Memory map of the Apple II ROMs

$F800­$FFFF Monitor. Handles screen I/O and keyboard input. Also has a disassembler, memory dump, memory  move, memory compare, step and trace functions, lo­res graphics routines, multiply and divide  routines, and more. This monitor has the cleanest code of all the Apple II monitors. Every one after  this had to patch the monitor to add functions while still remaining (mostly) compatible. Complete  source code is in the manual.  $F689­F7FC Sweet­16 interpreter. Sweet­16 code has been benchmarked to be about half the size of pure 6502 code  but 5­8 times slower. The renumber routine in the Programmer's Aid #1 is written in Sweet­16, where  small size was much more important than speed. Complete source code is in the manual.  $F500­F63C and $F666­F668 Mini­assembler. This lets you type in assembly code, one line at a time, and it will assemble the  proper bytes. No labels or equates are supported­­it is a MINI assembler. Complete source code is in  the manual.  $F425­F4FB and $F63D­F65D Floating point routines. Woz's first plans for his 6502 BASIC included floating point, but he  abandoned them when he realized he could finish faster by going integer only. He put these routines in  the ROMs but they are not called from anywhere. Complete source code is in the manual.  $E000­F424 Integer BASIC by Woz (Steve Wozniak, creator of the Apple II). "That BASIC, which we shipped  with the first Apple II's, was never assembled­­ever. There was one handwritten copy, all handwritten,  all hand assembled." Woz, October 1984.  $D800­DFFF Empty ROM socket. There was at least one third party ROM add­on.  $D000­D7FF Programmer's Aid #1­­missing from the original Apple II, this is a ROM add­on Apple sold that  contains Integer BASIC utilities such as high­resolution graphics support, renumber, append, tape  verify, music, and a RAM test. Complete source code is in the manual.