativesfromeachstate.Theburning
questionwas,howmanyrepresentativesfromeachstate?Delegatesfromthelarger,more
populousstatesfavoredtheVirginiaPlan,whichcalledforeachstatetohaveadifferentnumber
ofrepresentativesbasedonthestatespopulation.Delegatesfromsmallerstatessupportedthe
NewJerseyplan,underwhicheachstatewouldsendthesamenumberofrepresentativesto
Congress.
ConnecticutdelegateRogerShermaniscreditedwithproposingthealternativeofa
"bicameral,"ortwochamberedCongress,madeupofaSenateandaHouseofRepresentatives.
Eachstate,suggestedSherman,wouldsendanequalnumberofrepresentativestotheSenate,
andonerepresentativetotheHouseforeach30,000residentsofthestate.
Atthetime,allthestatesexceptPennsylvaniahadbicamerallegislatures,sothedelegates
werefamiliarwiththestructureofCongressproposedbySherman.
Shermansplanpleaseddelegatesfromboththelargeandsmallstatesandbecameknown
astheConnecticutCompromiseof1787,ortheGreatCompromise.
ThestructureandpowersofthenewU.S.Congress,asproposedbythedelegatesofthe
ConstitutionalConvention,wereexplainedtothepeoplebyAlexanderHamiltonandJames
MadisonintheFederalistPapers5266.
Today,twoSenatorsandavariablenumberofmembersoftheHouseofRepresentativesbased
onthestatespopulationasreportedinthemostrecentdecennialcensusrepresenteachstatein
Congress.TheprocessoffairlydeterminingthenumberofmembersoftheHousefromeach
stateiscalled"apportionment."
Thefirstcensusin1790counted4millionAmericans.Basedonthatcount,thetotalnumberof
memberselectedtotheHouseofRepresentativesgrewfromtheoriginal65to106.Thecurrent
Housemembershipof435wassetbyCongressin1911.