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BA (Hons.

)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: Boutique Barcelona Hotel – Part A

Brief:
Create an identity for a new boutique hotel in the centre of Barcelona and produce a full set of
brand guidelines to be followed.
The hotel will take influence from its Barcelona location, but will aim to avoid cliché’s and too
obvious Spanish links.

Background:
Barcelona is a city full of beautiful architecture and history and is a city for exploring. Many people
don’t think of Barcelona as having a beach, due to it being a major city, but it does and this is a
selling point of the city as it means visitors can relax on the beach in addition to exploring the hustle
and bustle of the city.
The many works of iconic architect Gaudi are key tourist attractions and landmarks such as the
Sagrada Familia are often seen on Barcelona postcards and other souvenirs. Using such
landmarks within the design could however cheapen the look of the hotel as they are often seen as
tacky.
A boutique hotel is a small, stylish hotel often found in a ‘fashionable’ and often urban location.

Considerations:
Consider printing and finishing methods as these could add to the high-end nature of the hotel.
What aspects of the city could be conveyed in a subtle way?

Mandatory Requirements:
The branding must be based on a relevant concept related to Barcelona, but avoiding cliché’s.
Brand guidelines must be complete and in depth to a level that another designer could follow.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.

Target Audience:
Adults with a high disposable income.
Adults wanting to treat themselves to a city break.

Tone of Voice:
Exciting.

Deliverables:
A full set of brand guidelines, in a printed format.

Reading List:
Wally Ollins On Brand. Ollins, Wally
Wally Ollins: The Brand Handbook
Turning Pages: editorial design for print media. Klanten, Robert (2010
The production Manual* A graphic design handbook. Gavin Ambrose/Paul Harris


















































This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.



BA (Hons.)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: Boutique Barcelona Hotel – Part B

Brief:
Apply the identity for a new boutique hotel in the centre of Barcelona, to a range of relevant
products for both inside the hotel and promotions that will be seen outside the hotel.
The hotel will take influence from its Barcelona location, but will aim to avoid cliché’s and too
obvious Spanish links.

Background:
Barcelona is a city full of beautiful architecture and history and is a city for exploring. Many people
don’t think of Barcelona as having a beach, due to it being a major city, but it does and this is a
selling point of the city as it means visitors can relax on the beach in addition to exploring the hustle
and bustle of the city.
The many works of iconic architect Gaudi are key tourist attractions and landmarks such as the
Sagrada Familia are often seen on Barcelona postcards and other souvenirs. Using such
landmarks within the design could however cheapen the look of the hotel as they are often seen as
tacky.
A boutique hotel is a small, stylish hotel often found in a ‘fashionable’ and often urban location.

Considerations:
Consider printing and finishing methods as these could add to the high-end nature of the hotel.
Any digital mock-ups will need to be produced to a high standard, as these will be key to
communicating the brief on boards and portfolio.

Mandatory Requirements:
The branding must be based on a relevant concept related to Barcelona, but avoiding cliché’s.
Branding must be applied to a range of relevant products, following the rules created in the brand
guidelines from part A of the brief.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.

Target Audience:
Adults with a high disposable income.
Adults wanting to treat themselves to a city break.

Tone of Voice:
Exciting



Deliverables:
Following the brand guidelines apply the identity to:
Interior and exterior signage
Door hangers
Welcome brochure for room
Room Service Menu
Complimentary products (Shampoo, conditioner, shower gel, care pack.)

Promotional Material -
Brochure
Website (Proposed)
Postcards

Corporate products –
Business Cards
Letterheads


Reading List:
Wally Ollins On Brand. Ollins, Wally
Wally Ollins: The Brand Handbook
Turning Pages: editorial design for print media. Klanten, Robert (2010
The production Manual* A graphic design handbook. Gavin Ambrose/Paul Harris


























This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.



BA (Hons.)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: Leeds City Guide

Brief:
Produce a city guide for tourists and newcomers to Leeds. The guide must be informative but also
evoke excitement and embody qualities of the city.
The guide must be in the form of a publication, bound in some way for easy portability.
It must include points of interest within Leeds in addition to a map.

Background:
Leeds is the third largest city in the UK and is considered the cultural and commercial heart of West
Yorkshire. Although there have been many new developments in the centre of Leeds there are also
many historic elements in the city such as the Corn Exchange which opened in 1864.
The aim of a city guide is to assist people around a place, guide their exploration and/or help them
reach certain destinations. They should include points of significance of the city and provide advice
about the city.

Considerations:
Amount of content. It is not necessary to include every restaurant and museum in Leeds but the
chosen content must be carefully and purposefully selected.
Think about places outside of the city centre of Leeds, such as Roundhay Park, Temple Newsam,
etc.
Format, what will be the most appropriate format for a city guide?
Fun. Exploring a new city should be exciting and the city guide should help evoke emotion in the
reader.

Mandatory Requirements:
The guide must include a map and information about places to eat and drink in addition to cultural
places such as museums and galleries.
Must be organised in an easy to follow manner.
Must be a multi-page document bound in some way.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.

Target Audience:
Adult tourists or newcomers to Leeds.

Tone of Voice:
Informative and fun. The aim is to convey Leeds as an exciting place

Deliverables:
Multi-page publication providing points of interest and significance to tourists and newcomers to
Leeds, including a map.



Reading List:
Editorial Design. Zappaterra, Yolanda (2007)

The Production Manual* A graphic design
handbook. Gavin Ambrose/Paul Harris

Book Design. Haslam, Andrew (2006)

Turning Pages: editorial design for print media.
Klanten, Robert (2010)

The Map As Art. Katherine Harmon (2009)

Useful Websites:
www.thebookdesignblog.com





































This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.



BA (Hons.)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: First World Problems Publication

Brief:
Design and produce a publication based on the first world problems, commonly complained about
today.
Using primary research methods gather a wide range of people’s individual first world problems and
put these together in an entertaining, light hearted publication that people can relate to.

Background:
First world problems are the problems that people commonly complain about in first world nations,
such as ‘I asked for no whipped cream on my tall Starbucks order, but they gave me a grande with
extra cream’.
When in reality these are not problems at all and the individuals who complain about such things
are far more privileged than people in the third world, these are the people with the real problems.
It is commonly used as a hashtag on social media platforms. #firstworldproblems.

Considerations:
Although I plan for the publication to be light hearted and humorous I do also want to have some
sensitivity to the fact that these are not real problems in comparison the problems faced by people
in third world countries.
Consider the format and binding techniques, and the appropriateness of these for the content.
Where will the publication be distributed? Will this affect the format and/or binding methods used?

Mandatory Requirements:
Thorough research must inform the publication.
Must be finished to a high enough standard to be sold.
Produce a multi-page document bound in some way, containing both text and imagery.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.

Target Audience:
Adults aged 16 – 30.
People looking for an entertaining, light-hearted publication.

Tone of Voice:
Light hearted, humorous and entertaining.


Deliverables:
A publication consisting of multiple pages, bound in an appropriate way to be easily distributed.




Reading List:
Editorial Design. Zappaterra, Yolanda (2007)
The Production Manual* A graphic design handbook. Gavin Ambrose/Paul Harris
Book Design. Haslam, Andrew (2006)
Turning Pages: editorial design for print media. Klanten, Robert (2010)

Journals:
Computer Arts
Creative Review

Useful Websites:
www.twitter.com
www.villagebookstore.co.uk
www.thebookdesignblog.com


I also plan to visit Village the independent book-store in the Corn Exchange in Leeds.





































This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.



BA (Hons.)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: Gender Stereotyping

Brief:
Produce a series of prints raising awareness and trying to put a stop to gender stereotyping.

Background:
Gender stereotypes are generalisations about the attributes, roles and differences of males and
females. Although these can be both positive and negative they are often negative/derogatory.
Gender stereotypes can leave people feeling inadequate, confused and hurt as some people feel
that because they don’t match the stereotypical masculine or feminine traits they have somehow
failed.

Considerations:
What format will the prints take? Eg. Posters, postcards, etc. And how will they be distributed?
This is an important issue and should be dealt with sensitively. The prints must not offend any
audiences.
Printing method should be appropriate to the content.

Mandatory Requirements:
Produce a series of at least 4 prints.
Must work together as a set.
Prints must not offend anyone.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.

Target Audience:
Men and women who use gender stereotypes to judge others.
Men and women who have been affected by gender stereotyping.

Tone of Voice:
Serious.

Deliverables:
A series of at least 4 prints raising awareness of and aiming to stop gender stereotyping.






Reading List:

The Production Manual* A graphic design handbook. Gavin Ambrose/Paul Harris
Campaign graphics: tools for campaigns and sales throughout the year. (2008)

Advertising now: print. / Wiedemann, Julius (ed.) (2006)

Materials, process, print: creative solutions for graphic design. / Mason, Daniel (2007)















































This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.



BA (Hons.)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: The Local Butchers

Brief:
Design the brand for a new butchers/chain of butchers encouraging people to buy meat from local
butchers over supermarkets.
Produce a full set of brand guidelines and apply the brand to necessary products for the store.

Background:
Many people choose now to buy meat from supermarkets to save money and time, but this has
lead to many butchers closing down.
There was a time when everyone would buy their meat from their local butchers, who provided local
produce, which is very important. Relationships would be built with customers and butchers would
be friendly places to visit and purchase a range of local meats, they would and can also advise on
cooking and preparing meat, which is something you cannot often get in supermarkets.

Considerations:
Imagery and designs will need to draw audiences into the butchers and make them look like
welcoming places. Often large knives are used in branding and this can be off putting.
Consider the location of the store? Will this affect the audience.
Will the butchers sell ready to eat products as well as raw, for example pork pies and sausage
rolls?
Will any in-store design be required? Potential for wall prints, but will these be decorative or give
information?

Mandatory Requirements:
Research into the history and development of the butcher industry.
The brand must be inviting rather than off putting.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.

Target Audience:
Local adults.

Tone of Voice:
Welcoming and friendly.

Deliverables:
Full identity for new store
Brand Guidelines
Identity applied to relevant products:
Signage
Price Labels
Wrapping
Bags
Receipts
In-store information
(Web presence)

Business elements:
Business Cards
Letterheads
Invoices


Reading List:
Wally Ollins On Brand. Ollins, Wally
Wally Ollins: The Brand Handbook
1000 retail graphics: from signage to logos and everything in-store. JGA
Packaging Design. Stuart, Bill. (2007)




























This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.



BA (Hons.)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: 1960’s Inspired Stationary/Gift Collection

Brief:
Design a pattern inspired by the design and events of the sixties and then apply this to a range of
gift products and stationary including wrapping paper, gift bags, tags, greetings cards and extend
this range to stationary such as notebooks and writing sets.
How these products will be sold will also need to be considered and potentially produced.

Background:
The time period of the sixties was a hugely influential time with many political and cultural
occurrences during the decade, which are still very much remembered today.
Fashion and music were two sectors that were huge parts of the sixties with icons such as The
Beatles and Twiggy making their names.
Many iconic films were also released during the decade such as Hepburn’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s
and My Fair Lady.
There were also many advances in design such as in the printing technology and with the
emergence of transferable letters (Letraset).

Considerations:
The theme of the pattern must be relevant to the 1960’s period, in addition to resembling the design
aesthetics of that period.
How will the products be printed? Are more traditional printing methods more relevant to the 60’s?
Stock may also be influenced by the 60s theme, as could the format of stationary items such as
notepads.
Must consider how the products will be sold. Is it necessary to produce packaging for these items?
Think about and look into pattern design. Are there rules that need to be followed?
Crafting will need to be considered. The products need to be finished to a high enough quality that
they could be sold.

Mandatory Requirements:
Design an appropriate 1960’s themed pattern.
Ensure the items that the pattern will be applied to are appropriate.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.

Target Audience:
Women aged 18+


Tone of Voice:
Fun, light hearted

Deliverables:
Wrapping Paper
Gift Bags
Gift Tags
Greetings Cards
Range of Notepads
Writing Set


Reading List:
British fashion in the 1960s. Armstrong, Mark (2013)
1960s. Yapp, Nick (1998)
Pattern Design. Savoir, Lou Andrea (2007)
The pattern sourcebook: a century of surface pattern design. Cole, Drusilla (2009)
Patterns: new surface design. Cole, Drusilla (2007)

Useful Websites:
www.tigerprint.uk.com
www.thepatternlibrary.com

This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.



BA (Hons.)
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Level 6
Module Code:

Module Title: Learning Outcomes:

BRIEF TITLE: Whiskey Tasting Pack

Brief:
Design a whiskey tasting pack that includes all necessary information and equipment to learn about
whiskey tasting.
The pack will provide information about the correct methods of tasting whiskey as well as giving
some information about the history and production of whiskey.

Background:
There are many different types of Whiskey such as Scotch, Bourbon, Rye and many more, and
these offer different flavours.
There are many factors that affect the different tastes of Whiskey from the drying process of the
barley, type of cask used to the water used. The age of the whiskey also affects the taste. Age
plays a huge part in the Whiskey making process with malt whiskey commonly sold after aging for
10-12 years.
Whiskey tasting when done professionally is a complex procedure involving smell, appearance and
of course taste. This pack will teach whiskey lovers what to look for when selecting and tasting
whiskey.

Considerations:
As age is so significant to whiskey production and it has been a common alcohol for so long, more
traditional print production methods may be beneficial in the production of the pack.
Letterpress and embossing would give a tactile finish in addition to working with the age concept,
which would be beneficial as the event is all about tasting and getting involved. However, I will need
to consider the quantity of prints I will need and consider appropriateness of printing methods.
Audience. Although whiskey is often thought of as an older mans drink many women do drink
whiskey and younger adults also enjoy the drink, so ensure designs do not alienate any audiences.
Where will the pack be sold? This is likely to be bought as a gift, so the design will need to reflect
this.

Mandatory Requirements:
The pack must include samples of a variety of whiskeys and a nosing glass in addition to the
printed information.
The printed information needs to be designed in a way that is visually interesting and engaging in
addition to being easy to follow.
These items need to be packaged in an appropriate manner.
Produce design boards to show the development and resolution of the brief.



Target Audience:
Gift buyers buying predominantly for adults 25+, although some younger adults may also be
interested in learning about whiskey tasting.
Whiskey lovers.

Tone of Voice:
Fun and exciting, but also informative.

Deliverables:
Information packs holding tester bottles of whiskey, a nosing glass and printed information
explaining whiskey tasting and information about the history and production of whiskey.



Reading List:
Wally Ollins On Brand. Ollins, Wally

Wally Ollins: The Brand Handbook. Ollins,
Wally

The Production Manual* A graphic design
handbook. Gavin Ambrose/Paul Harris

Basic packaging. / Roojen, Pepin van &
Hronek, Jakob (2010)


Useful Websites:
www.scotchwhiskyexperience.co.uk

























This brief should be read in conjunction with the module brief. Please refer to
module handbook for module brief, submission deadline, graded outcomes
and further reading.