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Company Analysis

Financial Analysis--This module is contained in separate files.


SWOT Analysis
Note: This option will print all Strategic Group Maps (discard as needed)
TOWS Matrix
General Company Information
General Internal Analysis
Core Competence Assessment
Industry and Competitive Analysis Data Matrix for Strategy Canvas
Four-Action Framework
Industry Analysis SPACE Chart / Analysis
Competitive Analysis Strategic Analysis & Choice
Porter's Five Forces Strategic Alternatives and Analysis
Strategic Group Map Recommendations
GE Matrix Strategy Map
Recommendations
Market Analysis Mission Statements
Environmental Analysis Vision Statements



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Note: This option will print all Strategic Group Maps
(discard as needed)
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Strategic Analysis Model - that works
Think Plan Act
Print Cover Go To Input
Print All Industry and Competition
Print Industry Go To Input
Print Comp Go To Input
Print Porter Go To Input
Print Market Go To Input
Print Env An Go To Input
Print All Company Analysis
Print SWOT Go To Input
Print Go To Input
Print Go To Input
Print Go To Input
Print Go To Input
Print Mission Go To Input
Go To Input Print Strat
Print Go To
Print Vision Go To Input
Print ALL Strategy Output Worksheets
Go To Go To Print All Recommendations Pri Prin
Print TOWS Go To Input
Print Core Go To Input
Print GE Matrix Go To Input
Go To Input Print 4-
Print Strategy Map Go To Input
SAM
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= Strategic Analysis Model that works
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Strategy Toolbox Checklist
Indicate which tools are appropriate for completing a Strategic Plan for this company. Indicate completion for tools used, and space is allowed to
record comments regarding any of the tools.
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PHASE I: Situation Analysis
General Company Information
Industry and Competitive Analysis
Industry Analysis
Competitive Analysis
Porter's Five Forces
Strategic Group Map
GE Matrix
Market Analysis
Environmental Analysis
Company Analysis
Financial Analysis
SWOT Analysis
TOWS Matrix
General Internal Analysis
Core Competence Assessment
Strategy Canvas
Four-Action Framework
SPACE Chart / Analysis
Strategic Alternatives and Analysis
Strategy Map
Recommendations
Mission Statements
Vision Statements
PHASE II: STRATEGIC ANALYSIS AND CHOICE
PHASE III: RECOMMENDATIONS
PHASE I: Situation Analysis
Instructions
Welcome to the Strategy portion of the SAMtw software (Strategic Analysis Modelthat works!).

Crafting a good strategy is hard work. It requires having to pay relentless attention to as much data about the company and its
environment as can be gathered (it should be data-driven, not opinion-driven), understanding, analyzing, and making sense of changes
in the environment and in the company itself. And because those data and analyses sometimes don't cover what is truly needed, one
must rely also on forecasts, judgment, experience, and even educated guesses.

Strategy is how a company actually competes and, for the strategy to be successful, it must lift the company above its competitors and
also position it for long-term success. It is as much about figuring out what to do as what not to doabout making difficult choices (see
below). No easy task. And until a strategy is implemented, one wont know whether it has been successful.

SAM
tw
follows the process laid out in the strategic-planning book you now own. Because of the complex nature of deciding what to do
and what not to do in a competitive, ambiguous, changing, and uncertain environment, this Strategy workbookand the companion
financial workbooks for 3, 4, and 5 years worth of datawill help you immeasurably. Here are some pointers to help you get the most
out of this software.

Before starting, be sure after downloading the workbook to save it to your hard drive. After that, each time you use it for a different
company, save it under that companys name. Remember to save after completing every sheet.

The first thing to tell you is that the strategy workbook comprises work sheets, i.e., rough notes, a thinking pad, and even ruminations
that no one else will see until your thinking has evolved and you can defend your analyses and recommendations. If youre ever in doubt
as to whether your answer is correct or even belongs in a particular box, simply put it down; you can always go back and change it.
Your first entries are not necessarily your final ones; its amazing how your thinking changes when you can actually see your ideas on the
computer screen or in a printoutanother benefit of the strategy worksheets.

While the tools and analytical techniques in the workbook will give you more insight than you would have had without using any of
them, your instructor might nevertheless choose to have you complete a subset of them (use the Checklist to note which ones not to
complete).
On every sheet, you will find comment boxes or call-outs attached to almost every entry to both explain the term used and guide you to
making a relevant (not necessarily correct) response. When you have made all entries on a particular sheet, check them against your
intuition and other relevant information you might have. For example, arriving at a high Industry-Attractiveness Index when other signs
point to it being not very attractive should tell you to go over your analysis again. The same might apply to your entries in the Porters
Five-Forces Analysis. While there are never any right answers (unlike the Financial workbooks that depend on inputting the data
correctly), the ones you enter should be defensible, i.e., you should be able to tell someone else why your entries made sense.

Dont be afraid to leave an entry blank if you have no idea what should go in a box, or enter Unknown. Another idea is to put an entry
in square parentheses (or some color) to denote a complete guess. Even the best strategists dont know the answers to everything. For
example, one such category of information that managers have little information about is competitive information; some strategy cases
also provide too little competitive information. Thus, after completing the Competitive Snapshot sheet, you might find you were able to
complete very few boxes. One conclusion, which should be apparent even to you, is that you know very little about your competitorsa
serious shortcoming when doing a strategic analysis. In another example, if you can come up with only one or two environmental
trends, know that you are missing others.

The sheet that is the most important and most difficult to complete is the Alternatives Analysis and Choice. Reading Chapter 5 in the
book before and during completing this sheet will help enormously. Another thing that will help is having done it 2-3 timesyou will
begin to focus more on the strategic issues and being strategically creative than on what terms mean. Remember to phrase key strategic
issues as questions (to which the answer is not known) and to address all of them in constructing your bundles (they will diverge as you
go through this process, but will have a chance at the end to delete issues that werent addressed and add new ones that were). Your
bundles should meet the six criteria given in the book and you must have a minimum of two bundles (otherwise there is no choice
involved). You should take care when giving each bundle a name; doing so will not only help distinguish them from each other but
crystallize the principal strategy it embodies. Finally, it is the relative scores in your Criteria Matrix that matter, not their absolute value.
Construct your argument defending your winning bundle from your Criteria Matrix.

Strategy is about deciding what to do (your winning bundle) and what not to do (the bundles you reject) in order to compete better over
the next three years. This workbook will allow you to examine your thinkingor have a group examine its thinkingand arm you with
arguments to persuade others that your recommendations make the most sense under the circumstances. Yes, its hard work, but once
you become familiar with the process, youll give more time to strategic considerations and less to the mechanics. And, youll be
hooked.


Stan Abraham
Once input is complete for this screen, click here to print Cover Sheet which incorporates the data entered here.
Sporting Goods - Retail
Name of Company
Company Name
Segment
Industry
Number of Employees
Products/Services
CEO Name
CEO Style
No. Years in Business
No. Locations
How Many States/Countries?
Headquarters Location
Public or Privately Held?
Parent Corporation/Company
Stock Price Range (12 Mo)
Ticker Symbol
Strategy Designer
Input General Company Information
Publicly Held Privately Held
Total Industry or Segment Sales ($M)
Industry or Segment Growth Rate (%/yr)
Lifecycle Stage Degree of Vertical Integration
Scale Economies Industry Profitability Degree of Concentration
I ndustry Driving Forces
Weight Rating Product
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0
Industry
Attractiveness
Index
0.0
This index indicates that this is NOT an attractive industry to enter or remain in.
Industry Snapshot
Company Name
Factors
Industry Attractiveness Matrix
Degree of Technological Innovation
Purchasing
Manufacturing
Distribution
Advertising
0%
0% `
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
Weight each item(sum
should be 100)
Total (should = 100) 0
Competitor Analysis for Critical Success Factors
Score companies on a scale of 1 to 10 for relative strength for each factor (10 indicates greatest/highest level)
Factor Company Name Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5
0
0
0
0
0
ADDITIONAL COMPETITIVE DATA
Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5
Strategic Factor Company Name Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5
Competitive Advantage
Strategic Intent
Geographic Scope
Positioning
Generic Strategy
CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS
Name up to 2 things each competitor
does better than Company Name
Name up to 2 things that Company
Name does better than each
competitor
Type of Competition
Print after input is complete
for this screen
Basis of Competition
Competitor 4
Others
Company Name
Competitor 1
Competitor 2
Competitor 3
Company Name
Competitive Analysis: Snapshot of the Competition
Enter Market Share Data
Competitor 5
Are Market Shares Stable or Changing?
Name 5 Success Factors

Make sure to input names of
competitors here. They are used
in numerous instances within the
model.
Print after input is complete
for this screen
Rivals/Competitors
Top 5 competitors of this company:
Do not Input - These Come
From Competition Input!
Identify Substitutes
Identify Potential Entrants
Intensity of Rivalry
Bargaining Power of Buyers
Bargaining Power of Suppliers
Identify Suppliers
Identify Buyers/Customers
Company Name
Competitor 1
Competitor 2
Industry Analysis: Porter's Five-Forces Model
Company Name
Porter's Five-Forces Model is typically represented in the form of a cross, shown in the
small diagram to the left. The central box is Rivals, with others from top, clockwise,
New Entrants, Buyers or Customers, Substitutes, and Suppliers. All five boxes are
also sources of competitive threats. Its value as an industry analysis is assessing the
power of each of these boxes, which are the additional corner boxes in the diagram.
What is the intensity of rivalry? How high are entry barriers? What is the bargaining
power of buyers and suppliers? What is the threat of substitutes? Your entries to the
five boxes and four analysis boxes are done sequentially on this sheet, but will appear
in the form of the small diagram on the output.
Competitor 3
Competitor 4
Competitor 5
Threat of Substitutes
Barriers to Entry
Relative Indication of Size
Strategic Group
Map Data Criteria A Criteria B Group Size
User Defined Titles of Groups (X) (Y) (Diameter)
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
User Defined Criteria for X & Y Axes
Criteria A
Company Name
Competive Analysis: Strategic Group Map
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B
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
Strategic Group Map
Group 1 Group 2
Group 3 Group 4
Relative Indication of Size
Strategic Group
Map Data Criteria A Criteria B Group Size
User Defined Titles of Groups (X) (Y) (Diameter)
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Group 5
User Defined Criteria for X & Y Axes
Criteria A
Company Name
Competive Analysis: Strategic Group Map
C
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B
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
Strategic Group Map
Group 1 Group 2
Group 3 Group 4
Group 5
Relative Indication of Size
Strategic Group
Map Data Criteria A Criteria B Group Size
User Defined Titles of Groups (X) (Y) (Diameter)
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Group 5
Group 6
User Defined Criteria for X & Y Axes
Criteria A
Company Name
Competive Analysis: Strategic Group Map
C
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B
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1
Strategic Group Map
Group 1 Group 2
Group 3 Group 4
Group 5 Group 6
Weight Rating Product








0
Industry
Attractiveness
(I.A.) Index 0.0
Weight Rating Product








0
Comp Strength
(C.S.) Index 0.0


I ndustry Attractiveness Matrix (I . A.)




Factors


This index indicates that this is NOT an attractive industry to enter or remain in.
Success Factors
G. E. Matrix Chart
Company Name
If the company plots in the top three boxes (shaded light green), the GE Matrix indicates a possible strategy of 'Grow, Invest, and
Build." If it ends up in the bottom three squares (shaded light red), the matrix indicates a 'Harvest' or 'Exit' strategy. The grey shaded
boxes require a strategy on a case-by-case basis.
The G.E. Matrix was named after the corporation that first developed and used it as a guide to strategic choice.
The G.E. Matrix plots Industry Attractiveness (0) against Competitive Strength (0).
G.E. Matrix
This index indicates that this company is NOT competitive.
Competitive Strength Matrix (C. S.)
0.0
20.0
40.0
60.0
80.0
100.0
0.0 20.0 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0
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C.S. Index
Who is the market?
Who is the target market?
Who is the served market?
What is the size of the target market?
How fast is the market growing (%/yr)?
How far is the market penetrated (%)?
What
What are customers' current needs?
What are customers' future needs?
What are current distribution channels?
What are channel markups at each stage?
How price-sensitive are customers?
What is the current pricing strategy?
What are some market/customer trends?
Company Name
Market Analysis: Snapshot of the Market
Severity of Impact on Company
Negative Positive
Category H M L DEFAULT L M H
Attitude/
Lifestyle
Environmental Analysis: Impact of Environmental Trends
Company Name
Statement of Trend
Economic
Other Trends
Regulatory/
Legislative
Demographic
Technological
Political/
Legal
Socio-
Cultural

Print after input is complete for this screen
List up to eight strengths specific to this company:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
List up to eight weaknesses specific to this company:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Company Name
Company Analysis: SWOT Analysis
WEAKNESSES
STRENGTHS
List up to eight opportunities specific to this company:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
List up to eight threats specific to this company:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
THREATS
OPPORTUNITIES
1. 1.
2. 2.
3. 3.
4. 4.
5. 5.
6. 6.
7. 7.
8. 8.
SO Strategies WO Strategies
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
ST Strategies WT Strategies
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
Company Analysis: TOWS Matrix
Company Name
INTERNAL
FACTORS
EXTERNAL
FACTORS
Strengths (S)
Weaknesses (W)
Opportunities (O)
Threats (T)
Current strategy
When was it last changed?
Does a written strategic
plan exist? Is the plan
declared or articulated by
senior management?
Corporate culture
Is the Company involved in a
planned change program?
What
Any constraints?
Describe any IT initiatives
with strategic implications
Company Name
General Internal Analysis
Capability
Is the
capability
valuable?
Is the
capability
rare?
Is the
capability
costly to
imitate?
Is the
capability
nonsubsti-
tutable? Competitive Consequences Performance Implications
Company Name
Core Competence Assessment
Criteria for Core Competence
(A capability that meets all 4 criteria is a core competence)
The four criteria that distinguish capabilities from core competencies are related to competitive advantage and firm performance.
Valuable capabilities are those that create value for a firm and help it deliver customer value by exploiting opportunities or
neutralizing threats in its external environment. Rare capabilities are those possessed by almost no current or potential competitor.
Costly-to-imitate capabilities are those that other firms cannot develop easily, quickly, or inexpensively. And nonsubstitutable
capabilities are those that do not have strategic equivalents.
Company Name
Strategy Canvas
Analysis and Discussion
This takes the form of a graphical two-dimensional representation: The x-axis comprises a list of the
factors the industry currently competes on, such as price, features, promotion, distribution, service, etc.,
and the y-axis represents the offering level that buyers receive across all these competing factors (no
scale is possible since the levels pertain to many factors, but the range is from low to high). Insofar as the
company under analysis scores high on factors that other companies and the industry don't, it points to
the existence of a Blue Ocean.
Apple
Dell
Others
List up to seven factors for each (keep responses brief):
Which factors should be reduced well below the industrys standard? Which factors should be raised well above the industrys standard?
1
test 1
1
test 8
2
test 2
2
test 9
3
test 3
3
test 10
4
test 4
4
test 11
5
test 5
5
test 12
6 test 6 6 test 13
7 test 7 7 test 14
Which of the factors that the industry takes for granted should be eliminated? Which factors should be created that the industry has never offered?
1
test 15
1
test 22
2
test 16
2
test 23
3
test 17
3
test 24
4
test 18
4
test 25
5
test 19
5
test 26
6 test 20 6 test 27
7 test 21 7 test 28
## #REF!
## #REF!
Summary of Differentiation / Blue Ocean
Company Name
Four-Action Framework
A first attempt at plotting a companys value curve might disappoint if the curve is too similar to that of the industry. This means, of course, that the company is not at
all or sufficiently differentiated. The Four-Action Framework is designed to stimulate thinking to find ways to differentiate the company and even ways of competing
that have not been contemplated by the industry (a Blue Ocean). What is attractive about it is its simplicity and ease of use. Think of it as "focused brainstorming.
Reduce
Raise
Eliminate Create
Strategic Position and ACtion Evaluation (SPACE) is used to determine the appropriate strategic posture for a
company. Financial Strength (FS) and Competitive Advantage (CA) are the two primary determinants of a firm's
strategic position. Industry Strength (IS) and Environmental Stability (ES) characterize the entire industry. You are to
assign scores (below) for each of the 4 dimensions. Each factor contains a comment to assist in scoring. Averages
(or average minus 6 as indicated) for each dimension are plotted on the chart. The result is a four-sided polygon
displaying the weight and direction (the "thrust") of the strategic assessment. By adding the results of the two X-axis
dimensions (CA & IS) and the two Y-axis dimensions (FS& ES), an (X,Y) coordinate is obtained and plotted on the chart
to determine the appropriate strategic posture. Keep in mind that the SPACE Chart is a summary device and each
dimension should be analyzed individually as well, especially if any dimension results in a high or low score.
Indicate a score for each of the following criteria. Indicate a score for each of the following criteria.
Return on Investment Growth Potential
Leverage Profit Potential
Liquidity Technological Know-How
Capital Required Versus Capital Available Resource Utilization
Cash Flow Capital Intensity
Risk Involved in Business Ease of Entry into Market
Inventory Turnover Productivity, Capacity Utilization
Economies of Scale and Experience Other:
Other:
Average #DIV/0! Average #DIV/0!
Indicate a score for each of the following criteria. Indicate a score for each of the following criteria.
Technological Changes Market Share
Rate of Inflation Product Quality
Demand Variability Product Life Cycle
Price Range of Competing Products Product Replacement Cycle
Barriers to Entry into Market Customer Loyalty
Competitive Pressure/Rivalry Competition's Capacity Utilization
Price Elasticity of Demand Technological Know-How
Pressure from Substitute Products Vertical Integration
Other: Differentiation, Uniqueness
Other:
Average - 6 #DIV/0! Average - 6 #DIV/0!
Factors Determining Financial Strength (FS)
Factors Determining Environmental Stability (ES)
Company Name
SPACE Analysis
Factors Determining Competitive Advantage (CA)
Strategic Dimensions and Scoring
Factors Determining Industry Strength (IS)
Company Name
SPACE Analysis
FS #DIV/0! #DIV/0!
IS #DIV/0! #DIV/0!
ES #DIV/0! #DIV/0!
CA #DIV/0! #DIV/0!
This model is adapted from Strategic Management: A Methodological Approach by Rowe, Mason, Dickel, Mann and Mockler, 1994, p.255-265.
#DIV/0!
#DIV/0!
#DIV/0!
This posture is common in an industry which is unattractive
where the company lacks financial strength and lacks a
competitive product. Focus should be on product
competitiveness. Common practices for companies in this
situation: retreat from the market, discontinue products
with low profitability, aggressive cost cutting measures, cut
capacity, halt or reduce further investment.
This situation is typical in a company with a definite
competitive advantage in a very attractive industry with
some environmental uncertainty. Critical to this company
is financial strength. Common practices for companies in
this situation: acquire financial resources to increase
marketing effort, increase sales force, expand/improve
product offerings, productivity investments, cost reduction,
or merge with cash-rich company.
Aggressive
Competitive
Conservative
Defensive
Financial Strength
Strategic Position and ACtion Evaluation (SPACE)
#DIV/0!
Competitive Advantage
This situation is typical in a very attractive industry without
environmental uncertainty. Financial strength helps protect
the company's competitive advantage. Critical to this
company is risk of entry of new competition. Common
practices for companies in this situation: explore new
opportunities, acquisitions, increase market share, and
focus resources on products that have a competitive
advantage.
This posture is common in a market which is stable with
low growth. Focus should be on financial stability and
product competitiveness. Common practices for
companies in this situation: prune product line, reduce
costs, cash flow improvement, protection of competitive
products, new product development, and entering more
attractive markets.
Industry Strength
Environmental Stability
Descriptions of Strategic Postures
-
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
5.0
6.0
FS
IS
ES
CA
Aggressive -
Strength on all dimensions
Competitive -
Comp. advantage in good
industry, but weak in financial
and environmental stability
Defensive -
Relative weakness
on most dimensions

Conservative -
Financially sound, but
market is very competitive
and is waning
(High)
(High) (Low)
(Low)
0 0 0 0
WO Strategies 0 0 0 0
ST Strategies 0 0 0 0
WT Strategies 0 0 0 0
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Strategies Developed Using TOWS Matrix
Alternatives Analysis and Choice
Company Name
Key External Strategic Issues
SO Strategies
Key Internal Strategic Issues
Strategies Developed Using TOWS Matrix
Alternatives Analysis and Choice
Company Name
Bundle 1 Bundle 2 Bundle 3 Bundle 4
Name Bundle 1 Name Bundle 2 Name Bundle 3 Name Bundle 4
Describe each
bundle fully
Strategic Alternatives
Strategies Developed Using TOWS Matrix
Alternatives Analysis and Choice
Company Name
Criteria Matrix
Fit with corporate culture Extent to which culture must change
Adverse effect on competitors Capital investment required
Contribution to shareholder value Likelihood of competitive retaliation
Growth in revenues Time to breakeven point
Growth in profits Overall riskiness
Return on investment Other
Strength of value proposition Other
Increase in bargaining power Other
Other Other
Other Other
Criteria Matrix
Indicate a score from 0 to +10 (10 being best) for the positively correlated criteria chosen (indicated by "P")
Indicate a score from -10 to 0 (0 being best) for the negatively correlated criteria chosen (indicated by "N")
Bundle 1 Bundle 2 Bundle 3 Bundle 4
Name Bundle 1 Name Bundle 2 Name Bundle 3 Name Bundle 4
Fit with corporate
culture
P
Adverse effect on
competitors
P
Contribution to
shareholder value
P
Growth in revenues P
Growth in profits P
Return on investment P
Strength of value
proposition
P
Increase in bargaining
power
P
Other P
Other P
Extent to which culture
must change
N
Capital investment
required
N
Likelihood of
competitive retaliation
N
Time to breakeven
point
N
Overall riskiness N
Other N
Choose NO MORE than 6 of the following criteria to use in your evaluation of the bundles:
Choose the most relevant of the following positively correlated
criteria to use in your evaluation of the bundles. To add your
own, overwrite "Other" cells.
Choose the most relevant of the following negatively correlated
criteria to use in your evaluation of the bundles. To add your own,
overwrite "Other" cells.
Strategies Developed Using TOWS Matrix
Alternatives Analysis and Choice
Company Name
Other N
Other N
Other N
Other N
0 0 0 0 OVERALL SCORE
Strategies Developed Using TOWS Matrix
Alternatives Analysis and Choice
Company Name
Name Bundle 1 Name Bundle 2 Name Bundle 3 Name Bundle 4
Bundle Description

(will appear based on
choice above)






Rationale for
selecting the
preferred choice
Indicate Bundle
Choice
Bundle 1
Bundle 2
Bundle 3
Indicate Selection
Bundle 4
Financial Test #1 theme
Test # 2 theme that
wraps around
Customer
Operations
(Process)
Learning & Growth
Build the Enterprise
Increase Customer
Value
Achieve Operational
Excellence
Be a Good
Corporate Citizen
Source: Kaplan & Norton, The Strategy-Focused Organization, How Balanced Scorecard Companies
Thrive in the New Business Environment (Harvard Business School Press, 2001)
Strategy Map
S
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O
b
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c
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s
Strategic Themes
Company Name
Print after input is
complete for this screen
Enter Data to be
used for charting Most Recent Year
Revenues
Net Income After
Taxes (NIAT)
Overwrite cell B11 with first year
Objectives 2005 2006 2007
Use this section to indicate annual changes in absolute dollars
Revenues
- - -
Net Income After
Taxes (NIAT)
- - -
Use this section to indicate annual changes as percentage changes
Revenues
Net Income After
Taxes (NIAT)
Other objectives
Other objectives
Strategy
Strategy
Strategy
Strategic Intent
Decisions for the Next Three Years
Recommendations
Company Name
I NPUT SHEET
Programs
Print after input is
complete for this screen
Decisions for the Next Three Years
Recommendations
Company Name
Trigger-Contingency Pairs
2005 2006 2007
Trigger
Contingency
Trigger
Contingency
Trigger
Contingency
Programs
Company Name
Mission Statements
PROPOSED MISSION STATEMENT
CURRENT MISSION STATEMENT
Company Name
Vision Statements
PROPOSED VISION STATEMENT
CURRENT VISION STATEMENT
for
Company Name
A Public Corporation
0
Prepared by
Segment Industry
Products/Services
CEO Name CEO Style
No. Locations How Many States/Countries?
Number of Employees No. Years in Business
Parent Corporation/Company Ticker Symbol Stock Price Range (12 Mo)
0 0
0
0

0
0
Strategic Analysis
Company Snapshot
0 0
0
0
Strategic Analysis Model - that works
Type of Competition Basis of Competition
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
0%
Are Market Shares Stable or Changing?
Critical Success Factors - Weighted Score Results
Factor Company Name Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTAL WEIGHTED
SCORE 0 0 0 0 0 0
Company Name
Competitive Analysis: Snapshot of the Competition
0 0
Market Share Data

Competitor 4
Competitor 5
Company Name
Competitor 1
Competitor 2
Competitor 3
Others
0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
1
Company
Name
Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5
Critical Success Factors - Total Weighted Scores
Company Name
Competitive Analysis: Snapshot of the Competition
Matrix of Strategic Factors
Strategic Factor Company Name Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5
Competitive
Advantage

Strategic Intent
Geographic Scope
Positioning
Generic Strategy
Things that Company Name does better than the competition:
Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5


Things that the competion does better than Company Name:
Competitor 1 Competitor 2 Competitor 3 Competitor 4 Competitor 5


Competitive Core
POTENTIAL NEW ENTRANTS


RIVALS
SUPPLIERS OF KEY INPUTS
Company Name
BUYERS
Competitor 1
Competitor 2
Competitor 3
Competitor 4
Competitor 5
SUBSTITUTE PRODUCTS



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7
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3
7
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4
5
.
Intensity of Rivalry:
C
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m
p
a
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N
a
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e
P
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s

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Bargaining Power of Buyers:
Threat of Substitutes:
Barriers to Entry:
STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0

Company Name
SWOT Analysis
Reduce
test 1
test 2
test 3
test 4
test 5
test 6
test 7
Eliminate Create
test 15 test 22
test 16 test 23
test 17 test 24
test 18 test 25
test 19 test 26
test 20 test 27
test 21 test 28
Raise
test 8
test 9
test 10
test 11
test 12
test 13
test 14
COMMENTS / ANALYSIS
0
Company Name
The Four-Action Grid
Objectives 2005 2006 2007
Revenues
0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Net Income After
Taxes (NIAT)
0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
Other objectives
0 0 0
Other objectives
0 0 0



Programs








#REF! #REF! #REF!
Decisions for the Next Three Years
Recommendations
Company Name
Strategic I ntent
-
0
0
1
1
1
Most Recent Year 2005 2006 2007
Revenues
-
0
0
1
1
1
Most
Recent
Year
2005 2006 2007
Net Income After Taxes (NIAT)
Decisions for the Next Three Years
Recommendations
Company Name
Trigger-Contingency Pairs
Year 1 Year 2 Year 3
Trigger

Contingency

Trigger

Contingency

Trigger

Contingency

Check boxes - Basic Data
1 A Public Corporation
A Private Company
Forms - Industry
1 Lifecycle Stage
1 Degree of Vertical Integration
1 Degree of Technological Innovation
Scale Economies
FALSE Purchasing
FALSE Distribution
FALSE Manufacturing
FALSE Advertising
1 Industry Profitability
3 Degree of Concentration
STRATEGY
FALSE Fit with corporate culture
FALSE Adverse effect on competitors
FALSE Contribution to shareholder value
FALSE Growth in revenues
FALSE Growth in profits
FALSE Return on investment
FALSE Strength of value proposition
FALSE Increase in bargaining power
FALSE Other
FALSE Other
FALSE Extent to which culture must change
FALSE Capital investment required
FALSE Likelihood of competitive retaliation
FALSE Time to breakeven point
FALSE Overall riskiness
FALSE Other
FALSE Other
FALSE Other
FALSE Other
FALSE Other