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The University of Texas at Dallas

Global Leadership Executive MBA Program

OB 6301: Organizational Behavior


Spring 2009: January 8 – April 12, 2009
Professor Contact Information
Anne M. Ferrante Phone: (972) 883-6467
Fax: (972) 883-6164
E-Mail: Use Blackboard e-mail

James K. Harvey Phone: (972) 867-8448


E-Mail: Use Blackboard e-mail

Course Description

This course addresses the human behavior and organizational concepts that
affect personal and organizational leadership.

Student Learning Objectives/Outcomes


• To learn about individual processes and behavior such as personality,
ethics, motivation, learning, performance management, communication,
and group dynamics
• To learn managerial and leadership issues of decision making and power,
and the organizational issues of teamwork, culture, and change
management.
• To develop critical thinking and analysis skills to critique business
situations from an organizational behavior point of view.

Resources
Texts: Cavanaugh, G, American Business Values, Prentice Hall, 2005.

Kinicki, A. Organizational Behavior: Core Concepts. McGraw Hill,


2008.

Articles: Posted by week in Course Materials

Cases: Posted by week in Course Materials

Course Syllabus Page 1


Schedule of Assignments
______________________________________________________________
Introduction: Organizations in Society
Key Topics: Environment of Organizations
Stakeholders
Corporate Social Responsibility
Ethics
Dates: January 5 – January 11
Lecture: Values Based Management
Organizations in Society
Readings: Cavanaugh, G, American Business Values, Prentice Hall,
2005
Kinicki, Chapter 1
Retreat Session: Values Based Management – Kaplan
Team Assignment: Case vignette presentations
Retreat Session: Introduction to Organizational Behavior and 21st Century
Leadership
Peer Evaluation: Due January 11

Module 1: Leadership in Organizations


Key Topics: Leadership and Management
Leadership Theories
Attributes and Styles
Power and Influence
Dates: January 12 – February 1, 2009
Lecture: Leadership
Power and Influence
Readings: Kinicki, Chapters 10 and 11
Buckingham, H., “What Great Managers Do”, Harvard
Business Review, March, 2005.
Goffee, R. and Jones, G. “Why Should Anyone Be Led by
You? Harvard Business Review, January, 2001.
Goleman, D., “What Makes a Leader?” Harvard Business
Review, January, 2004.
Hill, Linda, “Power and Dynamics in Organizations”,
Harvard Business Review, March, 1995.
Kotter, J., “What Leaders Really Do”, Harvard Business
Review, December, 2001.

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Zaleznik, A., “Managers and Leaders: Are They
Different?”Harvard Business Review, January, 2004.
Discussion Forum: Questions Posted in Discussion Forum
Responses posted no later than January 17
Case Analysis: Cory Robinson at Sprint Corporation (A)
Team-written case analysis questions and webconference
presentation and discussion.
Case analysis questions and instructions posted under
Course Materials
Written responses and presentation submitted to the
Digital Drop Box no later than 9:00 pm, Friday, January
30, 2009
Webconference: Saturday, January 31, 2009
8:30 – 10:00 AM CST.
Peer Evaluation: Submitted February 1

Module 2: Individuals in Organizations


Key Topics: Motivation
Diversity and Generational Differences
Dates: February 2 – February 22, 2009
Lecture: Motivation
Workplace Diversity
Readings: Kinicki, Chapters 2-4
Gabarro, J. and Kotter, J., “Managing Your Boss,” Harvard
Business Review, January, 2005.
Herzberg, F., “One More Time: How Do You Motivate
Employees?” Harvard Business Review, January 2003.
Johnson, Lauren Keller, “The Ratings Game: Retooling
360s for Better Performance”, Harvard Management
Update, January, 2004.
Livingston, S., “Pygmalion in Management”, Harvard
Business Review, January, 2003
Stauffer, D., “Motivation Across Generations”, Harvard
Management Update, March, 2003.
Discussion Forum: Thomas Green: Power, Office Politics, and a Career in
Crisis
A Day in the Life of Alex Sander: Driving in the Fast Lane

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at Landon Care Products
Questions Posted in Discussion Forum
Responses to both questions posted no later than
February 14
Case Analysis: Thomas Green: Power, Office Politics, and a Career in
Crisis A Day in the Life of Alex Sander: Driving in the Fast
Lane at Landon Care Products
Team-written case analysis questions and webconference
presentation and discussion.
Case analysis questions and instructions posted under
Course Materials
Written responses posted to the Digital Drop Box no later
than 9:00 pm., Friday, February 20, 2009.
Webconference: Sunday, February 22, 2009
4:00 – 5:30 PM CST
Peer Evaluation: Submitted by February 22

Module 3: Groups in Organizations


Key Topics: Group Process
Collaboration
Dates: February 23 – March 15, 2009
Lecture: Groups and Teamwork
Decision Making
Conflict and Negotiation
Readings: Kinicki, Chapters 6,7,8
Cone, J., “How to Change a Mind: Yours and Others”,
Interaction Associates White Paper, March, 2005
Conger, J., “The Necessary Art of Persuasion”, Harvard
Business Review, May-June, 1998
Gratton, L. and Erickson, T., “Eight Ways to Build
Collaborative Teams”, Harvard Business Review,
November, 2007.
Katzenbach, J. and Smith, D., “The Discipline of Teams”,
Harvard Business Review, July, 2005
Discussion Forum: TerraCog Global Positioning Systems: Conflict and
Communication on Project Aerial
Question posted in Discussion Forum
Responses posted no later than March 7

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Case Analysis: Innovation and Collaboration at Merrill Lynch
Team-written case analysis questions and webconference
presentation and discussion.
Case analysis questions and instructions posted under
Course Materials
Written responses and presentation posted to the Digital
Drop Box no later than 9:00 pm., Friday, March 13, 2009
Webconference: Saturday, March 14, 2009
8:30 – 10:00 AM CST.
Peer Evaluation: Submitted by March 15

Module 4: Organizational Systems


Key Topics: Organizational Culture and Design
Change Management
Dates: March 16 – April 12, 2009
Lecture: Organizational Culture, Design, and Change
Readings: Kinicki, Chapters 12, 13
Beer, M and Nohria, N., “Cracking the Code of Change”,
Harvard Business Review, May – June, 2000
Beer, M, Eisenstat, R., and Spector, B., “Why Change
Programs Do Not Produce Change”, Harvard Business
Review, Nov. – Dec. 1990
Kotter, J., “Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts
Fail”, Harvard Business Review, January 2007.
Meehan, P., Rigby, D., and Rogers, P., “Creating and
Sustaining a Winning Culture”, Harvard Management
Update, January, 2008.
Discussion Forum: Campbell and Bailyn’s Boston Office: Managing the
Reorganization
Questions posted in Discussion Forum
Responses posted no later than March 28
Case Analysis: IBM’s Decade of Transformation: The Turnaround
Instructions posted under Course Materials
Paper posted to the Digital Drop Box by April 11
Peer Evaluation: April 12
Course Evaluation: April 12

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Grading Policy and Evaluation
Preparation and Participation at Retreat Session 15%
Individual discussion forums
4 @ 10%each 40%
Team case analysis: presentation and written summary
3 @ 10% each 30%
Final team case analysis paper 15%
Written Assignments
Evaluation of written assignments and project papers will be based on thoughtful,
analytical, well-constructed responses demonstrating knowledge of the topic by
citing examples of the key concepts present in the readings or cases.
• A—Excellent: Understanding of all key issues; no important analytical errors
or omissions; concise, very well written and organized, makes appropriate
use of charts and tables.
• B—Good: Understanding of most issues; only a few important issues not
discussed; few analytical errors; well-written and well-organized, makes
appropriate use of charts and tables.
• C—Adequate: Understanding of many issues, but not all important aspects
covered; various analytical errors; excessive case recitation unsupported by
analysis; poorly written or organized, makes inappropriate use of charts and
tables.
Webconference Team Discussions and Presentations
Evaluation of webconference presentations and discussions will be based on
demonstration of knowledge of the organizational behavior theories, concepts
and issues. Responses should be based upon and reference the text, lectures,
readings or other sources of independent research. During the discussion each
team is expected to add value by questioning, exploring or challenging at least
one other team’s presentation.
• A—Excellent analysis and presentation. Clear and concise answer to the
question and provides one or more key concepts or evidence from the text,
readings or other outside sources to support presentation. Immediately and
effectively responds to questions, provides specific answers and defends
points if challenged by other team members. Presentation slides are clear,
concise and well organized. During webconference, team members ask
questions or provide evidence that adds value to the other team’s
presentation or topic.
• B—Good analysis and presentation: Clearly answers the question and
provides at least one key concept or supporting evidence from the text or
readings to support presentation. Responds to questions with an answer that

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clarifies or defends points made by others. Presentations slides address key
information and are generally organized to support the presentation. Team
members ask questions or provide evidence that adds some value to the
other team’s presentation or topic.
• C—Adequate: Answers the question, but provides no key concepts or
evidence from the text, readings or other outside sources to support
presentation. Presentation slides do not wholly support the presentation.
Team members respond to questions generally and provide adequate
answers, which may or may not add clarity or defend points made by others.
Members do not ask questions or provide evidence that adds value to the
other team’s presentation or topic.

Course & Instructor Policies


Format for Written Assignments
Refer to complete assignment instructions in Course Materials
Written assignments should be Word documents (no html formats) that are:
• Double-spaced, 12 pt. Arial or Times New Roman font, 1-inch margins.
• Citations properly formatted in MLA style
• Clearly identified by team
– Document name must include your team number and name of assignment
(i.e. Team2_Robinson.doc).
– No cover page
– Document header with your team number and name of assignment.
– Document footer to include a page number
Assignment Submission
Assignments must be posted on Blackboard (Bb) within the course area by the
due date. Assignments are submitted to the Digital Drop Box under Tools tab.
Be sure to use the SEND command to submit to the Drop Box. Do not use Add
command to post.
Late Assignments
The format and team-based nature of this course does not allow for late
submission of assignments.
• If you will be unable to participate in a discussion forum you must notify the
instructors before the posting deadline and provide the reason for missing the
forum. Dr. Ferrante or Mr. Harvey will either provide an alternative
assignment and due date or determine the appropriate grade deduction.
• If you will be unable to fully participate in the development of your team case
analysis you must notify the instructors before team analysis begins. Dr.
Ferrante or Mr. Harvey will determine the most appropriate alternative
assignment or determine the appropriate grade deduction.
• If you will be unable to participate in your team’s case analysis presentation
you must notify the instructors before the submission deadline and provide

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the reason for missing the forum. Dr. Ferrante or Mr. Harvey will determine
the most appropriate action or determine the appropriate grade deduction.
Retreats:
Attendance at the retreat is a course requirement.
Evaluations:
Peer Evaluation
Students need to complete a peer evaluation for each team assignment. The
peer evaluation is an electronic document whose link is located on Blackboard
(Bb) in the course area under the Information button.
Course Evaluation
The completion of a course evaluation is a course requirement. Students need
to complete a course evaluation form which is an electronic document whose link
is located on Blackboard (Bb) in the course area under the Information button.
Students who do not submit a course evaluation by the due date will receive an
incomplete grade for the course.

Course Syllabus Page 8