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Volume 48 - Issue 5

October 1, 2014
theeyeopener.com
@theeyeopener
Since 1967
the pint
is a lie
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
you’re NOT GETTING WHAT YOU pay for.
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Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
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See something
unusual
on campus?
Tell us
everything.
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
NEWS 3
Timetable issues here to stay
Every semester, Ryerson students have to deal with the painful uncertainty of scheduling
Take that, future generations.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
By Aidan Cox
Mind the gap and your wallet
A new report shows your pay is less about your skills and more about how long you’ve been at the job
By Jake Scott
After graduating you can expect
equal work, but not equal pay.
A recent report by the Confer-
ence Board of Canada states that
the wage gap between people age
25 to 29 and that of people age
55 to 59 has increased 64 per cent
since 1980.
You can have the same job and
do the same work but not the
same pay as someone 30 years
older.
This can be a problem when
you enter a job and a senior em-
ployee makes double your pay for
the same amount of work.
This two-tiered income system
has many contributing factors,
but the standout cause is employ-
ers unwilling to pay reasonable
wages to skilled workers entering
the workforce, according to the
report.
“We are constantly trying to
create links between the students’
union and labour on campus for
precisely this reason,” said RSU
Vice-President Education Jesse
Root.
“A lot of management is push-
ing for a two-tiered [wage] system
and particularly in a union envi-
ronment, which is the case for
most people [working] at the uni-
versity, that’s really problematic,”
Root said.
A two-tiered wage system cre-
ates two classes of workers, the
high-paid seniors and the low-
paid new hires, regardless of job
responsibility or qualification.
Some think of it as a “loyalty
bonus” where more time spent
working for an employer is re-
warded with more pay, but youth
employment expert and lawyer
Adam Langille thinks it’s unfair.
“The old adage, ‘Last hired,
first fired,’ certainly still rings
true,” Langille said.
“Unions are [now] addressing
the issue of intergenerational eq-
uity, which is good because many
unions have essentially forgotten
young people.”
Students entering the work-
force are devalued through what
Langille calls precarious work,
such as part-time jobs, contract
work and the dreaded unpaid in-
ternship.
But most students don’t have
the luxury of turning down work
after accumulating debt through-
out post-secondary schooling.
“I think it’s a little unnerving
when you look at the stats, but I
think that’s the trend. It’s become
more and more difficult to get an
education that’ll get you a good
job,” said first-year sport media
student Victor Findley. “I’m up
for a challenge … [but] it does
make me feel uneasy.”
RSU gets a
failing grade
The 2014 Campus Freedom In-
dex lists the Ryerson Students’
Union (RSU) as the fifth-worst in
Canada for upholding freedom of
expression but Ryerson University
among the best schools for free ex-
change of ideas. This is the second
year the RSU’s ranked in the top
10 worst student unions.
The index is an annual report
put together by the Justice Cen-
tre for Constitutional Freedoms
(JCCF), an organization focused
on the fundamental freedoms de-
fined in the Canadian Charter of
Rights and Freedoms.
The JCCF gave Ryerson a C
for policies and an A for practic-
es. Ryerson got the A because it
“defended the open discussion of
controversial ideas on campus,”
including providing security for a
men’s issues discussion and resist-
ing pressure to have a Black Pan-
ther leader banned from campus
in 2007.
The RSU didn’t do so well, get-
ting a D for policies and F for prac-
tices. The report said parts of RSU
policy “clearly infringes the ex-
pression rights of student groups,
particularly religious and political
student groups” and “gives discre-
tion to the RSU … to censor speech
that is deemed to carry political or
religious messages.”
One of the reasons for the RSU’s
F for practices was its denial of
two group applications in 2013, a
men’s issues group and a pro-life
group called Preserving Human
Dignity at Ryerson (PHDR), ac-
cording to the report.
“The RSU may not agree with
the men’s issues awareness club
[but] denying them the privileges
other students have in the union is
censorship and it’s wrong and it’ll
qualify them for the F,” JCCF Com-
munications and Development Co-
ordinator Michael Kennedy said.
RSU President Rajean Hoilett
said that the RSU and JCCF have
different views on what freedom
of expression means.
“While creating freedom of
expression, we’re also simultane-
ously working to make sure the
campus is safer and more inclu-
sive,” Hoilett said. “It’s impor-
tant to prioritize those things over
things like freedom of expression,
so making sure people don’t mask
hate speech for freedom of expres-
sion is a really big priority and I
think that’s something that gets
lost in this report.”
Kennedy, however, said that
the JCCF uses the Criminal Code
definition of hate speech and that
none of the messages by the re-
jected groups or their affiliates fall
into that definition.
Each semester, Ryerson students
are held in limbo waiting for their
class schedule.
Students have no idea how their
fall timetables will look until late
August. Many have expressed dis-
satisfaction with how late their
timetables are released and the issue
is currently one of the most popular
topics on Soapbox, an online forum
for students to submit complaints.
“Say you have a part-time job,
how are you going to schedule
your new availability for each fall
and winter semester when you
don’t know what your schedule is
going to be like until it’s too late?”
said Vernon Szeto, a fifth-year
business management student.
Szeto posted on Soapbox in Au-
gust to share his frustration. One
month later, the post has more
than 800 up-votes and multiple
comments from students express-
ing the same annoyance.
“At Ryerson, through the
course intention process, students
have direct influence on which
courses are offered,” said Char-
maine Hack, Ryerson’s registrar,
in an email.
“Most universities do not take
student preferences [into ac-
count] for course offerings. This
approach is considerably less
time-consuming than Ryerson’s
demand-driven approach.”
Program departments also need
to confirm which courses they are
offering along with how many sec-
tions, then submit that informa-
tion to the registrar’s office.
“We acknowledge that every-
body would like schedules sooner
rather than later,” John Turtle,
Ryerson’s secretary of senate, said.
“It’s a request often made by the
faculty as well because they don’t
get their schedules until relatively
late in the process.”
The University of Toronto and
York University don’t use course
intentions. Instead, the courses
for each department along with
times are posted online a month
or two before enrolment starts.
So while the courses available
may be set in stone, students re-
ceive their timetables earlier than
those at Ryerson.
“Students at U of T usually get
their schedule in July,” said Chloe
Lopez, a fourth-year environmen-
tal studies major at the University
of Toronto.
Lopez added that their enrol-
ment process usually starts in July,
depending on which year a stu-
dent is going into. Ryerson’s starts
in mid-August.
The Department of Arts and Sci-
ences at U of T posts the courses
that are offered for the fall semes-
ter around April every year on its
website. So even if students don’t
end up with some courses they
originally wanted due to aggres-
sive enrolment competition, they
can still have a good idea of what
days and times they will have class
months in advance.
York University’s enrolment
procedure works the same way
but starts in June.
“The summer and fall-winter
schedule is available for students
to view prior to the end of each
current winter term,” said Denise
Closs, assistant registrar at York.
Closs pointed out that York’s
course offerings are based on en-
rolment history and forecasting,
rather than Ryerson’s demand-
driven system.
This academic year, students at
Ryerson were given the opportu-
nity to do their course intentions
in March 2014. Another round
of course intentions was offered
in May. Despite this, students had
to wait all the way until the enrol-
ment period opened in mid-August
to find out what course scheduling
would look like.
By Jackie Hong
Scheduling issues can cause uncontrollable rage and a broken laptop.
PHOTO: NICK DUNNE
4 EDITORIAL Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
Editor-in-Chief
Mohamed “Love Me Paul” Omar
News
Jackie “Drink Beer” Hong
Sierra “And” Bein
Jake “SCIENCE” Scott
Features
Sean “Draft Punk” Wetselaar
Biz & Tech
Laura “Hairstylist” Woodward
Arts and Life
Leah “James La Ronde” Hansen
Sports
Josh “Joke Supplier” Beneteau
Communities
Natalia “Dead Food” Balcerzak
Photo
Farnia “Granny” Fekri
Jess “Chalk Of Destiny” Tsang
Rob “Hadouken” Foreman
Fun
Keith “Hair Model” Capstick

Media
Behdad “Big Daddy” Mahichi
Online
Nicole “Feature Creature”
Schmidt
John “I Dream Of Spam” Shmuel
Web Developer
Kerry “Interactive God” Wall
Copyeditor
Becca “Flight Woes” Goss
General Manager
Liane “Me Hearty” McLarty
Advertising Manager
Chris “Coffee Pal” Roberts
Design Director
J.D. “Sir Cooks-A-Lot” Mowat
Contributors
Truman “Spike” Kwan
Nick “Dropkick” Dunne
Vivian “Dive” Tabar
Amy “Kilty” Frueh
Ramisha “Sixth Time’s The
Charm” Farooq
Allison “Semicolon Killer” Elkin
William “Dragonpunch” Johnson
Jake “Falconkick” Kivanc
Alex “Beer Scientist” Downham
Devin “Beer Explorer” Jones
Mitch “Beer Researcher” Bowmile
Chris “Beer Tester” Blanchette
Aidan “Dr.” Cox
Nitish “On Fire” Bissonauth
Luke “World Traveller” Galati
Daniel “Smashed” Rocchi
Erin “Flexible” Hesselink
Adena “Kettlekorn” Ali
Michael “Polo” Musalem
Lauren “Plough” Der
Catherine “Explicit” Machado
Adriana “Politicarts” Parente
Justin “It’s Going Up!” Chandler
Rachel “Billies” Lee
Aaron “Ram Cam” Navarro
Josephine “Media Master” Tse
Brendan “Hi Brendan!” Sylvia
Michelle-Andrea “Awesome”
Girouard
Courtney “Badass” Miceli
Sarah “Newfie Accent” Jackson
Ammi “Up And Away” Parmar
Brooklyn “No Sleep” Pinheiro
Olivia “Mesquite” McLeod
Annie “Cryptomeria” Arnone
Chelsea “Kapok” Lecce
Deven “Cypress” Knill
Julia “Banyan” Vit
Leaura “Reliable” Katelyn
Super Awesome Interns
Julia “Bags Bunny” Tomasone
Anika “Stealthy” Syeda
Playing the part of the Annoying
Talking Coffee Mug this week is
CopyRITE, for waking up one morn-
ing and thinking to itself, “Fuck it! It’s
Monday and we’re busy. Let’s only
have two people working the store!”
The Eyeopener is Ryerson’s largest
and only independent student news-
paper. It is owned and operated by
Rye Eye Publishing Inc., a non-
profit corporation owned by the
students of Ryerson. Our offices are
on the second floor of the Student
Campus Centre.
You can reach us at 416-979-5262,
at theeyeopener.com or on Twitter
at @theeyeopener.
Paul Calandra, parliamentary secretary to Stephen Harper, and me — best friends.
PHOTO COURTESY CBC NEWS/YOUTUBE
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: MOHAMED OMAR
I love you, Paul Calandra
By
Mohamed
Omar
Canadian federal politics is like an
owl in a cage. Tamed and under-
stood, it can be a majestic beast
from which we can draw wisdom,
patience and leadership. But most
of the time it’s just an animal dis-
creetly defecating.
Last week in the House of
Commons, a man stood up and
set that owl loose — and the shit
was everywhere.
Paul Calandra is parliamentary
secretary to Prime Minister Ste-
phen Harper and the Conservative
MP for the Ontario riding of Oak
Ridges-Markham.
During a livestream of question
period on the Cable Public Affairs
Channel — a Netflix for federal
politics, if you will — Calandra
was asked by Tom Mulcair, the
NDP’s leader, about Canada’s mil-
itary mission in Iraq. Normally, a
politician would give a vague an-
swer on the topic.
Calandra answered by attacking
the NDP’s position on Israel and,
reading from what he later said was
a Facebook post, used words like
“effing.” That’s like a prof asking
you why your essay was late and
you said, “well your ESPN sub-
scription is about to expire and that
reflects poorly on you, punk.”
Even a baby drunk on moon-
shine would sober up after a re-
sponse as nonsensical as that.
But here’s the magical thing
about all of this: after his glorious
gaffe was so brutally eviscerated by
the Internet — God bless Twitter —
the idiocy of Calandra and federal
politics as a whole became almost
tangible, begging to be challenged.
Mulcair tried again. Calandra
kept talking about Israel. Clearly
incredulous over how bonkers of
a reply he had received, Mulcair
asked Andrew Scheer to coerce
an on-topic answer. Scheer, the
speaker of the house — respon-
sible for keeping order— didn’t
do anything. He apparently can-
not force a grown-up MP to give
a legitimate answer to a legitimate
question. Mulcair, understandably
agitated, questioned Scheer’s neu-
trality (a big no-no in the House)
and was revoked of his two re-
maining questions.
This display is a painfully sharp
example of why many students
don’t give a damn about politics.
What kind of students or young
adults — already drowned in tu-
ition, loans, part-time work or
rent — want to care about, much
less join, fools like that?
Luckily, we found a couple.This
week’s feature by Ramisha Farooq
looks into youth in politics, a topic
quick to dismiss — the young’uns
don’t vote, they don’t care and get
off my lawn, you damn hippies! —
and drowned in cynical attitudes.
But Farooq’s story, which ac-
knowledges the low turnout rates of
young voters, looks into three young
minds who have taken in that pessi-
mistic view of politics and morphed
it into ambition. Whether it’s playing
secretary and phoning constituents
for a local politician or running to
be mayor of Toronto, our three sub-
jects are a good mirror for youth in
politics for a great reason — they’ve
grown up outside that shitty cage.
They are young in a time when
political mishaps are immortal-
ized in YouTube videos and gifs —
Google “Paul Calandra faceplam,”
you’re so welcome. They want ac-
countable and trustworthy politi-
cians, not sneaky ones. They’ve had
too many of the latter.
Few of them are noble and
many are overpaid dweebs. Paul
Calandra has taken that shitty fact
and smeared it all over our face.
So thanks, Paul. I love you.
I’m Morgan
Freeman.
You are
reading this
in my voice.
Hello.
you should
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Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
NEWS 5
One of The Eyeopener’s top beer scientists interrogating a pint on the whereabouts of the missing ounces.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
Drinking for truth and justice
We heard some pints don’t measure up, then we did something about it
Beer, the golden nectar of the
poor university student, has been
a cornerstone of humanity since
the earliest civilizations. It’s one
of the finest products that can
be crafted from wheat — deli-
cious, refreshing, cold and, most
importantly, alcoholic (bread is
only one of those four things and
therefore inferior).
But what if you don’t always
get the amount of beer that you
pay for?
Inspired by a Toronto Star in-
vestigation and dedicated to the
greater good, we used only the
finest of scientific instruments to
answer a burning question: are
the local watering holes screwing
you out of a few ounces of hard-
earned beer?
Our mode of investigation saw
both editors and reporters alike
adopt scientific method by visit-
ing a variety of establishments,
procuring samples and putting
them through vigorous testing to
see if they were up to standard
(basically, we went to a bunch of
bars, ordered pints, poured the
beer into measuring cups, waited
for it to settle and read the mea-
surement).
But our selfless pursuits would
be for naught if the Canadian
government didn’t have stan-
dards, which it does, occasion-
ally. Unless otherwise explicitly
stated, a pint in Canada is de-
fined as 20 oz. (568 mL) with
a half-ounce margin of error —
and foam (head) doesn’t count.
This means, in theory, bars that
serve less than 19.5 oz. of deli-
cious beer while advertising pints
as 20 oz. can face fines of up to
$2,000, according to Measure-
ment Canada’s Fairness at the
Pumps Act.
The Eyeopener’s extensive in-
vestigation found that out of 14
pints ordered at six local water-
ing holes, only four pints lived
up to their advertised volume.
Here’s the raw data. Unless oth-
erwise noted, a pint is 20 oz.,
with 19.5 oz. being the legal bare
minimum:
Firkin on Yonge
Drinks: Two pints of Canadian,
$7 each.
Results: Both were 20 oz.
Good job, Firkin!
Lou Dawg’s
Note: Lou Dawg’s is a slight
anomaly because they serve 18-
oz. glasses, not pints.
Drinks: Two glasses of
Steamwhistle, $6.75 each.
Results: One glass only con
tained 14 oz. The second was
18 oz.
Ram in the Rye
Drinks: Canadian, $5.50;
Coors, $5.50
Results: Canadian, 17 oz.;
Coors, 20 oz.
Mick E Fynn’s
Drinks: Moosehead, $7.75;
Coors, $7
Results: Moosehead, 17 oz.;
Coors, 17 oz.
The Marquis of Granby
Drinks: Canadian, $6;
house lager, $4
Results: Canadian, 18 oz.;
House lager, 17 oz.
The Library
Drinks: Moosehead, $6;
Steamwhistle, $7.20
Results: Moosehead, 16.5 oz.;
Steamwhistle, 15.5 oz.
In case you’re too lazy to do the
math, we lost out on a collective
27.5 oz. of beer — that’s almost a
pint and a half.
The most credible bar in our
experiment was The Firkin on
Yonge, which poured a clean 20
oz. pint both times.
The bar that screwed us the
hardest was The Library, which
gave us an average 4 oz. less than
the legal minimum and 4.5 oz.
less than the official definition for
a pint, despite explicitly stating
on its menu that its pints were 20
oz. The Marquis of Granby, who
shortchanged us a collective 8 oz.,
also explicitly advertised pints as
20 oz. on its menu.
Ryerson’s own Ram in the Rye
fell smack-dab in the middle of
the pack, filling one pint to regu-
lation but only giving us 17 oz.
for another pint.
Now, we do have some empa-
thy for our bartenders — when
The Eyeopener measured out ex-
actly 20 oz. of water and poured
it into a pint glass, the liquid went
up to quite literally the brim. And
19.5 oz. didn’t fare much better,
leaving less than a millimetre of
space between the brim of the
glass and the water. Unless a serv-
er has mastered the art of keep-
ing a glass perfectly still while he
or she walks over to your table
(which they’ve apparently done at
the Firkin), it’s pretty damn tricky
to deliver a legal pint even if you
manage to pour it.
So maybe this isn’t a story about
how some bars are screwing you
out of a few ounces of beer in ev-
ery pint — maybe it’s about how,
even when the government does
have standards, they can be wild-
ly unrealistic.
With files from Jake Scott,
Keith Capstick, Alex Downham,
Devin Jones, Mitch Bowmile and
Chris Blanchette.
By Jackie Hong
Another mayoral debate between
John Tory and Olivia Chow took
place at the George Vari Engineer-
ing and Computing Centre. The
debate eventually saw the two can-
didates trading blows over one an-
other’s history.
Friday’s debate focused on topics
facing the South Asian community
in Toronto.
Tory and Chow debated for an
hour about issues ranging from
youth mentoring to transportation.
Chow was critical of Tory’s past
with the Ontario Progressive Con-
servatives when the candidates dis-
cussed affordable housing.
“You’re always thinking nega-
tive,” said Tory in response. “You
have zero business experience.
Zero.”
Tory’s frustration with Chow
peaked near the end of the debate
when Chow suggested Tory should
skip the bid for mayor and rather
use his “rolodex” of wealthy con-
tacts to bring youth initiatives to
the city.
By Jake Kivanc
PHOTO: JAKE KIVANC
Look! Another debate!
Scope plays waiting game
The hearing for The Scope at Ry-
erson’s AM licence took place last
Thursday in Gatineau, Que.
The result of the Canadian
Radio-television and Telecom-
munications Commission hearing
is undetermined and will not be
made clear for some time.
Staff at The Scope are hoping
the decision will be made this year
and are optimistic that the AM
non-profit campus community li-
cence will be granted.
“We put forward the best appli-
cation we could have had,” said
Elissa Matthews, The Scope’s pro-
gram director.
If the licence is not granted The
Scope’s board will have to recon-
vene and discuss funding options.
Radio Ryerson, the Scope’s pre-
decessor, was rejected in 2012 for
it’s FM licence application after
the closure of Ryerson’s previ-
ous radio station, CKLN-FM, in
2011.
By William Johnson
6 NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
Briefs & groaners
Get this monkey off my back
On Sept. 26 security received
reports of some monkey busi-
ness near Pitman Hall. A student
dressed in a gorilla costume was
scaring innocent passersby.
It was later found out that this
obstruction of Ryerson life was
caused by a group of mind-numb-
ingly overachieving students film-
ing a video for a class assignment.
It has not yet been confirmed
whether or not any serious trauma
was caused by the incidents and
there is still no word on the grade
the students ended up receiving.
Real talk, though. Bikes
Six bicycles were stolen over the
span of three days around campus,
Ryerson security and emergency
services told The Eyeopener. All
the bikes stolen were locked.
Although they said that this
amount of bike thefts is not nor-
mal, there are sometimes periods
throughout the year when bike
thefts increase. These clusters of
thefts are usually associated to one
individual who is coming back to
See something crazy on campus?
Email news@theeyeopener.com
Pot party in Podium
On Sept. 20, security received
complaints of some real OG Kush
stank and some way-too-tasty
tunes coming from the Podium
building. Security put on their
Toucan Sam hats and followed
their nose all the way to an Access-
ability washroom.
Inside was some dude blasting a
doob like it was nobody’s business.
Unfortunately for him, it’s actually
Ryerson security’s business. They
took the law in their hands and
asked him to leave, which he did.
Almost seems too easy, doesn’t it?
Kristyn Wong-Tam is running for Ward 27 councillor.
HANDOUT
Kristyn Wong-Tam talks about shaking the haters
How have the last four years at
city hall been?

They have been challenging, large-
ly because we’re operating under a
... government that has been rud-
derless and full of distractions.
We’ve had an absent, part-time
mayor who seems to have a disdain
for different communities. And as
a city councillor who represents
a downtown and midtown part
of the city, I’ve had to work very
closely with my city colleagues to
get things done.
What do you hope to achieve as
councilor for Ward 27 if you’re re-
elected?
Almost every single park in the
ward is either planned for improve-
ment or improvements are under-
way, which is very exciting because
its been a priority of mine to ensure
that our green spaces are adequate-
ly invested in, better maintained
and also that they serve a higher
purpose and function.
I’ve been championing wider
sidewalks and more welcoming,
safer and walkable, sustainable
neighbourhoods. I can point to
some very iconic successes such as
campus repeatedly to steal stu-
dents’ bikes.
Security is currently running an
investigation alongside Toronto
police to see if they can find an
individual or the individuals re-
sponsible.
Security also wanted us to re-
mind you guys that there is a free
bike storage room at 110 Bond St.
Celebrate Yonge, [which] launched
in 2012 [and] won an international
award in New York City for being
a special event. The Church Street
parklets, which is the very first
time we were able to introduce
the parklet program in Toronto,
... happened in Ward 27 under my
leadership.
How did you deal with the hate
mail you recently got from a self-
identified Ford Nation supporter?
It’s not the first letter we’ve re-
ceived of that nature. And certain-
ly I have recognized that over the
last four years the tone of some of
the correspondence we’ve received
has become very hate-laced.
I recognized that it was very im-
portant for me to stand up against
homophobia, against sexism and
against racism. I have been on the
receiving end of certain venom
coming from members who de-
scribe themselves as being support-
ers of Ford Nation.
What happened since my
speaking up and naming what’s
happened to me is that other ra-
cialized candidates who are run-
ning for city offices have also
been able to speak up and share
what’s been happening to them
and their campaign.
And I think that’s actually a re-
ally important step forward for the
city of Toronto.
What was the response like after
you posted the photo of the letter?
Obviously it hit a nerve. This city
has always prided itself on its di-
versity. It’s a city that understands
that it is built on thousands and
millions of people from around
the world who have chosen Can-
ada as their home. Whether it’s
people who are arriving today on
our shores or if it’s people who are
seventh-generation settlers.
What I think is important is that
there was also a very private re-
sponse. The private response was
the response of my family. My
mom and dad were obviously very
alarmed that someone would want
to hurt their daughter.
Is there anything you’d like to
say to Ryerson students?
I have a very strong and deep con-
nection to Ryerson. I used to work
on the campus at the campus radio
station, called 88.1 CKLN radio.
I watched Ryerson grow up from
being a polytechnic institute to be-
ing a full-fledged university. I am
really proud of my working rela-
tionship with Ryerson Students’
Union, with the faculty and ad-
ministration. I am very proud to be
able to champion some of the ini-
tiatives that Ryerson has planned
out such as the Gould Street clo-
sure. I was also incredibly proud to
be able to work with Ryerson … to
work on and improve and approve
the Ryerson Student Learning Cen-
tre, which I believe is going to be a
striking and iconic building.
I know that the ongoing issues
that we have for students is trying
to ensure that there is affordable
housing so students don’t have to
work two or three part-time jobs
to try to make ends meet. I was
a student once who had three
jobs and trying to focus on stud-
ies while paying my own rent and
while paying my own tuition was
a challenge.
I’m at city council because I
want to make things better, I
want to improve things and I
want to create things and I want
to innovate.
By Farnia Fekri
We spoke with the Ward 27 (Toronto Centre-Rosedale) councillor to ask her about her re-election bid and thoughts on Ryerson
DEADLINE to OPT-OUT, OPT-IN or ADD DEPENDENTS:
There are ABSOLUTELY NO EXCEPTIONS to this deadline
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2014
Need Info? Contact Member Services Office, Student Centre Lobby
or email health@rsuonline.ca
ALL STUDENTS MUST
OPT-OUT ONLINE
even if you’ve opted-out previously
OPT-OUT ONLINE:
https://studentplans.hroffice.com
Attention All Full-Time Students
OPT-OUT SYSTEM HAS CHANGED!
Apply online as early as
September 1st and supply
your bank information to get
refund via a direct deposit in
early NOVEMBER.
The Ryerson Students’ Union
(RSU) provides you extended
Health & Dental Insurance,
but if you have comparable
coverage, OPT-OUT for a
refund.
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
ARTS & LIFE 7
ArtsVote for your favourite candidate
Toronto organization co-chaired by Rye grad aims to raise awareness about arts funding at city hall
From L to R: candidates Ari Goldkind, Olivia Chow, John Tory, Morgan Baskin and
Doug Ford participate in the ArtsVote mayoral debate on Monday.
PHOTO: LEAH HANSEN
PHOTO: LEAH HANSEN
The audience listens in at the ArtsVote mayoral debate held at the TIFF Bell Lightbox
on Monday.
Five Toronto mayoral candidates
took on the issue of arts funding on
Monday at a debate co-ordinated
by ArtsVote Toronto, an organiza-
tion co-chaired by a Ryerson grad.
The issue is one that could po-
tentially affect many students
and recent grads planning to go
into creative professions. Ryerson
alumna Meagan Davis has been
championing the arts cause for al-
most a year with ArtsVote, an or-
ganization founded to engage vot-
ers and raise awareness about the
importance of supporting the arts.
ArtsVote’s campaign activities
encourage politicians to be sup-
portive of the arts industry and
raise awareness among ordinary
Torontonians, who are ultimately
the voters. Davis got involved
with the group last fall.
“Toronto is not a leader in arts
funding even though our city is
home to more artists than any
other city in Canada,” Davis said.
According to the Toronto Arts
Foundation, Montreal was spend-
ing around $55 per capita on arts,
culture and heritage funding in
2009. Five years later, Toronto,
By Leah Hansen
and Adriana Parente
home to 93 per cent more artists
than any other Canadian city, is
spending less than half of that —
$22.38 per capita to be exact.
Encouraging politicians to con-
tinue to invest in the arts and
ensuring accountability for arts
funding at city hall is another
one of the group’s initiatives. The
mayoral debate organized by Arts-
Vote that took place at TIFF Bell
Lightbox centred on the question
of support for cultural initiatives
in the city.
Candidates John Tory, Ari
Goldkind, Olivia Chow, Morgan
Baskin and Doug Ford all attend-
ed to outline their plans for fund-
ing and supporting the arts in To-
ronto, a hot-button issue for many
of Toronto’s 174,000 artists.
As the debate got under way,
all five candidates reaffirmed their
commitment to supporting the arts.
“The arts have always been
part of my life,” said Chow, who
worked as an artist after graduat-
ing from college. “We know that
arts give us a sense of identity [and]
help us celebrate who we are.”
Tory, Goldkind and Ford
stressed the importance of the
economic impact of Toronto’s arts
sector. According to the Toronto
Arts Foundation, the sector con-
tributes $11.3 billion to the city’s
annual GDP.
Baskin, a 19-year-old recent high
school graduate, spoke up about
the importance of the arts and cul-
ture industry to Toronto’s youth.
“Arts and culture jobs are often
held by those who find other indus-
tries to be not welcoming, youth
included,” she said. “There’s an
incredible amount of possibility in
this sector, especially in terms of
finding youth not jobs, but careers
that we feel good about.”
While ArtsVote is active now
only during election times, Davis
said that she would like to see
more continuous operations in the
future.
“I’d like to see ArtsVote have a
year-round presence to help edu-
cate the arts community about the
ongoing issues for our sector in-
cluding funding and policy deci-
sions,” Davis said.
In addition to organizing de-
bates and campaigning for arts
industry awareness, ArtsVote also
publishes a report card on each
candidate’s stance on the arts. The
grades will be assigned and posted
to the ArtsVote website by Friday,
Oct. 3.
Theatre in repetition
The Eyeopener previews theatre school productions La Ronde and The Plough
and the Stars, which both premiere at the beginning of October
The Plough and the Stars
Ordinary Dubliners see their
world collapse around them and
their lives turned upside-down as
Ireland battles for independence
in 1915.
“There will be blood,” warned
director David Jansen. “I like a
little bit of mess on stage.”
The Plough and the Stars, a
play by Seán O’Casey, sees per-
sonal and political meet onstage
as love and hatred, death and
childbirth play out against a
background of revolution.
The production has a modern
feel despite its historical setting,
says Dan Mousseau, a fourth-
year performance acting student
who plays Fluther Good.
“You could almost substitute
the rebellion... for what’s happen-
ing in the Middle East or Ukraine
[today],” said Mousseau.
Media coverage of war often
focuses on the fighting, while ig-
noring the common people facing
hardships they never imagined.
Despite the circumstances, people
going through such events can
form deep personal connections
in hostile times, said Madeline
Smith, an actor in the production
and fourth-year performance act-
ing student.
“There is a lot of love and
there is a little bit of humour
and there is always a song to be
sung,” she said. “Sometimes the
hardest times bring out the most
unexpected joys.”
Mousseau said that the events
the characters onstage are expe-
riencing are not unlike current
events that are happening around
the world. Audiences can draw
parallels between the historical
narratives seen in the play and
current conflicts like those in Syr-
ia. Connecting with the perfor-
mances doesn’t require a stretch
of the imagination.
“We see the effects of an event
like this on real people,” said
Mousseau. “I would hope [the
audience] sees something on
stage that reminds you of some-
thing you’ve lived yourself... like
how you felt when your footy
team lost or a loved one died.”
By Lauren Der
La Ronde
La Ronde, the classic play by Ar-
thur Schnitzler, is coming to Ryer-
son — but this time with a twist.
In this adaptation, director So-
nia Norris added Sigmund Freud
as an omnipresent character to
talk about human sexuality.
“They are all patients of Sig-
mund Freud … and the stage is
his couch,” said costume designer
Brett Postil, a fourth-year perfor-
mance production student.
The play — set in Vienna in
the early 20th century — ex-
plores how sexuality bypasses the
boundaries of social class through
10 interlocking scenes.
“Behind closed doors they don’t
see each other as a different social
class,” Postil said.
Freud places a magnifying glass
on the 10 characters that each
exhibit an archetype of the time,
from the Count to the Whore.
“Each character was given a
specific bright colour that kind of
signified where they were (in soci-
ety),” he said.
By Catherine Machado
The Count and the Actress,
who are members of a higher so-
cial class, are in reds and burgun-
dies. The Whore sports “syphilis
green.”
“[Syphilis] was a common ail-
ment at that time and she’s almost
dying from it and so it is really re-
flected in what she wears,” Postil
said.
Costumes aside, this is a play
that is infamous for its controver-
sial nudity. When La Ronde was
released in 1920, it received harsh
criticism due to its subversive sub-
ject matter and explicitness.
The theatre school is follow-
ing the policies of live theatre in
Toronto, which allow for topless
nudity. But Postil was concerned
with the play’s focus drifting from
human sexuality to just being
plain provocative.
He said that the amount of nu-
dity shown varied based on the
characters and how they interact-
ed with each other on stage.
“This show is an exaggerated
view on what sexuality was back
then and what it could be now,”
Postil said.
La Ronde premieres at the Ry-
erson Theatre on Oct. 2 at 7:30
p.m. with shows on Oct. 4, 7 and
9. The Plough and the Stars pre-
mieres Oct. 1 at 7:30 p.m. with
shows on Oct. 3, 5 and 8.
PHOTO COURTESY RYERSON THEATRE SCHOOL
Students working on The Plough and the Stars confer during rehearsal.
8 Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
FEATURES
I
nside a quiet Toronto home, young
Giulia Ilacqua was installed in front of
her TV watching her favourite show,
The West Wing. President Josiah Bart-
let walked across the screen with half a
dozen cameras flashing behind him. Ilac-
qua was enthralled, her eyes glued to the
television set.
Bartlet looked around the room with a
stern but soft gaze and smiled to his audi-
ence. Finally he began to speak. He started
off with some jokes, a few inspirational
quotes, but then noticed a woman in a pale
green dress directly across the room. She
was the only one sitting down and Bartlet
knew exactly why she was there. She want-
ed to preach her message of intolerance. He
looked away from his staff and directed his
attention to her. It only took a few sentenc-
es. He eviscerated her.
Barlet said, “While you may be mistak-
ing this for your monthly meeting at the
ignorant tight-ass club, in this house, when
the president stands, nobody sits.” This
was one of the best moments in the show’s
history — Ilacqua watched it religiously —
and it led to her love affair with politics.
Surrounded by strong-headed parents
with polarizing political views, she knew
from a young age that she wanted to help
change the world. She grew up watching
them debate and bicker about political par-
ties and policies at the dining room table.
It’s easy to say that youth in Canada are
apathetic to the idea of political activity
and being involved with political parties,
or even voting for that matter. It’s easy to
say that statistics don’t lie — only 38.8 per
cent of voters aged 18 to 24 turned out
in the 2011 federal election, according to
Elections Canada. It’s not hard to believe
that an increasing number of young adults
are simply not interested. It’s easy to count
youth out in every municipal, provincial
and federal election.
But a 2013 study from Simon Fraser Uni-
versity found that of youth aged 18-29, up
to 47 per cent participate in politics by boy-
cotting or boycotting products, 42 per cent
post or promote political material online
and up to 41 per cent sign petitions on or of-
fline. Young people may not be turning out
to the polls on election day, but that doesn’t
mean they don’t want to change the world.
David Smith, one of Canada’s most
highly regarded experts on Canadian con-
stitutional governance and recipient of a
Ryerson honorary doctorate, is a visiting
professor at the unviversity. He is also a se-
nior policy fellow at the Johnson-Shoyama
Graduate School of Public Policy.
He says that while turnout for elections
has dropped and that there isn’t as much
discussion in his classes as there used to be,
“it is a mistake to look at [only] the turn-
out in the election because youth now have
multiple ways to voice their opinion.”
Smith is a grandfather to two young
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Above: Ben Goslin, a volunteer for the NDP. Below: Giulia Ilaqua, an intern for the Liberals.
PHOTO ABOVE: FARNIA FEKRI, PHOTO BELOW: ROB FOREMAN
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
9 FEATURES
girls. He sees them texting, tweeting and
blogging on a daily basis. His belief is that
society’s entire communications system
has changed and that, in turn, has affected
youth engagement.
But Ilacqua hasn’t let that stop her.
She is currently the Toronto-Centre rep-
resentative for the Ontario Young Liberals
(OYL) and also sits on their board as an
executive. She is also the former president
of the Ryerson Young Liberals.
The OYL represents liberal supporters
between the ages of 14 to 25 and is an or-
ganization made up of smaller university
groups like the Ryerson Young Liberals.
They’re an affiliate group of the Liberal
Party of Canada, so members of the OYL
or Ryerson Young Liberals are not neces-
sarily party members. Yet they still play a
role in the federal Liberal party.
As a board member, Ilacqua’s responsi-
bilities include aiding in the approval of
the OYL budget, enacting new policies
and regulations and giving direction to the
OYL president.
Ilacqua’s grandparents also work as civil
servants for the City of Toronto. She says
that their work and encouragement is what
pushed her to want to make a difference.
“Political ideas are not personal but you
end up caring so much about them,” she
said.
Back at the dining room table, it was
becoming increasingly difficult for Ilacqua
to not yell “your opinion is not right,”
across at her grandparents.
But she didn’t decide to enroll in a
politics program until working for York
South-Weston MPP Laura Albanese.
When Ilacqua walked into Albanese’s of-
fice, she didn’t know what to expect. She
was only there to help out as an intern and
she didn’t think it would change her out-
look on politics. Though she spent long
days in a tight constituency office behind a
computer screen phoning citizens and run-
ning the reception desk, she was captivated
by the work.
When the dial tone started buzzing in
her ear, she knew there was a chance that
the person on the other line either wouldn’t
want to talk or would just hang up. But she
stayed on the line, waiting for a friendly
voice. Then it happened. “Hello?”
Ilacqua would talk for as long as pos-
sible, filling their ears with information
on the party. Talking to the community
is what made her happy and continues to
drive her career forward. To her, this was a
way to get involved and bring change.
M
ichael Tasevski walked up
to his parents’ Scarborough
home. With the excitement
still abuzz from the night be-
fore, he rang the pale white doorbell. His
mother came rushing to greet him with a
grin stretched across her face. Once inside,
after some quick hellos, he sat both his par-
ents down in the living room and told them
the big news.
The night before, Tasevski and his close
friends had walked into Toronto City Hall
and filled out a nomination form. He had
decided to run for mayor.
His parents’ faces were full of surprise.
Both were a little stunned but told him to
go for it, only if he was going to be able to
put in the effort.
The likelihood of him winning was and
is very slim but he said it’s more about the
idea of getting his message out and helping
youth get involved in politics.
Many years earlier, you would have
found a young Tasevski sitting in front of
his TV watching Bill Maher, an American
political satirist. While Maher made jokes
about American foreign policy, Tasevski’s
political journey slowly began.
He went on to graduate from Ryerson’s
politics and governance program in 2012
and now hopes to attend a professional
school and practice environmental law. He
hopes to wake up one day, slip on a suit
and go fight an oil company.
“I want to be the asshole in the courtroom
fighting off those other assholes,” he said.
Like Ilacqua, Tasevski says that question-
ing the news has taught him that politicians
are often less than honest and that he can
become the catalyst to get people voting.
For Tasevski, his platform is a way to
speak about urban green space, reliable
transit and youth empowerment. His cam-
paign has become a base for discussion
about issues like city sustainability and
the rising cost of living. Tasevski knows
he’s not going to win the mayoral race but
continues to campaign because he simply
wants people to listen — and get involved.
B
en Goslin watched a lot of TV
when he was in Grade 1. Scroll-
ing through the channels one day
he came across the news. Massive
headlines, bright colours and a stern-look-
ing news anchor filled the screen. Goslin
was only six years old at the time. That
day he watched the Twin Towers fall to
the ground in New York City. He was con-
fused about what he’d seen and what re-
porters were saying. He went to his parents
for answers. Even then, his parents liked to
keep him informed. They told him that the
attacks were no accident.
Goslin told his classmates about what
he had seen and what his parents had said
about the attack. The next day Goslin’s
mom, Michelle, got a stern call from the
school principal. Their son had been “scar-
ing the other children” and other parents
were complaining. For the other children
the attack was nothing but an accident.
Despite his age, Goslin said it was at this
moment he began to think about politics.
But his decision to ultimately come to
Ryerson to study politics and to become
a member of the NDP was finally made
for him when he met former NDP leader
Jack Layton at a protest in front of Queen’s
Park just before the 2011 federal election.
Goslin recalled a statuesque figure wear-
ing black, his white hair stood out in a sea
of orange. Layton made his way around
smiling at everyone who came and then
finally stopped in front of Goslin. All he
could say was hi — Layton shook his hand
and continued to make his rounds.
“It was so cool,” Goslin said. “He was
actually there to help people.”
As magical as it was meeting Jack Lay-
ton, Goslin’s first volunteer shift was far
from glamorous. His first day on the job,
he walked up to a small, very plain, boxed
building in Oshawa, Ont. — an area
known for being a Conservative strong-
hold. All the more reason Goslin wanted
to get involved. As he walked up, he saw
a bright orange sign plaque right above
the front door. When he walked in, he
was greeted by a receptionist and directed
toward the volunteer coordinator and his
first job. For the first few weeks he was
asked to canvass over the phone.
Once he was comfortable talking to
community members, Goslin was asked to
go door-to-door and canvass with former
Oshawa NDP candidate Mike Shields. As
he was walking up to the first house with
Shields right in front him, he felt good. He
didn’t do a lot of the talking but he felt
like he was doing something right, some-
thing that would bring change to Cana-
dian politics.
That sentiment changed when people
began to open their doors. “People will be
like, ‘No, I don’t want to talk to you,’”
Goslin said.
Despite this, Shields and Goslin kept
knocking until someone would talk to
them. When they did, he told them all
about what the NDP was doing and had
done for the country. A few of them even
decided to donate.
For Goslin, the satisfaction was worth
waiting for.
“I really just want to push progress in
our country.”
U
nlike many of his friends and
family, who go straight home
after work with few other cares
in the world, Goslin spends most
of his days cooped up within the walls of
a narrow NDP constituency office, on the
streets canvassing for donations or in class
studying to become a political strategist.
He’s only 19 years old but Goslin has
little time for rest. His days are long but
he doesn’t regret a moment spent talking to
people and spreading his party’s message.
Despite dismal youth turnout in all ma-
jor elections in the recent past, young peo-
ple are far from being uninvolved in the
political process.
It’s gruelling work, difficult — daily re-
jection doesn’t fair well with anyone — but
Goslin is far from unhappy. What he does
makes a difference to him and to those
he works for. There are 460,000 18 to
25-year-old Canadians working for politi-
cal parties, according to Samara, a Cana-
dian research group, and Statistics Canada.
And Goslin and his peers’ expressions of
their political opinions online are vital to
the future of Canada.
So while, his actions may not change the
world today, they are a huge step in the
right direction.
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EDITOR’S NOTE: The Eyeopener made
several attempts to contact members of
the Ryerson Young Conservatives for an
interview, but the organization declined
10 SPORTS Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
She shoots, she scores, she teaches
By Luke Galati
Some people go to China to see
the Great Wall, while others go to
teach kids how to play hockey.
This past August, Kori
Cheverie braved the 40 degree
heat of Shanghai and Beijing to
participate in a hockey camp for
kids.
“The ice was like a puddle,” she
said. “It was like a lake.”
Cheverie, 27, one of Ryerson’s
skate-training specialists, went on
the trip with the Toronto Maple
Leafs’ hockey development de-
partment, where she works as a
part-time staffer.
With the Leafs looking to gain
worldwide exposure and branch
out to as many markets as pos-
sible, the stars aligned.
“They were looking to have a
female presence on their trip, so
they asked me to come along,”
said Cheverie, who also plays pro-
fessional hockey with the Toronto
Furies.
It was her second time going
to China, after representing the
Canadian Interuniversity Sport’s
Team Canada at Harbin in 2009.
While working long days on the
ice, she saw the difference in the
game’s reach and popularity in
China compared to hockey-crazed
Canada.
“Beijing nearly has the same
population as Canada [more than
20 million] and only 1,500 total
kids play ice hockey in Beijing,
while over half a million Canadi-
ans are registered,” she said.
Cheverie added that the differ-
ence in culture helped her learn a
lot about how to teach.
The language barrier was
another challenge, with only
one translator and four on-ice
instructors.
When they broke off into
groups, she found some of
the kids didn’t speak English.
Luckily, some of her students were
able to act as translators. But the
experience taught her an impor-
tant lesson — how to become a
more effective communicator.
“I now get to the point. I say
what I’m going to say, show a
demonstration and move on.
That’s what I had to do there and
it works really well [in Canada]
too.”
The facility that the rink was in
housed rock-climbing, badmin-
ton, tennis, fencing and a running
track.
Cheverie spent her days teach-
ing the fundamentals of skating
A Ryerson skate trainer travelled more than 10,000 kilometres to teach kids how to skate, how to shoot and how to score on the ice
Vets ready to smash
Women’s volleyball is counting on veteran experience to carry them to the top
By Daniel Rocchi
The Ryerson women’s volleyball
team hosted the third annual Ry-
erson Invitational Tournament this
past weekend. The team is prepar-
ing for another season in the On-
tario University Athletics (OUA).
The team lost all three games
they played, once to the University
of Toronto Varsity Blues and twice
to the York University Lions.
Despite the losses, head coach
Dustin Reid was pleased to see
his team progress over the course
of the weekend.
“Your performance can’t be
consistently high if you have no
energy,” said Reid following the
first game against York. “We
weren’t at our best in that area
[Friday] against Toronto. We were
much more prepared to be on the
court [on Saturday] and battle for
a long match. That’s a good step in
the right direction for us.”
With three rookies on the
16-woman roster, the Rams will
be counting on the team’s experi-
ence for a strong regular season
and a return to playoff success.
“We’ve got a nice group of
young players on the team,” Reid
said. “But let’s be clear, the players
that have been here before, they’re
the players that are going to lead
this team and are going to deter-
mine our performance.”
The Rams will need that com-
petitiveness to find success in the
tight OUA eastern division. Last
season, three teams, including Ry-
erson, finished with 14-5 records,
just behind U of T for first place.
Ryerson took fourth place in the
east due to tiebreakers.
Toronto was also responsible
for ending Ryerson’s season. The
Varsity Blues defeated the Rams
in the quarterfinals, only one year
after their second OUA final four
appearance in team history.
This year, Ryerson has two
matches against U of T. Third-year
outside hitter Veronica Livingston
said playing the Varsity Blues is a
good measuring stick for the team.
“They’re a good team to play
against, they execute very well,”
said Livingston, who had the fifth-
most kills per game in the OUA
last year. “When you lose to them
it’s not like you just sat back and
lost. You were working hard. It’s
definitely just motivation for next
time.”
The team opens the season
at the Mattamy Athletic Centre
against Guelph on Oct. 17.
The women’s volleyball team huddles in a game against York.
PHOTO: TRUMAN KWAN
Yoga to
de-stress
By Erin Hesselink
Assignments are piling up and
deadlines are looming over your
head. Between work, school, in-
ternships, sleep and a social life,
your schedule is crammed and you
just don’t have time for it all.
Don’t worry, there is a simple
way to conquer this stress —
practicing yoga.
Below are three positions that
will help you calm down when the
stress kicks in.
Downward dog pose
Get into a pushup position with
your hands and feet shoulder-
width apart. Slowly lift your hips
and press your chest down so
your body becomes an inverted V.
Keep your back straight and press
your heels toward the floor. Try to
straighten your legs and you’ll feel
a nice stretch along your calves
and hamstrings. Hold the pose for
as long as you can.
Eagle pose
Balance poses are fantastic for
stress relief because they take
a lot of focus and your mind
doesn’t have time to think about
anything else.
For the eagle pose, stand up and
bend your knees. Balance on one
foot and cross one leg over the
other. Mimic the position with
your arms, giving yourself a twist-
ed high-five, and raise the elbows
as high as you can. If you want a
challenge, try going up on your
toes. Hold for as long as you can
(up to one minute), then switch
legs and repeat.
Child’s pose
Get down on your knees, sit
on your heels and bend forward,
reaching your arms out as far as
you can. Almost anyone can do
this pose and it’s one of the best
to just completely relax your body
and mind.
Don’t beat yourself up if you
can’t get a position perfectly. Yoga
is a practice, not a performance.
Kori Cheverie smiling with one of the kids she taught in China.
PHOTOS COURTESY KORI CHEVERIE/ TWITTER
and playing hockey, but she also
gained an economic takeaway
regarding the state of hockey
abroad. Playing hockey in China
is even more expensive than in
Canada.
“In China, like in Canada, hock-
ey is an expensive sport ... even
more there because hockey isn’t as
prevalent, so they have to travel
to Japan and Hong Kong to play
teams,” she said. “It’s unfortunate
that only the really wealthy have
the chance to play.”
Back at home, Cheverie’s con-
tinuing to immerse herself in the
hockey lifestyle.
“I love teaching hockey, it’s my
passion,” she said. “It’s not work.
It’s life.”
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
11 BIZ & TECH
First-year students in the course aca-
demic writing and research (SSH205)
are experiencing a different kind
of classroom this semester called a
“flipped lecture.”
“Rather than coming to class and
the professor lecturing at you — and
then maybe you get to apply it if there’s
enough time — you take the lecture
home,” said Paul Chafe, instructor of
SSH205. “The lecture becomes the
homework. The homework is then
done in class.”
Chafe was awarded the 2014
Learning and Teaching Grant —
worth $7,000 — for his proposal of
flipping his class to online lectures
and transforming classes into writing
workshops.
Lorraine Janzen Kooistra, who won
the Provost’s Experiential Teaching
Award at Ryerson for her outstand-
ing teaching records and contributions
to advancing teaching, is assisting
Chafe in this project.
The 15-minute online lectures are
PowerPoint slides with a voiceover of
Chafe teaching that week’s curriculum
to his six sections of SSH205, which
is a compulsory course for all stu-
dents pursuing a social sciences or
humanities major.
Curing lecture boredom with hands-on learning
Conventional teaching methods are getting flipped, thanks to this Ryerson prof
By Sarah Jackson
Magnet attracts government funding
A Ryerson startup scored a ton of
dough on Sept. 24.
Magnet, a Digital Media Zone
(DMZ) startup, is a website that
connects employers with skilled can-
didates.
The Ontario Ministry of Training,
Colleges and Universities (MTCU)
invested $1.2 million into the web-
site as part of the government’s ef-
forts to fix the lack of youth employ-
ment opportunities.
“One third of employers have dif-
ficulty finding employees with the
skills they need,” said Neville Mc-
Guire, manager of communications
at the Ontario Chamber of Com-
merce, which cofounded Magnet
with Ryerson.
The website allows users to cre-
ate an online profile more in-depth
than a resumé. This includes multi-
media aspects like videos and a ca-
reer timeline. The government has
teamed up with Magnet in hopes
of helping students find jobs by ex-
panding connections through this
technology.
Magnet, a non-profit organiza-
tion, began in 2014 in partnership
with the Ontario Chamber of Com-
merce — which represents 60,000
employers. The site allows these
employers to search for the specific
skills they need in employees.
Last Wednesday MTCU got on
board too. The $1.2 million invest-
ment has been used for start-up costs
and connecting the current 18 post-
secondary institutions involved, in-
cluding Ryerson, with employers.
“We want every post-secondary
on board and every large and small
employer. We want this to be the go-
to place for employers,” McGuire
said.
Magnet was developed by Doug
Walker, a Ryerson business adminis-
tration alumnus, along with the as-
sistance of students working at the
By Brooklyn Pinheiro
But Chafe, who has taught
this course since 2008, had concerns
about flipping his class.
“One thing I was worried about
was, now that I’ve freed up all this
time, what am going to do with my
students for three hours?” Chafe said.
With the grant money, he hired
Sydney Tyber and Cira Nickel, two
graduate students from the English de-
partment, to build a file of activities for
class time and a list of articles on best
practices for using the flipped lectures.
Chafe’s goal is to have his students
writing all the time, whether it’s work-
ing in groups or spending one-on-one
time getting advice from him. Chafe
now has more time to spend with his
students in class and, according to him,
flipped lectures are working so far.
“Compare my students now
to where my other students were last
term at this point, these people are
miles ahead of just applying these
ideas,” Chafe said.
But, like all classes at this time of
year, the real test is coming up.
“The midterm is just before [read-
ing week] so the proof will be in that,”
he said.
Less of this.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
Business with a side of culture
By Ammi Parmar
Students can now graduate with
a certification in business and
multiculturalism.
Ryerson’s G. Raymond Chang
School of Continuing Education
launched the first-in-Canada entre-
preneurship and multiculturalism
program, which will take off in the
winter.
The program was started by
Steven Tissenbaum, adjunct profes-
sor with the Ted Rogers School of
Management. He got the idea from
his students, who expressed an in-
terest in starting new businesses
and serving a diverse market.
“What first gave me the idea
was the sheer size, the growth in
the multiculturalism community,”
Tissenbaum said. “The multi-
culturalism communities are not
being served by advertising and
promotion as much as others.
Multiculturalism businesses have
always existed — I wanted to help
these businesses to better under-
stand how to go about expanding
their business in a cheaper, more
efficient way.”
With the help of entrepreneur-
ship professor Sean Wise and
Linda Koechli, program director
at the Chang School, Tissenbaum
worked to get the certificate ap-
proved.
Wise, now the academic coor-
dinator for the certificate, said the
program is aimed at students who
seek an entrepreneurial opportuni-
ty in culturally diverse markets, as
well as for newcomers from those
markets to leverage their diversity
as a competitive advantage.
“In today’s economy, a startup is
global on day one. So understand-
ing different cultures and investing
into emerging markets is now
synonymous with entrepreneur-
ship,” Wise said.
Ladies and gentlemen: Sean Wise, academic coordinator for the
entrepreneurship and multiculturalism certificate.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
Ryerson introduces one-of-a-kind program
PHOTO COURTESY CLIFTON LI
Mark Patterson, director of Magnet, speaking at the DMZ last Wednesday.
And more one-on-one time with this.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
DMZ. Together they created a web-
site called WhoPlusYou which then
evolved into the job portal Magnet.
“I hope to see individuals become
more empowered because they have
better access to the right opportuni-
ties as well as deeper market knowl-
edge about the career paths they
have chosen,” Walker said. “We
want to make jobs chase people,”
said Mark Patterson, director of
Magnet.
12 COMMUNITIES
Wednesday, Oct.1, 2014
Blogging the #RoadToRyerson
Five students share their journey as they begin their first year of university
Blessing bags
By Chelsea Lecce and
Natalia Balcerzak
The blessing bags are filled with simple necessities to help the homeless in Toronto.
PHOTO COURTESY FARIHA SHEIKH
Rye student helps raise awareness of Toronto’s homeless
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
Mikael Melo and Sunita Singh Hans are two of the Road To Ryerson bloggers.
PHOTO: NATALIA BALCERZAK
RU Student Life is trying to ease
the university transition by featur-
ing five first-year students and their
journey at Ryerson with the cre-
ation of the Road To Ryerson blog.
“Nobody tells student stories
better than students,” said Bailey
Parnell, RU Student Life brand
and social media specialist.
When RU Student Life asked in-
coming students to send in a video
on why they were excited to come
to Ryerson, they received more than
20 submissions. Mikael Melo, Suni-
ta Singh Hans, Nolan Blanchard,
Enna Kim, and Raven Lam were the
five bloggers selected.
Each blogger was then asked to
publish weekly posts about their
experiences for five weeks, begin-
ning three weeks before school
started. They were also encouraged
to use other streams of interactive
media, such as Instagram and Twit-
ter, to share their journey.
Melo, a radio and television
arts (RTA) student from Cam-
bridge, Ont., introduces himself
on the blog as a film geek and
includes a list of all his favourite
movies.
He adds that he loves to explore
the outdoors and wants to study
abroad sometime in the next four
years, wherever his road leads him.
For him, the blog is an oppor-
tunity to get to know people and
start developing an online person-
ality for himself. As a first-year
entering the media industry, it’s
important to have experience with
social media.
“I don’t know if there’s any
way that we could repay [RU Stu-
dent Life] for giving us this awe-
some opportunity,” Melo said. “I
think without Road to Ryerson, I
wouldn’t have been able to confi-
dently be like, ‘Yeah, I can do this.’”
Throughout the week, the blogs
have accumulated more than
15,000 views, along with more than
a thousand tweets using the #Road-
toRyerson hashtag on Twitter.
Singh Hans’ journey included a
plane ride over the Atlantic. From
a small town in Northern Ireland,
she said that she wanted to docu-
ment her time at Ryerson in a very
personal way.
“It’s really important to share
your experiences as much as you
can so other people can relate to
them,” Singh Hans said.
In her first blog post, she wrote
about how studying RTA at Ryer-
son was her dream growing up.
She mentioned that her older
sister graduated from journalism
at Ryerson and was a motivating
force that encouraged her move to
Toronto. Singh Hans even chose to
include her personal moments of
anxiety before leaving to Canada.
“I was very self-conscious about
including a lot because I didn’t think
a lot of people would understand
me, coming from Ireland and my
accent and everything,” she said.
“What I learned about this whole
journey was that people celebrated
my differences.”
All of the bloggers said that they
had been recognized by their peers
and a lot of friends were made be-
cause of the blog.
“I felt like a little celebrity in my
friend group,” said Blanchard, a
creative industries student.
He shared with his readers that
he was previously set on studying
fashion communications, but when
he discovered creative industries —
a new program at Ryerson — he
knew it was for him.
Blanchard said on his blog that
he’s thrilled to be taking a step
into university life.
“I thought this was an amazing
platform for connecting student
life and resources on campus,”
said Blanchard.
RU Student Life is hoping to
continue with the Road To Ryer-
son blog in upcoming years.
As the season brings shorter days,
Fariha Sheikh brings bags of bless-
ings.
Sheikh, a second-year crimi-
nology student, is the creator of
the Facebook group RU Blessing
Bags — made to raise awareness
of homelessness in Toronto. Aside
from educating others online
about the current issue, she’s be-
gun her process of creating bless-
ing bags to give to the homeless.
“Many people may take for
granted having those items in their
homes,” said Sheikh, “But what
about those who don’t have a
home?”
Sheikh said she is looking to
fund the bags through donations
and plans to hand out the bless-
ing bags when the weather gets
colder.
Blessing bags are gallon-sized
Ziplock bags filled with necessi-
ties and products for the home-
less. Most of the items in each bag
are for personal hygiene, such as
deodorant, toothpaste, lip balm,
soap and tissues. Other survival
goodies are basic things, includ-
ing water bottles, band-aids, coins
(for phone calls and to purchase
food) and granola bars.
She started the project after tak-
ing a course at Ryerson. “I took
Homelessness in Canadian Society
with [Pascal] Murphy in my first
year and he inspired me a lot,”
said Sheikh. “After seeing all the
homeless people [at] Yonge and
Dundas, I wanted to put what I
had learned to work.”
Sheikh said she first heard about
the idea of blessing bags through
a post on Tumblr, which inspired
her to put together the project.
“After seeing this brilliant idea, I
thought I would bring it to the heart
of downtown Toronto,” she said.
Blessing bags are big in America
but when Sheikh said she Googled
them in Toronto, there were only
a few churches distributing them.
With Ryerson situated right by
the city’s densest area of homeless
shelters, Sheikh said that it was
time to bring awareness to her
classmates.
Although the group is not of-
ficially registered with Ryerson,
she said that more people are
interested in getting involved.
Sheikh said she’d like to propose
the group to the student union,
once there’s enough members.
“I think RU Blessing Bags is a
great organization,” said Ayesha
Ell, a second-year social work stu-
dent. “There is a lot of stigma sur-
rounding homelessness and people
often forget that those who are
experiencing homelessness are just
regular people too.”
By Deven Knill and
Natalia Balcerzak
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
COMMUNITIES 13
These dorms are like no other
New reality web series unveils creative rooms at Rye
Residence life at Ryerson just got
a lot cooler.
Extreme Dorm Makeovers is a
new web-based series on RU Stu-
dent Life’s website that made its
debut Sept. 22. Inspired by MTV
Cribs, the show features students’
abilities to decorate and transform
typical dorm rooms into comfort-
able living spaces.
Cole Deakin, a third-year jour-
nalism student, is the host of the
series. With videographer and third-
year film student José Rosales, the
team searches Ryerson’s dorms for
creatively designed spaces.
“There is a stereotype that resi-
dences are like a jail cell,” Deakin
said.
The idea came to Deakin and
Rosales — who both work for
Student Housing Services and live
in residence — when they got the
multimedia specialist positions
at RU Student Life. They said
they wanted to challenge how
residence is interpreted and show
what it takes to create a home en-
vironment.
“Coming into residence, you have
a bare room you’re trying to make...
[for] yourself,” Deakin said.
When Rosales moved into Pit-
man Hall in his first year, he said
he was unhappy with his room.
“I’m an international student,
so I came with only my clothes,”
he said. “It was a single room with
a brick wall.”
Returning as an academic link,
Rosales said he wanted to make
his dorm into a home. With movie
posters and pictures of his loved
ones on shelves, he created a space
that he was happy to return to.
As a resident of the International
Living & Learning Centre, Claudia
Warner said that her dorm had po-
tential to be comfy.
With pink hearts on the wall,
pink bedding, pink lampshades
and even a pink fuzzy rug — War-
ner’s love for the colour is obvious
in the first episode of the series.
“The room looked bare and the
carpets were gross … but now I see
a room that reflects my happy, co-
José Rosales and Cole Deakin released the first episode of their reality design show.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
By Annie Arnone and
Natalia Balcerzak
If this picture wasn’t black and white, you would see Claudia Warner’s love for pink.
PHOTO COURTESY RU STUDENT LIFE
lourful and vibrant personality,”
said Warner, who also brought her
Xbox and stuffed animals.
“I wanted to have a room com-
pletely different looking than my
room at home to symbolize a new
chapter that I’m starting in my
life,” she said.
With filming and editing, the
production process takes more
than a week. Deakin and Rosales’
goal is to have the show running
until the end of the school year.
Rosales said he’s optimistic
about the show and that people
are already asking for episode two.
“I love learning about other
people and what they like, who
they are and where they came
from,” Warner said. “This web
series can show viewers some
knowledge about other people and
show [their] different sides.”
The next episode is in the works.
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Test Drive
Your Career
14 FUN & BROMANCE Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
Drop off your completed sudoku at The Eyeopener office (SCC 207)
and you’ll be entered into a draw to win a $25 Hairy Tarantula gift
card! Nerd it out after nerding it out ... You NERD!
Comic-Doku
NAME:
EMAIL:
STUDENT NUMBER:
PHONE NUMBER:
By completing this sudoku and
handing it in to our office you are
giving yourself a chance to em-
brace the comic book world! You
know what that means? DRAG-
ONS. You get to read about drag-
ons killing people, blowing fire
out of their mouths, flying majesti-
cally and being badass as hell. All
of this fantastical goodness just
for finishing a stupid little math
puzzle.
This will be especially beneficial
if you’re a Magic: The Gathering
fan, you can mingle with Storm-
breath Dragons and Thundermaw
Hellkites and kiss your GPA good-
bye! YAY!
Lowered Expectations
The return of the fun king of Rye
Last year’s fun editor is back to say a few words about his successor
By Jake Scott
The vapid, mouth-breathing fun
editor who currently curates this
cacophony of crap has asked me to
write him something. That’s right,
something! Not a witty anecdote,
a satirical look on politics or even
a comic, but simply something.
And now here I am, the previ-
ous fun editor, filling space for a
man who doesn’t know what he
wants. I mean the guy abolished
the fucking horoscopes! Can you
believe that shit? Now how are
people going to dictate their sad,
little lives? I’ve been witnessing the
effects of horoscope withdrawal
all over campus.
Just the other day some poor
soul was sweating as she decid-
ed which direction to swipe on
Tinder. Without my horoscopes
telling her what the planets and
stars had already decided for her
she was absolutely fucking lost.
She didn’t even make a selection,
she simply threw up a pumpkin-
spiced latte and started googling
photos of “Kimye.”
Even worse, a young man in
line at Tim Hortons practically ex-
ploded. The server asked him his
order and the sad sap tried to opt
out of his RSU health care. When
she told him that she could give
him either dark roast or regular
coffee he started smashing his face
off the counter screaming, “I don’t
even need dental!”
Don’t you see what he’s done?
Free will isn’t something you
can just throw around like a
bag of puppies. It’s something
that needs to be suppressed by a
steady stream of innocuous celeb-
rity Twitter accounts, inane talk
shows and MOTHER. FUCK-
ING. HOROSCOPES.
Instead, this long-haired, nerd-
jock abomination is feeding
people fantasies about mink con-
quest and political mind control!
I worked my ass off keeping this
student body apathetic and droll.
I even ran a bloody campaign on
that platform! It just makes me
sick.
Here you go, Keith. I hope
you’re happy. Dick.
PHOTO: JESS TSANG
Ride or die, fun boys for life.
This week, Rosencrantz the mink
travelled all the way to North Ko-
rea to defend Ryerson students’
honour.
It has been discovered that the
glorious leader of North Korea
Kim Jong-un is the man behind
the devious plan to pour pints of
beer under 20 ounces.
Rosencrantz, seeing the effect
this had on the lives of his new
Ryerson friends, would not stand
for this debauchery.
He infiltrated North Korea in
hopes of engaging in a Mortal
Kombat-style battle with his en-
emy and bringing full pints back
to Ryerson.
The battle has since ended, and
Kim Jong-un has been reduced to
a mere pile of shattered ankles ...
Get mink’d, son.
Mink
battles
Kim
Jong-un
ILLUSTRATION: JESS TSANG
COMIC BY AMY FRUEH
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
15
S
T
U
D
E
N
T
D
E
B
T
S
P
E
C
IA
L
S
M
onday
5pm - 11pm
WING
NIGHT
1 pound of
Halal Wings
5.25
Tuesday
5pm - 11pm
BURGER
NIGHT
Regular &
Quinoa
Burgers
6.99
Thursday
5pm - 11pm
BBQ PULLED
PORK
SANDWICH
with fries and
coleslaw
7.75
WRAP NIGHT
Buffalo Caesar
Or Veg Buffalo
Caesar
6.49
Wednesday
5pm - 11pm
Friday
5pm - 11pm
FISH &
CHIPS
7.25
Free
Charging
Free
Spot
Free
Charging
Free
Spot
Free
Charging
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Charging
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Spot
/RamInTheRye @RamInTheRye @RamInTheRye
63 GOULD STREET
(entrance off Church Street)
www.ramintherye.ca
Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014
16

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