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Q) How the shapes of the binomial probability distribution vary with the

different values of probability?


There are many reasons for the shapes of the binomial probability
distribution to vary with the different values of probability. Below are
the generalizations about how the shapes of the binomial probability
distribution vary with the different values of probability:
When p is small (0.1), the binomial distribution is skewed to the
right.
As p increases (to 0.3 for example), the skewness is less
noticeable.
When p=0.5, the binomial distribution is skewed to the left.
When p is larger than 0.5 the distribution is skewed to the left.
The probabilities for 0.3, for example are the same as those of 0.7
except the values of p and q are reserved. This is true for any pair
of complementary p and q values (0.3 and 0.7, 0.4 and 0.6 and 0.2
and 0.8).
Representing it graphically when n is constant,
When n=5, p=0.1






r Probability
0 0.5905
1 0.3280
2 0.0729
3 0.0081
4 0.0004
5 0.0000
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0 1 2 3 4 5
when n=5, p=0.3
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0 1 2 3 4 5
when n=5, p=0.3
When n=5,p=0.3






Q) How do you choose a correct probability distribution among
binomial, poission and normal distribution?
To choose binomial probability distribution the following
conditions must satisfy:
Each trial should have only two possible outcomes i.e. success or
failure, pass or fail, head or tail, etc. i.e. there are only two
mutually exclusive categories.
The probability of success remain same that is constant from trial
to trial consequently the probability of failure also remains fixed
for each trial.
The trails should be statistically independent.
The random experiment is performed for finite and fixed numbers
of times.
Similarly to choose poission probability distribution the following
conditions must satisfy:
The number of trails is infinitely large i.e. n
The probability of success of each trail is small i.e. p0
np =


r Probability
0 0.5905
1 0.3280
2 0.0729
3 0.0081
4 0.0004
5 0.0000
Similarly to choose normal probability distribution the following
conditions must satisfy:
The curve must have a single peak thus it is called unimodel.
The curve is bell shaped and symmetrical.
The mean of normally distributed population lies at the centre of
its normal curve.
The mean, median and mode of this distribution must coincide.
The two tails of the normal curve extends infinitely and must never
touch the horizontal axis.
Area under the normal curve is to be unity i.e. 1 and the mean
should divide it into two parts.
So, using the above condition we can choose the correct probability
distribution.