DOLBEAU-MISTASSINI

CORPORATE IDENTITIES
$6.95 JUN/09
v.54 N.06
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06/09 canadian architect
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In Study Model Wonderland from Halifax to
VancouveratMontreal’sGalerie
MONOPOLI;winnersoftheAIBC
ArchitecturalAwards.
24 Practice
RobertBillardandKMBRArchitects
PlannersInc.havedevelopedaworkflow
managementprocesscalledtheHolistic
ProjectDeliverymethod,aclear
enhancementtotheIntegratedDesign
Process.
26 review
TherecentCarrot Cityexhibitionatthe
DesignExchangepromotesvaluableideas
ofurbanagricultureandlocalfood
production,assertsSanamSamanian.
29 calendar
Speed LimitsattheCanadianCentrefor
ArchitectureinMontreal;Twenty and
ChangeinToronto.
30 BackPage
DennisEvansreportsonhowtheStraw
BaleObservatoryinSaskatchewanfacili­
tatestheappreciationoftheetherealand
sublimequalitiesoflight,skyandthe
prairielandscape.
13 salle de sPectacle dolBeau-
Mistassini
Paul lauReNdeau aNd JodoiN laMaRRe PRatte desiGNed this dRaMatic PeRfoRMiNG
aRts ceNtRe, cReatiNG a coheReNt New focal PoiNt foR a sMall QueBec coM-
MuNity. teXt thoMas stRicklaNd
18 agnico-eagle Mines and
torys llP
the iNteRioR ReNovatioNs to the headQuaRteRs of Both a MiNiNG coMPaNy aNd a
leadiNG law fiRM Move faR BeyoNd staNdaRd coRPoRate office desiGN, couRtesy
of tayloR sMyth aRchitects aNd kuwaBaRa PayNe MckeNNa BluMBeRG aRchitects.
teXt leslie JeN
cover the Reflective exteRioR of the salle
de sPectacle dolBeau-MistassiNi | des-
JaRdiNs | MaRia-chaPdelaiNe iN QueBec By
Paul lauReNdeau | JodoiN laMaRRe PRatte |
aRchitects iN coNsoRtiuM. PhotoGRaPh
By MaRc GiBeRt.
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The NaTioNal Review of DesigN aND PRacTice/
The JouRNal of RecoRD of The Raic
JuNe 2009, v.4 N.06
contents
p05 Contents.indd 5 6/12/09 10:44:27 AM
canadian architect 0/09
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Ian ChodIkoff ichodikoff@canadianarchitect.coM
above arthur erICkson (rIGht) GIves PIerre
trudeau (MIddLe) a tour of the ubC
MuseuM of anthroPoLoGy—one of
erICkson’s Most IMPortant vanCouver
buILdInGs.
viewpoint
On May 20th, Canada lost one of its greatest
architects. By the time of his passing at 84 years
of age, Arthur Erickson had built a career that
spanned several decades, providing us with a
number of significant buildings that defined an
emerging nation through an architecture that ac-
knowledges its geography and expresses the
vitality of its citizens: the venerable Roy Thomp-
son Hall, the groundbreaking Simon Fraser Uni-
versity, the landscape-inspired University of
Lethbridge, and the Museum of Anthropology at
the University of British Columbia, a post-and-
beam concrete masterpiece that places First Na-
tions art and culture on par with the great cul-
tures of Ancient Greece and Persia. In addition to
his innumerable contributions to residential de-
sign, he directly influenced the evolution of sev-
eral important Canadian cultural, educational,
corporate and governmental institutions. Inter-
nationally, Erickson positioned Canada as a place
that could stand proud amongst the great nations
of the world. Few of us were able to see his Can-
ada Pavilion at the 1970 World’s Fair in Osaka,
but many of us have heard him eruditely describe
how his architecture came to be an ambassador
for our country by confidently displaying our cul-
tural and creative spirit within a wooden teepee-
inspired building. The Canadian Chancery in
Washington, DC, an oft-misunderstood building
largely due to its postmodern inclinations, is an-
other strong example of Erickson’s interpretation
of Canadian architecture as emissary abroad. Lo-
cated in a precinct of Washington dominated by
Federalist buildings, Erickson’s Chancery refer-
ences the porticos, columns and entablatures of
its neighbours—but is expressed through a vo-
cabulary of exposed concrete elements integrated
with ample greenery and a publicly accessible
landscaped courtyard. But most importantly,
Erickson’s architectural intentions and aspira-
tions transcend formal geometries, exuding val-
ues that reflect contemporary Canadian culture
and democracy.
Erickson’s reputation as an architect entered
our collective imagination long before Gehry,
Libeskind or Koolhaas were considered house-
hold names. This became apparent to us at the
magazine, as we have had in the past weeks the
privilege of hearing from many readers wanting
to share their personal experiences of either
Erickson the man or an Erickson building—from
those who knew him well as far back as the 1950s,
to the aspiring architecture student who, recently
having toured an Erickson structure, discovered
the importance of his chosen field of study.
Erickson was an architect who could inspire us
with his bravado and humanism as much as he
could provide us with lessons about the plasticity
of concrete, the expansiveness of glass, and the
elegance of steel.
Arthur Erickson taught us about leading with
substance over style: culture, history and human-
ity are the true foundations of good architecture,
and these aspirations can be realized through
programmatic invention. At Simon Fraser Uni-
versity, for example, he responded to the chal-
lenge of building a new educational facility by
breaking down social and academic barriers so
that university students from a variety of disci-
plines could debate and interact freely within a
new space-age superstructure. When designing
the Vancouver Law Courts, he redefined our ex-
pectations of a democratic city by placing access-
ible rooftop gardens on top of a legislative facil-
ity, and by encasing both the public hall and
courthouse within a large transparent glass en-
velope.
Just as former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau
once defined a nation through his political
leadership during the 1960s, ’70s and early ’80s,
Arthur Erickson’s buildings of that era represent
an equally sophisticated confidence and vision
for Canada. Without a doubt, Erickson’s contri-
butions helped define a period of Canadian
architecture that exudes an unprecedented con-
nection to the particularities of site and land-
scape, and to First Nations heritage. He remains
an inspiration to us all.
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06/09 canadian architect 9
news
aBOVe the latest exhibition organized by
Montreal’s galerie Monopoli explores
the use of the Maquette by architects
froM across the country.
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In Study Model Wonderland from Halifax
to Vancouver.
This exhibition at Maison de l’architecture du Qué­
bec—MONOPOLI in Montreal begins with a ques­
tion: in this day and age of AutoCAD and digital
design, is the study model still playing a role in the
architect’s creative process? The answer proves to
be resoundingly affirmative, from a vast cross­
Canada investigation conducted by the MONO­
POLI team with the help of three researchers
under the direction of chief curator Sophie Giron­
nay. Forty study models have been selected for the
exhibition in a variety of scales and representing a
vastly divergent assemblage of projects, each pos­
sessing a unique quality of expression and beauty.
They are housed within a setting courtesy of archi­
tectural firm Atelier in situ, the exhibition’s guest
designers. Along with the models, photos of the
finished buildings and quotes from their archi­
tects express the creatively complex process of de­
signing a building. Accompanying the exhibition
is a 56­page catalogue titled 1:26, the result of a
creative collaboration—graphic design by Uniform,
image direction by Alain Laforest, photographs by
Marc Gibert, and a colour pamphlet by Émilie
Graves. The exhibition ends October 10, 2009.
www.galeriemonopoli.com/?cat=22&lang=en
awards
winners of the aiBc architectural awards.
At this year’s annual AIBC Architectural Awards,
eight awards were bestowed upon British Colum­
bia’s architectural leaders. Recipients of the Lieu­
tenant­Governor of British Columbia Award in
Architecture Medal for 2009 are: the Arts & Social
Sciences 1 and Blusson Hall complex at the Simon
Fraser University Burnaby Campus by Busby
Perkins+Will Architects Co; and Kensington Park,
Robert Burnaby Park and Swalwell Park Wash­
rooms by Bruce Carscadden Architect Inc. Three
projects received Lieutenant­Governor of British
Columbia Merit Awards: the Chimo Aquatic and
Fitness Centre by Hughes Condon Marler Archi­
tects; the North Vancouver City Library by Dia­
mond and Schmitt Architects Incorporated and
CEI Architecture Planning Interiors; and Whistler
Public Library by Hughes Condon Marler Archi­
tects. The 2009 AIBC Innovation Award went to
the “22” series of electrical accessories by Omer
Arbel for Bocci, and the 2009 AIBC Special Jury
Award was granted to Dockside Green—Synergy
by Busby Perkins+Will Architects Co. And finally,
the first­ever AIBC Emerging Firm Award recog­
nizes Bowen Island­based JWT Architecture and
Planning, led by James Tuer.
www.aibc.ca
cOmpetitiOns
winners of Formshift Vancouver ideas
competition selected.
The winners of the first­ever FormShift Vancou­
ver have been selected. In the Vancouver Primary
category, honours go to a submission from Cal­
gary­based Sturgess Architecture. The Vancouver
Secondary choice is Romses Architects (Scott
Romses) of Vancouver. In the third and final cat­
egory—Vancouver Wildcard—the nod goes to Go
Design Collaborative (Jennifer Uegama and Paul­
ine Thimm) of Vancouver. This unique competi­
tion, co­hosted by the Architectural Institute of
British Columbia and the City of Vancouver, chal­
lenged architects, designers and others with crea­
tive flair to submit innovative, built­form ideas
that will guide Vancouver’s future growth. Competi­
tors were encouraged to draw inspiration from sev­
eral key initiatives developed by the city, including
the Climate Change Action Plan, the EcoDensity
Charter, and the Greenest City Action Team.
Jurors were impressed with the integration of
wide­ranging ideas for sustainable development,
including many that incorporated components of
renewable energy on a community level, Vancou­
ver’s back lane conditions, urban agriculture, land
parcellization and tenure, and various designs for
green­roof technologies. Many submissions also
strongly addressed affordability and livability in
the design. The winning submissions thoughtfully
put forth multiple innovations and approaches.
www.formshiftvancouver.com
what’s new
Landmarks, monuments & Built heritage of
the west.
The University of Manitoba Archives & Special
Collections, along with its partners, the Ukrain­
ian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg Archives,
the Canadian Architectural Archives, and the
Archives of Manitoba, have created a website de­
voted to Western Canada’s architectural history
and the effects it has had on Canadian society.
The 7,000 textual documents, photographs, blue­
prints, films, and sound clips that comprise Land­
marks, Monuments & Built Heritage of the West
document this rich historical legacy.
http://umanitoba.ca/libraries/archives/digital/
built_heritage/

OBituary
Legendary canadian architect arthur
erickson dead at 84.
Arthur Erickson, the Vancouver­born architect
known for his groundbreaking designs in concrete
and glass, passed away in a Vancouver hospital at
age 84 on May 20, 2009. Born in 1924, he graduat­
ed from Montreal’s McGill University in 1950 and
worked as an associate professor at the University
of British Columbia from 1957 to 1963. He first
achieved international acclaim soon after for his
award­winning design for Simon Fraser Univer­
sity in Burnaby, British Columbia. Later, he de­
signed many significant buildings that make up
the urban landscape of Vancouver, including the
Vancouver Law Courts, Robson Square and UBC’s
Museum of Anthropology. Erickson’s success in
Vancouver soon spread around the globe. His
noted designs include Roy Thomson Hall in To­
ronto, the Canadian Embassy in Washington, Cali­
fornia Plaza in Los Angeles, Napp Laboratories in
Cambridge, England, Kuwait Oil Sector Complex
in Kuwait City, and the Kunlun Apartment Hotel
development in Beijing. Architecture critic Trevor
Boddy said the distinctive stamp Erickson left on
the young West Coast city would be his most en­
during legacy, as he was the first to believe Van­
couver could be a world­class city. Boddy stated,
“The way that he prodded and primed and hoped
that Vancouver would become a better place, more
diverse, more dense, more visually engaging, more
beautiful, the notion that this geographically iso­
lated city could be a global contender.”
Abridged from the CBC News website. For the full
story, please visit www.cbc.ca/canada/story/
2009/05/20/erickson-obit.html.
p09 News.indd 9 6/12/09 10:46:09 AM
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p10 InterfaceFlor ad.indd 10 6/12/09 10:46:34 AM
2008-2009
RAIC Board Members
President
Paule Boutin, FIRAC
1st Vice-President and
President-Elect
Ranjit (Randy) K. Dhar, FRAIC
2nd Vice-President and
Treasurer
Stuart Howard, FRAIC
Immediate Past President
Kiyoshi Matsuzaki, PP/FRAIC
Regional Directors
Stuart Howard, FRAIC
(British Columbia/Yukon)
Wayne Guy, FRAIC
(Alberta/NWT)
Charles Olfert, MRAIC
(Saskatchewan/Manitoba)
David Craddock, MRAIC
(Ontario Southwest)
Ralph Wiesbrock, FRAIC
(Ontario North and East/Nunavut)
Claude Hamelin Lalonde, FIRAC
(Quebec)
Paul E. Frank, FRAIC
(Atlantic)
Chancellor of College of
Fellows
Alexander Rankin, FRAIC
Council of Canadian University
Schools of Architecture
(CCUSA)
Eric Haldenby, FRAIC
Editorial Liaison
Ralph Wiesbrock, FRAIC
Executive Director
Jon Hobbs, FRAIC
Editor
Sylvie Powell
The national office of the
RAIC is located at:
330-55 Murray St.
Ottawa ON K1N 5M3
Tel.: (613) 241-3600
Fax: (613) 241-5750
E-mail: info@raic.org
www.raic.org
up
date
ISSUE 31.2
SUMMER 2009
The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada
The leading voice of architecture in Canada
Have you renewed your
membership?
Use the RAIC online payment
system
Along with the traditional member-
ship categories – Architects, Interns
or Intern Architects, Graduates,
Faculty and Fellows – the RAIC
offers opportunities to become a
Life Member, Student Associate
and Affiliate. With the exception of
Affiliates and Student Associates,
all these categories allow members
to attach the MRAIC (Member of
the Royal Architectural Institute of
Canada) and FRAIC (Fellow of the
Royal Architectural Institute of
Canada) designations following their
name – a recognized symbol of
professionalism.
To reinforce the numerous roles held
by qualified architects in society,
the RAIC strongly encourages all
licensed (or registered) architects to
also use the title “Architect” after
their name as well as the appropriate
designation MRAIC or FRAIC.
Help the RAIC continue to be the
voice of architects in Canada by
encouraging colleagues to become
members.
Second Edition of the Canadian Handbook of
Practice for Architects – 2009
The Second Edition of the
“CHOP” can be download-
ed in a PDF format from the
RAIC website as of May 22.
Architecture students, intern
architects, and licensed or
registered architects can
purchase the new document
for $75 from the RAIC. This
new edition contains over 50 checklists, many of
them new, updated references and current practice
advice.
This summer a CD-ROM version and a printed paper
copy will also be available for sale.
A Guide to Determining Appropriate Fees
for Architectural Services
The RAIC has just completed
a national fee guideline which
includes updated recommen-
dations for percentage-based
fees. The guidelines are in-
tended for both clients and
architects alike and supports
existing provincial fee guide-
lines and assists architects
when negotiating fees with
clients.
The document is free to download for RAIC mem-
bers. Printed copies to send to clients will be avail-
able for $25 each.
NEW! NEW! NEW! NEW!
Veronafiere 2009
Another fabulous opportunity offered to Canadian Architects
through RAIC membership
RAIC members are once
again eligible to become one
of six lucky architects for a
terrific professional develop-
ment opportunity to attend
the trade show Marmomacc
held in Italy Sept. 28-Oct. 2,
2009. Scholarships cover tui-
tion, meals, accommodations
and local transportation and
the administration fee. Those
selected will be responsible for travel costs to and from Verona.
Participants earn 20 hours of CORE continuing education credits.
The class is limited to 30 architects, 16 from the U.S., six from
Canada, and the others from the U.K., South Africa, India and
Australia.
Interested RAIC members should submit
a résumé to Jon Hobbs, FRAIC
(jhobbs@raic.org) before June 12, 2009.
photo: Pierlucio Pellissier, MIRAC photo: Philip O’Sullivan, MRAIC
photo: Philip O’Sullivan, MRAIC
p11-12 RAIC.indd 11 6/12/09 10:47:49 AM
Conseil d’administration
de l’IRAC de 2008-2009
Présidente
Paule Boutin, FIRAC
Premier vice-président et
président élu
Ranjit (Randy) K. Dhar, FRAIC
Deuxième vice-président et
trésorier
Stuart Howard, FRAIC
Président sortant de charge
Kiyoshi Matsuzaki, PP/FRAIC
Directeurs régionaux
Stuart Howard, FRAIC
(Colombie-Britannique/Yukon)
Wayne Guy, FRAIC
(Alberta/T.N.-O.)
Charles Olfert, MRAIC
(Saskatchewan/Manitoba)
David Craddock, MRAIC
(Sud et Ouest de l’Ontario)
Ralph Wiesbrock, FRAIC
(Est et Nord de l’Ontario/
Nunavut)
Claude Hamelin Lalonde, FIRAC
(Québec)
Paul E. Frank, FRAIC
(Atlantique)
Chancelier du Collège des
fellows
Alexander Rankin, FRAIC
Conseil canadien des écoles
universitaires d’architecture
(CCÉUA)
Eric Haldenby, FRAIC
Conseiller à la rédaction
Ralph Wiesbrock, FRAIC
Directeur général
Jon Hobbs, FRAIC
Rédactrice en chef
Sylvie Powell
Le siège social de l’IRAC
est situé au,:
55, rue Murray, bureau 330
Ottawa ON K1N 5M3
Tél.,: (613) 241-3600
Télec.,: (613) 241-5750
Courriel,: info@raic.org
www.raic.org
en

bref
NUMÉRO 31.2
ÉTÉ 2009
L’Institut royal d’architecture du Canada
Le principal porte-parole de l’architecture au Canada
Avez-vous renouvelé votre
adhésion?
Si non, vous pouvez le faire dès
maintenant en utilisant le système
de paiement en ligne de l’IRAC.
En plus des catégories de membres
usuelles – architectes, stagiaires,
diplômés en architecture, universitaires
et fellows – l’IRAC offre maintenant la
possibilité de devenir membre à vie,
membre étudiant associé ou membre
affilié. À l’exception des membres
affiliés et des étudiants associés, tous
les autres membres ont droit d’inscrire
les initiales MIRAC (membre de l’Insti-
tut royal d’architecture du Canada)
ou FIRAC (fellow de l’Institut royal
d’architecture du Canada) après leur
nom – un symbole de profession-
nalisme reconnu.
Pour mieux faire connaître les nom-
breux rôles des architectes dans la
société, l’IRAC invite aussi fermement
tous les architectes à utiliser leur titre
« d’architecte » avec la désignation
MIRAC ou FIRAC.
Encouragez vos collègues à devenir
membres de l’IRAC et renforcez ainsi
l’IRAC dans son rôle de porte-parole
des architectes du Canada.
Deuxième édition du Manuel canadien de
pratique de l’architecture – 2009
La deuxième édition du
Manuel canadien de pratique
de l’architecture pourra être
téléchargée en format PDF à
partir du site Web de l’IRAC à
compter du 22 mai.
Les étudiants en architecture,
les stagiaires et les archi-
tectes peuvent se procurer le
nouveau document au coût
de 75 $. Cette nouvelle édition comporte plus de 50
aide-mémoire dont plusieurs nouveaux, des biblio-
graphies à jour et des conseils adaptés à la pratique
d’aujourd’hui.
Dès l’été, il sera également possible de se procurer le
Manuel sur CD-Rom ou en version imprimée.
Un guide aidant à déterminer les honoraires
appropriés pour les services d’un architecte
L’IRAC vient tout juste de pu-
blier un guide national sur les
honoraires qui comprend notam-
ment des recommandations à
jour concernant les honoraires à
pourcentage. Ce guide s’adres-
se autant aux clients qu’aux
architectes et aide les architec-
tes à négocier leurs honoraires
avec leurs clients. Il se veut
également un complément aux
tarifs d’honoraires existants de
certaines provinces.
Les membres de l’IRAC peuvent télécharger le docu-
ment gratuitement. Des copies imprimées pouvant être
transmises aux clients seront en vente au coût de 25 $
chacune.
DU NOUVEAU !
Veronafiere 2009
Une autre fabuleuse occasion offerte aux architectes canadiens
membres de l’IRAC
À nouveau cette année, les membres
de l’IRAC ont la chance de devenir
l’un des six architectes qui recevront
une bourse pour suivre un cours sur
la pierre et le marbre et assister au
salon professionnel Marmomacc en
Italie, du 28 septembre au 2 octobre
2009. Les bourses couvrent les frais
de cours, les repas, l’hébergement et
le transport sur place, de même que
les frais d’administration. Les architectes choisis doivent toutefois assu-
mer leurs frais de transport en direction et en provenance de Vérone.
La participation au cours est reconnue et représente 20 heures de
formation continue dans le volet formation DIRIGÉE. Le nombre de
participants est limité à 30 architectes dont 16 proviennent des États-
Unis, 6 du Canada et les autres du Royaume-Uni, de l’Afrique du Sud,
de l’Inde et de l’Australie.
Les membres de l’IRAC qui désirent poser
leur candidature doivent faire parvenir un
curriculum vitae à Jon Hobbs, FRAIC
(jhobbs@raic.org), avant le 12 juin 2009.
photo : Lee Gavel, FRAIC
photo : Philip O’Sullivan, MRAIC
photo : Philip O’Sullivan, MRAIC
p11-12 RAIC.indd 12 6/12/09 10:48:15 AM
06/09 canadian architect 13
SubStance and Spectacle
the architecture of thiS new regional
theatre iS aS dramatic aS the perform-
anceS held within itS carefully propor-
tioned interiorS.
proJect Salle de Spectacle dOlBeaU-MIStaSSINI | deSJaRdINS | MaRIa-
cHapdelaINe, dOlBeaU-MIStaSSINI, QUeBec
architectS paUl laUReNdeaU | JOdOIN laMaRRe pRatte | aRcHItectS IN
cONSORtIUM
teXt tHOMaS StRIcklaNd
photoS MaRc GIBeRt
The combination of architecture and the performing arts has often featured
significantly in projects of civic reorganization and unification, both
literally and symbolically. One public works project, L’Opéra Paris (Palais
Garnier) instigated by Baron Georges-Eugène Haussmann and designed by
architect Charles Garnier in 1861, was planned to unify not only the new
formal order of the city but the people as well; it was to be the public face of
new Paris. In the 20th century, the white sails of Sydney’s Opera House,
designed by Jørn Utzon in 1957, have come to symbolize the emergence of
Australia as a cultural and economic force in the international arena. At a
smaller scale but with as much ambition, Dolbeau-Mistassini in Quebec
hopes a recently completed performing arts centre, designed by Paul
Laurendeau Architecte in consortium with Jodoin Lamarre Pratte et
associés architectes, will concentrate its diverse and prolific arts scene in
one place and represent the continuity of the recent amalgamation of two
distinct cities under one governing body.
In the 1980s, the City of Dolbeau, located 300 kilometres north of Quebec
City in the regional municipality of Maria-Chapdelaine, began planning a
hall to concentrate the area’s extant community of folk and opera singers,
musicians and graphic artists. Yet it was the 1997 merger of Dolbeau with
Mistassini, a neighbouring city, and growing support from broadcasters,
producers and municipal politicians that crystallized the idea into a project.
In 2005, following a thorough study, a site was chosen in the former city of
Mistassini and a competition call was issued for a theatre that would pro-
mote “a new coherence in spite of the heterogeneous character of the neigh-
bourhood.” (Salle de spectacles de Dolbeau-Mistassini, Concours d’architecture,
2005).
Out of roughly 30 submissions, Laurendeau was initially selected as one
of four finalists for Phase I of the project’s design competition. Before
continuing on to Phase II, and after a change in provincial policy regarding
design competitions, he was “encouraged” to form a collaboration with a
more experienced firm that was familiar with buildings of similar scale to
the performing arts centre. Forming a consortium with Jodoin Lamarre
Pratte, Laurendeau’s design went on to win the commission. He is accus-
tomed to working with the arts and design community, honing his design
approach on projects such as Fashionlab (a clothing design agency) in 2001
and DESERT for the collective Champ Libre in 2004 (see CA, November
2004). While the Dolbeau-Mistassini Salle de Spectacle represents a shift
in complexity and the architect’s first foray into theatre architecture, the
design shows a confident merging of the client’s program requirements and
aboVe tHe fRONt eNtRaNce tO tHe peRfORMING aRtS ceNtRe GRace-
fUlly ReflectS tHe exIStING BUIldINGS alONG aveNUe de l’ÉGlISe.
p13-17 Dolbeau.indd 13 6/12/09 10:48:51 AM
14 canadian architect 06/09
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aBOVe The glazing along The foyer’s second level creaTes an
illusory reflecTion aT nighT—one ThaT defines a dramaTic hori-
zonTal elemenT To The archiTecTure. LeFt The simple landscape
reinforces The ausTeriTy of This building in rural Quebec. BOttOM
LeFt This image of The exTerior of The faciliTy illusTraTes how iTs
sToic volumes provide a radical conTrasT To The dynamic inTer-
ior of The building.
site pLan
1 former sT-michel school (1948 secTion)
2 TheaTre
3 supermarkeT
4 sTorage
5 orpheon cinema
6 arena
p13-17 Dolbeau.indd 14 6/12/09 10:49:12 AM
06/09 canadian architect 15
0 10M
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0 10M Ground floor level two
1 hall
2 foyer
3 caterer
4 orchestra
5 stage
6 loading dock
7 green room
8 dressing room
9 garden
10 administration
institutional agenda with Laurendeau’s design approach.
Laurendeau believes that the principles of geometry and proportion are
fundamental to the design of a building. “Symmetry,” he explains, “induces
a relationship with others; it becomes a shared language.” Beginning with
the golden section, a ratio of purportedly divine proportions connected to
Vitruvius and found in Le Corbusier’s Modular Man, Laurendeau executed
an extensive study of significant 19th-century architectural treatises
combined with a geometric analysis of the Dolbeau-Mistassini program
brief. Such historical allusions aside, the building, according to Lauren-
deau, is not revivalist. The formal geometric arrangements also accommo-
date programmatic and operational requirements while providing a prin-
ciple around which contractors can coordinate.
Laurendeau’s successful proposal was in plan and volume a close match
to the Management Committee’s organigramme—the functional require-
ments of the proposed theatre. The procession follows a symmetrically
arranged central axis beginning with the entrance on Avenue de l’Église,
passing through the foyer, lobby, auditorium and ending on the stage. While
11 foyer (seen from above)
12 balcony 1
13 stage (seen from above)
aBove the gloriously proportioned verticality of the theatre
space, which is dramatically dressed in red and gold.
p13-17 Dolbeau.indd 15 6/12/09 10:49:36 AM
16 canadian architect 06/09
0 10M
0 10M
0 10M
longitudinal section
lateral section through the foyer
lateral section through the auditorium
aBoVe, left to right The green room provides a spacious and open
environmenT in which performers may congregaTe before
and afTer The show; The ausTere qualiTies of The dressing
rooms are evidenT.
p13-17 Dolbeau.indd 16 6/12/09 10:49:55 AM
06/09 canadian architect 17
cLient CITY OF DOLBEAU-MISTASSINI
architect teaM PAUL LAURENDEAU, MARC LAURENDEAU, DENIS GAUDREAULT
StrUctUraL DESSAU SOPRIN
MechanicaL/eLectricaL ROCHE LTÉE
LandScaPe PAUL LAURENDEAU | JODOIN LAMARRE PRATTE | ARCHITECTS IN CONSORTIUM
interiOrS PAUL LAURENDEAU | JODOIN LAMARRE PRATTE | ARCHITECTS IN CONSORTIUM
cOntractOr UNIBEC INC.
theatre cOnSULtant GO MULTIMÉDIA
acOUSticS LEGAULT & DAVIDSON
SiGnaGe/GraPhicS UNIFORM
area 2,630 M
2

BUdGet $9.2 M
cOMPLetiOn OCTOBER 2008
this arrangement might seem obvious and even simple in plan, it is a con­
sidered solution to the community’s requirement for a significant amount
of space in the centre of the building to be used as a meeting hall for clubs
and events. Importantly, the foyer’s multi­purpose role is established
through movement in and out of the space, which occurs on all four sides.
On one side is a grove of trees concealed from Avenue de l’Église by an early
20th­century section of Saint­Michel School; later additions were demol­
ished to create space for the theatre. When fully grown, the green grove of
trees will starkly contrast the spare and polished foyer offering a themed
scene, enticing writers and composers to reflect upon the space.
Laurendeau has used contrast to effect in the Salle de Spectacle. In the
auditorium, which also corresponds to the golden section, the seating is ar­
ranged in the shape of a drum, the only round form in the building. Taking
full advantage of this shape to emphasize the height of the auditorium space,
Laurendeau explains that he has structured the balconies to “provoke verti­
cality and vertigo.” This impetus combined with the seats’ bright red fabric
and gold balcony façades defines a palpable distinction between this room
and the rest of the building. Occupying the drum’s cardinal point is an
enormous circular chandelier, carrying hundreds of lights, which ignite the
rich colours. Before a performance begins, the lights are dimmed and the
elaborate fixture rises to the ceiling to consolidate the transformative po­
tential of the theatre, signalling the drift from ordinary to imaginary.
On the street, the simple boxy form of the metal­clad theatre sits
innocuously behind the elevation. Recalling the golden age of the music
hall, the marquee­like façade offers the promise of a revitalized commercial
district, and speaks to Dolbeau­Mistassini’s hope for a collective identity.
Laurendeau explains that, “as an icon the building has to sustain its
function.” For the designer, however, it is not the role of architecture to
provide meaning; it is the community, he believes, that will bring
significance to the building. Laurendeau’s approach concentrates on the
object itself, bringing together principles of geometric order and a history
of building typology that create a stage for community identification and
articulation. After all, he notes, “It is their building.” ca
After a period of time working as an architect, Thomas Strickland is undertaking
a doctorate in the history of medical architecture, considering in particular the
influence of pop culture in the 1960s and ’70s on innovative, space-age hospital
design. He is an occasional art curator and published critic.
cLOcKWiSe FrOM aBOVe A BARE-BULB LIGHT FIxTURE wAS CUSTOM-DESIGNED
USING INExPENSIVE AND SECOND-HAND PARTS; A COST-EFFICIENT
LIGHTING STRATEGY ILLUMINATES THE wELL-BALANCED CIRCULAR THEATRE
SPACE; THE DARk wALLS AND CEILING PROVIDE A DEEPLY ABSORPTIVE
BACkDROP FOR THE ROUND BLACk COLUMNS IN THE LOBBY SPACE
THAT APPEAR TO FLOAT ABOVE THE POLISHED CONCRETE FLOOR.
p13-17 Dolbeau.indd 17 6/12/09 10:50:14 AM
18 canadian architect 06/09
core identity
two corporate offices in downtown
toronto reassert their respective identities
through newly redesigned interior spaces.
proJect Agnico-EAglE MinEs officEs, ToronTo, onTArio
architect TAylor sMyTh ArchiTEcTs
proJect Torys llP lAw officEs, ToronTo, onTArio
architect KuwAbArA PAynE McKEnnA bluMbErg ArchiTEcTs
teXt lEsliE JEn
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06/09 canadian architect 19
In recent years, there has been an increasing
level of sophistication apparent in the creation of
a public image that positively reflects the values
and interests of businesses in the corporate and
commercial sector. Integral to this exercise in
corporate identity and branding is the physical
design of a company’s office space, and the
message it delivers to its employees, clients, and
the population at large. Here, two businesses—an
international mining company and a large
corporate law firm—have undertaken major
redesigns of their office spaces to accommodate
current functions but also to communicate and
clarify not only who they are, but what they do
and how they do it.
In this era of heightened environmental
awareness, mining is frequently viewed as a
nasty, ugly business dedicated to the extraction
and depletion of the earth’s resources. However,
Taylor Smyth Architects have attempted to
mitigate that reputation through the creation of a
subtly elegant head office for Agnico-Eagle
Mines in Toronto. Gold and gold-mining
operations are the focus of the company, with
exploration and development concentrated in
Quebec, Finland, Mexico and the US.
The Toronto headquarters occupies the top two
floors of a five-storey building located just east of
the financial core of downtown Toronto, enjoying
privileged views of St. James Cathedral and the
OPPOSite Variegated colours and patterns characterize these split stone cores—rem-
nants of the mining extraction process—which are put to good use in this expres-
siVe feature wall. tOP defining one wall of the reception area, horizontally grained
traVertine slabs are interspersed with the occasional strip of gold-coloured alum-
inum, eVoking stratified geological layers of the earth. the frosted glass behind the
display case permits shadowy glimpses of employees in the corridor behind. aBOVe con-
tained within a wood-framed transparent acrylic screen, striking photographic
images of miners at work are featured prominently in the fourth-floor lunchroom.
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p18-23 Core.indd 19 6/12/09 10:51:42 AM
20 canadian architect 06/09
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peaceful park surrounding it. The design of the
space concentrates the primary offices and a huge
boardroom on the penthouse level, and offices on
both floors enjoy generous amounts of outdoor
terrace space.
Both literal and metaphorical allusions to
mining and geological exploration are ever-
present. As such, material selections include
plenty of stone: travertine sheathes entire walls
and limestone is used for flooring. Accented by
strips of gold-coloured aluminum, a massive
travertine wall rises two storeys from the fourth-
floor reception area to the fifth floor, wrapping
around an open stair. Contained within this wall
is a display case that showcases raw samples of
gold ore, the focus of Agnico-Eagle’s business.
Literal imagery is also incorporated into the
office design. In the fourth-floor lunchroom, a
seating area is separated from the corridor by a
cherry wood-framed screen, into which clear
acrylic screens are placed. Transferred onto these
tOP The boardroom door is adorned by a floor-To-ceiling luminous backliT panel of
TranslucenT sTone. aBOVe a display case is seT inTo The sTriking TraverTine wall in The
recepTion area, showcasing raw samples of gold ore.
client agnico-eagle mines
architect team michael Taylor, brian harmer, pochi lu, Joanne
pukier
Structural read Jones chrisToffersen
mechanical Toews engineering inc.
electrical ianuzziello & associaTes inc.
interiOrS Taylor smyTh archiTecTs
art cOnSultant darren alexander
aV cOnSultant avw-Telav
cOntractOr maranT consTrucTion
GrOund FlOOr area 1,500 m
2

BudGet $1.74 m
cOmPletiOn december 2007
1 recepTion
2 office
3 worksTaTion
4 map room
5 meeTing room
FiFth FlOOr
FOurth FlOOr
6 lounge/kiTchen
7 Terrace
8 sTair
9 elevaTor
10 washroom
1 elevaTor/lobby
2 office
3 worksTaTion
4 servery
5 meeTing room
6 break-ouT area
7 Terrace
8 sTair
9 elevaTor
10 washroom
11 boardroom
12 supply/copy
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06/09 canadian architect 21
screens is an enlarged black-and-white photo-
graphic image of miners at work, discovered in
Agnico-Eagle’s archives. The transparency allows
views of movement and activity behind the
screens, and the effect is striking.
But most compelling is the incorporation of
actual byproducts from the mining process into
the design of the office. Core samples of beauti-
fully patterned and textured stone have been used
to create a feature wall in the reception area.
Extracted from bore holes drilled during mining
investigations, these split stone cores would
otherwise be disposed of, but were meticulously
arranged in a vertical sequence of slender
columns by the architectural team, who also re-
tained the hand-drawn chalk marks on the stone
as a record of the mining industry process. Visu-
ally arresting, this wall offers one of the most
poetic memories of the office.
The Toronto-Dominion Centre has long been
established as the financial heart of the country
and one of Canada’s architectural icons. Com-
prised of six office towers and a low-rise banking
pavilion, the TD complex is best known for its
Mies van der Rohe design, the commission of
which we are forever indebted to Phyllis Lam-
bert. Though Mies (along with Bregman +
Hamann and John B. Parkin Associates) was
responsible only for the design of the plaza, the
banking pavilion, the original TD Bank Tower
(1967) and the Royal Trust Tower (1969), over
the next two decades, the remaining four build-
ings were designed to be harmoniously consis-
tent with their older siblings.
Within this prestigious complex, Torys LLP
occupies 10 floors in the 36-storey TD Water-
house Tower (1985) on the south side of
Wellington Street across the road from Mies’
original TD Bank Tower. Torys is a massive
business and commercial law firm with offices in
Toronto and New York, and with an impending
lease expiration, debated on whether to move
entirely or to conduct a substantial renovation to
its existing space to better meet the firm’s spatial
tOP The vasT and spacious recepTion area of The Torys office on The 33rd floor, where
compelling arTwork compeTes wiTh specTacular views of lake onTario. aBOVe pascal
grandmaison’s compeTiTion-winning phoTographic sTudy of an androgynous
model covers an enTire wall in The norTh mulTi-conference room.
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22 canadian architect 06/09
requirements—and, more importantly, to refresh
its identity and reputation for contemporary
leadership and innovative spirit. After an
extensive study was conducted with selected firm
Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects
(KPMB), the choice was ultimately made to stay
put and renovate. The scope of the project was
more or less confined to a complete overhaul of
the 32nd and 33rd floors, each ringing in at
30,000 square feet.
Revealing the characteristically understated
good taste of KPMB, the redesign is in keeping
with the generally staid conservatism of a law
firm and also the gorgeously ascetic restraint of
Mies' original vision. A neutral colour and
material palette of dark walnut floors and mill­
work, fumed oak, marble slab, bronze accents,
glass, and matte white walls provides the perfect
backdrop for an impressive art collection, and to
better accept magnificent views of the lake and
the city along with abundant natural daylight.
By consolidating all client functions on the
33rd floor and one­third of the 32nd floor, the
firm was able to eliminate redundancies and
“demonstrate its commitment to providing a high
level of client service.” Two impressively scaled
conference spaces occupy prime real estate on
the 33rd floor. A north­facing multi­conference
“room” can be divided into as many as five
separate spaces through articulated partition
walls that fold up into the ceiling. Moreover, this
space enjoys views of Mies’ darkly austere TD
Tower across the street. Divisible into four
separate spaces, the opposite conference suite
occupies the southwest corner of the 33rd floor,
capturing glorious views of Lake Ontario.
The conventional image of a law firm as an old
boys’ club of tufted leather sofas, stinky cigars,
16­hour workdays and an insatiable appetite for
billable hours is blown away here, for one could
mistake the 33rd floor for a cool, contemporary
art gallery. Torys has a long history of collecting
art which began in the 1970s, but which really
accelerated in the mid­’90s when they retained
the services of art consultant Fela Grunwald. The
firm communicates its progressive culture and
creatively innovative approach to the practice of
law through the acquisition and display of art and
through its support of artists.
Consequently, the firm now owns over 400
pieces of cutting­edge contemporary Canadian
tOP LeFt The corridor TerminaTes in a spec-
Tacular floor-To-ceiling view of The firsT
building compleTed in The ToronTo-
dominion cenTre complex—The mies van
der rohe-designed Td bank Tower (1967).
The provision of seaTing offers lawyers
a poeTic place of respiTe for reflecTion
or informal meeTings. LeFt The sculpTural
solidiTy of The sTaircase forms a focal
poinT in The secondary recepTion area
on The 32nd floor.
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06/09 canadian architect 23
1
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0 50’
North multi-coNfereNce room
South multi-coNfereNce room
clieNt ZoNe
PartNer/aSSociate officeS
art Gallery/hall
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South multi-coNfereNce room
clieNt ZoNe
PartNer/aSSociate officeS
art Gallery/hall
art, much of which hangs on the walls of the
lengthy corridors which form deliberately con­
tinuous loops of circulation. These white­walled
corridors were designed extra­wide to provide
the requisite distance from which to view the art,
which further amplifies the gallery feel. Compris­
ing all scales and types, the pieces hang at con­
tinuous intervals down the corridors, forming a
pleasing rhythm as one moves through the space.
Capitalizing upon the role of art in the firm’s
identity, the renovation project presented an
opportunity to commission fresh contemporary
Canadian artwork to help define and embellish
the folding partition walls in the aforementioned
conference spaces. From submissions by five
invited artists, pieces by Montreal­based Pascal
Grandmaison and Toronto resident Robert Fones
were selected. Grandmaison’s massively scaled
close­up photographs of an androgynous face are
utterly captivating in the north conference area,
and one doesn’t know where to look: the photos
or the fabulous view of the Mies tower to the
north? In the south­facing conference zone,
Fones adapts text from Miguel de Cervantes’ Don
Quixote and renders it in barely legible script,
superimposing it over photographic images of a
blue, blue Lake Ontario, echoing the exhilarating
views of the same lake at the city’s edge below.
Clearly, it is no longer sufficient to hire an
architect to just design a nice office. The de­
mands being made on design firms require a
clear understanding and articulation of what the
client represents and what that client chooses to
communicate. The design for Agnico­Eagle
Mines is very clear about tangibly referencing
what the company’s business is all about. In the
Torys office, while the design is less literal, it
does an excellent job of conveying the ideology of
the firm, its process, and its identity. ca
tOP StaircaSeS link the main client-focuSed floor to the more utilitarian Practice
floorS below on which lawyerS’ officeS are located. aBOVe eroding the SharP corner
of the client dining room, Sliding doorS eaSily diSaPPear into wall PocketS, enabling
a greater aPPreciation of the art lining the corridor wallS.
client toryS llP
architect team marianne mckenna, Steven caSey, george
bizioS, rita kiriakiS, gary yen, thom Seto, JoSe emilia, lilly liaukuS,
Jill greaveS
Structural halcrow yolleS
mechanical andronowSki & aSSociateS
electrical Stantec engineering inc.
cOSt cOnSultant curran mccabe ravindran roSS
acOuStical cOnSultant aercouSticS engineering ltd.
aV cOnSultant weStbury
art cOnSultant fela grunwald fine artS
lighting Suzanne Powadiuk deSign
cOntractOr rae brotherS limited
grOund FlOOr area 180,000 ft
2

Budget withheld
cOmPletiOn auguSt 2008
33rd FlOOr
1 elevator lobby
2 recePtion
3 caucuS
4 boardroom
5 kitchen/Servery
6 cloakroom
7 Storage
8 dining
9 dedicated video
conferencing
32nd FlOOr
North multi-coNfereNce room
South multi-coNfereNce room
clieNt ZoNe
PartNer/aSSociate officeS
art Gallery/hall
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p18-23 Core.indd 23 6/12/09 10:53:36 AM
24 canadian architect 06/09
Roundtable Session
Week 1&2
Roundtable Session
Week 5&7
Roundtable Session
Week 9&11
Holistic Project Delivery
Approval
Week 2&4
Problem-Solving
Questions
BIM
Session
1&2
Pre-Design
Session
3&4
Session
5&6
Approval
Week 6&8
Problem-Solving
Questions
BIM
Approval
Working
Drawings
Practice
aBOVe Using a holistic project delivery method, problem-solving qUestions are defined
at the oUtset, making discUssions with planning and permitting aUthorities more effi-
cient. additionally, there is a more eqUitable negotiation process jUst prior to the
approvals and working drawings stages.
a hOlistic aPPrOach
a vancoUver-based architect is helping to
develop a streamlined project management
process known as the holistic project
delivery method.
teXt robert billard
In recent years, there has been a push for sustain­
able initiatives through measurement tools such
as Green Globes and LEED. However, using a
version of the Integrated Design Process (IDP)
has reduced many of these strategies to mere
buzzwords and marketing tools.
To some, current approaches to the IDP­inten­
sive process can have a single­minded focus on
LEED or other green initiatives. Unfortunately, it
is incorrect to suggest that IDP emerged as a res­
ponse to programs like LEED. The IDP approach
has been around for much longer and has at least
partly contributed to many successful non­com­
petitive design­build projects, especially in the
private sector.
Being green is only one part of the goal of a
successful project. The evolution in thinking
about ecological and sociological issues as a neces­
sary component to the health of our built environ­
ment has developers and designers needing to
increasingly address a Triple Bottom Line (i.e.,
measuring economic, ecological and social suc­
cess) approach.
In and of itself, focusing solely on LEED or
other green measurement tools is neither an in­
tegrated nor a holistic approach to a client’s
needs. Alternatively, the IDP promotional mate­
rials infrequently deal with issues of schedules
and budgets. Certainly, being sustainable has a
far broader definition than simply being green.
What appears to be missing from many IDP in­
itiatives is an actual plan—a strong set of objec­
tives and a firm schedule. Each version of the IDP
offers either highly complex or overly simplistic
bubble diagrams in an attempt to fit within the
traditional phases of a project, but rarely a sched­
ule and a process flow.
To address these issues, KMBR Architects
Planners Inc. have developed the Holistic Project
Delivery (HPD) method. At the root of our con­
cern, we noticed that processes developed for
IDP could benefit from the the application of a
workflow management process originally devel­
oped by Toyota that considers the expenditure of
resources for any goal other than the creation of
value for the end customer to be wasteful. Known
as the “Lean” process, its methodology was de­
signed to distill the essence of management deci­
sions and reduce ineffective time management.
Its implementation focuses on getting the right
things to the right place at the right time in the
right quantity to achieve optimum workflow
while minimizing waste and maximizing both
flexibility and adaptability. In architecture, a
wasteful expenditure of resources often amounts
to time lost in circuitous and elaborate lines of
communication where internal teams are too
large, meetings are ineffective, and there is a lack
of strict control over the outcomes and schedul­
ing of these meetings. Using Lean principles with
HPD seeks to streamline these things and get
people to focus on their goals.
What is hPd?
With HPD, many basic concepts of IDP are in­
cluded; however, the key is the provision of a
“how” along with a clearer vision for the design
workflow process. It is founded in a strict objec­
tive­based process led by the project schedule
and physical deliverables. It incorporates green
initiatives such as LEED but is not led solely by
them. The intent is to approach the project from
as many sides with as many minds as possible to
ensure as holistic an outcome as possible. HPD
can be adapted to any project but used in its pur­
est form, it results in a significant departure
from the traditional schedule and phased project
delivery method.
how hPd Works
Traditionally, the design of a project is broken
down into distinct phases: Schematic Design,
p24-25 Practice.indd 24 6/12/09 10:55:31 AM
06/09 canadian architect 25
Individual Design Objective
HPD Coordinator
Objective-Based Design Team
Solution Option(s)
All Design
Team Viability
Review
HPD
Coordinator
HPD Coordinator
HPD Coordinator
DESIGN OBJECTIVE PROCESS FLOW
HPD
Session
ACCEPT REJECT
HPD
Session
UNRESOLVABLE
R
E
S
O
L
V
A
B
L
E
Decision Point
Design Development, and Working Drawings.
Through a pre-determined, strictly scheduled
and coordinated number of sessions, along with
well-directed Objective-Based Design Groups
(OBDG) between the sessions, the HPD method
seeks to blur and compress these phases by work-
ing at the micro and macro levels of design simul-
taneously. For example, issues such as orienta-
tion, programming and massing are intrinsically
linked to choices in image, traffic flow, material,
planting, energy use, and systems.
Why hPd Works
By continuously moving back and forth from the
micro to the macro in what would normally be the
schematic design phase helps to limit the num-
ber of unresolved issues which contribute to er-
rors or omissions that can be costly in the grand-
est phase of all—construction. HPD provides a
crystallization of the design prior to assembling
the construction documentation in the same way
as the traditional schedule allows, but in a faster
and more fluid manner while maintaining a strict
adherence to the process laid out at the begin-
ning of the project.
The time between sessions is used to develop
solutions to the next set or layer of program re-
quirements. The Objective-Based Design Groups
(OBDGs) are charged with the responsibility to
return with solutions to the project’s goals and
deliverables. These solutions will range from how
to obtain a particular LEED point to meeting a
client’s budget constraints to what type of struc-
ture to employ. Through strong skills in the areas
of project management and organization, the
HPD Coordinator is tasked with ensuring that
these solutions, and possibly divergent interest
groups such as the client and the community, are
coordinated and brought to the session table.
HPD sessions are similar to the wrap-up sec-
tions of a typical design charrette. At the session,
information from the Objective-Based Design
Groups is presented and the preferred option is
selected. This is accomplished through the facili-
tation of an experienced HPD Coordinator. Em-
phasis is placed on using the sessions to make
decisions. Minutes of these sessions are pre-
dominantly documentation of these design deci-
sions, and written acceptance of the minutes is
strictly required.
Including the client’s groups and authorities in
the OBDGs and the sessions serves to negate the
traditional phases, where typically there are a
series of periodic owner’s reviews and official
approvals that break the step of the project and
distort the logical continuity of the developing
design. In HPD, the approvals process happens at
the sessions. Buy-in by all relevant parties is in-
tegrated, immediate and informed.
When hPd Works
HPD fosters a more fluid way of conducting the
design meetings. The issues and goals are
brought forth and tackled by all, regardless of
discipline, but held in check by the HPD Coordi-
nator. For example, the choice of glazing will af-
fect not only the energy efficiency of the HVAC
system but the aesthetics, daylighting, glare, secu-
rity, orientation, landscaping and user schedul-
ing. The HPD Coordinator must keep his finger
on the pulse of the project at all times.
We have found that a strictly coordinated and
focused team can deliver a complex project in
roughly six to nine sessions over a period of 12 to
18 weeks and at that point move seamlessly into
construction documentation. Having team mem-
bers at the sessions with approval authority is
crucial in compressing the schedule in this man-
ner. For example, a recent school project bene-
fited from having a member of the British Col-
umbia Ministry of Education at the sessions and
the schedule was dramatically compressed. Hav-
ing been a part of the design process, the Minis-
try was able to approve the project much faster to
avoid significant delays based upon traditional
review periods.
The use of a Building Information Modelling
(BIM) tool, such as Revit, is also integral to HPD.
Using a three-dimensional design tool to its full-
est potential provides a fundamental change in
the way the design team functions. BIM offers the
client a fast and dynamic means to understand
the project rather than otherwise complicated
and static two-dimensional drawings. BIM also
provides an integrated and swift ability to change,
quantify and coordinate various building com-
ponents.
In addition, in the old model of project deliv-
ery, senior members with a wealth of experience
rely on junior members to implement ideas, cre-
ating a “delay” in the realization of a solution.
Using BIM brings the tools back into the hands of
senior designers and offers earlier results. Con-
cepts are input into the design in real time, cut-
ting out the inefficiency of “middle-men” com-
munication such as between the senior architect
and the junior architect/designer and then the
architectural technologist. For architects, there is
a significant amount of time and money spent on
meetings and drawing coordination, to name two
examples. While the HPD members’ individual
hourly rates increase, the effectiveness of their
input and the reduction in implementation time
results in a net gain.
There are many other aspects of HPD that
serve to provide the client and the project with
tangible benefits in areas such as program, sus-
tainability, operations and maintenance. How-
ever, at the heart of every project are the simple
matters of schedule and budget. Approaching the
solution holistically from all angles simultan-
eously and with a strict process not only provides
the best solution for the client but also works to
meet the goals of time and cost.
As the economy continues to challenge the in-
dustry, clients are becoming savvy in their under-
standing of the architectural process. Providing a
clear plan and method that addresses their goals
on a holistic level—and not simply providing lip
service to an integrated design process or essen-
tial sustainable design strategy—will benefit every-
one. In architecture, it is obvious why we need an
integrated design approach. With the HPD meth-
od, we also have the how. ca
Robert Billard is an architect specializing in educa-
tional and sustainable projects across Canada. He
developed the HPD method with KMBR Architects
Planners Inc. in Vancouver.
p24-25 Practice.indd 25 6/12/09 10:55:51 AM
26 canadian architect 06/09
review
carrot city
A recent visit to the Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto convinced me that
the ideas and theories pertaining to sustainable design in the urban context
are continuing to be realized. This former Don Valley industrial site is cur-
rently transforming into an extraordinary place where gardening and food
production is being put into practice, right in the middle of the city. Could
the future of architecture actually see effective strategies for enabling food
production incorporated into mainstream design proposals?
Based on current population growth estimates, our planet’s human popu-
lation is expected to reach 9 billion by 2040. The recognition of environ-
mental degradation within our cities has motivated many researchers, en-
vironmentalists and designers to consider relocating food-producing
entities to serve our urban populations more effectively. With the constant
influx of people into urban areas, the need for fresh, accessible and safe
food supplies has never been more critical. These concerns have inspired
the implementation of innovative ideas relating to urban agriculture across
both the developed and developing world. The desire to locate food produc-
tion within the city comes from the simple need to access nutritious prod-
ucts easily while mitigating costs associated with transporting the food we
eat. Unfortunately, farming in cities—or “urban agriculture”—is often
viewed as a problem for municipalities rather than as a solution to making
them more self-reliant in sourcing food. These problems include limited
space devoted to agriculture, resistance by some landowners or businesses
in the community, and a general lack of infrastructure and financing to sup-
port local food production and distribution. How can architecture help?
Carrot City, an exhibition held at Toronto’s Design Exchange this past
spring, was devoted entirely to the subject of urban agriculture and how de-
sign professionals might play a role in improving the local production of
food in urban areas while examining its impact on the design of urban
spaces and buildings. Included in the exhibition were numerous projects
from cities such as Toronto, Vancouver, Inuvik, New York, London and Syd-
ney. One of the curatorial directors of the exhibition, June Komisar, de-
scribes the process as a collaborative journey in which students, designers
and architects explored ideas from Canada and around the world that pro-
mote the practical adoption of current urban agricultural best practices and
thinking. The curators behind Carrot City—Mark Gorgolewski, Joe Nasr and
Komisar—have collaborated with their students at Ryerson University to de-
velop an exhibition that addressed possible solutions on four different
scales: City, Community, Home, and Products. Carrot City imagines a future
where fruit, vegetables and livestock are raised and distributed in urban
areas by utilizing greenhouse-growing methods and recycled resources
year-round to provide greater food security for urban dwellers.
The exhibition proposed a number of architectural concepts that incor-
porate food-growing techniques, such as new water management technolo-
gies and effectively orienting a building on its site. The following discussion
provides a brief explanation of some of the ideas contained in the exhib-
ition’s four scales.
city
Cities depend on a continuously operating transportation infrastructure to
deliver a constant food supply. If this infrastructure shuts down, the city
will run out of food in a matter of days. Therefore, it is essential to imple-
ment urban agriculture programs into planning, architecture and land-
scape design early in the development process and over a long period of
time. The transformation of our urban spaces into green and fertile en-
vironments can also mean new urban design possibilities. Underused
spaces such as high-rise towers, public parks, schoolyards, and even lane-
ways can become locations where food is locally produced. Strategies that
introduce agriculture on the vertical surfaces of residential and commer-
cial towers are but one example of improving a building’s thermal proper-
ties and increasing the potential for greater local food production. An ex-
ample of bringing urban agriculture to existing high-rise towers comprises
part of the Tower Renewal Project, an initiative led by Graeme Stewart of
the Toronto-based firm of E.R.A. Architects that hopes to reduce the eco-
logical footprint of aging concrete residential towers by recladding them
with more energy-efficient building materials. Introducing urban agricul-
A recent exhibition At toronto’s Design exchAnge presenteD A
cross-section of current iDeAs AssociAteD with urbAn Agriculture.
teXt sAnAm sAmAniAn
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p26-28 Review.indd 26 6/12/09 10:56:31 AM
06/09 canadian architect 27
ture into the reskinning of existing concrete towers further enhances their
sustainability quotient.
community
Local food production also has the potential to strengthen community. Car-
rot City clearly illustrates that spaces such as barns or schoolyards can also
be used as local community food centres, not just as facilities to improve the
social dynamism amongst neighbours. Facilitated through a grassroots
community education program, locally grown food can enhance our social
and economic lifestyle while having a positive impact on our health and en-
vironment. For example, community-building educational initiatives and
back-to-work programs using urban agriculture as an economic generator
OPPOSite As pArt of the MAyor’s tower renewAl proposAl, under-
utilized open spAce surrounding suburbAn residentiAl towers
could be trAnsforMed into fArMlAnd. aBOVe Also included in
the MAyor’s tower renewAl initiAtive, creAting fArMers’ MAr-
kets At the bAse of ApArtMent towers is An effective And
Accessible wAy to bring AffordAble fresh fruit And vegetAbles
to locAl residents. BOttOM, LeFt and MiddLe work Architecture coM-
pAny’s public fArM 1 hAs trAnsforMed sections of cArdboArd
tubes into plAnters for vegetAbles, herbs And fruit. BOttOM riGht
under the guidAnce of edible estAtes, A non-profit devoted to
proMoting locAl food production, tenAnts of this ApArtMent
coMplex Are Able to grow soMe of their own vegetAbles.
is what the Artscape Wychwood Barns project in Toronto has done to
strengthen its local community. Combining arts and environmental organ-
izations into a single creative space supporting community engagement
through education and food production, the success of Wychwood Barns
relies upon the collaboration between Artscape and the Stop Community
Food Centre—two non-profit organizations with a vision for sustainable re-
generation. The project embraces sustainable design by responding to the
issues of water conservation, reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and
brownfield redevelopment. This is largely being achieved through educa-
tional programs centred on environmental issues as well as through the
creation of a food centre and community greenhouses where residents are
able to grow their own food.
home and Work
Turning lawns, roofs and backyards into a productive landscape of vege-
tables, fruits and herbs will allow hotels, restaurants and individuals direct
access to fresh produce. By applying these ideas to the design of these res-
taurants, hotels, condos, and residential neighbourhoods, a direct rela-
tionship can be established between food production and consumption.
An example of this approach is Fritz Haeg’s Edible Estates food education
program in North America, which has managed to highlight the strong
connection between the sources of our food and the natural environment.
In Southwark, London, Haeg went so far as to fertilize the ornamental
g
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fritz hAeg dAn wood/work Architecture group dAn wood/work Architecture group
p26-28 Review.indd 27 6/12/09 10:56:52 AM
28 canadian architect 06/09
aBOVe artisanal baked goods are sold
in a local fresh food market. tOP riGht
toronto’s WychWood barns has
brought a farmers’ market to an area
of toronto that previously had none.
aBOVe riGht the popularity of neighbour-
hood baking ovens Was one of the
inspirational legacies of Jane Jacobs
that increased the community’s con-
nection to food production.
but impractical front lawn of a social-housing
estate, transforming it into productive working
gardens where residents have established a
food-growing cooperative. This simple farming
idea has the potential to be implemented for
single-family residences, roof gardens, school-
yards, parks, and public spaces—in just about
any city imaginable.
Products
Throughout the exhibition, several objects, tech-
nologies, systems and components were exhibit-
ed to illustrate the potential to increase local food
production in urban locations and buildings.
Often involving small-scale solutions, many
ideas and schemes appear to foster urban agri-
culture, such as Public Farm 1, designed by
WORK Architecture and Elodie Blanchard. Here,
folded planes made from cardboard tubes be-
come planters for vegetables, herbs and fruit.
This system can also be compartmentalized into
small sections to facilitate its transport, which
also enables rapid assembly and usage on various
sites.
Carrot City promises the landscape of our fu-
ture cities to be a productive one, offering a pos-
sible solution to the challenge of increasing
urban agricultural production. Now is the time
for architects and designers to consciously ad-
dress these issues and incorporate them into
their designs to ensure a healthier and more sus-
tainable future. ca
A graduate architect from Ryerson University, Sanam
Samanian has been participating in a variety of
architectural research projects. She has worked for
several architecture firms and is currently working
with the Black Pen Group Inc.
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p26-28 Review.indd 28 6/12/09 10:57:29 AM
06/09 canadian architect 29
Product ShowcaSe calendar
EXTENSIONS
May 15-June 26, 2009 This exhibition
at the Japanese Canadian Cultural
Centre examines the relationships
between a family, the physical con­
struction of a home and the pastoral
landscape of Ontario. The exhibition
is composed of a 1:1 installation of
the Knoxville House in Port Hope,
Ontario, designed by Toronto intern
architect Haji Nakamura, and in­
cludes notebooks, models and proto­
types.
Speed Limits
May 20-October 12, 2009 This exhib­
ition at the Canadian Centre for
Architecture in Montreal addresses
the pivotal role played by speed in
modern life: from art to architecture
and urbanism to graphics and de­
sign to economics to the material
culture of the eras of industry and
information. It marks the centenary
of the foundation of the Italian
Futurist movement, whose inaugural
manifesto famously proclaimed
“that the world’s magnificence has
been enriched by a new beauty: the
beauty of speed.”
www.cca.qc.ca
Eric Owen Moss Architects:
If Not Now, When?
May 29-September 13, 2009 This ex­
hibition at the SCI­Arc Gallery in
Los Angeles features an installation
by Eric Owen Moss Architects,
which is comprised of an aluminum
structure hanging from the gallery
ceiling, wrapped variously with ser­
pentining aluminum ribbons.
www.sciarc.edu
Twenty and Change
June 3-July 5, 2009 This biennial exhi­
bition series is dedicated to profil­
ing emerging designers working in
architecture, landscape and urban
design who have yet to receive wide­
spread public and media attention
for their speculative or completed
work. Canada has a rich community
of young designers who are redefin­
ing the limits of their discipline,
setting a new agenda for our social
and physical environment. Working
in a wide range of scales and across
diverse interests, the collection of
works rethinks ideas of materiality,
domesticity, public space, land­
scape, and infrastructure.
www.twentyandchange.org
Making Modern
June 13-July 25, 2009 Showcasing de­
sign from the School of the Art Insti­
tute of Chicago’s (SAIC) department
of Architecture, Interior Architec­
ture, and Designed Objects (AIADO),
this exhibition brings together work
by recent AIADO graduate students
in the department’s inaugural mas­
ter’s thesis exhibition. Making Mod-
ern will showcase buildings, objects,
and systems where humans are part
of the globe’s many entwined layers.
www.saic.edu

Future of canada’s infra­
structure Summit
June 24-25, 2009 Taking place at the
Holiday Inn Select in Toronto, this
conference will enable attendees to
capitalize on infrastructure spend­
ing, stimulate economic recovery, en­
hance environmental sustainability,
assure accountability and transpar­
ency, manage risk, attain greener
energy, build strategic partnerships,
and measure the performance of
suppliers and vendors.
www.strategyinstitute.com
BoMa international conference
and the office Building Show
June 28-30, 2009 Commercial real
estate professionals need the strat­
egies and solutions to prosper in a
down economy, attract and retain
tenants, reduce operating expenses,
negotiate more profitable leases,
achieve sustainability, keep build­
ings and tenants safe, and make
sound financial decisions that create
value. This dual event is the place to
learn the strategies and build the
relationships needed to achieve
operational excellence and sustain
business through this challenging
market cycle.
www.boma.org
For more inFormation about
these, and additional list-
ings oF Canadian and inter-
national events, please visit
www.canadianarchitect.com
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p29 Calendar&Showcase.indd 29 6/12/09 10:58:07 AM
30 canadian architect 06/09
Backpage
LeFt windows and cutouts provide privi­
leged views of the expansive prairie land­
scape of saskatchewan. BeLOW LeFt the
stucco­clad straw bale observatory.
cUBic eQUatiOn
atop a hill overlooking flying creek valley,
the straw bale observatory provides a spec­
tacular experiential retreat.
teXt + phOtOS dennis evans
ior dimensions are approximately nine feet
cubed. The exterior is clad in stucco while the in-
terior is detailed with hand-finished plastered
walls and ceiling. The floor is wood. The four
walls have two-foot square openings with cardin-
al direction alignment. These openings, along
with an additional elliptical cutout in the ceiling,
allow for the passage of light, sound, air and
weather. They also serve as viewfinders for mak-
ing photographs of the landscape.
Observatories for the practice of measuring
light movement are universal and ancient. The
Kogi, native to the Northern Columbian High-
lands, are but one of many cultures that still em-
brace direct observation of the natural environ-
ment to inform their codes for meaningful and
responsible living. As part of their nature-based
aesthetics, the Kogi build temples to watch the
sun “weave” its pattern of time across the
ground. These rituals of observation and reading
light ensure continued contact with their life
source and provide a means for expanding the
perception of reality. For them, light is the med-
ium. Creating the Straw Bale Observatory brings
these ancient Kogi principles into a dialogue with
the Prairie landscape and lifeworld—a place res-
onant with its own history of First Nations’ cul-
tures and their articulation of the connections
between art, nature, spirituality, and healing
practices. By using ancient models of observation
and contemplation, the intent is to add a con-
temporary dimension to this profound cultural
practice.
As a means to construct order around us, this
project is a system of inquiry linking ancient
principles and practices with present dialogue to
facilitate new modes of perception, communica-
tion, and social interaction for a contemporary
audience. ca
Dennis Evans is Professor Emeritus at the University
of Regina. The Straw Bale Observatory project has
stimulated sky/light investigations in Tibet, Mongolia
and Ladakh. Flying Creek Valley was documented as
part of the television series Landscape As Muse and
was featured on the SCN and Bravo television net-
works.
the impetus for building the observatory and
using it for image-based investigations. Located
at Flying Creek Valley near Craven, the Straw Bale
Observatory provides a platform for the docu-
mentation of light quality, movement and reflec-
tion. As a site-specific work, the structure facili-
tates the recording of light phenomena.
The exterior dimensions of the blocky struc-
ture are roughly 12 feet cubed, but the consider-
able thickness of the walls means that the inter-
The Saskatchewan Prairies’ low, flat horizon en-
courages one to pay attention to the enormous
blue sky. Because of its vastness, one cannot es-
cape the clear intense light. This recognition is
p30 BackPage.indd 30 6/12/09 10:58:32 AM
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