championnewspaper championnewspaper champnewspaper championnews

thechampionnewspaper.com
FRIDAY, OCT. 10, 2014 • VOL. 17, NO. 29 • FREE
• A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS • Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.
FREEPRESS
See Wilson on page 15A
See Ellis on page 15A
DeKalb County District Attorney Robert James tells jurors that the case against indicted county CEO Burrell Ellis is about “pub-
lic corruption.” Photo by Andrew Cauthen
Decatur resident wants to be children’s chief advocate
Valarie Wilson, former Decatur school board member, said more money is needed
for public education. Photo by Christopher T Martin
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
F
ormer City Schools of
Decatur school board
member Valarie Wilson
said she feels “compelled”
to run for the state school board
superintendent position.
“While on our [local school]
board, I was consistently
disappointed at what I felt like was
a consistent defunding…of public
education,” Wilson said. “Every
year from the time I started serving,
there was more and more and more
that was being taken away as it
related to funding, but more and
more requirements or mandates that
we [had] to deal with.”
When she became president
of the Georgia School Board
Association, Wilson interacted with
districts outside of Decatur and saw
“the struggles that they were having,
particularly in some of our rural
areas,” she said.
“It was difcult,” Wilson
said. “You can’t see that level of
devastation… and not be moved to
try to make and impact.”
If elected, “the frst thing that
I would like to do is to restore the
budget and bring the budget current
to the needs in the state of Georgia
for our public education system,”
Wilson said.
“A lot of people say that I focus
a lot on funding, and I do,” she said.
“If they travel this state and they saw
what was happening throughout
this state, they would stop saying
that.”
Wilson said there are school
districts “that can’t have their
schools open for the mandated 180
days because they don’t have the
resources to do it.
“We need to make sure that we
are appropriately funding public
education so that we can stop
these furloughs [and] we can stop
overcrowding classes,” she said.
“Districts don’t have enough
money to do the things that
they need to do,” Wilson said,
“so funding is critical. I want to
make sure that we are sensitizing
Ellis’ fate in jury’s hands
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
A
fer three weeks of
testimony, the fate of
suspended DeKalb County
CEO Burrell Ellis is in
the hands of a jury comprised of a
dozen of his constituents.
Closing arguments were heard
Oct. 6 in the trial of Ellis, who
is facing four counts of criminal
attempt to commit thef by
extortion; three counts of thef
by taking; two counts of criminal
attempt to commit false statements
and writings; three counts of
coercion of other employees to
give anything of value for political
purposes; one count of conspiracy
in restraint of free and open
competition; and one count of
conspiracy to defraud a political
subdivision.
A key strategy during the closing
arguments by attorneys for indicted
Ellis was to attempt to discredit the
testimony of the state’s key witness.
Defense attorney Dwight
Tomas told jurors that they
“should not believe a single word
out of [Kelvin Walton’s] mouth.
Walton is the suspended chief
procurement ofcer who has
admitted to perjuring himself before
a special grand jury.
“‘I did a lot of wrong but I did it
with the CEO,’” Tomas said.’ “Tat
was the frst thing that came out of
Education .............. 18-19A
Business ........................20A
Sports ...................... 22-24A
Opinion ........................... 5A
Classifed .......................21A
QUICK FINDER
LOCAL, 11A LOCAL, 3A
MAKER FAIRE
CELEBRATES
INNOVATION AND TECH
AVONDALE ESTATES
MAYOR RESIGNS
BUSINESS, 20A
NEW CHAMBER LEADER
SAYS COUNTY IS OPEN
FOR BUSINESS
Page 2A The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014

LOCAL
See Simpson on page 6A
Towers’ principal journeys from remedial to remarkable
A BETTER WAY FORWARD
Launch your
educational future.
visit gpc.edu/secondhalf
It’s not too late to register or apply for second-half classes at Georgia Perimeter
College. You have until September 22 to submit all documents. Now’s your chance to
join more than 21,000 students who call GPC home.
Second-half fall classes start October 13, so what are you waiting for?
ChampionAd9-4.indd 1 8/25/14 3:06 PM
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
Dr. Ralph Simpson, principal
of Towers High School, said he is
“just blessed” to be named the 2014
principal of the year for the DeKalb
County School District.
“I am just amazed by [God’s]
grace because I would have never
imagined that I would be here at this
point…four years ago,” said Simp-
son, who was honored by the dis-
trict Sept. 27. He received a trophy,
plaque, laptop, printer, $1,000 and
a personal library from Scholastic
Books.
Four years ago, Simpson was in
trouble.
The Atlanta native’s first career
was in corrections. He worked in
Atlanta for a maximum security
prison, then in the jail system.
Simpson majored in criminal
justice at the University of West
Georgia, where he received his mas-
ter’s degree. He earned a doctorate
in educational leadership from Ar-
gosy University.
Simpson transitioned into edu-
cation, working as an elementary
and middle school teacher, and
middle school and high school as-
sistant principal. In 2000, he became
the principal at Stone Mountain
High School and in 2005 he was the
first principal at Miller Grove High
School. From there he was promot-
ed to assistant area superintendent
and then demoted to assistant prin-
cipal at Tucker High School.
In 2007, Simpson wrote a book
titled From Remedial To Remarkable,
in which he described his transfor-
mation from a remedial high school
student to an assistant area school
superintendent.
It was the sale of $13,000 of
the books in local schools that led
to his demotion in 2010 from the
district office back to an assistant
high school principal. The sale was
deemed a conflict of interest by
school officials.
The demotion and the journey
from that point, Simpson said, even-
tually worked to his benefit.
“Any time you experience some
challenges, initially the first thing
you want to ask yourself is ‘Why
me?’ or ‘Why did it happen to me?’”
Simpson said. “My faith in God is at
a point where I don’t look at it from
a perspective of what happened to
me. It’s more or less what happened
for me.
‘I am just amazed by
[God’s] grace because I
would have never imagined
that I would be here at this
point…four years ago.’
– Dr. Ralph Simpson, principal of Towers High School
Ralph Simpson, principal of Towers High School, said he is “humbled” and “amazed” to be named principal of the year by the
DeKalb County School District. Photo by Andrew Cauthen
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 3A
LOCAL
Avondale Estates mayor resigns
Ed Rieker
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Avondale Estate Mayor Ed
Rieker announced his resignation
Oct. 2.
In a message
sent through the
city hall news
email, Rieker said
he accepted a “pro-
fessional oppor-
tunity that will re-
quire a significant
amount of [his]
time and attention.
“Therefore, I am resigning as
mayor effective today. The city of
Avondale Estates and its residents
are unique, charming and vibrant.
It has been a privilege and honor to
volunteer and serve as your mayor,”
Rieker wrote.
According to reports, Rieker ac-
cepted a job at Emory University.
Rieker has been mayor for seven
years. He was first elected in 2007
and was reelected to a second term
in 2011.
Mayor Pro Tem Terry Giager
will act as the city’s mayor. Rieker
is still officially the mayor until the
city commission accepts the resig-
nation. City Manager Clai Brown
said he expects the commissioners
to meet soon to accept the resigna-
tion.
According to the city’s charter
on the process and timeline for fill-
ing the mayor’s vacancy, a special
election will be held to fill the posi-
tion. The city will hold the special
election March 17, 2015.
There are three or four dates per
year on which special elections are
allowed to be held. The city cannot
hold the election Nov. 4 because
state law requires at least 29 days
between the call of a special election
and election date.
To hold a special election on
Nov. 4, the city would have been
required to call a special election on
Oct. 3, which was impossible be-
cause the city commission must first
meet to accept Rieker’s resignation
and declare the position vacant.
The city will then notify the
county Board of Registration and
Elections of the vacancy, and the
county will issue the call for the spe-
cial election.
Rieker’s resignation came a day
after he apologized to residents at
an Oct. 1 meeting on how he and
the commission handled an annexa-
tion bill.
“I realized as mayor that I had
made a mistake,” he said to a packed
crowd. “I’ve been doing this for
seven years now. I’m learning all the
time and I’m sorry that I made mis-
takes. I’m doing my best.”
At a Sept. 22 meeting, residents
questioned the mayor about House
Bill 1130, filed by state Rep. Karla
Drenner (D-Avondale Estates) that
included a proposed annexation
map for the city. Residents were
not aware of the bill when it was
filed, and the commission never
discussed it in a public forum. Resi-
dents found out about the bill at a
Sept. 15 city planning and zoning
board meeting.
The map shows areas west and
north of Decatur being annexed
into the city. The areas include
neighborhoods of Katie Kerr and
Forrest Hills, and the DeKalb Farm-
ers Market.
At the Oct. 1 meeting, Rieker
cleared up rumors that Drenner
acted on her own in filing the bill.
“That’s absolutely untrue,”
Rieker said. “We asked her to drop
the bill that was put in last year. We
gave her the map; we asked her to
do that as we have many times in
the past for other annexations.”
Drenner said the reason she
introduced her bill on March 7 was
the Lakeside cityhood bill passed
the Senate on March 3. Her bill was
later pulled because the annexation
bills—Briarcliff, Lakeside and Tuck-
er—failed to make it to the House
floor for a vote in the last legislative
session March 20 and were put on
hold until the next legislative ses-
sion.
The city will hold another
public work session Oct. 15 for
residents to speak.
Ed Rieker’s resignation came
a day after he apologized to
residents at an Oct. 1 meeting
on how he and the commission
handled an annexation bill.
The Champion FreePress, Friday Oct. 10, 2014 Page 4A
OPINION
Letter to the Editor
Ten reasons DeKalb vendors demand
Kelvin Walton and Nina Hall be fired
It’s time for us to come to the
reality that our local government
has been in a crisis for far too long.
As a watchdog group, we have
complained for years about a “cloud
of corruption” that gives DeKalb
County a bad reputation as well
as a black eye hindering economic
development and decreasing public
trust.
Now we are faced with the
serious issue of having local
politicians indicted for illegal
activity and violation of their oaths
of office. Yet, a few politicians
continue with the same excuses
that interfere with the quality of
life our community deserves. Our
county employees, police and
firemen have gone over five years
without raises or even a cost of
living increase until this last budget
year. When will the crisis end?
When will a high quality of life and
increased public trust begin?
The title of this article, “Ten
reasons DeKalb vendors demand
Kelvin Walton and Nina Hall be
fired,” strives to educate the public
on facts they may not be aware of,
and apply “heat” to interim Chief
Executive Officer Lee May to take
action and fire two employees who
have clearly engaged in alleged
criminal activity. The reasons to
fire Kelvin Walton and Nina Hall
include:
1. Kelvin Walton funneled cash
from vendors to a county employee
who served on approximately 15
selection committees for DeKalb
County projects. The employee’s
name is Nina Hall, formerly the
executive assistant/secretary to
CEO Burrell Ellis.
2. Kelvin Walton headed a
department that practiced out-of-
control nepotism and cronyism
that fueled alleged criminal activity.
Kelvin Walton and Nina Hall
violated their job descriptions. Yet,
interim CEO Lee May suspended
Kelvin Walton and Nina Hall
with pay at a combined taxpayers’
payroll cost of approximately
$228,800.
3. Kelvin Walton and Nina Hall
engaged in acts of alleged criminal
activity that produced conflicts of
interest.
4. Kelvin Walton, under oath,
willfully lied multiple times during
his May special purpose grand jury
testimony and Walton admitted
under oath that he lied to the grand
jury.
5. Kelvin Walton and Nina
Hall both refused to answer
questions and pleaded the Fifth,
citing the self-incrimination rule.
Kelvin Walton refused to answer
343 questions for fear of self-
incrimination. Nina Hall refused to
answer 30 questions for fear of self-
incrimination.
6. Kelvin Walton assisted elected
officials and high staff officials
in engaging in alleged criminal
activity causing an investigation
which involves the FBI, U.S.
Attorney General, Department of
Revenue and the Inspector General.
7. Nina Hall first denied ever
receiving gifts or cash from
vendors under oath. However, she
eventually confessed to receiving
cash from Kelvin Walton and
allegedly Michael Hightower.
8. Kelvin Walton accepted a gift/
service from a vendor of cash value
without paying for the service.
9. Vendors and employees’
complaints that identified waste,
mismanagement, alleged illegal
activity by contractors and Kelvin
Walton were ignored.
10. Board of Commissioners
and DeKalb County staff members’
conflicts of interest that were a
cause of action for major media
investigations were incorrectly
based on advice given by Kelvin
Walton.
It’s time for DeKalb County
taxpayers, homeowners and
business owners to send a message
that we want the madness to end.
The local government should
focus on the needs of the public,
provide a high quality of life, and
restore public trust.
We need a full forensic audit to
expose the “true” financial picture
and shortfalls of Watershed and
Public Works. We need a full
forensic audit of the purchasing
and contracting department. We
need an answer to the question,
“Is there any criminal activity that
should be prosecuted?” Vendors
and contractors have requested a
full criminal investigation by the
Federal Bureau of Investigation
into alleged criminal activity to
include:
• Bid-rigging
• False documentation
(evidenced by fraudulent
checks)
• Violation of the False Claims
Act
• Fraud
• Kickbacks, up-charging and
over-billing
• Tax fraud
Until we place restoring public
trust as a top priority, taxpayers,
property owners, homeowners,
and business owners will have
increased lack of trust in our local
government. We ask our Board of
Commissioners, those that remain,
to demonstrate the value they place
in restoring public trust in our
local government by enacting the
following changes:
• Establish and fund an internal
auditor.
• Creation of a new anti-
corruption unit within
the DeKalb County Police
Department, in concert with
the FBI and GBI.
• Support the board of ethics
and maintain its independence.
If there are people that value
restoring public trust and removing
this “cloud of corruption,” we need
your help in convincing interim
CEO Lee May to immediately fire
and remove Kelvin Walton and
Nina Hall from the DeKalb County
taxpayers’ payroll. If the CEO
continues to refuse to fire Kelvin
Walton and Nina Hall, we need
interim CEO Lee May to explain to
the rest of us the reason, “Why”?
– Viola Davis, RN BSN
OPINION
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 5A

Let Us Know What You Think!
THE CHAMPION FREE PRESS encourages opinions from its readers.
Please write to us and express your views. Letters should be brief, type-
written and contain the writer’s name, address and telephone number
for verifcation. All letters will be considered for publication.
Send Letters To Editor, The Champion Free Press, P. O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 30031-
1347; Send email to Andrew@dekalbchamp.com • FAX To: (404) 370-3903 Phone:
(404) 373-7779 . Deadline for news releases and advertising: Thursday, one week prior
to publication date.
EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions written by columnists and contributing editors do not
necessarily refect the opinions of the editor or publishers. The Publisher reserves the
right to reject or cancel any advertisement at any time. The Publisher is not responsible
for unsolicited manuscripts.
Publisher: John Hewitt
Chief Financial Ofcer: Dr. Earl D. Glenn
Managing Editor: Andrew Cauthen
Production Manager: Kemesha Hunt
Photographer: Travis Hudgons
Staf Reporters: Carla Parker, Lauren Ramsdell
Advertising Sales: Louise Dyrenforth Acker
The Champion Free Press is published each Friday by ACE III
Communications, Inc., • 114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur, GA.
30030 • Phone (404) 373-7779.
www.championnewspaper.com
DISPLAY ADVERTISING (404) 373-7779 x 110
FREEPRESS
STATEMENT FROM THE PUBLISHER
We sincerely appreciate the discussion surrounding this and
any issue of interest to DeKalb County. The Champion was
founded in 1991 expressly to provide a forum for discourse
for all community residents on all sides of an issue. We have
no desire to make the news only to report news and opinions
to effect a more educated citizenry that will ultimately move
our community forward. We are happy to present ideas for
discussion; however, we make every effort to avoid printing
information submitted to us that is known to be false and/or
assumptions penned as fact.
ONE MAN’S OPINION
And now is the time
“It’s very important to remind
the American people that the U.S.
has the most capable healthcare
system and the most capable
doctors in the world, bar none,”
–Lisa Monaco, assistant to the
president for Homeland Security
and Counter-terrorism, at a White
House press briefing on Oct. 6,
2014.
Prior to the White House
stating with assurance late last
week, “We’ve got this,” I was of
the mind that our public officials
were taking the appropriate steps
to prevent and/or minimize the
impact of any outbreak of Ebola
hemorrhagic fever on U.S. soil. 
This unfortunately is the same
administration that assured the
American people weeks ago that an
Ebola outbreak in this country was
all but impossible, and again the
same administration who gave us
the Affordable Care Act. Ask most
any physician or hospital CEO what
that has done to our nation’s health
care infrastructure during the past
few years.
I’m not a doctor, nor do I play
one on TV. I have a great deal of
confidence in my personal medical
team, but I also understand
that much of my healthcare is
completely dependent upon my
own daily diet, exercise and living
choices. The doctor treating me
for years managing a chronic
medical condition, cannot take
my medication for me, nor pay
attention to the diet triggers I know
will cause me trouble. Similarly,
neither the president, CDC, nor
our local attending physician at a
nearby hospital E.R. can be aware
of every human encounter we
make, or steps we take in the event
of a larger outbreak here stateside.
Given the growing pandemic
in west Africa, the presence of the
world’s largest airport, and several
healthy settlements of African
refugees in DeKalb County and
other parts of Georgia and the
nation (Liberian population in
Dallas, Texas, is approximately
10,000), there will be more sons,
daughters, grandchildren and
citizens of Sierra Leone, Liberia
and other nation’s attempting to
flee their shores. Though U.S.
troops are building treatment
centers for an additional 1,700
patients to be treated, patients
with full-blown Ebola symptoms
are being sent home daily, as was
the case with the 19-year-old,
seven-months pregnant neighbor
who Eric Duncan assisted in and
out of a cab to a nearby hospital
to seek treatment. After being
turned away for lack of facilities,
the young mother could no longer
walk on her own, and was vomiting
in the cab, where her family and
Mr. Duncan were trying to safely
transport and comfort her. She
died, along with her unborn child,
several hours after returning home. 
Mr. Duncan, aware of the
neighbor’s diagnosis or not, left the
country days later, exposed, but not
yet exhibiting symptoms from a
virus that has an incubation period
of up to 21 days. As authorities
on both sides of this controversy
consider prosecuting Mr. Duncan,
I am forced to ask the human
question, who can seriously blame
him for trying to escape his home
country where actually coming
down with full-blown Ebola is
essentially a death sentence? Word
has reached Africa that patients
have been successfully treated or
“cured” in the Americas. Duncan
has family and a son in Dallas. I
have a hard time believing he
intentionally came here to harm
others.
My home in Scottdale is not far
from several refugee communities
in Clarkston. A warm and friendly
neighbor, Mamma D is from
Liberia. She worked for years as
a physician’s assistant and mid-
wife, she told me recently, clearly
suffering the loss, that a physician
she worked with for decades had
died from the illness, treating and
trying to save his patients until
the end. Her son was in Monrovia
at that time, farther away from
the hottest Ebola spots, but that
has quickly changed—and he was
trying to secure a visa to come
to the United States. Hundreds
of local refugees still have family
overseas. Dozens are employed
nearby at Our DeKalb Farmer’s
Market.
I’m clear that contact with
a bodily fluid of someone
demonstrating symptoms of
infection is required for contracting
the virus, but at that point things
get fuzzy very quickly. The
time is now for a major public
awareness campaign, explaining
the symptoms to look for, logical
preventative steps to take and a
series of actions recommended in
the unlikely event of exposure to a
patient with the virus. (continued
next week)
Bill Crane also serves as a
political analyst and commentator
for Channel 2’s Action News, WSB-
AM News/Talk 750 and now 95.5
FM, as well as a columnist for The
Champion, Champion Free Press
and Georgia Trend. Crane is a
DeKalb native and business owner,
living in Scottdale. You can reach
him or comment on a column at bill.
csicrane@gmail.com. 
Bill Crane
Columnist
Page 6A The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014

LOCAL
If you would like to nominate someone to be
considered as a future Champion of the Week,
please contact Andrew Cauthen at andrew@
dekalbchamp.com or at (404) 373-7779, ext. 117.
RONALD ABERCROMBIE
Ronald Abercrombie
Simpson Continued from page 2A
“Oftentimes you don’t know
why certain things happen,
but had that not happened, it
wouldn’t have put me in a po-
sition to be where I am and
I wouldn’t have received the
recognition, quite honestly,” he
said.
Simpson said his role as
Towers’ principal allows him to
showcase his skills and abilities.
“Otherwise I may not have
had that opportunity,” he said.
“If I look back four years ago at
what happened, that was a set
up for me…to receive the type
of recognition that I’ve gotten in
just the short time that I’ve been
here.”
Since he took over the reins
at Towers High, the “level of ex-
pectation” has improved, Simp-
son said.
“There appears to be a new
level of energy with the stu-
dents,” Simpson said.
The school had the largest
gains of any high school in the
district in ninth-grade literature
and economics grades, accord-
ing to Simpson. Towers’ gradua-
tion rate increased by more than
20 percent in a year.
Additionally, all of the
school’s administrators returned
for the first time in eight years
and 96 percent of the teachers
returned, Simpson said.
Returning students “had
an opportunity to experience
the change in culture [and] the
change in climate,” Simpson
said.
“We gave them a reason to
feel proud about their school.
We did a better job of making
them understand that education
is a means to their success,” he
said.
Simpson said the key to his
recent success is the “fortitude,
the perseverance, the patience
and the will to continue to work
hard and serve children despite
the challenges.”
“I am more than grateful,
more than appreciative and I am
humbled by it because there are
so many great principals in our
school district who could very
easily have been chosen as prin-
cipal of the year,” Simpson said.
Three years ago,
Ronald Abercrom-
bie of Clarkston
garnered an interest
in providing housing
for lower income in-
dividuals and fami-
lies.
He also became
interested in learn-
ing about construc-
tion and decided to
start volunteering
with Habitat for
Humanity-DeKalb, where he is now in providing
housing for lower income people and construct-
ing homes. Habitat for Humanity–DeKalb, Inc. is
an official county affiliate of the Habitat For Hu-
manity International organization headquartered
in Americus.
Since its incorporation in 1988, Habitat for
Humanity–DeKalb has built or renovated 60
homes, serving about 450 people including about
200 children. Abercrombie, 68, said it was “Habi-
tat’s national reputation,” along with his interest
in construction and helping others that led him
to join the Christian organization three years ago.
He has been heavily involved with the orga-
nization and has been a house leader once on a
construction project.
“I show up almost every Saturday for one
project or another,” he said. “[As house leader] I
helped organize the work for the volunteers each
Saturday and was able to add a set of helping
hands along the way.”
Abercrombie also serves on the Community
Housing Development Organization board, a
committee that oversees the Community Hous-
ing Development funds that Habitat receives
from DeKalb County.
“DeKalb County receives these funds from
the federal government (U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development) to help pro-
vide low-income housing,” he said. “This money
goes into our cost and is repaid to Habitat over
the length (30 years) of our Habitat mortgages to
the homeowner, and then it is recycled into other
builds or renovations. Our mortgages carry no
interest over the 30 years, as is the Habitat policy.”
Abercrombie also tutors refugee students
from Clarkston High School.
“These children are the youngsters that call
themselves the Fugees Family,” he said. “The Fu-
gees Family organization was begun by, and has
as its driving force, a young woman by the name
of Luma Mufleh. I tutor math and science for
these high school students.”
Abercrombie said he likes giving back to the
community where he lives and finds the volun-
teer activities to be fun.
“Also, it is important at my age to stay busy,”
he said.
DeKalb County School District’s principal of the year, Ralph Simpson, once worked for a
maximum security prison. Photo by Andrew Cauthen
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 7A

COMMUNITY
AROUND
DEKALB
Countywide
Forum to provide information on
how to increase property values
 
“Suspect you’re overpaying property taxes
and/or asking if you should appeal your property
tax assessment?” asks an announcement about an
upcoming forum. “Appealed your property taxes
and do not understand the process?  Have you
asked for ways to increase your property value
and address violations that decrease your property
value?”
Homeowners and property owners who ap-
pealed their 2014 DeKalb County real and per-
sonal property tax assessment are invited to attend
“People’s Forum II:  Increase property value and
avoid overpaying property taxes” on Oct. 11, at
9:30 am. at Sanford Realty Company Conference
Center, 4183 Snapfinger Woods Drive, Decatur.
“This forum will help educate and assist
homeowners and property owners in understand-
ing the appraisal, appeal, and assessment process,”
according to the announcement. “The forum will
provide information on how to file a complaint
against violations that decrease property value.”
Confirmed forum presenters include Cal-
vin C. Hicks, DeKalb County’s chief appraiser;        
Debra DeBerry, clerk of Superior Court; and By-
ron Scott, supervisor of the Board of Equalization.
The forum is sponsored by Restore DeKalb.
Brookhaven
Development authority selects
frst vice chairman

Luke Anderson was elected as Brookhaven
Development Authority’s first vice chairman
to serve alongside Chairman Walt Ehmer. An-
derson, a licensed patent attorney, has served as
a member of the development authority since
2013. The development authority is a public body
that promotes trade, commerce, industry and
employment opportunities.
Decatur
Porter Sanford Center to host
40 plays
The third annual Atlanta Black Theatre Festival,
which features 40 plays in four days, will be held
Oct. 9-12 at the Porter Sanford III Performing
Arts and Community Center. The opening recep-
tion: Vittles and Vibe will be held Oct. 9, 5-8 p.m.
The reception costs $10 to attend and will feature
music by Ryan Whitehead. The Porter Sanford
III Performing Arts and Community Center is
located at 3181 Rainbow Drive in Decatur. To
RSVP to the reception, visit www.eventbrite.com.
Church to hold annual barbecue
The 53rd annual Oak Grove United Method-
ist Men’s Barbecue will be held Saturday, Oct. 18,
from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The fundraiser will in-
clude United Methodist Women’s bake sale, arts
and crafts, live bluegrass and gospel music and a
used book sale.
Barbecue plates are available for both takeout
and eat-in. The cost is $10 for adults and $6 for
children. Proceeds benefit 29 different church
and community causes.
Oak Grove United Methodist Church is lo-
cated at 1722 Oak Grove Road, Decatur, between
LaVista and Briarcliff Roads.
Call (404) 636-7558 or visit www.ogumc.org
for more information.
Dunwoody
Author to hold book launch party
Atlanta-based author Ben Halpert and his
nonprofit organization, Savvy Cyber Kids, will
host a book launch party for Halpert’s new book,
The Savvy Cyber Kids at Home: Adventures Be-
yond the Screen, at the Super Run Atlanta, Oct.
12, at Brook Run Park, 4770 Georgia Way South,
Dunwoody.
Festivities begin at 8:30 a.m. with a 5K Run,
followed by the book launch party at 9:30 a.m.
and a 1K walk/run along with refreshments and
many fun family activities at 10 a.m. The event
is free. For more information, contact Halpert at
(404) 955-7233 or founder@savvycyberkids.org.
Annual Apple Cider Days event
planned
Dunwoody Preservation Trust will host Apple
Cider Days, its annual fall fundraising event, Oct.
22-26. Apple Cider Days 2014 will feature a fam-
ily friendly carnival atmosphere, have new rides,
a broad selection of food choices, live music and
add new activities.
Apple Cider Days will be open from 4 to 10
p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 22, and Thursday, Oct.
23; 4 to 11 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 24; 10 a.m. to 11
p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 25, and noon to 6 p.m. on
Sunday, Oct. 26.
The Dunwoody Preservation Trust’s cor-
porate sponsorships create programs with local
Dunwoody/North Atlanta impact.
For more information, visit www.
appleciderdays.org.
Lithonia
School to host food tasting
event
Arabia Mountain High School will host its
fourth Annual Taste of Arabia on Saturday, Nov.
1, at the school, located at 6610 Browns Mills
Road, Lithonia.
Doors will open at 3 p.m. and tastings will
take place in the commons area from 3 to 7 p.m.
Guests can visit with others in the commu-
nity, taste culinary treats, listen to music and
cheer for their favorite competitor in the cooking
competitions. Tasters will vote on the top three
culinary businesses at the end of the event.
Tickets are $1 for a “taste” and discount pack-
ages start at $10. A tasting will consist of a sam-
pling of the restaurant’s cuisine. Tickets can be
purchased from the school’s PTSA at the school’s
front office.
There is no fee to participate for anyone in-
terested in showcasing his or her culinary busi-
ness. For more information, send an email to
Ptsa@arabiaptsa.org.
Davidson-Arabia Nature Center
to host hike
Hikers can experience the outdoors with
Ranger Robby during the Range Ramble Guided
Hikes Oct. 10, 8‒11 a.m. Ranger Robby will visit
some of his favorite spots in the Davidson-Arabia
Mountain Nature Preserve. This weekly hike is
always different based on the season and interests
of the hikers. For more information and addi-
tional events visit www.arabiamountain.org.
Stone Mountain
Oktoberfest adds beer tasting
The annual Stone Mountain Oktoberfest fes-
tival will be held Oct. 11-12 at the Village Cor-
ner Restaurant.
The weekend will include pretzel-eating con-
tests, stein-holding contests, traditional German
music and dancing, and, of course, lots of Ger-
man food and beer. New this year is a Beer Tast-
ing that will be held Oct. 11, 1 to 7 p.m.
Tickets are $30 and are available at www.
stonemountainvillage.com. General admission to
the event is free.
Photo by Travis Hudgons
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 8A
LOCAL NEWS
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
An inmate is dead and
a DeKalb County police
detective is resting at home
after a shooting outside
magistrate court Oct. 2.
Cedric Alexander,
DeKalb County’s deputy
chief operating officer of
public safety, said at an Oct.
3 press conference that he
visited detective Phillip
Christy at Grady Memorial
Hospital where he was
recovering from gunshot
wounds to his wrist and
thigh.
“We continue to pray
for his recovery,” Alexander
said.
Christy was released
from the hospital Oct. 6.
Alexander said two
detectives were escorting
two armed robbery suspects
to jail from magistrate court
around 8:30 p.m. when one
of the suspects, 19-year-old
Miguel Benton, attacked
Christy, grabbed the
detective’s gun and shot him
twice. A second detective,
Eddie Stubbs, shot and
killed Benton.
Benton was arrested
the day before the shooting
incident and charged with
armed robbery for allegedly
robbing a Clarkston family,
who were sitting in their car
at the time of the robbery.
“It is a very sad and
unfortunate incident,”
Alexander said. “Both
of these officers showed
a great deal of courage
with this event. They both
certainly could have lost
their lives.”
Christy is a 25-year
police veteran and is an
11-year veteran with the
department.
Alexander said the
department is investigating
the shooting and how
Benton was handcuffed
before the shooting.
Alexander also said the
department will look at
its policy on how inmates
are transferred from jail to
court.
“This is still an ongoing
investigation,” he said. “We
always go back and look at
everything surrounding a
police shooting.”
DeKalb police detective stable after shooting
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Brookhaven can ban Pink Pony
and other adult entertainment busi-
nesses from selling alcohol after
a certain time, says the Supreme
Court of Georgia.
The Supreme Court ruled in
favor of Brookhaven Oct. 6 and
upheld a DeKalb County court’s
dismissal of the Pink Pony’s lawsuit
against Brookhaven. Justice Har-
old Melton wrote for the Court
that given “the established record
regarding the deleterious effects of
alcohol coupled with nude dancing,
the trial court did not err by finding
that, as a matter of law, Brookhav-
en’s sexually oriented business
ordinance does not unconstitution-
ally infringe upon Pink Pony’s free
speech rights.”
The city released a statement
saying, “the Georgia Supreme Court
affirmed that the city of Brookhav-
en is not bound by Pink Pony’s
agreement with DeKalb County,
and that Brookhaven’s sexually
oriented business ordinance is con-
stitutional as a matter of law. The
city will continue to defend all of its
ordinances. The council’s adoption
of legally valid regulations—like
those in place in DeKalb County
and in cities across Georgia—has
never been about one business, but
about having sound ordinances that
protect the long-term interests of
the city and its residents.”
In December 2013, DeKalb
Superior Court Judge Courtney
Johnson issued an order granting
Brookhaven’s motion to dismiss the
suit, ruling it has no legal merit.
The Pink Pony adult entertainment
club off Buford Highway filed a
lawsuit in May 2013 after the city
adopted an ordinance that would
prohibit nudity and force stricter
alcohol pouring and sales times for
liquor license holder businesses in
the city.
In the lawsuit, Pink Pony ar-
gued that the club entered into an
agreement with DeKalb County in
2001, which was amended in 2007
that says the club would continue to
function as is and if another munic-
ipality comes in and takes over that
area then the agreement is binding
upon the new city.
According to the 33-page or-
der, Johnson granted Brookhaven’s
motion because all of Pink Pony’s
claims “turn upon the application
of legal principles and are prop-
erly resolved as a matter of law for
[Brookhaven].”
Pink Pony’s attorneys argued to
the Georgia Supreme Court that the
trial court made a number of errors.
The state court said Pink Pony’s
main argument was that the trial
court was wrong in concluding the
ordinance passed the constitutional
standards regarding free speech laid
out in the Georgia Supreme Court’s
1982 ruling in Paramount Pictures
Corp. v. Busbee.
The state court said that deci-
sion posed three questions: “(1)
Does the [legislation] further an
important governmental interest?
(2) Is that interest unrelated to the
suppression of speech? and (3) Is
the legislation an incidental re-
striction of speech no greater than
essential to further the important
governmental interest?”
The state court’s opinion said
that the ordinance passes all three
prongs of the Paramount Pictures
test.
“First, it furthers the important
government interests of ‘attempt-
ing to preserve the quality of urban
life,’ and ‘reducing criminal activity
and preventing the deterioration of
neighborhoods,” the opinion said.
“These goals, in turn, are not relat-
ed to any desire to suppress speech.”
Finally, “any incidental restriction
of speech caused by the ordinance
is no greater than essential to fur-
ther these important governmental
interests.
“Pink Pony’s contention that
Brookhaven should be bound by
the prior agreement between Pink
Pony and DeKalb County does
not change this result,” the Oct. 6
opinion says. “As found by the trial
court, this prior agreement cannot
be used to bind the successively in-
corporated city of Brookhaven.”
Court sides with Brookhaven on alcohol sales
The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Brookhaven Oct. 6 and upheld a DeKalb
County court’s dismissal of the Pink Pony’s lawsuit against Brookhaven. File Photo
DeKalb awarded $1 million grant to curb youth violence
DeKalb County has been awarded a grant
– dispersed between nine other sites across
the country – from the Department of Health
and Human Services (HHS) and the Depart-
ment of Justice (DOJ) to help curb youth vio-
lence. DeKalb County will receive $357,000
in federal funds each year for three years as
part of the grant.
“As 24 percent of the county’s population
is under the age of 18, services for our youth
has been a huge priority for DeKalb,” said
interim DeKalb County CEO Lee May. “This
generous grant, and the services it will pro-
vide, greatly helps further DeKalb’s commit-
ment to sustaining a strong foundation for
our youth and keeping our county safe.”
The DeKalb County Board of Heath,
DeKalb County Government and the City of
Clarkston, Georgia, received grant funding
through the Minority Youth Violence Preven-
tion: Integrating Public Health and Commu-
nity Policing Approaches (MYVP) program.
The MYVP is a joint effort by the HHS
Office of Minority Health and the DOJ Of-
fice of Community Oriented Policing Ser-
vices (COPS Office) to support interventions
aimed at addressing youth violence, improv-
ing academic outcomes, increasing access to
public health and social services and reduc-
ing violent crimes against minority youth, as
well as negative encounters with law enforce-
ment. DeKalb County will follow suit with
the other sites to field initiatives that combine
community policing and prevention ap-
proaches within a public health framework.
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 9A
LOCAL NEWS
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
A
new substation will increase
police presence in the
Stonecrest Mall area.
The mall “so graciously” donated
the 1,700-square-foot space for the
substation, said interim DeKalb
County CEO Lee May, during a
ribbon-cutting for the facility on
Oct. 3.
“We are acknowledging the
tremendous partnership that DeKalb
County government has with its key
stakeholders in our community,”
May said about the partnership
between the police department, mall
and Stonecrest Business Alliance.
“A tremendous group of
businesses and individuals have
come together…and wanted a
greater [police] presence in the
Stonecrest Mall area.”
The substation, located on
Stonecrest Mall’s lower level near
Dillards, will be the base for the
East Precinct’s neighborhood
enforcement team, May said.
“Our goal is to reduce the
amount of crime that is perpetuated
anywhere near this site,” May said.
“This will allow a greater
presence in this area, a greater
security,” May said. “We want
Stonecrest Mall to be the safest
place around so that we can be an
attraction for businesses to come
and for customers to come and
enjoy…purchasing things.
“It’s just a good example of
partnerships…coming to enjoy a
greater level of public safety in our
community,” he said.
Interim DeKalb County Police
Chief James Conroy said, “This
benefits everybody.
“The police department [is]
getting space that was donated,”
Conroy said. “At our East Precinct
we have a facility that is in need of
some repair and we need additional
space. It benefits the mall. It gives us
a presence here and makes people
feel a little bit safer and hopefully
any criminal in the area will and
think twice about committing a
crime here.”
The timing of the substation’s
opening comes at the beginning of
the police department’s holiday plan,
Conroy said.
Patricia Edge, Stonecrest Mall’s
general manager, said, “O happy day.
We have worked really hard to make
this happen.”
Stonecrest Mall houses new police substation

County offcials and community leaders offcially opened a police substation that
leaders say will decrease crime in the area. Photos by Andrew Cauthen

From left, interim Police Chief James Conroy and interim county CEO Lee May were
on hand for the opening of a new police substation.
Page 10A The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014

LOCAL
Old hotel to
be imploded
Avondale Estates
planning roundabout
demonstration
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
T
he skyline at the corner of I-85
and North Druid Hills Road will
be a little emptier in a month
after the implosion of a 19-story building.
The vacant Executive Park Motor
Hotel, described in an advertisement in
the 1970s as “Atlanta’s Prestige Suburban
Hotel,” is scheduled for implosion
Saturday, Nov. 8, amid fanfare, according
to Patty Gregory public relations manager
at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.
An ad announcing the hotel’s January
1971 grand opening boasted convention
facilities for 800, a grand ballroom,
restaurant and 474 “comfort-conditioned”
rooms.
Now, the building’s “outdated
construction and design” led Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta officials to
determine that “renovation was not a
viable option for this building,” according
to a news release.
“The current structure…would not be
able to serve any potential future needs of
the pediatric health care system,” the news
release stated. “In addition, removing
the building will contribute to the safety
and beautification of the surrounding
neighborhood.”
Donnie Reed, vice president of
facilities at Children’s, said, “We are
continuing to assess and plan for the needs
of our pediatric health care system to
determine future use of the property.”
To mark the implosion, Children’s
Healthcare of Atlanta is planning “Cape
Day ATL” for Nov. 7.
“We are encouraging everyone in
Atlanta to wear a cape on Cape Day to
show support for a special superhero-
loving patient and other kids like him,”
Gregory said.
“A day doesn’t go by at Children’s
without encountering at least one of our
patients dressed as a superhero,” Gregory
said. “Capes are almost as common as
hospital gowns around here. Our patients
fight obstacles every day, challenges most
of us could never dream of, and every
day, they put on their capes—literally
and figuratively—and fight. Their capes
represent courage, perseverance and hope.
Four-year-old DJ Pitts of Hapeville
wore many capes during his six-month
hospital stay at the hospital, including a
homemade cape that said “Super DJ.”
“To celebrate brave kids like DJ…we
are asking Atlanta to show their support
for DJ and kids in our hospitals by wearing
a homemade cape on Cape Day to work or
school, at home or at play.
“Our goal is to get the whole city of
Atlanta wearing capes,” Gregory said.
DJ will be the one pushing the button to
implode the old hotel building on Nov. 8.
Gregory said she is not aware of
any future plans for the site. After the
demolition of the building, which was
purchased in 2013 January for $9.6
million, “cleanup of the site will take
several weeks,” she said.
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Residents and commuters who drive through Avondale
Estates will soon see how a roundabout would work at the
North Clarendon and U.S. 278 intersection.
The city will hold a mock roundabout demonstration
Nov. 8 at the intersection for the public to get a feel
for how a roundabout would work. The city received
a $50,000 Livable Centers Initiative (LCI) from the
Atlanta Regional Commission to study the feasibility of a
roundabout, road diet and “Better Block” demonstration
project.
A road diet involves converting an undivided four lane
roadway into three lanes made up of two through lanes
and a center two-way left turn lane.
City Planner Keri Stevens said the city wanted to
look into further were a road diet from James Crossings
to Ashton Place, and also looking into intersection
improvements at the North Clarendon and U.S. 278
intersection, one of which could possibly be a roundabout.
The city also received an additional grant for the
project and the total project cost is $62,500.
“A part of that project cost, and the money allocated,
is to do an actual on-the-ground demonstration project,”
Stevens said. “It’s a completely temporary project and it
will generally show the impact of those proposed changes.
People can see in real time what it would possibly look
like.”
Stevens said the demonstration will have “temporary
materials” such as cones, chalk and flags to see exactly
what the physical impact would be size-wise and how it
will function generally.
“The roundabout is a little bit more difficult to show
functionality-wise because you can’t actually drive in areas
that might be possibly a part of the roundabout,” she said.
“But, they will at least be able to see how it would impact
that intersection.”
Consultants from Nelson\Nygaard Consulting
Associates are conduction the feasibility study. The firm
will look at the size, what makes it effective and what
impact it will have on that intersection and the city as
a whole. Once the study is completed, a report will be
created, which will show traffic counts and costs associated
with implementing the project.
“The demonstration project is really a public outreach
project,” Stevens said. “If the community is not in favor of
it, or if the impact is so not great, we will look into other
intersection improvements that will work with the road
diet.”
Example of a roundabout
The 19-story former Executive Park Motor Hotel will soon disappear in a cloud of dust. Photo by
Andrew Cauthen
Page 11A The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014

LOCAL
Maker Faire celebrates innovation and tech in Decatur
by Ashley Oglesby
W
hat constitutes a “maker”? By
definition, the term can apply
to artists, crafters or anyone
who creates something. But the
past decade has seen a more specific “maker
movement” emerge, one with robots, drones,
bitcoins, gurus and storm troopers.
Maker Faire Atlanta, a self-described
hybrid of science and county fairs that dubs
itself the “Greatest Show (and Tell) on Earth,”
setup shop this year in downtown Decatur
on North McDonough Street and in the large
parking area surrounding the Callaway Build-
ing on Oct. 4-5 for its fourth annual innova-
tors celebration.
The event is a grassroots effort that began
on Georgia Tech’s campus as the Atlanta Mini
Maker Faire and has since grown to be the
largest Maker Faire in the Southeast.
“[The Makers Faire] is too big to be in one
category. It’s arts and crafts meets popular sci-
ence and popular mechanics at DragonCon,”
said Roy Craft, director of program develop-
ment at Georgia Tech and development direc-
tor of the Maker Faire Atlanta.
Organizers of this year’s fair estimated
more than 20,000 people in attendance com-
pared to last year’s one-day event which at-
tracted 10,000 people.
Once a Mini Maker Faire reaches 10,000
participants, it has the option to become a
featured fair. Atlanta now has joined the ranks
of other cities such as Rome, Paris, Detroit
and Kansas City. Unlike these other featured
Faires, however, Atlanta’s event is completely
free and is wholly produced by volunteers.
David Sluder, executive producer of
Maker Faire Atlanta said, “We do this because
we care deeply about the maker movement
and want to see it take Atlanta by storm.”
The upgrade also included exclusive
coverage by MAKE magazine, featured place-
ment on the Maker Faire website, and the new
moniker: Maker Faire Atlanta.
This year’s weekend Faire included a
Power Racing Series, guest speakers in the
Decatur High School auditorium and hosted
more than 220 creators, innovators, tinkerers,
hobbyists and amateur enthusiasts of all ages.
The youngest makers were from The Chil-
dren’s School.
The private Midtown Atlanta elementary
school implemented its play, passion and
purpose benchmark with the Innovator’s
Playground. A mini Maker faire dedicated to
elementary children was presented by com-
munity partners, faculty, staff and families.
Although other schools have partnered with
the Maker Faire, The Children’s School is the
first to do it on a scale of its size.
“This is a concept that we had to really
showcase how making and tinkering really
needs to begin with elementary children,” said
Nishant Mehta, head of the school.
He added, “It’s not just about Legos, but it
really is about higher level 3D printing, higher
levels in terms of electrical circuits and so on.”
Part of the Maker Faire’s mission is to
educate the next generation of innovators by
partnering with organizations with renewed
emphasis on STEAM (science, technology,
engineering, arts and mathematics) learning
in schools and after-school programs all over
the country.
Craft said, “It’s a part of a bigger move-
ment that’s really going to transform educa-
tion from just abstract theoretical knowledge
to applied and doing stuff.”
As the maker movement continues to
grow, its community of experts and novices,
Sluder recommended anyone inspired to pick
up a new tool a start playing around.
“A good deal of the process is learning
how to use the tools and then seeing what you
can make after that.” He said.
From the eclectic Freeside group in the
West End warehouse to the Geekspace Gwin-
nett and the Decatur Makers, there are a half-
dozen maker groups around Atlanta that offer
classes and provide the tools to help amateurs
start new projects.
For more information about the Maker
Faire Atlanta, visit makerfaireatl.com.
Artists, craftsmen, builders and tinkerers displayed their creations Oct. 4-5 in Decatur for the
estimated 20,000 visitors to Maker Faire Atlanta. Photos by Ashley Oglesby
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 12A
LOCAL NEWS
Fall Convocation
TO ALL ALUMNI OF
DeKalb Area Vocational School (1961 - 1963)
DeKalb Area Technical School (1963 - 1972)
DeKalb Community College-Technical Division (1972 - 1986)
DeKalb Technical Institute (1986 - 2000)
DeKalb Technical College (2000 - 2011)
Georgia Piedmont Technical College (2011 - 2014)
Please join President Jabari Simama for
Fall Convocation
Bridging from Our Past, Building for Our Future
Tursday, October 23, 2014
11:00 a.m.
Georgia Piedmont Technical College
Conference Center, DeKalb Campus
495 N. Indian Creek Drive
Clarkston, GA 30021
RSVP by October 16, 2014, to
Seddrick Hill at hills@gptc.edu or (404) 297-9522 ext. 1828
Celebratory lunch to follow
by Nicholas L. Washington
P
rinceton Elementary School
students, faculty and parents
experienced an evening with Atlanta
Falcons’ tight end McKenna Sean “Bear”
Pascoe, the Falcons’ team mascot, Freddie
the Falcon, and the Falcons’ cheerleaders
as they celebrated the opening of the
facility’s homework center. “Fitness Fun
with the Falcons” was the theme of the
event and is an initiative intended to
encourage youth to participate in physical
activities.
According to Dr. Kyia Clark,
Princeton Elementary School’s Principal,
the center will build a community of
“vibrant learners.”
“This [center] is a wonderful place
for our students, parents and school
community,” said Clark as she thanked
SCANA Energy for partnering with the
school to host the event.
“I’m appreciative of them [SCANA
Energy] in what they have done with the
program and how it has really made the
children excited about homework,” Clark said.
During the visit, Freddie the Falcon led
students in stretching exercises followed
by fitness activities, including a football
toss, rope jump and a hula hoop contest.
Pascoe spoke to the children about
the importance of physical fitness and
explained that it can be fun. He later
joined the students in a football toss,
coached a tug-of- war match, autographed
pictures and answered fans’ questions.
Pascoe explained that giving back to
the community is one of the highlights of
his football career.
“The impact I’m having on the
students feels great,” Pascoe said. “I love to
come out. To see their faces when I come
out, that’s what it’s all about. The NFL is
fun, but giving back is what it’s all about.”
DeTrauyvein Kleckly, a fifth-grader at
Princeton Elementary was “very excited”
to meet the NFL star.
“I most enjoyed tossing the ball with
him,” Kleckly said.
Assistant Principal John Wilson also
expressed appreciation for the visitors.
“I’d like to thank him [Pascoe] for
coming out and being a positive role
model for the children to see,” Wilson
said.
“It’s great when the players come out
and visit the children because they get
a chance to see what they can become,”
Wilson said. “If they see it, they can
believe it. When they can believe it, good
things can happen.”
Atlanta Falcons visit
Princeton Elementary
Students pose for a “rise up” photo to commemorate a visit by an Atlanta Falcons player. Photos by Nicholas Washington

Atlanta Falcons’ tight end McKenna Sean
“Bear” Pascoe (left) visits students at Princeton
Elementary to celebrate the opening of a
homework center.
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 13A
LOCAL NEWS
WEEK
PICTURES
In
Searching for Our Sons and Daughters:

For a programming guide, visit www.yourdekalb.com/dctv
Now showing on DCTV!
Finding DeKalb County’s Missing
Stories of our missing residents offer profound
insights and hope for a positive reunion.
DCTV – Your Emmy® Award-winning news source of DeKalb County news. Available on Comcast Cable Channel 23.
Photos brought to you by DCTV
T
ucker held its fifth annual Taste of Tucker event
Oct. 4. Attendees sampled appetizers, entrees
and desserts from a variety of local restaurants.
Participating restaurants included Brockett Pub,
Longhorn, Local 7, Riverside Pizza and more. The event
also included live music from the Mike Lowry band and a
Kids Zone. Photos by Carla Parker
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 14A
LOCAL NEWS
Upcoming Seminars at DeKalb Medical
For a referral to a DeKalb Medical physician or to reserve
your space for these free seminars, please call 404.596.4772.
Light refreshments will be served. Parking is free.
Doc Talks
www.dekalbmedical.org dekalbmedical
Celebrating Women’s Health:
Ladies’ Night Out to
Empower Women to
Make Health a Priority
Tuesday, September 23, 2014
6:00–8:00 p.m.
Community Room
Hillandale campus
Our expert panel of doctors
will ofer information on
a wide range of women’s
health topics such as healthy
aging, breast cancer, ftness
and nutrition, menopause
and more. Come early and
receive a complimentary
bone density scan of the heel
which indicates whether
you may need further
osteoporosis testing.
Call 404.596.4772 or visit
www.dekalbmedical.org.
IWantToBeRecycled.org
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
K
at Kelly wants to give away
her house.
Located in Stone
Mountain, the mid-1960s
partial brick ranch has three
bedrooms, a two-car garage and “it sits up
on a hill so it’s really nice,” Kelly said. “You
can look over the street which is one of the
things I like about it.”
The home, which she occupied from
2003 to 2009, was Kelly’s “first American
dream,” she said.
“The pine floors—I installed them
myself,” I made the closet doors in the
house. I did all the work on it. The house
really was my baby.”
After a failed relationship, Kelly
eventually purchased a new house and
rented the Stone Mountain home.
“Most people would [say], ‘It’s an
investment property; that’s cool that you’re
making a monthly income on it,’” Kelly
said. “But for me…I have an emotional
connection to the house. It was my first
house. It was where I learned how to do
things.
“My heart’s not in renting that house
out,” Kelly said. “I just want someone in it
who loves it and wants to be there. I know
it sounds cheesy but it’s true.”
Approximately a year ago, she decided
she wanted to raise funds to pay off the
mortgage and give the house away to
“someone who was working but couldn’t
afford to do both the mortgage and the
general costs that go along with home
ownership, but could do one or the other,”
Kelly said.
Kelly first launched the campaign
through PayPal to avoid the excess fees
charged by fundraising sites.
“I put it out and I had some interest
from local media but then I started getting
harassed by people who [said], ‘This is a
scam. You’re just wanting people’s credit
card numbers,’” Kelly said.
For a year, those comments
discouraged her from continuing the
campaign. Kelly returned to the idea a
month ago.
Now, Kelly wants to give the house to
her current tenants: a young single mother
with a preschool child.
“This tenant…feels connected to the
house,” Kelly said. “She loves living there
and…she wants to stay there and she wants
to be in a place where she can raise her
little boy.
“When I see them outside I say, ‘She
fits there,’” Kelly said. “She belongs there. I
can’t say it any other way.”
Kelly’s goal is to raise $110,000 to pay
off the mortgage; she would be taking a
loss when it comes to the taxes.
“I’m being led by something that’s not
financial. It’s my heart,” Kelly said. “My
goal is to inspire other people…to think
about the concept of home and what it
means and how important it is to some
people. I want us to think about other
people.
“I could keep [the house] and treat it
like an investment property, which is what
most people would do,” Kelly said. “For
me it’s about my connection to the house
and about giving someone else the sense of
permanence and sense of home.”
For more information about the
campaign, visit www.makemeahomeagain.
com.
Woman seeks to give away
her American dream
Kat Kelly wants to “give someone else the sense of permanence and sense of home.” Photo by
Andrew Cauthen
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 15A LOCAL NEWS
Wilson Continued From Page 1A
Ellis Continued From Page 1A
our legislators, our communities, and they
understand the relevance and the importance of
fully funded public education.”
Wilson said she also wants to “efciently and
efectively implement Common Core in the state
of Georgia.
“I believe in Common Core standards,”
Wilson said. “I think that they are important
and necessary for our children to be successful.
I also recognize that we have to be efective and
supportive in making sure that there is efective
and efcient implementation. I think we’ve had
a misstep on that. I think that we have to be sure
that we are providing all of resources and the
support that is necessary and that we are freeing
teachers from the concern of losing their jobs
because they don’t meet certain marks at certain
times.”
Wilson added that during her “frst term” she
would focus on “bringing parents to the table in a
substantive way.”
“We have go to help parents…realize how
best to support us in the public education system
in helping their children to be successful,” Wilson
said.
Wilson is one of four DeKalb residents
running for state executive positions, including
former Lithonia city councilwoman Doreen
Carter, for secretary of state; Sen. Jason Carter,
for governor; and former state senator Connie
Stokes, for lieutenant governor.
“Tere is an opportunity to get people to the
polls when they recognize that they have four of
their own [running] for statewide ofce,” Wilson
said.
She is also one of fve Black women running
for statewide elected positions.
“I think that what we see happening…is
we are mirroring what Georgia is looking like,”
Wilson said.
“I liken that to what we see happening in
our public education system,” she said. “For the
frst time ever the majority of children in our
public education system are children of color. I
think that’s a refection of our state and the way
our state is going. I think it’s pretty awesome
because we are representing that diversity we see
happening.”
Wilson said she is “very proud” to be
the Democratic nominee for state school
superintendent, but doesn’t believe there is a
place in education for politics.
“Little boys and girls don’t come into our
classrooms as little Democrats, Republicans, Tea
Partiers or Independents,” Wilson said. “Tey
come as little boys and girls looking to be taught,
with a yearning for education and we need to
answer that and meet that.
“I am looking forward to representing
children and being their chief advocate,” she said.
the mouth of Kelvin Walton when…
he testifed.”
“He perjured himself before
the grand jury. He didn’t do that
with the CEO,” Tomas said. “He
took money—cash money—from
vendors, but he didn’t do that
with the CEO. He came in this
courtroom and he misrepresented
the facts in this case. He didn’t do
that with the CEO.”
Prosecutors have “the burden to
prove beyond a reasonable doubt
that CEO Burrell Ellis acted with
criminal intent,” Tomas said.
“Kelvin Walton is the key for
the state in their efort to prove
that,” Tomas said. “And they failed
miserably.”
“You did not hear anything
about Ellis lining his pockets,”
Tomas told jurors.
“I told you at the very beginning
of this case that there would be
no evidence in this case that CEO
Burrell Ellis stole one dime of
money. I told you…there would
be no evidence of any kickback
scheme.”
Tomas said prosecutors
“hitched their wagon” to Walton,
“an admitted liar, admitted
perjurer.”
Ellis saw Walton as a
trustworthy friend, but “the real
Kelvin Walton…abused the trust
given to him by Mr. Ellis,” Tomas
said.
Tomas told jurors that
prosecutors “want you to fnd Mr.
Ellis guilty and…pronounce him a
criminal.
“Mr. Ellis is far from a criminal,”
Tomas said. “He has not done any
criminal act that’s alleged in this
indictment.”
Tomas asked the jury to “do the
right thing and end the torment of
Mr. Ellis.”
DeKalb County DA Robert
James said, “Tis case is not about
his public service. Tis case is about
his public corruption.”
Te trial is about “lies,” James
said. “Flat out lies. Lies to the
public, lies to the grand jury, lies to
his staf, lies over and over and over
again.
“Liar, liar, pants on fre,” James
said.
Ellis uses “his infuence, his
power, county resources [and]
county employees, to further his
campaign goals” of paying back a
$150,000 campaign, James said.
“Tat’s public corruption,” James
said.
Ellis dangles his power in front
of vendors to “exchange one favor
for another favor,” James said,
“because he owes a lot of money to
a lot of people and he hopes that
if he helps these folks with their
contract issues…they will help him
get his problem resolved.”
“It ain’t a public service, Mr.
CEO. It’s a Burrell Ellis service,”
James said during his closing
arguments.
“You ask yourself, ‘Why is he
doing this stuf?’” James said to
the jury. “Well, because he’s chief
executive ofcer of DeKalb County,
and he believes that entitles him to
do whatever he wants to do.
“All you’ve heard [is], ‘Respect
the CEO, respect the ofce. If the
CEO calls you, you’ve got to call
the CEO back,’” James said. “Who
is he? He ain’t God. He’s just a man.
He’s just a servant.”
Page 16A The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014

LOCAL
T
h
is
s
ta
te
m
e
n
t is
p
u
b
lis
h
e
d
in
a
c
c
o
r
d
a
n
c
e
w
ith
S
e
c
tio
n
1
9
(
b
)
o
f th
e
D
e
K
a
lb
C
o
u
n
ty
O
r
g
a
n
iz
a
tio
n
a
l A
c
t o
f 1
9
8
1
, p
. 4
3
0
4
.
D
E
K
A
L
B
C
O
U
N
T
Y
, G
E
O
R
G
IA
S
T
A
T
E
M
E
N
T
O
F
F
IN
A
N
C
IA
L
P
O
S
IT
IO
N
B
Y
F
U
N
D
A
s
o
f J
u
n
e
3
0
, 2
0
1
4
(
In
th
o
u
s
a
n
d
s
o
f d
o
lla
r
s
/ u
n
a
u
d
ite
d
)
D
r
u
g
A
b
u
s
e
L
a
w
E
n
fo
r
c
e
m
e
n
t
S
p
e
e
d

E
m
e
r
g
e
n
c
y
S
p
e
c
ia
l T
a
x
S
p
e
c
ia
l T
a
x

P
E
G
F
o
r
e
c
lo
s
u
r
e
V
ic
tim
J
u
v
e
n
ile
T
r
e
a
tm
e
n
t
C
o
n
fis
c
a
te
d
S
tr
e
e
t
H
u
m
p
T
e
le
p
h
o
n
e
G
r
a
n
t-
G
r
a
n
ts
G
r
a
n
ts
D
e
s
ig
n
a
te
d
D
is
tr
ic
t
G
e
n
e
r
a
l
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
S
u
p
p
o
r
t
C
o
u
n
ty
J
a
il
R
e
g
is
tr
y
A
s
s
is
ta
n
c
e
R
e
c
r
e
a
tio
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
&
E
d
u
c
a
tio
n
M
o
n
ie
s
L
ig
h
ts
M
a
in
te
n
a
n
c
e
S
y
s
te
m
In
-
A
id
2
0
0
5
J
A
G
#
1
0
2
0
0
9
A
R
R
A
F
ir
e
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
U
n
in
c
o
r
p
o
r
a
te
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
1
0
0
2
0
1
2
0
3
2
0
4
2
0
5
2
0
6
2
0
7
2
0
8
2
0
9
2
1
0
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
5
2
5
0
2
5
7
2
6
0
2
7
0
2
7
1
2
7
2
A
s
s
e
ts
:
C
a
s
h
a
n
d
in
v
e
s
tm
e
n
ts
8
1
,6
5
1

2
,9
2
0

1
,8
5
3

-

8
0
3

1
0
9

7
0

1
7
5

2
5
2

8
,0
6
2

6
9

1
,2
3
9

4
,6
7
2

4
,7
4
0

1
8
9

9
1
1

(
1
0
,9
0
3
)

(
1
0
,1
4
5
)

(
2
,5
2
8
)

A
P
C
le
a
r
in
g
R
e
c
e
iv
a
b
le
1
0
,5
0
4

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
,0
1
2

1
,9
8
7

3
,9
9
0

In
v
e
n
to
r
ie
s
a
n
d
p
r
e
p
a
id
ite
m
s
6
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T
o
ta
l A
s
s
e
ts
9
2
,2
2
3

2
,9
2
0

1
,8
5
3

-

8
0
3

1
0
9

7
0

1
7
5

2
5
2

8
,1
3
5

6
9

1
,2
3
9

4
,6
7
2

4
,7
4
0

1
8
9

9
1
1

(
8
,8
9
1
)

(
8
,1
5
8
)

1
,4
6
2

L
ia
b
ilitie
s
:
A
c
c
o
u
n
ts
p
a
y
a
b
le
9
5
0

2

1

-

-

-

(
1
)

-

-

3
1
5

-

-

3
1

1
5
7

-

1

1
1
5

1
5
8

2
2

D
e
fe
r
r
e
d
r
e
v
e
n
u
e
1
1
,1
8
3


-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
0

-

-

-

1
,8
7
6

1
8
5

1
0

-

-

-

P
a
y
r
o
ll lia
b
ilitie
s
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A
d
v
a
n
c
e
p
a
y
m
e
n
ts
a
n
d
d
e
p
o
s
its
4
7
9

1
,7
0
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
4
8

-

-

1
8

-

-

-

-

-

9
4
6

N
o
te
s
p
a
y
a
b
le
8
6
,1
1
1

D
u
e
to
o
th
e
r
s
9
6
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
,4
7
1

-

-

-

-

-

-

1

-

(
1
4
0
)

O
th
e
r
A
c
c
r
u
e
d
L
ia
b
ilitie
s
T
o
ta
l L
ia
b
ilitie
s
9
9
,6
8
4

1
,7
0
5

1

-

-

-

(
1
)

-

-

2
,0
8
4

-

-

4
9

2
,0
3
3

1
8
5

1
1

1
1
6

1
5
8

8
2
8

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
(
7
,4
6
1
)

1
,2
1
5

1
,8
5
2

-

8
0
3

1
0
9

7
1

1
7
5

2
5
2

6
,0
5
1

6
9

1
,2
3
9

4
,6
2
3

2
,7
0
7

4

9
0
0

(
9
,0
0
7
)

(
8
,3
1
6
)

6
3
4

T
o
ta
l L
ia
b
ilitie
s
A
n
d
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
9
2
,2
2
3

2
,9
2
0

1
,8
5
3

-

8
0
3

1
0
9

7
0

1
7
5

2
5
2

8
,1
3
5

6
9

1
,2
3
9

4
,6
7
2

4
,7
4
0

1
8
9

9
1
1

(
8
,8
9
1
)

(
8
,1
5
8
)

1
,4
6
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

H
o
te
l /
R
e
n
ta
l M
o
to
r
C
a
p
ita
l
P
u
b
lic

B
u
ild
in
g
U
r
b
a
n

A
R
R
A
G
O
B
o
n
d
s
M
o
te
l
V
e
h
ic
le
E
x
c
is
e
1
9
8
7
G
O

1
9
9
8
1
9
9
3
2
0
0
1
G
O

2
0
0
6
G
O

H
o
s
t C
a
p
ita
l
Im
p
r
o
v
e
m
e
n
t
C
O
P
S
S
a
fe
ty
A
u
th
o
r
ity
R
e
d
e
v
e
lo
p
e
m
e
n
t
H
U
D
S
e
c
tio
n
C
a
p
ita
l
D
e
b
t
S
T
D
H
o
s
p
ita
l
P
o
lic
e
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
T
a
x
T
a
x
B
o
n
d
s
-
P
a
r
k
s
B
o
n
d
s
-
J
a
il
B
o
n
d
s
-
H
e
a
lth
B
o
n
d
s
-
P
a
r
k
s
B
o
n
d
s
-
P
,T
,L
P
r
o
je
c
ts
P
r
o
je
c
ts
P
r
o
je
c
ts
J
u
d
ic
ia
l F
a
c
ilitie
s
J
u
v
e
n
ile
C
o
u
r
t
A
g
e
m
c
u
1
0
8
L
o
a
n
P
r
o
je
c
ts
S
e
r
v
ic
e
D
e
b
t S
e
r
v
ic
e
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
2
7
3
2
7
4
2
7
5
2
8
0
3
1
1
3
1
2
3
1
3
3
1
4
3
1
5
3
3
0
3
5
0
3
5
1
3
5
4
3
5
5
3
5
6
3
5
7
3
6
0
4
1
0
4
1
1
A
s
s
e
ts
:
C
a
s
h
a
n
d
in
v
e
s
tm
e
n
ts
(
1
0
,2
5
8
)

(
7
,8
1
4
)

1
,6
7
7

1
,0
1
7

-

-

-

2
3
,9
1
5

3
5
,6
7
3

6
,0
7
3

1
9
,7
6
9

-

6
1
0

4
2
1

4
,3
4
0

3
,2
1
7

3
,8
4
7

4
,4
5
1

2
,3
8
8

A
P
C
le
a
r
in
g
(
2
0
0
)

(
9
2
9
)

R
e
c
e
iv
a
b
le
9
0
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

In
v
e
n
to
r
ie
s
a
n
d
p
r
e
p
a
id
ite
m
s
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

T
o
ta
l A
s
s
e
ts
(
9
,3
5
5
)

(
8
,0
1
4
)

1
,6
7
7

1
,0
1
7

-

-

-

2
3
,9
1
5

3
5
,6
7
3

6
,0
7
3

1
9
,7
6
9

-

6
1
0

4
2
1

4
,3
4
0

2
,2
8
8

3
,8
4
7

4
,4
5
1

2
,3
8
8

L
ia
b
ilitie
s
:
A
c
c
o
u
n
ts
p
a
y
a
b
le
-

1
,2
8
8

-

-

-

-

-

7

1
8

-

2
0

-

1

-

-

2
3
3

-

-

-

D
e
fe
r
r
e
d
r
e
v
e
n
u
e
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

9

-

-

-

-

3
,3
6
0

-

-

-

P
a
y
r
o
ll lia
b
ilitie
s
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A
d
v
a
n
c
e
p
a
y
m
e
n
ts
a
n
d
d
e
p
o
s
its
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

N
o
te
s
p
a
y
a
b
le
D
u
e
to
o
th
e
r
s
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

O
th
e
r
A
c
c
r
u
e
d
L
ia
b
ilitie
s
T
o
ta
l L
ia
b
ilitie
s
-

1
,2
8
8

-

-

-

-

-

7

1
8

-

2
9

-

1

-

-

3
,5
9
3

-

-

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
(
9
,3
5
5
)

(
9
,3
0
2
)

1
,6
7
7

1
,0
1
7

-

-

-

2
3
,9
0
8

3
5
,6
5
5

6
,0
7
3

1
9
,7
4
0

-

6
0
9

4
2
1

4
,3
4
0

(
1
,3
0
5
)

3
,8
4
7

4
,4
5
1

2
,3
8
8

T
o
ta
l L
ia
b
ilitie
s
A
n
d
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
(
9
,3
5
5
)

(
8
,0
1
4
)

1
,6
7
7

1
,0
1
7

-

-

-

2
3
,9
1
5

3
5
,6
7
3

6
,0
7
3

1
9
,7
6
9

-

6
1
0

4
2
1

4
,3
4
0

2
,2
8
8

3
,8
4
7

4
,4
5
1

2
,3
8
8

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

B
u
ild
in
g
P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
U
r
b
a
n

W
a
te
r
&
W
a
te
r
&
W
a
te
r
&
W
a
te
r
&
S
a
n
ita
tio
n
A
u
th
o
r
ity
B
o
n
d
s
J
u
d
ic
ia
l F
a
c
ilitie
s
R
e
d
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
S
e
w
e
r
S
e
w
e
r
B
o
n
d
s
S
e
w
e
r
S
e
w
e
r
S
a
n
ita
tio
n
S
a
n
ita
tio
n
A
R
R
A
C
a
p
ita
l
A
ir
p
o
r
t
A
ir
p
o
r
t
S
to
r
m
w
a
te
r
S
to
r
m
w
a
te
r
V
e
h
ic
le
V
e
h
ic
le
R
is
k
W
o
r
k
e
r
s
T
o
ta
l
D
e
b
t S
e
r
v
ic
e
D
e
b
t S
e
r
v
ic
e
D
e
b
t S
e
r
v
ic
e
O
p
e
r
a
tin
g
C
o
n
s
tr
u
c
tio
n
R
&
E
S
in
k
in
g
O
p
e
r
a
tin
g
C
o
n
s
tr
u
c
tio
n
P
r
o
je
c
ts
O
p
e
r
a
tin
g
C
o
n
s
tr
u
c
tio
n
U
tility

C
o
n
s
tr
u
c
tio
n
M
a
in
te
n
a
n
c
e
R
e
p
la
c
e
m
e
n
t
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
C
o
m
p
e
n
s
a
tio
n
A
ll
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
F
u
n
d
s
4
1
2
4
1
3
4
1
4
5
1
1
5
1
2
5
1
3
5
1
4
5
4
1
5
4
2
5
4
4
5
5
1
5
5
2
5
8
1
5
8
2
6
1
1
6
2
1
6
3
1
6
3
2
A
s
s
e
ts
:
C
a
s
h
a
n
d
in
v
e
s
tm
e
n
ts
(
7
4
5
)

(
3
,9
7
6
)

4
8
8

4
0
,2
3
7

3
8
5
,2
3
9

2
0
0
,6
6
9

3
3
,3
2
2

(
8
,9
0
9
)

(
6
,8
9
1
)

7
,4
0
2

7
,0
2
8

6
,1
3
8

1
1
,4
9
4

1
,8
6
5

(
2
7
3
)

2
3
,7
2
0

2
1
,3
5
4

2
,3
0
4

9
1
0
,6
6
8

A
P
C
le
a
r
in
g
(
1
,1
2
9
)

R
e
c
e
iv
a
b
le
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
4
,0
7
0

-

-

2
5
,5
5
0

In
v
e
n
to
r
ie
s
a
n
d
p
r
e
p
a
id
ite
m
s
-

-

-

7
,8
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
,4
9
2

-

4
7
0

-

1
0
,8
6
3

T
o
ta
l A
s
s
e
ts
(
7
4
5
)

(
3
,9
7
6
)

4
8
8

4
8
,0
7
0

3
8
5
,2
3
9

2
0
0
,6
6
9

3
3
,3
2
2

(
8
,9
0
9
)

(
6
,8
9
1
)

7
,4
0
2

7
,0
2
8

6
,1
3
8

1
1
,4
9
4

1
,8
6
5

2
,2
1
9

3
7
,7
9
0

2
1
,8
2
4

2
,3
0
4

9
4
5
,9
5
2

L
ia
b
ilitie
s
:
A
c
c
o
u
n
ts
p
a
y
a
b
le
-

-

-

1
4
,8
0
0

2
6
0

1
0
8

-

4
3
3

4
0

-

3
2

3
5

1
2

-

1
,3
6
9

1
5

1
,1
8
6

3

2
1
,3
1
6

D
e
fe
r
r
e
d
r
e
v
e
n
u
e
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
,7
4
0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1
9
,4
1
3

P
a
y
r
o
ll lia
b
ilitie
s
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A
d
v
a
n
c
e
p
a
y
m
e
n
ts
a
n
d
d
e
p
o
s
its
-

-

-

1
3
7

-

2
,4
8
3

-

-

-

-

4
5

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

5
,1
1
3

N
o
te
s
p
a
y
a
b
le
-

8
6
,1
1
1

D
u
e
to
o
th
e
r
s
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2
,4
3
2

O
th
e
r
A
c
c
r
u
e
d
L
ia
b
ilitie
s
6
,2
7
3

6
,2
7
3

T
o
ta
l L
ia
b
ilitie
s
-

-

-

1
4
,9
3
7

2
6
0

2
,5
9
1

-

3
,1
7
3

4
0

-

7
7

3
5

1
2

-

1
,3
6
9

1
5

7
,4
5
9

3

1
4
0
,6
5
8

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
(
7
4
5
)

(
3
,9
7
6
)

4
8
8

3
3
,1
3
3

3
8
4
,9
7
9

1
9
8
,0
7
8

3
3
,3
2
2

(
1
2
,0
8
2
)

(
6
,9
3
1
)

7
,4
0
2

6
,9
5
1

6
,1
0
3

1
1
,4
8
2

1
,8
6
5

8
5
0

3
7
,7
7
5

1
4
,3
6
5

2
,3
0
1

8
0
5
,2
9
4

T
o
ta
l L
ia
b
ilitie
s
A
n
d
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
(
7
4
5
)

(
3
,9
7
6
)

4
8
8

4
8
,0
7
0

3
8
5
,2
3
9

2
0
0
,6
6
9

3
3
,3
2
2

(
8
,9
0
9
)

(
6
,8
9
1
)

7
,4
0
2

7
,0
2
8

6
,1
3
8

1
1
,4
9
4

1
,8
6
5

2
,2
1
9

3
7
,7
9
0

2
1
,8
2
4

2
,3
0
4

9
4
5
,9
5
2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

G
e
n
e
r
a
l F
u
n
d
1
0
0

G
r
a
n
t-
In
-
A
id
F
u
n
d
2
5
0
2
0
0
1
G
O
B
o
n
d
s
-
P
a
r
k
s
F
u
n
d
3
1
4
U
r
b
a
n
R
e
d
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t A
g
e
n
c
y
B
o
n
d
D
e
b
t S
e
r
v
ic
e
F
u
n
d
4
1
4

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
P
r
o
p
e
r
ty
T
a
x
e
s
1
4
8
,7
5
6

1
9
,3
9
2

C
o
n
tr
ib
u
tio
n
s
fr
o
m
p
r
iv
a
te
s
o
u
r
c
e
s
4
2
5

1
4
7

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
1
,8
5
5

1
1

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
6
1
,4
8
2

3
8
,0
8
9

In
te
r
g
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
ta
l
1
1
,6
2
5

8
,1
3
7

In
te
r
g
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
ta
l
(
2
7
7
)

-

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
1
,2
6
5

8
9

O
th
e
r
T
a
x
e
s
5
,5
9
9

2
,0
3
4

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
(
1
,7
2
9
)

1
,0
2
1

C
o
n
tr
ib
u
tio
n
s
fr
o
m
p
r
iv
a
te
s
o
u
r
c
e
s
(
1
8
3
)

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
(
3
6
4
)

(
3
6
4
)

L
ic
e
n
s
e
s
a
n
d
p
e
r
m
its
9
3

-

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
(
1
,8
8
9
)

2
,7
9
8

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
(
3
3
)

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
9
0
1

(
2
7
5
)

In
te
r
g
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
ta
l
2
,0
0
8

7
0
6

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
1
,1
9
7

1
,1
9
7

P
r
o
c
e
e
d
s
fr
o
m
s
a
le
o
f b
o
n
d
s
(
3
8
)

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
C
h
a
r
g
e
s
fo
r
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
3
4
,8
0
7

1
1
,2
8
7

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
9
,6
2
9

1
3
,3
0
0

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
(
1
,5
2
6
)

-

D
e
b
t S
e
r
v
ic
e
9
0
1

2
1
4

F
in
e
s
a
n
d
F
o
r
fe
itu
r
e
s
1
0
,2
7
7

5
,2
5
4

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
2
4
,1
9
7

2
4
,1
9
7

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
o
u
t
-

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

3
3

G
e
n
e
r
a
l G
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
t:
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
3
,9
9
5

2
4
,2
0
8

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
(
1
,2
6
5
)

(
9
7
7
)

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
5
,7
0
9

(
1
,3
9
4
)

F
in
a
n
c
e
-

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
9
0
1

(
7
6
3
)

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
2
,4
4
5

6
4
0

W
o
r
k
fo
r
c
e
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
8
,0
9
3

2
,2
1
4

C
a
p
ita
l P
r
o
je
c
ts
2
0
,7
4
1

3
2
8

P
r
o
c
e
e
d
s
o
f g
e
n
e
r
a
l lo
n
g
-
te
r
m
lia
b
ilitie
s
-

-

C
iv
il a
n
d
C
r
im
in
a
l C
o
u
r
t S
y
s
te
m
:
F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
-

-

W
a
te
r
&
S
e
w
e
r
O
p
e
r
a
tin
g
F
u
n
d
5
1
1
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
3
7
,4
0
4

3
7
,4
0
4

S
h
e
r
iff
3
2
3

7
8

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
3
,2
5
4

(
2
8
)

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3
0
8
,5
8
0

1
1
3
,4
4
5

J
u
v
e
n
ile
C
o
u
r
t
1
,4
6
1

3
2
7

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
2
3
,9
9
5

3
0
0

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
S
u
p
e
r
io
r
C
o
u
r
t
1
,1
9
4

4
6
0

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
1
6
0

6
8

G
e
n
e
r
a
l G
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
t:
S
ta
te
C
o
u
r
t
2
8

2
3

2
0
0
6
G
O
B
o
n
d
s
-
P
a
r
k
s
, T
r
a
n
s
p
o
r
ta
tio
n
, L
ib
r
a
r
ie
s
F
u
n
d
3
1
5
C
h
a
r
g
e
s
fo
r
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
2
5
7
,6
5
5

1
2
3
,3
4
5

C
h
ie
f E
x
e
c
u
tiv
e
O
ffic
e
r
1
,2
8
9

7
5
5

S
o
lic
ito
r
8
9
6

8
7

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
1
,5
0
0

3
9
4

B
o
a
r
d
o
f C
o
m
m
is
s
io
n
e
r
s
3
,1
4
2

1
,2
1
7

D
is
tr
ic
t A
tto
r
n
e
y
1
8
4

2
9
8

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
-

-

L
a
w
D
e
p
a
r
tm
e
n
t
4
,7
7
6

1
,4
9
7

P
u
b
lic
D
e
fe
n
d
e
r
4

4

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
(
6
,9
0
9
)

1
7

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
2
8
,1
6
5

2
8
,1
6
5

E
th
ic
s
2
1
5

2
3

M
a
g
is
tr
a
te
C
o
u
r
t
1
,1
0
3

1
3
9

In
te
r
g
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
(
6
4
)

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
8
7
,4
8
0

1
5
1
,9
7
2

G
e
o
g
r
a
p
h
ic
In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
2
,1
1
0

7
4
9

P
o
lic
e
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
2
,5
4
1

6
7
2

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
(
3
,2
8
5
)

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
R
is
k
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
-

-

F
ir
e
&
R
e
s
c
u
e
1
8
5

5
2

C
o
n
tr
ib
u
tio
n
s
fr
o
m
p
r
iv
a
te
s
o
u
r
c
e
s
(
3
,8
1
0
)

-

F
in
a
n
c
e
7
,4
1
9

(
7
,1
7
4
)

F
a
c
ilitie
s
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
1
5
,1
7
2

8
,3
7
5

P
u
b
lic
W
o
r
k
s
-

-

P
r
o
c
e
e
d
s
fr
o
m
s
a
le
o
f b
o
n
d
s
(
3
,2
8
5
)

-

W
a
te
r
a
n
d
S
e
w
e
r
1
3
2
,0
8
5

6
3
,5
3
9

P
u
r
c
h
a
s
in
g
3
,1
9
9

1
,3
5
6

C
o
m
m
u
n
ity
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
1
6
,3
6
9

4
,7
2
8

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
(
3
6
,6
5
9
)

3
6
,6
5
9

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
-

4
3

H
u
m
a
n
R
e
s
o
u
r
c
e
s
&
M
e
r
it S
y
s
te
m
3
,2
0
0

1
,3
9
7

P
a
r
k
s
1
,7
7
6

2
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
(
5
4
,0
1
2
)

3
6
,6
7
6

In
te
r
fu
n
d
tr
a
n
s
fe
r
s
1
4
7
,9
7
6

6
7
,3
9
9

In
fo
r
m
a
tio
n
S
y
s
te
m
s
1
8
,9
0
0

8
,0
6
2

E
x
te
n
s
io
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
-

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
-

(
4
,9
6
8
)

F
in
a
n
c
e
6
,5
1
0

2
,9
4
3

F
a
m
ily
&
C
h
ild
r
e
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
(
7
1
9
)

-

P
a
r
k
s
3
1
,5
7
5

3
2
9

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
2
8
7
,4
8
0

1
1
8
,8
3
9

P
r
o
p
e
r
ty
A
p
p
r
a
is
a
l
4
,4
8
8

2
,2
0
6

S
a
n
ita
tio
n
1
3

-

L
ib
r
a
r
y
7
,2
8
4

3
8
6

T
a
x
C
o
m
m
is
s
io
n
e
r
7
,0
7
6

3
,0
6
6

C
o
m
m
u
n
ity
R
e
la
tio
n
s
-

-

T
r
a
n
s
p
o
r
ta
tio
n
1
,6
9
7

3
6
4

R
e
g
is
tr
a
r
a
n
d
E
le
c
tio
n
s
3
,4
2
3

1
,2
7
8

F
le
e
t M
a
in
t.
-

-

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
-

-

W
a
te
r
&
S
e
w
e
r
B
o
n
d
s
C
o
n
s
tr
u
c
tio
n
F
u
n
d
5
1
2
C
iv
il a
n
d
C
r
im
in
a
l C
o
u
r
t S
y
s
te
m
:
A
n
im
a
l C
o
n
tr
o
l
-

-

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
(
9
4
,5
6
8
)

(
5
8
)

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
S
h
e
r
iff
7
6
,3
8
6

3
6
,0
2
4

B
d
o
f H
e
a
lth
1

-

(
5
4
,0
1
2
)

1
,0
2
1

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
J
u
v
e
n
ile
C
o
u
r
t
8
,9
9
2

3
,0
6
1

S
r
C
itiz
e
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
5
,5
7
9

1
,3
4
7

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t In
c
o
m
e
-

1
9
2

S
u
p
e
r
io
r
C
o
u
r
t
8
,6
3
2

4
,0
1
5

H
u
m
a
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
1
,2
6
9

6
1
5

H
o
s
t C
a
p
ita
l P
r
o
je
c
ts
F
u
n
d
3
3
0
P
r
o
c
e
e
d
s
fr
o
m
s
a
le
o
f b
o
n
d
s
(
1
7
,4
7
7
)

-

C
le
r
k
S
u
p
e
r
io
r
C
o
u
r
t
6
,6
6
3

3
,1
8
0

K
e
e
p
D
e
k
a
lb
B
e
a
u
tifu
l
1
6

-

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
4
0
8
,6
4
4

4
0
8
,6
4
4

S
ta
te
C
o
u
r
t
1
3
,2
0
8

6
,3
3
3

A
r
ts
, C
u
ltu
r
e
, a
n
d
E
n
te
r
ta
in
m
e
n
t
-

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3
9
1
,1
6
7

4
0
8
,8
3
6

S
o
lic
ito
r
S
ta
te
C
o
u
r
t
6
,1
0
6

2
,8
5
2

R
e
g
is
tr
a
r
/E
le
c
tio
n
s
-

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t In
c
o
m
e
3
3
5

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
D
is
tr
ic
t A
tto
r
n
e
y
1
1
,8
1
8

5
,9
0
7

W
a
te
r
&
S
e
w
e
r
2
4
8

-

In
te
r
g
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
ta
l
(
9
,4
7
8
)

3
1
5

C
a
p
ita
l P
r
o
je
c
ts
3
8
7
,6
9
7

2
1
,5
4
8

C
h
ild
A
d
v
o
c
a
te
1
,9
9
6

8
6
6

N
o
n
-
D
e
p
a
r
tm
e
n
ta
l
3
6

D
e
fe
r
r
e
d
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
-

-

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
3
,4
7
0

2
,3
0
9

P
r
o
b
a
te
C
o
u
r
t
1
,5
7
4

7
3
4

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
1
5

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
1
1
,9
3
4

1
1
,6
2
1

3
9
1
,1
6
7
2
3
,8
5
7
M
e
d
ic
a
l E
x
a
m
in
e
r
2
,5
0
1

1
,1
8
3

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
(
2
)

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
(
5
,5
7
9
)

(
5
,5
7
9
)

P
u
b
lic
D
e
fe
n
d
e
r
7
,7
0
7

3
,5
9
3

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
(
3
0
,9
6
9
)

(
4
9
5
)

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
(
2
,7
8
8
)

6
,3
5
7

W
a
te
r
&
S
e
w
e
r
R
&
E
F
u
n
d
5
1
3
M
a
g
is
tr
a
te
C
o
u
r
t
2
,7
5
4

1
,3
7
4

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
9
,6
2
9

1
0
,5
9
3

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
:
C
a
p
ita
l P
r
o
je
c
ts
2
8
,1
7
5

3
2
5

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
A
d
m
in
&
C
o
m
m
u
n
ic
a
tio
n
s
-

-

G
r
a
n
ts
/2
0
0
5
J
A
G
#
1
0
F
u
n
d
2
5
7
U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
(
3
0
,9
6
3
)

(
4
1
)

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
1
5
,8
5
8

-

A
n
im
a
l C
o
n
tr
o
l
3
,8
2
1

1
,8
1
8

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
(
2
,7
8
8
)

2
8
4

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
(
4
6
)

-

P
o
lic
e
2
,1
8
4

1
,2
3
7

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
(
1
5
,3
3
9
)

3
3
,4
9
0

F
ir
e
&
R
e
s
c
u
e
9
,0
5
4

3
,9
7
4

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
1
7
6
,3
1
1

1
7
6
,3
1
1

P
la
n
n
in
g
&
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
1
,3
5
7

5
6
9

In
te
r
g
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
4
8
9

1
6
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
7
6
,7
8
4

2
0
9
,8
0
1

P
u
b
lic
W
o
r
k
s
:
T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
9
7

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
D
ir
e
c
to
r
s
O
ffic
e
2
9
2

1
9
6

D
e
fe
r
r
e
d
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
-

-

C
a
p
ita
l P
r
o
je
c
ts
1
8
1
,5
4
0

1
2
,6
1
2

E
c
o
n
o
m
ic
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
1
,2
9
4

5
5
6

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
(
4
1
)

(
4
1
)

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
(
4
,7
5
6
)

(
8
8
9
)

P
u
b
lic
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
-
L
ib
r
a
r
y
1
3
,2
8
8

6
,4
8
7

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
5
4
5

1
2
8

1
7
6
,7
8
4

1
1
,7
2
3

H
e
a
lth
a
n
d
H
u
m
a
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
E
x
te
n
s
io
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
6
0
0

2
5
8

P
o
lic
e
7
7
0

1
3
8

W
a
te
r
&
S
e
w
e
r
S
in
k
in
g
F
u
n
d
5
1
4
P
u
b
lic
B
o
a
r
d
o
f H
e
a
lth

3
,9
5
6

1
,9
3
3

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
(
2
2
5
)

(
1
4
)

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
C
o
m
m
u
n
ity
S
e
r
v
ic
e
B
o
a
r
d
1
,7
8
4

7
9
5

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
5
4
5

1
2
4

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
F
a
m
ily
a
n
d
C
h
ild
r
e
n
S
e
r
v
ic
e
s
1
,2
7
8

6
2
3

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

H
u
m
a
n
a
n
d
C
o
m
m
u
n
ity
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
3
,0
5
6

1
,0
0
4

2
0
0
9
A
R
R
A
S
tim
u
lu
s
F
u
n
d
2
6
0
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
5
8
3

2
7
1

C
itiz
e
n
H
e
lp
C
e
n
te
r
-

-


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
F
r
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
4
5
,6
4
6

3
3
,9
0
9

C
a
p
ita
l Im
p
r
o
v
e
m
e
n
t
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
P
r
o
c
e
e
d
s
fr
o
m
s
a
le
o
f b
o
n
d
s
-

-

C
IP
-

-

P
r
o
p
e
r
ty
T
a
x
e
s
-

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
2
1
,9
1
9

2
1
,9
1
9

G
O
B
o
n
d
s
-
P
a
r
k
s
-

-

S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
6
8
,1
4
8

5
6
,0
9
9

N
o
n
-
D
e
p
a
r
tm
e
n
ta
l
3
3
,6
9
3

5
,2
6
8

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
G
r
a
n
ts
1

-

In
te
r
g
o
v
e
r
n
m
e
n
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
(
9
,8
9
9
)

3
9

D
e
b
t S
e
r
v
ic
e
6
8
,1
4
8

2
2
,7
7
7

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
-

3
1

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
fr
o
m
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
2
9
9

-

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
-

-

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
1
,0
6
2

(
1
4
,1
3
8
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
r
r
ie
d
F
o
r
w
a
r
d
9
2
9

9
2
9

C
IP
-

-

T
r
a
n
s
fe
r
s
T
o
O
th
e
r
F
u
n
d
s
1
0
,0
2
3

8
,2
4
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
(
8
,6
7
1
)

9
6
8

U
n
a
p
p
r
o
p
r
ia
te
d
-

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
3
0
8
,5
8
0

1
2
0
,9
0
6

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
:
T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
6
8
,1
4
8

2
2
,7
7
7

W
o
r
k
fo
r
c
e
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
8
1
1

6
8

N
o
n
-
D
e
p
a
r
tm
e
n
ta
l
(
9
,4
8
2
)

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
r
e
s
(
8
,6
7
1
)

6
8

Page 17A The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014

LOCAL
F
ire
F
u
n
d
2
7
0
C
a
p
ita
l Im
p
ro
v
e
m
e
n
t P
ro
je
c
t F
u
n
d
3
5
0
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t F
u
n
d
2
0
1

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
S
a
n
ita
tio
n
O
p
e
ra
tin
g
F
u
n
d
5
4
1
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
P
ro
p
e
rty
T
a
x
e
s
4
2
,1
3
1

2
,6
8
0

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
3
0
,3
9
2

4
,2
6
9

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
1
2
,2
4
4

7
,5
8
5

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t In
c
o
m
e
4
3
4

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
4

2

L
ic
e
n
s
e
s
a
n
d
P
e
rm
its
5
,1
9
6

2
,7
6
6

O
th
e
r T
a
x
e
s
1

C
o
n
trib
u
tio
n
s
fro
m
p
riv
a
te
s
o
u
rc
e
s
(1
1
0
)

2

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
6
2
,5
7
7

1
1
,5
4
8

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
2

1

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
(3
,5
3
5
)

-

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
1
4
7

-

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
(7
)

(1
)

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
6
7
0

3
2
0

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
-

3
0

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
4
6

1
2
9

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
2
6

1
1

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
2
1

1
8

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
(4
,4
9
5
)

(5
,5
0
0
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
7
,4
3
8

7
,4
3
8

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
T
o
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
-

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
6
,3
0
3

6
,3
0
3

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
2
8
,2
3
3

2
8
,2
3
3

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
7
0
,2
1
2

1
9
,1
1
7

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
8
6
9

8
6
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
6
1
,3
6
9

1
6
,9
0
7

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
5
0
,9
1
9

2
7
,0
3
4

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
6
,0
8
6

3
,6
4
6

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
in
a
n
c
e
2
5
0

1
2
5

P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
-P
o
lic
e
-

-

B
o
a
rd
C
o
m
m
is
s
io
n
e
rs
-

-

S
a
n
ita
tio
n
6
8
,1
7
9

3
2
,9
0
8

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
-F
ire
5
0
,2
9
4

2
2
,6
9
8

G
IS
6
4
8

9
2

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
1
,7
8
3

-

P
la
n
n
in
g
&
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
5
,9
3
8

2
,3
0
7

N
o
n
-D
e
p
a
rtm
e
n
ta
l
1
1
,0
7
5

3
,4
3
6

F
a
c
ilitie
s
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
2
,8
8
0

1

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
-

-

P
u
b
lic
W
o
rk
s
- D
ire
c
to
r's
O
ffic
e
-

1
4
3

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

F
le
e
t M
a
in
te
n
a
n
c
e
8
6

-

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(1
,8
3
4
)

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
1
4
7

-

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(2
2
0
)

In
fo
rm
a
tio
n
S
y
s
te
m
4
,5
3
5

1
,8
2
6

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
7
0
,2
1
2

3
1
,1
9
9

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
1

(1
9
)

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
6
1
,3
6
9

2
5
,9
1
4

F
in
a
n
c
e

-

-

6
,0
8
6

2
,4
3
1

C
le
rk
S
u
p
e
rio
r C
o
u
rt
-

-

S
a
n
ita
tio
n
C
o
n
s
tru
c
tio
n
F
u
n
d
5
4
2
S
p
e
c
ia
l T
a
x
- D
e
s
ig
n
a
te
d
S
e
rv
ic
e
s
F
u
n
d
2
7
1

R
e
c
o
rd
e
rs
C
o
u
rt
7
5
0

3
1
4

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
P
E
G
S
u
p
p
o
rt F
u
n
d
2
0
3

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
P
o
lic
e
1
9
5

6

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
L
ib
ra
ry
1
3

-

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
2
6
,5
7
7

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
P
ro
p
e
rty
T
a
x
e
s
1
2
,8
7
0

5
1
2

T
ra
n
s
p
o
rta
tio
n
2
1
,4
6
3

1
,5
1
8

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
(6
,4
4
5
)

(6
,4
4
5
)

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
1
0

1

S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
1
,9
6
1

1
,2
1
5

P
u
b
lic
W
o
rk
s
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
0
,1
3
2

(6
,4
4
5
)

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
1
4
5

4
7

L
ic
e
n
s
e
s
a
n
d
P
e
rm
its
-

-

H
o
s
t C
a
p
ita
l O
u
tla
y
2
5
,9
5
2

1
,2
6
3

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
,9
5
9

1
,9
5
9

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

(3
)

R
o
a
d
&
D
ra
in
a
g
e
2
0
,2
9
2

2
,4
7
0

C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
5
,1
0
9

5
2
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
,1
1
4

2
,0
0
7

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
-

-

P
a
rk
s
2
7
7

-

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
8
9
1

3
4
0

P
la
n
n
in
g
&
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
5
9
6

1
3
7

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
1
5
,0
2
3

(4
3
)

P
E
G
S
u
p
p
o
rt
2
,1
1
4

1
7
4

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
2
6
0

1
3
6

C
o
m
m
u
n
ity
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
2
0
,1
3
2

4
8
6

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(1
9
)

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
1
9
,3
0
3

7
,0
5
9

E
c
o
n
o
m
ic
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
1
0
7

-

2
,1
1
4

1
5
5

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
(2
,1
0
2
)

(2
,1
0
2
)

E
x
te
n
s
io
n
S
e
rv
ic
e
7

-

S
a
n
ita
tio
n
A
R
R
A
C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
F
u
n
d
5
4
4
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3
3
,1
8
3

7
,1
5
7

N
o
n
-D
e
p
a
rtm
e
n
ta
l
(2
8
,1
6
8
)

-

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
C
o
u
n
ty
J
a
il F
u
n
d
2
0
4
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
ire
1
,2
8
6

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
- P
o
lic
e
-

1
0

D
F
A
C
S
-

-

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
-

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
P
u
b
lic
W
o
rk
s
- T
ra
n
s
p
o
rta
tio
n
3
,1
1
5

9
0
8

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
-

-

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
(1
2
,3
3
9
)

-

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(3
3
3
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
7
,4
0
2

7
,4
0
2

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
1
1
0

7
4

P
u
b
lic
W
o
rk
s
- R
o
a
d
s
a
n
d
D
ra
in
a
g
e
1
0
,2
1
5

5
,6
9
0

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
5
0
,9
1
9

7
,2
9
4

F
in
e
s
a
n
d
fo
rfe
itu
re
s
8
0
7

5
6
4

P
a
rk
s
a
n
d
R
e
c
re
a
tio
n
1
0
,8
8
7

5
,2
3
7

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
(4
,9
3
7
)

7
,4
0
2

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
2

2

A
rts
, c
u
ltu
re
&
e
n
te
rta
in
m
e
n
t
-

-

C
O
P
S
P
ro
je
c
ts
F
u
n
d
3
5
1
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
9
1
9

6
4
0

N
o
n
-D
e
p
a
rtm
e
n
ta
l
8
,9
6
6

3
,9
5
5

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
3
,0
6
1

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
to
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
-

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(7
,9
9
8
)

-

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
T
o
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
9
1
9

6
4
0

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(3
2
7
)

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t In
c
o
m
e
1
,4
1
9

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
(4
,9
3
7
)

-

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
3
3
,1
8
3

1
5
,4
7
3

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
-

-

9
1
9

6
4
0

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
,4
1
9

-

A
irp
o
rt O
p
e
ra
tin
g
F
u
n
d
5
5
1
S
p
e
c
ia
l T
a
x
D
is
tric
t - U
n
in
c
o
rp
o
ra
te
d
F
u
n
d
2
7
2
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
F
o
re
c
lo
s
u
re
R
e
g
is
try
F
u
n
d
2
0
5
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
-

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
1
,4
1
9

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

6

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
-

1
,4
1
9

-

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
5
,0
7
1

2
,4
6
6

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
2
4
0

6
0

S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
-

-

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

-

O
th
e
r T
a
x
e
s
3
0
,8
0
5

2
,7
4
5

P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
- J
u
d
ic
ia
l F
a
c
ilitie
s
F
u
n
d
3
5
4
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
7
,8
6
7

7
,8
6
7

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
9
3
9

9
3
9

L
ic
e
n
s
e
s
a
n
d
P
e
rm
its
2
0
,8
6
2

1
5
,6
8
6

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
2
,9
3
8

1
0
,3
3
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
,1
7
9

9
9
9

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
in
e
s
a
n
d
F
o
rfe
itu
re
s
1
7
,1
1
1

9
,6
5
0

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t In
c
o
m
e
(1
,7
4
4
)

-

D
e
K
a
lb
-P
e
a
c
h
tre
e
A
irp
o
rt
1
1
,1
6
1

1
,4
1
8

P
la
n
n
in
g
&
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
1
,1
7
9

2
1
0

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
(1
0
1
)

(1
6
)

D
e
fe
rre
d
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
-

-

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
2
,0
0
0

2
,0
0
0

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(1
4
)

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
(5
5
,5
5
7
)

(2
6
,4
6
7
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
6
1
8

6
1
8

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(2
2
3
)

(3
0
)

1
,1
7
9

1
9
6

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
F
o
rw
a
rd
3
,9
9
0

3
,9
9
0

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
(1
,1
2
6
)

6
1
8

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
1
2
,9
3
8

3
,3
8
8

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
7
,1
1
0

5
,5
8
8

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
C
a
p
ita
l p
ro
je
c
ts
4
4
1

9

A
irp
o
rt C
o
n
s
tru
c
tio
n
F
u
n
d
5
5
2
V
ic
tim
A
s
s
is
ta
n
c
e
F
u
n
d
2
0
6
G
e
n
e
ra
l G
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
t:
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(1
,5
6
7
)

-

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
C
h
ie
f E
x
e
c
u
tiv
e
O
ffic
e
r
4
8
9

1
9
0

(1
,1
2
6
)

9

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
F
in
a
n
c
e
8
7
4

3
3
0

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
3
8
0

2
2
6

P
o
lic
e
S
e
rv
ic
e
s
-C
o
d
e
E
n
fo
rc
e
m
e
n
t
-

1

B
u
ild
in
g
A
u
th
o
rity
- J
u
v
e
n
ile
C
o
u
rt F
u
n
d
3
5
5
In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
(7
,1
4
0
)

-

F
in
e
s
a
n
d
F
o
rfe
itu
re
s
1
,0
0
0

2
0
2

R
e
c
o
rd
e
rs
C
o
u
rt
4
,2
6
5

1
,9
6
8

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
D
e
fe
rre
d
re
v
e
n
u
e
-

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
5
1

5
1

P
la
n
n
in
g
&
D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t
4
,0
7
7

1
,5
0
6

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
2
,6
6
3

2
,0
0
0

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
,4
3
1

4
7
9

N
o
n
-D
e
p
a
rtm
e
n
ta
l
7
,4
0
5

1
,5
9
1

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
(5
6
)

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
7
,4
4
2

7
,4
4
2

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
-

-

P
ro
c
e
e
d
s
o
f lo
n
g
-te
rm
L
ia
b
ilitie
s
1
,2
6
1

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
,9
6
5

9
,4
4
2

V
ic
tim
A
s
s
is
ta
n
c
e
7
8

8

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(6
3
2
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
4
2
1

4
2
1

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
T
o
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
1
,3
5
3

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
1
7
,1
1
0

4
,9
5
4

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
,6
2
6

4
2
1

C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
1
7
,4
6
4

5
,1
1
0

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

3
6
2

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(1
4
,4
9
9
)

(1
,7
7
1
)

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
1
,4
3
1

3
7
0

H
o
s
p
ita
l F
u
n
d
2
7
3
C
a
p
ita
l p
ro
je
c
ts
4
7
4

-

2
,9
6
5

3
,3
3
9


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
1
,1
5
2

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
1
,6
2
6

-

S
to
rm
w
a
te
r U
tility
F
u
n
d
5
8
1
R
e
c
re
a
tio
n
F
u
n
d
2
0
7
P
ro
p
e
rty
T
a
x
e
s
1
3
,0
2
0

8
4
8

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
4
,1
3
3

2
,5
6
0

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
-

-

U
rb
a
n
R
e
d
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t A
g
e
n
c
y
F
u
n
d
3
5
6
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
1
2

8

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t In
c
o
m
e
3
3
1

(4
)

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
1
4
,7
5
0

4
8
3

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
9
6
2

4
5
0

P
ro
c
e
e
d
s
o
f g
e
n
e
ra
l lo
n
g
te
rm
lia
b
ilitie
s
-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

-

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

3

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
-

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

6

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
6
,1
4
0

1
6
,1
4
0

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
3
7

3
7

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
(5
,4
9
7
)

(5
,4
9
7
)

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3
0
,9
0
2

1
6
,6
3
1

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
9
9
9

4
9
0

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
1
,9
8
7

(2
,0
9
3
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
4
,7
3
4

4
,7
3
4

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
4
,7
3
4

4
,7
4
0

S
to
rm
w
a
te
r U
tilitie
s
3
0
,9
0
2

5
,2
3
9

P
a
rk
s
a
n
d
R
e
c
re
a
tio
n
9
9
9

4
2
1

H
e
a
lth
a
n
d
W
e
lfa
re
-H
o
s
p
ita
l
1
1
,9
8
7

7
,7
1
6

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(2
)

F
u
n
d
e
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
-

C
a
p
ita
l p
ro
je
c
ts
4
,6
9
9

4
2
1

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(9
0
)

9
9
9

4
1
9

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(4
5
4
)

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
3
5

(2
1
)

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
3
0
,9
0
2

5
,1
4
9

1
1
,9
8
7

7
,2
6
2

4
,7
3
4

4
0
0


P
o
lic
e
S
e
rv
ic
e
s
F
u
n
d
2
7
4
H
U
D
S
e
c
tio
n
1
0
8
L
o
a
n
F
u
n
d
3
5
7
J
u
v
e
n
ile
S
e
rv
ic
e
s
F
u
n
d
2
0
8


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
S
to
rm
w
a
te
r U
tility
C
o
n
s
tru
c
tio
n
F
u
n
d
5
8
2
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
P
ro
p
e
rty
T
a
x
e
s
5
4
,7
6
1

3
,1
3
9

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
(1
,2
7
4
)

2
,3
6
5

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
1
1
,4
1
3

7
,0
7
1

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

1

C
o
n
trib
u
tio
n
s
fro
m
p
riv
a
te
s
o
u
rc
e
s
1
8
7

-

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
3
0

1
4

O
th
e
r T
a
x
e
s
-

2

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
9
,1
0
0

-

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
1
,4
2
2

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
2
2
3

2
2
3

L
ic
e
n
s
e
s
a
n
d
P
e
rm
its
1
,0
2
8

3
3
1

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
6

1
6

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
5
3

2
3
7

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
4
7
8

1
7
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
7
,8
4
2

2
,3
8
2

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
2
0
0

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

1

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
2
,4
6
9

2
,4
6
9

J
u
v
e
n
ile
C
o
u
rt
2
5
3

7
2

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
1
6
5

3
3

C
a
p
ita
l p
ro
je
c
ts
5
,7
2
6

3
,6
8
7

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
4
,2
7
8

2
,4
6
9

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(1
0
)

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
3
8
,5
0
4

2
1
,1
7
7

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
2
,1
1
6

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
2
5
3

6
2

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
3
,3
7
8

1
3
,3
7
8

7
,8
4
2

3
,6
8
7

C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
9
,1
2
8

6
0
4

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
1
9
,7
2
7

4
5
,3
1
1

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(4
,8
5
0
)

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
A
R
R
A
C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
F
u
n
d
3
6
0
4
,2
7
8

6
0
4

D
ru
g
A
b
u
s
e
T
re
a
tm
e
n
t &
E
d
u
c
a
tio
n
F
u
n
d
2
0
9
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
T
o
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
3
2
8

3
0
7

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
P
o
lic
e
S
e
rv
ic
e
s
9
9
,4
9
1

4
6
,5
7
1

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
1
9
,9
0
8

7
,7
3
5

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
V
e
h
ic
le
M
a
in
te
n
a
n
c
e
F
u
n
d
6
1
1
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

1
1
9
,7
2
7

5
4
,6
1
3

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
F
in
e
s
a
n
d
F
o
rfe
itu
re
s
1
3
0

1
2
1

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
5
9
7

2
8

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
3
3

1
3
3


H
o
te
l / M
o
te
l T
a
x
F
u
n
d
2
7
5
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
3
,8
1
9

3
,8
1
9

In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
2
0
0

9
6

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
6
3

2
5
4


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
4
,4
1
6

3
,8
4
7

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
3
3
,1
0
0

1
5
,5
7
9

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
6
0
0

5
2

H
e
a
lth
a
n
d
W
e
lfa
re
2
4
4

6

O
th
e
r T
a
x
e
s
4
,4
6
9

2
,8
7
1

C
a
p
ita
l p
ro
je
c
ts
3
4

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
3
8
3

3
8
3

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
1
9

(4
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
,5
4
8

1
,5
4
8

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
4
,3
8
2

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3
4
,2
8
3

1
6
,1
1
0

2
6
3

2

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
6
,0
1
7

4
,4
1
9

4
,4
1
6

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
le
e
t M
a
in
te
n
a
n
c
e
3
4
,2
8
3

1
6
,9
1
4

L
a
w
E
n
fo
rc
e
m
e
n
t C
o
n
fis
c
a
te
d
M
o
n
ie
s
F
u
n
d
2
1
0

C
o
n
v
e
n
tio
n
B
u
re
a
u
2
,4
6
0

1
,1
8
7

G
O
B
o
n
d
s
D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
F
u
n
d
4
1
0
In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

(1
,6
5
4
)

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
T
o
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
3
,5
5
7

1
,7
6
9


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
3
4
,2
8
3

1
5
,2
6
0

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(2
1
4
)

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t In
c
o
m
e
-

3

6
,0
1
7

2
,7
4
2

P
ro
p
e
rty
T
a
x
e
s
1
,0
3
2

2
2
2

V
e
h
ic
le
R
e
p
la
c
e
m
e
n
t F
u
n
d
6
2
1
In
te
rg
o
v
e
rn
m
e
n
ta
l
1
,3
7
3

7
8
1

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

2

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

1
6


R
e
n
ta
l M
o
to
r V
e
h
ic
le
E
x
c
is
e
T
a
x
F
u
n
d
2
8
0
In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
6
,7
9
0

6
,7
9
0


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
P
ro
c
e
e
d
s
o
f g
e
n
e
ra
l lo
n
g
te
rm
lia
b
ilitie
s
-

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
8

1
0

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
8
,1
6
3

7
,5
9
0

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
6
,8
0
8

6
,8
0
8

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
1
5
,9
5
5

6
,1
1
1

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
O
th
e
r T
a
x
e
s
6
5
6

3
2
5

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
7
,8
4
0

7
,0
3
2

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
5
0
0

9
5

P
o
lic
e
6
,4
8
1

1
,5
1
2

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

S
h
e
riff
7
9
6

5
5

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

-

D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
7
,8
4
0

2
,5
8
1

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
2
4
,3
1
8

2
4
,3
1
8

D
is
tric
t A
tto
rn
e
y
1
0
9

3
7

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
7
5
2

7
5
2

F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
4
0
,7
8
1

3
0
,5
3
4

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
T
o
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
,4
0
8

1
,0
7
7

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
u
n
d
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
-

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
7
,8
4
0

2
,5
8
1

V
e
h
ic
le
s

4
0
,7
8
1

(4
,7
8
4
)

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
7
7
7

(6
5
)

D
e
v
e
lo
p
m
e
n
t A
u
th
o
rity
1
,4
0
8

6
0

In
te
rfu
n
d
tra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
8
,1
6
3

1
,5
3
9

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

-

G
O
B
o
n
d
s
S
T
D
D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
F
u
n
d
4
1
1
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(2
,4
5
7
)

1
,4
0
8

6
0


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
4
0
,7
8
1

(7
,2
4
1
)

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
S
tre
e
t L
ig
h
ts
F
u
n
d
2
1
1
1
9
8
7
G
O
B
o
n
d
s
- P
a
rk
s
F
u
n
d
3
1
1
T
a
x
e
s
2
6
,3
2
8

1
,5
8
2

R
is
k
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t F
u
n
d
6
3
1
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

3

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
F
ro
m
O
th
e
r F
u
n
d
s
-

-

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
S
a
le
s
T
a
x
e
s
-

-

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
(1
9
)

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
5
,4
5
9

5
,4
5
9

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
9
,5
5
0

6
,7
2
5

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3
1
,7
8
7

7
,0
4
4

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

3

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
4
,5
0
0

1
5
5

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
(1
9
)

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
P
a
y
ro
ll d
e
d
u
c
tio
n
s
a
n
d
m
a
tc
h
e
s
-

4
0
,0
8
7

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
2
,2
2
4

2
,2
2
4

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
3
1
,7
8
7

4
,6
5
6

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
1
,5
8
5

1
1
,5
8
5

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
6
,7
2
4

2
,3
7
9

C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
-

-

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
o
u
t
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
1
,1
3
5

5
8
,4
0
0

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(1
9
)

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
3
1
,7
8
7

4
,6
5
6

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
P
u
b
lic
W
o
rk
s
-T
ra
n
s
p
o
rta
tio
n
6
,7
2
4

2
,3
4
3

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
(1
9
)

-

R
is
k
M
a
n
a
g
e
m
e
n
t
2
1
,1
3
5

4
6
,0
8
0

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
(3
3
)

B
u
ild
in
g
A
u
th
o
rity
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
B
o
n
d
s
D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
F
u
n
d
4
1
2
In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

6
,7
2
4

2
,3
1
0


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(2
,0
4
5
)

1
9
9
8
G
O
B
o
n
d
s
- J
a
il F
u
n
d
3
1
2
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
2
1
,1
3
5

4
4
,0
3
5

S
p
e
e
d
H
u
m
p
s
M
a
in
te
n
a
n
c
e
F
u
n
d
2
1
2
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
3
,1
1
0

-

W
o
rk
e
rs
C
o
m
p
e
n
s
a
tio
n
F
u
n
d
6
3
2
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

-

In
te
rfu
n
d
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
3
1
2

7

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
-

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
(1
5
5
)

(1
5
5
)

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
3

1

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
2
,9
5
5

(1
5
5
)

C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
2
,8
4
7

8
7
1

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
1
,3
5
7

1
,3
5
7

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
-

7
7

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
,6
7
2

1
,3
6
5

C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
-

-

D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
2
,9
5
5

5
9
0

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
3
,7
8
7

3
,7
8
7

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
In
te
rfu
n
d
tra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
6
,6
3
4

4
,7
3
5

P
u
b
lic
W
o
rk
s
-R
o
a
d
s
&
D
ra
in
a
g
e
1
,6
7
2

1
2
6

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

-

2
,9
5
5

5
9
0

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
-

-

N
o
n
-D
e
p
a
rtm
e
n
ta
l
6
,6
3
4

2
,8
9
8

1
,6
7
2

1
2
6

P
u
b
lic
S
a
fe
ty
J
u
d
ic
ia
l F
a
c
ilite
s
A
u
th
o
rity
D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
F
u
n
d
4
1
3
U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(4
6
4
)


2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
6
,6
3
4

2
,4
3
4

E
m
e
rg
e
n
c
y
T
e
le
p
h
o
n
e
S
y
s
te
m
F
u
n
d
2
1
5
1
9
9
3
G
O
B
o
n
d
s
- H
e
a
lth
F
u
n
d
3
1
3
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
2
0
1
4
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
-

(1
)

A
L
L
T
A
X
F
U
N
D
S
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
A
c
tu
a
l
M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
6
,2
7
2

-


2
0
1
4
C
h
a
rg
e
s
fo
r S
e
rv
ic
e
s
-

2

In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
3

-

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
(3
,0
4
7
)

(3
,0
4
7
)

R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
:
B
u
d
g
e
t
In
v
e
s
tm
e
n
t in
c
o
m
e
5

2

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
-

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3
,2
2
5

(3
,0
4
8
)

T
a
x
e
s
, S
e
rv
ic
e
C
h
a
rg
e
s
, In
c
o
m
e
&
T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
5
2
6
,4
9
6

M
is
c
e
lla
n
e
o
u
s
1
0
,5
2
5

4
,8
1
2

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
3

-

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
(4
,9
3
4
)

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
4
,8
9
1

4
,8
9
1

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
D
e
b
t S
e
rv
ic
e
3
,2
2
6

9
2
8

F
u
n
d
B
a
la
n
c
e
C
a
rrie
d
F
o
rw
a
rd
(fo
r e
n
c
u
m
b
ra
n
c
e
s
)
7
1
,4
2
9

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
1
5
,4
2
1

9
,7
0
7

C
a
p
ita
l P
ro
je
c
ts
-

-

T
ra
n
s
fe
rs
o
u
t
(1
)

-

T
o
ta
l R
e
v
e
n
u
e
s
5
9
2
,9
9
1

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
In
te
rfu
n
d
tra
n
s
fe
rs
-

-

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
3
,2
2
5

9
2
8

E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
:
E
m
e
rg
e
n
c
y
T
e
le
p
h
o
n
e
S
y
s
te
m
1
5
,4
2
1

5
,1
6
5

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
3

-

A
p
p
ro
v
e
d
B
u
d
g
e
t
5
2
1
,5
6
2

U
n
a
p
p
ro
p
ria
te
d
-

(8
1
)

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
3

-

E
n
c
u
m
b
ra
n
c
e
s
ro
lle
d
fo
rw
a
rd
fro
m
2
0
1
1
7
1
,4
2
9

T
o
ta
l E
x
p
e
n
d
itu
re
s
1
5
,4
2
1

5
,0
8
4

T
o
ta
l A
p
p
ro
p
ria
tio
n
s
5
9
2
,9
9
1

Page 18A The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014

LOCAL
Students serve in Lithuanian summer camp
by Lauren Ramsdell
lauren@dekalbchamp.com
L
ithuania has had a long and
storied history. Once a large
empire, it was ravaged by the
Holocaust, subsumed under the
USSR, then a satellite nation and is
now a free member of NATO. Its
economy is expanding, and there’s
more opportunity than ever in this
Baltic country.
However, the economy hasn’t
affected everyone equally. There’s a
small middle class making up the
gulf between the rich and poor.
Well-educated Lithuanians fre-
quently move elsewhere in the Euro-
pean Union, contributing to a brain
drain in the country.
The aftershocks of communist
rule are theorized to contribute to
the high degree of post-traumatic
stress disorder among young Lithu-
anians, particularly those who come
from economically disadvantaged
backgrounds. The Decatur Rotary
Club, along with the Vilnius, Lithu-
ania Roatary Club and the Lithua-
nian Rotary District 1462 sponsored
four Decatur-area students to volun-
teer at a summer camp for children
who come from these backgrounds,
as well as those in the foster system
or from single-parent homes.
Decatur High School students
Vito Antinozzi and Lyndsay
Morrow and Agnes Scott College
students Ijaaz Kingston and
Celeste Whitman spent one week
living with host families and one
week at the summer camp in July
2014 at Camp Vasara near Vilnius,
Lithuania’s capital. All four served
as camp counselors alongside
Lithuanian peers.
Though none of them spoke
Lithuanian, many Lithuanians speak
English
“Neither of us spoke Lithuanian,
we learned some basics along
the way but not enough to really
communicate,” Kingston said.
“Especially trying to figure out what
was going on around the camp, we
had to rely a lot on translators.”
But, through gestures and
signals, the counselors got to know
the kids at camp. Some pointed to
objects around the campground
and got the counselors to say the
name in English. Kingston said she
spent time with one girl who loved
to tell her Lithuanian words. Others
wanted hugs, or to play sports, or
have their hair braided.
The biggest difference, Whitman
said, was both the children and the
counselors looked and acted older
than she would have guessed. Most
of the Lithuanian counselors were
under 18, but looked and acted like
adults.
“I have worked with kids before,
in Costa Rica,” Whitman said.
“But I was interested in working
with children in a different setting.
Kids in Europe are going to be a
lot different than kids in Central
America and I love traveling, and I
had never been to Lithuania before.
I thought it would be interesting,
because Eastern Europe, a lot of
people don’t go there.”
Whitman and Kingston are
members of Agnes Scott’s Rotaract
Club, the collegiate affiliate of
the Rotary Club. Antinozzi and
Morrow are members of Decatur
High School’s Interact club, the high
school Rotary affiliate.
Decatur Rotary Club member
Barbara Tedrow spearheaded
the idea. Tedrow has family
ties to Lithuania, where she has
done genealogical research with
academics in that country.
Tedrow and her husband,
photographer Bill Boley,
accompanied the students and
documented the experience.
“This service learning
project ties together the study
of community issues, personal
objectives, appropriate and relevant
action, and the project’s impact on
the community and the individual
volunteer,” Tedrow said.
Whitman said that they were
able to see the difference made with
many of the campers.
“Our goal was to show the
children that they could be
successful and to encourage them
to be themselves because they may
not have experienced that,” she said.
“They gained a lot of confidence.”
Students marching in a parade with the Rotary Summer Camp fag are, from left, L’jaaz Kingston, Agnes Scott College; Lyndsay
Morrow, Decatur High School; Celeste Whitman, Agnes Scott College; Nico, a Lithuanian Jesuit Gymnasium high school
student; Vito Antinozzi, Decatur High School; and Alina, another Jesuit Gymnasium high school student from Vilnius, Lithuania.
The Jesuit Gymnasium, which has a highly regarded school, rented the conference site for the Rotary project and the summer
camp. Photo provided
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 PAGE 19A
EDUCATION
Dual enrollment is at record
high at Georgia Perimeter
by Kysa Anderson Daniels
Sarah Ghalayini isn’t quite sure
what career path she’ll eventually
take, but the 17-year-old Georgia
Perimeter College dual enrollment
student is exploring a broad range
of possibilities including biomedical
engineering, intellectual property
law and neuro-oncology.
“But that can all change at a mo-
ment’s notice,” she said. 
Ghalayini is certain, however,
that she made the right choice in
deciding to participate in GPC’s
Dual Enrollment (DE) program,
which enables qualified high-school
juniors and seniors like her to take
college classes, while also satisfying
the requirements for a high school
diploma.
“I am much better prepared for
life after high school because of the
dual enrollment program at GPC
and am looking forward to apply-
ing the skills I have learned in the
environment of a four-year college
and beyond,” said the Fulton Science
Academy High School senior and
GPC Dunwoody student.
Georgia Perimeter’s DE pro-
gram is attracting students in record
numbers. There are 1,150 students
enrolled in nearly 6,000 credit hours
on GPC’s five campuses and online.
Georgia Perimeter, according to
Dr. Jeff Meadors, the college’s dual
enrollment coordinator, educates
more DE students than any other
school in the University System of
Georgia. GPC Alpharetta leads the
DE roster with 736 participants, fol-
lowed by Dunwoody and Newton
campuses, with 197 and 144 respec-
tively.
“Since around 2009, the overall
college DE enrollment has increased
with minor dips along the way due
to changes in legislation, which
impact costs,” Meadors said of dual
enrollment, which is offered to stu-
dents tuition-free.
Active recruiting gets big credit
for the enrollment increase.
“There tends to be a direct rela-
tionship between time spent in high
schools by dual enrollment staff and
the enrollment numbers,” Meadors
explains.
Kay Harrison, who oversees
dual enrollment at Alpharetta Cam-
pus, cites several benefits to students
and their families.
“In these times where four-year
schools are getting more competi-
tive, it (DE) gives high school stu-
dents an edge in that they have al-
ready had experience at a collegiate
level and have proven themselves
successful,” Harrison said.
Free tuition, credit transferabil-
ity and the fact that DE courses do
not impact the number of classes
the HOPE scholarship will fund are
added bonuses, Harrison said.
Most Georgia Perimeter DE stu-
dents earn a total of between three
to 15 credit hours. Ghalayini cur-
rently is taking a full load of classes
at GPC and carrying a 4.0 GPA.
She’ll graduate from Fulton Science
Academy in May with approximate-
ly 50 college credits—and what she
considers immeasurable experience.
“Dual enrollment is more than a
way for high school students to get
ahead in their studies,” Ghalayini
said. “It’s a way for them to explore
their interests and their identity.
Since the college years are typically a
time for self-discovery, dual enroll-
ment provides a medium through
which students can get a head start
on the exploration of their passions.”
Sarah Ghalayini said her GPC dual enrollment experience is preparing her for life
after high school. Photo by Bill Roa
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 20A
BUSINESS
The Voice of Business in DeKalb County
DeKalb Chamber of Commerce
404.378.8000 www.DeKalbChamber.org
Two Decatur Town Center, 125 Clairemont Ave., Suite 235, Decatur, GA 30030
by Kathy Mitchell
Katerina Taylor said one of the things she
likes about her new position as president of the
DeKalb County Chamber of Commerce is that it
enables her to use skills she honed in the corpo-
rate world along with her passion as a commu-
nity advocate.
“Te chamber is the one place key players in
the building of our community come together.
Education, tourism, government, workforce de-
velopment, community service and many other
elements all work together to build a county
where people will want to live, work and play. I
was a banker for 16 years, and I’m the daughter of
a successful entrepreneur. I started my own busi-
ness in 2009. I have a deep appreciation for how
everyone works together to build a community,”
Taylor said.
Since the resignation of Leonardo McClarty
in May, Taylor had served as interim chamber
president. She was named president in Septem-
ber. Te frst woman to head the DeKalb County
Chamber in its 76-year history, Taylor said she
brings a perspective that may make DeKalb’s
chamber unlike typical chambers of commerce,
which are traditionally male-driven.
“We’re not going to be conventional. We’re
going to be forward thinking. We’re going to try
some things that haven’t been tried before. I don’t
mean I plan to turn DeKalb upside down, but
if I have to turn it upside down to make it place
where existing businesses can thrive and new
businesses will want to come to, then we’ll turn it
upside down,” she said.
“We’re going to be aggressive in recruit-
ing business to DeKalb County. We have many
wonderful assets. We have great colleges such as
Emory, Oglethorpe and Agnes Scott. We have
the CDC and Stone Mountain is the top tourism
attraction in the state. We need to make sure peo-
ple know these are in DeKalb,” she said. “We need
to let people know DeKalb is open for business.”
A native of Kansas, Taylor has lived in Geor-
gia 11 years. She joined the executive team of
the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce in 2012 as
the director of memberships and programs; in
2014, she was promoted to director of operations
and investor relations, giving her oversight of all
chamber staf and responsibility for the budget.
She said that now is “a great time to help lead
DeKalb County,” noting that her overarching goal
is “to drive progress in DeKalb through busi-
ness advocacy, collaboration, community and a
diverse, high-performing staf.  We have a highly
diverse county—more than 200 languages are
spoken here—I want to refect that diversity in
the chamber staf.”
She acknowledged that DeKalb County has
an image problem stemming from legal problems
in both the school system and county govern-
ment. “But I think we’re now moving in the right
direction. Superintendent Michael Turman is
doing a phenomenal job with the school system
as is [Superintendent] Phyllis Edwards in the
city of Decatur. [Interim DeKalb County CEO]
Lee May is being very responsive to problems
in government that may be hindering business.
He is urging our members to let him know when
they see problems with doing business in DeKalb.
He said, ‘We can’t fx a problem unless we know
about it,’” Taylor said.
Te key to future progress, she added, is
transparency. “We have to start operating in
an environment in which there are no secrets.
People have to know where money comes from
and how it’s being spent. Te hiring and promot-
ing process, the rules for doing business with the
county have to be out in the open.”
Taylor also noted that county unity will be
important to DeKalb’s future. “In the years I’ve
lived here, I’ve been hearing about rivalries be-
tween diferent areas of the county. Tat needs to
stop. We have to stop dividing the county up,” she
said. “When something good happens in DeKalb,
we should see it as a victory for whole county
and not be concerned about whether it happened
on the north side, the south side, the east side or
wherever.
“Tere are unique communities within the
county, and that’s a good thing. Tat’s something
we should embrace, but neighborhoods should
not see each other as rivals,” Taylor said.
Te new chamber president said she wants
every corner of DeKalb to be physically attrac-
tive. “I have nothing but praise for the work the
CIDs [Community Improvement Districts] are
doing to build their areas of the county. It makes
a huge diference when areas—whether they’re
commercial, industrial or residential—are clean
and well cared for. Tat creates a place where
people want to be,” she said.
New chamber president plans to ‘drive progress in DeKalb’
‘We need to
let people
know DeKalb
is open for
business.’
The frst female president of the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce, Katerina Taylor says she will be aggressive in building the county’s business environment.
– Katerina Taylor
President, DeKalb County
Chamber of Commerce
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 21A
CLASSIFIEDS
DISCLAIMER: We do not knowingly accept advertisements that discriminate, or
intend to discriminate, on any illegal basis. Nor do we knowingly accept employment
advertisements that are not bona-fide job offers. All real estate advertisements are
subject to the fair housing act and we do not accept advertising that is in violation of
the law. The law prohibits discrimination based on color, religion, sex, national origin,
handicap or familial status.
The Champion is not responsible for any damages resulting from advertisements. All sales fnal.
RATES: $30.00 for up to 40 words, each additional word $0.60.
All ads are prepaid! All Major credit cards accepted!
For Prices, Deadlines and Information
Visit www.championclassifeds.com
Classifieds
TheChampion
Ads Due By Friday - Noon
for next publication date.
HELP WANTED
Seeking LSBE/MBS/WBE frm to bid
transportation services for delivery of
excavators. If interested, please contact Jeff
Lashley at 770-349-3026 for details.
Seeking LSBE/MBE/WBE frm to bid sale
of Whelen strobe lights. If interested, please
contact Jeff Lashley at 770-349-3026 for
details.
AUCTIONS
ADVERTISE YOUR AUCTION in over 100
newspapers for only $350. Your 25-word
classifed ad will reach more than1 million
readers. Call Jennifer Labon at the Georgia
Newspaper Service, 770-454-6776.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
RUN YOUR own medical alter company. Be
the only distributor in your area. Excellent
income opportunity. Small investment required.
Limited avail – start today! 1-844-225-1200.
SAWMILLS from only $4397.00- Make & Save
MONEY with your own bandmill – Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE
Info/DVD: www.NOrwoodSawmills.com 1-800-
578-1363. Ext.300N
DRIVERS
ATTN: Truck Drivers! Covenant Transport is
HIRING! Team & Solo Drivers Needed. No
CDL? We can help! 3wk training avail. Call
Career Trucker today! N. GA 866-494-7434; S.
GA 866-557-9244.
Chief Carriers is hiring fatbed drivers in
your area! 42-48 cpm start pay, based on
experience. 10K miles/month average. CDL-A,
1 year OTR required. 888.476.4860 www.
drivechief.com
AVERITT EXPRESS – New pay Increase for
Regional Drivers! 40 tp 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus!
Post-Training Pay Increase for Students!
(Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVERY
Week + Excellent Benefts. CDL-A req. 888-
602-7440. Apply @ AverittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employoer – Females, minorities,
protected veterans, and individuals with
disabilites are encourage to apply.
Drivers: Run FB with WTI. Be home through
the week and weekends. Start up to 28% plus
fuel bonus. New equipment. BCBS. Experiece
needed. LP available. Call 877-693-1305.
NEW PAY *Weekly Home Time for SE Regional
Drivers! Earn up to $.42/mile PLUS up to
$.03 per mile in bonus pay! 866-277-7298 or
SuperServiceLLC.com
25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Learn
to drive for Steven’s Transport! NO
EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Earn $800+ per
week! PAID CDL TRAINING! Call for Pre-Hire!
1-888-749-2303.
Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers earn 50 up
to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to Qualifed
drivers. Home most weekends. Call 843-266-
3731/www.bulldoghiway.com EOE.
Needed Entry level Drivers! Covenant
Transport, Solo & Team Driving opportunities!
Need your CDL? 3 wk training avail! Don’t wait,
call today to get started! N. GA 866-494-7435
or S. GA 866-557-9244.
START WITH OUR TRAINING OR CONTINUE
YOUR SOLID CAREER – You have options!
Company Drivers, Lease Purchase or Owner
Operators Needed. (855) 973-9344. www.
CentralTruckDrivingJobs.com
EDUCATIONAL TRAINING
MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!
Train to become a Medial Offce Assistant. NO
EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online Training can
get you job ready! HS Diploma/GED & PC/
Internet needed! 1-888-407-7162.
AIRLINE CAREERS start here with HANDS on
FAA certifed training for cartter opportunities
in aviation, manufacturing and more. Financial
Aid for qualifed students – Job Placement
assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (866)564-9634 www.fxjets.com
MISCELLANEOUS
DIVORCE WITH OR WITHOUT children
$125.00. Includes name change and property
settlement agreement. SAVE hundreds. Fast
and easy. Call 1-888-733-7165, 24/7.
REAL ESTATE
NOTICE OF SALE: PREVIOUSLY Foreclosed
land being sold in HIAWASSEE Georgia.
Rushing Stream with Utilites. WAS $99,900
now $18,900! 90 mins from Atlanta! (877) 717-
5263 Ext. 565.
PREVIOUSLY Bank Foreclosed, 5.65 acres
ONLY 14,900. 29.1 Acre creek front 29,900.
Mountain views, Rushing Trout Stream,
Minutes to 40,000 Acre Lake, Adjoins State
Park. Roads, Utilities, Financing. Call 877-590-
2372 or Remax 423-756-5700.
SERVICES
WELDING CAREERS – Hands on training for
career opportunities in aviation, automotive,
manufacturing and more. Financial aid
for quaifed students – Job and Housing
assistance available. CALL AIM (877) 205-
2968.
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY,
to more than 1 million Georgia newspaper
readers. Your 25-word classifed ad will appear
in over 100 Georgia newspapers for only $350.
Call Jennifer Labon at the Georgia Newspaper
Service at 770-454-6776 or online at
www.gapress.org/georgianewspaperservice.
html
If so, then you may be able to seek compesation.
Please call the law firm of Weitz & Luxenberg today
at 1-800-921-8888 to discuss your potential claim.
Weitz & Luxenberg is a national leader in represent-
ing victims of defective medical devices and medi-
cines and is eager to conduct a free and confidential
consultation with you.
We’re with you – every step of the way!
700 BROADWAY | NEW YORK, NY 10003
BRANCH OFFICES IN NEW JERSEY & CALIFORNIA
800-921-8888
WWW.SurgicalInjuryCenter.COM
ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Prior results do not guarantee a future outcome. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged,
unless prohibited by state law or rule. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on
advertisements. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. Gary Klein, Esq.
WEITZ LUXENBERG P.C.
Did You Develop Cancer Or The Spread of Fibroids
After a Hysterectomy or Fibroid Removal By
Laparoscopic Surgery?
A T T E N T I O N W O M E N
MorcellatorAd_NY_Press_2014_W&L 9/11/14 11:34 AM Page 1
Get FAA approved Aviaton Maintenance training.
Financial aid for qualifed students – Job placement
assistance. CALL Aviaton Insttute of Maintenance
(866) 564-9634
www.FixJets.com
AIRLINE
MANUFACTURING
CAREERS
BEGIN HERE
Hands on training for career opportunites in
aviaton, automotve, manufacturing and more.
Financial aid for qualifed students – Job and
Housing assistance available.
CALL AIM
877-205-2968
WELDING
CAREERS
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 22A
SPORTS
NFL should wear purple, too
Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Sports Reporter
CARL A’ S CORNER
Since 2009, NFL players,
coaches and referees have worn
pink apparel in games during
the month of October for Breast
Cancer Awareness Month.
The initiative is a part of the
NFL’s “A Crucial Catch” campaign.
The NFL partnered with the
American Cancer Society for the
campaign, which focuses on the
importance of annual screenings,
especially for women who are 40
and older.
Every Sunday in October,
players will wear pink shoes, socks,
wristbands, sleeves and other
apparel to help raise awareness for
the campaign. According to the
NFL, it does not profit from sales
of the merchandise. Since 2009,
NFL has raised approximately $7
million for the American Cancer
Society, with the majority of the
contribution coming from the sale
of Pink items at retail and via the
NFL auction website.
The NFL has done many
things to bring awareness to breast
cancer and support women who
have survived the disease. It is a
great cause and the NFL should
continue to bring awareness to
breast cancer and research.
However, while the NFL
honors women who have survived
breast cancer, they should also
honor survivors of domestic
violence.
October is also National
Domestic Violence Awareness
Month.
Over the past two months,
the NFL has been criticized for
its handling of players accused of
domestic violence. Some critics
have questioned how the NFL
can advertise “A Crucial Catch”
campaign this month when there
seems to be a lack of support for
women when it comes to properly
punishing players who are charged
or convicted of domestic violence
or sexual assault.
In an Oct. 1 USA Today article
written by Lindsay Jones, Syracuse
professor Anne Osborne said, “It
will be harder to take [the NFL’s
“A Crucial Catch” campaign]
seriously, absolutely. ... For some
people it seemed like just a PR
effort to acknowledge women’s
presence around football. Now in
light of all of this, it will ring as
sort of hollow.”
Jones reports the NFL said
that it “won’t scale back its efforts
to raise awareness of breast
cancer, an initiative that began
in 2009, but rather emphasizes
that this campaign is one of its
most tangible ways to prove the
league values its female fans.”
NFL VP/Social Responsibility
Anna Isaacson told Jones that
the NFL can “support breast
cancer awareness and also make a
difference with domestic violence
and sexual assault campaigns.”
Isaacson said the NFL
“is considering a formal
acknowledgement of domestic
violence awareness month in
October ... but the league has yet to
decide what would be the best way
to handle such a large-scale effort.”
During the premiere of CBS
Sports Network’s We Need To Talk,
the first nationally televised all-
female sports show which aired
Sept. 30, NFL Network reporter
Andrea Kremer noted Domestic
Violence Awareness Month is
“symbolized by a purple ribbon.”
Kremer suggested that the
NFL should allow players to wear
something purple along with
pink apparel to bring awareness
to domestic violence without the
threat of a fine for violating the
NFL’s uniform protocol.
The NFL should seriously
consider Kremer’s idea. NFL
Commissioner Roger Goodell
admitted that he “got it wrong”
when it came to the Ray Rice
incident, and pledged that he
“will get it right” going forward.
The NFL has partnered with
the National Domestic Violence
Hotline and the National Violence
Resource Center to help women
who have suffered from abuse.
If the NFL and Goodell want
to continue to “get it right,” they
should allow players to wear
purple during games this month.
Photos by Mark Brock
Dunwoody
Lakeside
Dunwoody and Lakeside defend JV cross country county championships
by Mark Brock
The championship reign of
Dunwoody and Lakeside will continue
for another year as the pair defended
their titles in the 2014 DeKalb County
Junior Varsity Cross Country Girls’
and Boys’ Championships at Druid
Hills Middle School Oct. 2.
The Dunwoody Lady Wildcats
captured their fourth consecutive title
by placing all seven runners in the Top
10 to outdistance Lakeside 18-61 for
the title. Druid Hills took third with 70
points.
The first four runners to cross the
finish line were all from Dunwoody,
led by individual titlist Lauren Caplan,
a freshman, with a time of 14:53.66.
Freshman Julie Hensley finished
second in 14:58.67 and freshman
Chloe Thomas finished third in
15:01.06.
Sophomore Julia Echols gave the
Lady Wildcats the sweep of the top
four sports in 15:14.26. Sophomore
Olivia Vergara finished eighth in
15:45.91 to round out the scoring
for Dunwoody, while eighth grader
Elizabeth Coffie finished ninth in
15:54.07 and sophomore Christy
Holloway was 10th in 15:54.71.
Lakeside had a pair of freshman in
the Top 10, led by Brittany Andrienni
in fifth (15:21.48) and Hannah
Breeden in sixth (15:30.26).
Southwest DeKalb’s Daisa
Alexander finished seventh to round
out the Top 10 for the girls’ meet with
a time of 15:44.27.
Freshman Emily Greipsson
(16:21.23) was 13th overall to lead a
group of five consecutive Druid Hills’
runners to lead the Lady Red Devils’
third place finish.
The Lakeside Vikings ran away
with the boys’ title for the second
consecutive season behind six Top 10
finishes to keep Clarkston at bay with
a 23-64 victory. Dunwoody was a close
third with 68 points.
Freshman Myles Boyd led
Lakeside, taking the individual title
with a time of 11:57.41 as one of three
Vikings in the Top 4 for the meet.
Sophomore Oscar Godoy, who won
the 2013 individual title, was third
in 12:15.90 and sophomore Ryan
Wenner took fourth in 12:25.86.
Eighth grader Oliver Hewett
(12:39.00) was ninth and freshman
Jake Tubesing was 10th (12:45.33).
Clarkston’s second place finish
was led by freshman Samuel
Gebremariam, who took second
overall in a time of 12:13.22. Kahsay
Sahlu (12:36.68) was seventh and
Jarrett Ray (12:37.03) was eighth to
give the Angoras three Top 10 finishers
on the day.
Dunwoody sophomore Ethan
Herod was the lead for the Wildcats
finishing in fifth overall with a time of
12:28.12.
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 23A
SPORTS
See Football on page 24A
Redan head coach Roderick Moore
Redan’s Rodnell McCree, center, breaks tackles during
his 84-yard punt return.
Photos by Travis Hudgons
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
T
he Redan Raiders defense knocked down a
potential game-winning touchdown pass to
defeat Chamblee and win their first game
of the season.
Redan beat the Chamblee Bulldogs 18-13 in
Region 6-AAAA play Oct. 3 at Hallford Stadium.
In his first year as head coach at Redan, Roderick
Moore said he was happy for his players because
they’ve worked hard all season to win.
“We had a lot of ups and downs, but they
worked hard and they didn’t lose faith,” Moore
said. “They kept believing in themselves.”
The Raiders were on a five-game losing streak
heading into last Friday’s game, and suffered a
big 60-0 loss to Marist while allowing 285 rush-
ing yards the previous week. The Raiders defense
had to face another running team in Chamblee,
which averages 178.5 rushing yards per game, led
by Xzavier Shugars, who averages 117.5 yards
per game.
Redan’s defense was able to contain Shugars
and the Chamblee offense early in the first quar-
ter. After forcing Chamblee to punt, Redan’s Rod-
nell McCree fielded the punt and ran 84 yards to
Chamblee’s 10-yard line. A couple of plays later,
Xavier Dennis scored on a quarterback sneak to
give Redan a 6-0 lead.
Shugars got it going in the second quarter
but had two touchdowns called back due to pen-
alties. He did score on a 3-yard run late in the
second quarter to tie the game at 6-6. He got his
second touchdown of the game on a 6-yard run
in Chamblee’s opening drive of the second half to
give Chamblee a 13-6 lead.
Redan responded with a 35-yard touchdown
pass from Dennis to Rodney Jones. A missed
extra point had the Raiders down 13-12. Redan
took the lead midway in the fourth quarter.
On 4th and 16 from the 25-yard line, running
back Antwan Johnson took a screen pass from
Dennis and with blockers in front of him, ran
into the end zone to give Redan a 18-13 lead with
7:10 left to play.
“We knew they were going to put pressure on
us,” Moore said. “We called [the play earlier in
the game], but we messed up on the pass. And I
said let’s run the play again, we ran it and we were
successful, got the touchdown and took the lead.”
Chamblee tried to put together a winning
touchdown drive. A big pass play from quarter-
back Brent Burgess to Devin Wallace had the
Bulldogs down at Redan’s 13-yard line. However,
two delay-of-game penalties had Chamblee look-
ing at a 4th and 21. Burgess’ pass to the end zone
was knocked down, sealing the win for Redan.
Redan sits sixth in the region with a 1-5 over-
all record, while Chamblee is fifth at 1-4. Moore
said the win gives his team a lot of momentum
going forward.
“We still have a chance to go to the playoffs,”
he said. “We’re just going to keep on fighting and
go out and play.”
Redan will face Arabia Mountain (2-3) at
Hallford Oct. 10, and Chamblee will host Litho-
nia at North DeKalb Stadium.
Redan wins its first game of season
Druid Hills rallies past Dunwoody
by Mark Brock
Hasaan Enis scored four
touchdowns as the Druid Hills
Red Devils rallied from a late
third quarter deficit to defeat
the Dunwoody Wildcats 28-7 in
Region 6-AAAAA action at North
DeKalb Oct. 3.
Enis gave Druid Hills an early
6-0 lead in the first quarter with a
2-yard touchdown run. Dunwoody
answered in the second quarter
with a 19-yard pass from Kaseem
Duke to Chase Hawkins to take a
7-6 lead into halftime.
Late in the third quarter, Enis
hauled in a pass and raced 21
yards for a touchdown to give
Druid Hills a 13-7 lead heading
into the fourth quarter.
Enis helped Druid Hills pull
away in the fourth quarter with
touchdown runs of 24 and 16
yards for the final margin of 28-
7. Druid Hills improved to 3-2
overall and 1-0 in region play,
while Dunwoody fell to 3-2 and
0-2 in the region.

Tucker 57,
Newton County 21
The Tucker Tigers opened
Region 2-AAAAAA play with a
57-21 road victory over Newton
County Oct. 3 for the program’s
500th win.
The Tigers (4-2, 1-0) led
throughout the game with leads of
22-7 early in the second quarter
and 27-15 at the half. The Tigers
scored 16 straight points to start
the second half and took a 43-15
lead over Newton (2-2, 0-1).
Stephenson 46,
Miller Grove 14
The Stephenson Jaguars
improved to 3-2 on the season
with a 46-14 victory over DeKalb
County and Region 6-AAAAA foe
Miller Grove (3-2) Oct. 3.
The Jaguars, 2-0 in sub-region
play, jumped out to a 27-7 lead
and cruised to the win over the
Wolverines, 1-1 in the region.
Stephenson now leads the series
2-1 against Miller Grove.

SW DeKalb 27, M.L. King 6
The Southwest DeKalb
Panthers picked up their first
victory in five tries against the
Hasaan Enis
Photo by Travis Hudgons
The Champion FreePress, Friday, Oct. 10, 2014 Page 24A
SPORTS
Weekly ad in hand. Coupons in pocket.
BOGO-vision on. It’s time to save.
publix.com/save
Pet of the Week
Babs is a short
and plump
pocket sized
3-year-old
pittie that is as
sweet as can
be. She is an
affectionate
girl and will
shower you
with love all
day long. She
LOVES belly
rubs and gets
along great with other dogs. She has been
at the shelter for months and is ready to
find her forever home And since the free
adoption promotion has been extended
through October; you can adopt Babs
for no charge! You’ll get this wonderful
girl who will be spayed, vaccinated and
microchipped for free!
Please call (404) 294-2165 or email
adoption@dekalbanimalservices.com
for additional information.
Athlete of
the Week
The Champion chooses a male and
female high school Athlete of the
Week each week throughout the
school year. The choices are based
on performance and nominations by
coaches. Please e-mail nominations
to carla@dekalbchamp.com by
Monday at noon.
MALE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Hasaan Enis, Druid Hills
(football): The senior running
back scored four touchdowns
in the 28-7 win over
Dunwoody Oct. 3.
FEMALE ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Lauren Caplan, Dunwoody
(cross country): The freshman
won the individual title and
finished first with a time
14:53.66 to lead Dunwoody to
its fourth consecutive DeKalb
County Junior Varsity Cross
Country girls’ championship
Oct. 2.
Martin Luther King Lions with a 27-6 Region
6-AAAAA win Oct. 3.
The Panthers (3-2, 1-0) held just a 6-0 lead
in the second quarter before pulling away to the
21-point victory over the Lions (0-5, 0-1).

Lakeside 35, Alcovy 26
The Lakeside Vikings made their
homecoming crowd happy with a 35-26 Region
6-AAAAA victory over Alcovy (0-6) Oct. 3 at
Adams Stadium.
The Vikings were holding a 21-19 lead
in the third quarter before pulling away for
the victory. Lakeside is 3-3 overall and 1-0 in
region play.
All Scores

Friday, Oct. 3

Redan (1-5) 19, Chamblee (1-4) 13
Marist (6-0) 33, Lithonia (2-4) 6
Arabia Mountain (2-3) 55,
Stone Mountain (0-6) 6
St. Pius (3-2) 34, Columbia (4-2) 20
Druid Hills (3-2) 28, Dunwoody (3-2) 7
Lakeside (3-3) 35, Alcovy (0-6) 26
Tucker (4-2) 57 Newton Co. (2-2) 21
SW DeKalb (3-2) 27, M.L. King (0-5) 6
Stephenson (3-2) 46, Miller Grove (3-2) 14
Open: Cedar Grove (4-1), Clarkston (0-6),
Cross Keys (0-3), Decatur (2-3), McNair (1-4),
Towers (1-4)
Football Continued From Page 22A