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603
F53
I
VERYTHINGfor
canners
<5k.
t
A
^bushed by
£. D. FISHER, FRANKLINVILLE, N. Y.
HE
COMBINATION GfIS ITIHCHINE.
(sr~
THE BEST INDEPENDENT LIGHTING FOR FACTORIES, MILLS, CHURCHES, THEATRES, HOTELS, STORES, DWELLINGS, ETC.
CI
FACTORY OF THE GEUPER & PyCSCHKE MANUFACTURING CO.. MILWAUKEE,
USING A SOO-LIQHT COMBINATION GAS MACHINE FUEL GENERATOR.
We mention a few of the large manufacturing
concerns whose establishments are lighted by
the Combination Gas Machine:
Detroit Stove Works, Detroit, Mich.
Druid Mills Manufacturing Co., Baltimore, Md.
Flint &|Walling Manfg. Co., Kendalivllle, Ind.
Jas. Ostrander & Sons, Troy, N. Y.
Dayton Manufacturing Co.," Dayton, O.
Cleveland Rolling Mill, Cleveland, O.
DeWitt Wire Cloth Co., New York City.
Streetsville Woolen Co., Streetsvllle, Out.
P. Cox Shoe Co., Rochester, N. Y.
Whittaker Engine & Skein Co., Kenosha, Wis.
We also make Gas Machines especially adapted for use in the Mechanical Arts, for
brazing, soldering, etc This is of special interest to Can Makers, Canning Establishments,
Watch-Case Manufacturers, and wherever Fuel Gas is useful. For such work we can pro-
duce Fuel Gas at 40 cents per thousand cubic feet. We manufacture also the Bolton I lor
Water HEATER. Send for illustrated books, "Warmth for Winter Homes," and "Light
for Evening Hours."
DETROIT HEATING AND LIGHTING CO.,
Chicago, 88 Lake St.; St. Louis, 508 X. 4th St
Boston, 42 Pearl St.; Dallas, Texas.
311 WIGHT ST., DETROIT, MICH
OPRINGFIELD
*
GENERATORS,
FOR MANUFACTURING FUEL CIS,
As shown in the illustration herewith,
are of capacity ranging from two barrels
to forty. They are made of galvanized
iron, or of Bessemer Steel. Every scum
is heavily riveted and soldered. They are
compound Generators ; the multiplicity of
the evaporating pans furnishes a powerful
instrument, permitting the use of gasolene
of lower gravity and less cost than any
Gas Generator in the world. In Fuel Gsw
operations, where the work is sustained
all day, this quality is essential to success
and to economy. These Generators will
turnish from 500 cubic feet up to 20,000
cubic feet of gas per day. Pressure is
furnished to them by our Air Pumps,
operated by either weight or Water Wheel
;
or, where there is shafting, a Sturtevant
Blower, may be used. Blowers, counter-
shafts, pulleys, furnaces for heating solder-
ing irons, fire arresters, automatic check
valves, special burners, and all appliances
for use with Fuel Gas, constantly on hand.
GilDert &Barter jnig. Do.
90 JOHN ST., NEW YORK.
KIRWAN
&
TYLER,
1409 EASTERN
AVENUE,
BALTIMORK,
Md.
^fc.
Oyster, fruit
and
Vegetable
\\}^±l
-,.
.
*~^
<
S)m
V
*fti«f « tull line of all the latest and
most
improved
Machinery
used
in the Canning
Business.
cases,
c
SOLDER,
Correspondence
Solicited and all Inquiries
Promptly
Answered.
KIRWAN & TYLER'S
PERFECTION
*
SOLDERING
FLUID.
The Best Soldering Fluid in the Market for Tinners' use.
Is rapidly taking the place of Muri-
atic Acid, among its many good features
being
1. Economy in cost.
2. Great saving of labor in preparing
(as with acid) being all ready for
use.
3. Saving in solder and other material.
4. Causes solder to flow freely.
5. No unpleasant or injurious fumes
in factory, as in use of acid.
6. Non-poisonous.
1 quart package,
2
" "
$3.00 per dozen
6.00
1 gallon
2
"
3
"
5
"
10
"
20
"
30
"
50
"
10.00
'
20.00
'
30.00
'
45.00
<
90.00
'
165.00
<
230.00
'
350.00
'
Delivered F. O. B.
WE MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF
Bar, Drop, Wire Segment and Coil Solder.
If you want a good article send your orders to
KIRW0N
& TYLER, 1409 Eastern five., Baltimore,
JIM.
c
SOLDER
J
WE HAVE BETTER FACILITIES THAN ANY OTHER HOUSE IN THE WEST
FOR SUPPLYING CANNING COMPANIES WITH
J
SOLDER
&
BAR,
TRIANGULAR,
DROP.
c
WIRE,
SEGMENT,
TAPE,
9
Bolt and Bar Copper for Soldering Irons.
WE REFER TO MOST OF THE LARGE CANNING COMPANIES AS TO
THE SATISFACTORY PRICE, QUALITY AND RESULTS OF OUR SOLDER
AND SOLICIT ORDERS FROM THOSE WANTING HONEST GOODS.
ifi \£m
LATCHFORD & HO.,
Costs Less Than Twelve Cents
Per Gallon.
Costs Only About One Cent
Per Pound.
PERFECTION
SOLDERING FLUX.
INDISPENSABLE FOR CAPPING CANS.
Better and Cheaper than acid or rosin. Free from the poisonous fumes of acid. Will not injure the
health of the cappers who use it. Contains no free acids of any kind, hence does not discolor cans.
Free from all trie Objections that
apply to Muriatic Acid..
Costs, when Diluted, ready for use,
only about one cent per pound.
It is put up in concentrated liquid form, and must be diluted with water before using. About two
parts water to one part flux is the proper proportion for general purposes. In convenient form, always
ready for use. Saves time, trouble, solder, money. The best and cheapest preparation on the market.
Unequalled for cleaning soldering irons ; does not take off the tin. Send for sample ;
it will pay you.
Samples free by mail.
Baltimore, JMd.
Ave
you ifsinj
A PAIL
WrflCH LOOKS LIRE this if it
STANDS OVER A SEASON?
DO
NOT
CONTINUE
TO USE THESE, BUT
^Investigate the
Merits
sf
This
Pail.*
There
are
many
other
Goods in
this
Ware
yon can
use
to
advantage.
Write for
Catalogue to
GORDLEY
I
HAYES,
SOLE
AGENTS,
173 and 175 Duano
Street,
NEW
YORK.
We Might Give You Names
.
••
• •
OF A LARGE NUMBER OF PACKERS WHO ARE
USING OUR WARE. WE ADD A FEW LETTERS
RECEIVED FROM SOME WHO HAVE HAD THEM
THE LONGEST IN USE.
Richardson & Bobbins.
Dover, Del., July 30, 1888.
After six months' use they seem to be as
good as when we commenced using them. Some
of them we used to put boiling lard in and the lard
stood in them until cold, but it did not affect the
pail any more than so much cold water.
Richardson & Robbins.
Dover, Del., August 20, 1890.
We still adhere to our opinion of your goods
as expressed to you in July, 71
Winslow Packing Co.
Portland, Me., August 9, 1888.
The pails are certainly superior to any we
have ever tried.
Winslow Packing Co.
Portland, Me., August 22, 1890.
I can only repeat the recommendation which
I have once before given in behalf of the Winslow
Packing Co., namely : that I rind vour wares ex-
ceedingly satisfactory. C. P. MATTOCK, Pres.
Oneida Community, (Limited.)
Community, N. Y. June 23, 1888.
Last season we bought some of your wash
tubs, and alter one season of hard service in our
canning business we find them practically as good
as new.
Oneida Community, (Limited.)
Kenwood, Madison Co., N.Y., Aug. 20, 1890.
Our three years' use of your Indurated Ware
only confirms our good opinion of its lasting qual-
ities. We consider it altogether the best and
cheapest ware we have ever used. Our tubs are
now, after three years' service, practically as good
as new.
Gordon & Dilworth, Table Delicacies.
New York, Aug. 18, 1890.
Replying to yours of the 16th, we are very
happy to be able to confirm our past expressions
in favor of your Indurated Fibre Wares. They
are continuing to give eminent satisfaction, which
is demonstrated by our continuous use of them.
_J
Established 1871.
Incorporated 1887.
G
~)
niIHQGRAPHlC_CO.

*

5
WE MAKE A
SPECIALTY OF
FURNISHING
FINE
LITHOGRAPHED
GLOSS
LABELS
FORCANNERS ___

OUR
FACILITIES
ARE OVER 1,000,000
LA-
BELS PER DAY
WRITE FOR
ESTIMATES
BEFORE
ORDER-
ING
ELSEWHERE.

*
Capital $120,000
STECHER
LITHOGRAPHIC
CO.
ROCHESTER,
N. Y.
DANIEL
G. TRENCH I CO.,
CHICAGO, ILL.
BROKERS
CANS,
CANNED GOODS
TIN PLATE METALS,
AND CANNING FACTORY SUPPLIES OR
ALL KINDS.
We do a strictly brokerage business, carrying no financial interests whatever in the goods we handle
;
our only interest, therefore, is to give our patrons, the packers every advantage the market offers, both
in executing then orders for Supplies and in marketing their Canned Goods. Special attention given to
sale of all Canned Goods put before us from any district. Prompt and complete reports given on all
goods offered us. We coverall large markets west of Pittsburgh through a chain of able representatives.
If You Mai<e
Tomato
Catsup or Fruit
Butter This is Just What You Want.
HFsletrTlulputitiing
macfrine.
*
J
_—---/
THE
]\[o.
2
JVEacIjiiie-s*-
Will make a barrel of Tomato
Tulp in
about Hve Minutes.
You cannot af-
ford to be without it. It also works
well for
FRUIT BUTTER AND PUMPKIN.
This machine has two rollers and two brushes, revolv-
ing over a sieve of suitable mesh for the work, the rollers
crushing the hard substances, and the brushes sweeping
the material through the sieve to drawer below I he
refuse is disposed of by simply raising the tail gate
when the revolving brushes throw it out For general
cleaning the top can be raised as shown in the cut. 1
he
machines are now in use by most all the leading
canning
houses, and are indispensable
to the economical
work-
ing of any
establishment in that line of business.
i
5
Manufacturers
an' 1 Builders of
ALL KINDS OF PASSENGER
AND FREIGHT
ELEVATORS.
OFFICE AND WORKS,
FianUord
Avenue,
Wildey and
Shackamaxou
Streets,
PHILADELPHIA.
OFFICES-108
Liberty St, New
York; 33
Lincoln St, Boston.
IMPROVED PATTERN FOR 1891.
230-g
uopiM^isnNr & maurer's
—*
STANDARD
*~-
Thermometrig
Steam Gauge.
A COMBINATION THERMOMETER AND STEAM GAUGE.
Adapted to every variety of Steam Process Kettle, Retort or Chest. As an Accurate,
Uniform and Durable Indicator of Steam Temperature and Pressure it far Sur-
passes any Spring or Mercury Gauge, or any style or make of
Thermometer extant.
Endorsed by the Leading Canners and Packers of the World.
No spoiled goods by its use. Sent on thirty days' trial to any responsible packer.
Improved Pattern for 1891 is constructed of Non-corrosive, Bronze Metal and is a very
superior instrument. Made in straight or angle shapes.
HOHMANN & MAURER'S CANNERS' SPECIALTIES.
Special 3 1-2 inch, half circle, 30 lb. spring gauges.
Special 10 in. sensitive Pyromiter spring gauges.
Bristol's self-recording steam sauces.
Mercury bath testing thermometer and all other thermom-
eters, gauges, fittings and appliances used in connection with canning.
HMAKTTNT dh 3VE J±TJ IE*. DE3
Plymouth and Joy Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y.
9
U S. A.
CHAS.
N.
HALEY,
BROKERAGE
AND
COMMISSION
OMAHA,
NEB
Morflt'a
Cypher Cotle.
Armsby's
"
"
S:i\\ lit-ll
U.S.
CANNED
GOODS
AND
DRIED
FRUITS
A
SPECIALTY.
If you arc not
represented
satisfactorily
in this
market, I
should like to handle your
goods to the
jobbing
trade.
I
make
special
effort on Canned Goods,
Heavy
Groceries
and
Dried
Fruits, and should be pleased to have
your
samples
and prices in car lots.
Omaha used two
hundred
and fifty
to three
hundred
carloads of
Tomatoes
during
the
past sea-
son and other
goods in
proportion,
and caters
to a rapidly
increasing
trade in the far west.
Let me hear from
you with
samples
and prices and slate
commission
you pay.
Your
correspondence
will have prompt
attention.
REFERENCES
Omalia National Bank, Omaha.
Arbuckle Coffee Co., New ^ orK.
Martin Wagner Co.,
Baltimore.
Any Wholesale House in Omaha
and Council Bluffs.
Omaha is one of
the best distributary
points in the
U.S. for
Standard and Fine Hoods.
THOMAS L BUNTING.
A BOOK OF REFERENCE.
EVERYTHING FOR GANNERS
DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF
CANNERS AND PACKERS.
-)
FRANKL1NVILLE, N. Y.
PUBLISHED BY E. D. FISHER.
1891
( ^fc »
COPYRIGHTED
1891.
PRESS OF"
CHAS.
A.
PERLEY,
FRANKLINVILLE, N. Y.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
A HISTOEY.
By E. D. FISHER.
T\J
1 810 a work was written in France by
J
*"
M. Appert in regard to the canning of
hermetically sealed goods and was pub-
lished by authority of the French govern-
ment. Successful experiments had been
made before but we owe to Appert the clear
exposition of the principles that underlie
the processes of the art. His experiments
which were made with fish, meats, fruits
and vegetables, were of a most elaborate
character. He used glass exclusively, as
a metal package at that time apparently
had not been thought of. Appert's expe-
riments covered a period of ten years,
and so exact and clear were his methods that he
may well be called the father of the canned
goods industry.
Thomas Kensett was undoubtedly the first
to pack hermetically sealed goods in the United
States, as he was packing canned goods in New
York City as early as 1819. Messrs. T. H. and
J. Kensett, of Baltimore, Md., have in their pos-
session an oyster label used by him bearing date
1822.
In 1825 Thomas Kensett and Ezra Daggett
obtained a patent from the United States Gov-
ernment on an improvement in the art of pre-
serving. This patent bears the autograph sig-
nature of the then President of the United States,
James Monroe; of the Secretary of State, John
Quincy Adams, and the Attorney- General, Wil-
liam Wirt.
In 1832, Philip Jones, a native of Massa-
chusetts, is mentioned as having put up fruit by
a particular process. It is not known just what
this process was, but it is believed to have been
the same as that employed by Appert.
We learn of the catching and preserving of fish
in 1835, and, although we do not find by what
process they were preserved, we believe it was by
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles for Catsups, and Preserves. Jars of all Kinds.
EVERYTHING
FOR
CANNERS.
the use of brine, as at
present. At various per-
iods up to 1840, the art of preserving in hermet-
ically
sealed
packages is
mentioned,
but it was
far from being
general,
being known to only a
few.
Tr
In that
year, 1840, the old house of Kemp,
Day & Co ,
now at 116 Wall Street, New York
City was
established.
From
1840 to 1850
much
progress was made in the art.
During that per-
iod many
embarked
in the
business. In 1847
Harrison
W. Crosby, of
Jamesburg, N. J., com-
menced
packing
tomatoes,
called by
Appert,
"love-apples."
In the year 1848 Mr. Crosby
sent a box
containing
six cans of
tomatoes to
Queen
Victoria and to the
President of the United
States,
both of
whom
acknowledged
their
receipt.
William
Underwood,
founder ot the house of
Underwood
& Co.,
Boston,
Mass.,
was also en-
gaged in packing
tomatoes at
this time. As
early as 1835 he
imported
tomato
seed in order
to grow
tomatoes
for catsup.
Isaac Winslow,
of
Portland, Me., is supposed to have been the
first to pack sugar corn in hermetically
sealed
cans for sale. His first
experiments
were made
in about the year 1842, and in 1 863 he
obtained
letters patent of the United
States for his inven-
tion.
He was the uncle of the
well-known
John
Winslow Jones, who will be
remembered
from the
celebrated
Jones-McMurray
suit, when Mr. Jones
sued Louis
McMurray of
Maryland in 1874,
for
an
infringement
of the Winslow
patents referred
to. Mr.
McMurray
established
and operated at
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles for C
FrederickaCity.Md.,
(of Barbara Freitcha fame)
the largest corn
canning factory in the world.
Its present
capacity is 250,000 cans per day.
The years
following
1850 witnessed a very ra-
pid increase
in the
business, and the trade showed
a healthy
development.
Maryland soon came
to the front as the
recognized
leader and centre
of this
growing
industry,
with Maine, New York
and New Jersey
following.
At the present time the canning
'industry has
grown to
immense
proportions,
numbering
about 2,000
factories in operation
scattered
over this broad
domain from New Foundland to
California
and from
Florida to Alaska.
These
factories
give
employment to 1,000,000
persons
during
the
canning
season; they use the raw
material,
fruits,
vegetables,
etc.,
produced on
1 500 000 acres of land, thus
furnishing a home
market
for the
products of 30,000
farms,
giving
employment
to a vast number of farm
laborers,
and
bringing
in to the farmers
$20,000,000
an-
nually for their
produce.
They
transform
this
raw
material into
600,000,000
cans of food worth
*
#25,000,000
in first hands.
Our
salmon
and other fish canning
industries
employ
3,000
vessels and 48,000
fishermen, while
those
directly
and indirectly
interested
amount
to
nearly
300,000.
The yearly output of fish
aloneis
100.000,000
cans valued at $15,000,000.
The
factories
engaged in canning fish are located
principally
on the rivers and inlets of California,
Oregon,
Washington,
Alaska, and
British Col-
umbia.
Then comes
Maine, New
Brunswick and
atsups,
and Preserves.
Jars of all Kinds.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
Nova Scotia, with their pack of mackerel, lob-
sters, and herring sardines.
But few fish are packed outside of these places
except on the gulf coast of Florida, Alabama
and Mississippi, where this important industry
is just springing up and rapidly developing,
i The oyster canning industry which has al-
ready attained gigantic proportions, is still
growing. There are engaged in it, 2,000 vessels
employing 20,000 hands, while the whole num-
ber of persons directly and indirectly concerned
will reach nearly 250,000. The annual output
of oysters is 75,000,000 cans valued at $8,000,-
ooo'
Then comes the immense and still growing
meat industry, the center of which is Chicago
.
Beef, mutton, poultry, tongue, etc., are packed
and shipped to almost every part of the globe.
The output of this class of goods in 1889 was
worth $22,000,000.
When we take into consideration the number
of minor products that find their way to mar-
kets in hermetically sealed packages and add to
them the above products, we are able to form
some idea of the magnitude of the business.
It is estimated that 350 varieties of fruits,
vegetables, fish and meats are packed during a
single season. Neither is the business confined
to the more wealthy or thickly settled parts of
the country. Those portions which were but a
few years ago considered frontier territories, are
adding their quota to the business. Texas, Kan-
sas, Nebraska, Colorado, Dakota and Utah are
coming forward as large producers of canned
goods, and those, too, of a high grade.
Change of methods have also kept pace with
the growth of the business. While first princi-
ples have remained the same, the minutia of the
business—the laborious processes—have wonder-
fully changed. As an instance, corn wasformerly
cut from the cob by hand, and filled into the can
with a small quantity of liquor. After this the
can was closed with a straight (or tinner's)
copper and given a bath of forty or fifty minutes
in boiling water. It was then opened by prick-
ing the can and allowing the heated air and va-
por to escape; then closed and subjected to a
bath in boiling water for six hours. This method
has given place to the continuous cutters which
takes a stream of ears of corn, faster than one
can follow with the eye. The cut corn is taken
by carriers to the automatic hot fillers, which
takes the cans from the shute, fills with syrup
and corn and delivers to the power cappers.
After this a bath of one hour in an iron retort
completes the process. The former bath was a
pan set over an arch; the latter a large strong
cylinder like a steam boiler. By the former
method one or two acres of corn were considered
a large pack. Now a factory thinks 1,000 or
even 2,000 acres in a single season, nothing very
remarkable.
The pea huller is another result of the invent-
ive genius that has come to the aid of the packer.
In one factory during the past season 1,700
bushels of peas (pods) were shelled by a single
Buy your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
machine of this kind in fourteen hours' work.
We scarcely cease wondering at this before an-
other machine called a
"
viner," advances a step
further and takes the peas from the vine, picks
and shells at the same operation. By the aid of
this machine a factory easily handles 1,000 to
2,000 acres of peas, while 50 to 100 were all that
could be safely undertaken by the old method.
Perhaps greater advances have been made in
the mode of manufacturing cans. In the early
stages of the business the operations were all
performed "by hand" and were of necessity
very slow and expensive.
Now one piece of machinery cuts a whole sheet
of tin into the ends for the cans; revolving shears
cut another sheet into the parts used for the
sides of the cans called "bodies." Another takes
the bodies, forms and locks, and passes them
through the solder. A single operation of a
most complicated and ingenious machine puts
on both ends and delivers it for the final solder-
ing, when the cans are rolled into cars for ship-
ment, tested aud counted at the rate of 100,000
to 250,000 cans per day.
Many important industries have grown out of
the needs of the canners. Machinery is required,
and many new and ingenious devices have been
brought out to meet the demand. Cans, cases
and labels have been required in almost endless
quantities. The carrying trade has been taxed
to transport both supplies and finished goods.
Only a short time ago a solid train composed of
twenty-four cars of canned corn was shipped by
the Hoopestown, (111.) Canning Co., to San
Francisco. About the same time one of fourteen
cars of canned gallon apples was sent by the
Erie Co. from Buffalo, N. Y. to Pittsburg, Pa.
The future of the business?
Everything points to a large increase in the
number of factories and volume of business. The
business, we believe, has passed safely through
the critical period that always comes to a new
industry, and has settled on a firm basis. The
demand for this class of goods has fully kept
pace with the growth of the business. Weexpect
the decade upon which we have just entered will
see a greater advance in business and methods
than has ever before been known.
S-
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
FRUIT
EVAPORATING INDUSTRY.
By MICHAEL DOYLE.
Up
OCHESTER (N. Y.,) is the recognized center
of the evaporated and dried fruit in-
dustry of the United States, which during
recent years has assumed very large proportions,
the goods being shipped in large quantities to
all the leading markets of the world. No finer
fruit is produced on this Continent than is grown
in the territory embraced under the name of
Western New York, comprising some twelve of
the most fertile and richest counties of the Em-
pire State. The cultivation of fruit, especially
apples, has superseded all other agricultural
products, and has proved more remunerative to
the grower than any other product. The
orchards of the farming community are the chief
sources of their wealth, and the industry is prose-
cuted with unabated vigor, largely aided by the
experience, skill and resources of the great nur-
series of Rochester, famed throughout the world.
Whether due to this proximity, to the favorable
climate and soil, or to the superior and skillful
cultivation of the orchardists, one thing is cer-
tain—that the apples of Western New York are
sought with avidity and bring relatively higher
prices than those grown elsewhere. The success
and magnitude of the evaporating industry is
due largely to the fine quality of the fruit, easily
and cheaply procurable in abundant quantities,
and also to the enterprise of the producers in
adapting new and improved evaporators and
machinery in place of the crude processes in
vogue years ago, producing thereby a quality of
fruit fully as good as though it were in the fresh
or matured state. Thousands of tons of apples
are thus prepared every season from a grade of
fruit heretofore wasted and allowed to rot on the
ground, and which now forms a source of revenue
to the grower. It is in the utilization of these
waste products that the desiccation of fruit be-
comes a valuable and indispensable adjunct to
every fruit grower, and the business may be con-
sidered as yet in its infancy.
Within a radius of forty miles of Rochester
there are more than fifteen hundred evaporators,
ranging in capacity from the small farm-house
dryer of twenty-five bushels per day to the large
steam evaporators drying 800 to 1,000 bushels
of apples each twenty-four hours. These evapo-
rators give employment during the autumn and
early winter months to at least 30,000 hands,
Bu7 Your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
who average from
f
5 to $12 a week, according
to experience and usefulness. New factories are
erected every season, proving that the business
is profitable when properly and economically
conducted. Constant care and scrupulous clean-
liness are the first elements of success in evapo-
rating good fruit. The production during the
past season (1888) may well be considered the
largest since the inception of the business some
fifteen years ago. A careful estimate places the
total quantity at about 30,000,000 pounds,
worth at first cost some $2,000,000. To pro-
duce this quantity of evaporated apples it re-
quired 5,000,000 bushels of apples, 15,000 tons
of anthracite coal, and the constant attendance
night and day of an army of men, women and
children, numbering from 25,000 to 30,000. The
water eliminated in the process of evaporation
amounted to 225,000 tons, reducing the fruit to
about one-eighth of its original weight in the
green state, each one hundred pounds yielding,
when properly evaporated, twelve pounds on an
average. The fruit is usually packed in cases of
two cubic feet measurement, holding fifty pounds
net, or the product of say eight and a half bushels
of green apples, and in this concentrated com-
pressed form is shipped all over the world. The
advantages in freight alone will be apparent from
a comparison of the cost of shipping one case to
Liverpool, England, which at existing freight
rates will cost a little less than thirty cents,
while in the green or fresh state in barrels the
canned state almost $2.10, without considering
the deterioration of the green fruit and the
dangers of fermentation to the canned article,
the apples in the evaporated state being trans-
ported without any danger of deterioration or
decay. The refuse of the apples, such as the par-
ings and cores, are dried, and form the base of
all the cheap jellies manufactured at present.
The quantity thus produced last season will
aggregate some 12,000,000 pounds, so that not
a particle of the fruit is wasted
.
The principal consuming countries abroad are
Germany, England, Belgium, Holland and
France, in which the new product has entirely
displaced the old-fashioned sun-dried fruit. There
were shipped alone to France during 1887, 1 8,-
000 barrels of a quality known as chopped or
sliced apples, dried without being either pared or
cored, and used chiefly for the production of
cider, cheap wines, and distillation when the
vineyards of France suffer from the phylloxera.
Some 4,000,000 pounds were exported during
the season, of which more than one-half was
shipped from Rochester. New York State evapo-
rated fruits have secured a very favorable repu-
tation and strong foothold abroad, and can be
had in almost every town or city of importance
on the European continent. The goods are also
taken in considerable and increasing quantities
by the West African and Australasian trade
every season, and with the popularity and grow-
ing demand at home, the success of the business
is more than assured.
same quantity would cost $2.25, and in the
Buy Your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
DEVELOPMENT OE THE TIN CAN.
ByR. tynes smith,
OF THE R. TYNES SMITH CAN CO., DALTIMORE, MD.
A paper read before the Western Packers Canned Goods Association at Indianapolis, Indiana,
February, 1890. By permission.
Y personal knowledge of tin cans dates
back only to 1857, and I am indebted to
various sources for information of the
times previous to that date. Of the persons who
have assisted me in this way, I must mention
Mr. Henry Evans, Jr., and Messrs. T. H. and J.
R.Kensett. Mr. Evans was a practical can -maker
in 1847 and has contributed largely to them any
improvements in methods of manufacturing
since then. The Messrs. Kensett are grandsons
of the Thomas Kensett, who was undoubtedly
the first man to pack hermetically sealed goods
in the United States. The Messrs. Kensett have
several interesting mementoes of their grand-
father and his business, among them being one
of his oyster labels with thedateof packing, viz:
"February, 1822." This label has directions
for opening the "case" containing the ousters,
and the language is such as to clearly indicate
that this "case" was a, tin can. They also have
a patent granted to p]zra Daggett and Thomas
Kensett in 1825 for an improvement in the art
of preserving, etc. This patent bears the auto-
graph signatures of the then president of the
United States, James Monroe; of the secretary of
state, John Quincy Adams, and the attorney
general, William Wirt. In the specifications in
this patent "vessels of tin plate" are mentioned,
but are not claimed as being novel. Thomas
Kensett came to the United States from England
in the early part of the century, the exact date is
not known, but he was packing canned goods in
New York as early as 1819, for in that year he
entered into partnership with his father-in-law,
Ezra Daggett, with a view
7
of enlarging his
business.
We find then Thomas Kensett using tin cans
for hermetically sealed goods as early as 1819
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles for Catsups, and Preserves. Jars of all Kinds.
to
EVERYTHING
FOR
CANNERS
and certainly
laying no claim to them as a new
article of
manufacture,
although
securing a pat-
ent for an
improvement
in the art of preserving.
I assume
from this that
Kensett
learned the use
of tin cans where he learned the art of preserving,
viz: in England,
before he
emigrated
to this
country.
Appert, the
inventor of the art of
preserving
food by
hermetical
sealing, did not use tin cans.
In his
description
of his processes,
written in 1810
and
published by
authority of the French
govern-
ment, he says: "I chose glass as being the mat-
ter most
impenetrable by air, and have not ven-
tured to
experiment
with a vessel made of any
other
substance."
Peter Dnrand took out a patent in
England in
1810,
which he frankly
states is for "an inven-
tion
communicated
to me by a
foreigner,"
and
the
phraseology
of the description
in Durand s
patent is so nearly
identical with
Appert s own
language
as to leave no doubt that the latter is
the
foreigner
referred to by Durand. But Durand
ventured a step
further than
Appert, for in his
patent he covered
"vessels made of glass, pot-
tery, tin or other metals or fit
materials."
Here,
then', we have the first mention of the tin can in
connection
with
hermetically
sealed food. So
that
while to Appert is due the credit of invent-
ing an art
which, it is not too much to say,
has
proved of
incalculable
advantage
to human
health and
comfort, to Durand is due the credit
of first using that
material for packages,
which
of all others
enables the
magnificent
invention of
Appert to be most
generally
availed of. It would
be quite
impracticable to
transport
glass or pot-
tery
packages to many
points to which tin car-
ries fresh food so
desirable, and even necessary,
for the
health and
convenience of the people.
The
greater
cost of the frailer
materials would
take°this
class of food out of reach of a large
proportion of those who are now able to use tin
goods
freely.
Further, it would be
impossible
for our
packing
houses to
produce the
quantities
of goods they now do, the glass and
pottery
requiring so much
more care in handling that all
the
processes of
manufacture
are necessarily
much
slower
than
with tin cans.
We see, then, that
to the tin can is due no small share of the extra-
ordinary
growth aud spread of this compara-
tively new
industry.
Just how the first cans were made I have been
unable to
ascertain.
Some of the earlier ones
had tops and bottoms,
with edges overlapping
the ends of the body, but without the anular
oroove or crease for the solder, as in the more
modern styles;
others had the tops and bottoms
set into the ends of the
bodies, a recess or swage
being
worked into the body for their
reception
Eater on the plumb can (tame into general use,
at least in this country,
while the swaged can
with inserted
ends
continued to be used very
largely in Kngland and
France, and indeed is
stilt used to a
considerable
extent to the present
day,
particularly in France.
One very desirable
feature of the plumb and swaged cans was that
the soldering was all on the outside.
Buy Your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St.,
Philadelphia,
Pa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS. II
In the early days cans were made by regular work for one man, and they required from five to
tinsmiths and the work all done by hand, the
bodies laid off on the sheet of tin by pattern, and
cut out with the stock shears, the blanks for the
tops and bottoms described by dividers and also
cut out with the shears, the edges formed on them
by means of the edging-stake and mallet. The hole
in the top was punched out with a hollow punch
by hand, and the cap was made by a large-sized
hollow punch, and also struck out by hand. The
California gold fever gave a great impetus to the
canning business, creating as it did a demand
for food in concentrated and portable shapes.
This increased demand stimulated improvements
in all departments of the business, and we now
begin to notice a series of efforts to improve on
the methods of making cans. Can making began
to be a distinct branch of the tinners' trade.
Little devices for facilitating the work appeared.
Neatness in style and increased rapidity of the
workmen were demanded. The bench burring
machine took the place of the edging-stake and
mallet; an apparatus with weights, reels and lme
was devised to assist the workmen to plumb the
heads and bottoms on neatly and with greater
rapidity, and it was astonishing to see how beau-
tifully a skilled man would, with a sharp pointed
soldering iron, pile up the solder, little by little,
into a complete, smooth and rounded ring or
ridge right on the joint, leaving scarce a mark of
where the tool had touched. But after all this
was slow work as compared with later opera-
tions; 150 of these plumb cans was a good day's
six pounds of solder to the hundred. The work-
men received $2.50perhundredformakingthem.
Mr. Evans tells me that about 1852 he bought
a quantity of two-pound cans, for which he paid
$9 per hundred, but as the firm had a contract
for all the goods they were packing at $7.50 per
dozen, there was no great hardship in this. This
price of $7.50 per dozen was uniform for every
variety of food they should pack in two-pound
cans, and included oysters, meats, fruits and
vegetables. At these figures the cost of the cans
was about one-seventh of the wholesale price of
the goods. At the average price of two-pound
goods to-day the cost of the cans is about one-
fifth, the proportion, however, varying from one-
eighth to one-third, showingthat, notwithstand-
ing the great cheapening in the cost of the cans,
the cost of the canned food to the consumer has
been cheapened in even greater proportion. Some
of the older packers would probably say that
the profits of the packers have been lessened in
even still greater proportion.
The years from 1850 to 1860 witnessed quite
a number of improvements in the methods of
making cans. In the early part of this period
Mr. Henry Evans devised the cap crease and cap
or stud to fit it, a device which remains to-day
practically without change. Circular shears be-
gan to be used for cutting out the disks for tops
and bottoms. For the body squaring shears
superseded [the pattern, scribe-awl and stock
shears; but by far the longest stride forward
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles for Catsup, and Preserves. Jars of all Kinds.
12 EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS,
was in the construction of the can itself. It was
in 1857 or
'58
that I saw the first floated can,
since so well known to the trade as the hand-
made can. I remember being in the office of
Thomas Kensett & Co., when Mr. Evans came in
with one of these cans and showed it to Mr. Ken-
sett. After a close examination the latter pro-
nounced it ad d ugly rough affair and declared
he would never use them. In twelve months he was
using no other kind. It is unnecessary for me
to describe this style of can : every packer is
familiar with it. But perhaps some description
of how they were made at first may interest you.
After the body was rolled upit was fitted around
a sheet iron cylinder held in the hand. A section
of a joint of bamboo, split lengthwise, was laid
along the lap and held in position by the pres-
sure of the left thumb, the remainder of the hand
being grasped around the body. The whole was
then laid firmly against the edge of the bench,
while the rosin and solder was applied and the
seam soldered. After the head and bottom were
floated on (the term, floating, was applied to
the process of soldering on the tops and bot-
toms to distinguish this method from the old
one of plumbing, already described) the ends of
the side seam at the junctures with the end
seams would be cut or melted away by the
action of the soldering iron in floating. This
was looked upon as the weak point of the can,
and was remedied by buttoning, that is, a small
lump of solder was melted on to these weak
points. Dies and presses for making the heads
Buy Your Bottles of the Whitney Glass W
and bottoms came into general use with the in-
troduction of the floated can. The disks of tin
as they came from the circular shears were put
into dies and the edges and the creases pressed
up in them, the cap-hole and crease being made
by a subsequent operation. The first improve-
ment made in the method of constructing these
cans which I remember was the invention of the
belly-puncher. This was nothing more than the
original form of the now well known seaming
block. The sheet iron body cylinder was fitted
on to a block of wood, the rear end of which, ex-
tending beyond the cylinder, was bolted to a
bench; a lever hinged on this rear end of the
block had a slate knife attached, so arranged as
to be brought down upon the seam lap, thus
doing away with the bamboo thumb piece. The
forward end of the lever was provided with a
wooden handle, and in operation the workman
pressed his stomach against the handle and bore
down a part of his weight upon it to hold the
lap in position while soldering. This stomach
feature gave the rig its uncouth name of belly-
puncher. Those of us who have had a practical
acquaintance with this instrument of torture have
no desire to soften its rough appellation. Now
came improved forms of dies, the compound die
cutting the disk forming the edge and crease
on the bottoms at one stroke. Later the com-
bination die, cutting the disk and forming the
edge and crease and cutting and creasing the
cap-hole atone stroke. Treadle presses succeed-
ed screw presses, and they in turn are being re-
orks, 227 fc'outh From St., rhiladeljliia, Pa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS. 13
placed bj power presses. The floated can went
so far in the direction of economy of material
and workmen became so skillful and rapid in
making them (many of the rapid workmen can
turn out 1,000 of these cans per day) that it for
a long time bid defiance to change and it is
difficult even now for many to realize that its
day is passing, but the ingenuity and perseve-
rance of man knows no such thing as a final
stopping point forendeavor. Wefind, therefore,
that scores and hundreds of devices, more or less
elaborate, have been invented for making cans
by machinery. Most of these, indeed there are
very few exceptions, have proved failures. Among
the earlier efforts in this direction I remember
the Gray patent. Mr. Gray took a can body
after seaming and placing it on an upright cylin-
der in a press, by means of a die he turned the
end of the body inwards to an angle of about 45
degrees, a second operation laid this flat or at
right angles with the main portion of the body,
and a third operation pressed a crease, similar
to the cap crease, into this flattened portion.
These operations were repeated on the opposite
end of the body. Then the bottom, shaped like
a large cap, was soldered into the crease of one
of the ends, completing the can. The hard usage
to which the soldered side seam wap subjected by
this method caused many of them to leak, and
this style of can, though very promising at first,
met with no favor. The necessity for an abso-
lutely tight package, as well as a strong and
cheap one, has proved the stumhling block to
most of the machine-made cans. Gradually but
surely, however, development and improvement
have come, and to-day there are three distinct
types of machine-made cans being put upon
the market in large quantities that in the
essential features named above surpass the
floated or hand-made can, while there are
still others more or less successful in these
features.
EVERYTHING
FOR
CANNERS.
CANNING
REMINISCENCES.
By H. N. S
HEPARD,
OF THE PHCENIX CANNING CO., WELLAND, ONT.
^Nthe year
1857,Mr.E. A. Edgett,
thenayoung
I
man, went to New York City and engaged to
work one year for the firm of Kemp, Day &
Co.
in the canning
business.
Returning
the next sea-
son he
startedasmall
businessof his own located
near the village of Camden, in Oneida Co., N.
^
.
His was the first cauuing
factory in the State
outside of New York City.
Mr.
Kdgett's pack
for several years
consisted of sweet corn, wild
blackberries,
beef and poultry, all of the other
many
products
which are now canned in such
large
quantities
were then
unknown in the
market.
Mr. Kdgett
commenced
cooking his cans in
large deep pans set in brick arches and
continued
to use these for several
years. He packed the
product of two acres of sweet corn the first year
and was obliged to take two trips to New York
before
hesucceededindisposingof
thewhole of it.
I commenced
working at this business for Mr.
Kdgett in 1861, the first work I did being to cap
corn cans.
The copper then in use for this pur-
pose, was four square.
We would run the solder
round a dozen caps roughly,
and then take a
brad awl to hold the cap down, while smoothing
it. This was a very
slow method
considering
the
conveniences of the
present time.
Canned corn at that time sold at $2.50
and
$3
per dozen aud
everything
else at the same
rate.
This induced
others to start in the busi-
ness and soon after or about the year 1859,
Ananias
Edgett,
brother of k. A. Edgett started
a factory in the same town
followed by Day
Brothers and
Wallace Nix.
About the year 1865
Wilburt
Bowen of
Syracuse, N. Y.,
started a
factory in that city,
followed by
Merrelle &
Soule
of the same place, after which
canning
factories
sprung up
almost like
mushrooms;
no village of
any
pretentions
being
without one or more,
and
some offering
considerable
sums of money as
inducements to
parties
thinking of going into the
business.
My first
experience in making
cans was by
using a screw press
operated by
hands. To cut
Buy Your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St.,
Philadelphia,
Pa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
•5
»
the tin into bottoms and tops, we were obliged
to change the dies three times in order to get
them ready for use. The first die would cut a
flat blank; and we would generally cut up several
boxes of tin into these blanks; then change it for
a die that would turn up a flange. They were
then ready for use as bottoms. Then as only
half were needed as bottoms we were obliged to
change the die again for one which would punch
the tops.
In this way we were obliged to pick up each
blank with the left hand, put it in the die and
with the right hand pull the sweep around with
force enough to make the impressions all perfect.
It was a slow and tiresome way of cutting tin

compared with present conveniences. Caps were
cut by laying the tin on the die and striking it
with a mallet. The vents were afterwards made
with a brad awl and hammer.
The old former was a "belly puncher." Instead
of a treadle to raise the knife that holds the
bodies, we had a large handle running out from
the knife; we had to raise that up with the left
hand and then hold it up with one side, then slip
on the body, get it in position, press the knife
down with one side then grasp the handle with
the left hand and hold it, while with the right
the solder and rosin were put on and seam made.
We had to bend down to raise the knife with one
side in order to have our two hands to pall off
the body.
Fifty cans was a
j
ob for the bench. After finish-
ing floating the cans had to be placed on the
bench seam up and with a pointed copper we had
to (what we called) "button" them; that was to
melt a drop of solder on each cut off.
We used. charcoal entirely for heating coppers,
that has given place to the neat yet powerful,
kerosene, gas and gasoline burners of the present
time.
Our solder molds used to be a cast-iron some-
thing; similar to a washboard in looks with only
one part and we were obliged to be very careful
when running the solder or part of the sticks
would be large and a part small. We cut our
drops with a tinner's shears, gauging the size
with our eye; five pounds being allowed to every
one hundred two pound cans.
During the civil war when we were obliged to
pay such exorbitant prices for everything, I
helped to make cans out of tin which cost twenty-
four dollars per box. We used nothing but the
best charcoal tin at that time in the manufacture
of our cans.
Canned fruit brought a high price in market,
peaches, pears, plums, cherries, quinces, etc.,
selling at $4.50 per dozen in
2% pound cans and
everything else in proportion.
Our labels then were printed by our village
printer, on white paper with perhaps a border
with just "sweet corn packed by, etc." It only
reached half way around the can.
The packing boxes were mostly of spruce or
basswood and cost
.f
15 to
f
18 per hundred.
The corn was taken in by counting the ears in
a load. A bushel of ears were then husked and
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles for Catsups, and Preserves. Jars of all Kinds.
i6
EVERYTHING
FOR CANNERS.
couated.
The price was forty cents per bushel of
husked ears.
As will be seen by this sketch very little labor
saving
machinery was known to the business.
The cooking or "processing"
was all done in
pans set in brick arches. These gave place to the
steam boiler and "open" or "water bath," and
these in turn to the iron retorts of the present
time. The various
operations were all done "by
hand," as cutting corn, shelling peas, capping,
filling, etc. The quality however of the goods
were fully equal we think to the best goods packed
now. The cost was very high owing to the cost
of material and supplies, but the price that they
broughtleft a larger margin of profit than we have
been able to see the past few years in the business.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
'7
THOMAS L. BUNTING.
SUBJECT OF ILLUSTRATION.
^HOMAS L. BUNTING whose portrait we
give herewith, is a representative canner,
well-known to the trade. He is manager
of the HamburgCanning Company, of Hamburg,
Erie County, New York, packers of the celebrated
Hamburg canned goods. Mr. Bunting is presi-
dent of the New York Packers' Association;
State president of the National Packers' Associ-
ation; president of the Hamburg Water and
Electric Light Company, and of its Investment
and Improvement Company; vice-president of
the Bank of Hamburg, and is one of the C ity
and County Hall Commissioners.
In November last he was elected to Congress
from the thirty-third N. Y. district. He is also
interested in farming, owning a large farm just
east of the village of Hamburg, which is devoted
to dairying and stock-raising. He is a member
of the Erie County Farmers' Institute, and has
read frequent papers before that body bearing
upon subjects of interest to farmers. He was
deputized to voice the views of that society on
the subject of bogus butter before the Commit-
tee on Agriculture at Washing-ton. He has also
given much study to the canning interests, and
drafted the existing law which aims to weed out
certain fatal abuses in the industry. On invita-
tion of the different packing associations of the
country, he delivered an address on
*'
Organiza-
tion of Packers," at Indianapolis, last February,
and as a result, the National Canning Associa-
tion was formed. Mr. Bunting made an argu-
ment before that body at Baltimore a few
months ago since on the subject of "Tariff and
Tin Plate," and headed the delegation to Wash-
ington to argue before the Ways and Means
Committee against the increased duty on tin
plate.
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles for Catsup, and Preserves. Jars ol all Kinds.
i8
EVERYTHING FOR CANKERS.
Everything
forCanners
PUBLISHED ANNUALLY BY
E. D. Fisher, Publisher,
FRANKLINVILLE, N.Y.
SUBSCRIPTION RA TES.
Sent free to all Canners an<l Fruit Evaporators of North America.
To all others, price $1.00.
ADVERTISING HATES FOR 1892.
Full Page,
V!
{) "
Two Pages, (facing each other,) *25-00
One-half Page,
- j?.00
One-fourth Page, - --
5 00
Advertisers are entitled to one copy for each quarter page of ad-
vertising space taken.
Guaranteed edition for 1892, over 4,000 copies.
EDITORS COLUMN.
To our friends, the canners and evaporators
of North America, we make a bow. Having had
some considerable experience in the canning and
evaporating business, we understand something
of their needs.
"
It is not all gold that glitters"
even in this part of the business world. Experi-
ence is a fine thing; and a man who engages in
either one of these lines of business cannot have
too much, if it isthe right kind. I know several,
however, who think they have a surplus, and
would like to trade it off cheap for cash. They
are not exactly free traders, but they believe in
reducing the surplus. By cautiously investigat-
ing the cases, I have found that their surplus
believe in the homeopathic theory,
"
similia sim-
ilibus curantur." There is nothing here to cause
uneasiness, however. Such men are found in all
lines of business; they tumble headlong into
business and when it fails to pan out as they ex-
pected, they are just as anxious to tumble out
—sort of a "rolling stone" that Solomon, or
somebody, says "gathers no moss."
It is not our purpose to furnish an exhaustive
treatise on the art of canning or evaporating;
we are not competent for that, if we were inclined
—which we are not: You may find some sugges-
tions here, however, that you may be able to
modify and make of service.
The object of this work is to bring to your
notice and attention the new and old labor-sav-
ing machines that have been brought out and
that are constantly being devised, to facilitate
the business and lessen the cost of manufacture.
Also to introduce to you those who deal in can-
ners' and evaporators' supplies of all kinds from
a paring knife to a steam engine, and to furnish
the addresses of responsible dealers in the large
cities.
All the machinery advertised in these columns
havebeen thoroughly tested. We are personally
acquainted with most of the manufacturers and
their machines. The particular attention of
canners is called to the oil system of heating
coppers, which has been in use now three seasons,
with universal satisfaction. You can find
"
Everything" here to equip your factory from
top to toe. All that we ask in return for this
was considerably reduced already. Perhaps they
Buy Your Bottles of the Whitney tilass Works, 111 South Front St., Philadelphia, Fa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS 19
service is that as often as you write these parties
you will mention this work. We do not expect
you to say : "We saw your advertisement in E.
D. Fisher's work, "Everything for Canners,"
but kindly, at the foot, or top, or side, or cross-
wise, or somewhere, put the word
"
Sawfish.'' In
English, that means, "We saw your advertise-
ment, etc., and it is also the copyrighted title of
our Cypher Code. This will enable our adver-
tisers to get some idea of the value of these col-
umns as an advertising medium. This isamod-
est request and we trust you will not forget it.
The Cypher Code, we believe, will be a great
convenience and saving. It is used by all adver-
tisers in this book and a great many others.
Bound in cloth and boards, price, $2.
If you have any machinery, new or old, that
you wish brought to the attention of the can-
ners and evaporators, or any labor saving -de-
vices, or anything that would be of interest or
profit to' the fraternity, let us hear from you.
CANNERS' AND PACKERS' DIRECTORY.
Our Canners' Directory (a list of the fruit and
vegetable canners) has now reached its fourth
edition. It is brought down to March 1, 1891;
a book of 125 pages, nicely bound, and has
about 2,500 addresses. It is carefully indexed
by states and places and divided as follows:
Fruits and Vegetable Canners, Green Corn Can-
ners, Fish and Oyster Canners, Manufacturers
of Pickles, Jams, Jellies, etc., Pork and Beef
Packers. It is indorsed by the leading business
men and manufacturers of the country who have
used it for the past four years. Price, $5. It
will be sent to any address; remittance to be
made on receipt of same. Two extras will be is-
sued in April and July, giving changes, new fac-
tories, etc., and sent free to all subscribers. Ad-
dress this office.
WHOLESALE GROCERS OF THE U. S.
Through the wholesale grocers the great bulk
of canned and evaporated goods find their way
to the retail trade. To meet the requirements of
the trade we prepared a year ago a complete
list of all the wholesale grocers of the United
States. This is now being revised and reprinted
to bring it down to March 1, 1891. It is a book
of about 175 pages; contains the address of 2,-
500 wholesale grocers with street number in the
cities. It also gives the large dealers in these
lines of goods in the smaller places, say 5,000 to
10,000 population, distinctly separate from the
others. It gives the population of all the places;
it gives the banks in each place, and to meet
the general demand, we give a few leading gen-
eral merchandise brokers and commission men
in the cities and larger places.
This book will be out of the press about the last
of April. Price,
f
5.
We will send a copy to any responsible house,
payment to be made promptly on receipt of
same. Address this office.
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles lor Catsups, and Preserves, Jars of all Kinds.
20
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
WEIGHT OF VEGETABLES.
Corn is generally bought by the ton in the
husk; in Baltimore it is bought by the hundred
A correspondent is informed that there are no
ear^
specific weights for the different green vegetables,
a bushel of corn in the husk will weigh about
although there are laws in some places fixing
7Q lbg ^ aud 1QQ earg husked will make a bushel,
what weight shall go to a bushel, but thesediffer
feut & ^caQ Qardly be made q{ thig) ag the
in the states and even in different sections of the
earg do not average the same everywhere
same state. The measurement of a bushel is
more often the guide. Under the rules of the
nwjnwc
Canned Goods Exchange, the packers of Balti-
ASSOCIATION OFFICERS.
more buy green peas and string beans by meas-
The officers of the various canned goods asso-
ure, usiug a barrel that will contain two and a
ciations are as follows:
half bushels, level measure, the barrel being
national canned goods association.
tested and sealed by the inspector of measures.
L Q Seager> presi dent, Gilman, Iowa.
The rule also requires that the following arti-
T L Bunting, vice-president, ...Hamburg, N. Y.
cles shall be purchased by weight, aud that a
E g Ju
,
secretary>
Baltimore, Md.
bushel of tomatoes shall be 62 lbs.; Lima beans,
52 lbs.; Damsons beans. 56 lbs.; red cherries,
western packers canned goods ass n.
56 lbs.; white cherries 52 lbs.: gooseberries 52 lbs. L. G. Seager, president, Gilman, Iowa.
In New York State peas are bought by the J. S. Edwards, sec. and treas.,.. .Leavenworth, K.
bushel of 30 lbs. (pods) or where a viner is used, F. Van Camp, vice-president, Indiana,
by the bushel (shelled peas) by measure Of the B. F. McCall, "
Illinois.
large varieties, four bushels of pods will make J. B. McNabb, "
Ohio.
one bushel of shelled peas: of the early varieties, J. B. Silver,
Missouri.
five bushels to one. In peaches, a box 23 inches S. P. Silver,
Arkansas.
long, 14 inches deep and 8% inches wide, inside F. M. Caruth, "
Nebraska.
measure, shall be a bushel, and sellers shall mark Roland Lakin,
" Kansas.
capacity on every box, large and small. E. C. Dorr,
Minnesota.
In New York State 63 lbs, is required for a Max Kuner,
Colorada.
bushel of tomatoes. New Jersey buys tomatoes J. P. Douglass,
" Texas.
by the ton of 2,000 lbs—about 62% lbs. per bush- H. B. Kelly, "
Iowa.
el. In Harford County, Md., the state law re- C. M. Huber, "
Mississippi.
quires a bushel of tomatoes to weigh 62 lbs.
Lafayette Ladd
" Michigan
Whitney Glass Works. Bottles tor Catsups, and Preserves. Jars of all Kinds.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
21
NEW JERSEY CANNED GOODS ASSOCIATION.
F. C. Probasco, president, Bridgeton.
W. F. Hort, secretary, Bridgeton.
CANNED GOODS EXCHANGE OF BALTIMORE.
Elbert Thomson, president,
Martin Wagner, first vice-president,
Jas. E. Stansbury, second vice-president,
A. F. Jones, secretary.
NEW YORK CANNED GOODS ASSOCIATION.
T. L. Bunting, president, Hamburg.
J. G. Gibson, secretary, Utica.
HANGING PULLEYS.
The following rules will be found invaluable in
ascertaining the speed and sizes of pulleys.
To find the size of driving pulley, multiply the
diameter of the driven by the number of revolu-
tions it should make and divide the product by
the number of revolutions of the driver.
To find the diameter of driven, multiply the
diameter of the driver by its number of revolu-
tions and divide the product by the number of
revolutions of the driven.
To find the number of revolutions of the driven,
multiply the diameter of the driver by its num-
ber of revolutions and divide by the diameter of
the driven.
To find the horse power of a pulley, multiply
the circumference of the pulley by the speed and
the product thus obtained by the width of the
belt and divide the result by 600; the quotient
will be the horse power.
To ascertain transmitting power of belting,
multiply the diameter of driving pulley in inches
by its number of revolutions per minute and this
product by width of belt in inches; divide this
product by 3300 for single leather, four-ply rub-
ber or four-ply cotton belting—or by 2100 for
double leather, six-ply rubber or six-ply cotton
belting, and the quotient will be the number of
horse power that can be safely transmitted.
USEFUL TABLES.
Being in receipt of frequent requests for the
standard sizes for cans, as adopted by the
Canned Goods Exchange, November 19, 1883,
we give the dimensions.
No. 1 cans, 2% inches in diameter, 4 inches in
height.
No. 2 cans, 3 7-16 inches in diameter, 4 9-16
inches in height.
No. 3 cans, 4 3-16 inches in diameter, 4 7-8
inches in height.
No. 6 cans, twice the quantity of No. 3.
No. 10 cans, 6% inches in diameter, 7 inches in
height.
NUMBER NAILS IN A POUND.
5d cut, 200; wire, 266.
6d cut, 160; wire, 213.
7d cut, 128; wire, 170.
The number of nails required to make a 2-lb.
box, 26; to make a 3-lb. box, 32; to make a
gallon box, 32.
Buy Your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa.
22
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
COKE TIN PLATE.
The following is a handy classification of the
Coke tin plate.
BESSEMER STEEL,.
Ordinary Bessemer.
Aberdare
Llandtaff
Moselle*
A. C.
Albion
Mostyn
Bee
Myrtle
Blodwen
Caklicot
Newcastle
Xero
Carlos
( )sborne
Castell
Otto
Celyn
Pencelawdd
Clover
Regina
Clyne
Clywd
Coral
Corsica
Crystal
Cvfarthfa
R. M. R. N. B.
Silverton
Sylvau
Tewgoed
Dunvant
Toledo
4^>
Dyfed
Troy
E. D. S.
1'sk
Elin
Emroch*
V (in circle)
W. P. S.
Eton
Falteg
Glantaff
Gorwydd
Gwen
Boricon
Ida
Illtyd
Iros
J. C. II.
Jubilee
J. li. Grade.
B. V.
Bova
Caldy
Cilfrew
Fluellen
Grafton
Hawkwell
J.B.
Lima
Lydbrook
Nellie
Panama
Yspitty
Derwent
Sartoris
SIEMENS-MARTTN
STI EL..
Alyn
Brenin
Arto
Brymbo
Bedil
Butler
Cennen
Comet
Cuba
Danube
Ely
Emroch*
Fairwood
Gefin
Glan
Goodwood
Havana
Hexham
Leo LIanmore
Loretto Mint
Moselle* Niagara
Pentre Pierre
Sardis S. & Co.
T. G.
Tintern
IT. F.
PENLAN GRADE.
Cwmdu Deri
^
Penlan
Strick
H. S.
Lletty
Mona
Oban
Samlet
S. M. S.
T. M. T.
Bynea
Frood
L. F.
The brands marked with an asterisk are made
in both Siemens and Bessemer steel qualities.
TOMATO AND CORN PACK.
The tomatoe pack for the past eight years is
as follows
:
Cases, Two Doz.
1890
3,166.177
1889
2,976.765
1888'
-
:::::::::::::::::
3
-
34
H
3
Z
1887
2,817,048
1886
2,363.760
1885
1,434,006
1884
2,421,177
1883 :::::::::::::::::::
_
2
_!i
3
;!I!
Total eight years
21,465,649
Average per year, ,
2,633,206
The corn pack for the past six years is as
follows:
189
1,588 860
]889
'
1,760,300
isss:::: ::::::::::
3,491474
1887
2,311,424
1886
1,704,735
1885
1.082,174
Total pack six years
1 1,938 967
Average anuual pack six years 1,989,828
Bay Your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS. 23
( I
SAWFISH' CYPHER CODE.
Compiled by ELLIOT D. FISHER.
Adapted to the use of Canners, Evaporators, Dealers in Fruit and Produce, Commission
Men and Merchandise Brokers.
HIS cypher code has been prepared with a
great deal of care with this object in view:
To furnish an elaborate and complete cy-
pher covering everything, so far as was pos-
sible, coming in the range of business tran-
sactions, and to do this in a concise and
practical way. Nothing is omitted that is
covered by other codes now in use, or that
was felt necessary to make this complete. Much
is added that we have found others were deficient
in. The whole is arranged in a simple and
natural manner.
By the use of the affix, great elasticity is also
given to the work. In using, the affix is added
to the end of the cypher word. To illustrate its
use, the cypher word, "complot," means, "cases
of 2 lb. white cherries in extra heavy syrup."
By adding the affix, "ox," making the word,
"complotox," it means, "cases of 3 lb. white
cherries in extra heavy syrup." Full instructions
are given at the section where the affix is used.
In this book—Everything For Canners—the
part of the code bearing on green fruits, general
produce, nuts, etc., are not given. This will not
affect the usefulness of the code to those not
handling those lines of goods.
Complete copies of the "Sawfish" cypher code,
bound in cloth, will be furnished for $2 per copy.
Address this office. Every canner and fruit
evaporator in North America, also all of the
firms whose advertisement appears in this work
have copies of the code. The address of other
parties using it, will be sent to any address for
a two-cent stamp.
We advise you in havingnew stationery printed
to state,
"
We use Sawfish Cypher Code."
Buy your Bottles of the Whitney Glass Works, 227 South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa.
24
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
NUMERALS.
% Aba
% Abac
% Abaca
%
Abad
H
Abaf
% Aban
% Abang
1 Abar
1% Abas
1% Aba9e
1% Abash
IK Abat
1% Abate
1% Abau
1% Abb
2 Abbe
2 V Abd
2 V Abda
2% Abde
2% Abe
2 V Abh
2% Abl
2% Abj
3 Abja
3 V Able
3 V Ablen
3V Ablude
3V Aboard
3% Abod
3% Abol
3% Aboma
4 Abound
4 V Abrad
4 V Abraham
4% Abrasion
4 V Abreast
4 V
Abrld
4% Abroach
4% Abrook
5 Abrupt
5 V Aba
5 V Abscin
5 V Abscon
5V Absent
5% Absis
5% Absol
5% Absolve
6 Absorb
6V
Abstain
6 V Abstract
6 V
Absurd
6%
Abund
6 V
Abuse
6%
Abut
6%
Abutment
7 Abysm
7 V Aca
7
1
4 Acad
7 V Acal
7 V Acan
7
S
8 Acamar
7M Acced
7% Accent
8 Access
8 V
Accessary
8'., Acclt
8V Accla
8% Accliv
8% Acclo
8% Accola
8% Accord
9 Accost
9 V Account
9
'
4 Accoy
9V Accred
9 V Accrue
9
s
, Accurat
9M Accusant
97i
Accustom
10 Ace
10 V Acea
10', Aceld
10V Aceph
10% Acerb
10 %
Acerous
10% Acelat
10V Ach
11 Achea
11
'a Acheron
11H Achi
11
V
Aching
11% Achiot
11% Achmite
11', Aeical
11% Acid
12 Acin
12 V Aclid
12 V Acme
12% Acnes
12 V Acol
12 \ Acoly
12 % Acop
12% Acorn
13 Acorus
13
'„ Acous
13
'4 Acquaint
13 ',, Acquire
13 V Acquit
13 % Acra
13', Acre
13% Acrid
14 Acroa
14 V Acrom
14
'4 Acros
14
3
i Acioter
14V Acroteria
14 V Actian
14 % Active
14% Actress
15 Actuary
15'tf Actuate
15 V Acub
15',, Aculon
15 V Acumen
15 V Acus
15% Acute
15% Ada
16 Adam
16 V Adaman
16
'
4
'
Adap
16 V Ailapis
16', Adar
16 V Adarce
16'., Adarm
16% Add
17 Addle
17 V Adelite
17
'4 Adcno
17 V Adept
17 M Adequa
17% Adher
17% Adieu
17% Adjoin
18 Adjure
18 V Admea
18 V
Admire
18% Admit
18V
Admon
18
s
,, Adna
18% Adon
18% Adop
19 Ador
19 V Adrift
19', Adroit
19% Adult
19V Adun
19 V Advan
19', Adven
19% Adverb
20 Adverse
20% Advocate
20 V Advow
20';, Adyt
20 ' i Aerate
20 V Aerial
•20', Affa
20% Affair
21 Affect
21
'„ AHi a
•21 '4 Allirm
21% Allix
21 % Affla
21V a mux
21% Affor
21
'„ Affray
22 Affron
22 V Affuse
22 V Afloat
22% Africa
22 V Aga
22 V Again
223* Agar
22% Agate
23 Agend
23 V Agg
23
'
,
Agile
23 <i Agio
23 V Agistor
23
s

Agil
23% Agllet
23 V Agna
24 Agnel
24 V Agno
24V Agon
'24 ',
Agony
24 V Agnise
24 V Air
24', Ake
24% Alac
25 Alarm
25H
Albet
'2.V, Albln
25% Albor
•25
V Album
'2.
r
> Alca
25% A lean
25% Alco
26 A ley on
26 %
Aldern
26
'
,
Aleger
•2(1 '„ Alemb
26 V
Alentt
•26
%
Alga
26% Algar
26% Algeneb
27 Alias
27 V Alip
•27', Aliqua
27% Alkaloid
27 V Alkerva
'27
'
Alku
27% Allag
27% Allan
28 Allec
28 V Allegro
28% Al'.erlon
28 V Alllant
28 V Alio
28% Alloy
28% Allure
28% Alma
29 Almen
29 V Aloe
29 V Alogy
29 V Alp
29V Alphe
29 V Alpine
29% Alqul
29% Alto
30 Alter
30 V Altin
30 V Alude
30% Alvea
30 V Alveola
30 V Alvine
30 V Amadot
30 V Amazon
31 Amb
31% Ambient
81
', Amblg
31% Ambit
31
V
Amble
31V Ambo
31% Ambry
31% Amelva
32 Amerce
32 V Am
32 V Ami
32 V Amon
32 V Amoret
32
s
,; Amorosa
32% Amuse
32% Ana
33 Anagra
33 V Anagro
33 V Analcam
33% Analcas
33 V Ananas
33 V Anap
33% Anaphor
33% Anarch
34 Anthe
34% Anther
Buy Your HoWe-sof Whitney Glass Works, til South Front St., Philadelphia, Pa.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
35 Antho
35'. Antic
36 Anticor
86X Antlilo
87 Antidote
S7 % Antllog
38 Antistes
39 Antler
40 Anton
41 Aonia
\Vz Apenine
43 Aperient
44 Aphiin
45 Aphritc
46 ipiary
47 Apis
47M Aplo
48 Apocop
49 Apog
50 Apothem
51 Apostle
52 Appar
52 M Appease
53 Appla
54 Appoint
55 Apprest
56 Apricot
57 Apro
m% Apropo
5S Apter
59 Arab
60 Arable
61 Arbor
62 Arcad
62 ii Arcan
63 Archa
64 Archet
65 Archen
66 Archil
67 Archon
67K Archta
6S Ard
69 Arden
70 Arders
71 Area
72 Areek
72X Arena
73 Arenos
74 Areole
75 Arcotic 117 Assert
76 Arg
US Assuag
77 Argil 11 11 Aster
77\ Argo 120 Asth
7S Argute
121 Astra
79 Arian i
]22 Astrea
SO Aricin
122^ Astu
SI Arida
123 Atag
82 Aries
124 Atch
S2
1
-
Aril
125 Athle
83 Arim
126 Atimy
84 Aris
127 Atlas
85 Ark
128 Atone
86 Armad
129 Attag
87 Armin
130 Attaint
STA Arminian
131 Attic
88 Armor
132 Attire
S9 Arnut
133 Audib
90 Aroura
134 Audient
91 Aroy
135 Augean
92 Arrach
136 Augite
92 '-{ Arraign
137 Augur
93 Arrant
137K Auk
94 Arras
138 Aullc
95 Arrect
139 Aume
!)6 Arriere
140 Aura
97 Arroba
141 Aurel
ffi% Arshin
142 Auroral
98 Arson
143 Ausp
99 Artful
144 Aust
100 Artes
145 Austra
101 Arct
146 Ava
102 Artifice
147 Avan
102K Artisan
147K Avar
103 Arur
148 Avenor
104 Arve
149 Avenue
105 Ascri
150 Avernia
106 Ash
151 Aver
107 Ashla 152 Aviary
108 Asin 153 Avo
109 Ask
154 Avow
110 Asia 155 Awa
111 Aspi
156 Awar
112 Aspen 157 Awn
112>£ Asper
158 Ayle
113 Aspha 159 Azo
114 Assail 160 Azure
115 Assar 161 Azurn
116 Assay
162 Ba
162 'i Bab
163 Bac
164 Back
165 Bacul
166 Badg
167 Badia
168 Baf
169 Bailie
170 Bag
171 Bagrc
172 Bagnet
I72K Bah
173 Baign
174 Balr
775 Bait
176 Bake
177 Bal
177K Balas
178 Bald
179 Balk
180 Ball
181 Ballet
182 Balloe
182>£ Balm
183 Balneal
1S4 Balot
185 Balsa
186 Bait
187 Bambo
187K Ban
188 Band
189 Bander
190 Bandie
191 Bandon
192 Bandore
192K Bane
193 Bang
194 Bangle
195 Bann
196 Banque
197 Banter
197K Bap
198 Barb
199 Barba
200 Barbar
201 Barbel 248 Beam
202 Bardic 249 Beard
203 Baret 250 Beam
204 Barill 251 Breast
205 Barium 252 Beat
206 Barque 253 Beau
207 Mann 254 Beaver
208 Baron 255 Bechic
209 Barra 256 Beck
210 Barraca 257 Beckon
211 Barrack 258 Beclip
212 Barren 259 Becloud
212
'i Barse 260 Bedash
213 Barton 261 Bedaub
214 Barytes 262 Bedeck
215 Basal
262K Bedel
216 Basan 263 Bedlight
217 Base 264 Bedim
218 Bashaw 265 Bedla
219 Basilar 266 Bedote
220 Basilis 267 Bedwar
221 Basin 267>i Bee
222 Basis 268 Beeld
223 Bass 269 Beetle
224 Basset 270 Bey
225 Bassoc 271 Bel
226 Bastard 272 Belch
227 Bastile 272K Beld
228 Bat 273 Belgia
229 Batavia 274 Belial
230 Bateau 275 Belle
231 Bath 276 Beliona
232 Batist 277 Bellow
233 Battel 277K Belt
234 Batten 278 Beluga
235 Baube
279 Belie
236 Bauge
280 Bern
237 Bav
281 Bend
237>£ Baw
282 Bene
238 Bawd 282K Beneil
239 Bawl
283 Benefice
240 Bawn
284 Beneme
241 Bayar
285 Benet
242 Bayon
2S6 Benign
243 Bazar
287 Benison
244 Beach 287X Benum
245 Beacon 288 Benzo
246 Bead 289 Berate
247 Beagle 290 Bere
26
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
•291
292
292
!
293
294
295
296
297
297 !
298
.".in
300
301
302
303
304
31 ii
307
308
309
310
311
312
31-2'.
313
314
315
310
317
317',
818
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
826
327
328
829
330
331
333
331
Bereave
Berg
Berme
Beroe
Berr
Bert
Berth
Beryl
Beset
Best
Betid
Betroth
Bevel
Bevy
Bez
Be/.oar
Bias
Bib
Bibio
Bicand
Bids
Bicker
1U.1
Bier
Big
Bigg
Biggin
Bigot
Bll
Bild
Bile
Bilge
Bilk
Bill
Billia
Bilva
Binary
Biolog
Biotin
Bipar
Biped
Birem
Birth
Bisect
Bish
Bison
Bister
Bisto
335
336
337
337 !

338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
:i47'_.
348
340
350
3151
352
353
354
365
35G
357
358
359
300
361
362
302
'
2
303
304
365
366
307
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
370
377
378
379
Bit
Bitter
Bituni
Biviour
Bivoua
Bizarr
Blab
Black
Bladder
Blade
Blain
Blake
Blanch
Bland
Blar
Blast
Blay
Blaze
Blazon
Blea
Blear
Bleat
Bleb
Blond
Blendous
Blest
Blind
Blink
Bliss
Blite
Blithe
Bloat
Blobb
Block
Blockish
Blomar
Blonk
Bloom
Blore
Bloss
Blotch
Blotc
Blown
Blouze
Blub
Bludg
Bluff
Bluish
380 Blunt 427
381 Blurt 428
382 Blush
429
383 Bluster
430
384 Boa
431
385 Boar
432
3S0 Boast 433
Boat
434
887a Boba 435
3S8 Bobb
430
389 Bobo
437
390 Bohca
438
391 Bocas
43:)
302 Boce
440
398 Bod
441
394 Bodg
142
39S Bodice
1)3
300 Boiling
444
397 Bodkin
11..
31 is Bog
4)1,
390 Bogor
447
400 Boh
448
401 Boiar
449
102 Boil 150
403 Boiob 4.71
404 Bolar 452
403 Bold 458
400 Bolet
454
107 Bolis
4.->.">
408 Boll
456
409 Bolster
457
410 Bomb
458
411 Bombar
459
412 Bombasin
460
413 Bombic
461
414 Bona
462
415 Bond
402',
416 Bone
403
417 Bones
404
418 Bon lire
405
419 Bonm
400
420 Bonn
467
421 Bonny
468
422 Bonten
469
423 Bonze
470
424 Booby
471
12.', Book
472
420 Boole.
473
Boon
Bora
Borax
Boreal
Boron
Borrel
Bos
Bot
Botch
Both
Bond
Bonn
Bourn
Bovat
Bow
Bowet
Boxe
Boy
Brace
Brach
Brachl
Bracket
Brad
Braid
Brail
Brain
Brait
Brak
Bram
Bramble
Bramin
Bran
Branch
Branco
Brand
Brandy
Brank
Bras
Brast
Brawl
Brave
Brava
Brawn
Bray
Brayle
Brazen
Breach
Break
474 Bream
475 Breast
470 Breath
477 Brec
178 Bred
479 Brera
4 SO Breve
4S1 Brevia
482 Brew
483 Briar
484 Brick
485 Brld
480 Brided
1ST Bridge
487% Brig
488 Brigan
489 Brlgose
4110 Brim
491 Brind
492 Brine
493 BriHtle
494 Brit
495 Brize
496 Broad
497 Brocade
498 Brocatcl
499 Broider
500 Brom
505 Rromlne
510 Broth
515 Brucina
520 Bruclte
525 Bruin
530 Rruise
535 Bruit
540 Brun
545 Brunt
550 Brusk
535 Brutal
500 Bry
505 Bub
570 Buc
575 Buck
580 Buckra
585 Buco
590 Bud
595 Budge,
000 Buff
005 Buffo
010 Bug
015 Bugle
020 Build
02.3 Bulb
030 Bulge
03.5 Bulim
640 Bull
045 Bum
650 Bumk
655 Bunch
000 Bung
665 Bunk
070 Bur
075 Bureau
080 Burgh
085 Buria
090 Burlace
695 Burn
700 Bursar
705 Bury
710 Bush
715 Busk
720 Bustar
725 But
730 Button
735 Buttress
740 Buxom
745 Cab
750 Cabar
755 Cabial
700 Cabin
705 Cabur
770 Cach
775 Cack
780 Cadav
785 Cadcn
790 Cadger
795 Cadmlan
800 Caft
810 Cag
8?0 Calm
830 Cais
840 Cajole
850 Cai
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
800 Cnlama . 3400 Canth
870 Calamlt 3500 (ant le
880 Calash 3600 Canvas
890 Calcar 3700 Cany
900 C'alcin 3750 Cap
MO Cakl 3800 Caper
920 Calefy 31100 Capias
930 Calendar
401-0
Capite
940 Call 4100 Capoch
950 Caliber 4200 Capon
976 Calice 4250 Caprice
1000 Calico 4300 Capriol
102.5 Calin 4350 Capsi
1050 Callver 4400 Capstan
1075 Calk 4500 Capsule
1100 Call 4000 Captain
1125 Callous 4700 Caption
1150 Calomel 4750 Capu
1175 Calor 4800 Carb
1200 Calumb 4900 Cara
1250 Calx- 5000 Caraco
1300 Camber 5100 Carat
1350 Cambril 5200 Carav
1400 Cambric 5300 Carbon
1450 Camlet 5400 Carboy
150(1 Camoc 5500 Carcas
1550 Camoys 5(i00 Career
11)00 Camp 5700 Cardia
1700 Camphor
5800 Cardin
1750 Camping
5900 Cardo
1800 Cana 0000 Care
1900 Canak 0100 Caress
2000 Canar
6200 Caribo
2100 Cancer 6300 Carina
2200 Cancr 6400 Carious
2300 Cancrite 6500 Carl
2350 Cand 6600 Carlot
2400 Candle 6700 Carnage
2500 Candled 6800 Carnal
2600 Candy
6900 Carney
2700 Canic
7000 Carob
2750 Canker
7100 Carotid
2800 Cann
7250 Carouse
2900 Canoe 7500 Carpal
3000 Canon
8000 Carve
3100 Canopy
8500 Carr
3200 Cant
9000 Cart
3300 Canteen
10,000 Cartes
1-,
11,000 Casa
12,000 Casca
13.000 Case r
14,00) Caspia
15,000 Cass
16,000 Cassine
17,000 Castan
18,000 Castile
19,000 Castle
20,000 Castrat
21,000 Casual
22,000 Casuist
23,000 Ca
24,000 Catam
25,001) Caten
26,000 Catgut
27,000 Caudal
30,000 Cautel
35,000 Cav
40,000 Cavea
45,000 Caver
50,000 Cavet
75,000 Cavetson
100,000 Caves
i
To Cavil
3
To Cavity
S
To Caw
7
To Cedar
e
To Ceil
To Celery
a Cell
1 s
To Cement
CALIFORNIA
CANNED
FRUITS.
The Code word means cases, usual number of cans to the case.
Prices are always understood to be per dozen.
Census Two and one-half pounds Apples, standard.
Cent Three pounds Apples, standard.
Centaur Gallon Apples, standard.
Centennial ..
Centipede . .
.
Central Two and one-half pounds Apricots, standard.
Center Two and one-half pounds Apriccts, extra.
Centric Two and one-half pounds Apricots, seconds.
Centuple Two and one-half pounds Apricots, pie.
Centurion ...Gallon Apricots, pie.
Century
Cerate Two and one-half lbs. Assorted Fruits, standard.
Cereal Two and one-half lbs. Assorted Fruits, seconds.
Cerebral Two and one-half lbs. Assorted Fruits, pie.
Ceremonial. .Gallon Assorted Fruits, pie.
Ceremony . . .Two and one-half pounds Blackberries, standard.
Certain Two and one-half pounds Blackberries, extra.
Certainty .
. .Two and one-half pounds Blackberries, pie.
Certify Gallon Blackberries, pie.
Certitude. .
. .Two and one-half lbs. Cherries Black, standard.
Cervine Two and one-half lbs. Cherries Black, extra.
Cession Two and one-half lbs. Cherries Black, seconds.
Chafe Two and one-half lbs. Cherries Black, pie.
Chaff Gallon Cherries Black, pie.
Chafing' Two and one-half lbs. Cherries White, standard.
Chagrin Two and one-half lbs. Cherries White, extra.
Chain Two and one-half lbs. Cherries White, seconds.
Chair Two and one-half pounds Currants, standard.
Chairman . . .Tw.o and one-half pounds Currants, extra.
Chaise Two and one-half pounds Currants, pie.
Chaldron . . .Gallon Currants, pie.
Chal ice
Chalk Two and one-half pounds Damsons, standard.
28
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
Chamber
Two and one-half pounds Damsons, extra.
Chamfer
Two and one-half pounds Damsons, pie.
Chamois
Two and one-half pounds Egg Plums, standard.
Champ
Two and one-half pounds Egg Plums, extra.
Champaign . .Two and one-half pounds Egg Plums, seconds.
Champion . . .Two and one-half pounds Gooseberries, standard.
Chance
Two and one-half pounds Gooseberries, pie.
Chancel
Gallon Gooseberries, pie.
Chancery • . .Two and one-half lbs. Crapes Muscat, standard.
Chandler
Two and one-half lbs. Grapes Muscat, extra.
Change
Two and one-half pounds ( .rapes, standard.
Changeless . .Two and one-half pounds Grapes, extra.
Channel
Chant
Chanter
Two and one-half pounds Green Gages, standard.
ChaOS
Two and one-half pounds Green Gages, extra.
Chaotic
Two and one-half pounds Green Gages, seconds.
Chap
Two and one-half pounds Nectarines, standard.
Chapel
Two and one-half pounds Nectarines, extra.
Chaplain
Two and one-half pounds Nectarines, pie.
Chaplet
Two and one-half lbs. Peaches White, standard.
Chapman
Two and one-half lbs. Peaches White, extra.
Chapter Two and one-half lbs. Peaches White, seconds.
Char
Two and one-half lbs. Peaches Yellow Free, st'd.
Charade
Two and one-half lbs. Peaches Yellow Free, extra
Charcoal
Two and one-half lbs. Peaches Yellow lire. sec.
Charge
Two and one-half lbs. Peaches Yellow Free, pie.
Charger Gallon Peaches Yellow Free, pie.
Chariot
Charity
Charm
Two and one-half pounds Plums, standard.
Charmer
Two and one-half pounds Plums, extra.
Chart
Two and one-half pounds Plums, pitted.
Charter Two and one-half pounds Plums, assorted.
Chary
Two and one-half pounds Plums, pie.
Chase
Gallons Plums, pie.
Chasm
Chaste
Two and one-half pounds Prunes, standard.
Chasten
Two and one-half pounds Prunes, extra.
Chastise . .. .Two and one
Chastity ... .Two and one
Chattel ... .Two and one
Cheap Two and one
Cheapen . - . .Gallon Pears
Cheat Two and one
Checker Two and one
Cheek
Cheer
Two and one-
Cheerful Two and one-
Cheerless . ..Two and one-
Cheery
Two and one
Cheese
Two and one
Chemical
Two and one
Chemist
Cherish
Cheroot
Two and one-
Cherry
Two and one
Cherub
Two and one
CheSS
Two and one
Chest
Chestnut
-half pounds Tears Bartlett, standard,
-half pounds Pears Bartlett, extra,
-half pounds Pears Bartlett, seconds,
-half pounds Pears Bartlett, pie.
Bartlett, pie.
-half pounds Pears Winter Nellis.
half pounds Pears Duchess.
half pounds Quinces, standard,
half pounds Quinces, extra,
half pounds Quinces, preserved,
-half pounds Raspberries, standard,
-half pounds Raspberries, extra,
-half pounds Raspberries, seconds.
half pounds Strawberries, standard,
half pounds Strawberries, extra,
-half pounds Strawberries, preserved.
half pounds Strawberries, seconds.
CALIFORNIA
DRIED FRUITS.
Boxes contain 2? and 50 pounds.
APPLES.
(hew S. D., quarters, common, sacks.
Chick S. D., quarters, prime, sacks.
Chide S. D., quarters, choice, sacks.
Chief S. 1)., sliced, common, sacks.
Chieftain . . .S. D.| sliced, prime, sacks.
Child
S. I)., sliced, choice, sacks.
Childhood . . . Evaporated, rings, prime, boxes.
Chill
Evaporated, rings, choice, boxes.
Chilly
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
29
APRICOTS.
Cliime S. D., bleached, common.
Chimney . .S. D., bleached, prime.
Clliu S. I)., bleached, choice.
China Evaporated, bleached, prime.
Chine Evaporated, bleached, choice.
Chintz Evaporated, bleached, fancy.
Chirp
FIGS.
Chisel Sun-dried, black, sacks.
Chit Sun-dried, white, sacks.
Chivalry . . . .Sun-dried, white, box.
Chlorate ....
GRAPES.
Chloride Stemless, sacks.
NECTARINES*.
Chock White, choice, sacks.
Choice White, fancy, sacks.
Choke Red, choice, sacks.
Cholera Red, fancy, sacks.
Choose
PEACHES.
Chop Unpeeled, S. D., common, sacks.
Chopper Unpeeled, S. D., good, sacks.
Choral Unpeeled, S. D., bleached, common, sacks.
Chord Unpeeled, S. D., bleached, prime, sacks.
Chorus Unpeeled, S. D., bleached, choice, sacks.
Chosen Unpeeled, S. D., bleached, fancy, sacks.
Chowder . . . .Unpeeled, evaporated, bleached, choice, sacks.
Chrome Unpeeled, evaporated, bleached, fancy, sacks.
Chronic Peeled, S. D., bleached, prime, boxes.
Chronicle . . .Peeled, S. D., bleached, choice, boxes.
Chub Peeled, evaporated, bleached, choice, boxes.
Chuckle Peeled, evaporated, bleached, fancy, boxes.
Chura
Chump
PEARS.
('•lurch S. D., quarters, sacks.
Churl S. I)., sliced, boxes.
Churn Evaporated, sliced, boxes.
Cider Evaporated, rings, boxes.
Cipher
PLUMS.
Circle Pitted, S. D., common, sacks.
Circular Pitted, S. D., choice, sacks.
Circulate. . . .Pitted, evaporated, prime, boxes.
Circus Pitted, evaporated, choice, boxes.
Cistern Pitted, evaporated, fancy, boxes.
Citation
PRUNES.
C} te Ungraded in sacks.
Cittern Four sizes in sacks.
Citrine Four sizes in boxes.
Citron Boxes, 40-50 fruit.
City Boxes, 50-60 fruit.
Civet Boxes, 60-70 fruit.
Civil Boxes, 70-80 fruit.
Clack Boxes, 80-go fruit.
Clad Boxes, 90-100 fruit.
Claim
RASPBERRIES.
Clam Raspberries, boxes.
Clamber Blackberries, boxes.
Clammy
RAISINS AND DRIED GRAPES.
Clamor London Layers.
Clamp London Layers, choice.
Clan London Layers, fancy.
Clang Layers.
Clank Loose Muscatels, 2-crown.
Clap Loose Muscatels, 3-crown.
30
Claret
Loose Muscatels, fancy.
Clarion
Third Grade Loose in sacks.
Clast
Unstemmed, sacks.
Clasp
Stemmed, sacks.
Clasper
Seedless Muscatel.
Class
Seedless Muscatel, boxes.
Clatter Seedless Sultanas.
Clause
Clavate
CANNED
FRUITS.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
The Code word means cases, usual number of cans to the case.
Prices are always understood to be by the dozen.
To indicate 2 pound cans, use affix "ox."
To indicate
3
pound cans, use attix "ax."
APPLES.
Comet
Three pounds, standard.
Coilliit
One-half gallon, standard.
Comfort
Gallon, standard.
Comic
Gallon, seconds.
Coming Gallon, New York.
Comma Gallon, Michigan.
Command . . .Gallon, Western (Mo., Ras. or Iowa).
Comment . . .Two pounds. Grab.
Commerce . . .Three pounds, Grab.
Commit
Assorted Pie Fruit.
Common
Two pounds, standard.
Commune . . .Three pounds, standard.
Compact
Gallon, standard.
BLACKBERRIES.
Companion . .Two pounds, standard.
Company . . .Two pounds, table in syrup.
Compare . . . .Two pounds, Lawton in syrup.
Compart Two pounds, preserved.
Compass . .. .Two
Compeer Two
Compend Two
Compete Two
Compile Two
Compiler . . . .Two
Complacent .Two
Complot . . . .Two
Comply Two
Compose Two
Compound ..Two
Compress ...Two
BLUEBERRIES.
pounds, standard,
pounds, table in syrup,
pounds, table in syrup, extra.
CHERRIES,
pounds, Carnation, standard,
pounds, Carnation, table in syrup,
pounds, White, standard,
pounds, White, extra,
pounds, White, extra heavy syrup,
pounds, White, common (seconds),
pounds, Red, pitted, standard,
pounds, Red, pitied, extra,
pounds, Red, pitted, preserved.
DAMSONS.
Comprise . . . .Two pounds, standard.
Comrade . . . .Two pounds, extra.
Concave Two pounds, preserved.
Conceal Three pounds, standard.
Concede Three pounds, extra.
Conceit Three pounds, preserved.
EGG PLUMS.
Concert Two pounds, standard.
Couch Two pounds, extra
Concise
Concision
Conclave .
Conclude .
Two pounds, seconds.
Three pounds, standard.
Three pounds, extra.
Three pounds, seconds.
FIGS.
Conclusive . .Two pounds, in syrup.
ConCOCt
Two pounds Table.
CoUCOCtiVC
• -Two pounds, in cordial (glass).
GRAPES.
Concord
Two pounds, standard.
Concordant.
.Two pounds, extra in syrup.
Coiicrele . . .Three pounds, standard.
Concubine . . .Three pounds, extra in syrup.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
3'
GUAVAS.
Concur Two pounds.
GOOSEBERRIES.
Condemn . . . .Two pounds, standard.
Condense . . . .Two pounds, extra.
GREEN GAGES.
Condign Two pounds, standard.
Condiment . .Twc pounds, extra.
Condition . . .Two pounds, extra heavy syrup.
Condole Two pounds, preserved.
Condolence . .Three pounds, standard.
Condone Three pounds, extra.
Conduce Three pounds, extra heavy syrup.
Conducive . . .Three pounds, preserved.
Conduct Three
Conductor . . .Three
Conduit Three
Cone Three
Confeet Three
Con lection . .Three
Confederate .Three
Confer Three
Confess Three
Confessor. . . .Three
Confidant . . Three
Confide Three
Confine Three
Confirm Three
Confiscate . . .Three
Conflict Three
Confluent . . .Three
Conflux Three
Conform Three
Confound. . . .Three
Confront . . . .Three
PEACHES.
pounds, Crawford, standard, Yellow.
pounds, Crawford, extra, Yellow.
pounds, Crawford, extra heavy syrup.
pounds.
pounds, White Heath, standard.
pounds, White Heath, extra.
lbs,, White Heath, extra in 10 deg. syrup.
lbs., White Heath, extra in 20 deg. syrup.
pounds, White, standard.
pounds, White, extra.
pounds, White, extra in 10 degrees syrup.
pounds, Half Yellow, standard.
pounds, Half Yellow, extra.
pounds, Half Yellow.
pounds. Lemon Cling, standard.
pounds, Lemon Cling, extra.
pounds, Yellow Cling, standard.
pounds, Yellow Cling, extra.
lbs.. Yellow Cling, extra in 10 deg
pounds, seconds. White.
pounds, seconds. Yellow
syrup.
Confuse Three pounds, seconds, Half Yellow.
Confute Three pounds, seconds, White in syrup.
Conge Three pounds, seconds, Yellow, in syrup.
Congeal Three pounds, seconds, Half Yellow, in syrup.
Convenor . . .Three pounds, seconds, County Brands, standard.
Conger Three pounds. Pie, peeled.
Congestive . .Three pounds. Pie, peeled, in syrup.
Congregate .Three pounds, Pie, unpeeled.
Congress . . Three pounds, Pie, unpeeled, in syrup.
Congruence. . Three pounds, Pie, unpitted.
Coilgruily ..One-half gallon, Pie, peeled.
Conic One-half gallon, Pie, peeled, in syrup.
Coilit'S One-half gallon, Pie, unpeeled.
Conjecture . .One-half gallon. Tie, unpeeled, in syrup.
Conjoin Gallon, Pie, peeled.
Conjoint Gallon, Pie, peeled, in syrup.
Conjugal Gallon, Tie, unpeeled.
Conjunct . . . Gallon, Pie, unpeeled, in syrup.
Conjure Gallon, Pie, unpitted.
PEARS.
To indicate Two Pounds size cans, affix "oy."
To indicate Two and one-half Pounds size cans, affix "ay."
Connate Three pounds, Bartlett, standard.
Connect Three pounds, Bartlett, extra.
Connection .Three -pounds, Bartlett, extra, selected, in 20 de-
grees syrup.
Connive Three pounds, Bartlett, standard. New York Slate.
Connubial ..Three pounds, Bartlett, extra, New York Slate,
heavy syrup.
Conoid Three pounds, Bartlett, seconds.
Conquer . . . .Three pounds, Common, cut, unpeeled, in water.
Conquest . . . .Three pounds, Common, cut, unpeeled, in syrup.
Conscious . . .Three pounds, Common, cut, peeled, in water.
Conscript. . . .Three pounds, Common, cut, peeled, in syrup.
Consent Three pounds. Duchess, standard.
Consequent. .Three pounds, Duchess, extra.
Conservator .Three pounds. Duchess, extra, heavy syrup.
Conserve . . . .Three pounds, Duchess, in water.
EVERYTHING
32
___
,
Consider . . . .Three
pounds,
Duchess,
seconds.
Consign
Three
pounds, Bell, in water.
Consist
Three pounds, Bell,
standard.
Consistent
. -Three pounds, Bell,
extra.
Coilsole
Three
pounds, Bell,
seconds.
C()Ils0rt
Three pounds.
Seckcl,
standard.
Conspire . . . -Three
pounds,
Seckel, extra.
Constant . . . .Three
pounds,
Seckel,
seconds.
PINEAPPLES.
For 3
lbs., affix -ox"; for 1 lb., affix "ax."
Constipate
. . Two
pounds. Bahama.
Constitute
. .Two pounds,
Bahama,
grated.
Constrain . ..Two pounds,
Bahama,
Johnson s Brand.
Constraint
..Two
pounds,
coreless,
extra.
Constrict . . .Two pounds,
eyeless,
extra.
Construct . . .Two
pounds, grated,
natural.
Constructive
Gallon
grated,
natural.
Construe , . . -Two pounds,
Nassau.
Consul
Two
pounds,
seconds, in syrup.
Consult
Two
pounds,
seconds, in water.
Consume . , . .Gallon,
seconds, in
water.
QUI NCI'S.
Consumer
. . .Two
pounds,
standard.
Contact
Two pounds,
extra, in
syrup.
Contain
Two pounds,
preserved.
Contemn
. . . -Two
pounds, in water.
RASPBERRIES.
Contempt
. - -Two
pounds,
Black,
standard.
ConS
-...Two "pounds.
Black, extra, in to degrees syrup.
Content
Two
pounds, Black,
preserved.
Contents . . . .Two pounds, Black,
standard, in water.
Contest
• -Two
pounds, Red,
standard.
Pnnlext
. -Two
pounds, Red, extra, in syrup.
Continent...
Two pounds, Red, extra, in ,0 degrees syrup.
Continual
. . -Two
pounds, Red, extra,
preserved.
FOR
CANNERS.
Contort —
Contortion
Contra —
Contraband
Contract
.
.
Contractor
Contradict
Contralto .
Contrary
Contrast
.
STRAWBERRIES.
.Two pounds,
standard.
.Two
pounds,
standard, in syrup.
Two pounds,
extra, in 10 degrees syrup.
.Two
pounds, extra, in 20
degrees syrup.
Two
pounds, extra, in 30
degrees
syrup.
, .Two
pounds,
extra,
preserved.
. .Two
pounds,
seconds.
! .Two
pounds,
seconds,- in water.
WHORTLEBERRIES.
. .Two
pounds,
standard.
. .Two
pounds,
table, in syrup.
CANNED
VEGETABLES.
Cases of Two Dozen, each.
Pru* is per dozen.
which is most
commonly
used
To indicate 2 lbs., use affix "ox ; 3
lbs.,
amx g
affix
"ov."
ASPARAGUS.
Contrite....
Two and
one-half
pounds,
Extra
White,
square
cans,
California.
Contrive....
Two and
one-half
pounds,
square cans,
Cahforma.
Control
Two
pounds.
Controvert..
Two
pounds,
tips.
Contuse
Two
pounds,
Boreaux.
Conundrum
-Three
oounds,
square cans.
Convene
BEANS.
r,,n vent
Three
pounds,
Baked.
ConTentioU.
.Baked,
picnic, 4
dozen in case.
Converge
...Flageolet.
Converse...
Two
pounds,
String,
trench
Convert
Two
pounds,
String,
standard.
Convex
Two
pounds,
String,
extra.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
33
Convey Two pounds, String;, seconds.
Convict Two pounds, String-, White Wax, standard.
Convince Two pounds, String, White Wax, extra.
Couvocate . . .Two pounds, String, White Wax, seconds.
Convoke. . . . Two pounds, Refugee, standard.
Convolve . . . Two pounds, Refugee, extra.
Convoy Two pounds, Refugee, extra, small.
Convulse . . . .Two pounds, Lima, Green, standard.
Cony Two pounds, Lima, Green, extra.
Coo Two pounds, Lima, Green, seconds.
Cook Two pounds, Lima, soaked.
Cool
CORN.
Coolness Two pounds, Sugar, standard.
Cooly Two pounds, Sugar, extra.
Cooper Two pounds, Sugar, seconds.
Coot Two pounds, New York State.
Copal Two pounds, Maryland, standard.
Cope Two pounds, Maryland, extra.
Coping Two pounds, Maine, standard brands.
Copped Two pounds, Maine, extra brands.
Copperas Two pounds, Western, standard brands.
Corpse Two pounds, Western, fancy brands.
Copula Two pounds.
Copulate
Copy
Coquette Two pounds, Corn and Tomatoes.
MUSHROOMS.
Coral One-fourth, Extra French.
Coralilie One-fourth, Ordinary.
OKRA.
Corb Two pounds, standard.
Cordage . . . .Two pounds, and Tomatoes.
l'FAS.
Cordate Fine Green French.
Cordial Extra fine Creen French.
Cordon Superfine Green French.
Core Two pounds, Early June, standard.
Corf Two pounds, Early June, extra.
Cork Two pounds, Early June, first and best.
Corky Two pounds, Early June, County brands.
Cornea Two pounds, Early June, seconds.
Corner Two pounds, sifted.
Cornet Two pounds, extra, sifted.
Cornice Two pounds, White Marrowfat.
Corolla Two pounds, White Marrowfat, extra.
Coroner . . . .Two pounds, White Marrowfat, seconds.
Corporal . . . .Two pounds, Marrowfat.
Corps Two pounds, Marrowfat, extra.
Correct Two pounds, Marrowfat, seconds.
Correction ..Two pounds, Marrowfat, soaked.
Corrector . . . Two pounds, Champion of England.
Correspond. .Two pounds, Champion of England, extra.
Corridor . . . .Two pounds, Champion of England, seconds.
Corrode Two pounds, Yorkshire Hero.
Corrupt Two pounds, Yorkshire Hero, extra.
PUMPKIN.
Corse Three pounds.
Corset Gallon.
SUCCOTASH.
Cortege Two pounds, Green, standard.
Cortical . . . .Two pounds, Green, seconds.
Corsey Two pounds, soaked.
TOMATOES.
Cost Three pounds, standard.
Costal Three pounds, extra.
Costive Three pounds, standard, California.
Costume . . . .Three pounds, County Brands, standard.
Cot Three pounds, standard, hot packed.
34
EVERYTHING
EOl
CANNED
FISH.
Code word indicates cases, usual number of cans to the case.
Prices are by the dozen.
ANCHOVIES.
Dab
Pickled.
Dabble
Essence, one-half pints.
Dace
1'aste Stone Jars.
Dad
One pound, in oil, one and one-half do/.en bottles.
Dagger
One lb., extra, in oil, one and one-half uoz. bottles.
pa}ly
One pound, in salt, one and one-half doz. bottles.
Dale
Dam
One pound Uluefish, four dozen.
Dame
Bloater, Paste Stone Jars.
CLAMS.
Damp
One pound Clams.
Dance
One pound.
"
Little Neck."
Dandle
One pound. Spiced.
Danger
Two pounds,
Chowder.
Dank
Clam Eritters.
Dapper
CRABS.
Dare
One pound Crabs, Devilled.
Dark
One pound Crab Meat.
Darkly
I. OUSTERS.
Darn
One pound Lobster, two dozen.
Dart
One pound Lobster, four dozen.
Dash
One pound Lobster, fancy.
Data
Lobster, Devilled, too/, tins.
Daub
Lobster, Pickled, pints, in glass.
Daunt
Lobster, Spiced.
Davit
CANNERS.
MACKEREL.
Day
One pound Mackerel, four dozen.
Daysman
One pound Mackerel, Soused.
Deacon
Two pounds, in mustard.
Deaden
No. 5,
in salt.
Deaf
OYSTERS.
Deal
No. 1, Light.
Dean
No. 1,
Standard.
Dear No. 1, Lunch.
Debar
No. 1, Cove, light.
Debase
No. I, Standard, spiced.
Debit
No. 2, Lightweight.
Debt
No. 2,
Standard.
Decamp
No. 2, Standard, spiced.
Decant
No. 2, Cove, 14
ounces.
Decay
No. 2, Cove, extra, fiat cans.
Deceit
Sixteen ounces, Spiced.
Decent
Twelve ounces, Spiced.
Decide Eight ounces,
Spiced.
Deck
Pint, in jars, Pickled, standard.
Declaim
Lint, in jars, Pickled,
extra.
Decline
Quart, in jars, Pickled, standard.
Decoct
Quart, in jars, Pickled, extra.
Decolor
Decorate —
SALMON.
To designate other size tin cans, use affix same as in Canned
Meats.
Decoy
No. I,
Sacramento River.
Decree
No. I, Columbia River.
Decry
No. 1, Skeena River, P>. C.
Deduct
No. 1,
Alaska.
Deed
No. 1, outside rivers.
Deepen
No. 1. fiat cans.
Deer
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
35
SARDINES.
Deface
% American.
Defame '/ American.
Default
y2
Imported.
Defeat
% Imported.
Defect
%
10-12 fish, imported.
Defense
)i
S-io fish, imported.
Defer # Boneless.
Deiiance
yi
Picnic.
SHRIMP.
Defile Dunbar's.
Define .. Biloxi.
Deforce Potted.
Defray Sea Front.
Defy
Degrade
CANNED MEATS.
The Code word means cases, usual number of cans to the case.
Size are not indicated by the Cipher.
To indicate i lb., use the affix "ox."
To indicate 2 lbs., use the affix "ax."
To indicate
3 lbs., use the affix "oy."
To indicate 6 lbs., use the affix "ay."
Demur Beef, Roast, round cans.
Den Beef, Roast, flat cans.
Denote Beef, Sliced.
Dense Beef, Potted.
Dent Beef, Corned.
Dental Beef, Corned, four pounds, one dozen.
Dentist Beef, Corned, ten pounds, half dozen.
Dentoid Beef, Tongue.
Deny Chicken, Honed.
Depart Chicken, Kricasse.
Depend Chicken, Devilled.
Depict Chicken, Potted.
Deplore I lam, Lunch.
Deplume Ham, Sugar Cured.
Deport Ham,
% Potted, two dozen.
Depose Dam,
% Potted, four dozen.
Deposit Ham, Devilled.
Depot Mutton, Roast.
Deprave Mutton, Corned.
Depress Meats, Assorted.
Deprive Ox Tongue.
Depth Pigs Feet, whole, two and one-half pounds.
Depute Tongue, l.unch.
Deputy Turkey, Roast.
Derange ....Turkey, Boned.
Deride Turkey, Devilled.
Derive Turkey, Potted.
Dervish Tenderloin.
MILK.
Descant Milk, Condensed, No. 1.
Descend Milk, Condensed. 8 oz.
Descent Milk, Condensed,
9
oz.
Descry Milk, Condensed, 16 oz.
SOUPS.
Cases usual number cans to the case. Code word indicates No.
2 size.
To indicate
3 lbs. or No.
3, affix "ox.
Desert Assorted.
Deserve Beef.
Design Chicken.
Desire Chicken, with Okra.
Desist Creen Turtle.
Desk Julienne.
EVERYTHING
3
r>
Despair
Mock Turtle.
Desperate . . .Maccaroni.
Despite
Mulligatawny.
Despond
Mutton, with lJarley.
Despot
Oxtail.
Destine
I'ea.
Destroy
Tomato.
Detach
Vegetable.
Detail
Vermicelli.
Detain
Terrapin.
Detect
Terrapin Stew.
RAW
OYSTERS.
Deter
Cans, Extra select.
Dete9t
Cans, Select.
Detort
Cans, Standard.
Detract
Cans, Medium.
Detrude . •• Cans, XXX.
Douce
Gallons, Extra Select.
Develop
Gallons,
Select.
Deviate
Gallons,
Standard.
Device
Callous, Medium.
Devil
Gallons,
XXX.
Devoid
Barrels, No. i, Shell.
Devolve . . .Barrels, No. 2,
Shell.
Devoted
Varrcls, No. 3.
Shell.
PICKLES.
Cases, two do/en in ease.
Devour
Tickles, pints.
Dew
Vickies, pints, English style.
Dexter
Vickies, quarts, one do/en in case.
Diadem
Tickles, one-half gallon, one do/en in case.
Dial
.
.Chow-Chow, pints.
Diary
Vickies, Midgets, fancy.
Dibble
Vickies, Picnic, fancy.
Dice
Vickies, Assorted, lunch.
FOR CANNERS.
Dictate
Vickies, barrels, 30
gallons, 1,200 Vickies.
Dictum
Vickies, barrels, 1,000 Vickies.
Did
Vickies, barrels, 1,500 Vickies.
Die
Vickies, barrels, I ,Soo Vickies.
Diet
Vickies, barrels, 2,000 Vickies
Digit
Vickies, half barrels.
Digress
Vickies, 10 gallon kegs.
Dike
Vickies,
5
gallon kegs.
Dilate
Vickies,
3
gallon kegs.
PURCHASE
AND SALE OF TIN PLATE.
pac0
Quote lowest price, immediate delivery.
Pacer
Quote lowest price, delivery .
Pacific
^'e offer you subject to prompt, reply by letter.
pacll
We offer you subject to prompt, reply by wire.
Packet
Your quotation Tin Plate received and noted.
Please enter our order as follows, immediate
delivery.
pa<l
Your quotation Tin Plate received. Please enter
our order as follows, for future deliver)'.
pa<ldle
Please
acknowledge receipt of order and furnish
by mail accepted contracts.
Padlock
Did not succeed in placing your order at price-
named, for .
Pagan
best we can do, wire if we shall accept.
Page
Vlease place our order as per message just re-
ceived, for .
Pagoda
Vlease place our order as per letter just received,
for
.
1>aid
Tin Plate bought of ,
and now ^\uu, has not
been received. Have same sent forward with-
out delay. If shipped, send tracer.
-hipped Tin Plate •
will ship Tin Plate
Pail

Pain

paint
We have placed your order at price named an.
received contracts
which we forward by mail.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
37
COKE TINS.
I. C. 14X20. PENLAN GRADE.
BESSEMER
STEEL.
J.
B. GRAFTON.
200 to 500 bxs.,
500 to 1,000
"
100
"
150 '
200
"
250
'
300
"
500
"
I,0OO
"
Painting,
Palate,
Pailing,
Palsy,
Pampas,
Pane,
Pannier,
Panther.
Papal,
Par,
Pair,
Pale,
Pall,
Palter,
Pamper,
Panel,
Pansey,
Pantry,
Paper,
Parable,
Palace,
Palette,
Palm,
Paltry,
Pander,
Pang,
Pantheon,
Pap,
Papist,
Parade,
SQS. 15 X
15.'
Carload
100 bxs.,
150
'
200
"
Paradox,
Parasol,
Parch,
Parent,
Paragon,
Parboil,
Pardon,
Parental,
Parapet,
Parcel,
Pare,
Paring,
SQS. 12 X 12.
100 bxs.,
200
"
Parish,
Parody,
Parsley,
Parley,
Parole,
Parson,
Parlor,
Parrot,
Partake,
1. c. 14 x
19^
100 bxs.,
150
'
200
"
250
"
Partial,
Partner,
Pass,
Passion,
Past,
Particle,
Parts,
Passable,
Passive,
Pastern,
Partly,
Party,
Passage,
Passport,
Pastime,
1. c. 20 x 28.
Carload
100 bxs.,
150
"
200
"
250
"
Pastor,
Patch,
Paternal,
Pathos,
Patriot,
Pastry,
Pate,
Path,
Pathway,
Patrol,
Pasture,
Patent,
Pathetic,
Patient,
Patron,
I. C. IO X 20.
IOO "
200 "
Patten,
Pauper,
Pawn,
Patler,
Pause,
Pawner,
Patty,
Pave,
Pay,
COKE TINS.—Continued.
I. C. 14 X 22. TENLAN GRADE.
BESSEMER
STEEL.
J.
B. GRAFTON.
Carload
100 bxs.,
200
"
250
"
Paymaster,
Peach,
Pear,
Pebble,
Pea,
Peahen,
Pearly,
Pecan,
Peace,
Peal,
Pease,
Peck.
Note.—Unless otherwise noted, full standard weight is under-
stood.
Peculate ... 90 Lbs.
Peculiar 95
Lbs.
Pedal
100 Lbs.
Pedant
10S Lbs.
Note.—Unless otherwise noted price is f. o. b.
PIG TIN.
MALACCA. B0NSTEAD.
Peddle,
Peel,
Peerless,
Pell,
Pedestal
I Peep,
I Pelf,
'Pellet,
AUSTRALIAN.
Pedigree,
Peer,
Pelican
Pelt.
PIG LEAD.
Peltry
One to five tons Prime Domestic.
Pen
Two tons Prime Domestic.
Penal
Five tons Prime Domestic.
Pence
1,000 pounds Prime Domestic.
Pendant 2,000 pounds Prime Domestic.
SOLDER.
1 to 5 t'ns.
2
5
1,000 lbs.
2,000 lbs.
TRIANGULAR BARS
3^x 80 x IOO.
Pending,
Pension,
Pepper,
Perform,
Perish,
Penitent,
Pensive,
Pepsin,
Perfume
Perjure,
DROPS.
%x 80x100.
Penman,
Pentogon
Perch,
Perhaps,
Permit,
Pennant
Penult,
Perdu,
Perigee,
Perplex.
WIRE.
y2
x
yz
ISoxioo
Pennate.l Penny,
Peony,
Perfect,
Peril,
Perrv,
People,
Perfidy
Period,
P rsist,
38
EVERYTHING
FOR CANNERS.
CANS.
Standard size, ordinary cap.
To indicate large hole use affix OX.
To
indicate
solder hemmed caps use affix AX.
To indicate solder
creased caps use affix OY.
2 LliS.
Carload ....
5,000
10,000
25,000
50,000
100,000
250,000
Person,
Pertain,
Pervade,
Pester,
Petrel,
Pew,
Phenix,
3 LBS.
Perspire,
! Pertly.
Perverse,
j
Petal,
Petrify,
Pewter,
! Phial,
6 LBS.
Persuade,
GALLON.
Pert,
, Perturb,
Peruse,
Pervert,
Pest,
Tetard,
Petit,
Pettish,
Petty,
Phantom,
Phase,
IPhiz,
Phonic.
TIME.
Phase
A. M.
Physic
P- M-
pica
Yesterday A. M.
Pickax
Yesterday P. M.
Picket
This A. M.
Pickle
This P. M.
Picnic
To-morrow A. M.
Picture
To-morrow P. M.
j>j
e
.First to middle of month.
Piece
Middle to last of month.
pjer
Last month.
1ST TO lO'I'H.
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September. . . .
October
Pitfall,
November.. . . Pivot,
December I
Plain,
Piety,
Pike,
Pilgrim,
Pillar,
l'imp,
Pine,
Pink,
Pipe,
Pistol,
IOTH TO 20TH. 20TH TO 30TH.
Pigeon,
rigmv,
Pile,
Pilfer,
Pill,
Pillage,
Pillow,
Pilot,
Pimple,
Pinch,
Pinery,
Pinion,
Pint,
Pioneer,
Pippin,
Pirate,
Piston,
Pitch,
Pith,
Pity,
Place,
Plaid,
Plainly,
Plaint,
ADVICE TO
TRAVELING
SALESMEN.
Plan
Another man has been over this ground I am
going on.
pi aue
Answer lowest figure at which 1 may sell, another
salesman here figuring low.
pianet
Come home soon as through at .
plank
Come home quickest route.
Plant
Do not be too stiff in your prices, rather than
miss
sales sell on basis .
piauter
Do best you can, make the sale at best figure.
plash
Do not come home until
Plater
Do not leave
until you hear from us.
plat
1 return by first train.
Plate
• • I wiH be bome if nothin
g
»llerferes b
>'
"
plater.
The market has
strengthened ;
advance prices
.
PlatOOIl
• -The
market has weakened ;
drop prices
-
Platter
Trade is dull ; shall I go on or come home ?
Play
...'..'
-You are going too fast ;
take more time and work
the ground better.
piayf„l
You are selling too low
piea
You are going too slow
Plnflil .. .You may sell at

,
Please'.'.'.'.
. . .When
are you going to leave the place
where you
are now ?
do not take less than
get out and work lively,
nothing less.
pledge
When
will you be at

BUYING.
prune
At
what price can you buy ?
pry
At auction
to-day.
Psallll
At private sale to-day.
Pshaw
Are r' ,,in
S
>' our orders -
. ,
puWic
Are there any more to be had at same price
Publish
...Bought for your account.
Pneke,.
Bought
subject .0 your
acceptance,
which
please
confirm.
pnddle
Buy and hold subject to order.
p„flf
Buy and ship via

pngh
Buy
and ship for our account.
EVERYTHING
Puke Buy and ship for account of .
Pull Buy and ship at once by cheapest and best route.
Pullet Buy at lowest possible price.
Pulley Buy on 30 days' time, if cannot do better.
Pulp Buy for cash, usual discount if cannot do better.
Pulpit Buy at price named in your message.
Pulse Buy at price named in your letter.
Puma Can you buy more at same price ?
Puiup Can you duplicate last purchase ?
Pun Cannot duplicate last purchase?
Punch Cannot buy at your limit
; have refusal at .
Punish Cannot be bought for less than .
Punt Consider your order filled unless you hear from us
to the contrary.
Pupil Do not buy at an advanced price.
Puppet Do not buy until you receive our letter.
Pur Did you fill our order at price named
>
Pure Had bought before we received your message.
Purge Had bought before we received your letter.
Purify If not satisfactory, decline by wire.
Puritan If you cannot buy at our limit, wire best you
can do.
Purity If you cannot fill order immediately, wire us.
Purloin If you wish us to try, wire.
Purple If prices are higher, hold until you hear from us.
Purport Impossible to fill your whole order.
PUTT Will furnish balance soon as possible unless coun-
termanded.
Purser Shall we fill order at same price ?
Pursue Shall we fill your order at an advance price ?
Purvey Shall we use our judgment ?
Pus Shall we buy to arrive ?
Push Sha1' we buy for cash, less usual discount ?
Puss Take part or as much as you can get.
Put Telegraph your best offer.
Putty Telegraph your order.
Pyre Use your judgment.
OR CANNERS.
3<J
Rabbet Use your own judgment in buying, we will be
satisfied.
Rabbi We can duplicate quality and price.
Rabble We can duplicate quality, price slightly advanced.
Rabid We have bought for you.
Race We have your order, but too late to buy to-day.
Rack We will be able to fill your order within a few
days.
Racket We annot fill your order at prices named.
Radiant We countermand our order.
Raft You can take a few days to fill order.
Rafter ..... .You are buying more than we need, hold on.
CORRESPONDENCE.
Rage According to contract.
Raid According to instructions.
Rail Answer quick.
Rain Answer by wire.
Rainy Answer by letter.
Rake Answer by wire care of
Rally Arrange on best terms.
Ram Arrangements are all made.
Ramble Best I can do.
Rammer Can you furnish goods equal to ?
Ramp Can you furnish goods equal to your last year's
pack ?
Rancor Confirm promptly by wire.
Range Cannot get refusal, another party ahead.
Rank Do not want it at any price.
Rankle Follow instruction in letter.
Rant Go ahead.
Ranter Hold subject to instructions.
Rap Hold subject to order.
Rape Have you received our letter ?
Rapid Immediately.
Rapine Is it all right ?
Rapt It is all right.
Rapture . . . .Letter received and will have prompt attention.
EVERYTHING
40 . .
Rare
Message
received.
Rascal
No more at any price.
Rasll
has not come ;
wire us what route it was
shipped bv.
Rashly
found and will rush through to destination.
Rasp
On no account.
Rate
Received
your telegram.
Kather
Received your telegram
;
we will ship.
Ratio
Sending
particulars by mail.
Ration
Send answer by
half-rate message.
RatoOll
Send terms and conditions.
Rattan
Telegraph at our expense.
Rattle
Telegraph by
"
Sawfish"
Cypher Code.
Ravage
We are waiting for instructions.
Rave
We confirm.
Raven
We have refusal,
subject to
immediate reply by
wire.
Ravish
Who are the parties?
Raw
Wire name of buyer.
MARKET.
Ray
Buyers are plenty ;
stocks light.
Reach
Business very dull.
Read
Business very good.
Reader
Business looking better.
Reading
Desirable goods are scarce.
Ready
Difficult to buy at any price.
Real
Do you think advance in price will be sustained ?
Realm
Is there any advance in price ?
Ream
Keep us fully posted in regard to any change 111
the market.
Reav>
Market strong, tendency
upward.
Rear
Market weak, tendency
downward.
lleason
Market is firm with no change in prices.
ReJ,el
Market is in an excited condition and prices arc
unsettled.
Rehnke
No important change has occurred since our last.
FOR
CANNERS.
Rebus
Owing to an excited market, sales are active at
higher prices.
Rehut
Prices are too high to be maintained long.
Recall
There has been an advance of fully
Recant
There has been a decline of fully
Recast
• • To-day's
quotations are as follows.
Recent
The impression is that the market has reached the
top.
ReceS8
The impression is that the market has reached the
bottom.
RESPONSIBILITY.
Receipt
Are
all right?
Recline
Are
troubles
serious or only temporary ?
Bw
.
o! l
'
are in trouble,
reported to be very unsafe.
J^cord
'.
'. '. '.
'.
'.
are not in serious trouble ;
considered safe
for reasonable
amount.
Recount
....
are all right
;
good for anything they will
Re tor
-
are doubtful ;
advise you to be cautious.
Recur
.'.'.'.••
-Advise you not to accept
without ample security.
Red
\re we involved ?
Redan
^e you involved ?
Redeem
Better pay the claim.
Redraw
Bank
refuses to cash the draft.
Reduce
Buyer's standing not
sufficiently
well known.
Reed
By failure of.
Reef
Can you refer to any house here ?
Reel" ......
-Can learn very little about them and that is unfav-
orable.
Reeve
Cannot accept
draft unless secured.
Refer
Dollars.
Refine
Do you need any
assistance ?
Refit
Draw on demand.
Reflux
Draw at sight.
Reform
Have remitted.
Refrain
Have drawn at sight.
Refuse
• • -Have drawn on demand.
Refund
Have
drawn at sight, bill lading
attached.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
41
Refuse Is the buyer considered unquestionably good ?
Regain Pay draft.
Regard Pay immediately.
Regret Remit by first mail.
Reign Remit by telegraph.
Reject Will remit to-day.
Relate We will not require any assistance.
SELLING.
Relay At what price can we sell ?
Release Answer very lowest price.
Relic Answer lowest price at which I may sell.
Relish Are all sold?
Rely At what price will you sell, delivered ?
Remain At what price will you sell, f. o. b. ?
Remark Can you sell more ?
Remedy .... Can you sell more at same price ?
Remise Can you furnish goods equal to ? at what
price ?
Remit Cannot tell yet whether we can fill your orders.
Remote Close the contract.
Remove Cannot sell at over
Rend Cannot sell at your limit.
Render Do not sell.
Renew Do not sell any more at that price.
Rent Do not sell any more at any price.
Rental Do not sell below
Repair Have sold.
Repass Have sold, immediate delivery.
Repay Have sold, future
Repeal How many can you sell ?
Repeat How many more can you sell ?
Repel If you cannot sell at price, what is best you
can do ?
Repent Is there any prospect of selling ?
Repine Make positive sale.
Reply Make sales subject to pack.
Report Make no further sales until you hear from us.
Reprint May I sell more ?
Reprove Must be sold.
Request Must have buyer's name by telegraph.
Resent New pack.
Reserve Pack 1890.
Reside Pack 1891.
Resign Pack 1892.
Resin Pack 1893.
Resolve Pack 1894.
Resort Pack 1895.
Respect Pack 1896.
Respite Pack 1897.
Rest Sell only in car lots.
Restore Sell only in small lots.
Retake Same terms and conditions as last.
Retard Sold subject to your approval.
Retire Sold subject to your approval, which please con-
firm.
Retreat Will not sell for less than
Return We can sell more at same price.
Reveal We cannot sell more at same price.
Revere We cannot sell at price you name.
Review refuses to take goods.
Revoke refuses to take goods, says not equal to
sample.
SHIPPING INSTRUCTIONS.
Revolt Ship as soon as possible.
Revolve Ship immediately.
Reward Ship soon as ready.
Rheum Ship in refrigerator cars.
Rhomb Ship usual way.
Rhyme Shipped as per instructions.
Note.—Code word means, Ship by or via. To convey "we
have shipped by," use affix "ox." To convey "were shipped
by," use affix
"
oy."
Ribbed Adams Express.
Ribbon American Express.
EVERYTHING
42
^
Rice
Express.
Rich
American Line Steamers.
Riches
Anchor Line.
Rick
Allan Line Steamers.
Rid
Atchison,
Topeka &
Santa Fe R. R.
Kiddle
Atlas Line of Mail Steamers.
Ride
B. &0. R. R.
Rider
B. & O. Express.
jjjft
B. & O. (Lake and Rail).
Right
...... -B. & O. R. R., care C. cV E. I. R. R. at Chicago.
RU1
B. & O., care L, B. cV W. at Columbus.
Rjm
Baltimore & Charleston Line.
Rjme
Baltimore & Potomac R. R.
RlUg
Baltimore cS: Savannah Line.
Kjnse
Baltimore & Florida Line of Steamers.
Riot
Black Line.
Ripe
Blue Line.
Rise
Bay Line
Risen
Bangor &
Portland R. R.
Rite
Boston &
Bangor S. S. Co.
Rival
Boston & Maine R. R.
Kive„
Boston,
Norfolk,
Washington &
Baltimore Line.
Road
Bremen Line Steamers.
Roam
Care of
Roast
Canal.
Rob
Canada Southern.
Robe
• .Canadian Pacific.
Rod
California Southern Pacific R. R.
R de
Charlotte,
Columbia &
Augusta R. R.
Ro
g
ue
Chesapeake & Ohio, and
Southwestern R. R.
Roll
Cheapest route.
Romp
Chicago &
Alton R. R.
Rood
Chicago & Great
Western R. R.
R00f
Chicago,
Burlington & Quincy R. R.
Rook
Chicago,
Milwaukee &
St. Paul R. R.
Room
Chicago, St. Louis &
Pittsburgh R. R.
Roost
Chicago, St. Paul &
Kansas City Ry.
R00t
Chicago, Rock Island &
Pacific R. R.
FOR
CANNERS.
Rouge . .
.
...c. c.
Round. .
.
...C. P.
Rout
...C. P.
Rove
...C. P.
Royal ... ...C. P.
Rubber.
.
...C. P.
Ruby ... ...C. P.
Rude .... ...X. P.
Rope
Chicago & Northwestern R. R.
I J oral
Continental Line.
Rose
• • .Cincinnati & Southeastern R. R.
Rosin
Cincinnati, New
Orleans &
Texas Pacific R. R.
Rot
Cunard Line
Steamers.
Rote
Clyde Line.
..C. C. C. Si I. Ry.
.C. P., and U. P. R- R-
and 1). & R. G.
U.
P.,andC. M. & St. P. R. R.
U. P., andC. ,V N. W. R. R.
U. P., andC. R. 1. &
1'. R. R-
U. P., andC. B. & Q.
R- !<•
U. P., and Wabash.
Ruff
Diamond Line Steamers.
R„g
Diamond Jo.
Line Steamers.
S__er
Delaware,
Lackawanna &
Western R. R.
Sack
Denver .V New Orleans R. R.
Sad
Express.
Sadly
Empire Line.
S_fe
Erie & Pacific 1 Hspatch.
Sag
Erie & North Shore I .ine.
Sa^e
Ericsson Line.
Said
Fast Freight Line.
SaU
Florida
Dispatch Freight Line.
Saint
('lobe Line.
Salad
Green
Line.
Safe
Great
Western
Dispatch.
Saline
Great
Southern
Dispatch.
Sally
Guiofl
Line.
Saloon
Gulf Coast
Dispatch
Freight Line.
Salt
Grand
Trunk Ry.
Salute
Hamburg
Line Steamers.
Salve
1Iavre Une steamers-
Sand
Inland Route.
Sandal
Inman Line
Steamers.
Sandy
Interstate
Dispatch.
Sane
Illinois
Central R. R.
EVERYTHING FOR CANNERS.
43
Sap . .Indiana, Bloomington iS: Western R. R. Scum Steamer to Boston, thence by vessel.
Sapor . . Kankakee Line. . ..Steamer to New York.
Sappy . . Kanawha Dispatch. Seal....... . .Steamer to Boston.
Sash . .Kentucky Central K. R. Seam . .Sea.
Sassafras
.
. . Lackawanna Line. Seaman . .
.
. .Star Union Line.
Sat . . Lake Superior Transit Co. Search . .South Shore Line.
Sate . . Lehigh Valley Ry. Season .... . . Steamer.
Satin . .Louisville & Nashville R. R. Seat . . Sarnia Line.
Satire . .Maryland Central R. R. Secure. . . . . .Southern Pacific.
Saucer . .
.
. . Merchants' Dispatch Transportation Co.
Sedan . .S. P.. and A. V.
Savage . .Midland Line, care C. & E. I. Ry.
Sedge . .S. P., and A. T. & S. F.
Save . . Maine Central Ry.
Savory . .
.
. . Maryland Steamboat Co. Seed . .
"
Sun-Set
"
Route.
Saw . . Merchants & Miners' Transportation Co.
Seek .State Line Steamers.
Saxon — . .Missouri, Kansas & Texas Ry. Seen . . St. Louis & San Francisco Ry.
Say . . Missouri Pacific Ry. Seine . .St. Louis & St. Paul Packet Co.
Scale . . Morgan Line.
Self . .Subject to cartage.
. .National Line Steamers.
Sell . .T. W. & W. Ry. at Fort Wayne.
Scanty . .New York Central & Hudson River R. R. Senate .Texas & Pacific.
Scape . .New York & Baltimore Transportation Co. Senna . Take bill of lading.
Scar . .New York, Lake Erie & Western Ry. '
Sense — . .Traders' Dispatch.
Scarlet . .Northern Central Ry. Sent .United States Express.
Scene . .Northern Transportation Co. Sentry .Union Line.
Scent . .Northern Pacific Ry. Separate .
.
. . Union Pacific Ry.
School . . Norfolk & Western Ry. Separation . Union Steamboat Co.
Scold . .North German Lloyd Steamship Co. Sepoy .Union Star Line.
Scoop . .Old Dominion S. S. Co. Seraph .... .Virginia, Tennessee & Georgia Air Line.
Score . .Outside Line. Serge .Vermont Central.
Scorn . .Philadelphia & Reading Ry. Sermon .... .Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Ry.
Scout . . Pennsylvania Ry. Serous . Wabash Steamer Line.
Scow . . Pennsylvania Central Transportation Co. Serpent ..
.
White Line.
Scrap . .Quickest route. Serum .... .White Star Line Steamers.
Scream —. . Rail. Serve Western Transportation Co.
Screw . . Rail and river. Set .Western Maryland Ry.
Scri |> . . Red Line. Seton .Wire shipping instructions.
Scrub . . Red Star Line. Seven .Western New York & Pennsylvania Ry.
Scull . . Richmond & York River Line. Seventh . .
.
.West Shore Ry.
Sculptor . . . .Savannah Line. Sever
EVERYTHING
44
TERMS AND
CONDITIONS.
§ew
Buyer to furnish labels which seller puts on.
Sex
Sextaut
Cash less, i]/2
per cent.
Shade
Cash less, usual discount.
Shady
Cash 30
days.
Shah
Draft against bill of lading.
Shale
Draw on
demand for two-thirds of invoice.
Sham
Draw at sight, B. L. attached.
Shape
Delivered free on board.
Shave
Delivered.
Shear
Shed
Free on board.
Sheep
Goods to have buyer's labels.
Sheet
Same terms and conditions as last.
Shell
Subject to approval of samples.
Shin
Subject to our approval.
Ship
Subject to your approval.
Shoal
Subject to prompt reply by wire.
Shod
Ten days.
Shone
Thirty days.
FOR CANNERS.
Shore .
.
Short .
.
Shot...
Should
Show . .
.
Shut .
.
Shy ....
Side .
Shift
Silent .
Silk.
Silva .
.
Simple
Sin ... •
Sine . .
Sinew .
HOW MANY
Wholesale
Grocers Are There
IN THE UNITED STATES?
MV 1\I17\A/ T TQT
(1891 Edition

of the Wholesale Grocers of the United States gives about 2,500. Every
•*•"*- -*•
-1
"
i-< " " -LjIO 1
Wholesale House in the United States is given. In the larger-smaller places, say 10,000
in population, the largest dealers in Canned and Evaporated Goods are given. These general dealers are distinctly marked
so you will not get them mixed up with the wholesale dealers.
THIS LIST gives the population of each place by last census.
IT GIVES the Banks in each place—a great convenience to you in making collections and inquiries in regard to the
responsibility of your customers.
IT GIVES the Street Numbers in the cities.
IT ALSO gives in every place of 10,000 population, or more, a few leading and responsible
=BR0KERS IN CANNED AND EVAPORATED GOODS.-
You frequently have goods that you wish to offer in cities where you are unacquainted ; through these men you can reach
any market in the United States.
Book of 175 pages, nicely bound, price $5.00.
Every Canner, Packer and Fruit Evaporator Needs This Book.
CANNERS AND PACKERS DIRECTORY OP NORTH AMERICA.
^LI™ZiXJZ
Fish, Meats, Jellies, Preserves, etc., etc., in North America. Nicely bound; 1891 Edition. Price $5.00.
address,
ELLIOT D. FISHER,
FRANKLINYILLE, N. Y.
"RisHei^Gorn^Silker
(Improved for 1891)
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W
E. D. FISHEK, Esq., Kansas. Ills., Dec. 27, 1889.
Dear Sir „•—I cheerfully volunteer to say as to the merit of your Corn
Silker, that it is without any exception the most perfect machine for the
purpose intended of anything 1 have ever seen, and I have tried several
makes, and seen a good many more in operation. Your Silker did
my work the past season to my entire satisfaction. I feel that I cannot say
too much in its praise. I recommend it to all Canners ol Green Corn as
the machine to buy.
Yours, very respectfully,
JOHN T. STAFF.
Mr E. D. FISHEK,
Fuanklinvillk, N. Y., Jan. 17, 1890.
j)ear Sir —We have used one of your Corn Silkers two seasons with
entire satisfaction. It silked the corn for two Hemingway Cookers, and is
the best machine ol the kind we have ever seen. Respectfully,
FRANKLINVILLE CANNING CO.,
A. O. Holmes, Secretary.
E. D. FISHEK,
Hamburgh, N. Y., Feb. lti, 1891.
Dear Sir -—The Com Silker purchased of you last season gave the
best of satisfaction. Yours respectltilly, T. L. BUNTING, Sec'y.
PRICE, $100.00.
MANUFACTURED BY E. D. FISHER,
FRANKLINVILLE, N. Y.
TIME KEEPING SIMPLIFIED
SIMPLE AND ACCURATE IN EVERY PARTICULAR.
A New 6^rb System.
Been in practical use for several years. Is particularly useful in factories
where the time kept by the hour is irregular and broken.
The foreman has absolute control of the time of his department, and saves much trouble
often caused by careless time-keeping and guess-work
practiced in many places.
DISPUTES ON P7W DSYS Hi£OID6D.
The register sheets fit the standard sizes of spindle files, and when the week or month's
roll is made up, a complete indexed reference book is formed.
For particulars address,
I. W. LANGFORD,
KANSAS, ILLINOIS.
The
International
Type-Writer
The Simplest,
Strongest and Best Writing Machine in the World.
' ,; "'« !
""'>^iii Uii^'^"'
MANUFACTURED AND SOLD BY
The Parish
Manufacturing
Co.
PARISH, N. Y., U. S. A.
A strictly first-class machine. Fully warranted. Made from the very best material, by skilled workmen, and with the
best tools that have ever been devised for the purpose. Warranted to do all that can be reasonably expected of the very
best type-writer extant, Capable of writing 150 words per minute—or more—according to the ability of the operator.
PRICE, SIOO.
If there is no agent in your town, address the manufacturers:

hgexts waktev. The Parish Mfg. Co., Parish, N. Y.
TRADE I
ARABOL.
GUM ARABOL
FOB
ENVELOPES, PAPETERIES, LABELS,
postage stamps,
confectioners', stationers'
AND
lithographers' use.
CRYSTOL
LIQUID GLUES
FOR LABELLING ON
TIN, GLASS, WOOD AND LEATHER.
ACME PAPEBHANGEB8' GLUE.
JAPANOL
FOR LABELLING ON LACQUERED
AND
JAPANNED TIN.
SIZING
FOR
WALL PAPER PRINTING IN COLORS
AND
BRONZES, FOR TEXTILES, ETC.
MUCILAGE
FOR OFFICE PURPOSES.
BEST AND CHEAPEST
IN THE MARKET.
FOR LABELLING
USE
d
CRYSTOL LIQUID
PASTE.
THE BEST, CHEAPEST,
AND
CLEANEST,
FASTEST STICKER ON TIN, GLASS, CHINA
AND WOOD.
GUARANTEED NOT TO MOLD.
BEST THING OUT FOR USE ON LABELLING MACHINES.
PACKED IN TUBS OF ABOUT 20, 40 AND 75 POUNDS AND IN BARRELS OF
ABOUT 220, 280 AND 450 POUNDS NET. ORDER A SAMPLE
TUB OF 20 POUNDS FOR TRIAL.
Arabol Manufacturing €o.
13 OOLD ST., NEW YORK, U. S. A,
(/)
1
ft
ft
t"
a
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INTERIOR VIEW
STAFF'S * COR^f *
COOKER.
Forfullparticulars, prices and testimonials, address,
CONSTRUCTION OF COOKER.
The main body of the machine is made of steel boiler iron, with ca«.t
iron bottom and lid. The inside kettle is made of heavy copper, with one
inch of space between the outside jacket and inside of kettle. The lid is
hinged, and running dcwn through the lid are two perpendicular stirring
shafts with arms. The shafts are revolved by means of gear wheels on the
lid. Running across the bottom of the machine is a shaft with screw or
conveyor blades attached. This conveyor runs out to the end of the noz-
zle or spout of the machine and forces the corn out through the two open-
ings alternately.
CONSTRUCTION OF CAN FILLER.
The can filler consists of bed plate, the upper side of which is divided by
three partitions, about five inches high, running lengthwise, into two alley-
ways or slips for cans to slide in, one row of cans passing under each of
the two openings in the nozzle of the cooker. There is a sliding plate
worked back and forth, in guides, that closes first one of the openings in
the nozzle and then the other one, just as the cans are filled This causes
one can to be constantly filling. By means of a device (a pair of revolving
valves) hot syrup or brine, in any desired quantity, is put into the second
can back of the can being filled with corn The lever that is connected to
the slide that cuts off the corn at the nozzle, is also attached to the syrup
valves, and works both syrup device and cut-off slide at one stroke.
COOKING
The corn as it comes from the silker is fed or spouted into the top of the
cooker through a small hopper. The outside space in the jacket is filled
with live steam and heats up the main body of the corn. The stirring arms
being hollow admit steam through small openings into the corn direct
ADVANTAGES.
< ne man and two boys can operate my machine and do more work than
two men and four boys can accomplish with other machines on the
market, and do it better. The man works the lever and regulates
the speed and heat. One boy puts empty cans into the machine
and the other boy takes away the filled cans and puts them into
trays. By means of the sliding cut-off, as soon as a can is full,
the stream of corn is cut off entirely and opened directly into
the can on the other side, already in place, and thus no corn is
spilled on top of the cans as is the case where the corn is allowed
to run through one nozzle and spill while the can is being changed
JOHN T. STAFF,
kansas, ill.
MERRELL
&
SOULE,
MANUFACTURERS
OF THE LATEST
IMPROVED
CORN
COOKERS
CORN
CUTTERS
CORN
SILKERS,
t
t
CAN
WIPERS,
CAN
CAPPERS,
PROCESS
KETTLES,
H0ISTERS1
TOMATO CAN
FILLERS
ma-
ran
c i e .„. „m» r-italoo-ue now ready, fully describing
the above and many new m:
St'^h"
hdhgrtfe
„, Pac&s
«!,.. .bh to in,,,™, the
,«*%
„nd cheap,
the cost of
pioduction.
$.
MERRELL
&
SOULE,
SYRACUSE,
N. Y.
MERRELL
&
SOULE'S
ROTARY
CORN
SILKER
* PATENTED
JANUARY 31, 18QO.
*
upper end which contains a screw for feeding the corn into the
sieve. The sieves are very easily removed for the small
amount of cleaning required and the whole machine is very
simple and strongly
constructed.
For price and further information,
address,
IIlBirell
& Soule,
SYRACUSE,
NEW
YORK.
This machine is made on an entirely new principle, has been
thoroughly tested and proven to be far superior to anything
ever
offered for separating the silks and pieces of cob from out corn
with rapidity and economy.
The sieves revolve in opposite directions and are set on an
incline to allow the silks, husks and cobs to work out at the lower
end. It takes very little power and although it occupies only
3x6 feet floor space it has unlimited
capacity, having four times
the sieve surface that any other silker has, occupying the same
floor space. The ma-
chine requires no attend-
ant, it being arranged
with a receptacle at the
The Hemingway
ffUTOFnflTIC
DUN
SYRUPING niHCHINE.
CAPACITY 30,000 TWO-POUND CANS PER DAY OF TUN HOURS.
HIS machine does its work accurately, putting
into each can just the quantity of syrup it is set to
till ; requires only a boy to feed the cans into the
spout, the machine moves them forward automati-
cally to and from the sryuper.
In construction it is strong and durable, and
is especially adapted for syruping Corn, Peas and
Beans. Is easily adjusted to fill (as may be de-
sired) from one to eight ounces of syrup into each
can.
These machines are in use with most of the
packers in New York state, as also with a great
many packers in the west, and receive the un-
qualified endorsement of those who have used
them.
For Price and Terms, address,
HEMINGWAY MFC-. CO.
SYRACUSE, N. Y.
THE HEIVII]Nr<3WAY
PATENT
REEN CORN COOKERS
CAPACITY 12,000 TO 15,000 TWO-POUND CANS PER DAY OF TEN HOURS.
The only green corn cooker made carrying steam through the entire center of the mass by means of hollow shaft and hollow flights at-
tached to same, thus giving the corn an even and quick cooking, reducing the juices of the corn to cream, retaining all the natural whiteness
and delicacy of flavor. Our patent feeder gives a positive and regular feed of corn into the cooker, and we obtain an even amount of corn
passing from the tiller into the cans. The operator can sit close to the machine and handle the cans with perfect safety ami no danger what-
ever of being scalded by steam and corn blowing out upon him. These machines were adopted this last season by some of the largest corn
packers in the United States, among them the Louis McMurray Pkg. Co., of Frederick City, Md., who packed all their corn for the season of
1890 with our cookers, syrupers and process. Our machinery enables the packer to produce a superior quality of corn, and the best canners
of the United States are adopting them. For prices, terms or any information, write us.
HEMINGWAY MFG. CO., SYRACUSE, N. Y.
SLEEPER
SEAMING
MACHINE
SEAMS 1,200 CAN BODIES PER rfoUR.
And requires a young man to lend it. It "makes a lap seam of re-
markable uniformity
"
and they are " marvels of
strength and beauty."
Mr.
J.
Lewden Robeson says,
"
I am free to say that from the
standpoint of a master machinist, I consider it a machine of great
merit, and as an invention in the can making industry, it is one-
much needed. It is carefully and thoroughly constructed, and
properly handled, is not likely to get out of order.
West Jersey Packing Co., John W. Stout, by
W. I.. Morris, Mgr.,
J.
F. Brady & Co., Geo.D. I.aning and Benj. S. Avers, all of Bridge-
ton, N.
J.,
say they "have no doubt the seams are as safe and strong
as any seam can be made by hand, and as reliable as any seam can
be."
The Albert Fischer Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ohio, say, "In regard to
your Seamer will say that we think it is the best machine in exist-
ence, and do not sse how anyone making cans can do without it.
As far as the practical working of the same is concerned, will say
that it is perfect. The seams are all perfectly soaked and we con-
sider them the strongest that can be made, requiring less solder on
every 1,000 seams that we ever used before, either in making them
by hand or machine. In fact we think the machine is entitled to
all the praise anybody can give it."
1). Cummins, Conneaut, Ohio, says, under date of Aug. 30, 1890,
"The Seaming machine we have had in almost constant use since
lanuary 1, up to date, making all our cans upon it. We have had
no trouble to successfully operate the machine. We consider the
Seamer quite an improvement over our former way; that it has
sa ed us some money in labor and solder besides doing satisfactory
work."
(has G. Summers .V Co., Baltimore, say,
" It is belted to run 20
cans per minute or 1 200 per hour and will turn out that quantity
unless the operator neglects his work, for we have found almost no
stoppages necessary from other causes. One hand operates it and
is all that is required.
* * * The machine makes very strong
seams and as we have been packing the cans as fast as made we do
not sav this from eye inspection simply, but from actual process
tests. One and one-fourth to one and one-half cents per 100 seams
will cover all the cost of tending the machine and the bodies made
on it are so uniform in size as to reduce somewhat the cost of head-
ing and floating on account of it."
SLEEPER ROLLING MILL
FOB MAKING EIBBOB sol. OKI! FOB
1SF. II'US BEAMEfi.
SLEEPER IIIflCHINE
CO.,
35 CONGRESS
STREET, ROOM 31,
BOSTON,
MASS.
sli:i:i*i:i:
^ MACHINE
This machine has but recently been completed and is now offered for sale in connection with our Seamer.
It will take the can bodies as fast as delivered by the Seamer and after fluxing the ends of the body will
put on both heads and deliver the cans ready for floating. The can body requires no handling trom the
time it enters the Seamer until it is ready for the floater, and for attendance the machine requires a boy
only, whose duty is to lay the heads upon the aprons, one of which is shown in the cut, and in a general
way to see that everything goes on correctly. The cost of heading cans by this machine is simply the
wages of a boy, say a half to three-quarters of a cent per hundred cans, and the product should be in ex-
cess of 1000 cans per hour. Using our Seamers and heading machines the entire cosst for labor for seam,
jng and heading cans and delivering them ready for floating should never exceed two and one-quarter
cents per hundred, and should not under ordinary conditions exceed tivo cents per hundred. Our ma-
chines require only the exercise of fair intelligence in operating them. They are never absent at a criti-
cal time, and never join in strikes or take advantage of your necessities.
Address,
SLEEPER MACHINE CO.,
35 Congress St., Room 31, BOSTON, MASS,
PACKERS
OODEN

WARE
L
SUPPLIES. .
KEGS,
BOXES, PAILS, BUCKETS TUBS, KITS,
FIRKINS,
MEASURES,
CRATES, CASES, WOODEN
DIPPERS,
WOODEN SPOONS, MUSTARD SPOONS,
BUNGS, PLUGS, WOOD BOWLS, LADLES AND
ALL OTHER WOODEN
SUPPLIES IN 1001 DIF-
FERENT
SIZES, STYLES AND VARIETIES, &c, &c.
AnvtW
wooden you want eend to us for it. New or special styles made to order. Distant trade
solicited and freight
paid from Maine to California,
Florida to Alaska or for export. Don't let your
dea of disLce or expense deter you from
investigating. We pay the freight to your city. We make a
speedy of furni,hing
distant customers
anything they want in wooden goods and if they want new or
special things to order, we do it. Get your wooden ware all in one place, small lots, carloads or large
contracts.
Wholesale
Cooperage
and
Woodenware
Manufac-
turers
and
Dealers,
W. K.
PEIRCE
&
CO.,
JUILFORD,
JT. H.
8*
PATENT EXHAUST
VENTILATING WHEEL
A WONDERFUL
Kb ]VIoYer.
Invaluable for removing
STEAM
m
MOISTURE
(aiming; aud Packing
FACTORIES.
Will remove Dust, Hot Air or
any floating substance.
You can gain remarkable results
in
DRYING
ALL KINDS OF GOODS.
THE
m
BACKUS
WATER MOTOR
IS THE
Cheapest Power Known
FOR DRIVING
ALL M[3 LIGHT MACHINERY.
Write for circular
and full particulars.
BACKUS WATER HIOTOR
CO.
Newark^ .T../., V* &•£•
CHAIN
CONVEYORS
i _ _ *:
CONVEYOR. ^P?l
ELEVATING #CONVEYING
MACHINERY
FOR HANDLING
Grain, Krtiits,
Tomatoes,
BOXES, PACKAGES, BARRELS, COAL, XC. •
Detachable and Roller Chain Belling for Driving
Belting—Wire not affected by Moisture.
Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Price List.
THE JEFFREY MFG. CO.
221 East First Avenue, Columbus, O.
Livingston's
Celebrated
Tomato
Seeds
For over twenty years we have made TOMATO SEEDS FOR CANNERS OUR GREAT SPECIALTY, and the result is that our
varieties are known and recognized as standard the world over. We annually supply a majority of
the leading canners in the United States and Canada. The varieties specially
suited to canning and catsup making are
Livingston's
Beauty
Tomato !
Livingston's Paragon
Tomato !
Livingston's
Favorite
Tomato !
Livingston's
Perfection
Tomato !
A great deal of seed of above varieties has been palmed off upon canners which was badly mixed and deteriorated
GET
THE
GENUINE
BY BUYING
DIRECT
FROM US
For Special Prices and our Seed Annual, address
A. W. LIVINGSTON'S
SONS, Seed Growers,
COLUMBUS,
OHIO.
HARRISON

CONVEYOR
BORDEN
&
SELLECK
CO.
SOLE
MANUFACTURERS,
48
and
50
Lake
Street,
. .
CHICAGO,
III-
Office
of
Probasco &
Lining I
BEIDGETON,
N. J.,
March 5,
1889. )
has saved us almost the
entire cost th s thejhst, • ason
assistanc/ot
-
the COnveyor.
to
-
&MS
^-"SKKgl
^,
d-
its MSt
'
*—
.
*
l—
0#C* 0/
JNO. E.
DlAMENT
j.
Cedahvillk,
N. J-,
September 10,
1888. f
Borden,
Selleck
& Co.,
Chicago, I1L:
.
doil
excelient
work,
(7en««»«».-The
"Harrison"
Conveyor
fnrn,.hed by you o, my
^ R
I)iament
and is well
adapted
for the canning
business. *
J.
SEND
FOR
LLUSTRATED
CATALOGUE.
Apple Parers ! Apple Parers !
IT IS POOR ECONOMY TO BUY SUCH AN ARTICLE AS AN APPLE PARER BECAUSE IT IS CHEAP IN PRICE, BUT THE
BONANZA PARER AND CORER
HaB this advantage over all others, it is not only
sold at an exceptionally low price ( lower than any
other machine ever made that will do the same
work), but possesses all the features that go to
make up a
-COMPLETE SUCCESS
!—
The Bonanza runs very easy; is very fast; does per-
fect work on large or small apples, and is durable.
PRICE ONLY $6.50.
For paring, coring and slicing, we have the "Dandy"
for hand use, and the "Eureka" for power. We
believe no one can afford to run Apple Parers by
hand when power is available.
The Eureka is the only Power Apple Parer. It
is a perfect success as a power parer ; it is also
without a rival for hand use.
We make more apple parers than all others
combined. We make a large variety of smaller
machines for family and factory, at prices ranging
from $4.00 per dozen up.
We believe we can safely say we can fur-
nish parers that will do more work, better work,
faster work, and at better prices, than anyone else
in the world.
CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
AIVTRIM, IV
ESTABLISHED 1876.
FRANK
DIESEL,
701 to 705 North Halsted
Street,
CHICAGO,
Ills.
See*
i—
-
C,0«Nf
7^S.TK IS U I=KCTU R E R OF
CANS
OF
EVERY
DESCRIPTION
The above cuts showing a few of our specialties. Factory fitted throughout with latest improved machinery Cans outside
soldered. No acids used. Cans sold at lowest prices.
Work Guaranteed.
All Orders Filled Promptly.
Correspondence Solicited.
BANKS, B/ILIR6ER
& 60.
GENERAL
BROKERAGE and COMMISSION
cAwmmm oood <B
We Sell to Jobbers # Wholesale Dealers
I3ST A BROKERACrE "WAY.
Also handle Consignments on Commission. We "travel" territory from
New York to Chicago. Five First-Class Salesmen.
No. 222 Ontario Street, CLEVELAND, Ohio.
e. 0. YOUNG,
MERCHANDISE
BROKER
AND
MANUFACTURERS' AGENT.
25 Davis St., SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
U. S. Telegraph Cipher.
Refer, by permission, to
CITY BANK, Los Angeles,
HOWELL & CRAIG, Los Angeles.
P. O. Box 1177. Station C.
Telephone 804.
B. A. HOLMES,
(Late of BOOTY & HOLMES.!
MERCHANDISE BROKER
158 North Main St., LOS ANGELES, Cal.
Executes Orders from Eastern Wholesale Buyers for all California Products
at Bottom Figures. BEANS A SPECIALTY. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Sellers Pay Brokerage.
MANUFACTURERS' and PACKERS' ACCOUNTS, and AGENCIES
FOR SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SOLICITED.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
We Use the U. S. Cipher, and " Sawfish
"
Code.
MINNEAPOLIS BROKERAGE CO.
BROKERS IN
Canned Fruits
and
Vegetables
ESTABLISHED 1882.
OP ALL KINDS--
Dried Fruits, Cove Oysters, Canned Mackerel, Clams, Shrimps, Etc.
Correspondence and Accounts Solicited.
324 Hennepin Ave., MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.
REFERENCES:
WM. A. BROOM, with Harrison, Farington & Co., Wholesale Grocers.
GEO. E. BIGGINS, Credit Man, Anthony, Kelly & Co., Wholesule Grocers.
W. D. HALL, Sec'y Minneapolis Board of Tr.-.de.
C. M. DOW, Prefct. First National Bank, Jamestown, N. Y.
R. G. DUN & CO.
C.R.& W.J. SUTHERLAND,
commissionIierchants
And MERCHANDISE BROKERS.
Largest Jobbers of Evaporated Fruit In Albany.
25 Hudson Avenue, ALBANY, N. Y.
Refer by Permission :
SOUTH END BANK, Albany, N. Y.
WING BROS. & HARTT, Wholesale Grocers, Albany, N. Y.
N. K. FAIRBANK & CO., Lard Refiners, Chicago, Ills.
BRISCOE, PLUMSTELL & CO., Box Manufacturers, Bay City, Mich.
And All Commercial Agencies.
JACOB
J.
PERES & CO
who i-esK i_e
BROKERAGE AND COMMISSION
IMHEDVCIPIEIIS., Tenm..
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
SINCLAIR-
SCOTT
MFG.
CO
IB -A- LT I
MOIRES,
3Vtd-
MANUFACTURERS
OF
CANNING

HOUSE
• MACHINERY
Write
for
Catalogues.
Estimates
Given
on
Outfits.
IANUFACTURERS
OF
THE
N
UMSEN
PEA
SEPARATOR
CLEANS
and
SEPARATES
PERFECTLY,
CAPACIT
TT 2 ,500
BUSHELS
DAILY.
CAMDEN, N. J., October 7,
1890.
"S22£
^have yours or tbe 6th, and wo„u, say *., owing to our
to^Si
we have 1 een unable to reply to your previous communication
b'fi-e Our experience this
season with the Nnmsen Pea Separator has
o.tra.c,, that its capacity is intensely
superior to he^d W
machine We regard it as the most advanced machine in .ts hue. \\ e no ice
7£Z
increase*
the y.eld of email size peas, that wed, no get when
we used our old Rotary
machine. We are entirely satisfied with U.
Yours truly,
ANDERSON
PRESERVING CO.
PORTLAND,
Ore., Oct. 14,
1890.
made for "The
Numsen, or Knd-sn,iKe j
ea c i
has been made good to the letter.
.
,,
8ea90n just
Separator m the highest terms.
Wishing you success,
We are very truly yours,
UJ(
„.
mf
, ,,
THE OKEGON
CITY
PACKING CO.
i „«„ a Wnllpr Write for Circular and
Prices.
This is the only
Separator to work after a Huller.
Respectfully
yours,
SINCLAIR-SCOTT
MFG.
CO.
SPECIAL OPEN
STEAM JACKET,
WATER JACKET,
Steam Jacket Kettle With Raised Curb.
Prompt estimates will be given for Special Kettles,
Retorts, or other work: in our line.
D. R. SPERRY
& COMPANY,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Hollow-Ware, Caldrons, Sugar Kettles, Laundry
and Dairy Stoves, Etc.
BATAVIA, ILL.
C. B.
MCDONALD'S
(Patented. Capacity from 10,000 to 12,000 cans per day.)
CAN
MAKING
OUTFIT.
TO CANISTERS.
The cut on opposite page represents an outfit in position and comprises seamcrs, crimper and floating
apparatus. Cans outside soldered on a new principle. Packers with this outfit can save over 50 per
cent, on cost of cans as compared with the various methods of can making. Please note the accompany-
ing testimonials from responsible packers.
FRAXKLIXVILIF. CANNING CO.
Franklinville, N. Y., Nov, 29, 1889.
C. B. McDonald, Esq., Englewood, 111.,
Dear Sir : We have used your can making machinery two
seasons both for making cans and pails up to gallon size very satis-
factorily, making a nice and strong can at a great saving in tims
and solder. We take pleasure in recommending this machinery as
both economical and reliable. Yours truly,
FRANKLINVILLE CANNING CO.,
A. O. Holmes, Sec.
EAST HAMBURG CANNING CO.
Orchard Park, N. Y., Nov. 22, 1889.
C. B. McDonald, Esq., Englewood, 111.,
Dear Sir : In reply to your favor of the 20th, we would say,
we have used your can making outfit during the last two seasons,
and it has given excellent satisfaction. We have no trouble in
making ten to twelve thousand cans per day, and its economy and
other advantages over the hand method are so great that no packer
would return to the old way after once using your system.
Yours truly, EAST HAMBURG CANNING CO.
HAMBURG CANNING CO.
Hamburg, N. Y., Dec. 10, 1889.
Mr. C. B. McDonald, Englewood, 111.,
Dear Sir : After a three years' trial, we can cheerfully say we
are entirely satisfied with the outfit you furnished us. We have
made first class cans at a great saving in solder, gasoline and labor.
We can recommend this machinery to any party wishing to get at
the minimum cost of manufacturing cans.
Very truly yours, T. L. BUNTING, Sec.
ARMOUR & CO.
Chicago,
Jan. 21, 1890.
Mr. C. B. McDonald, Esq., Chicago.
Dear Sir
:
Having used your can making machinery several
years, making on an average of twelve million cans per annum, we
can cheerfully recommend it as the best and most economical way
of making cans for preserving purposes.
Yours truly,
A. D. COLEMAN,
Supt. of Armour & Co.'s Can Factory.
EDEN CENTER PRESERVING CO.
Eden, N. Y., May
7, 1889.
Mr. C. B. McDonald, Englewood, 111.,
Dear Sir : The can making outfit furnished by you is working to
our entire satisfaction. Are making at rate of 12,000 cans per day.
The advantages of your system over old methods or buying are too
many to enumerate. But to sum up the matter, the saviug on cost
of our cans for this season's pack will several times cover purchase
price of plant. Very truly,
Frank Achilli, Supt.
John Vellam, Pres.
FAIRBANK CANNING CO.
Chicago, March 30, 1889.
C. B. McDonald, Esq., Chicago.
Dear Sir : We wish to say to you in reference to the machin-
ery which you furnished us for the making of our cans, that the
same has been in constant operation in our factory for over a year,
and we can recommend the same to any one in need cf similiar ma-
chinery. It is an entire success. Yours truly,
FAIRBANK CANNING CO.
ERIE PRESERVING CO.
Buffalo, N. Y., Dec. 13, 1889.
C. B. McDonald, Esq., Chicago, 111.,
Dear Sir : We have now been using your can making outfit
for three years and are well pleased with the results. For the past
two seasons we have been making our gallon cans all on the system.
During the past fall we have made 5, coo gallon cans per day with
four floaters. We consider that you have done much in lessening
the cost of can-making, and wish you every success.
ERIE PRESERVING CO.
C. M. Fenton, Sec.
BATA VIA PRESERVING CO.
Chicago, Sept. 26, 1889.
C. B. McDonald, Esq., Englewood, 111.
We have been well pleased with your system for can making
which we have used with good results this year.
Yours truly, BATAVIA PRESERVING CO.
Wilcox.
C. B. McDONALD,
Room
49, 81 Clark St., CHICAGO
THE CLARK PERFECTION
KER08ENE OIL SYSTEM
FOR CAHNERS, CAN MAKERS AND TINWARE MANUFACTURERS.
MOST ECONOMICAL.
REDUCES INSURANCE RISKS.
ALWAYS RELIABLE.
NEVER CLOGS WITH CARBON.
BURNER POINTS NEVER
BECOME HEATED.
FIRE EASILY REGULATED.
Patented Dec. 24, 1889.
ABSOLUTELY SAFE.
OIL IS FED BY SUCTION OR
GRAVITY.
OIL AND AIR SEPARATE.
ONLY 5 POUNDS AIR PRES-
SURE REQUIRED.
ABUNDANCE OF HEAT.
SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, CONTAINING PRICE LISTS, TESTIMONIALS, ETC.
CLARK
NOVELTY COMPANY,
ROCHESTER, N. Y.
FL- O. OON^JSTT,
NO. 239 COMMERCIAL STREET,
PORTLAND,
Me.
MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN
fegfc^
t
^
GANNER3' MACHINERY
pp?
-*•
*S
s' <
?=^r*
^5^-
SticRnBy Press,
CONANT SILKER,
SEND FOR CATALOGUE.
ETC, ETC.
*
FOR
CLEANLINESS,
ACCURACY,
DURABILITY,
THIS
MACHINE
TAKES
THE
LEAD.
OCCUPIES
3*4 FT.
FLOOR
SPACE.
USED
BY
MANY
LEADING
PACKERS
IN
BOTH
THE
EAST
AND
WEST.
Attachment
shows
ever:
amber
during
trie
day.
The
Automatic
Registering
night
EXACTLY
the
number
of
cans
ru
Correspondence
Solicited.
K.
fy
JVEenell,
JVtaislialltotfii,
la.
CLIMAX
GAPPING MACHINE
BUILT WITH EITHER
4
OR 6 IRONS.
Capacity 2.000 and 3,000 cans per hour respec-
tively. Feeds its own solder and acid.
TESTIMONIALS.
Odessa, Del., Dec. 4, 1890.
Pennsylvania Brass Works.
Gents : The Capping Machine we bought of you in 1889, and
improved in 1890, has done our work well. In fact we do not
see how we could have got through the season without it. We
know it will do all you claim for it. The Gas Machine is also a
great success and gives us plenty of light and heat.
Watkins Packing Co.
Elizabethtown, Kt., Aug. 7, 1890.
Pennsylvania Brass Works.
Gents : The Capper we bought of you is doing all you claim
for it. We have no words strong enough to fully express our
satisfaction with It. 'Sours, &c.,
Elizabethtown Canning Co.
Baltimore, Md., Dec. 18, 1890.
Pennsylvania Brass Works.
Gents: In reply to your inquiry as to how we are pleased
with the Climax Capping Machine, we will state that the 4-iron
machine we purchased of you last August and placed in our
factory at Lynch, Md., has given us entire satisfaction in every
respect, as well as the Gas Plant, which illuminates our factory
and supplied the heat for the capper; in all we are much
pleased with your system. Yours truly,
Wm. Grecht & Co.
New Berne, N. C., Nov. 24, 1890.
Pennsylvania Brass Works.
Gentg: The Climax Capping Machine we bought of
you last summer has given us entire satisfaction; like-
wise the Gas Plant. We take great pleasure in recom-
mending your Capping Machine and Gas Plant to all
packers of canned goods. Yours Resp'y,
Greenabaum Bros.
Write for catalogue and testimonials.
PENNSYLVANIA
BRASS WORKS,
G. E. LOCKWOOD, Manager.
1512 SPRING GARDEN STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA.
TTENTION!
WHY BUY CANS WHEN YOU CAN MAKE
THEM CHEAPER?
If you have the machinery you can make your cans AT COST, when you need them, and save
the high prices asked by the manufacturers when the supply is short.
BUY YOUR TOOLS FROM
AYAR MACHINE WORKS,
SALEM, N.
J.
MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN EVERYTHING NEEDED IN
A FIRST-CLASS CAN MAKING SHOP.
PRESSES, DIES,
CAN M^lKIN<3 TOOLS.
Send for catalogue and price list of complete outfit for making cans. We are also manufacturers
of Improved Labor-Saving Machinery for canning factories. Send for particulars.
Address,
HYHR
HlflCHINE W0RKS
:
MAURICE
B-
AYARS, SALEM, NEW JERSEY.
THE
STEVENS
CAN
•FILLING*
MACHINE
WILL FILL
TWO POUND,
THREE POUJSD,
AND
ONE GALLON CANS
FULL EVERY TIME.
CAPACITY :
FOOT
MACHINE
10,000 TO 14,000 CANS.
POWER
MACHINE
20,000 TO 25,000 CANS
PER DAY.
FOR
TOMATOES,
PUMPKIN,
ETC., IT 13
PERFECTION.
HAS
NO
EQUAL.
Endorsed by over
2oO
Canners from
Boston to
San
Francisco,
MAURICE
B.
AVARS,
Ayar
Machine
Works.lSalem,
N. J.
SendforlPrices, Testimonials, etc.
J.
LEWDEN
ROBESON,
T. VAN KANNEL,
Secretary and Treasurer.
President.
THE
CANNERS'
SUPPLY
CO.,
NO.
20 WATER
ST.,
BRIDGE-TON,
N-J-
SOLE
MANUFACTURERS
OF THE
PO¥EK
STEAM
SCALDER,
PLATFORM
CONVEYOR
HIGH
SPEED
CAN
FILLER,
AUTOMATIC
TIME
COOKER
POWER
GAPPING
MACHINE.
Operated under
Patents of T. Van
Kannel.
Dealers in all kinds of SUPPLIES FOR
CANNING
FACTORIES
^^SS^J^^i
Hangers and Pullevs
Indurated
Fiber Wake that does not fall to pieces.
Cotton
Beltino mat
"
nof effects by Veat or
moisture of canning
factories.
Complete Gas Plants for Lighting and
Mechanical Heating ;
Water, Steam, and Gas Fixtures, Pipe and Fittings.
Complete Outfit for Can Making,
Floaters,
Headers,
Fire-Pots,
Dies, Presses, &c.
See Next Page.
The Platform Conveyor.
Patented Aug. 12, 1890.
This member of ouv Automatic Canning System was in operation
last season in eight canning factories, giving in each case complete
satisfaction.
It takes scalded tomatoes from the Power Steam Scalder, distrib-
utes them to one hundred or more parers, and leturns the empty
buckets to the Scalder.
It collects the pared tomatoes, from one hundred or more parers, in
numbered buckets, conveying them to the tilling machine, and re-
turns the empty buckets.
It collects all the skins, water and other refuse from each paring bin,
and removes the satre to a single dump at any point of the apparatus
desired, from which it is taken out of the building by an ordinary chain
conveyor, all without
"
slopping
"
the floor and without manual labor.
At
"
quitting time
"
it brings water in buckets to ea -h parer for
washing the bins and vessels used, and finally it washes itself, and
is clean and bright for the next day.
The PLATFORM CONVEYOR lias no favorites, treats all alike, is
prompt and impartial, does not go on a strike, is always on duty, and
asks only for two bushels of coal daily for its pay.
It saves much room; it saves labor; it saves time; it keeps the
floor clean; it keeps the entire factory in good order. Send for de-
scription, testimonials and prices of all our machinery.
THE CflNNERS' SUPPLY CO., 20 Water St., Britfgeton
fl.
J.
T.
WOLD

CO.,
76
AND 78
MARKET
ST
MANUFACTURERS
OF
DIE©
AND
CAN
MAKING
TOOLS.
T.
wold & CO.,
HE
76 and
78 marKet
St.,
Chicago,
m.
CIDER ! CIDER !
NO MORE SOUR OR HARD CIDER IF YOU USE
Forman's

Cider -
P
reservative
WARRANTED EVERY TIME OR MONEY REFUNDED.
Write for Circular and Testimonials for keeping Cider sweet through the Summer months;
also refining it. Equaled by none, but superior to all, which can
be shown by my references.
I have a special and reliable Preservative which is of the utmost importance to Picklers, Mince Meat and Wine Merchants,
also for Preserves, Catsup and Jellies; also to manufacturers of perishable goods of any nature.
Address,
q q p Q R M A N,
Sole Manufacturer,
GENEVA, Ashtabula Co., Ohio.
THE ©ELLUL0IB VARNISH @0.
COLORED LACQUERS FOR CANNERS.
Applied by Dipping or Brushing. Dried With or Without Heat, and
—«-
Permanent in Color.
*•

SAMPLES AND PRICES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION
.A.KTY COIjOR I5XTI»XjICJ-A.'I
,
3E:I3.
ROOFING!
GUM-ELASTIC
- -
- - ROOFING FELT
COSTS ONLY
$2.00 Per 100 SQUARE FEET
Makes a Good Roof for Tears, and
ANYONE CAN T>TJT IX ON.
Send Stamp for Sample and Full Particulars.
GUM ELASTIC ROOFING CO.,
39 and 41 West Broadway, NEW YORK.
LOCAL ACENTS WANTED.
HP E N Years' Experience in Growing
PEAS and BEANS for the Seed and
Canning Trade. Samples and Prices
Mailed on Application. Growing on
Contract a Specialty
CHARLES H. WARDWELL,
ADAMS, (Jeff. Co.) N. Y.
MANUFACTURED BY
R. H. GERSTLE A BRO.
288 BOWERY,
isr e: mv y o r k.
Samples and Prices on Application.
PATENTED 18S2.
'85, '86, '88, '89. '90.
SPRING STEEL GALVANIZEO.^/jJ./
v*''
iS>
ARMORED
For SUCTION. WATER. STEAM, GAS, AIR, ACIDS and for every
purpose to whioh a Hose can be applied RESISTANCE to Great
Pressure ; Unobstructed Flow of Water ;
Increased Flexibility and
Perfect Protection are some of its Advantages.
U/a Piinrnntoa
every foot sold to withstand constant service for such
li 6 uU3r3rllBB longer period as to render its cost much less in the
end. Every wind ot the wire can be cut without loosening or uncoiling.
The making, vending or use of any serviceable armored wire-bound
hose not of our manufacture is an infringement on one or more of our
patents. The rights secured to us renders eacli individual dealer or user
responsible for such unlawful use with all the consequences thereof.
All Sizes from 1-8 Inch to 42 Inches In Diameter.
For Prices and Discounts, address
WATERBURY RUBBER CO.,
Sole manufacturers and owners of all the
SPHINCTER GRIP STEEL ARMORED HOSE PATENTS,
49 Warren Street
NEW YORK
YOUR PROCESS ROOM
NEEDS ATTENTION BY USING
ADJUSTABLE GAGE HOOKS.
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY
DO
YOU
CATCH
ON
No Factory Complete Without One
THE SIMPLEST DEVICE IN USE FOR
HANDLING PROCESS CAGES.
PERFECT IN OPERATION
J Saving Time and entirely doing away with the cumbrous old bales.
Address, WM. F. DANA, BELPRE, Ohio.
Splendid Opening for Canners
N
The Healthy Highlands of Northeast Georgia
!
The Grandest Business Openings. Five Manufacturing Establishments already in operation. Others
going in rapidly. Room for many more. Cheap Cotton, cheap Wool, cheap Lumber, cheap Raw Material,
FREE WATER-POWER, Low Cost of Living, Free Factory Sites and Small Operating Expenses, render Demorest
a manufacturing paradise. Low cost of Building Material enables every man to build and own a house.
Finest Climate in the United States !
Summer more Pleasant tlian in the North ! Winter Mild and Short ! Spring and Autumn Long and Delightful !
YELLOW FEVER IMPOSSIBLE! MALARIA UNKNOWN!
ASTHMA ALWAYS CURED !
Bronchial and other chronic troubles always relieved. No Hay Fever. The bracing air and remarkably Pure Spring
Water restore health and render life enjoyable.
For particulars address the
Demorest Home, Mining & Improvement Co.
DEMOREST, Georgia.
FRANK J. SIBLEY, Secretary.
<
USE
»
ROSS REGULATING
VALVES
To control Steam at the pressure you desire.
They will regulate the flow of steam and maintain any desired pressure.
Made in all pipe sizes above 1 inch. Sent on trial to re-
sponsible parties. Try one.
Try Ross "Mable Wedge" Gate Valves. "They Shut Tight."
ip
oss
Oakwood Ave., troy, N.Y.
Improved
* Patented * £team -t-
Jacket
*
fettle
PLAIN IRON
OR
WHITE ENAMALLED.
SUPERIOR TO COPPER FOR EVERY PURPOSE.
(Patented October ioth, 1880.)
Safety Valve furnished with Kettles,
Cut off to 60 pounds.
Tested to 100 lbs. Hydrostatic Pressure-
SIZES:
20
> 35> 7°
AND IO° gallons.
Also Manufacturers of
IRON
CAULDRONS,
From 12 to 120 gallons.
For full particulars write to us for
price list.
BARROWS, SAVERY
GO
,
SOUTH FRONT AND KEED STS.,
PHILADELPHIA, PA.
^WHOLES^
BROKERAGES
COMMISSION
MINNEAPOLIS
fur
--J
vilNrsL.Aruuo
W (§U
and ST. PAUL
FRUIT EVAPORATORS.
FOR NEARLY TWENTY YEARS THE UNDERSIGNED
HAVE MADE A SPECIALTY OF FRUIT EVAPORATORS. WE
COVER THE WHOLE FIELD AND RANGE OF SIZES, CAPAC-
ITY AND COST FROM A COOK STOVE DRIER TO THE LAR-
GEST AND MOST COMPLETE STEAM HEATED COMMERCIAL
EVAPORATOR
L-
SIMOON
This evaporator was designed to meet the requirements of our export trade for a Tea, Coffee and
Cocoa Drier, and it is the best, most economical and scientific contribution to the domestic fruit evapor-
ating industry yet produced. We are headquarters on Evaporators, of any desired capacity, at
small cost. Write us your wants and we will make you prices that will save you money.
American HlanufacturiiiEj
Co.,
WAYNESBORO, FRANKLIN CO., PA.
THE NEW YORK
SCREW TOP WORKS,
MANUFACTURERS OF
SHEET METAL SCREWS AND OILERS,
FRUIT JAR TOPS AND SPRINKLER HEADS.
Patentees of the "Acme Fruit Jar." Stamped and spun work of all kinds made to order and esti-
mates furnished on special styles and sizes.
Office and Factory: 187 Pearl St., bet. High and Nassau Sts.
Stamps,
NJ pilEf|g
„^
SENDFOR^
Catalogue
WANTED



SPECIAL OFFER TO SECURE AGENTS.
This Self-Inking
Stamp with your
n tme and add.i ess
or business, engra-
i ed on it and sup-
p'y of ink sent post
paid for only 35C
Bottle Carter's tn-
•iellible ink 10 cts.
extra.
Marks linen, cards
papers, etc. Agents
big terms and how
to Serine a $2 50
outfit free sent with
order or on appli-
cation. A fewgood
men wanted on sal-
_ary or bie commis-
'sion. Address,
SOUTHERN RUBBER CO.,
Rubber Stamp Dept, Box 481, RICHMOND, VA.
THE
"BOYNTON"
EQUAL TO THE WILSON FOR SHIPPLNG
AND CANNING.
We have proof that two well known persons, who send out catalogues every spring have engaged
quite a quantit}
7
of the BOYNTON to grow the coming season, expecting lo offer them first in their next
season's catalogue, with a great flourish of trumpets, at high rates. So our friends will see we have the
start of them one year, and thus give all a chance to get a start in this gieat market berry this spring at
$1.00 per dozen, $3.00 per hundred, by mail or express.
David Ledzy, of Albany County, N. Y., writes us as follows :
"I have °rown the Boyuton Strawberry for two vears. It is without exception the best berry I have ever raised, and I have been in the busi-
ness for fifteen years, and have tried all kinds. It Is as early as the Crescent; holds out larger and longer, and outsells all others in the nnarket.
I o-ot from 2 to 4 cents more for it than for othei kinds. It is good on sand or clay, and is displacing the Crescent around here. It is a sight worth
looking at with its load of fruit. I cannot say too much for it. "Any man that sets it out will not regret it."
For further particulars see our descriptive and wholesale catalogues, sent free to all applicants, and
also for a full line of fruit trees and berry plants with prices retail and wholesale.
PURDY'S RECORDER AND EVAPORATOR.
A 16 page Quarterly at only 25c. a year. Fruit growers and evaporators should take it. Specimen free
PURDY'S SMALL FRUIT INSTRUCTOR.
It tells in plain, simple language how to plant, grow and market ^mall fruits of all kinds, how to get
the best crops, giving the best plans for growing ; how to dry, force, pot, grow
7
seedlings
;
plans of drying
houses, grape trellises, etc., etc. It is as full of practical matter as an egg is of meat. You wouldn't ex-
change it for any $1.00 or $1.50 book on the same subject that you ever saw. The writer has compressed
into this work his 38 years' experience. No family should be without it. Bound in strong leatherette
cover, with 120 pages, postpaid, for 25 cents. Splendid inducements and good discount to those who wish
to act as our agents for its sale. It will take at first sight and sell quickly in every family.
A.M.-es,,
& jvl Ptfi^jy, Palmyra,
]\[.
y.
I=*L- ex oonajstt.
NO. 229 COMMERCIAL STREET,
PORTLAND, Me.
MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN
=*=
CANNERS'
MACHINERY
@F
SlicKneu
Press,
CONANT
SILKBR,
ETC., ETC.
SEND FOR
CATALOGUE.
Specially Adapted to the Does Not Harm Any Article
Canning Trade. of Food.
UNIVERSAL
0OLDERING FLUX
MANUFACTURED ONLY BY
UNIVERSAL CHEMICAL COMPANY.
OFFICE 124 WATER STREET NEW YORK.
Works South Brooklyn, N. Y.
A FAIR TRIAL OF THIS FLLJX WILL PROVE THAT:
IT DOES NOT DISCOLOR OR STAIN THE METAL.
IT MAKES NO POISONOUS FUMES. IT IS FREE FROM ACID.
IT DOES NOT INJURE HANDS OR TOOLS.
IT MAKES THE SOLDER RUN FREFLY. IT UNITES PERFECTLY.
IT IS THE CHEAPEST AND BEST FOR CANNING
AS WELL AS FOR SOLDERING OF EVERY DESCRIPTION,
SAMPLES FREE OK CHARGE,
MENTION THIS BOOK.
II is not necessary to say we saw your advertisement in E. D. Fisher's
"CVCRYTlilNQ TOR CANNCR-5"
But simply put the word,
"
Sawfish," on your letter.
STARK MACHINE-TOOL CO.
OFFICE: NO. 379 MAIN STREET,
WORKS: SEVENTH, COR. HUDSON STS.,
BUFFALO, N. Y.
-MANUFACTURERS OF- *
i
*- •
xf
resses, Dies and
Canners' Machinery

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.—
PLEASE WRITE TO US FOR PRICES, &c. MENTION THIS BOOK.
TWENTY YEARS' EXPERIENCE.
HUNDREDS OF FACTORIES SUPPLIED WITH MACHINERY
MANUFACTURED UNDER THE PERSONAL SUPERVISION OF OUR PRESI-
DENT, MR. MICHAEL J. STARK.
FRUIT,
VEGETABLE
AND
OYSTER
BOXES.
1
PRINTED AND PLAIN, NAILED AND IN SHOOKS.
Ask for prices before placing your order.
Headquarters for boxes and shocks.
Best facilities for
prompt shipments
guaranteed.
IT IS A WELL-KNOWN
FACT
And generally acknowledged, that Western Pennsylvania, Eastern Ohio, and West Virginia consume
more Canned Goods in proportion to the population than any other section of America. This is because
of the large Iron and Glass Manufacturing Establishments and the Mining Industries, employing thous-
ands of workmen, who necessarily must live well in order to work well. Pittsburgh is the center of
this great and valuable section, and it naturally follows that Pittsburgh contains many large Wholesale
Grocery Houses, through whom nearly all of the Canned Goods are sold in the section embraced in
Western Pennsylvania, Eastern Ohio and West Virginia. To manufactui ers and packers of Canned
Goods all over the United States and Canada, we can heartily recommend corresponding with
EDWARD DAVIS,
MANUFACTURER'S AGENT & MERCHANDISE BROKER,
PENN BUILDING, 708 PENN AVENUE,
PITTSBURGH, PA.
Mr. Edward Davis has had many years' experience selling the Wholesale Grocery Trade, and since
1886 has established a large and growing Brokerage business. He is giving special attention to Canned
Goods and is in direct correspondence with all of the responsible Wholesale Trade in Western Pennsyl-
vania, Eastern Ohio and West Virginia. Both packers and jobbers can rely on condition of markets
as represented by him and many prominent packers have been well satisfied with results obtained
through service rendered by the above named.
ATTENTION TO CORRESPONDENCE AND FULL INFORMATION PROMPTLY AND CHEERFULLY GIVEN.
Robert
c.
lowry
&
co.
NO.
28
STATE
STREET,
~Hj I"
5
NEW
YORK.
nnv ro in shooks
of
EVERY
DESCRIPTION.
We
make a
specialty
of two and three
pound cases
for Canned
Goods,
made of
White
Pine or
Virginia
Yellow Pine.
We deliver in car-load lots at lowest wholesale saw
^ p()R
QUOTATIONS.
mill prices direct from our mills.
tt
SNAP SHOTS"
Should be read by Canners, Fancy Grocers and Fruit Pre-
servers. The Fruit Trade Journal has inaugurated this new-
department in its columns. It will
BRING YOU BUSINESS
not only by corresponding with such houses mentioned ( if you
are a subscriber) but by having your card displayed (if you are
an advertiser) you may be benefited both ways, as anything
published
In The "Fruit Trade Journal"
Is read with interest throughout the country by Fruit Growers,
Shippers and Merchants, as well as Grocers, Confectioners, etc.
Don't hesitate, but write at once for sample copy and rates to
FRUIT TRADE JOURNAL CO.,
24 State Street, NEW YORK.
MICHAEL DOYLE <& CO.
ROCHESTE R, jN. Y., IJ. S. A.
Manufacturers and Wholesale Jobbers
Evaporated
and
Preserved Fruits
CODES :
UNITED STATES,"
••KNIGHT'S,"
'
SCATTERGOOD'S,"
"
A. B. C."
"
SAWFISH."
DIRECT
WIRE CONNECTION
WITH
OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE
BY
POSTAL TELEGRAPH
LINES.
Cable Address. "DOYLE,
ROCHESTER."
EVAPORATED
APPLES,
SUN-DRIED
APPLES,
CIDER VINEGAR,
CHOPPED APPLES,
CANNED
FRUITS,
DOMESTIC
DRIED FRUITS,
BOILED CIDER,
APPLE WASTE.
DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN
BEANS.
HIGHEST
CURRANT CASH PRICES PAID FOR ABOVE GOODS.
Samples and offers requested. Liberal advances on consignments.
Opaline.
Lsolored JLacquer
for
Lsanners.
Produces a Brilliant Heavy Coating that not only
Ornaments the Tin but Preserves
it
from Rusting.
Manufachtred by

The Tred'k Crane Chemical Co.
Short Hills, N.
J.
Put up in any Size Package
from One Gallon to a Barrel.
ALBERT
W.
COBB &
CO.
BROKERS
AND
COMMISSION
MERCHANTS
N
Canned
Goods
^
Dried
Fruits
Correspondence
Solicited. Liberal
Advances on
Consignments.
No. 36
Wabash Avenue,
.
CHICAGO,
Ills.
R. H. B.EARD. J. J. Wl LSON
BEARD, WILSON & ©0.
BOX MANUFACTURERS
AND
WHOLESALE LUMBER DEALERS.
Poplar and Cottonwood
BOXES,
Foreign a:ra_cL Domestic,
DELIVERED IN ANY PORTION OF THE WORLD.
Poplar and Cottonwood
A SPECIALTY.
SIDIHSTG, CEILING
A N D
DRESSED LUMBER.
Cor. Third and Auction Streets, MEMPHIS, Tenn.
JAMRS WOOLVVORTH, Prcst
|
P /I
PIT ill < 1 (III 000
*
Ij R HAWES
'
Secretary.
GEO. D. WILLIAMS, Gen'l Mgr. \
vArllilli, eplUU,UUUt
| H. H. LOCKWOOD, Treasurer.
The Sandusky Lumber
*f
Box Co.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
XjTJim: :b :e :r,
Manufacturers

of- Boxes

and

Box

Shooks
SANDUSKY, Ohio.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. PROMPT SHIPMENTS GUARANTEED
Acme Soldering Solution.
The Best Flux in the Market for General Soldering and Capping Cans
REFERENCES FURNISHED ON" REQUEST.
MANUFACTURED AND FOR SALE BY
Brown, McClure <& Wales,
I HON, STEEL, HEAVY HARDWARE and METALS
69 to 83 Purchase Street, . . . BOSTON, Mass.
A. MALTBY, President.
E.J. VAXCE, Vice-President and Manager.
ALFRED MOSHER,
Jr., Secretary and Treasurer.
j. yjluce; box
co
CAPITAL, . $20,000.
fllanufaeturers of
J30XES
AND
WHOLESALE
DEALERS IN LUMBER.
BAY CITY, Mich.
We are prepared to contract with Canners and Evaporators for their supply of Boxes for season of
1891, and have a large stock of thoroughly seasoned Lumber on hand, specially selected for this trade.
Our facilities for prompt shipment are unsurpassed.
AYrite us for delivered prices.
PACKING BOXES,
MADE UP OR IN 8HOOK8.
Factories at Baltimore and Norfolk

*—
-WRITE FOR PRICES, GIVING SIZE. —
North Carolina Pine will make the Strongest, Cheapest and Best
Boxing for Canned Goods.
Address:
G-EO. G. TYLER,
No. 2515 Boston Street, BALTIMORE, Mil.
Linton Manufacturing Company,
Manufacturers of and Wholesale Dealers in
Lumber, SaltlmcTPacking Boxes
Cor. Jefferson Avenue and Euelid Street,
=
SAGINAW, Mich.
— ^^=
wWARFIELD
manufacturing go.
336, 338, 340 AND 342 NORTH ST., BALTIMORE, MD
FRUIT, VEGETABLE AND OYSTER
Packers' Machinery.
MOST COMPLETE LINE MA]"JlJ FACTORED-
Boilers, (Horizontal and Vertical) Steam Engines
Steam Boxes,
Oyster Cars and Cross Trucks,
Shriver Patent Process Kettles, (Sole Manu-
facturers)
Open Process Kettles, all sizes,
Process Crates, Dipping Crates,
Platform Trucks, Crane Fixtures,
Gasoline and Kerosene Fire Pots,
Tanks, Pumps, Gauges, Etc.
Warfield Patent Corn Cutting Machines,
" "
"
Silking
"
" "
"
Exhausting"
" "
"
Dipping
"
" "
"
Test
"
"
Tomato Scalders,
Patent Pea Hullers and Separators,
Steam Pumps, Injectors and Ejectors,
Steam Gauges, Thermometers, Capping Irons,
Forging Stakes, Coppers, Pipe Fittings,
Valves, Etc.
dan Making Machines
ef
Ever); Descriptien-
SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE.
SEND FOR "PACKERS' REFERENCE BOOA
"
containing Useful Information for
tonntrs
G. A. CROSBY & CO.,
176-178 SOUTH CLINTON STREET, CHICAGO, ILL.
MANUFACTURERS OF
LABOR SAYING
mraiPRY
FOR MANUFACTURERS OF
Cans and Other Tin
Packages.
.^PMP^-^
V< »IW«WI
Cut of Patent Automatic Double Headed Power Crimper.
The mc*t rapid and effective machine ever constructed for crimping
tops and bottoms on to can bodies. The work is accomplished at a single
operation with great accuracy. The machine is designed to handle from
the smallest sizes of cans up to cans tive inches in diameter.
MERRIAM FLOATING MACHINE.
Having acquired exclusive ownership of the
Merriam Patent Can Floater, we desire to call the
attenti >n of can manufacturers to this improved
method of outside soldering. These machines have
been adopted by many of the leading fiuit, vege-
table and meat packers throughout the U.S., and
we can confidently recommend them to the trade,
feeling assured that we are offering an article that.
once used, will render itself indispensable to every
enterprising packer of canned goods.
<gf
. A. CROSBY & CO
176 AND 178 SOUTri CLINTON STREET,
CHICAGO, ILL.
MANUFACTURERS OF
cr
PRESSES,
DIES AND SPECIAL MACHINERY
FOR THE MASHFACICKE OF
Fruit, Vegetable, Fish, Lobster, Oyster
and Meat Cans.
The Patent Positive Automatic
jfe Knock-out is so arranged that it
|§|lr
is not necessary to use springs
pF in the punches or upper Hies and
when this device is used it is an
impossibility for the operator to
allow two thicknesses of stock to
become wedged into the upper
die, each upward stroke of the
slide throwing the work out auto-
matically. This is a feature wor-
thy of your investigation.
n
No. 16 Power Press on Bench
Especially designed to operate cap and other small dies.
If you are in need of anything in our line kindly advise us as to your requirements
and we shall be pleased to send our new catalogue with prices.
«fcM,\
No. 30 Power Press with Patent Automatic Knock-out.
Especially designed to operate half-gallon and smaller Mzes.
Western Agents
for
l\\e Clark
Perfection Kerosene Gil Heaters
BUCKLINS
CYCLONE PULP
MP
PUMPKIN MACHINE
MANUFACTURED BY THE BUCKLIN CAN FILLER CO,, KEYPORT, N. J.
WILL REDUCE ANY FRUIT OR VEGETABLE TO A FINE PULP.
WILL EXTRACT ALL OF THE PULP FROM TOMATO PEEL-
INGS, AND IN PACKING PUMPKIN DOES ALL THE WORK
OF PEELING AND SIFTING ABSOLUTELY WITHOUT WASTE.
These machines are fully guaranteed to work
satisfactorily and will be sent to any responsible
party with privilege of returning at our expense
if after five days' trial it fails to do what we claim
for it. The testimony of dealers in canned goods
is that pumpkin prepared hy this machine is
superior to that packed by any other process,
and although we only claim a capacity of fifty
tons of pumpkin in ten hours, we believe the
machine capable of doing double that quantity.
We also furnish to purchasers of this machine
our exact process for packing pumpkin.
Send your order early to avoid the annoy-
ance and loss liable to come from delay.
We shall introduce this season as a compan-
ion to the Cyclone, a machine for tilling cans
with pumpkin, which will have a capacity of abou', 3,000 cans an hour. We will send this machine
out with the same guarantee, viz.. on rive days' trial with privilege of returning at our expense if it fails
to give entire satisfaction.
THE BUCKLIN
Detroit, Mich., Feb. 14, 1890
Gentlemen : We have used your Can Filler one season and can
say that it is the only machine that equals hand work. We have
used power fillers, but for packing goods of first quality, your ma-
chine is decidedly the best we have ever used.
Dailey Preserving Co.,
Per E. G. Dailey.
Greenwood, Ind., October, 7, 1890
Gentlemen : The pulp grinders sent by express reached us yes-
terday and the one by freight came in this morning We have tried
them enough to make us think you ought to find a new name for it
for we think the word, Cyclone, hardly expresses the smartness of
the machine. A cyclone might knock some things worse than the
machine, but it certainly could not knock out all the good there is
in pumpkins or tomato peelings as fast and as well as the machine.
Yours Truly,
J.
P. Polk
CAN FILLER,
This is theonly Can Filling Machine which will fill cans with toma-
toes equal to careful hand-packing. It requires less power than
any other machine, and consequently there is less mutila-
tion of fruit, and when the cans are cut open the
tomatoes will be found nearly whole.
Atlantic, Iowa, Oct. 3, 1890.
Gents: Enclosed please find New York draft calling for one hun-
dred and fifty dollars, amount in full for invoice, Sept. 13, 1890, for
which please receipt. We take pleasure in remitting for your Cy-
clone Pumpkin machine after a very successful and thorough test of
time allowed us, and we are willing to concede the point that it is a
veritable cyclone on a pumpkin pile, doing its wO'k in a perfect and
satisfactory manner.
Yours Truly, Atlantic Canning Co
,
By S. V. Martin.
Springville, N. V., March 22, 1890.
Gentlemen.: We have used several (an hillers during the past
ten years, but consider your Fillers far superior to them all. We
believe it to be the best filler in the world.
Yours truly, Western New York Pres. Co.
New Hartford, N. Y , Oct.
7, 1890.
Dear Sirs : Enclosed please find check for one hundred and
fifty dollars to pay for Cyclone Pulp Machine We take pleasure in
paying this bill, for the machine has already paid for itself and we
have run it less than a week. Yours Very Truly,
New Hartford Canning Co.
THE-
PERFECTION SCALDER
• ••
• -

THIS SCALDEB IS ONE OF THE GREATEST IMPROVE-
MENTS IN LABOB SAVING MACHINES, FOR TOMATO
PACKEBS, THAT HAS BEEN DESIGNED FOR YEARS.
NOTHING COMPLICATED, AND NO WEAK POINTS
ABOUT IT. IT IS MADE OF LIGHT BOILER IRON,
IS STBONG AND WELL BUILT, WASHES TOMATOES
NICELY AND SCALDS THEM EVENLY. THE TOMA-
TOES ARE CABRIED FIRST THROUGH WARM WATER
AND WASHED. AFTER WHICH THEY PASS THROUGH
THESCALDEB AND ARE DROPPED INTO THE CANNERS
BUCKETS. IT HAS A CAPACITY OF ONE TON IN
FROM THREE TO FOUR MINUTES.
FOR FULL PARTICULARS, PRICES, &C, ADDRESS
I. H. COX & CO., Bridgeton. N. J
^
-..
COX
S
*
PATENT-
•A
GAPPING
MACH INE
This machine is made in two sizes, called
THE COMBINATION MACHINE AN!)
CAPPER NO. 3.
The Combination Machine caps 12 2-lb. or
3-lb. cans at each operation. Its capacity is
15,000 to 18,000 per day.
CAPPER NO. 3.
Caps 16 2-lb. cans at each operation and has
a capacity of 20,000 to 25,000 cans per day.
This machine is especially adapted for capping
corn, peas, oysters, etc. B »th machines have
been greatly improved for the coming season.
We make a specialty of hand capping
steels and guarantee lo furnish a satisfactory
article at the ver}' lowest market price.
GREEN CORN PACKING MACHINERY
MANUFACTURED AND SOLD BY THE
BARKER MANUFACTURING CO
OLDEST AND LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF CANNING HOUSE MACHINERY
IN THE UNITED STATES.
HAND CORN CUTTER.
CAPACITY 3.O00 CANS PER DAY.
This machine does not mash the corn nor cut up the cob
and mix it with the pulp so that it cannot be separated, as all
other automatic cutters do. The knives can be eaujred to cut
any required depth of kernel without mashing or jambing the
same, the remaining corn being removed by a series of scrapers.
THE POWER
CUTTER
The Power cutter is essentially the same asthe hand cutter but does the work much better and quicker
The same arrangement of knives and scrapers is used as on the hand cutter, only made a little heavier.
We do not hesitate in saying that the quality of corn cut with this machine cannot be equalled by any
other corn cutter in existence. The corn is freer from small particles
of cob, is less mashed, and the cob is entirely cleaned.
We publish below a sample of the hundreds of testimonials we have
leceived from packers using our machinery. 1 he rirm of Burnham &
Morrill have used the Barker Cutters exclusively since 1876, and in
their numerous factories ovvn 60 hand cutters, 19 power cutters, 15 can
washers and 8 can tillers.
THE POWER CUTTER.
CAPACITY 10,000 CANS PER DAY.
The Barker Manufacturing Co., Portland, Me.
Gentlemen :—We have useil your Power Cutters, and think they are superior to anything we
have ever seen for cutting green corn from the cob. One power cutter will do the work of four
hand cutters, and in a better manner. We are very much pleased with them.
Yours Respectfully, Burnham & Morkill.
UK Horn
Silking
A^chine
Patented June 18, 1889
For removing silk and small pieces of cob and for cleaning the corn thoroughly whether whole,
cut or scraped, is made of iron strongly built and braced throughout. All parts likely to come
in contact with corn are covered with galvanized iron. All silk is removed from the corn before
it goes to the sieve, thus preventing its clogging and this is the point on which we claim superior-
ity over all others.
This machine will pay for itself in one season as it increases the value of the corn by being so
thoroughly cleaned.
OUR CAN FILLER
Can't be beat
; ^
it is the most perfect working machine
made, filling and weighing accurately from
75
to 100 cans
per minute. Its action is entirely automatic requiring but
one person to shovel the corn into the hopper, and a boy to
place the cans in a spout overhead, when they will drop down, place themselves under the nozzle and
be pushed out upon the table, weighed and filled.
Attached to the Filler, is a self-acting pump which may be regulated so as to put any quantity of water
into the cans before they are filled.
We are going to put upon the market this coming season a combination Can Filler that will fill toma-
toes, squash, pumpkins, in fact anything that is packed in three lb. cans as well as corn.
OUR CAN WASHER
Is instantaneous in its action washing and drying a can in a
fraction of a second leaving the entire top, including the groove
entirely dry. It can be utilized in packing anything that is
put up in circular stud-top cans. It requires no particular skill
and a person after five minutes' practice can clean from forty to
sixty cans per minute.
We manufacture and can supply packers with fire pots, bath
room fire pots, engines, boilers, shafting, pulley hangers, belting,
in fact everything needed in a first class canning house.
We are also agents for one of the largest printing houses in
the United States and can furnish labels of all kinds at reduced
rates
Parties contemplating enlarging their factories or putting in
new machinery, or wish to acquaint themselves with the most
CAN WASHER
approved methods of packing corn, will find it to their advan-
oapaoity 20,000 cans DA,Ly,
ta
g
e to correspond with us.
CAN FILLER.
0TEVENSON & CO.,
«
Engineers ana machinists,
BALTIMORE, ME).
MANUFACTURERS OK
FOOT AND SCREW PRESSES,
Can makers' ana
Tinners' Tools
AND
P.4CKERS' M^CHiJTER t\
\/mtofl
^.
STEVEMOPr & CO.,
229 North Holliday Street,
BALTIMORE, MD.
STEVENSON'S
IMPROVED AUTOMATIC
HICH
,*t
<£>
**
TRIPLE CAN
TESTER
~*~
Price
$200.00
SEND FOR DISCOUNT.
REFERENCES.
MANUFACTURED UNDER
1
October 10, 1882.
PATENT
PENDING.
R. Tyues Smith Can Co., Baltimore, Md.
Tri-State Can Co., Keokuk, Iowa.
The Louis McMurray Packing Co., Frederick, Md.
The Martin Wagner Co., Baltimore, Md.
C. G. Summers & Co.,lBaltimore, Md.
Robinson & Bro., Fallston, Harford Co., Md.
1TEYENS0N
229 N. HOLLIDAY ST., BALTIMORE, MD.
PLEASE WRITE TO THE
FERR0DUTE
HIHGHIKB
CO.,
°f bridgeton,
h.
j
For their Illustrated Circular of
Foot
and Power Presses
DIES
And all other Oanmakers'
Tools,
Such as molds, cutters, coppers,
seamers, floaters, headers, crimpers,
soldering machines, etc., for making
all kinds of cans, for packing fruits,
meats, vegetables, fish, lobsters, sar-
dines. &c, they make a full line W ith
allthe latest improvements and have
supplied nearly all the principal fac-
tories in the United States, Canada,
etc. They supply also all kinds of
Packers' Apparatus
AND A FULL LINE OF
HEAVIER DRAWING PRESSES, SC,
Pails, Cannisters,
TINWARE,
. liu/ other
Sheet
Mela I
Goods.
fc—
*yr.#Hft
THF TRFSf(VTT
Fruit Eva
P
orators
>
Furnaces,
iniJ llUJUwl l
Bleachers and packing, Presses
ARE THE BEST MACHINES ON THE MARKET TO-DAY.
Send for Catalogue, Price List and
Testimonials. Address
THE TRESCOTT MANUFACTURING CO., FAIRPORT, N. Y.
OUR No. 3. REDWOOD HANDLE. Blade 2)4 inches long. Handle 3% inches long.
J. RUSSELL & CO., 37 Reade Street, NEW YORK.
DOLSEN, CHAPIN & CO.,
Manufacturers of
IN
BAY CITY, Mich.
We are prepared to quote prices for White Pine Boxes in Snooks, delivered F. O. B.
cars at your place in carload lots, as per specifications.
Charles
S.
Trench
& Co.
j
NEW YORK: BALTIMORE:
54 CLIFF STREET. 17 P. 0. AVENUE.
TIN

PLATES

AND

CANS.
PACKERS WILL SAVE MONEY BY ENQUIRING OF US BEFORE
PLACING ORDERS ELSEWHERE.
CANNED GOODS
If you have any stocks you wish to find a market for, send
us a memo, of what they are and we may move them.
ESTABLISHED 1870.
^
TINPLATE DECORATING CO.
HO John Street, NEW YORK.
Every Variety of Tinplate Decorating to the Trade
INCLUDING COLOR WORK.
IVlanu.factu.rers of Tin Show Cards, Etc.
Labels on Tin a Specialty.
v
Write for Prices.
o^zlst
Fruit and Oyster Cans
ALL SIZES.
"W" :Et I TIt! FOE PRICES TO
The DTJGDALE CAN CO.
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind.
WANTED !
Tin Blanks or Circles from
2 3-8 inches diameter up to
7 inches diameter.
WM. A. GILL & CO.
COLUMBUS, Ohio.
^
^s^
SGALESTofTGANNERS.
HE price of the JONES 5
ton $60 Wagon Scales has never
changed since
1879, when the price of iron advanced so
rapidly. Scales have come and Scales have gone. We have seen
very high priced Scales sold on account of the name, and very
low priced Scales because of the price. All makers unite in con-
demning the [ONES Scale because it is a first-class Scale, fully
warranted, and sold at a fair price. The big bugs dislike it because
it has decreased their robbing profits; and the little bugs, the 2
ton
$40
and
3
ton
$35,
fellows hate us because customers take
our well-known and reliable
5
ton Scale at $60, in preference to
wooden or gas pipe levers at low prices.
Full information given on application to
JONES OF BINGHAMTON,
BINGHAMTON, IV. Y.
"HE PAYS THE FREIGHT."
A
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CRAND
STANDARD TYPE WRITER
INSTANTLY CHANGEABLE TYPE.
PERFECT AND PERMANENT
ALIGNMENT.
WRITING ALWAYS IN SIGHT.
Send for Catalogue and samples of work. We also manu-
facture tne IDEAL COPY-HOLDER. A Great Improvement.
Best In the market.
GRflPJILL JIIflCHINE CO.,
New Yokk Office, 353 Broadway.
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Chicago Office, 237 La Salle Street. Vji ft
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Chas. A. Perley, Franklinville, N. Y.
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BEANS,
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SQUASH,
SWEET CORN,
TOMATO, CUCUMBER,
PEAS, ONION.
We make a Specialty of furnishing all Seeds used by Canners,
Evaporators and Pickle Manufacturers. Ou» goods are equalled by
few and excelled by none, and are furnished at Moderate Prices.
Correspondence invited. Address,
D. M. FERRY &
CO.,
SEEDSMEN,