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D E P A R T M E N T O F

Biology
D E PA RT M E N T FACU LT Y PREPARATION FOR TEACHING
Students interested in learning more about the preparation involved
James R. Wilson, Chair for teaching at the elementary and secondary levels, should refer to the
Professor of Biology (1991) School of Education listing located on page 185 of this bulletin.
PhD University of Cincinnati 1976
cell biology

Gary L. Bradley OBJECTIVES


Professor of Biology (1972) The objectives of the Department of Biology are to help students better
PhD University of California, Davis 1982 understand themselves and the living things around them, to develop a
genetics scholarly approach to the study of scientific information, and to prepare
for careers in biology and in medicine.
Natasha S. Dean
Assistant Professor of Biology (2003)
PhD Loma Linda University 2004
microbiology
BIOLOGY LEARNING OUTCOMES
1. Graduates will demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts in the
Lee F. Greer
biological sciences and integrate their knowledge to support learn-
Assistant Professor of Biology (2007)
ing in other disciplines.
PhD Loma Linda University 2007
2. Pre-professional graduates will be proficient in the biological science
genomics-bioinformatics, phylogenetics, developmental
sections of pre-professional entrance exams (MCAT, DAT, etc.)
biology
3. Graduates will have developed a world view that includes an
understanding of professional and ethical responsibility regarding
L. Lee Grismer
personal, social, and environmental issues. They should know rel-
Professor of Biology (1994)
evant biological standards or codes of ethics and be able to use these to
PhD Loma Linda University 1994
make appropriate ethical judgements.
herpetology, systematics, biogeography
4. Graduates will be able to think critically and communicate their
understanding about what constitutes appropriate use of science in
Eugene E. Joseph
distinguishing between fact, fiction, and faith.
Associate Professor of Biology (1989)
5. Students will demonstrate methods of biological research including
PhD Morehouse School of Medicine 2004
skills in: data acquisition and analysis, writing research proposals
anatomical and biomedical sciences
and reports, the ability to design and follow experimental protocols,
and presentation of research results. Development of these skills
John Perumal
may result in opportunities to work with faculty in laboratory and
Professor of Biology (2002)
field research and share authorship on resultant publications.
PhD University of Western Ontario 1994
6. Students will be able to employ technical skills commonly used for
botany, ecology
biological research.
7. Students will develop leadership skills by participating in the Teach-
Shereen Sabet
ing Assistant Program, Community Involvement Projects, or as
Assistant Professor of Biology (2009)
officers of clubs centered in the Biology Department (Tri-Beta
PhD University of California, Los Angeles 2003
Honors Society, the Environmental Club, and Pre-Med Club).
virology, immunology
8. Students should be able to apply their understanding of biology to
current events in the popular and scientific media.
9. Students will strengthen their learning opportunities through
increased involvement and participation in Biology classes where
DEGREES OFFERED faculty use innovative presentation, interactive techniques, and
r Bachelor of Science degree in Biology, with a required emphasis in technology.
one of the following areas: biological science or biomedical science

r Minor in Biology

78 DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


UNDERGR ADUATE R ESE ARCH M A J O R S
The Department of Biology is committed to providing undergradu-
ate students with the opportunity to do research. The biology faculty BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
are actively engaged in research. They welcome qualified and highly
motivated students to participate with them in their laboratories. Inter- BIOLOGY
ested students are encouraged to discuss research opportunities with Required: 60 units in biology, including:
individual faculty. Limited support in the form of grants and assistant- r#*0- -  -  -     
ships may be available. 301L, 302, 302L, 303, 303L, 350 & 405
  r"OBSFBPGFNQIBTJTJOCJPMPHZ TFFCFMPX

r*OBEEJUJPOUPUIFCJPMPHZVOJUT NBKPSTNVTUUBLFEVSJOH
their final year: UNST 404B
1 unit may be applied to the major from CHEM 491 and 492
FIELD STUDY OF BIOLOGY 2 units may be applied from CHEM 493
To provide first-hand experiences in field biology, in conjunction with
Required Cognates:
accumulating book knowledge, we offer fieldwork-based opportunities
through our Field School. Currently, we coordinate an annual 2-3 week r$)&. -  -  -   - 
course, typically in late June and July, in a tropical environment. The 373 & 373L
most recent trips have involved studies of island herpetofaunas on the   r."5)
Bay Islands in Honduras and on Pulau Tioman in Peninsular Malaysia.   r1):4 -  - -
The locations, departure date, and duration may change from year to
year depending on research objectives.
The student chooses one of the following areas of emphasis:
During this course, students plan and conduct fieldwork, including
travel logistics, equipment selection and coordination, specimen collec- Biological Science:
tion and preparation, and organization of a field notebook. The research r#*0-PS
conducted during this course has consistently led to publication of ar- r1MVTVOJUTGSPN
ticles in peer-reviewed scientific journals. BIOL 408, 410, 434, 436, 439, 446, 466, 467, 469, 474, 485, 487,
any upper division course taught at Rosario Marine Station

Biomedical Science:
r#*0-PSPS
COURSES TAUGHT AT r1MVTVOJUTGSPN
ROSARIO BEACH MARINE STATION * BIOL 434, 436, 439, 446, 466, 474
BIOL 111R Ecosystem Biology (5) (includes lab)
BIOL 112R Processes in Biology (5) (includes lab) Biomathematics:
BIOL 113R Biology of Organisms (5) (includes lab) Offered with the Department of Mathematics and Computing
BIOL 400R Paleobiology (5) (See requirements listed under that department.)
BIOL 406R Marine Biology (5)
BIOL 408R Biology of Marine Invertebrates (5)
Biophysics:
BIOL 426R Marine Phycology (5) Offered with the Department of Physics
BIOL 454R Behavior of Marine Organisms (5) (See requirements listed under that department.)
BIOL 460R Marine Ecology (5)
BIOL 462R Ichthyology (5)
Psychobiology:
BIOL 465R Ornithology (5) Offered with the Department of Psychology
BIOL 477R Natural History of Vertebrates (5) (See requirements listed under that department.)
BIOL 485R Systematic Botany (5)
BIOL 486R Topics in Biology (1-5)
BIOL 446R Human Anatomy (5)
M I N O R
* The General Biology series (BIOL 111R -113R) is taught every sum- BIOLOGY
mer and is a prerequisite for all other Rosario Beach classes. Normally Required: 30 units in biology, including:
four to six of the upper-division courses are offered during any given   r#*0- -  - -
summer. To see a current listing of courses offered, go on-line to r3FNBJOJOHVOJUTUPCFTFMFDUFEGSPNPSMFWFMCJPM-
rosario.wallawalla.edu. ogy courses

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 79


C O U R S E S tary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system.
Three classes, one hour each, and two three-hour laboratories per
A student must receive a grade of C or better in order for a class to count week. Does not apply toward a major in biology.
as a prerequisite for another course. This applies to both individual and
sequenced classes unless otherwise specified. Waiver of any specified course BIOL 132 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (5)
prerequisite requires the approval of the course instructor. A systematic approach to the integrated study of human anatomy and
physiology. Designed primarily for students in associate and bacca-
LOWER DIVISION laureate degree programs in allied health and nursing. Topics covered
are: special senses, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphat-
BIOL 107 Human Biology (4) ic system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and
The human being as an integrated organism; systems of the body; the reproductive system. Four class hours and one three-hour laboratory
basis of healthful living. Four class hours per week. Not open to stu- per week. Does not apply toward a major in biology.
dents who have taken any other course in physiology, or to students Prerequisite: BIOL 131
majoring in Biology.
BIOL 185 Basic Medical Microbiology (5)
BIOL 111 General Biology I (4) Surveys human pathogens and diseases and provides a medicine-
Introduction to life and its processes. Includes basic biological chem- based overview of related concepts, such as bacterial metabolism
istry, the biology of the cell (including membranes, respiration, com- and reproduction, drugs, drug resistance, and basic immunology.
munication, and division), genes and inheritance, genomes, DNA, and Designed primarily for students expecting to enter the allied health
the genetic basis of development. Students must earn a C or better to sciences (nursing, dental hygiene, physical therapy, etc.) Four class
move to BIOL 112 and BIOL 112L. Four class hours per week. hours and three laboratory hours per week. Does not apply toward a
major in biology.
BIOL 111L General Biology I Laboratory (1)
One three-hour laboratory per week, presenting experimental aspects BIOL 221 Tools and Methods I (1)
of the topics presented in BIOL 111. To be taken concurrently with This is an introductory laboratory methods course which develops
BIOL 111. Students must earn a C or better to move to BIOL 112 and student skills in notebook journaling, experimental design, problem
BIOL 112L. solving, and biotechniques. Students learn to determine protein con-
centrations using protein concentration curves, separate and deter-
BIOL 112 General Biology II (4) mine MW of proteins using the SDS-PAGE, and also measure enzyme
Science-based evidence for the origin of biological diversity, specia- activity. Students learn to do calculations to make solutions, use bal-
tion, phylogeny, and systematics. Descriptions of vertebrate and in- ances and pH meters and also become proficient in the use of spec-
vertebrate diversity. Includes the principles of animal form, function, trophotometers and centrifuges. Meets for a three-hour time period
nutrition, circulation, immunity, excretion, hormones, reproduction,
once per week.
development, and neuronal systems. Students must earn a C or better
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 &113L
to move to BIOL 113 and BIOL 113L. Four class hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 111 & 111L BIOL 222 Tools and Methods II (1)
This laboratory course builds on information presented in Tools and
BIOL 112L General Biology II Laboratory (1)
Methods I. In addition to the laboratory skills developed in BIOL 221,
One three-hour laboratory per week, presenting experimental aspects
of the topics presented in BIOL 112. To be taken concurrently with particular interest is given to techniques and concepts in microbiology
BIOL 112. Students must earn a C or better to move to BIOL 113 and and molecular biology. Students learn the Gram stain method,
BIOL 113L. bacterial transformation, DNA electrophoresis, the polymerase chain
Prerequisites: BIOL 111 & 111L reaction (PCR) and aseptic techniques for performing transfers in
microbiology and molecular biology. Students are introduced to the
BIOL 113 General Biology III (4) principles of the scientific method and experimental design. Meets for
Introduction to plant biology, including photosynthesis, evolution, a three-hour time period once per week.
transport, nutrition, reproduction, and environmental responses. Prerequisite: BIOL 221
Additionally includes basic ecological principles and processes and
behavioral ecology. Four class hours per week. BIOL 223 Tools and Methods III (1)
Prerequisites: BIOL 112 & 112L This course instructs students in methods of scientific study. Initially,
students are presented with a number of different approaches, which
BIOL 113L General Biology III Laboratory (1) are discussed by faculty, in order to study particular phenomena; stu-
One three-hour laboratory per week, presenting experimental aspects dents develop hypotheses and then take measurements to test their
of the topics presented in BIOL 113. To be taken concurrently with
hypotheses. The use of appropriate controlled variables and methods
BIOL 113.
Prerequisites: BIOL 112 & 112L of graphical presentation is discussed. A brief introduction to statis-
tical methods is included so that appropriate methods and sample
BIOL 131 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (5) sizes can be proposed. Students are guided in the development of a
A systematic approach to the integrated study of human anatomy hypothesis-based research proposal, do a literature search, and then
and physiology. Designed primarily for students in associate and write and present a research proposal. Meets for a three-hour time pe-
baccalaureate degree programs in allied health sciences and nursing. riod once a week.
Topics covered are: organization of the body, cells, tissues, integumen- Prerequisite: BIOL 222

80 DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


BIOL 295 Undergraduate Research (1-4) 221, 222, 223). Two to four weeks devoted to demonstration laborato-
Original investigation pursued under the direction of a faculty member. ries and the remaining laboratory time dedicated to the development
The student may take up to four units maximum. and execution of a discipline-related project. To be taken concurrently
Restriction: Limited to freshman and sophomores with a minimum overall with BIOL 303. Meets for a three hour time period once a week.
GPA of 3.0 Prerequisites: BIOL 302 & 302L

BIOL 299 Directed Study (1-4) BIOL 327 Survey of Biological Principles (4)
Lower division independent project, not involving original research, An introduction to basic biological processes, this course is designed
taught on an arranged basis. Up to four units maximum may be taken. to give the student a modern treatment of the fundamental processes
Prerequisite: Consent of the Biology Department Chair & arrangement with and principles of living organisms. This is an interdisciplinary study
an instructor focusing on the biological paradigm, built on the fundamental princi-
ples of chemistry, physics, and biology. Does not apply toward a major
UPPER DIVISION in biology. Four class hours per week.

BIOL 301 Cell and Molecular Biology (4) BIOL 350 Colloquium (1)
The basic concepts of current molecular and cell biology, including cel- Upper division departmental course involving invited speakers who
lular regulation, function, and control; processing of information; and present the results of their current research. A grade of IP is assigned
cell organelle function and processes. Introduction to the techniques until the student has attended 12 colloquia, over six consecutive quar-
used in modern cell and molecular biology, and their application to ters. One class hour per colloquium.
answer questions about the cell. Four class hours per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
Prerequisites: BIOL 113, 113L & CHEM 371
BIOL 376 Biostatistics (4)
BIOL 301L Cell and Molecular Biology Projects Laboratory (1) Statistical analysis of biological systems, including both parametric and
Investigation-based laboratories designed for student research experi- non-parametric methods. Four class hours per week.
ence. Projects focus on methods of modern cell biology and draw from Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
techniques learned in the Tools and Methods labs (BIOL 221, 222,
223). Two to four weeks devoted to demonstration laboratories and the BIOL 389 Topics in Biology (4)
remaining laboratory time dedicated to the development and execution Courses on various current topics in biological science, specifically
of the discipline-related project. To be taken concurrently with BIOL designed for non-majors. The student may repeat different sections of
301. Meets for a three hour time period once a week. the course for additional credit. Typically taught as an evening class.
Prerequisite: BIOL 223 Does not apply toward a major in biology. Four class hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
BIOL 302 Genetics (4)
Principles of genetic analysis of viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotes; BIOL 405 Biology Seminar (2)
molecularly based but includes classical concepts. Four class hours per Recent developments and current topics in selected areas of modern bi-
week. ology. May be repeated for a total of 4 units. Two class hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 301 & 301L Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L

BIOL 302L Genetics Projects Laboratory (1) BIOL 408 Biology of Marine Invertebrates (4)
Investigation-based laboratories designed for student research experi- An introduction to the biology of the invertebrate phyla. Treatment
ence. Projects focus on methods of modern genetics and draw from organized phylogenetically and covers a broad spectrum of current
techniques learned in the Tools and Methods labs (BIOL 221, 222, knowledge about the biology of individual representatives of marine
223). Two to four weeks devoted to demonstration laboratories and the invertebrate organisms. Three class hours and one three-hour labora-
remaining laboratory time dedicated to the development and execution tory per week, with extended field trips as substitution for some labs.
of a discipline-related project. To be taken concurrently with BIOL 302. Offered occasionally.
Meets for a three hour time period once a week. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
Prerequisites: BIOL 301 & 301L
BIOL 410 Science at the Cutting Edge (2)
BIOL 303 Developmental Biology (4) The flow of scientific information from the research laboratory to text-
Molecular and genetic mechanisms of gametogenesis, fertilization, books and the popular media. The presentation of current research
morphogenesis, differentiation, and regeneration. Processes of devel- and its integration into the body of knowledge. Requires attendance
opment caused by cell and molecular interactions, under the control of at minimum of one national scientific meeting within the Southern
gene expression. Four class hours per week. California area. Limited class size. Two class hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 302 & 302L Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
Restriction: May not be taken concurrently with UHNR 324
BIOL 303L Developmental Biology Projects Laboratory (1)
Investigation-based laboratories designed for student research experi-
ence. Projects focus on methods of modern developmental biology and
draw from techniques learned in the Tools and Methods labs (BIOL

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 81


BIOL 414 General Ecology (4) BIOL 466 Systems Physiology (4)
Basic concepts concerning the relationships of organisms to their Current concepts and principles of the mechanisms and processes of
environment. Emphasis on physiological responses of individuals; body function and the regulation of its internal environment. Topics
structure and dynamics of populations; interactions between species; include respiration, circulation, membrane transport, nervous integra-
and the structure, dynamics, and functions of communities and eco- tion, metabolic regulation, hormonal control, nutrition, and reproduc-
systems. Includes equivalent of one three-hour laboratory per week. tion. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week.
May substitute for BIOL 415. Taught alternate years. Three class hours Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L BIOL 467 Herpetology (4)
Identification, evolution, distribution, and life history of amphibians
BIOL 415 Environmental Science (4) and reptiles. Three class hours per week and one three-hour laboratory,
Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary study of how the physi- or the equivalent, per week.
cal, chemical, and biological conditions of the earth work, and how Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
we are affecting the earth’s life-support systems (the environment).
This course introduces students to the very complex interlocking envi- BIOL 469 Animal Behavior (4)
ronmental problems facing us today. Beginning with basic ecological A survey of basic principles and classic studies underlying the science
principles, the course goes on to examine population dynamics, energy of animal behavior. Behavior is presented as a manifestation of the
utilization, resource consumption, the various forms of pollution, and structure and function of animal, one that is subject to rigorous analy-
conservation methods to preserve our natural resources, natural areas, sis and experimentation based on objective data. Four class hours per
and native species. This is a Service-Learning course and includes a week.
three-hour laboratory period per week. May substitute for BIOL 414. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
Taught alternate years. Three class hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L BIOL 474 Microbiology (4)
Biology of bacteria, viruses, protozoans, other microorganisms, and
BIOL 434 Histology (4) their interactions with their environment. Includes surveys of micro-
Descriptive and functional analysis of normal human tissues and or- bial adaptation and taxonomy, human-microbe relationships, environ-
gans. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. mental and industrial microbiology. Three class hours and one three-
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 301 & 301L
BIOL 436 Immunology (4)
Consideration of the diverse roles of the vertebrate immune system
BIOL 477 Vertebrate Natural History (4)
with special attention to events that occur at the level of cellular com-
An evolutionary approach to the morphology, physiology, behavior,
munication and signaling. The immune response against cancer and
and ecology of major vertebrate groups with special emphasis given
the interaction of the immune system with the central nervous system
to the vertebrates of southern California. Treats the question of how
are explored. The components of the immune response are developed
members of different vertebrate groups live their lives, and critiques
in light of available experimental evidence, and immunology are pre-
scientific hypotheses on how these different life strategies evolved. The
sented as an investigative science. Four class hours per week.
course is designed to engage students in the scientific thought process
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
required to go from the observed to the theoretical. Weekend field
BIOL 439 Neurobiology (4) trips will be taken to different regions of southern California. Three
An advanced course on the functions of the mammalian nervous class hours per week and one three-hour laboratory, or the equivalent,
system. Neuronal substrates of behavior including perception, moti- per week.
vation, emotion, memory, consciousness, and abnormal thought and Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
behavior are explored. Genetic correlates of behavior also considered.
Cross-listed as PSYC 452. BIOL 485 Systematic Botany (4)
Prerequisite: BIOL 466 Classification of vascular plants with focus on flowering plants. Empha-
sis is made on identification of species with the aid of botanical keys,
BIOL 446 Human Gross Anatomy (5) recognition of plant families, and notation of habitats where various
An intensive, basic course in clinically-oriented human anatomy, in- species occur. Other taxonomic methods are introduced. Three class
cluding laboratory study of the human cadaver. Three class hours hours and one three-hour laboratory, or the equivalent, per week.
and two three-hour laboratories per week. This is a service learning Prerequisites: BIOL 113 &113L
course.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L BIOL 486 Topics in Biology (1-4)
Restriction: Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment Review of specific areas in biological science, offered at the discretion
of the department. The student may repeat different sections of the
BIOL 461 Virology (4) course for additional credit, up to four units maximum.
This course introduces students to fundamental principles of viruses. Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L
Physical structure, classification, and life cycles are presented with in-
depth examples from different families. Four class hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L

82 DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


BIOL 487 Field Study in Biology (1-5)
Field courses offered at the discretion of the department. Recent ex-
amples have included BIOL 487C Natural History of Baja California
(4 units), and BIOL 487E Tropical Field Biology/Tioman (5 units).
Normally offered during the summer. Involves a considerable amount
of travel and fieldwork. Different sections may be approved for addi-
tional credit.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113 & 113L

BIOL 495 Undergraduate Research (1-4)


Original investigation pursued under the direction of a faculty mem-
ber. Students may register for BIOL 495 multiple quarters. Up to a total
of 4 units of BIOL 495 can apply as electives toward either Biology
major emphasis; subsequent units can be used to satisfy the general
electives requirement.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113, 113L & formal agreement with the supervising
instructor
Restriction: Limited to students with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 &
upper division status

BIOL 499 Directed Study (1-4)


Upper division independent project, not involving original research,
taught on an arranged basis. The student may take up to four units
maximum.
Prerequisites: BIOL 113, 113L, consent of the department chair & ar-
rangement with the supervising instructor

UNST 404B Religious, Moral, and Social Aspects of Biology (4)


The department’s capstone course, dealing with current philosophical
issues in biology. Four class hours per week.
Restriction: Only for biology majors with senior standing

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 83