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AMORC FOLDER 1

(1898-1929)
1898
The Chicago Sunday Tribune
Chicago, Illinois
Sunday, April 17, 1898
Page I
Wpmen yesterday organised a lodge of
Masons at the Tuxedo. Madison avenue and
Fifty-ninth street.
Woman
Organise a
[asonlc Lodge.
They call It Manhat
tan Mystic Lodge.
There had been taik
of such a movement
for several weeks.
but the women were reticent. They mat In
a real lodgeroom. with queer insignia and a
delicious air of mystery. Humor says much
of this mystery was occasioned by doubt
whether the real Masons would recognise
this new feminine order. But fats and the
Masonsa real lodgewere kind to the
women.
Mrs. May Banks Stacey, who li the head
and front of the movement, was formally
Initiated a few days ago. and yesterday she
wore In, with mysterious rites, twenty of
her followers.
The principal requisite for membership Is
that one must be the wife, widow, daughter,
sister, or granddaughter of a Mason. The
ritual used In Manhattan Mystic Lodge wlU
be that of the first woman's lodge, founded
in France In 1796. of which the Empress Jo
sephine was s member." said Mrs. Stacey.
1906
The Washington Times
Washington, District of Columbia
Saturday, August 25,1906
Page 5
W E A L T H Y m Y O R K E R
P U N S B I G L I B R A R Y
Quarters to Be Used by the I nstitute
for Psychical Re
search.
N E W Y ORK A ug 2S.~-rnru'eal l n* hi * j
I denti ty f or the pi vr.t, a weal thy real -i
dent of N<w Y ork ha? J ust vol unteered;
to r appl y several thousands of dol l ars
f or the purpose of Loafi ng and equi p
pi ng adequate quarters. i ncl udi ng a l ec
ture room and l i brary and compl ete
l aboratory, to he u*ad hy the NV Y 'ork
I nsti tute f or Physical Research. Thi s j
staten.* nt I s 1 hv H. Spencer l^ewla, I
<>f \VM 14Sih ntr*<ei. assi stant edi tor
of a mnK tl ne eal l -d Modern Mi racl e*,
and an I nstructor I n the Metropol i tan
i nsti tute of Selene**
"Our purpose." sol d Mr. I >ewta, "l * to
submi t al l phenomena of a tj<-cnl!ed
eupernaturul order t> the cl osest sci en
ti fi c ecru l i ny. Wc hoi*e to devel op
anr tig our member* some who wi l l be
Capatl e of hypnoti c power and through
them i n f tudy and test every phase of
that surj ect. We ahul l i nvi te spi ri tual
i st medi um* to gRe evi dence* of the
power they cl ai m I n our l ecture hal l
and undor condi ti on* whi ch will el i mi
nate enti rel y the possi bi l i ty of f raud
T horough sci enti fi c I nvesti gati on of
i
ftychlc&l matters is our onl y ai m We
i not propose to i ndorse or adverti se
a nyhody."
The Washington Times
Washington, District of Columbia
Saturday, August 25,1906
Page5
WEALTHY NEW YORKER PLANS BIG LIBRARY
Quarters to Be Used by the Institute for Psychical Research
NEW YORK, Aug. 25.- Concealing his identity for the present, a wealthy
resident of New York has just volunteered to supply several thousand of
dollars for the purpose of leasing and equipping adequate quarters, including
a lecture room and library and complete laboratory, to be used by the New
York Institute for Physical Research. This statement is made by H. Spencer
Lewis, of 252 West I48th street, assistant editor of a magazine called Modern
Miracles, and an instructor in the Metropolitan Institute of Science.
"Our purpose," said Mr. Lewis, "is to submit all phenomena of a so-called
supernatural order to the closest scientific scrutiny. We hope to develop
among our members some who will be capable of hypnotic power and through
them to study and test every phase of that subject. We shall invite spiritualist
'mediums' to give evidences of the power they claim in our lecture hall and
under conditions which will eliminate entirely the possibility of fraud.
Thorough scientific investigation of psychical matters is our only aim. We do
not propose to endorse or advertise anybody."
1907
NOTED MEN DISCUSS INCOME TAX.
THE PEAK
Q
A L T O N B. P A R K E R E A V O R f l
M y A L T O N m . P A H E *
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lifiMi livlaai life n | (mwin#*
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h# laari l I no iii# f I t i n Ala m
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l li af I*. t i t I U i e . i i n e t h e y n n j n y n n r i n i n
r/ n r* rf i d | j
fiurh a Full Ofjlillilf.r 111# Id.afl cl lha t |1u n f
J . C ! P H E L P S S T O R E S O P P O S E S I T .
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m S m i hai na i d Th j m c l i i m h td wm-M
ahmili k? m (M il J a |e oraiaiM fdlinra bi inAvad-
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f i A r b l f tn af r l ^ i f l | l a i v fm (V l
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m i <.m , If at mia^A h a ---1 - J m aao'ptf may i-w-
all b j Ii i h ark it# II kaa pavaa ui liaiulal ew t t ^ a
f ( 1 I B | h j n d l al d u i U Ip
l a f B r t f l a' Chat rival * ( M il ad i l i f e ; h i i
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1h a | la In B#l f l o p ' a*j i aa a panHi^i M Ma
fl CP*ar u n a!l I M 1l t h at o f ^ T 111 t E ,l (o il. l *J m naifc1r la I ti a a v l n l t i i a l air
d a s. 11 ( I t ? to ha aa J a! |i i d Kalr El B J t h a t n .m U M M mcu tra aueb a^oFlaual'c a to ponlaei u
j j r t ^ i ^ l r C l a n l o t r a m * Et . i f i d , aa i t d t r r o r a a * - l f f i w f t aai ** * '
WHAT IS NE
O U R ON L Y O S C A R B E C L A
BV f l SC A D H A M M E Q f T E I N .
rWriftM ByaoiaHp fa# r U WarUJ
W T C X U B >n<tav to TstliPfi
Wallah I ta U e a a h a M i a l u r a frni
aUathfeft aid B r k l l n p tab'Tha wof
I C l h a t i f j a a a I i i m n i m i * r M l 1n Er
I f l o a H a U i a , h a a H a aarm apar a-hnna
fiHai e. aa |l ana. M i n l j k l . a i i | a t I rr
l in o a t In nil ah Inj a t a n ooly caa flnariiha
IM P a m
T> nrd a | l(lad art lata ftcrh l . i h r ad t i
ftmai N at Tiwk pnhfk <rtaflt1l]j llnaa no m ti
ra^aaiirt hoi rflnaa ked Ilia both hotafeEa 1i
rot i! aj Bad jaEi a* t u k aAaa Paak. aa II acm
inttad to Lila ten a I i fc!n j; from 11a I nrttnu rli
Wt al achat en j i]d or r r m l d Aa rtli | 1ho
omirl Of CLlat ofQcUJ panrinJ caf
Trra that la "* Ana r d tla U l Bf l Tn
Ma Tnrh la dlf!ar*#f, ebi ) t i l aMtmlal gn/ aii
rat MB * m In ha iiawirad W hjl |a lha F i
C I N iT lO N I
l l la a mfeltar nf fcairt, 1 ikould b j fBnn tii
o t EM Naa Tcrh la idi A a i #m #H and
hat Berra haa Soar in pail a m -i t a H urt
th* Wntli.
1 an I li ad 1! Na at York laoha Qu U n i |q
H a v i n g F u n w i t h t h e D i r e c t o r y .
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of amrihlf flfaai Ipupartn-a la alnan. inn. 1flf |hai-
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l.un"h in afiar only iN ily llafeila and car
Uali, hi ^tiaa d pi Tula am And la n a i f n <1a
iW'* hM-tr.f.aa
TJi#a- a. a fn?ir anH P i hJ< #nlinira n l l l h * a
r, irt~<r ll*11a r a t f i l i l n w l art <"( 1*1aj an.1 ><
:- i 11a11#ii hfUfei. Iiv Ih- *
T il l! ,**.* T n Ii t i l l a L' *n la w r
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I r l nit ! falila Til a fn' nprt . i ( a*#a Ealia
i i art ii a| ni ife r ran Pipn t irailiui* a Tta
ana|p( aHI.na
I* c n i ' . l M f e i l * i i aa in aa a a 1 guntinam* iS> Pila
hMifl. H Ifl lfd in i* fekj lh a iH>aonr aii.xi d Ii j i<I
1! 1* * v r M | | \.*n\miM Tj-a ftx*i |*iil ma l i tli
niarl l|qilra n r ' l a p a*1(Pina flu* m nI ta Pv
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1i.Mll I rn>J| a P | J m i n r a l i fl.ll S t - m Tn^B 1ar
an * 1n fry tetnul II' 11 la1n4 |!jkt kMrlnd I nr. .<
lha m- #y x'na l| li(J -!fl>il#n fa ui.1 t**M
l|atT-a 111 rip ana fgal
1 r * i <1..ana iii t :m dll a.if (i j 1a J tijuaa do I
l i n laa M i n i ** 1o i i h 2 i a T h ai a ay i t a l .a
liam-ll I1i1 M# Mill. X. tins n|.i,piflt t>r J -a a#I
'rlt a rJ ,n>ti| r( dnil'M ( to irhl Si J oltll
t h r l i h t t nA t i r M ta r nniiiirna " f N i - < a i i
Greatest Psychic Wo nder of 1906
n rr r fs. c: rr l p m i s .
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ai d va f i n t r l IQ 111# t d l n i l l f l l d f l l t l l
In ll.lt fliiMTl'FJ llflr l P"fl |inf jinaafHn ini
Iba i.hJ I' ini *. l a liaia a*-n I h# nwria hi df.
sr < -| i n i * f f i ar p l C T J L t i a i i c c u l i l l i a t r IP C 'r r e
fi .J
T li;. |rn i* lut i fli j Ia nj Hum ilial uf lila-
; " at/ | i j l l l f.f | i l ' nuid*nuiil<|lnr Of
ni<ll|ia. iffltn ] la- flit kll*iii (lia 1r nmiria, i n J ia|a.
pj '_,f nal (CifllhU, l ei U .i li.idltiu- tmnl.J haia
i w i h t d . it tfliillilcally. ilic dm rljjll- na of i k i
f(fill. I 1* Lrt*j|lfe ;i airnl
Hi fl i i i r t n c i h l E l<..d ( I i i ! n l < l
niU r^j*'al( th* tl:#ll)fh1 s f r n h j l*i# nndlnm Ji-
HI 3]*!] I fca r a r m in l l J a t fji i | .in tit-Jinn l ^ f n r n
i:inil'<r*d 1!i* -i t c u Ii i c . i:
rp liln hfi* I flr IT.adlliin wa# t ali' ]-Sl^'ai iH <
is:i >au.u<i.
The Tragedy of Injustice.
V N E W E L L n W i Q w T M I L L I B .
TTtuira Al.#ntnifk / nr lha -Cuaiiafc U'nrla Lj Ida J 'fliMo of I l \ f * \ n v l k f l a r e h
Tan 111 aulla pi i*a jtial l a x a U i . al H i I M i t h l i u i ai k ta M t |
/ t V a M n S ' i l ifi a Huf k pi ikhu nn oi Ufa t i ir un in-ika latgj. giio i far ttii Injuatjec Hj bi imtilfl
* t i i mar aeaiai ip*i auffar Ixnfl ago J tiL*a!fln cru lftad l a aiilm if . Ai>-ua c i h h i .I ha
x U U rt,EJ lar IfhirilJ ti Liipnad Jia hgrO, hui m- illf a m j mail aBC alllagc br gfl ! Kiai oOi
iraaiyp IP cm il aad nhjual j^if ininla
O vn l i a ^FtitM lr wf lrh tti# rtirk anfftri 1fl 1b* flnjf iH n f y l lcn p| ti la tiar-
Cfea rPlrt field#i (j mlna.l hy I Iii pe]||l#t1 ifllaiakM nl lk p trlf 1a<dr hiia ti# r ti I t lhd<
fei/ ma.l |0 (li# aIna el i hi faifi#i Krtpli>#ta Miinai1ih#a auliar fliliHQiia'j hy r arn e| *<fv
iHimlq avtnia mar blth limy l)i# a- coiiltfl . m allm ct Ilia <|ilin ai d iH lk irii| h ;h ica
iai]<ria| final m-mti- 1I fi1#n lh nnifinr r adJ Iey fl*ifa#t ifirnngh *m#l #r1(l#1tin ctaf atanla fef
| rniatijijt pt#a ha 1a la tin s i l l f Mfinnil li Iff hia jiiQhlam of u H*mi liidE--
tuaiil ard ihla huirlng ul imiiallo# In il arfli It oni rf tha hflrdtl f i a :.' r r a that it 3u tinei
Ivncra.
tr|ui I d In Pil lit Ef.
J ral l> fnra * i et r t | P | T litl ul tnuiletilenl. Iiuiiuio*! ujid latfld bj all wbe g r- flw
iJi#ii h- ifrmp * i c r j (jiihaHn | I li a- -j* A 'hai ihri- r irtu in jti^Ht Ufa ha- ip#<n
C"l 11* n| i .ifi ii pi |n:i nli-i f . i 1 ti i V ' K < 1 a i '.i*. dlnnlf fut er.#i. ifan# man <( a m n
feknaa i s i b i c i l . I(i#fin1<d In i |mH!r il*l<:n- lll lit a high Mill Ifl] Dvhti Ihif. Ifeifd hlT' Irrm
rail# m j aji h hr rp ifmi / li*< h##o IiHi#iiHa# --Hm i#lih tra mtiar ilirrr. K t ia w .i'^'
ihai na f;?id iii- .ri 'lieu Inti 1.1#if, mill i .(I |m t i t In non in uf any Icfui ul wroaa. m- man
xaaii- hi ^#dnluf n . II
Ae h,vi.vlgnlira rriiimlllta re.irrl 11a al i ll ' t i ullh lha alimcni Ihif it# man bad nrvnr
I'itn 1milri*] fur invitilng ih'jt imllilnj onl f tha wtj na.l b-tn f>nml In hl i n u i r rrtr
na a j >11r rrvpm. ard ij ai h m u l.#l h i h l Ip la iufTar ii.naly Ii m i u i c fi-* m i t iiiiKinll-
lifllfl. in ii'i In rlarli in a j- ulil- ati|Hf!'ir /
Ilul Eli m .' l it TpiiiUH niiily bli apfi'Ml III# 111gh ufflrlll an i t trail ' Til# in^uirtlt la riettSl
"I h#fi 3j# fek'#1 Beiii'fer' i In.' j.iuiH. n il. ' Ii*lti hla - r!j In *rei.> tiial no In <1j ii la
i l.ita.l mini ].itila In* 1.#tn d >nn II# aid. .'ll lnt!<j#m liny ha elo-n! m ]imr hamLa. lull
ii ihe lute.ii i.l L d ! ilig Iii c Idr fi i l .mil i hi nay ll luma hiicalL r t ..flu full J nail, a
111 a d '
Rp i Im g Itiaa t'lMhallr fliifl#rln ^a nl mar n huaa grtm| rEfra had h#oe A i - a t m . *h"
n mad m Ilia hnir# iafi. f*nrf 1lt and lawli* p c i # lirar|*ir' iV# itie flanaipr u
ViiJ mad If in Iii voalirttiuti had dailruei ii mmi humceiii Mbeui I lea.] trandr.. m my latini
un-ff, J un.I hip trawlad fr<fein >ny ho ini' ' 1 'hr l' i|ili#l Iu ilM a urutifl iH idli 1 dlaJ Lul
i hia i t opi a w n r i H! rawa# ha r1|M1 1 lie iiian tin Old M ta 1C# hf#in.i.
lB]jiH(fl prerr^fiiai anil fptilill# mn M *# In tndiir# In alKnea. W11ti 1ii i yan/ ih.i fjapar|
pi t hill nl burati rriild aira uc-.n an amlnanf u. <1ninai henoj.-il r 111fl n ei ill# lapuhllc 1 hr
h lla f. ll niif if r l r i f i k j Aliar ff iy y#ar* m'5,# n i i j-.m |litg and fhu algtlit for: i
:ula#Ti| #r. 'M ail ] lhi llila n>sr h*d raaraa I iht m-Jiel# Innur el hIn Ida
Ti.cn. i liu F.arm had aU ht#r dura, and ihv pui^##.! i rrm a phnid ih# imlh ram#
Mill 'll . Iiti.li limj 0 flic !jm A l| if f t* n (j |_V I 11J >iqi lirnE# a i# faih- ra Ih t FI,
]< Kill'. * m .'or liti - ' ll :in.l irtld Hlfl plaltift ilifli nrlciky lit i f .f :n r j h. urmila] ligyi in fiut
ma |>f.:|*.rly Inie Ilia bv.idu nl |r.iaix- i and nf i- ' .iir.i H I rum aji#tnal*aa jirid l|>l'1f " f in I#
ild ii I ni'at I1# laflnanri nf llfluer. i n k i n ' tiM i i l t i -fl plgjfi ap^urfi. *hi TOlilfl
r J a n.1 hi nia1f t urfead n.. n j Ian / I rnianic. l l -i-n-fJ Ic# m a m t i i lead al Ilia k b fjilhar
Vh- man #tm'd fr.xlia fte -lol#n*f Had li# 1-'#r nliuall#r #hi!ni# an nf tejrpnr f, r# li# aeul,f.
liy i.ea uifh.l Jiui> c]^aj-rJ lilmaall Hut lie aa ti| pauldfln uiirih. i L u j j i H <111* auJ roci
jin am- na gnld. nml 'rii# ,ia - ia- ' nnH ]m would nan nian a fmiliah K"i'a dUJ mnr.i and hrlraj .1
I'h a la.|j#F * rilllf lani muH #ip'iama nf l il i **'r a 1 ha I Ii r Inr hJ rli l ViaJ till
*n |.Ma l*##r rlili.fly ]*!..i-.1I la ^ m Iii hIi fc- Piwr ' f i enat pmiP##- ll# in
nardly a nl Ic In* ' iilglil iuit i |n u<i Men a Im iidauli #l hlir liclur- iai#r<jie ami l'*e Mm
In !- 1 "i ** n ji c i,.*m
V. Ql]d J .it au tfiximi.1 u( '.lie juju, : t j i k L .
#HAttfc 9 j !. I'.till, i >I J *.U i i :: 4 ,!.
Loflutoal-atli .- I -F. li# o#L i i iij t..,-i g
A m e r i ai i I j- ni h . n ( m h o # j ,.
nr- *>li i . 1111a 1 1 feplm t o I nJ .a'i
fc|a * 'fc- tisil k|,u|| anri n,(
j fi ia i fi l xi E^uul d .IcaerL1^ i i uui i i !, u.r -m
df H... - ill | i I*-# r.V T
T t 1-4 ' "-I anrl a. ren\r" . rl ? and In -1#
(ti ' !V 'a#rsom
h*i-c U l: * l J
- ar.uu# ef a g-uklmnsn
arv. - _____ _______
>1i i # III- ffnllcHIM! *i<4 stul
11 .in# V n i- iar!!] ha I h- all I dir nlhrra
Mi.# ].]in miahi iw dtilap T r - milium * a s
y -<| | | all i 'I-Bi ii L ard eiini# r Mil | liiva hai#
n- r..i;r pit |i.
If l - j.c I ' i n a i p I a l Mlilfe 1. i n r. al #11 nlhar
H* (.1 .aI a<1n.K dial 1U|ttM l^1* * * " (irhatea
1 J IH fR.a r: am :' T 1*4 " T ' r r r r x rrp,<
llcn la i- aa'hki Thla la #ipn.11*:j| IE#
t.f i#ir|flihy u if) xtrejna, Mat * i #p Ej . 11 Ij -
ill# r1 |i<tpf11.ca!a Till* damunai rml n ""n ll.a
* 1 # (ha e ai r#mfl*itfll.J #. if If* * t r
rLuuri!flil I f flixleif. ur lif 4->- ***
LinJ y t d InviJ lIsii' tra
fi si n cr fijrifi I i J qdiM
Tl.a r##d nf ll' - hour la f>i ViMlr# and lan|i In |ti fiueol
L bJ UJ l i i .
T1.# full (--l a rrt [#:!i i pj
-.(Ill m il* . Iy In ill- I'll- |irtipli# m man t a j iai I gold m< .VA .T r l
i4,11-** *n' HI#ini" -n' 1 ''if li 1'MiiB-l J:aii IlmwiiildliAfl i*-i *uo
Mia#lv 1*il'h#-i h*'1fl.'r#l iii'lu^llf t ' i many nf ninitit mar'yit'd *MirF pmh#ii 1#iu r c i t
haiitita '.fl in' vlrMma ..1 lii.illt n < ]J >i.ny .iml lii|>>. 4l#i! hnUU * v l * t H (
itBight-i. i h* i #m r* rl i ( " 'I ..*- i I nr ' hr'l i t h crrj ml i e, ti ^i e cu pl ac- %,. tfi a j i i Ugn.ni .
l..rv. ! |.M< 11 ' ll H ' n 11- - *l n.i-n Rl). Inn itlln |< n-1 Ir llir ln ai all Fl It'.l su Hi.)
|ilu## fin adtt Ifira1ir,#-u n? r. (. Tn i |i#j i|. . nly k nf h .fc ad ard ihu II \ m#> nn k
1#S T'l" Il>st skFatH in nr* f i n ampnp hr psnlri- ni Fgr ifce Ne*,v V" (r
. . .
Laiest Triumph o f Vivisection.
D i sease t h e P r o d u c t of T h o u g h t p
---------------------- t i n i i i -------- g M h-aw l r t it*i*r ***-# *
I
1<m h-4 m aI
h*i chlVJ r ini-, a l(j[V4.. U
1-, .imat 1L- uf Wa#ll i
d V F * A U L \K t V t S T
H IBM - e- * * ' 1* i " m f * * ' *
, 4 j i j : i n kV.vTf). % # . .
t-j-I trU '- tr
Ad i J I- . -I! Ill .* ' l i f e
u 1.1, 1. ha , ai | i ' ! . ' " i n J u - i a W i Oi.e u i i
I ilia un fa .m l J f rrldrlan TJ El r.e*
> 1 '* :."P ! h* l' 1- * i
11- /*
.
:et: . nia
iirl ts.1 I 41 1.1a
ef l l r - j r - n r r
l .n tiu f l cu j <1i mki #rit | . *
* !. I (111 11nr- l I nan MUltl i *
lu ' - tail ,i.*.l nl 111.#- - In - -
In I f l . l * - f - - l T l i l i a I- #
f l i J4j i k i . * ( t aa feufxsl na l n _ 1!U
laa.J .a* mai m- l- J iiimii In Una] l l -
> - j F<a. ll i .j na > i # w f j . f> l i l i
ai iai*|) .asa. ( j .ma. *fei|i.to4 f - 'C I "
- a l l -1 * 14It t . i t ana*I. i f la
4i *-a i fi r":i t
world I *r
lliTuunli tli" ilnu* r*adi*r. iui-1 you* will flrut LSAi
1( WJufuIiis ~fTiy-erven Core*, oik* H*ftr| "ml ono
Jjnvrr. 'I'lirr' h m tivf-n'y ft-|>i>vn-r, two Hunt 1' 1'
olxt.v-oti" li i*k line* I leu i , tlva three
ft park a, riK i . - - r ii1 ' i nnd ten ti nt* .
\ * liif]v ' I 1"' * l l ni , li*ry h Ihuv j i . mo, Hint.
1U truM -vl ii' Stuck**. New York 1 ewdewetl with
five nml nnr-lnlf <>!iiriiii*. f K1)i<:*,~ twelve (Jueen*.
one i;i'iliii!>!i of iwi*nPy-foi:r DttKeai llilrlj?-
elcht Kurin mi l i'yltty-two l/.if,Xi Tner* are )*t*an
CNatli'" fur nil Hi'ii r .y.tlly to dwell In.
Tho spiritual tv Ifnie of tltf otiv rvight to b" well
looked /iftit, ni t. foi i> nml litl alxty-tlirea
Popes, f nr ( Vf llunlf, one hundred nml thirty-two
Abbot*. nltie \ Vieyn, i Irven ITIratft, twenty l*nr-
Jjlifji, two 1, thirty.eight KMern, onn./oltuTin
pnd three-|nrier* of f'.'iteiina, two column* of Den,
-1wrlve I Mi enj , one eolimin of Ohurchea, forty-
right anxious. t wrnly-c iglit Christiana and eight
Tilt;..
nuitter *.f 1/wvr. wJilHi lot* ful<l
n<t ono Uunwit how ritinv^, yom'J 7
tho
Ik)
I .1
no four a ml nil* - imi t eoitimm
In a Ilnrlen baiter, liy the Way.
That New TniK ! atlll a youn* town
la showi
at acslnei one Sklnneri rtooont eonatltuta a *
showing, e'lhor.
ConiMofkig craaLoeaa ao.1 coodnaw* of t^** bi* ij
burg. It ll hard to ew why tha rJIroa^ry hot!d hand (;
it- twTmrttnt 1>nmwt# Tha raft t&&t wo hive al*5
fifieen Apple*, rtghieew Citron*. 'five Orangea, flvn
rvachea, one drape,- "th.r Plum* and on* Tear
dnean't rn-ak* enUr* amend*' hut New York Ian i
golnw to cry aibout It: It la too llghl-hMrled. for, a*

:t
(-J i f
s
Cv
r

<
.
<> i
f.i v
G\
i
f t i
%
\
I i
(,S>
P
i
i
:
Hnrpoa to only one J'anr.
- Tho first nnme In the-directory la Jaquea Aa. nni
the last rvxmo Ui Ixtuls ZyM Their* are twtlvo
nant^a that hajtln with X, nine oolumna of Joneae"r*J*J
thlrtv-flv i ^Inmm of flmltln,"|wo column* of John ^
'ftmltha mul rrineen eMnmri of Brown* t' v
() >
' l*i
W

l&.meatlesft I S s s ' c H i c W o n d e r 0 1 T I 9 0 6
. S P E N C C R l e w i s ,
Hitt Arte Vort I n s t i t u t e f o r P*yrAlrtJ<
i r t h )
/
. 'whom ho had never nocn, 4nd told whera ha wag
at the iiiutreni rocltnj which f"t* war nfter-
wmd verified to the minutest detail.
In this .lemon*!rjtlon it wtta not possible for
tlio Medium to ever 1i ^vt>-nan-the foonrs ha dt*^-
spfjtril. sne1 therefora thera could have been no
ftnnd
ThlH lenves but two explanationsthat of tele-
-ndvfmccirtmt -of--pmTchi'-^pnihxr:tTid that of erlihll spirit ecEfitnunJcatlon. Of
ml rwotirch And study. r<*. those prescut know tbelr rooin^, and Isle-
DathA' wa* possJblh. for lita medhim-could hove
received, telopathically, the descrtptlona of tba
looms from the persons present.
Dm granting this, we find that tslepctthy could
no! expislr the method whereby the medium de
scribed the room In which the gentleman before
rpenttoned was -apcmiJni; tho evening, nor could It
Explain how the metiUtin was enabled to tell us
WLUZ1
L H K - * * ne
otie nf^ 'lhe most
sticc^sslul for tha
mix'* -wtmdet/u! d lsroT
revolutions and
roucltmlnns having been
effected In this one year
than have been recorded
In the nnnal* nf thin scl-
cneo since tho first
aaarLjs;
In. response to the ....
------ ItVorlrV-ior4Ui ~l l uu) u i U. -nt
TP*r1TrtrTr T rr r jv yonx-rl _____
in this country in 1848. p^coent knfw -.vhete the gentlcmap was and cor-
reqitcat from the Sunday lalnly no one knew exactly wht bp and the others
Ui~.inoau-Biari(abla~with-lilm-ftifght-tx^-dolnrTrFTTTKJITHrt^wi.j a
-fjaj-ofiie exlilli!Unit of Lh<i xcAt, I will describe the ?tmrgei t.o Rll_i'r?senL and Chore cuul l hava baen
-ulaftiona(.ration before the ->oeieiy by n youns^no^dhlt cn. -----------
.American IndltUi, who oinlTcd thnt In a trance ho If telepathy con explain this dcmonstrstlon then
could comtnunlcftte with the spirit of an Indian we must adroit that telepathy between Hfrangers
ehtaf, and 8iw> wjt|t the Ui/eat isplrit." aful tha4 el * dlsiitnce nt anv ttnje rtnd nnrter r mr pnM1-
hta.-sp4ciatAnjuht.ilcscElheJJimui:h=tiIm=h.Jbtt]nes^ttana^ia possible. Tht* t&rxteruUnpithe Hmttaflons
of ihoie SfTthtrrvTdn the fjoiti. ;*____________- df telrpBthv to an extrorne, hULdVeH So. If may h*
Thn meantm nifl describe, ncrurnTely andain de- the real bypotTiesls. This demonstration on the
t*n. fhr> i ii.iTUfr Pt slynf t Iic f ? urrscilt. OliO roam' wfiola was the most remark able, of Its class, ever
InJ- jp' n_______ ____ ______________________recorded hi- our society, ar perhapa by uuy o t i
T "
,T.
tar-
V
: *
i
AT'_
1r!~
- JJe uku descilbfd the appearancfl of a gentleman bo<ly of InvcxtlKatcra.
D i s e a s e t l h e P r o d u c t o f T h o u a S a t .
h*
C H A R W t S S ^ t w a S R T D A V t f t i -----Motbrrhrarr of *oroa otairmy tiwrlny NrfsHrn
T
F a lb mi ght Dill 111 H11 in^tnnt of tlfrie flllat* or her Child. 9tie gotw Into a collapa*. fev*r follow* anrl
^ contrsct tho lit.*.*.! vewtejs; canslnir a ruili of plioHshirar the gates of death. Waa It nat a iJioimlii
* lilutwl jojivJTrom any p.m: if it eon lnTr".iAe or that produced thl* lilness?
dkmlfllini lh" r>t-r-*riiin nt u j*11tut. It It aan hasten oj
Mtara -!*-"!* r*-t- t< It -C-Xn turn ttl"
ry. ina Mu-iii.IX I t usn t..i. laisr* - ---- - ------------ - -----___ _ ___________
... , .... ........................ - ^ m* t.t dkv. Is Jiro-u.n te dilm tbjt h^ ttr-llfc.has
A man I* * I M Rt n tisnouf
amt napp.rwM and blaasolijftAtli
ble^Iifll. of heinth
;jpA)T rrppettt
PI
ttll
l .tl l
J tnti
prj*r
livr
- - _ _ _ . v c i k._ 4 J . !Ml i w . - - . - , r g J
I f rtpwsri* -ff n . 1 i : : -icen Urowwid In a U-j (urix* p a ^
h u often nectiiivd, It can 'lir.ng liiH.untuno.ma doa.li ,*r,l*rY- him nni], ltl *lrntrth In gorm. SiVin ha Ja-Jn- t i
then 1 It not iiatui'u! tor oh to cniichivl*'. withovll ** deltrWin and^ljl AU.ylie fun.'ttvms et tiie. body are by
fwtlvor aritntnwil. UlM It to.iy UrtiiK tvml o niora A"nine.Ml. a rtnctorni cnlled hnfl n.roc* T l x fllsrRsa f y ,
_or ten* cnptlirinii" ilcrapf,iT!t:cnt of tin* pliy-dud Or- *,<lt ls ** not that th* IWIn T d( * i * has hwi Tf>rJ
tfarusm. which ww coll rU-tem." proj.wcd by wtiAt .^o InetiaMT * -fr,w
On hvt ry. t(nr.1 nc n*iti* 'tiiTtiincc* wticrc fhr notion I hove a*en the most TrcrMlcrf'il "(Trcta f.Uiow a o f i
" ' I 1, I>*. r.. * |V ft* of HMifcr Af t er nn outhurM nf po - t in th" f un"- c . t
Greatest Psychic Wonder of 1906
By H. SPENCER LEWIS
(President of the New York Institute for Psychical Research.)
The year 1906 was one of the most successful for the advancement of
psychical research and study, more wonderful discoveries, revelations and
conclusions having been effected in this one year than have been recorded in
the annals of this science since the first "spirit-raps were heard in this
country in 1848.
In response to the request from the Sunday World for an account of the
most remarkable psychic exhibition of the year, I will describe the
demonstration before the society by a young American Indian, who claimed
that in a trance he could communicate with the spirit of an Indian chief, and
also with the "Great Spirit," and that this spirit would describe through him
the homes of those gathered in the room.
The medium did describe, accurately and in detail, the rooms of six of those
present, one room being in England.
He also describe the appearance of a gentleman whom he had never seen,
and told where he was at the moment of recital, which facts were afterward
verified to the minutest detail.
In this demonstration it was not possible for the medium to ever have seen
the rooms he described, and therefore there could have been no fraud.
This leaves but two explanations - that of telepathy and that of actual spirit
communication. Of course, those present knew their rooms, and telepathy was
possible, for the medium could have received, telepathically, the descriptions
of the rooms from the person present.
But granting this, we find that telepathy could not explain the method
whereby the medium described the room in which the gentleman before
mentioned was spending the evening, nor could it explain how the medium
was enabled to tell us just what this gentleman was doing for no one present
knew where the gentleman was, and certainly no one knew exactly what he
and the others with him might be doing. The medium was a stranger to all
present, and there could have been no collusion.
If telepathy can explain this demonstration then we must admit that
telepathy between strangers at a distance at any time and under any
conditions is possible. This is extending the limitations of telepathy to an
extreme, but even so, it may be the real hypothesis. This demonstration on the
whole was the most remarkable, of its class, ever recorded by our society, or
perhaps by any other body of investigators.
MewYork Sunday World
New York, New York
Sunday, J anuary 6,1907
1 2
the So-called Spiritualists
Deceive the Credulous Victims
Beeciel CorraapoadiDoaor TheWuhlniton Port
Now York. Jan 12.
O
NE of the objects of the recently
organized Institute for Psychi
cal Research In this city Is to
expose the methods by whlcn
so-called spiritualists delude
the public Their trlclu have been studied
for the past nine ye&rs by the president
of the Institute Dr H Bpencer Lewis
If there Is any truth whatever In the
communication of the dead with the liv
ing he said the other day to a reporter,
the spiritualists have yet to give a sin
gle proof of It In nine years I think I
have seen everything they have to show
Much was palpable fraud, even* In the
most mysterious, there was nothing that
could not be explained as due to natural
meana '
Dr Lewis <\as asked to explain the
mystery of the broad da> light seances In
vogue Just now
I have never heard a message given
that I could not trace to either keen ob
servatlon or clever guesswork." Dr
Leals said 1Let us take a typical meet
ing of the kind
The medium takas up an articlesa> a
ring She holds It up so that all may soe
It and begins *o describe It minute)} as
tbough for the bench! of those at a dis
tance
* Now with this ring,' she goes on
conies the form of a beautiful spirit I
do not know whi t there Is In this ring to
attract this spirit (A pause) Again 1
see this bcautirul spirit that cornea with
this ring I h f s spirit has a message for
the person a ho b-ought this ring"
All the time she Is talking the m-dlum
Is scanning tbc faces of the people before
her This Is wh\ she mlnutcl} describee
the ringto give her time In which to oh-
servo the audience And Invariably the
person Those ting Is held aloft betra>s
her Identity
"It may be that one womnrf will nudge
another or that the owner will smile or
becomo rrmnrknb!} interested, oc grow
goervous Whatever It may be. the quick,
practiced eve of the medium detects It
Gets a Dramatic Effect.
"She then slowly descends from the
rostrum sa)Ing that the spirit Is leading
her to the one for whom Its message Is
Intended She pauses befors each row of
people as though walling for spirit guid
ance but alt the wiille manning the faces
before her through half closed eyes At
last extending It to the right person she
s b m sof 11}
"'Yes you This beautiful spirit tells
me that vou are the one for whom lie
message Is Intended '
That Is the dramatic side of the work
To go right to the person and say. Tola
artl'le Is yours wouldnt produce the
sod. tearful condition always desired bv
the medium A women thus wrought up
and susceptible to all sorts of emotions
Is the ono for whom the molt wonderful
messages enn bo ototnlned
*We will euppose that n man Is sitting
nest to the woman who brought the ling
Well everv mtdlum knows that a naan
seldom goes alone to n seance and In
nlno Canos out of ten the woman Is hie
wife It le also a fart (not when a man
and Me wife conic to a eeance It Is gen
eral!) In the hppes of receiving a mes
sage from a child they hnve lost
Acting on this cue the medium now
sat
* Yes tnle henutlfnl spirit stands here
and this spl-lt form sa) s Mother1 *
This word Is pronounced \er> eoftly
and svveetlv Still the medium hae not
committed herself If the woman does
not break down and begin to weep eae
knows something le wrong ard goes on
to tephln that ttir spirit sremi to be
that of a mother who wants 10 give a
message lo her child or mentions one
possible explanation aftci another until
the woman assents to one of them
Parents Begin to Weep.
*In nine cases out of ten however the
woman begins to weep nnd the medium
ea)s iof 1% \n<! now I hear her snv
father H re tne nun breilcs down and
the mtdlum proetds solemnly
It 19 >our child who stands before you
now Tide spill, wants me to say that It
le nice of >ou to come to day It seeni9
to mo that this spirit haw not passed out
very long ngo Kas your child pasts.d
out long ago ' sho asks suddsnly of tne
'mother
And probably the mether will answer,
*Wh> no the passed out two aontbs
ago *
That Is apparentl) an Innocent b l of
Information which the medium might
have deduced from the woman's mourn
ing But the medium h) asking the
question hot Iear nod the sex of the cnlld,
which she did not know She goes on
Your daughter ays she wants to
thank )cu for the many times you have
visited her grave and the man) pr^tte
flowers )ou brought her there, reasoning
Of course tha If the daughter has been
ool) two rnontht. dead the mother baa
visited the giave and taken flowers.
'Then the medium will p-obabl) end up
with Your daughter ift) she Is so glad
that you got fathei to come with you
this evening He dldp t want to coice
bm you Induced h'm to do so and sh*
is so glad to see him here She hopes you
will hot come odea ta talk with her*
Of ton iht u kle placed on tlie /rostrum
tells much o ' tlio one who owned It A
ring m3) give lIk s c \ and n good Idea
of the nge of the oac who wore It Ant
ever, locket wnlch opens contains a pho-
togrntih 01 <\ lock ut I air but aa n el-
ebmteil medium one** explained to me, *
locket winch ooen nml la brough. to a
levnee Iv almoat auie tn do ao bee inue
It la a relic of one who i b dead Tneie-
fore wlien a medium plcka up auch a lor'c-
et fro-n the roat um ahe always area
though without committing herself defin
itely u photograph In connection Mth
It
It must be taken Into confederation
that the same people attend seaftces week
after week, and the medium gets to know
them pretty well, though they think they
never gi\t h%r any Information about
Chamaelvea
Thought He Waa Very Careful
' For Instance, a man vvho la a teacner
In ono of the pjbllc schools here began to
Investigate spiritualism about two yeara
ago Ha attended aeancca du Ing the win
tei an I gnrltia He thought he waa ver /
careful not to reseal anything about h
family or fife. but In the course of del'v-
erlng message* the medium had learned
hla profeuton and that he lived In f i e
Bronx
"Well after being a v a l for the aum-
tiier the teacher came bock to town tlui
Thursday before the Mondti on which
chool opened and Attended tho aeance on
Sunday evening At fee doo- one of tre
medium'! aaalatanta welcomed him. us Is
the cuetom, and remarked that he had
grown to be qu'te n stranger
1 Yes 1 reolh I the teacher I onlv got
back on Thursday Been off on my vaca
tion *
When the medium arrived she greet >I
the company nnd proceeded to hand out
bits of Informst'nn before beginning 1 10
regular work or the evening
You were downtown yesterdav * ahe
remarked to the teacher
"Of courae ahe ha 1 learned fro-n hrr
assistant that he had returned from nla
vacation on Thursday and naturally con
cluded that a teacher mining home after
a seasons absence would have errands to
take him downtewn between that day and
the n-cnlng of acliool
" Downtown* l ' h i vei I wee down
town toe man rerl ed s owly
Kede t Sh-ewd Guess.
"Now Ihp vers i n<*'- of hla reply
showed her nrneillntelv tlini he had not
been verv fi" downtown He had beon
doiintful If. Indeed It could properly he
galled downtown Therefore ahe deed'd
to stick It somewhere about the middle of
the city and went on
Yea. I see you at Fifty-ninth street.'
1If the teacher had said he wm t an
that street ahe could probably have drawn
out the fact that he had p&aeed It and
would have said that ahe saw him just In
the moment of passing However. In
case the guess was a fine one, and the
nran waa simply stunned 1
'Can you tell me what part of Fifty-
ninth street** be asked
Yes. east of the circle the medium
answered confidently, and again the
teacher wae mystified Yet any one ac
quainted with the re ghborhood of Fifty -
ninth street west of the circle will under
stand how little likelihood there waa of hla
having business over there
As the teacher assented to this lost
piece of Information and did not say lie .
1answered confidently, and again the
teacher e a e mystified Yet any one ac
quainted with the re gbborhood of Fifty -
ninth street wcat of the circle will under-
atand how little likelihood there waa of hie
having bualneaa over there
"As the teacher assented to thle last
Piece of Information and did not aay lie
had first been at the elide, sho reasoned
at once that he had come from tlie
Bronx on the elevated She did not eay
now that sne beheld him on the corner of
Third avenue, lor that would have been
too easily seen through She likewise con
cluded that he had vlelted the board of
education at rift)'ninth street and Park
eventie, but to say this would be risking
too much Again she hit safely midway,
end announced that the spirit revealed him
to her at the comer of Fifty-ninth street
and Lexington avenue. wJthojt, however,
stating whether he was conducting busi
ness there or merely passing
Again the teacher waa simply stunned,
for It so happened that he had not been At
the board of education but bad done a
little business In a building directly on
the comer of Fifty-ninth street and Lex
ington avenue And he went away deeply
Impressed, and seeing no connection what
ever between this surprising revelat.on
and his Innocent remark about hie vaca
tion
Dr Lewis gave this account of what ia
called materialization and dematerlallza-
tion ,
"In all such seances the room is pitch
dark except for a bluo lantern suspended
from the center or the celling The au
dience Is ranged about the walls as the
spirit Is to. appear and then disappear
right In the center of the floor. Instead of
on the platform
Something White Slowly Rising.
"Tha lantern shade goes down leaving
the room In complete darkness and In the
center <jf the floor appears a circle of Ore
and smoke, out of which the audience
gradually beholds something white r'slng
The blue lantern Is very slowly uncovered
the unearthly light disappears, and the
white figure grows end grows until an en
tire human form le standing there
*The spirit bows to the right and left,
and gives messages to some of the com
pany Then, as the light Is again shaded
the spirit slowly disappears, until only
the c'rcle of ghostly flro Is to be seen on
the floor This waves, flickers, and puffs
out, and all Is total darkness
"When the lights are turned up an In
stant later, there la no trace of the appa-
rltlon and all oxn examine the floor to sea
that there le no trapdoor In It
"All this seems wonderful hut the ex
planation le really very simple The part
of the spirit Is play ed by a woman dressed
In white Around the hem of the robe Is a
border of phosphorus Over this wntte
garment Is a long black slip, from the
top of which Is n string, one end of whldi
Is held by a man Inside the cabinet
Whan the lights first go out the spirit
glides from the cabinet unseen because of
her black coverfhg and stands In the cen
ter of the room Then she raises the black
slip nllgbtly and the phosphorus on_ the
bottom of her skirt gleams forth like wltcn
tire
i 'The spirit continues to isl se the black
slip, while the man In the cabinet pulls
tho string taut and the lantern lets fo in
more and more light, making the phos
phorus Invisible Finally the spirit stanip
all rovcrted the black slip falling down
her back, which Is turned toward tile
platform
'After the mssage<i aro g!\en she grad
ually draws tlis slip down over her agsln,
the lantern Is shaded and the ghost lire
gleams foith By waving her eklrts the
medium can make this wave flicker oorl
puff out In a trulj uncanny manner. W ten
complete darkness falls she regains ths
cabinet unseen
Stnngers Closely Watched.
"Interruption la strictly guarded against
In many ways A stranger Is not adml>-
ted, and until one Is known as safe ho Is
seated between two strong employes of
ths spiritualists
"Often a man who shows a tendency to
Investigate In the midst of proceedings
hss found himself suddcnlv outside the
door with no Idea how he got there The
explanation always given of this phenom
enon by the spiritualists is that ths man
resisted the peychic force and that it
knocked him down Ae the room Is dark
and he hi* seen and can prove nothing,
he hae no redress
"The bouncers of the splr tuallstlo
meetings also act as gatherers of Informa
tion I first gained admlss on to a dark
seance through the Invitation of a man
known to the spiritualists who conducted
tt I told them my name rft the outset.
The) seated me beside a tall man who
seemed to he rather nervous After a
while he whlepered to me
'Snv, do }ou be levc In this thing* Do
you expect a message?
*'I dont know,' 1 replied, uncertainly
The man went on then to Inform i d s
that he hag never been to a place of the
sort before, and that he d dn't really think
he would get a message
*Have you nny one in the splilt world
from whom }ou could get a communica
tion* he asked
Asked for Imaginary Sister
' 'Well thsre'e my sister Alice,' I said
Of course I have no slater Alice
Just here a email spirit came out of the
cabinet
'Look there whispered my nelrhoor
Tlieie comes one. now Perhaps that's
jour sister *
' Oh no I replied Mv sister was a
very tall g i r l 1
Shortly aft*r thin my neighbor was
called to the platform
* What da vovi f i n k of that* he whis
pered to me excitedly That s a messago
for me Just think of I f
weu no went up to me ataxe ,in1
whispered with the spirit who had called
him. and 1 thought to myaolf that It was
about time now for sl*ter Alice to appear
^ure enough. the very neat sp rlt to ston
from the cabinet was a tall specter, who
wnnted Dr Lewis And when I went i i p
and Inquired her name she Informed me
that she was Alice and b\ skilful ques
tion! nit I led her to recollect many things
In our past llxes which had never hap
pened "
Dr Lewis learned the secret of spirit
photographs from a medium who had
fallen Into a trim He explains that the
object of the Inst'tute la not only to ex
pose fraud but scientifically to clessirv
and analyse such phenomena as are usu
al!) called psychic, hypnotic or spiritual
istic. with the Intention of determining
their real nature **
The Washington Post
Washington, District of Columbia
Sunday, J anuary 13,1907
Fourth Part, Page 12
D E I L I I I H I M
R e s e a r c h e r T e l l s o f
D e c e p t i o n s
Nsw York I nvestigator of Psychical
Affairs H as Pound No Communl.
cation Bottyeen D aad
and L iving
flpeclnl to Th H^rnleV
NKW YOHK, J an. 2fl.-One of the ob
j ects nf the recently organized I nsti
tute fnr Psychical Hrsenrch In thin
city In to expose the methods by
which so-cnlleil splrltunllntn delude
the public. Their tricks have been
studied for the past nine years by the
president of the I nstitute, Dr. H.
Bpenrer Lewis.
"I f there Is any truth whatever In
the communication of the dead with the
living," ho said the other day to a re
porter, "tho spiri tuali sts have, yet to
give a single proof of It. I n nine years
I think I have seen everything they
have to show. Much tvas palpable
fraud; even In the most mysterious
there was nothing thnt could not be
explained ns duo to natural means."
Dr. Lewis was asked to explain the
mystery of the broad daylight stances
which are In vogue J ust now.
"I have never hoard a message given
that I could not trace to either keen
observation or clever guesswork," Dr.
Lewi* said. "L et us tako a typical
meeting.
"Tho medium takes up an arti cl e
say a ring. She holds It up so that all
inny see It and begins to describe It
mlnutoly, us If for the benefit of thoso
at a distance.
" Now, with thi s ring. she says,
'comcR tho form of a beautiful spirit.
I do not know what there Is in this
ri ng to attract this spirit. (A pause.)
Agnln I see this beautiful spirit that
comes with this ring. This spirit has
n message for the purson who brought
thi s ring.1
"All tho tlmo the medium is tal king
she Is scanning the faces of the people
before her. ThlB Is why she minutely
describes the ringto give her time In
which to observe the audience. I nvn-
rlnbly tho owner of tho ring betrays
her identity.
" I t may be that one woman will
nudge another or that the owner will
smile or become remarkably I nterested
or grow nervous. Whatever I t may be,
the qulqfr, practiced eye of the medium
detects It.
"She then slowly descends from the
rostrum, saying that the spirit Is l ead
ing her to tho ono for whom I ts mes
sage Is I ntended. She pauses before
each row of pcoplo as though waiting
for spirit guidance, but all the while
scanning the faces before her through
hal f closed eyes. A t last, extending It
to the right person, she says softly:
" Yes, you. ThlB beautiful spirit tells
me that you are the one for whom I ts
message Is intended.*
Works D r a ma t i c 8l da
"T hst Is tho dramati c side of the
work. To go right to the person and
say, This article Is yours/ wouldnt
produce the sad, tearful condition al
ways desired by tho medium. A woman
thus wrought up and susceptible to all
sorts of emotions is the one for whom
the most wonderful messages can be
obtained.
"Wo will suppose thnt a man Is si t
ti ng next to the woman who bought
the ring. Well, evory medium knows
that a man seldom goes alone to a
seance, and In nine cases out of ten
the woman 1s his wife. I t Is also a
fact that when a man and his wife
come to a seance I t Is generally in the
hopes of receiving a message from a
child they have lost.
"Acting on this cue the medium now
says:
" Yes, this beautiful spirit stands
hers n<1 this spirit form M rs
"Mnthsr. ,
"This word In pronounced Tory softly
And sweetly. fltlll thA medium has not
committed h*rMlf I f the woman does
not break down and begin to wsep she
knows that th spirit seems to bo that
of a mnthnr who wants to give a mes
sage to hr child, or montlnna ono
possible explanation after another un
til the woman assents to ono of tho
experimental aeries.
"I n nln c a r r a out of ton, however,
the woman begins to weep and the
medium Anya Anftly, 'And now I hear
hqr any fal her." ' Here the man
hfmkn down, and the medium proceeds
solemnly:
'I t In your child who stands before
you now. This spirit wants me to nay
that It Is nice of you to come today.
I t neems to me I hst this spirit baa not
panned out long ngo?' she asks sud
denly of tho mother.
"Probably the mother will answer,
Why, no; she passed out two months
ago.*
Information Meant Much
"That Is apparently an I nnocent hit
of I nformation, which tho medium
might havn deduced fmm tho woman's
mourning, hut the medium by asking
the tjuenilnn has learned tho sex of
tho child, which sho did not know.
Rhe goes on:
'Y our daughter says aho wants to
thank you for tho many times you
have cl si ted her grnve nnd tho mnny
pretty flowers you brought her there;'
reasoning, of course, that I f the dnligh
ter has henn only two months dead the
mother hns visited tho grave and taken
flowers,
"Then the medium will probably end
up with: Y our daughter says Aha In
so glnd that you got father to como
with you thi s evening. H< didn't want
to como, hut you I nduced him to do
so, nnd she Is so glad to see him here.
Rhe hopes you will both como often to
talk with her.'
Often the Article placed on the ros
trum tells much of the one who owned
)t. A ring mny give the sex and a
good IdeA of the ngc of the ono who
wore It. Not every locket which opens
contains a photograph or a lock of
hair, hut, an a colobrated medium once
explained to me, a lockpt which opens
nnd Is brought to a sennen Is Almost
sura to do b o , because It Is a relic of
one who in dead. Therefore, when a
medium picks up such n locket from
the rostrum she nlwnys aoea, though
without committing herself definitely,
a photograph which (a connected with
1L
"I t must ho tnken I nto consideration
that tho name people attend scancoa
woek after week, nnd the medium gets
to know them, though they think they
give her no I nformation about them
selves.
"For I nstance, a man who Is a teach
er In one of the public schools here
began to I nvestigate spiritualism about
two yearn ugo. Ho attended seances
during tho winter nnd spring. He
thought he was very careful not to
reveal anythi ng about his family or
life, but I n the course of delivering
messages the medium had learned hlH
profession and that he lived In the
Bronx.
"Well, after being away for tho sum
mer the teacher enmo back to town
tho Thursday before the Monday on
which school opened, and attended the
seance on Sunday evening. At the
door ono of the medium's assistants
welcomed him, as Is the custom, and
remarked that he had grown to be
quite n stranger.
" 'Y es,' replied tho teacher; 'I only
got back on Thursday. Been off on
my vacation.'
"When tho medium arrived she greet
ed the company, and proceeded to
hand out bi ts of I nformation before
beginning the regular work of the
evening.
" *You were downtown yesterday,
she remarked to the teacher.
Of course sho had loarncd from her
assistant that ho had rotumed from
hla vacation on Thursday, and nat
urally concluded that a teacher com
ing home after a season's absence
would have errands to take him down
town between that day and the open
ing of Bchool.*
I .ns Angeles Herald
I .os Angeles, California
Sunday, J anuary 27. 1901
rage 5
LOS ANGELES TTEBALD: SUNUAV WOTWTNO, J ANUARY 27. ID
s i r s SP IRITISTS
DEAL IN RANK
UN O O F F R A U D
Rowarclicr Tolls of
Deceptions
N | Yor k Inves ti gator of P s yeMeal
Affai r s Has Found No Cammunl.
cati on Batws s n Dead
and Li vi ng
gprrl nl t The Mrrnl i V
N nw Y OHK , J nn M On# nf the f>h-
Jh 1# nf the r n 1 1jr i .rgnol i ed I netl -
tut" I nr I ayrhl enl Hesrareh I n thi s
'1ty N fn S|.S th" i nrl hml l by.
whi ch an-rn IIimI * pi rl l mb llsl s Ml l de ,
1h# publ i c. Tl i cl r tri cks have l i mn
atml l i i t for th# piuM nl n# years by the
presi dent of tho I nsti tute. Hr. H.
ti p nrer I j cwl s.
I f there i s nny truth whstsver I n
the communi cati on of the dead wi th 111#
l i vi ng." he enl d the other day to n ro-
pnrter, "the spl rl tunl l el s have ynt i n
gI Vo n si ngl e proof of ||. i n nl no years
1 thi nk I hnv# seen everythi n* they
have to show. Much was pal pabl e
f raud; even I n the most mysteri ous
there was nothi n* that coul d not ho
cxi i l nl nrd ns due to nnturnl manna."
I r. I .enl s wns onknl to expl ai n th"
mystery nf the Ti mml i l nyl 1*hl stances
whi ch are I n vogue J ust nnw.
"1 have never heard a messa* # sl ven
that I coul d not trace tn ei ther keen
observati on or el ever guesswork." l *r.
L eu is sai d. "I - et us tnko a typi cal
meettn* .
" T bs medi um takes up an arti cl e
any a rl n*. Hhe hnbl s It up so that al l
may see i t anti begi n* to descri be I t
ml nul el y, na I f f or tho benefi t of those
at a i nstance.
" 'N<w. wi th thi s rl n* . she says,
comes the f orm of a beauti f ul spi ri t.
I do nnt know what there la I n thi s
rl n* to attract thi s spi ri t. (A pause.)
A gai n 1 see thi s beauti f ul spi ri t that
comes wi th thi s rl n* T hi s spi ri t has
n mcsen* e f nr the person who brought
thi s ri ng.'
Al l the ti me the medi um I s tnl kl n*
eh# Is scanni ng the f arce of the peopl e
bef ore her. Thi s I s why she mi nutel y
descri bes the ri ngto gi ve h#r l i me I n
whi ch to observe the audi ence. I nva
ri abl y the owner of thu rl n* betrays
her I denti ty.
" I t tuny be that one womnn wi l l
nudge another or thnt the owner wi l l
mi l e or become remarkabl y I nterested
or grow nervous. Whatever I t may be,
the qu!<, practi ced eyn of ths medi um
detect* J t.
"Hhe then sl owl y descends f rom the
rostrum, sayi ng that the spi ri t Is l end
i ng her to the ono f nr whom I ts men-
sh k o Is I ntended. Hhe pauses bef ore
ettrh r o w of peopl e as though wal l i ng
f nr spi ri t gui dance, but al l ths whi l e
scanni ng the f aces bef ore her through
hal f cl osed ry#s. A t l ast, extendi ng I t
to the ri ght person, she says sof tl y:
" Yes, you. T hi s beauti f ul spi ri t tel l s
me that you are the one for whom I ts
message i s i ntended.
Work* Dramati c Bi d*
" T hat I s the dramati c sl i ts of the
work To go ri ght to the person snd
say. 'Thi s arti cl e I* yours.' woul dn't
produce the sad. tearf ul condi ti on al
ways desi red by the medi um. A woman
thus wrought up and suareptl hl e to al l
ports of emoti ons Is the one f or whom
tho most wonderf ul messages enn bo
obtai ned.
We w||| suppose thnt a man I s al t-
ti ng next to the woman who bought
the ri ng. Wel l , every medi um knows
thnt a man sel dom goes al one to a
seance, and I n ni ne rases aut of ten
tho woman I s hta wi fe. I t ts al ao a
f act that when a mi n and hi s wi f e
rnmc to * seance I t l a general l y I n the
hopes of recei vi ng a message f rom a
chi l d they have l ost.
"A cti ng on thi s cue the mediumnow
pays.
" Tee, thi s beau I I fni spi ri t 1*nd*
Pimples Stopped
in 5 H ave
here and thi s spi ri t f orm snys
"Mother " ,
"Thi s word Is pmnrvti neM rsr y Softl y
nd *w##tl y Ml 1ll the medi um ti es not
commuted her*el f |f ths woman d""S
not hmsk down and begi n to weep sha
knows thst the spi ri t seems to he thnt
of a mother who wants to gi ve mei -
age (o her chi l d, nr menti ons one
r>lh1e esptsrmtl nn sf tet another un
til trio woman assents to one of l h
l p- rl mentsl seri es
fn ni ne maos out Of ten, however,
the a .man begl na (o weep and 1h
medi um s o y a softl y, 'And now I hear
her snv " f ather. " ' Here the men
break* down, and l ha medi um proceeds
Sol emnl y ;
" 'f t I* yori r chi l d who stand* before
you now T hi s spi ri t wants me tn say
thnt It I s ni ce nf you to come tndsy
I t seems tn me thst thi s spi ri t has not
peam-d nut l ung ago?* she asks sud- j
denl v of l ha mother.
"1rnhabl y the mother wi l l mnr r r ,
'Why, no; aha passed out two months ,
ago.'
I nf ormati on M ssns M uch
1Thnt Is apparentl y an I nnocent hi t
f I nf ormati on, whi ch the medi um j
mi ght have deduced f rom the woman's
mourni ng, hut i hn medi um by ashi ng
the i |neei I on has l earned the set nf
the chi l d, whi ch she di d not knnw. I
Hhe goes on
' 'Y our daughter says she wants to i
thnnk you f or the many I l men you
hove rtel ted h#r grnve and I hn many
prai l y Unworn you brought her there,'
reaeoni ng. of enti res, thnt I f the dough -
ter has been onl y two mnntha (l ead I hn
mother hi ts vi si ted thn grave and taken
fl owers.
"Then the medi um wi l l probabl y end
up wi th 'T our daughter anyn she ta
en gi nd tl i st you got f ather I n rnmn
wi th you thi s eveni ng l i e di dn't went '
tn rnme, hut you I nduced hi m I n do
SO, nnd she I s so gi n (I tn set. hi m hero
Hhe hopes yru wi l l both eoni e of ten I "
tal k wi th her,
"f trten the Arti cl e pi n rod nn the ros
trum tel l s mi l ch nf the one who owned '
It. A ri ng may gi ve the sex nnd a ,
good I dea n f the age nf the one who
wore It. Not every l ocket whi ch nprns
contai ns n photograph or n l ock nr
hai r, but, ns a cel ebrated medi um once
expl ai ned to me. a l ocket whi ch opens
and l a brought tn n sermon I s nl i nnat
aura i n do *r>, because It l a a ral l c or
one who l a dead. Theref ore, when n
medi um Pi cks up surh n l ocket from
the rostrum she al wnys se..*, though
wi thout commi tti ng hersel f defi ni tel y,
n photograph whi ch I s connected wi th
It.
"I t must be taken I hto consi derati on
that the snme peopl e al tonrl i wnncrs
wnek af ter week, nnd the medi um gets
to know them, though they thi nk they
gi ve her no I nf ormati on nhnut them-
*e|ves.
"F or I nstance, a man who I s a teach
er I n one of the publ i c school s here
begun tn I nvestl gnte spi ri tual i sm nhnut
two yrnrs ngn. Mo ntteni h-i ! sennren
duri ng the wi nter nnd spri ng. Me
thought he was very caref ul not to
reveal anythi ng nhnut hi s f ami l y or
l ife, hut I n the course of del i veri ng
messages the medi um hai l l earned hts
professi on and that he l i ved I n l ha
Bronx
"Wel l , af ter bei ng away f or I hn sum
mer the teacher came back tn town
the T hursday before thn Monday nn
whi ch school opened, nnd attended the
seance on Bunday eveni ng. At the
door one nf the medi um's A ssi stants
wel comed hi m. as I s tha cuatom. and
remarked that he had grown to bo
qui te a stranger.
" 'Tea,' repl i ed the tnacher: 'I onl y
got hack on T hursday. I teen off on
my vacati on.
When the medi um arri ved s h e greet
ed the compnny, and proceeded to
hand out bi ts nf I nf ormati on before
begi nni ng the regul ar work of th
eveni ng.
" 'Y ou ware downtown yesterday,
i h remarked to the teacher.
"Of course she had l earned f rom her
i M l stant that he had returned f rom
hl a vocati on on Thuradny, and nat
ural l y concl uded that a tnacher com
i ng home af ter n enn son's absence
woul d have errands tn take hi m down
town between that day and the open
i ng of achonl ."
ONE-RING CIRCUS IS
BETTER THAN THREE
HAS ALL BEST FEATURES FOR
TWO BITS
Menagar l* and Tr ai ned Anlmala Sur .
paaa Moat of tha Blggeot Tr i vali ng
Show* P er for mance at Wi nter
Quar ter * at Veni ce
$50,000
High (
Furni ture
and Dr,
Slightly damaged by fire, sme
the marKet at practically yo\
nothing reserved.
Sale Begins *
Tomorrow
Monday, J nnui
bargains unprecedented. Pric
to cost Every article is marKt
to the amount of damage, sh
sale price, and j ust how mucl
of pieces marKed almost noth
fourth of the original cost
Thousands and Thi
Worth of Elegant h
J ust as Good as
at Sensatioi
I f your neck l a till twi sted f rom trv-
The Washington Post
Washington, District of Columbia
Sunday, March 10, 1907
Third Part, Page 8
DEFENDS SPIRIT FAITH
National President Replies to
Prof. Lewis.
CITES PHOOF OF SOTO WOULD
Mr. Barrett Declares that the Genuine
ness of Messages from the Unseen to
Mortals in the World of Sense Has
' Been Demonstrated Beyond All Possi
ble DonbtArraigns Hia Opponent
Editor Post: I n.beha.lt of '300,000 Spirit
uali st* In tbe United States and Canada,
who have the courage to avow them
selves as such before the world, and can
give good and .sufficient reasons tor the
fai th that .is In them,'* I respectful l y. re
quest the use of your columns for a brief
reply to an arti cl e from the pen of Prof.
H. Spencer L ewis, that appeared under
prominent headlines I n the columns of
your highly esteemed J ournal J anuary
33. 1907.
With much that Prof. L ewis has said
al l well informed Spiritualists ars In fnll
accord, for he cannot condemn fraud
and chicanery more vigorously nor any
more conscientiously than they do. H1b
Il lustrati ons as to the ring, the weeping
parents, the amazed teacher, and the
bogus materialization may all be drawn
f ronyfact. Without doubt, many things
transpi re that are ascribed by the unin
formed and over credulous Spiritualists
to the agency of excarnate beings.
No ons among us who has studied the
subj ect of Spiritualism from I ts scien
tific, philosophical, and religious aspects
could or would be deceived by such sim
ple tri cks as those ProL L ewis exploits
as typical of all phenomenal manifesta
tions of Spiritualism.
Simple Conditions Oatgxown.
A s a matter of faot, all wall I nformed,
progressive members of our denomination I
outgrew all of these simple and easily ex- |
Z*ewls u d his society store ever known.
He has assumed to set forth as ovldcnce
of his prowess and discernment of b o u I
a few absurdities which, In his lack of
knowledge, he has seen fit to label
psychic phenomena. He has succeeded
I n showing his readers that be knows l i t
tl e or nothing of the subject of which he
j rrl tes.
' His expose of the simple tricks In his
two column arti cl e Is but the addition of
one more testimony to the multitude that
the Spiritualists havo collected through
thei r own fearless exposure of^the knaves
who have endeavored to steal the llvory
of heaven I n which to servo Batan: No
man, even I f . he be as opinionated as
Prof. L ewis, can give as much knowledge
I n nlpe years through a few experiments
as men and women of equal and even
superior mental power have gained
through many exporlments extending
Over a period of more than sixty years.
I n brief, there arc people as well quali
fied to sift nnd determine evidence us
Prof. L ewis, even though they may not
he members of- his highly respected and
most thoroughly respectable society. He
hah constituted himself counsel for both
sides, the judge and the j ury In the case,
and proceeded to pronounce an oplhlon
thnt he held long before he ever heard- of
psychic phenomena or tried to test a phe
nomenon.
Arraigns Prof. Lewis.
I f the facts do not conform to his the
ory. so much the worse for the facts.
This statement Is warranted by his braz
en declaration that the Spiritualists have
yet to give a single proof of spirit com
munion. He has egotistically placed him
self above the wisest and best minds of
all hgea, to say nothing of such wonderful
seers and prophets as the gentle Naza-
rene, the Apostle Paul, Swedenbprg, J ohn
and Charles Wesley, Flammarlon, C. F.
V arley, A. R. Wallace. J . J . Mapes, and
hundreds of others I n comparison with
whom Bpenccr L ewis, professor though he
l s, Is as a mole hill to & mountain, a pyg
my to a giant.
I t Is quite clear that Prof. L ewis Is not
posted with regard to -what his lntellec-
tusl superiors accomplished In the Hold
of psychic solenco long beforfk.be entered
l t. Andrew J ackson Davis as'-long ago
as ISIS proved beyond possibility of a
doubt that excarnate I ntelligence can and
does communicate with the. denizens of Hie
earth. J ohn and Charles Wesley, as wen
ms Emmanuel Swedenborg, did the same
thing In the eighteenth century. Upon
the prgof given by J esus of Nazareth,
Paul was able to establish a world reli
gion known as Christianity. I n 1861. Cora
X. V. Scott, a child of eleven years, gave
proof that dumfounded the wiseacres of
that day. as to the I nterference of spiri ts
The Washington Post
Washington, District of Columbia
Sunday, March 10, 1907
Third Part, Page 8
In the affairs of men. I n 1858 and 1851
Pro Robert Hare gave ample scientific
evidence; of the fact of spirit communion
through his crucial tests of the phenome
na examined by him. I n 1857. a boy In
Harvard College, Fred L . H. Willis, gavo
such wonderful evidence of the .presence
ot spirit I ntelligence and their ability to
make themselves known to their friends,
that he was expelled from that classical
I nstitution by reason of his having given
Sts learned faculty such an overdose of
truth as to make them tremble lest they
have to give up. thei r theories for bis
wonderful facts.
Quotes Crookes' Experiments.
From 1870 to 1874 Sir William Crookes
made most painstaking I nvestigation of
al l kinds of ocoult phenomena, and was
forced to admit that the only posslDle ex
planation for bla array of facts was that
spiri ts of the so-called dead were able to
communicate with mortals. Equally cru
cial testa were made by- Prof. Cromwell
F. V arley, Prof. Alfred Russell Wallace,
Prof. Zollner. Prof. Rudolph Virchow.
Carl du Prel. CoL A lbert do Rochas,
Count A lexander AksakoCT, Matthews Fld-
ter, and other men equally I ntelligent anil
qmlnent In scholarship, scientific acumon.
and ability to weigh evidence.* Over their
awn signatures these eminent men and
'thei r confreres declare that they have
proved the great truth that spirits out of
the body can give I ntelligent and help
ful mi stakes to spirits In the body.
Prof. Thomson J . Hudson, of J ust name
and fame, and exceptionally gifted In his
psclel field of study, has gone so* far as |
to declare that "he who doubts or denies ]
psychic phenomena I s not entitled to' bo
called a skeptic; he I s simply i T n o r a n t "
Of course Prof. Hudson does not admit
that these phenomena of themselves ema
nate altogether from spirit agencies, yet
he does admit that some of them, at least,
are due to the forces whose nature Is not
yet known to scientists.
The Washington Post
Washington, District of Columbia
Sunday, March 10,1907
Third Part, Page 8
Weighs pis Authorities.
Against the evidences ot the so men,
against their solemn asseverations as to
the absolute truth of their stH-oments let
Prof. Bprncer Lewis measure Ms few ex
periments and painful tack or knowledge.
I n. whose favor would the comparison
Tenlly be? The recble. Inrantlle utterances
Of Prof. Lewis would not be heard at any
given distance by reason of the rcsqnant
vibrations that would nil the air from
witnesses qualified to speak.
Prof. Lewis anil his friends, as well ns
bis apo'ngists, are requested to take notice
that ront rtf the" people whrv. rallies
a-<* gl ei nbov" made u*e of th puerile,
methods he- describes at such length trt'
establish the fact of spirit communion. '
Onlv the most crurial an0 painstaking
tssts would do for t>-eni, hence they was.-
ed I ttle I f any time upon ths iricas with
which Prof. Lewis was pleased to satisfy
himself. Again, I will admit that many
of the so-called messages can be traced to
clever guesswork and shrewd observa
tions, but many by no means implies that
all can be thus xplnlnrd. Qlvrn the guess
work and trickery even to enormous:
quantities, there ye* r*wtlM iAs tauid-
uum of fact which can be explained only
t!frou;h spirit Intervention In the affairs
of man.
Saya Lewis la
Frof. Lcwin has regl>
valuablu and . .
that he might indulge
pell with many bushels ~ >
'manifested neither the zl ..
scientist nor-, yet the open mlna of *a
philosopher.
The millions of Intelligent men and
worsen who have been testing psychic
phenomena through all of the ages, espe
cially slrite IBIS, have nbt done so slmoly
for amusement, l^iey have been in search
of truth, and In that searching they havo
been rewarded by revelations m6^o vital,
facts more stupendous, demonstrations
more valuable than all tho scientists unit
edly have been1able to produce In a
thousand years. They have discovered
the most precious of all mi ths-tbat death
docs not end all;- that man lives on |n a
more progressive stats of existence from
which be can send himmessage of -love
to those dear ones of his life whom he left
upon tlie earth.
This discovery has been made and The
proof thereof given by and through the
agency of spiritualism.
Let Prof. Lewis hug his empty delu
sions, dig up, expose, explain away, ex
ploit all of the 'Clicks and nonpensa that
he can And, yet, over all, around all, and
beyond all. is ths one- thing he has not
been able to grasp, much, less destroy or
overcomeand thatfene thing Is. the gen
uine message from the world of souls to
some mortal in the world of nenae.
HARRISON4D. BARRETT.
Pres. National Spiritualist Association.
Beattla. Wash.. 1907.
Dr. H. Spencer Lewis. President o f
the New York Institute for Phyt lr tl
Research, whatever that may be. has
evidently noticed with envy th<> notori
ety achieved by Wiggins and other
prophets o f disaster, and lie Is making
a lively shy toward f i t t i n g tils own
name In the papers. There Is no cheap
er and surer way o f getting talked
about than by putting up a good, strong
ralamlty howl, and the stlfTer ine yawp
the greater the notoriety. Therefore.
Dr. Lewis raises a wall such a s has
not been heard since Aaoenalonlat Mil
ler frightened the souls of our nervoua
grandmothers. He aays chat the stars
have given It to him straight that Aug.
31. ISIS, at a p. m.. ihers will begin,
about I I miles below Pittsburg, a ser
ies o f terrible earthquakes, which will
atuk Pittsburg I K feel. Cincinnati I N
feat, Louisville about aa low, and T$.-
N t . I M . N I . N O cubic feet o f water will
rush In. making an immense lake, cov
ering the whole Ohio Valley. I f t his
sort of stuff comes from reading the
stats, we are glad that people are hav
ing no better success In getting up wire
less telegraphy Pit h Mare.
The National Tribune
Washington D.C.
Thursday, March 28,1907
Page 4
& u r r ? 0 0 f u l f H ar r i ag r n i g
J n s H i b l f U r t u t m t A f f i n i ti es
= ------ ' ' == ~=rT
B y H. SPENCER LEWIS.
President o f the Ne w Y or k Institute f o r P i y c b i o l R n t n h .
jORE and uiore we Lear of "affinities," ".-oul-waies and othe<
M
l terms applied 10 case#wliervin true love Las pever existed and
I never could exisl- The true mwtuingi of theie tenus are *ii-
tornd to Gi unusual circunuiduces. ami very few really
understand what the-?*, spiritual terms mean. I t i* true that if
all marriages acre Last'd upon true affinities there would be
more happiness in marriage. The trouble at present is not
with the divorce laws. Lu> with the marriage laws. Were the
marriage laws proper there would be little need for divorce
laws of anv kind.
Affinines are two souls, two spiritual beings, each having a like
attire, like abilities, and possessing the same qualitv of love. They are
ne whole, separated at binh aud incomplete until joined again in mar-
rage. No di*<-ord, no opposite i hmk i ng or feeling must exist between
lem. An affinity miisl be the odier half-die spiritual complement
t our souls.
Perfect health is necessary for an afriniiv. True love is also necess
ary. I f these do not exist there tan la* *io uflinitv. The mind must
e pure, the thoughts must be spiritual, above material planes, and must
ome from a mind dint is v.hollv devoted 10 love mid sacred faithful-
1 Itere can he no successful marriage unless the principals are af-
nities to some degree. The greatest crime of the world at present is
he lax marriage laws. The greatest obstacle to the world's progress
s the easy manner in which two people may marry, live together and
ring into this world such children as will in die future weaken the
lations.
I rial marriages will not bring about the desirable results; thev mere-
v settle the physical questions oT marriage, leaving the spiritual, the
acred questions unsolved. The only rational method is that of forcing
i certain length of courtship, of acquaintance, between the man and
com an. I
I he Humeston New Era
Humrston, Iowa
Wednesday, November 13, 1907
Page 8
1910
PEARLS DIE FROM LACK OF USE
i Chicago Tribune 1
H Spencer Lew! a practical psycholo
Rist of Great Britain Is experimenting in
tel epathy He holds that thoughts ara
things that they have a psychological or
materi al existence as well as a psycho
logical structure l i e also finds It demon
stratad that thinki ng is a process of
varyi ng vi brations and that a thought J s
the di rect l esul t of a number of such vl
b rations
How Car it has been proved that these
thought vibrations emanate from our con
sclous being -Mr I -ewJ s does not pretenu
to Know But as a hypothesis he assumes
l hat thoughts produce physical vibrations
which emanate in all directions as do the
v brationa ot wavi s from Marconi s wire
less telegraph I f this Is granted it mut
be granted also that in oi dcr for another
mind to receive s.icli vibrations that mind
must be constructed physicallv upon the
..tme principle as a Marconi receiving
station
I f thought waves are vibrations con
stantl y emanati ng promiscuously it is ap
parent that only certai n bruins or minds
can be so physically attuned as to re
ceive those purely physical vibrations
This expla ns why those who from a
pschoioglca! point of view are constant
ly attuned to another cannot at all times
and under all circumstances receive men
tal messages pictures or words directed
to them by the agent A tmospheric con
ditions bodily Ills vi tali ty and I ts lack
and numerous other physical conditions
would tend o prevent an agent from
properly emanati ng or directing thought
waves and to prohibit thei r reception at
any other point
--------------- M ----------------
The Washington Post
Washington, District of Columbia
Sunday, March 13, 1910
Page 42
1912
New Advertising Man for Cesco.
H. S|>encer Lewis, the mail order and merchandising
specialist, who successfully launched the recent Vol-
tite campaign, has been engaged to start a vigorous
publicity and selling campaign for the C. F_. Sheppard
Co., of New York, manufacturers of loose leaf systems
and devices. I art of ihc company's systematic selling
campaign consists of a large and interesting monthly
house organ, the first issue of which will he mailed
about the 10th of October, a -mailer house organ foj
agents, and a scries of fifty booklets, each dc-crihing
a loose leaf system especially adapted to some par
ticular business. These liooklets will Ik- widely adver
tised and distributed, and means an innovation in
bringing business to the dealer's doors.
The American Stationer
Volume 72, page 6
New Y ork and Chicago
J uly 6, 1912
1913
H. Spencer Lewis Gets 2548
Answers From One Small
Classified Adv.
3Iffecilvencs* of Tvcnt advertisements la
Fhown by a jitAtrmcTu made b} H Spen-
*r j o u !s, ittl\ ei*c5an;T mnn;i.<er of the
_Mnen<\in Yolriic Co 'i*~, Wet 39ili St,
N o'a Yflrlc CStv, rep^i rflnp, the result*
n burned ijOsn a. U'vnt arl\iTlibcmrni lun
icsularlv l'or a time* In a certain dallv
r.cw^papor M r T.^\cl9 savs hi s fi rm t e-
t oh*c..i 2 IS Inqulnes from this orivertHe-
the v.r.uu* n'rnitr'.ruj $2 In
*fnvvps 'or ramplr ^rOm thec inquiries
>*s bou** rerr-ivecj, to tho date of the
Mureruent, orders amounting to 2003 97.
v.llh ctdera still coming mThy Moil
O'dcr Journal.
Eastern fJrm9 who rtre bidding for busi
ness la Cent i at Callfoi nia have found
THn TRIBUNE one of their best classi
fied medium*: Theia :a onlv one other
* paper that compare tn it m the point
of returns. THF, TRIBUNE prims mote
rlassifUfl advertisements from Its own
rlty than all It* competitors combiner,
f
nd does not run deadhead ndvortlse-
In order to create iho Impression
h.it its classified arl\ crtisin/? cohimiiB at e
healthy, as some of the other papers do.
--------- - --------------
Oakland Tribune
Oakland, California
Saturday, March 22, 1913
Page 7
1914
Harrisburg Telegraph
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Thursday, February 26, 1914
Page 9
W Obooenralr
By El
<
la Wheeler Wilcox
Copyright l i l t, by Star Company
THE WISEST MAN
M
UCH men Study, sad much men writs;
And more roan utter. and littla man know.
But tba wisest man look* IN (or hla tight
And sees (or himself whan tba path should 90.
And thu path should 90 throufh tbs forcit of faith
And blase It* trail to the brink o( death.
! Many tbs rales that wta* nan civs.
To make us *e what ta right and wroag;,.
But the wisest man I* tba one wbo will live
By the ;pw of love a* hs foes alone
And he fotc along throufh to and low May,
Though Winter Is rampant, who llvas this way.
Many ths ns mss ths Oraat Ons waars:
"Om," and "Logos," and "Holy Ohost";
But tba wisest man la ths ons who carat
Least for titles and lovaa ths moat
And he loves ths most whose heartIs aflame
For the Mighty Makar who has no name.
Many tba creada that wise man make,
Bused on MtWa't4' and towsrsd with "Must";
But the wisest man ta ths one who will taka
A simple religion of love and trust.
For lows and trust will aan7 man through
Whatever tbs Fates or ths Furls* do.
The aim of (lit
York Institute
or Psychic*] Ra
ta la TRUTH
not cold materiel
truth. b u t t h a t
which brinks manta)
and spiritual un
fold man t
For font r u n wa
tiara mat month Jr,
holding to no craad.
aa individual*
and women of
a r c . a n b I a aad
da, seeking trua
Ifestatl o n a of
m m ort alit y and
soul-communion.
Wa hara had many ramarkabla, - - -----
demonstrations whan wa have fait tha hara tha unlvarsallty of mind, and wo
and among tho fow adapta and maa>
tara living thare to-day. But In Am
erica, while wa have fewer matter*
and adapta, wa have many more In
telligent and educated people who are
brooking away from old tradltlona and
are earn fatly and patiently Making
for KNOWLEDGE OF IMMORTAL
ITY.
In many of the tall structure*
whJob ana to often apokan of aa a
symbol of our ungodly ambition* are
room a where weakly meetings are
held for just each purpoeee at tht lat
ter above daacrlbea.
Tha president of thla aoclaty says:
Onr tatednga, bald In our lodge
room* are marked by dignity and a
pervading spirit of sacred naan Grant
aad lowly man and woman alike find
Dent, eubtl* Inspiring truth of the
oneness and universal harmony of all
souls.
Our meatlnga are open to all who
can bring with themend attract
goodness. iwaetneaa and love of na
ture and God. In thla way wa have
shown many hundreds of aching
heart* yoang and old, the path to
peace and LIFE.
H. SPENCER LEW LB
abld* for the brief time of each meet
ing at least, in ths spirit of lovs and
goodnea* touohed by souls that have
gone on and upward.
"Wo differ from the London Psychic
Society aad other eoUntlflo (material)
bodle* Inasmuch as we do not seek
material evidence, either eolely or
primarily, and also In that wa are an
open bodyfree to alL
We have found much fraud end
The letter quoted above
writ- exposed It; w* have found great truths
ten In reply to a query about the aim
and methods of. the New York Insti
tute for Phychlcal Research.
Much la said and written In these
days of tha ungodly and unsplfitual
stats of humanity.
A missionary of Africa who has
bton absent from America a score
and glorified them-"
Thla Is but one of Innumsrabls so
cieties all ovsr our land organised for
similar purposestbs purpose of find
ing spiritual Illumination, to aid hu
manity In this life and to give It larger
encouragement to Wk forward to the
next sphere of existence with hops and
of yew* recently exhausted his vo-IJoy. Surely we need not call tills age
cabulery of uncomplimentary phrases a material or an ungodly one. We are
regarding tb* material and unholy In the dawn of the most wonderful
condition of the American people. spiritual era o f tha world. And Am-
Wc had all gone mod, ha n l d , over.eric* will be the canter of tha new
tall structures and fast speeding ve-! golden age.
hides. Ho believed the simple savages
wore mure spiritual minded than we,
despite our lofty ehurch spires and
costly edifices of worship. It has be
come the fashion to talk In thla way.
Yet NEVER WAS THERE 8UCH
A SPIRITUAL AGE AS THI8 BE
FORE, AND NEVER WERE THERE
ON EARTH AT ONE TIME SO MANY
PEOPLE SEEKING GOD AND
L O N G I N G . FOR INDIVIDUAL
kno w l e d g e Of h im as no w .
Still more wonderful la this fact:
THE GREATEST NUMB MR OF
EARNEST INTELLECTUAL SEEK
ERS FOR A WORTHY GOD ARE IN
AMERICA
In tha Oriental lands there are
wise seers and adept* man who have
given their entire Uvea to the study of
occult truth*
But their wisdom has done little for
Quite recently nearly seventy people
gave n whole afternoon to the discus
sion end thought of matters spiritual
and benevolent. Those people were
of ages ranging from twenty to sev
enty, and they represented Intellect,
fashion end toll. There were men of
power, women of high social position,
people who had achieved things In
many lines of endeavor, and others
who lived more humble and obecurs
lives. During that whola afternoon the
room where they congregated seemed
to be alight with the purs Dames of
uneelfls&nss aad lovs of ths Creator
and humanity:
No thought that was selfish, mer
cenary, base or unkind could havo
lived In tbst atmosphere.
Bach meetings mast give a new Im
petus to right thinking and right con
duct Such companies of individuals
ths mams* for those meases are1may be found In the heart of oar groat
bound by superstition. Superstition;cities all ovsr ths land. Ths people
which Includes the blood offerings of who compose them go forth to work,
I . . a a 1ftA M n h a u S a l l A a d 11 f a i n a -
fowls and animals at certain holy fes
tivals and the perpetuation of vermin
and insects to propitiate the gods Is
not spirituality.
India Is honeycombed with such
superstition. Yet tho greatest knowl
edge of high spiritual truths la to be;
to make money, to attend eoclal func
tion* to donee and to amuse them
selves In the world of men, but th*
whole tenor of their Uvea is benefited
and their impulses are elevated by
these meeting*
Concerted thought on any subject
found In tho old religions of India*la a mighty power.
Harrisburg Telegraph
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Thursday, February 26, 1914
Page 9
1915
The Globe, February 24,1915
OLDEST FRATERNAL
SOCIETY IN WORLD TO
HAVE BRANCH HERE
Ancient and Mystical Order of Rosaea Crucis to Have American Lodge -
Men and Women on Equal Footing - Cross Used Said to Antedate Christ
by 1,700 Years - Many Distinguished Members.
Would you like greater peace of mind, greater control of emotion, ability to
rise above the material conditions of life, capacity for greater physical and
mental recreation, a better understanding of life, a deeper insight into its
possibilities - in other words, to draw from life the best there is in it? You
would, of course, and so would your neighbor. Well, then, become members of
the Ancient and Mystical Order of Rosaea Crucis, which is now organizing an
American lodge.
The Rosaea Crucis is not to be confused with the Red Cross Society. There is
nothing charitable or religious about it, despite the feet that the cross is its
emblem. It is the "oldest fraternal and secret organization in the world," a
prospectus states, and - suffragists please note - the first organization known in
history where women were accepted on equal footing and were eligible to the
highest office.
It has had, and still has, some distinguished members, among whom might be
mentioned, according to the claims of the Rosicrucians, Napoleon, Henry II, of
England, King Louis the Pious, Lord Bulwer Lytton, and Lord Bacon, Dr.
Alexis Carrel of the Rockefeller Institute, who is now at Lyons directing
surgical treatment for wounded French soldiers, and Marie Corelli, the novelist,
are members of European lodges, it is claimed. An ex-president of the United
States is also said to be a Rosicrucian.
Antedates Christ
Rosaea Crucis means rosy cross. The cross used by the Rosicrucians as a
symbol antedates Christ by 1,700 years, they claim. Where the arms of the cross
meet in the Rosicrucian symbol appears a half unfolded red rose. The symbol
signifies that through the cross the members of die order unfold as does die rose.
The family of Thotmis IV, founded the order and built the temple of Kamak
and other temples, and were instrumental in having stored in the pyramids and
other safe places the emblems and signs of material sciences and
accomplishments. Realizing that some day knowledge might be wiped out, the
family of Thotmis decided to store in the pyramids philosophies and secrets
which could not be transcribed or otherwise indicated to perpetuate them for
"time eternal." Astrology, the Rosicrucians claim, was thus handed down
through the ages, finally becoming the science of astronomy.
The order is fraternal, like the Masons, which the Rosicrucians claim, sprang
from the order of Rosaea Crucis, the seventeenth degree of Masonry, it is
claimed being an admission of its debt tothe Rosicrucians. Outgrowths of the
Rosaea Crucis, it is stated, are the Knights of die Rosy Cross in England and the
Societe Rosicruciana in France.
Rosicrucians in the United States have been dying for half a century to obtain
the right to establish a lodge here, according to H. Spencer Lewis, American
foundation president, of 130 Post Avenue, who is also president of the New
York Institute of Psychical Research.
Jewels and Symbols.
"After fifty years of pleading, negotiating, and preparation, the supreme
authorities have granted the right to establish such a lodge," he said. "The
supreme consuls in Egypt and India designated Mrs. May Banks-Stacey, widow
of Colonel Stacey, U.S.A., to bring the jewels and symbols to this country. She
also has the rosary used by the family of Thotmis about 1,500 B.C. The chain is
made of skin, set with rubies, turquoises, amethysts, and other stones bearing
weird hieroglyphics."
Mr. Lewis explained that Mrs. Banks-Stacey was a lineal descendant on her
mother's side of Maty Stuart, and on her father's side of Cromwell. The
qualifications for membership, as he explained them are:
Age, over twenty-one years, belief in a Supreme Deity, good moral character
and habits, and belief in the philosophy of the Rosicracians. No one can become
a member until he is invited, but one may apply for this privilege. The minute
one becomes a member he or she realizes what a wonderful thing the Rosaea
Crucis is, Mr. Lewis explained.
"When the initiates on entrance to the order pass through the threshold," he
said, "they have a most wonderful revelation of what can be done in the science
of spiritual and material things. They get their first convincing evidence of the
Rosicrucian control of great natural phenomena.
"They must take an oath to hold sacred above all other tilings the innermost
secrets and teachings of the order. They pledge themselves to accomplish at
least one thing for the betterment of mankind before they die. It is a matter of
mortal life and immortal life for them to reveal secrets. To break the pledge of
the order invites all the disaster of life and condemns the soul and innermost
man to all punishment hereafter."
No Oaths in Court.
The Rosicrucians never take an oath in court. They make the sign of the
cross. They don't believe in heaven or hell, as "Billy" Sunday expounds it. They
believe with certain modifications in the theory of reincarnation. They have a
marriage ceremony which is performed previous to the civil ceremony, a
christening and funeral service of their own, said to be very impressive and
beautiful.
The lodges hold monthly meetings at which the officers wear robes. The
dues are nominal, the "great expenses of the order being furnished in an
unknown and unusual manner." The question of finances never gives the lodges
any concern, Mr. Lewis said. There are not sick benefits or insurance, but the
members see to it that no one of their fellows is ever in want.
"Any one who doubts that Rosicruciana is not well founded," said Mr. Lewis
in conclusion, "should go up to the Astor Library, there are thirty books on the
subject there and a catalogue of some 360 books published in nine languages.
There are also more than 300 manuscripts in the public libraries. There are
between 5,000,000 and 6,000,000 members of the order."
The first public announcement of the plans for the American Order appeared in
The Globe of February 24th 1915, exclusively by special arrangements.
The Globe was a newspaper published in New York City.
VtJk* f
f tk*
. H d l _ _____
Ran. M MU rer-ljlM B, aai
tart aartr.- A M i Ounl r tfc*
, . ^ , - I h H H a lawHata.-Wk la.aaa u
N u K f IB*, t lw ta to>a~ anoHM aantert, tm ftirt
MnnCWimn-la iM jfae ,aw i j^ >>tnrS <taira. aa
____
ta~ta It? J M l f t oStac. M*|A|i aw aM m a tbt <MM M a
i u m t y a j n iitta. krB. m ** t * ntcnMU.
c u l :
HwMa law w W iW rtakt la
tk^kitik tatk* M a a n -ta*
_____________ **tkar l a a m t
w4afal wwMIw > ka< * a*
<M h tha tamer mi ntrttfl iM
mnrtal ihiaas. Ttoraa tMt ant
nrrka ml tlMtr *w. aM u
w ** aan aa* * * 4 aanM.
Maa t n n u t aa p _____
)M>4 mtiM riTaf at Mat aaa
t wklck da alU n r .taka* Tk*
m an alaal, tk "mat
twM aaaty far * *H *n la tkia t*t*
tat latar ta that ttna
ataln laH tm aaa no
d
Muion*s Closing Sale of
COATS*-MUFFS
gular
' J m nut i
*0k t k
: c k t I
$s$n r
ncmtft*
: u m c i
t t J t
goes without . We apply these standards n |
ingor it doesnt go at all. before any single article is place
the Best & Co. standard of salehere.-And^ thatmeans .in
itdity in even* last bit of jmerchan-* buyin g, 0f t h e materials, in
ae-yoo-buy here is-'so dependent faaking- of.the merchandise an
upon onr honesty with ourtelnti that the prices at which an,article i s 1
Vyou have a right to a word concern- offered to you. ~
mg i t .. ~Whicn is your insurance of
__...Onr buying, staodardsJare as in ^ f e a ln e for every dolly yon ever 1
-- ' . i ^ U e as^36 years of> successful -1at Bests. (To pat.it gqnaervatt
operapOifqaumike them. They do -> .as we prefer to dp.)._ .-.
I' Spring ^Styles and Special Salei
S m a r t sB la c k , and W h it e S t i l t s A n l m p o r t a n t ' S a l
. ^ :' for Women ami Jttsae*2n i floor
W om cn s P t ir c S i l k l
: *" ; r 3^ 00, ; . ; /
: ' *e ^
A number of. distinctive, 'athnnt nadds nc abowa in ......~S
- - atpore thread lk with oar nonal
__ ",* -abides, from $25.00 npwri. -v
----------- imslitv amconnaaea rr
1 '. V>"f- -
1- t': T' j'_" *"iUtUm A . - . - ' * "%'
5.D E ST F R A T E R N A L
S O C I E T Y I N W O R L D T O
_ H A V E B R A N C H H E R E
Ancient and Mystical Order of Rosaea Crucis tc Have Ameri-
caft LodgeMen and Women on Equal FootingCross
Used Said to Antedate Christian Symbol ,1,700 Years
Many Distinguished Members.
Would you like greater peace of
Bind, (treater control of emotion,
ability to rise above tlie material con
ditions of life, capacity for greater
physical and mental recreation, a
better understanding of life, a oceper
insight into, its possibilitiesla other
words, to draw from life the bvt there
is In it? You would, of course, and
' so would your neighbor. \yll, then,
become members of ,the Ancrcnt and
Mystical Order ef Rosaea Crucis,
which is'now organising an American
lodge.
The R ostra C ruci s is not I n be con
fused wi th the R ed C ros S ociety.
>ere is nothi ng ebkri tnb! relip-
c. . about I t. dc-pi te ti at the
cross la embl em. H . oldest
fraternal and secret oru. i . . ti cn' in
the worl d," a prospect j j >. and
suffragi st* pl ease notett organ
i sati on known in where
women were nccepi cd < foot
i ng and wereel i gi bl e V ast
<r
* bno hod. and sti l l :
tlnguished members, among whom
might bo mentioned, according to tha
claim* of the Rosleruclans, Xapolean,
Hc-nry II. of England, King Louts the
Hour. U n i ' Rulwer |,ytton, and
Lord Itacon. Ur. / " Ttfl. t^rpjl of the
Rockefeller Institute, who Is now at
Lyons directing surgical treatment
for wounded French soldiers,' and
Marie Corelli, the novelist, are mem
bers of European lodges, it is claimed.
An ex-president of the United States
is alsp said to be a Roslcrucian.
A ntedates C hristian E ra.
R osssa Crucis means rosy cross.
The cross used by the Rosleruclans as
a 'symbol antedates Christ by 1,700
, years, they claim. W here the arms
of the cross meet in the R osi cruci an
stmbol appears a half unfol ded' red
ro. -e. T he symbol signi fi es tha:
through the cross the memW rs of the
order unfol d as does the rose.
T he fami ly of T hotmi s I V . founded
the order ;niu buil t ' e templ e o
Ki trnii k and other tern
I i nstrumental in havi ng
| pyrami ds and O ther sr
I embl ems and s1 of
cnees and ar
Ing that some day knowledge might
be wiped out. the family yf Thotmis
decided to store in .thy pyramids
philosophies and secrets which conld
not be transcribed -or otherwise In.
dleated to perpetuatetheni for "time
eternal.** Astrology, the Rosleruclans
calm, was thus handed down through
the ages, finally becoming the science
of astronomy.
The .order is fraternal, like the
Masons, which the Raatcruciana claim,
sprang from the order of Rosaea Cru
cis, the seventeenth degree of Mason-
ry. It Is claimed, being an' admission
of its debt to the Roslerudang. Out
growths of the Rama Crucis, it- Is
stated, are tha Knights of the Rosy
Cross In England and the ooclete
Roslcruclana In France.
. Rostcrudana ifi the United States
have been trying'-for. half a century
to obtain tha right to' establish a
lodge here, according- to H. .Bpcncer
Lewis. Amerlkait fOUndUlottVirooL
deni, of ISOPelt avenue; who I*, also
president of Us How York I&rtltute
of rysebloal Ueeearch., '
J ewels and S rmbob. i :
"After fifty yars of pleading, n t i o .
Bating, gad preVratlon, the.supra.vie
huthorlUea bavegrai.-i the right to
establish such a \Ige, be aald. T f e
supreme consuls lit Egypt and Iqdia
designated Mrs. >fcy Banks-8taiy.
Stacey. V; &' A-.
wonderful thing the Rosea Crucis la
Mr. Lewis explained.-
When the Initiates on entrance to
the 'order, pass through, the thresh-
hold." he said, "they have a most
wonderful revelation of what can be
done in' the science of spiritual, and
material thing*- They get their Hrst
convincing evidence of the. Ros!cru-j
clan control of great natural phe-j
nomcna. ' 1
"They must, take' an oath to bold
sacred above all other things the .In.
nermost secrets and teachings of the
o>der. They pledge themselves to ac*
civil ceremony, a christening and
funeral service of tbelr oi., *aid to
be very Impressive and beautiful.
The lodges hold monthly meetings
at which the officers wear robes. The
dues are nominal, the "great expenses
of the order being furnished In an
unknown and unusual manner." The
question of finances nev.fr, gives the
lodges any cohc-rn,.'Mr. Lewis said.
There arc no sick benefits or insur
ance, but the members see to tt- that
loo one of their fellows is ever In' <
want. I
'Any one who doubts that Rnsl..1
widow of. o'r
to brlnf the
this country
used by ,th-'
1.500 a C
skin, set
amethyst
weird hi, .
Mr. Ltk'is
Bar.ks-Sta :ey was a lineal
i and symbols to
n has th* roqgry
'hotmls about
ts made of
turquoises,
.ucr apnea bearing
yules.
explained hs* V i j .
compllsh- at least-one thing for the Icruclann Is not weir founded. feaid
betterment of mankind before thev
dle. H i s s matter of mortal life and
Immortal life: for them to reveal
secrets. To break the pledge of the
order Invites all the disaster of life
and condemns the soul and inner,
most man to all punishment here
after.
No Onthe in Court.
The-Rosleruclans never take an oath
In court. They make thVd sign of the
cross. They don't believe In heeven
or hell, as "Billy Sunday yxpounds
It They believe with certain modifi
cations In the theory of rcIncarnatioiA
They have- a marriage ceremony
which Is performed previous to the
Mr. Lewis In conclusion,'' Whocld go
up to the Astor Library. There are
thirty books pn' the subject there and
n catalogue of some 360 books, pub
lished in' nine languages. There arc
also more than 300 manuscripts In the
public libraries. There arc between
'.-..ooo.ooo and 6,000,000 members of the
order."
SHOOTS PARTNER ANp SELF.
SPRINCFIKI.D, Mass.. Feb. 21In
a business d i l u t e Vhich lawyers hat;
been called In to settle. Joseph Rogoff.
a clothing manufacturer* shot his
partner, Walter A. Wldlunsky, this
morninff. Hofoff then committed sir
Mde. Wldlansky Is seriously woon<*
T/)t f i r s t . J 9 U & / I C j nr .extt cr /ni 'f i t of
f o r t r ; e O r j e r I f f - ' * - " > -
J- : o - F ? i> r :<-d / ' * / 9 i f r-; .
Cf s r
;ant on ktr mother's side c
S tuart, ai d on her father's,
!CYomv.cu./ The quallflcatior,
trivmbersh p, as he explained
arc: 7
1cr. o\fcr twenty-one years.
' - I me Deity, good moral v
1 habits, ana belief in
v of the Rosleruclans.
eorae a member until h.
one may apply for t
minute one becom
she realizes what
:nr$
flIIIENX
an Incurable
Wife Dives
BapKol ShafL
h. K I n ver t I
r tn * l K- f r tf i c
a. I l ea C ar kr cl l
- --
iii*>
r that ate wo*
cun bl # n ul adi ,
d h n ml ml- A
emi n 'i pur ee,
pi ki n Maflk in -
uak-d that her
I 1te wi fe of
I F M B M l fd wi th
4iWi R ai l r oad mi
la the Ar al Um*
I l i ad n dcM i by
r t i t r t n M n .
f ar tba
hbrld
N FIRE.
ULUtit UtAllKHAL
- SOCIETY IN WORLD TO
HAVE BRANCH HERE
Ancient and Mystical Order of fiosaea Crude W Have Ameri-
> can lodgeMen and Women on Equal Footing-Crow
Used Said to Antedate,Christ by 1,700 YearsMany Oh-
----- tlnoulsheffUb niftBrs. ------- _ - *
tt i m m a, i i m i m m
b* >I M < o i l . tb, f aal i r of
d<0.dd to n o r , I n I ke t r l u M i
ptoio-ophbMo* Menu Shinn cMid
n ot ba I n i K i i M a t OI bor vl M M-
l l n i ad u j h i u m m i i i Mmb f ar r i ma
mr n n j ~ l _ 1 i ta H M aw tau
- K ? l U n r t a n Ihrouah
I O u o . a n a H i t a r a i l l n thn aetioaa
af r l r on omy.
T ba d a la I n l t i u l . I l ka I bn
T a r a , whkh I ke l uai r r ur ti i i a c hi n ,
n i n e tra m l ha o r da ol Ho i m i I 'm
i l ha ai ven l r eai b d m ol U n aan -
n , II ia cl tl i M d, hM n r n n i dB i l i M i n
d 111 dl M to IlM H ar l mi cl l n a Out-
c r u l k i a t I hi R m C r udn Id l i
b n I bi K n l n bn ol l ha floor
Cr am I n E n i l n od an d i be fl oddU
f l mtr n i H en a la V r an ee.
H odcf i i i tua In l ha Un Hftd B l i tr e
hai a been i eyin g I n r half ceuti f t)
l a obtaJ n I ke r i f ti la eatolillflh a
t r t p r TTp-
h IihI i ar coui r el
th i l i y to Haa above thr mal ar i al c o b.
di ti oae a( life. r wxwHi y'^ar *r r *at
pK f dei l >uid own tal r eef i ati eB , a
tel l er n n d/r a l a tidin g af life. dn r pr r
(an i ght l ata 111 pon i hl l i tteala al ter
w an l l U dr aw fr oze I lf* l ha bean faer e
l a- l a I t? Too vr eiiW of ooar ar , an d
l a woul d l our n eighbor . W el l , then ,
bor ome BM n hefi af J te A aci i at an d A n tedates C hf l f L
hi yeti col Or der mi Raami Cr uet*,
wartrfc w r u f an b i i i r v 1 A mer i ca*
mi r hl ha Bi N i tl offd. aecor dl n * in |w - * > n aau- ..
( l i l mi flf l ha R oden i den i , Napol r an
Haei r f 11. mi En gl an d, K i n g l ^i ute i te
Pkvum. I j i n l Hn Hr er L j ttn n . an d
l ar d Damn hr . A l exia Car r ol V I te
. dockafal l cr l y.i tH n b. abe la n ow h i
i L vf tdi di r ecti on an r gi cal tm tn en i
fn r BoUBd : F r en ch' mMin r *. and
M ar U Cor e 111, tte n n vel tr t, ar e mam-
her o of Rti n tpr an lAdjrr *. I t l i r U hn ^d.
An ex - r ml dan l af l ha l i n l l ad flUlM
la al an a*J d I n hr a R er l mn i an .
N * h A mar iooB f aun datl oa pr eal
Canto r f T C F W t v n M n r t fur-mim
whom of tha Ns Y er is l u 'l t u t .
T te Un twa H a i a ta mat to ha mtm-
n ed wilfa tha f tr t O n aa Soci ety,
T han M n othi n g r ter i i abl a or r r i l *
ritTAMtdb iHI UXTOSiX lha
4a M aaaR l M i L . i t U ui ho. ai d fiat
f r aJ amal an d n m l or can l E ati an i
1TL V eh. M-*-r
hi e i w i
homed
'* aa to
b A n n i hat b o o .
capn d by J ams'
I t e world,** a pmapocuia atalca. e n d
auBragiata plea** n o u t h e f l n t DlftfA'
IscatI on I n ei b In hlir tflr y ^"whCTO
xr on fllj V i va accepted m *qn * l l oal -
l n | and n m e li g i ble l e lha hl g te a t fa
,(aM. un bl i n u an d r tgn a of mater i al
I t haa ted. j f i d adl l tea, * M f* 4l g- an oca hud aoeoan pl l ahmemte PU
Cn wdo m i u u n ay
T ha Cr oai TI MS'by the R n dr T whi H we
i ayn bol u i ad i i aa Q u i d by 1.7M
y n n , they cl ai m. W ben tha ar m*
at the e n a meet i n the Roater uctah
ai mbol appear s a hal f un folded Tad
r oc Ttn * aymfaol idgn lflea that
tbi an cb l he ertww 1b aw ahtr a of tha
ar dor un fol d ai Aar* the n tuf-
Tha fami l y of Tbotn ala I V. foun ded
l ha or der an d bui l t I ke 1n mole af
K ar n mk an d al ter l en pl M , an d wer e
l uatmmi B l al I n har i n g tarwd 1" the
pyr ami d! an d other r al e D l am the
kill*
To-day, Thursday and Friday,
The Seasons Closing Sale of .
COATS, MUFFS AND SCARFS
b Surplus Stock at to j ^ Below Regular Prices
tfftn win*/aArranbfar parchnin* note fu n required/for next winter'* doe
I nhabilitp td tire pdtt and the cansenwtice style f the mddds, tofdher with the
fhl qhar^Rrfulur t price*, outre the wisdom af tuck anftnaeslmen'.. -
rirltt|mint fnrrfthantidafnttod^-insKUdaaranca:...
CIVET CAT M U F F S - ------ I OSEY MOUFFLON SET
XT5>. 2.00
ttllJi. 7.00
SCARFS-----------
Ufti
U S h 10.00
XUlCIv.TT NX J LARF
Ktt^i fXMwSHM
------- 17.50 ! 35.00
SL A CK L Y NX M U F F S - .
I,nimleMOM 23.50
AI i )
Wu men ? F u r C o a l s
F R E N C H SEA L
- KMpJmhaSM. 58-00
CA RA CUL
SA M E ST A R E S
Krtalark USM. VS CO. US.M.
^ 4 8 .0 a SSjOO
A f ter fi fty yl oan o t pl eadi n g, n cn
ti l l i n g an d pr epar ati on , the supr eme
aai hoal ti es havi gr an ted I he r i ght
MtabiL ah auch a l odge.'' he aaJ d
teaf gn ai ed U r q M ay B aaka-Stadag, [ ^* D o*1^
low af Cahmr t L *r y. U. - 1&| a'
t i hr l n g I te >r s* to ted aymhel j l a
thi a coun tr y. Bha aln o tea i pe r eaar y
head by tha l atel y f V tetmi a afaaai
I J M B. C. V bi^ f tel ai * la r oaAa of
bi a. aat wi th r ubi aa. tafguol aca.
of grAat l f i a i i l * p t e -
l al hyata, an d otter ston aa tear i n g
wei r d hi er ogl yphi oa '
Mr , U pM i M Si al oed that l i r a.
Ban ka-Htaeay a u a l in eal dsar er ul -
am on ter moi ber a aids of U ar y
htuaf l . an d an hef f atter a aide *
C* r ti uel l . T ha 4 un Uflea tlon a fn ?
tDHDl cn bJ s, U ha expl ai n ed I tej n
aal h i n tel d
m j r e t l mt e a all a t h ^ i k i n g s i t e l a -
l o t n i a t n t f i l s and l ee c h i n g a o l tha
or d r T hay G)*d(a i ten w I vM ta ac-
ai l ean t ooi thi n g l ot i bi
bqti maaai of man ki n d bef or t they
dl a I t la a u u e r of mor tal M e an d
i mmor tal Ufa for i tem I r f te* #el
mc t s u To f en * * I te pledge of i te
or der l n r l i ai al l tha fli mats* ol Ufa
i Bd oOBdamBi i pa aonl and Inper
meat mao to all pun L ahmeei
af ter ."
-fM atvar i sr sH - an a yr ar n tel l * #
In a Hut I ucr - Daily, good mor al char
sel f r ai d habi ts, an d bci uf I n the
Bbbtpaepb y I te H o^emadan a tia
N o Ooftlaa f a
T te B oai cr udan a B i ter take an
ttfloasfl arid unnMAa.k5Baoa*T" 1
qoM ti ao \of\teaB oaa tt* ' r t -glvea tte
kvdgaa an y coocta. Mr l a t h mud.
Ttj&re an np a b e n f m or me sir-
u u . hut l ha BMiafeirra i r e to 'I t tl hat
l ad on e of I t e r l U oa le m r Ul1
w aet
Any ooa w t e d o u b ( t t e i ' T U a e l -
r r uda& e ia n ot weU feunded-.** amid
>|r. Lewie Ib t joacloeior. ^abotUd go
us M I k A ai or U bn u- . T her e ar e
i hl r i y booki an i te aubj t t f ther e sui d
a eat.J oan s of soma M books p<ub-
l l ated i n f l ea I tn guaga. T her e am
slQ m n than 100 man^ soriotn In the
publ i c l l texr J n a Ther y gr e between
2can.(W5 an d I M .f W mtqi ter a of the
I n r l i pd, bul ear may appl y for thi s
ileg* p r l n id g * The ulBUta a m
miHn hcr b# nr ate TeaHn ea w hat -
U A u) thi n I tte R saas r uci a La.
L csi a caol n l eed
"l #ten tka tn l l l al aa an f n l r an cr i n
the or der n eaa I kr eucb the i kr eab-
tel d *' h* aaJ d, * thay have a mai l
won der ful r a^el atl oB ai whai r an be
don * I b l ha ar i aace of spi r i tual an d
mal ar i al i ki n g* They 0*1 I tel v f l n f
oat h
l a cour t. T hsy au k i I te si gn of \M
They deBi tel l s* * In hr ar ati
or tel l , as "Hi l l y" f l uaday ai pcun di
it*rw~teTiivenrnh
wbtieh l a | m l a i a i i paasdoiia t a the
r l l l uar eaaoay, a chatstdn l eg an d
f un er al ser vi ce of thei r own . - ai d i n
te ver y l mpr r sf !e ucd teaudf ul .
The lodaea bold mcmhJ y meeti n g!
ai whi ch l ha n ffl cer a wear r otes T he
duo ar e n omi n al , tte gr eat expen ses
or der .'
-i-
DIVORCE BUL SIGNED.
CA Ri i ON CI TY , Na*. Feb. 14.-T bi
pagaad h i lha preatn t i egtalgture yrgj
ataaod h>. (hienff I>oik_ihu n-
Ainri n s thn h i n l a l i r t u f l a r c e aa
I t a t t wo yaara ago. Fpc itm U a t
l * o y e a n * naJdeaca a f a l W i t one
year v u M n i a a r y he f o rw a a j person
m u Id apply far a d i g c i Id Ihl* atot*.
but prior t o that Ume only atx
man lha' reeideooe * a a r c q u l n d .
H
Hnt Avenuc at Thirty-fifth
ONESTY in what a store makes
for its customers and what it
sells to them goes without
saving-or it doesnt go at all.
But the Best & Co. standard of
quality in everv last bit of merchant
dise von bny here is* so dependent
jrgon gur honesty with oursefoei that_
you have a right to a word concern
ing it
not permit of the least deviatioi
apy one thing, in any one way..
We apply these standards rig
before any single article is placer
sale herel And.' that means .in.
buying, o f the materials, in
TBakioj;-of the merchandise-ant
the prices at which an article isti
~offere<Ttb you.
-Which is your insurance of
-uDun having standards are as in-_jgralaefor_even; dollar you ever sc
flexible as^ 36 years of successful at Bests. (To put it conservativ
operation can make them. They do . as we prefer to dp.)
Spring Styles and
Smart Black.and White Suits
< For Women and Misses 2nd Floor
. " T ' 3 5 .0 0
- -r * *
A ntimber ol ^dnefive. exclusive models Ere shown
----- the,new limit clnKxbr ck jqian ys----Alf^n L lhr new
In
-j l-tjML -gabardiner i.gerge^-iIbe-Eaodiak-
hades, from424.00 npvard.
- T he N e w S o H n p Cm fa-
Special Sales
An Important Sale
Womens Pure Silk B
69c
Black, white Endthe fashionable gtn^t sx
of pure threadsilk withomnmil |
j ailitv : disconflnneg 'rfVk
A Special Sale <
The World Almanac and Encyclopedia 1916
Published by The Press Publishing Co. (The New Y ork World), New Y ork, 1915
Page til 3
THI ANCIENT AMD MYSTICAL ORDER ROSAS 0RUCI8.
T he A mericas Order nl the R oar C rude * a eatabBahed 'n New Y ork Ci ty to F ebruary of I BI S af ter
Dine yean- preparati on T he A merican Supreme Council operates under a dul y al i ped aod aeelrd charter
with the A ncient Cunatl l utl on u lie law. T he order waa ori gi nal l y cetabl l ahed I n E cypl in 1360 B C , and
h the old n<i aecrri and fraternal order I n tbe world i n-day. wi th many million* of ntemhera I n every country.
I U Lear hi rut* mb rare all that la myal l eal. oeeul t. wl enl l ne. phi losophical. and helpful to one't boal in.
bapptaiwi. and ticrem Branch lodge" ara being eatabl Uhcd In al l tbe pri nci pal rl tl re cf tbe Cnl i cd Statea.
Membership l i mi ted to men and women of good moral*, over 21 pmfMalng a beli ef lb a Supreme Being.
Tbe order la non-ercmrl an Officer* for A merica Mott It onhtpf ul (.'rand Mai l er and I motr ator H,
Speocer Lew la. Commandant of the A merican t'ommandery. K ni ght* of the Rsmw ('ni rl a <*r r '(aT\ -s;r nr r ai
Hoa T hor. K J I maletatu. AO Fi fth A venue. New Y ork C i ty. M eeti ng! twice monthl y I n all temple*.
PORTRAITS OF GHOSTS
An IntnrMtlnf Explanation of Thooo
W i l r f Roaulta In Photography.
Turk. B b d i 30. 1313.
n M IOr mf n i Sem f o r k T i m n :
To ur c o m m n t i on s p i r i t p h o t o g r a p h s
i * t o t h e paint and * m p b u i i > lh
Ir apoitanca o f a d h e r i n g s t r i c t l y to fni't.
W i l l you permit a m ember o f tli* Or
der o f R o a a j t ' r u c l s to c o l l a i t e n l l u n to
t h e rrm sr Va bl e s c l e n t i n r f s c t a tlsc-.v-
sr ed by t h e m e m b e r s o f t he order In
O erinany re g a r d i n g s u c h p h o t o g r a p h i c
p heno mena T T b e w o r k e r s tn t hl a ordt t
o r e s e e k i n g t r u t h r e n o n l l e e a or t h e
ory. and t h e y hold t o t h e pri nci pl e t h a t
n o t h Inc s h o o l d be a t t r i b u t e d to t h e r a -
pe m a t u r e I If It c a n be e a p l a l n e d by n a t
ural l a w s .
Adhering In t h i s pr i nc i pl e . Ilia !nla
f ' r e f e e e o r J s i e b IfelmmulJar o f Lelpele.
a M a s te r In Ihe Order o f Roane C r u d e ,
c o n d u c t e d e x p e r i m e n t s to d e t e r m i n e I ho
n a t u r a l cauoea f o r t h e s t r a n g e e f f e c t s
s o m e t i m e s o b t a i n e d upon p h o to g r a p h i c
p l a t e s . T h e s e a s m s e x p e r i m e n t s h a v a
been c o n d u c t e d by m e m b e r s o f ( h e order
In t h i s c i t y , a nd t b s s a m e r e s u l t s h a ' s
proved t h a t p h o t o g r a p h i c p l a t e s In v a
ri ous s t a c e s or c h e m i c a l d e v e l o p m e n t
are s u s c e p t i b l e to e l e c t r i c a l v i b r a t io n s .
a s watt a s a c t i n i c light.
Fo r Ins tance , It w a s found t h a t a pho
t o gr aphi c p l a t s o f tho vary o rdinary
kind, unoxpooad to l i g h t Impressions,
would bo a f f o c t o d by t b s h i gh frequency
v i b r a t i o n o f t b s w i r e l e s s s p a r k - g a p . or
a a r l o l . w h l l o t b s p l a t s w a s w s t In t bs
d e v e l o p i n g bath composed o f hydro-
u u l no n e a nd Its a s o l s t s n t ch e m i c al s.
T b s v i b r a t i o n s r ef erred to we r e being
d i s c h a r g e d w i t h i n a m i l s nr two o f the
darkroom, a nd c a u s e d v a r i o u s c h a n s * *
In t he c h e m i c a l d e v e l o p m e n t o f tho "li
ver. r a n g i n g In In t e n s i t y a c c o r d i n g to
d * t u n s " o f t h e v Orations a nd t he i r 1
period o f d u r a ti o n . T h e obje ct!** o f f s e t
e t a s u s u a l l y a c om b i na t i o n o f cur ve s ,
s p i r a l s , and d e f i n i t e s p o t s o f Itghla a n a
I s h a d o w s , s u l l y pri nte d upon p h o t o
gra phi c paper.
Such e x p e r i m e n t s led to t h o u which
a n y p h o to g r a p h e r c a n ranks In t h i s m a n - |
nsr . A f t e r t ho un e x p o se d p l a t e Is w s t
w i t h t h e de v s l o p o r It should bo held In
l h a l o f t b a n d , t ho f e e t o f Ihe phi>-
t o g r a p be r b e i n g grounded t hr oug h slt f trr
d a m p n e s s o r a m e t a l p l a t s a t t a r h e d lo
l h a w a t e r pipes. N o w 1st the pbo-
l o g r a p h a r or s o m e on* e l s e t o uc h tu t he 1
corner o f t h e w s t p i s I s a n e l e c t r i c s^re
from d r y o r s t o r a g e b a t t e r i e s . glvTng
l o t he p l a l a o n l y lha p o s t i l v s c u m n l .
1 A f t e r a t w o orconds' I nf luence by the
1current t he p l a t e m a y be developed, and
i upon Its f i l m wi l l be s e e n f l o w e r s ,
s c r o l l s , d e s i g n s , s e e m i n g f a c e s , w r r e s .
S o . , la v a r y i n g Intenelry. and very
o f t e n In b e a u t i f u l co l o rs . A f te r ( h e ;
p l a t e la f i x e d H m a y be printe d na
u s u a l , a n d . w h i l e t he c o l o r s wi l l am
s h o w , t he phantom i m p r s u l o o s ca use d
by t h e c a r r e n t c a n be Interpreted by Ilia
s e e k e r s for s p i r i t u a l p h e n o m e n a sa
t h o w a t e r pipes. S o w l e t the pho-1
t o g r a p h a r o r so m e n n i e l s e ( o uc h l o t he 1
corner o f t b e wet p l a t e a n elect rt c * Ire |
from d r y or s t o r a g e b a t t e r i e s , gi v i ng
l o t b s p i a t o o n l y t ho p o s l i l v s c u r r e n t . '
A f t e r a t w o s e c o n ds ' I nf luence by the
1c u r r e n t Ihe p l a t e m a y be developed.' en d ]
i upon Its f i lm w i l l be s e e n f l o w e r s ,
s c r o l l s , d e s i g n s , s e e m i n g f a c e e . s r e r e s .
A a . . In v a r y i n g I n t e n s i t y , and very
o f t e n In b e a u t i f u l co l o r s . A f t e r i h e |
p l t o la f i x e d It m a y b s . p r i n te d ea
u s u a l , a n d . w h i l e t b s c o l o r s w i l l not
s h o w , t h e pha nto m I n p n w l o n s c a u se d
by t h e c u r r e n t c a n bo Interpreted by m e
e n k e t i f or e p l r t t u a l phenomena aa
s pirit p i c t u r e s . ' nr m o s t a n y t h i n g
e l s e . It a l l d e p e n d s upon t be rea s o n
f o r t he e x p e r i m e n t a nd t h e preconceived
n m v i r t i o n s o f t he e x p e r i m e n te r .
J u s t w h y e l e c t r i c a l c u r r e n t s should
e n a c t a p a r t i a l l y d e v e l o p e d , unaxpoxed
p i * ! , a a d w h y o n l y c e r t a i n eit-enxthn
o f c u r r e n t o r d e f l nH e l y tuned w i r e l e s s 1
V l r b r a l l o a s c a u s e such d e s i g n s , h a s not
I n , . l u a i n s d . a l t h o u g h tho res e a r c h
w o r k e r s o f l h a I t C. Order In t h i s rlty
a r e g i v i n g t h i s m s t l a r consi de r * lj I
t h o u g h t . Thla may e x p l a i n m a ny of
t h e p e c u l i a r t r ou bl e s w h i c h a l l p h o t o g
ra pher* h a v a e x p e r i e n c e d d u r i n g the
p a s t f e w y e a r * s i n c e t h e alr^-tha e t h e r -
l u . become m h e a v i l y c h a r g e d w i t h '
l a t r i d l y . ( f a d o u b f e d l y tho e x p e r i m e n t s
w i l l I n d to a s s i s t i n g la s o l v i n g the
problem of oolor p h o t o g r a p h y , but it
h a g bo a * d e f i n i t e l y f o un d t h a t s p i r i t s '
h a v e n o t h i n g to d o w i t h t b e c a u s e s or ;
rtxultSL gpgjjjtrBR f-EW IS. r . R. C. j
TIM rinxgf Bucolic Illusion.
The New Y ork Times (New Y ork, New Y ork)
Saturday. October 2,1915. page 10
PSYCHI C PHOTOGRAPHY,
N o b o d y Can A c c o u n t f o r R g a u l t s .
L e a s t o f All S c i e n t i s t ! .
To I hr Edi t o r o f The .Vrtr Tttrk T i m t f
W h i t e t h e IMtar f ro m H . Rpnr*r T-e|a.
p u b l i s h * ! by you o n Held. 2. c o n t a i n s m a n y
l i i t t r M l i n r Hama a n J (If t h e y sh o u l d turn out
t o ba t r u a ) a n u m b e r o f a s t o n i s h i n g f a r ta .
n o v r r l h a l e a a It does n o t In a n y w a y a f f e c t
t h e r a l u e o f t ho o e l d e n c e l a t e l y p u b li s h e d In
t h e P roroeflInga " o f t he S o c i e t y f o r Pay - I
c b l c a l B< m r - b . I f Mr. L a w l i had read t he
r epo rt Itaalf, Ins te a d o f t h e n e w s p a p e r e u m - |
ma ry o f t h e report . he would h a v e s e e n i h l e .
Me a t a i e e t h a t " It h a e t > n d e f i n i t e l y f.jund
( h a t a p i r t ts h a v e n o t h i n g t o d o w i t h t he
r a u e e e nr r e s u l t s " He e t a t e o . on t h o cuo-
t r a r y . a n u mb e r o f e f f e c t * w h i c h It la poa-
alble t o produce u i e n phnt g r a p h i c p t a t e e
In t h e r e a m o f c h e m i c a l l i e v r l n p m r n I . eurh
e " f l o e era, s c r o l l s . d e a l a r a . ae a m l na r a - e e .
m a . A c . KVir t h e e o e f f e c t # , a l e o . h l g h -
pu wared e l o c t r l c c u r r e n t # a r e n e m e e a r y .
e i t h e r o p e r a t i n g a t a d l a t x n c a or from t h e
hand o f t ba de v o l o po r raf ' h a p l alao.
In t s i w t r t o t h l e c r i t i c I m a y a a y .
I T h a i bia e x p l a n a t i o n , o f t h e fa> te do
s o t a c c o u n t for p e r f e c t l y d e f i n i t e . t u n i > -
a b l a f a c e a w h i c h h a e a ap p e a r e d on the p l a t e e ,
a n d a r e c l e a r l y n w a n l w ! ' t o a l l who m -
pare t h e m w i t h t h e o r i g i n a l phot >araj ihe.
2. T h a t in t hr ee e x p e r i m e n t s no e l e c t r i c
c u r r e n t s w h a t e v e r w e r e uard. e i t h e r c l o a e at
hand or a t a d l e t a n c o .
3. T h a t t h e r e le a l l t h e d i f f e r e n c e tn Ihe
w i r l d b e t w e e n f a i w e . " A c . , and
t be ph otog r ap h # a c t u a l l y o b t a i n e d .
4. T h a t no c l a i m w a s i , a d e a n y w h e r e tn
t h e report t h a t thaao w - r e eplrit p h o to g r a p h s ,
or produced by aplrlia. Tho t i t l e or t ho im
port la S o m e U o u . u a I P h e n o m e n a In P h o
t o g r a p h ) . '* a nd ta c a u t i o u s and norc ornmlt-
t a l t h r o u g h o u t .
B. T h a t no s p e c i a l t be o r v o f t h e f ke ta wma
n d v o c a t e d .
B. T h a t t h o p o a a l b l l l i y o f f rand. c o n s c i o u s
and u n c o n s c i o u s . w a e f u l l y a l l o w e d foe
U i r v u i h o u t . a nd m uc h o f Ihe l a a t l m o n y d i s
c o u n t e d In c o n s e q u e n c e
T. T h a t t h r e e p h o t o g r a p h s w e r e not In Col-
o r a but In n a t u r a l p h o t o g r a p h i c t l n t o .
*. T h a t In a n u mb e r o f i n e t a n c e a o b j e c t a
w e r e ph o to g r a p h e d w h i c h w a r e not a c t u a l l y
t he ra a t l h t i m e , but whi c h had n a i a d t h e r e
a faw m o m e n t a l * f i | p a r e n t l y s h o w i n g
t h e p h o t o g r a p h y o f Ihe " a s t r a l d o u b le ** o f
t he o b j e c t l e f t behind w h a n t he real o b j e c t
wag m o v e d . ( T h l e t he o r y u n o t a d v a n c e d tn
t he r e t o r t : t h e f a c t a w e r e m e r e l y recorded
w i t h o u t a n y e x p l a n a t o r y [ he orle# being o f
f e r e d . !
T e a r s a g o nur old e e e r e i a r y . I>r. i l w l g e n.
m a de t h e re m a r k t ha t * If we - o u l d o n l y g e t
t h e s c i e n t i f i c men t o a t t a c k ua. o u r r a s e
a ould b w o n . Thla la a c a s e In p o i n t ! A l
t ho u g h w e do n o t a l l i a n c e t h e s e fa ta a s
proof o f ep 1r I te or o f au;*ernormal a c t i o n
or In f a c t , a s a n y t h i n g b ey o nd r u r l o u e and
I n e x p l i c a b l e f a c t a n e v e r t h e l e s s Ihe " n a t u
r a l i s t i c e x p l a n a t i o n , put f o r w a r d to ex -
p a i n t he m a w a y a r e l ( i a i i a <ly f< ia-1 to
be w i l e o f t he m a r k , and w e a k e r t he r o w *
t h e y are e x a m i n e d . Tha e h j e n c e . for p e y c h l e
p h e n o m e n a m a y n o t be a . alrung aa m a n ) o f
ua d e s i r e , but t h e y n e v e r a p p e a r s t r o n g e r
t h a n w h e n a t t a c k e d by on w b o a t t e m p t s to
auruount for t he fa> i s by almpla. n a t u r a l
m e a n s HEI1KH A H D CA R R I l W I T f i N ,
New Tiwk. Oct . lO. 1913.
The New Vork Ti mes (Net* Vork, New Nork)
Tuesday. October 12. I *>15.
page 10
The New Y ork Times
New York. New Y ork
Sunday, October 24,1915
Page 16
OTHER LIGHT RAYS.
They Furnish a Practical Explana
tion of Spirit Photographs.
T o t k * K 'U t o r of T h t .Vnr f o r k T i m m :
II. k i t i r l a w i s s e e m s t o mo to bo
m a k i n g a s h o wi ly r l s i i a i i a s ou t o f a vary
s i m p l o m a t t e r . In s u p p o rt o f bio boltof In
u t r a l b o d i e s . " a t n n g a weird f o rc a a ."
a n d oucb p a b u l u m on w h i c h ba an d bio a s -
an cia ia a .it l h e Itoooo Crucla food t holr a c l e n -
lir t c f a n c i e s . ho c i t e s aomo of tho o d d l t l a i
f o u n d un - p h o t o g r a p h i c p l a t e s f a c t o , s o
ho r i g h t l y way a, " e a s i l y d - m i n i t r a t e I In a n y
p h o t o g r a p h i c s t u d i o . *' Thera era.'* ho p o i n t s
I o u t . " v i b r a t i o n s a n d c o l o r s I n v i s i b l e t o tho
I h u m a n oyo w h i c h cax> bo r e g i s t e r e d on a
! co m m o n p h o t o g r a p h i c p l a i n ." Tr u o t o o ugh.
1an d a l s o he m i g h t h a t a pnlnlad ou t t h a t
t h o r s la n o s u a h t h i n g ao an apSqua s u b o t a n r * .
a f a c t w h i c h a a p i a l n s a l l tho ** s t a r t l i n g "
p han oman a ho and nls an< l o n t o n I myotl*
m o c l i i a a h a v a recorded.
| To q u o t a Mr. L e w i s " Lot a n y b r i g h t 1
ob jo c t ho p U c a d a s a l n s t a (lark b a c k g r o u n d
and t h o Is no o f tho m m a r a f o c u s e d s h a r p l y
upon It. Thau Insert In t h s r a m o r a a p l o t s -
ho Ids r c o n t a i n i n g * p l * .a. Motors w i t h d r a w - I
in g t b s si Ids from the c a m e o s pormlt t h s
i o n s t s t hrow t ho o b j e c t I nto t s o dark e h a m -
bor o f t h o c a m e r a . Than re n o w t ho o b j e c t
q u i c k l y , an d a t tho s a m e t i n s w i t h d r a w t h s
s l i d # f ro m t h s p l a t e h o l d o r . m l m o b s a vary
s h o r t e x p o s u r e . I f c o n d i t i o n , a r s r i g h t , t h o r s
w i l l be I m p l a n t e d upon t h s p l a t s a tom* Im
p r e s s i o n o f t h s re m o v ed o b j e c t a n d a t o t har
tiro e s a s l i g h t l y d l l f s r s n t fo rm . l l o w T " Me
than prtM-eeda t o a n s w s r h i s q u e s t i o n by a
lot o f t a l k a b o u t d e p a r t e d s p i r i t s a a d s i m i l a r
** m y s t i c t h e o r i s i n g .
T h s farri Is. l i g h t a a * a c c e p t It by tho
r y e g i v e s u s our l i m i t e d p erc e p t i o n o f w h a t
w c d i s t i n g u i s h a s o p a q u s or t r a m p a r e n t ; but
w e k n o w t h a t t h e ep ec t ru m c o l o r s a re o n l y
a s m a l l s e c t i o n or t h s roim*onn<s i f l i g h t ,
a n d by utbor m e t h o d s o f l i g h t a n a l y s t s w e
r a s l l y prove a w i d e f i e l d o f " I n f r a - r ed
r a y s cm mo s i d e and u l t r a - v i o l e t *' on t h e i
s i b u T h e s e a r e so srouped b e c a u s e a s yet
i k n o w conapskralively l i t t l e a b o u t t h e m, but
s o m e t h i n g s wo do n o t k n o w a b o u t t h e s e
l i g h t e l e m e n t s . For s s o m p l s . k s * w t h a t
1s o r e s o f t h e s e r a y s hava muc h m o re p e n e t r a t
i n g p o we r t h a n t h e r a y s in t h e s p e c t r u m
d i v i s i o n . T h e X - r a y s h a v e a p e n e t r a t i n g
p ower q u i t e u n d r e a m e d o f u n t i l K o s n t g e n d i s
co v e re d t h i s f a c t .
T h s e>-re*n *f a c a m e r a Is o f s l i g h t h i n d r a n c e
t o t h e p a s s e s * o f r a y s o f t h i s t v p * . an d rn o . e
or l e s s w - l l d e f i n e d ph't*oraphs >f
" s h a r p l y r i e u w d b y tho l e n s c* n r e a d i l y
he t o k e n by t h i s m e a n s t hrus. Ihe
* o p aqu e s c r e e n o f a p l a t e b o l d e r ^ ^ ^ l f t he
I c o n d i t i o n s o re r i g h t . C o n s i d e r i n g t he a r y -
Ing p r o p o r t i o n s nf s u c h r a y s , d e p e n d i n g O.i
b a ro w .e i r i r . a t m o s p h e r i c , c h e m i c a l . or her
i n f l u e n c e s a t work on t h e l i g h t . ran
s u r e l y e x p l a i n t h e v a r y i n g lot o f s p l r l 1
1 p i c t u r e s w i t h o u t r e q u i r i n g t h s aid "plrita
! N ew York. Oct 21. 1013 C- *J
1916
Evening Public Ledger, Night Extra
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Monday, February 21, 1916
Page 11
i v ! i: !a i . iii:gi k s t
i n ii.*i i : u:-i t i u:
ORIENTAL M Y S T I C I S M
& ROS IC RUC IANIS M
si I K i . L > H S . \ i N D l i K S
I ' i - ( r ! ; ' i u I h .
T i l i *st M hi l l Alt V J - ! \T H 1* M.
u 1' \i:' i '*i il Kirill tl-A,
I !I i t .1:1 <*lt1I S .St S.
ADMISSION FREE
BY SPECIAL REQUEST
UNIQUE LECTURE
ORIENTAL MYSTICISM & ROSICRUCIANISM
By ALFRED H. SAUNDERS
Prelate of the Order Rosae Crucis
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22d, AT 8 P.M.
At PARKWAY BUILDING, Room 6-A
Broad and Cherry Sts.
A D M I S S I O N F R E E
FORT WAY NE J OURNAL-GAZETTE
BlflfOAY MOftN'W*. * M l l 1
Why the Rosaecrucians Came to New York
Prophecies Dating Back 1,500 Y ears Before the Wi se Men of the East Followed
the Star to Bethlehem A re Now Fulfilled in the A dvent of This A ncient Mystic *
Order to T he L and W here the Eagle Spreads I ts Wi ngs
By Charta W. Wood.
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an aad a Mark tdrd (lha |K
*a) covmftag tha araw ad tha ji
I Stataa T bta map. ha )(
waa takaa frata tha yynwM
< ' (
T h e r k w m r r
1 Avtaia, wbtft t
Nl.
Ur
t\\i
f l t u t a i
.1
N>ad
Ift* Rrlrf
B ahnal lha n a at No M fifth
with tha young Oraad Maatar Qoaaral nl
lha Bag loakad for A inalran Otand l ad|a Rut tha wary ha uafofdad
wna aaa that brought tha haawr hath ta tha HIt round to af th*
rfypttan pharanha aad throw a haul aw
whala wadan ft ct Hoad tha |J l B ar <d
tha i trydr paat
H. I pri xw L aah la tha Aaaarlrwn
Qnad Uwta Gaaaam. or Impawn!or
Ha raaalaad fab rwaai mm nghl ywara
age from tha Sappf e CwufMI d tha
V atd, through tha Oread L adp d
Ptaivw. ta awtahHah i h nrdar la A manna Thia
Sup Coamll la Ub graat atataaraUr authority af
R B i ti nH H wn l ta wary member*. i v a woal and
ft atifiaoaa It* dicta la army* that myatily emn ttw
Illuminati With hha rowimitalon Ur .
U wh ratvwd ordefe aaa to hagtn lha
work aatil I l l i . Ha waa than only
lwarily Bra yaan old. hut had alrcnd
b a r f a c m d lha Twelfth
IIIu bi bbW ta Touiouaa Hla
Ufa had haaa a pnpwi U n far thia ^ ^
rommMUt. Ha it hnowc b a atudant _! I>
l pay chiral raaaarch aad baa aided ta *SZZ^aF
i f tdH tmny d tha aa awHad w Mi b I
atlr haul Raaanwi ai i tui ta trur ntyeudera.** ha told ma I t la boa
a r~*tBim I t haa nothing ta rummoa with thaaaaphy nr Hindu and Yogi
lihUoaaytiy, and flat na can need wn with tha now thought monawwnt
apr i tatm mawtah h Wa rail H. rtf fatly, tha Alpha and O f ga af
all laamiag I t in a yfallnaophy. a attar i, an art aad w ai t aO d
ffaaaa. I f pmrebla aad am "
"I t would aaa ho tabltalied hmw aaul tha ywar 2M," ha added
That yaw wwa Aaad ta lha alarm I t waa iwwd by llarmaw 1J BO
t M an C hht; but tha aw n arm It apt, a van from Roman
rruaanr, uaul tha ri m d fnl
arnaat attaaupta l e fourxl tha trdar
daa Haaa ny aha aat
A man ran Repabtlc
dgatfi ru af lha ngltwm 1
Aacnrd.bg to Mr l aw
B ap from tha dag d Ma
thaa inward hlatury dai U
CewwdJ haa pwudtmd Mm
ata Tha f i
warn adagtwd lb
taadaralsad tha
And I harmla mm iwam
ha wtthMed haa tha world
ta tha
4 3 \ J O h af t a t
N U nB aa AT th# ardB ara la
About two I
paamHBd to " r r f lha
rarafawd Ma aaw a,HBaw.
(aa amall army af lafrtai i
aad 6ft y ham
Mr . L
af tha
H Span a Lrwlm.
paratot of Um T
rw an al
aal of lha
4 arrl aaa
a a reeaa
o* '
fafn-iai
want ywar, aaaaidlag
ah H h tha Roaaacrualaa
with twin S of thaai hava founded
rluba and bdawablpa But you will
ham uaod thw aaa a af tan i
rtmfd awl towdaau t
Tha ywaa NM1 Taa, that ta tha
to tha aaawBtBlan enlandar
Raw Taw. I t hwgtna at 1M A M.
Hu kicUag according to Our praaaint calendar. It waa la lha a f k d
March I S tw April 4, 14M B. f . whan Tinitial I I I ., Rulor of Egypt,
aad Ma I l Sa group of advanced thi n lam. argauaad the Aral t'eencfl
af lha ardr aat af the dan In phileaophy. which had I noa Bowling la
I fan royal ahBBham and rrynivnlad the hlg fatal learning af l
Tfarcr warn twain
IB l l
WMb Mr. Uwta
mala and oymhahi af authority. I T
ha aaya wa unknown aown I n tha (
mweta af tha ordar M u tn aoBad
Thu. mo- 1U-. uaad by tha anBai
upon Mi royal daewaaa TMo carlo
of tha ordm aad tha SCARAB w ,
by I far huprwaa M af n wt
Central Bark baara tfau carlo
tha IgtnaJ Scarab la tha h
U takaa to ayrahah tha p
bgypd ta Butra
B al l w lha ISCARAB d
man nog lha laaawal laa tha A aI ra
magnet af tha Order, pahlohad d Mu
that I f halmi with the paat I SI S t!
Uranlaa ah af the 9pt*
ocaurrad and morn vhfhla ha tha
l a Bod Thuiaday hacamlng the day af
tha aartmi and a i r f jWahlng af Important tBi
altera aa l ad the aumhar T Rwtng auMm
CROSS la carlo larwu halag ad.pd la pMai af
baa
fna
uyatlr Tha name <4
rdar waa mat adoptad at
but tha prtndplm. rulaa
and i odaa d praredura out
lined by Thrtmn bam f
down. It la iJ aia! practlcall*
unchmi gad la tha ritual of mil
Riwmni daa lodgm
Thiftma aaartad two obw-
iaki ootud* tha Temple d
K antak. ah the ardrr mat.
WHAT ROSAECRUC1ANI SM
By m Roadooruci nn
pUhABCRUClANISM la l ha Alpha aad O n f d
B whaaa, an art atM a aamat a
IS
l t fdi m the worUTa moat prof ound aaerata l l
aad tta ptaamanana; ll mahaa plain biology and ontology.
Ufa tad death In a different light limn that goner ally
ft dla cofiipraftanatvrty with loatniwuny. trr og tha <aiy a I
trl anra of aatnwany aa firm! taught by Rnaaamirlanai and gaalngy
aa with matallurgy, nM dl dar. art and philoaoph)
It t b l l u i wa ham limd and Ula Ufa n ahall Um aa plainly
aa the Ufa wa art living. I t tab fnwn ackanoe in aU IU faraochpa
ha p u t inyafmt which ham dad lad aolullon by tha lay tub ad and
tha unI niUalad
I t makea of all matnbvra real hrothma and alalarm. It m al a tha
humMe m I tank or artlaan I n America tha auual. tha pm, of the
owerful ruler m Eurape, not by humillaiion. hut toy tha trua
Itofi
than af
Wa aaa
tha dealra far pans,
and harmany aup-
planting tha gtar-
Ub* af war and
mrifa. Tha l aan
dB n fat raUgfoua atody. lor
atmment with tha Infinite
and b morn I ndicate aeqaafat
anaa with Ood and tha Dim
Lawn of L am, Paaea, Power
and Knowladge la mera mani
feat than am hefara "
1
THE FORT.
Molt AD Old Bath
Robe* for Nrwipaaer
Rap a ad Don Hw Oix
7 kc P o q t o r ^
Y A d v i c e
Why the Rosaecruciaps Came to New York
Propheae* Dating Back 1,500 Y ean Before the Wlae Men of the Bai t Followed
the Star to" Bethlehem Are Now Fulfilled in the A drent of Thla Ancient My*tir
Order to The L and Where the Eagle Spread* It* Wing*"
WHATROSARCKUCLANISMIB
BymRbMwriirMtt
CHICH|TER.SnLLS
THE PROECTTIVE
ELECTRICAL SUPPLY CO
L. O. HULL
Wall Paper
WHOLESALE AND RETA U
,xms df3farssu.
Yea; w. do PAPER HANGING, do it njhi .od <!*
1 19 Washington Boulevard, East
DR MORELAND.
1
Why the Rosaecrucians Came to New York
Prophecies Dating Back 1,500 Years Before the Wise Men of the East Followed
the Star to Bethlehem Are Now Fulfilled in the Advent of This Ancient Mystic
Order to "The Land Where the Eagle Spreads Its Wings."
The symbols on this page are copyrighted, 1915, by "The American Rosae Crucis."
By Charles W. Wood
THE Ancient and Mystical Order Rosae Crucis has come to America. It Is the
most ancient and most mystical of all orders; so ancient that the encyclopedists
have never been able to trace its origin, and so mystical that even the mystics of
other cults have never been able to divine its meaning. Every one has heard of
Rosaecrucianism. Few have any conception of what it stands for. Lexicon makers
have disputed about the spelling of the word. But now the thing itself,
Roseacrucianism, is here. And it is here to direct the course of America during the
next five wonderful years; to point out the course written in the stars in the dawn of
civilization and interpreted by the Wise Men of the East years before their
successors followed the Star to Bethlehem.
THERE was no air of mysticism about the rooms at No. 80 Fifth Avenue, where
I talked with the young Grand Master General of the long-looked-for American
Grand Lodge. But the story he unfolded was one that brought the hearer back to
the earliest councils of the Egyptian pharaohs, and threw about our whole modem
civilization the glamour of the cryptic past.
H. Spencer Lewis is the American Grand Master General, or Imperator. He
received his commission eight years ago from the Supreme Council of the World,
through the Grand Lodge of France, to establish the order in America. This
Supreme Council is the great autocratic authority of Rosaecrucianism. Its very
membership is secret and it enforces its dicta in ways that mystify even the
Illuminati. With his commission Mr. Lewis received orders not to begin the work
until 1916. He was then only twenty-five years old, but had already become one of
the Twelfth Degree Illuminati in Toulouse. His previous life had been a
preparation for this commission. He is known as a student of psychical research
2
and has aided in exposing many of the so-called spiritualistic frauds.
"Roseacrucianism is true mysticism," he told me. "It is not a religion. It has
nothing in common with theosophy or Hindu and Yogi philosophy, and has no
connection with the new thought movement, spiritualism or mentalism. We call it,
rightly, the Alpha and Omega of all learning. It is a philosophy, a science, an art
and a secret - all of these, inseparable and one."
"It could not be established here until the year 3268," he added. "That year was
fixed in the stars. It was read by Hermes 1,300 years before Christ; but the secret
was kept, even from Rosaecrucians, until the time of fulfillment. There have been
many earnest attempts to found the order here before. The enthusiastic
propagandists themselves did not know why permission was withheld. Some of
them have founded Rosaecrucian societies, clubs and fellowships. But you will
note that none of these have used the name of the order or its official emblems.
That could not be done until the year 3268.
The year 3268? Yes, that is the present year, according to the Rosaecrucian
calendar. March 21 is the Rosaecrucian New Year. It begins at 1.06 A. M.
Reckoning according to our present calendar, it was in the week of March 28 to
April 4,1489 B. C., when Thutmose III., Ruler of Egypt, and his little group of
advanced thinkers, organized the first Council of the order out of the class in
philosophy, which had been meeting in the royal chambers and represented the
highest learning of the world. There were twelve in the group, nine men and three
women. There are twelve degrees in Rosaecrucianism The figures 9 and 3 have
ever since been recognized as mystic symbols. The name of the order was not
adopted at once, but the principles, rules and modes of procedure outlined by
Thutmose have come down, it is claimed, practically unchanged in the ritual of all
Roseacrucian lodges. Thutmose erected two obelisks outside the Temple of
Kamak, where the order met.
According to a tradition of the order one of these obelisks was to stand some day
in the 'Land where the Eagle spreads its wings." It does. It stands in Central Park,
in the metropolis of the world, full of inscriptions meaningful to Rosaecrucians.
How was America associated with the eagle twenty-eight centuries before
Columbus? "I can only say that it was," said Mr. Lewis. Then he produced a map,
3
a map of the world showing the Roseacrucian symbols of an eagle, a pyramid and
a black bird (the "vulture") covering the area of the United States. "This map," he
said, "was taken from the pyramid of Cheops and from the oldest Rosaecrucian
tablets. The eagle and the pyramid were adopted in due time by the new
government at Washington as emblems of the American Republic. Thousands of
your readers will understand the significance of the vulture."
According to Mr. Lewis, Rosaecrucianism has had a continuous history from the
day of its birth. And there is no reason, he says, why this outward history should be
withheld from the world. The Supreme Council has permitted him to publish the
chronicle and it will appear in the near future. In this history he states that
Freemasonry is only an off shoot of Rosaecrucianism, resulting from a visit of an
earnest young seeker after truth named Saloman, or Solomon, to the Masters in
Egypt 2,000 years ago.
No one knows how many members of the order are in America today. About two
hundred and fifty have been permitted to "cross the threshold" since Mr. Lewis
received his commission; but aside from these there is a small army of initiates
especially prepared for the great work of the next few years in the European and
Oriental lodges. So far they do not know each other, and they do not know what
particular work will be assigned to them. But they are waiting for orders from the
Supreme Council of the World and all are confident that the destiny of America is
wrapped up with the Rose and Cross. With Mr. Lewis's commission as Grand
Master General came official seals and symbols of authority. Then, through
devious sources, which he says were unknown even to the Grand Master, came
some treasured jewels of the order. Most treasured of all was the original
SCARAB of Thutmose III, used by the ancient founder to impress his cartouche
upon his royal decrees. This cartouche was adopted as the first seal of the order
and the SCARAB was used for hundreds of years in Egypt by the Supreme
Masters who succeeded him. The obelisk in Central Park bears this cartouche of
Thutmose. The presence of the original Scarab in the hands of the Master of the
New World is taken to symbolize the passing of the founder's spirit from Egypt to
America.
ROSAECRUCIANS have been anticipating the great change in America for
centuries," said Royle Thurston, summarizing the forecast for the American Rosae
4
Crucis, official magazine of the Order, published at No. 80 Fifth Avenue. "It was
decreed that beginning with the year 1916 these States should come under the
Uranian influence of the Spirit. Gradually the change has occurred and more
visible becomes the influence in all the affairs of life. "We find Thursday
becoming the day of choice, subconsciously, for the starting and accomplishing of
important things. In even minute matters we find the number 7 figuring
conspicuously. We find the CROSS in various forms being adopted in place of
more decorative or more representative symbols. We note that the mind of the
nation inquiries rather of the Laws and Causes of things than of results. We see the
desire for peace and harmony supplanting the 'glories' of war and strife. The inner
desire for religious study, for attunement with the Infinite and a more intimate
acquaintance with God and the Divine Laws of Love, Peace, Power and
Knowledge is more manifest than ever before."
WHAT ROSAECRUCIANISM IS
By a Rosaecrucian.
ROSAECRUCIANISM is the Alpha and Omega of all learning, a philosophy, a
science, an art and a secret - all of these, inseparable and one.
It teaches the world's most profound secrets. It explains life and its phenomena; it
makes plain biology and ontology; it reveals life and death in a different light than
that generally understood. It deals as comprehensively with cosmogony, astrology
(the original science of astronomy as first taught by Rosaecrucians) and geology as
with metallurgy, medicine, art and philosophy.
It reveals the life we have lived and the life we shall live as plainly as the life we
are living. It takes from science in all its branches the great mysteries which have
defied solution by the lay mind and the uninitiated.
It makes of all members real brothers and sisters; it makes the humble mechanic
or artisan in America the equal, the peer, of the most powerful ruler in Europe, not
by humiliation, but by the true law of equality.
THE PORT WAYNE JOURNAL-GAZETTE,
Sunday Morning, April 2,1916. Page 46.
- - - - - - - - - - 1 -~ ^ r ii w -
| A ddi ti onal F raternal
| Soci ety News
I . O. o. F.
A l i c e Ca r e y Re be ka h l o d ge me e t s I n
I he Century Bl d g. t he fi r s t a n d t hi r d
Tue s d a y o f eac h mo n t h. A f t e r t he c l o s e
o f t he s e s s i o n l a s t Tue s d a y Mr s.
F r a n k K a y ga ve s e ve r a l I mpe r s o n a
t i o n s . Mr s . V i c t o r Ro d n e y S my t he a n d
Mr . Da ve s o n pl a y e d t he vi o l i n , bo t h be-
i n a c c o mpa n i e d by Mr s. C. O. S pen c e.
The s un bo n n e t d r i l l " br o ught f o r t h
r o a r s o f l a ught e r . A l un c h w a s s e r ve d
n n d a ge n e r a l s o c i a l t i me Tr as e n j o y e d
by al l .
A . M. O. 11. C.
F o r a s e c r e t s o c i e t y t ha t ha s be e n
In A me r i c a but s e ve n mo n t hs t he A n
c i e n t a n d My s t i c a l Or d e r o f Ro s e a Cr u
ets , ma d e a s t a r t i n gl y s t r o n g s ho w i n g
i a t t he Pe n n s y l va n i a Or a n d l o d ge s es -
| s l o n he l d i n t he Mo o se t e mpl e l a s t
I S un d a y a n d Mo n d a y e ve n i n g. A c l a s s
o f mo r e t ha n M>t o o k t he s e c o n d d e
gr e e a n d t e w e r e I n i t i a t e d I n t o t he fi r s t
d e gr e e . The w o r k i s be a ut i ful In bo t h
o f t he s e e ve n t s , a n d w a s ma d e t he mo r e
I mpr e s s i ve by t he pr e s e n c e I n P i t t s
bur g o f t he i mpe r a t o r . 11. S pe n c e r
I .pw l a a n d S e c r e t a r y Ge n e r a l Tho r
l Ci i mal e ht o o f X c w F o r k, w he r e t he
S upr e me l o d ge i s l o c a t e d . Ro s l c r u-
e i a n s fr o m s ubo r d i n a t e l o d ge s I n We s t
e r n Pe n n s y l va n i a fl o c ked t o t he t w o
me e t i n gs , a n d t he ha l l w a s o ve r r r o w i U
ed bo t h e ve n i n gs . A s i gn i fi c a n t f e a
t ur e o f t he ga t he r i n g w h s t he e xhi bi
t i o n o f t he w r i t t e n c ha r t e r a n d a ut ho r
i t y f o r t he f o r ma t i o n o f t he A me r i c a n
br a n c h o f t hi s s o c l e r y . i s s ue d by t he
I mpe r a t o r o f t he I t o s l c r uc l a n s a n d t he
s upr e me c o un c i l o f F r a n c e , w hi l e t he
a n c i e n t J ew el s , s o mo o f w hi c h d a t e
ba c k 3.6(H) y e a r s a l s o w e r e e xhi bi t e d .
Thi s o r d e r w i t h a me mbe r s hi p o f o ve r
li.OuO.OUO Is r e ga r d e d a s o n e o f t he mo s t
s e c r e t In t he w o r l d , w i t h t he a d va n c e
me n t o f s c i e n t i fi c kn o w l e d ge a s i t s o n l y
ba s i s a n d pur po s e . The Ro s l o r uc i a n s
a r e s n r e a d i n g r a pi d l y I n a l l d i r e c t i o n *,
a s t he r e a r c t ho us a n d s o f s t ud e n t s a n d
s c i e n t i s t s I n A me r i c a w ho kn o w o f
t he m a mi o f t h. .r w o n d e r f ul w o r k f o r
c e n t ur i e s . A Rus l c r uc l a n c o l l e ge a n d
o t he r i n s t i t ut i o n s a r e I n c o n t e mpl a t i o n
In r i i c n o t d i s t a n t f ut ur e . Tw o n e w
l o d ge s a r c t o be fo r me d i n Pi t t s bur g,
o n e f ur t he K a s t e n d s e c t i o n o f t he c l t r
a n d o n e fo r t he X o r t hs i d e . us t he Gr a n d
l o d ge l i ke a l l o t he r s ha s a l i mi t e d
me mbe r s hi p a n d I* n e a r i n g I t s c a pa c
i t y .
The Pi ttsburg Press
Pi ttsburgh, Pennsyl vani a
Sunday, May 7, 1916
Page 5
' i r v - v m -
LaPAOHtTri.
* > > )
#-H !
ViatiTfelth^Mystic-femple Where Imperator l^ewis (Pormerly of^Ri^SST-16).EPcrformed as ai
-- T . ^ . ... ........... LIl- mt Pmnintfpa kw)f
J l the J u n e cO**SFItnUWnmhr,*m9 T*m+Cammcil of the AncUut-am<L
Ofcwf t>rrfrr- H v * |U J M r l < > ^f l / . | ___
11 irael l 0A<i/ n miA A i rrrf, icAlcJ I i i fitted up a a temple. H. rtmj->-Caqcrilf alt li4k to beck i t
left lewril, j M f/ifll fil cf lit* order, performed the ftiyjflafll I rani mu- ro] Ito S d*kn K l l mel thtn la A
ffr e te o n y Ht plofrd fi i t e m imof*dieni in-t L- crvci i )l ._ |l i rrrd_ __printer fay I rad a. L awll a**d to |0
Mtrim i i f l u y e n l ad ai i a end oJ~elffhleen>mhiul*t~fou?i drew a fair to bi m-wl tk an-oocaeJ cnAJ Jofa and
yDMemet ml. Eudtphaily p r t t e n i ugi pffl/ouariJ p J mprrj j rd, bfllfcirtajj In I tial u j Lb*r bocana* *e-
LaLprodaocd-a Plftta 5/ Dold, ____ __ qualnted.
. 1rallod * M hl lompla n Wodnoa
b C h a r i * * W o l f o n . lino for l ai r. Ha y a fa. U ni out Mr Ho|h whfl | . itudBBl
T will empri se oo3i of tfaa lo ml ki Manny and bu nolfalai to 0r hi aroairpfal a. ard U r'C al le^
l ^b o y i ho n I d P ri ori ' f '* "" ------------ * ' TT^r h ai r aha h d c . i Blond > ?-
poJ J ohn U i i rhi . rradu- Thom are a t i a o i p ^ . t alooi-
ati n*
Vcrk. I lia JflWy la la tfaa fraal pat c o n u d othera of 'l be adaiBfed ~ l oinid-M be a tri fl e faea.l i r tfaaa llfaa powdered dried l aavat
lor. l ie ifld "niar KMmaJ aMn, f l e* - ~erder- ta - the nnmtwr. of l fal ru- tfaa *1ae.Eery one pi urnl iw_ _ KlImaJ afaLo atappod l ai o a cl
n1del Iweired-on add raal iAJ >-
l ot tfaal for tfaa Aral tl oa In A i rar
lea I would deDurnitra^a lha /M
vrooeai of ir an* mutation----------
' "For hundred* of l aan tho
Eldar Drotfaara of our ordar lo
No
........ .................... ..... l wu '|1ad liauda-
ttl roatgoluia-on full ol mywtlcllfn w| -
and the pungent aroma of E ul arn
aplcea. Student! al (ha ooult. cl ad-
In Iba robes of the Roaaaeruoiaa
*4*4 y Taea In p . BT rto.
faa*a at ao years aco to learn
il f ar liearil, * 1 aama of than ona ue pungent aroma or aaj utrn . Will, you he food annul*. Mr.
te tall faLa, i l Dow a faigfa ipICaa. Stud ante al (ha oooult. cl ad | l M r ii|ft lmlx UB hav
damuck hi tha adcuII huaIneao ,b r o ^ f *h Roaaacruolan ybu do tha alchemy atuot by ahlnh
i Ormnd Uaatoe Oeoara] AJ Ul "v t>rdW ;r^O * ^^bay- aa- ao- ol arm* ^y^rYflCninJ U1i^ J |j| BAd ^d l iBfQ'
Waa l ri f ta f ecul i r |oodtfaa-
raaJ atodroldr* 1ajked
E r r o l worked aft_thalr_.oruclfalM ^ l rafaaV ^d J ro*n
and wraatlad wltfa tha prablatna or ala," aald l^wla. rnakinc a aUtt*
olehomy to an attempt (o-apply tha u k d | l&itaad of a raply, **ta th.^
t ad u u a l -1 t i n - ai gut gk l l oM ^y uraa o( fOid. ^No* ahaul tfaa 0^
plry -ad j al mca At laat Ui*l * dor I I
dad U hqmii Ul lna ID ti l l ___Hl -ttl l ^n u i tr of Tbutmoaa I I I ,
High Reboot of Commirce bor
ocmmu Bleating tiaacboll reanll to
U bU ^ i h . r tbaro'i rnrf^~'tofl .- T otorati ^with i f adU a pmt f A -~o.-fri end-'-l a ManaaL . Trm|n1ag.
money lo maktoc gol d-that-way.- aomo aI _ i ta^0OR|enla I nto I ho Pd ollckid uowt iho ,mlr.
Tou gat ool j a Util* bit lor ell and touched a match Ui I t !-
jOar pain* mediately tfaa tampla waa fillod
rKh aa oddr.l l ka a oomfalnation:of
cay anDa peppar, myrrh, iwaat mi b
jerram, taroblnlh aod otfaor I bln
K ocrili waa not the only atudaflt
at hla teak. Thera la an a* ara|t
of a doi anmen and aonnnel
work. I t 1in*t abi ol utel r nMOiiary
tbi t thoy All *g*r robci. but mort
- Tb"a~lfaI6Y ~lcl6kg"rp*4J'rPom'l faa of thorn do.- T he diBertnl-^egreoo
pan aproad oct ovw oar heada a^od faara dl fl arent robniaoma red and
rortnod~ta~a'ihla-clood-whiah dani>-otfaaro.faluo oj white, i
mal ari al plana.' Tha mambart of who a u tfaa hnabajid oM l a._ ^t
our ynunh Dagraa balng tha meat Obollak I d CantraJ Park, ona of thl
-4-Brad. I .f - l i tha call Ic maha__two arwetad la E upt by Tfairtnacaa
Ifaa damonatratlan lor tfaa Brat I I I . aod toleodad to ataod ioma
day l a "tfaa country wt ara i hj 'taai i
-j i tl b I V a T bi c K ^Tod ^to wtw. Tfaa oh am leal laboratory la J ut
aoma of tfha dark. t m bank of tfaa temple. I n what aaed to
iwiilar'a nanlrv faetoraj ^a
T W n r a n n r - f l i i -tfaw- tfaa
tl mg.l p thla country. -
? r c . ( i n n ni l 'u d M ral l M I m* ml or- ma.d I l _. T hi rlbrn
S r i n, from i K k n ba.l i I d -Uon u d pbllMopUr doptrU nuU
hrl rbt- rd i v o u i - u d ^ uU i "' ' >
l tb > turbu. H. i i sod - tbi 0ti n* b.ck u> i b.i m IIo b bit
M l I t n l l u r v l n * T t r i l l i In Ml-----(0|d r . * I I . i i , m i , rul t.l aed i d b i f o l f l ' * ' 1 * 1 . " ! 1
I tbi pool tlbo tm l u l l >. l dtl cl l y u d nl b.r tbl dl l J i . j tuD, ,, gBod rmpll-- l b. l m- . mtmbir ui brtni (urti j o ISXTU ' UidoI k or an] of I A 'oi di i f . W " " I K tl u T I u b . - m* m . I r ^ i a S S l ^ k I
.. .................................. .. 1- - - - - - ~ d"w
- ~r ww l . * 1* n u . - - i . i i u ^jertrtr^.mni>9r i ^ ^ C = , roilllel1er_<1^ <lol,,^15lMu
i n t>f aanto#i M B i , l l l l i d i f
j rj - dj sj trX dj K l l k p u Tpy- by-fol iowfng.aharaaoaior. Uiftjy.BlCL naraloi
U i W tl M l l oi U m n ^M ^. --------^tf ay^B tl P ntmtrri-r- " m r l narrfaa-M ta'frf hugn-boUwa (M dl ael e-wwa-auoh aa.atgbt. be
ad Mm roni d- up Bwockaaad--------l ^aej i la a' afiorC P^heoar wi th- a - H T to' 'hTV-^w fn A T t i i w------ f . un d f n^l f af ^ndB ao-^ai y, !- J
-Ufa faypflotiarc and blo. roid the ad, a big rnu-d face... _ i ni be our afco^f i rtT 'C i l tba nigh l rai d..'Y tuor'.-faer b ar tbaaw ^
BgUhy. a big. round body aod^vavy I tout - of our coa*pBMlflnr*fa1ofa at- not aj po.g tfaam Bait wea oneA-2enrtft^i rtw-tt>a OM I i farhl aword-
h u m no going book of tfha armi aed^l aia, Ha ta tfai nj lhrea (ended bM he Torch baarar and tha r ai |0 full U<wa waa aaotfaar. al am they v i m than wah good*
L rwij l i la tfaa myxttc j m n old and laJ ka regul ar New V eata^vfrgl n, pha lwal atfaar offl- though you would not ptrk a rtma
- ------------------la a kllohab.
- tad- a botila fal L Ql^
dl itnied watar aad a cob* of l l f ad:
" i T M w n f ti f ---- W W* pi >nmI
i R h a croei hla fara and a pair ed
placfaartAll tfaa flocaoeary airtBL
enoagh t a t at.
"When - I weal
*b I tOI to semira pormld-
*WalL wtam I r*ry*falB| _ . !
I m d1 _ I . Ahhad_ib_d fUaai_brotfaera
tairneQ * a Tfaa mat el ^Hi r^pe
ity eewaatfa-g treat
' T an pi* ad a prlaad jawal of Ifaa
y g g g g g g g g f a ^ wi n M U l n
'l-l-ae aal udeaL
I i n buoy with U a wfralma
___] ajkad Ma aama aad fa-
n t Ui
O W u'i - 1%m(ra * . M i l I bi
" i >
eaadf l tl N ]|A >eQaa.l ar|
tfaalr oflarthga. No o d* knaa what
tfae otfamw had,- T he lartema tngrw
dI anti wera 'bladed In tba orueJ bla
with Ifaa lump al line, wfalch faed
bn tealad with altria acid and
q^ra^iJ I y .wakgtied. t-fTbla 1 atlrred
with my Angara (or MtareJ mln-
utM. I might add I hi t I
wurobod my An#era In tha Brooaaa
Al cha proper nomret 1 etoppod
tl rrl ng end wttfa a peir of Dlodwra
Look from tfaa nruc|fala a hit o( yal
l owmetaJ tfaa traaamutad natal
art lab stood tfaa *rld tern aad waa
rod Id not m unti l 1111, and an 1
waited aad modled and Bttarf my
lalf'f'OF- ffra^WortnandnoarTAprll-l
]I \ l . l i J cdrnrUr area drawh up and
ilnad: anfl.the?Ordr_iPOk. I l l BlAt^
In 'fba* country wltre tfaa ragl a
liwpraeda I La wlngl. "
Al my l urrel U on wera p* r
mltll d to anter (he lacopl* proper,
artilch la thfl third room hark an
pu turl or1floor^.-Tha room i u
rfaaavlly c u r t a i n e d . T h e e m c f h l c
J oh * preeepL
wwila ha m tolMn| ma tfaaea
Inga tfa. Aalat al k ^al the l ai l nK -
f att cCbU faa beard.
L=rW*doB0t.dc anjrwendingbwT."_
^omlUT"^- bi t' i s* ar t-"
aLkode In lran< of tha 1tnd* raUjr
f u k fan alaotrlc hul h La]n>1da Che
bowL and When rti a enrrent ha
f o r c e d on Hffata o l M a r a l c c l c r
dhow. The eructtila fan a cdrcnlar
pan arooBd I ti rdga.
T i l l m Ailed with wfaal looked
pick np bite of new*. I t. la rather
dull to-day."
While Rath and Callahan were
br oath In| tha rumea of tfaa horn
ing I b md m af L^e oihas i nk al tfaa
raerm 1 allium Lha (-Iraleaa r<wl-
era oi f f mf ears. Koenig waa
ri ght U wea e dull day
Tfaa tDltrumant waa not ed-
J l mLed properly, an 8l**dnl KcaDl*
turfaad a tfa ^craw an e key
board erreaj o at end, what ta
my UDtmlnad eare, aounded like a
a a m e e 4 e e M >M i <
r a e t h
Tourist Jokes, From The Passing Show
While l a Madrid I fall tma a
ubCBnlain tehJ i Dial mi enefaea, bat
they dl dol bite me k eeau they
aer rattled.
Tfaa rhinooaraa wfakh 1 saw In
Chile had B r bMD to a foO1na
picture Miow. Thai la what mahoa
the rhtnn-*arUa
Tha canale al Vanina rmi l ed oaa
of a poll Del an aa both thru ugh
the ofly.
Ona day 1 my aj on the
ba ctjudd direct ma- Ma fold izm Uj
aak tha Cjgvrmaher an Che oowu,
u he knew ell the ropea.
L eeri ng the ^yfewtfaer bahrod u>
va abai a r m la Boollend Aj I
alighted rroen. tha boa 1 a
ticot T i l l i ng tfael bla llllJ a bo? h*d
feJ Ian orwboard. 1 J umped Into
the wetwr, kwatn to, tha lad and
h r a i f k t him a a l a j y a a b o r e H e m i c - '
ally i tnok fate to faie father and
aald: H w i e jonM ewe" Tha
Ua ef U natn 1 l nd far Ber
lin. Aj 1 etudf botany I ylalled
tha -lauwne aniuaJ park. Wbws
1 want to tfaa window la buy my
ticket af edmJ aiLaa 1 u > maa
with .aawanta-B cfalldraa.
Ha maid: Do 1 h**a lo boy
aati nteea tic beta for aavi otei o
chfldran aa 1am tfaa (atfaar ol tfaaaa
eevaataao chi la ran V
H a yon <hja*t have to taka them
ta Ad* the animal.^. WaM a min ala
mmJ TV trl aa B e eelmaJ a td *
Mf j ? h
SfISI
iisfcj
. ......................
stic' Temple Where Imperator Lewis-(Pormerly oLfeS. :I6)-Rerformedas_an -Alchemist- *
a e w r t l uf l l i . i N c i n l d n d
P d r k r c ; I > 11? d u M U l n p at
M U i VD Cl n 1e n t i t l e , W
n e d t h e m y i f t o a j I r u n i m u
h I j i n - a - c r u c i b l e , _ | f i b r e d
m ' j n l n i i l d e T f o U / l d r e v r a b t f -
u f i d J i ) i m p r t i j v d , b r l f i r t n u
t a i n M e a a j h a U n ' t o u t
noncy and bu nolblng to
r-*
a r e a t r a n g e g c l g ( - o n u n
T r - ~ P t g h i y a - a e a U .
Y o r k . 111! J c f J a i n L h a l r o o t p a r -
l o r M e a n d T h o r ' K i l n a j a h t o . ' f l a o -
r o i a r j - G e n e r a i ; M t a t k t o t e c k a t
r o l l t o p d e a i k e . K l l m a l e h l o l a a
p r l n U ) f b y I f f l d f l , L e l | l o | o
t o h i m - w i t h - a D - o o c n e J a l i A ] J o h a n d
I n l h a l w a y t t e j b a c a m a a c -
quaIntod,
T r a i l e d i t t h e t a f l i p l a c B W < k 1i i * *
d a y M r J i o t h , w h o l a i t u d o n t
p r ^ h l B T a a l j T i M a a , ' e ^ x i k i p . 1 C a l l *
b a n ^ w h i ^ i i c a i e i p l o r a d - a f l * . B * 7 & * - -
L I a n l a n k n l t f t i r o e , * l l * l f l f l r
J . T wt t ^. Ti .eufli . aad.<l
golnm-on full oi mywtlclara u#
pungent aroma of EaaLcrn "Will you he good inough, Mr.
Studenta of the occult,-el ad-----ttw l r,1*-! ei k* drL'U>tai l ua ]oat bow
***** ol the Rcaaacruclaa r6u do I ke aleherej atunt by h!cb
L r a- - J - ^i ^M - .B - ai i n n rtUld'odda and.endi Id (9
ylng tn get ranj l la In aal------f o i d f . *
i r o t f l e l t y e n d o t h a r t h l n g i _ : g | u n l | , g o o d / 1 f e p W L h a I m -
l a g - a b f i r M o e t f l r . tl l f L j yi ri i i V y^atop^'V ow^td. f oagl p'rm*m
H * r a n c l < * n t r ' t i f r * ( T t " - t a r w a ^ n a y b e t r o i a - o r t e g s . - b * * t - w e
o c r a - e n d o i h c r a o f " l b * a d a a n c e d
1o r d e r - t o - L h a a n m h i l . . o t ; t h i r t y
a a v m , l - < J H i * a f * * d - * * a d d r a a a * e j -
10g I b a t f o r t b a f l r a t t l a i i 1b A n o
l e a 1 w o u l d d a n u n i l n t i t b a a # o r # t
S r i H s m i o l | r a n a m u t a t i o n
> ' F o r h u n d r r d a ot j r a a r a t h a
f c l d c r D r o t b i r a a l o u r o r d e r I n
E g y p t a o i k N i a t Lhalr o r u d b l M , ,
a n d w r w a t l a d w i t h L h a p r a b l a t n a o f
- a l e h a c n y t n a n a J U t a p L t o - a p p l y t b a
r a a x J a m e o i a J . l o w * ? o f . u r _ p h t t o * * - .
plry and gclanoa Al l aat U>a> auo-
- - - - - 4*4 i n . r r * * * ~ . . . . . . . f t a , I D * m i m i d n u t r
m a l a r i a l p l a n a . ' T b a m e r e b a r * o f
o u r F o u r t h D a g r e a b e i n g t b a m o a t
a d i a a c o d , i - 4* l L L i j f l c a J l t o m e h a
l h a d * m 0o j t r a l l e a l o r t b a b r a t
I I f r p Q P t h i l c o u n t r y ,
found 10 b a tri fl e farwrlir than
t b a t i n t K t r i o a a p r c a a n L n w
U . . - I w | g h l a d d - d u i ^ r t i i f a . l a ~ B f l '
money In mahtuf gold that-way.
Too g a t o n l y a l i t t l e h i t t o r a J I
y o c f p a J n a . "
t u ar good*lha
m a J i t u H i r o l d T I e a k e d
t r a j w a o u d f r o m otbi r m a t
ala," aald Lew la, maki ag a elate-
n t l n e t a a d o f a r a p l j , f a t h a
furwoL of fold. . ^0". aW>ui tba
d a r r I t H i o a l a h l l a i v a d W a y b a c k
o f T b u t m o B O I f l
who waa iba bDabahd.o( lTlj7 ^Tba
Gbwllak In CanLrai Park, ona ol Ik a
two ar*elad in E f j pt b| Tbutmoae
i n. and fal tfl drd to'al and aotaa
day i n Lho country wbari tb^aagl a
J ika powdarwd dried lewvaa.
___KHmaJ ahto atappod I nto a cloawC
Old, rwtaratnw with i M U a Doored.
ton a ol l L a occtot| I nto Lha pan
and touched a matoh to I t. I n-
n. dlately Lha tampla waa lUlad
-----with a n odor I lk* a nombtantJ ou ot
c a y e n n e p e o o # r m y m f a , f w a c t m a r
j e r r a m , U r w t l n t h a n d o t b l f I b l t L t a ,
r s a ~ l h M i n t o 6k W ^ r p * a J f r o m - t h a
p a n a p r a a d o a t o r * r c a r k a * d i a n a
f o r m a t ~ t B v t k l i t f a 4 w k t a l U | ,
t d ' t a l b * " o a f M B S - * a d * ^ d l * p d D a d ^
u d i o f f l b a d * r k n e a a
T 3U e T t * l t f -
H i g h S c h o o l o f C a m n a n c e b * i 1
oenmuBleating *fcajb*li raanll to
^ a U f r i t D d i n _ _ _ i l a n u a L ; T r a i n i n g .
diekid dfln tha iMrtr
T F a T m r
K o c r i l f l o a a n o t t h a o n l y a t i * d o i
a t b l a L a a k . T h a i a l i > n a a i r a g l
o f a d a u B ^ n u a n d w o m a n a t
w o r k . I t l a t i ' t a b a o l u t f l y ' n e C O a i i f y
t h a t t h a y i l l w e a r r a b r a . b u t n u x t
o l d b o B ' d a . T h d l f l e r n t ' d e g r * r *
h a v a d l f l a r c n t r o b e a a o m t r * t l a n d
- d t b a r a . b l u i ; . w h l t * . _ i _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
1- t T b a c b a m l o a i l a b o r a t o r y l a
h e o k o l t b a L e m p l a . i n w b a t t a * d ( a
- t b a . h u l l a g a - p a n t r v h e t r r i j | L , a
diva a damonatration of iraoamui*
tton. KolloW^ng iba long . aatab-__
liabnd dutaMn,'yigJ lXjpeh tnemlra
wti tr[ t t i IT T m t - t t c-mw" m*terlaJ -l*-*
him are to kaep Lhalr I ndividual
aharaa of thi i k . i L No one I ndi
vidual knoi a tha ml i tura, hu| eol-
I ftotlreJ y they own the- f ori nul a^l n-
(h( avant of tba paaclng al Iba ]m
p*Tator tha. fl ftM n_ J naj _cwie_|n*>
geLhcr tbre yeera thereafter and
repeat tha ceremony.
P r o b a b l / - I b a n a i r " f i m o L l o n - ^ i f ' -
:
J
d o ' T C ^ e t n m o I T a V e ' w t n g i ^ f m w l a tJ a l i o r t _ ] p a h i f i n w i t h "
p d j h c a d , b i g r o u n d l a c e . _ _ l u g t > n " 5u r " a t v o u J d ' e H r ' O n I h a n l p f i i -
o u n d b o d y a n d v e r y a t o u t c f o u r c o p v a c a t i o n , - * h l o h ! a t
i d j e g a . M f l l a | h | r t j l b r & a t o o d a d b y ^ l l i e T o r c h b e a r e r a n d t b a
I d a j ] d t a J k a r a g u U r N a w V e a t * l y V ^ t 1n , t h e t w e l v e o t h e r o f f )
/
1 ! ~ E T i r t f T ? w i r T * d S ^ o f f i f t e e n t ~ > a p r * l d J J U F l B j a / _ b e * r e t b g _ n * r
m e m b e r * t o t r i a l a o e r t e l n l o g r a 1 t m h b c ot e **1 o l t r t o r f l e r a l f a t )
d l n a t a n d I _ m a y u i L b a t t b e e e I n - a a m a n y o t l w r a a t b e e U o a n d U n a a *
g r f r d l B * e ^ j j g h L ' h * c r u c j a l T H M r
f o u n d f r i ~ a a l * - j
{ r * M & o t * b / a v a r y t i l l e n d a e r a l g t t
f l j r u r a , g w r b e d f r o m B a n k t o h e a l a i n
a b r i g h t - r e d - g e r m a B t - * w d - t o p p * d . .
w l L b a 4u r b u i . H e a l e o d a d t h e
c u r t a i n e d w i n d o w b e f o r e I
' t r t e i n n g d i * L
l a p e r a l a i 4a w i t * d . i & _ _ _ T h e r t b r a -
. t i e d a n d p h i l o s o p h y d e p a r t n e a t e
* r I n w n o t b e r p a r t o f t b a b u i l d i n g .
O w H l n g b a c k t n t h a t y e l l o w b i t
- o t m a u l t h a t I b a I m p e r a t o r M i d . . ,
b e b a d U s s s a U H L J t C A P l d
' r a a l l m p 0r t a n c V t h S b f I d r t ~
b e t l b a o h r | a t B l n g o t ^ U k C a K a r l e
C r a m w e l l l e . d a l e o f t i l l
e r r e m f l n y h a i n o t b r e a H i e d , b u t .
t h e G r a n d L o d g e w i l l b p r e a e n i
K a r l C r o m w e l l l a t b a y o u a g e e t - o f
t h f l . 1r o p e r a t o r e t h r a a c h i l d r e n
T t o l d l a k t 8i > e w t l l a b w a i - a a |
r ^ i n , > 1I | W f e w . t h M * r - w i w - ^ M n m * / ' w i t k i i r i i r n ? B ^5
e l o i w i i p a n g t h e m , f l a i l w a a i a - A c * j L o o n r " D l i t b a O b e l 1a k r h l * W 0r d
r o e a I n f u l l b l o o m w a a a n o L h a r , a l L b a t t o a y w e r e t h e r e w a h r o o d
T l i y I a a k w k a t y o w * r e d o l B j '
- - - - - 1_ H \ n n l r * 4. _ a n d . i k e . B e w r e ^ f u m e d
wllli M thorl ty that all enjgei Uana
tbi t I t ni ght be M at to the l ahora
ratewe~y B i n n u j tnt
e i A m l B a i l O B o r w a B B i e d w i l l - A a
_ _ _ . < : _ _
w o u l i n o t p t / h a . r o s e . 1b o u g h y o u
I n * b l t o b e n
_ _ _ _ t t d - b o 4i l e ^ f n a _ L
d t a t i l i a d mmtMt mtl A a C u b a at J b c ,
w t i h a e n o i b l a , f i r e e n d * p a i r **
p i o c h e r e *11 t i a n w * w a n o u t l t
- - f ' W e l i r w b a w f t h l i | m
1. aah tl fua* _ brtb i n
aiMBgh for ana.
" W h a n - 1 w e n t
I f l 1K H t o n e e n r e p w r a i i e
75and n t* oJ iF~I I ~ThU *
c o u l d n o t k a w a i t ] 1111, a n d a o I
-HI a* a el*
I a a h u a y w i t h L h a w l r a l M a . "
_ _ I w a k w d h t a a a n a a a n d h e l e t l
- w a r H a r r y K o e n i g , . * . f i a t U l j
e l o r t e l d i B . H * w e d U w * r t ' _ i l
Oetafl 'i
'1-1iM 1M .
tu mod floet T^Tha n a t a l SHU'-bi
- b e p f t a - t k a B l ^ l i e a a a a l h I
' Temple ad h prtaed J ewel of the
ardor , V .
* The I mpentM will not ageJ n
Pt-
TriaUawJ i ^N aa. K
l h a l r o f l a r t s g n - M a o n a k n e w w h a t
waited and atwdlad and hl tat my*
j ' U f f a r B e ' e n r k r u a - i i a - a p r i H r
j |U , tbf A artar waa dr*art up and
Ua Bjan* =*taswd: angri hFi
In ^lb a*- country -wlimra tba eagi*
tka etbwi ted.T bi >arl nca tngrw gptwada I Lawln^g,*
d i e s L a w a r e V U * < d i n t%* a r u c l U e
w i t h t h e lamp o f l i n e , w h i c h h a d
b e e n l e a l a d w i t h n l t H e a c i d a n d
y T | i j | j . w a l g b a d r f f b l a I a t f r r e d
w t t f c ' m y f l o g e r a f o r * v a r m J m I n - ^
0L a a , a n d 1 Q 31g b t a d d t h i t I
* o o r a b d m y & n # * r a I f l t b a p r a o e a a .
A t f r a p r c j x w m o m e n t 1 M o c i > w d
t l r r t n g . a n d w i t h a p a i r o l p i n n e r *
t o o k tram t b a c r u c i b l e a f a H o f y e l -
I t r W m a t a J L h a I r u a n l i i L M l m a t a J
a r t ] l o b a t n n d t b a a c i d t a M a n d w a e
At my aunwatJ flfi wg ware p^r-
mlUad to enter Iba Lentpla proper,
wtilcb la the third room bach on
fee sartor floor., Tha room a*a
J o b
VTMJa ha wae Cwlilng Me thaw*
U l an LA* tai nt el kk, of I ka l i i ti o-
t u e a l e o n l d A a b e a r d .
_ _ L ^ r W d T d A l f i t d d A & j e e a d l u t e m , -
a*J d ^oeoU r^mt^we tel - i r T i i i
Blok up k l u af new*. IL la rai har
dol l to-day,
While Roth and CaJ I aban war*
brae thing the fuxnae of tha-Anrw-
Ing luewaae af Uja ofrar end of tha
room ] alltowfl Lbe iwjfeleaa rwdllf*
ra M at wy eara KoesJ g wad
ri ght I t wae * dull day.
The i natrumaat wae act ad
justed prooarly, Student Koenig
turted a ttumi^crew an a key
board arraajeaawi t and, what to
my untrai ned aan, aounded I lka a
I k a a v l l y c u r t a i n e d T & a e r u c f b l a
l W r . i l I n f r o b t a l t b a l m p e r a t o r a
d M k . A n i l e c b l c b u l b l e j n a l d a ( b e
h o w l , a n d w h e n f r a e n r v a n t l a
L m - c td n o l i g h t * o i e e f e r a l e n l o n
d h o w , T h a n - u e t b l a t e a * o l r c o l a r
0*0 a r o u n d I t a m ! | t
T h l i w a d f i l l e d w i t h w b a t l o o k e d
^nN4atL I * H<a* t >aM M M H H i aM M I I H M A
Tourist Jokes, From The Passing Show
l E T C i m * f r o m t h e
c i T o u c h e d *
CrucibU Whin Thor
to IUgj: ViWfiM
W k l l i ! K a M C I f a l l
m a m l a J n t a b s a n e a t at a n a h M . b a t
t h e y d i d n l b f t e m a b * o * o a e t h e y
a r c r a d l a d -
T f c r h l a o e a m a w h i c h 1 f l a w I *
C h l l a h e a d n e v e r v - l a ' a m o v i n g
D l C t a r * at aa . T h a i l a M i l E D i b w e
t b a r A L u o M r t o o * . J
T b a C a n a l s o f V a n t e a r w m l n d e e e
O f g p o U & c l a n a d b o t h ge L h r a a t b
t b a o f t y .
O n a B a y 1 l * i w a y w * y o w t h e
h a c o u d d d t r w m m a ! H e t o l d d m t o
a a k t h e t l i i r n u i i 1 o n t h a n o m a r ,
a a b a k n a w a J I t h i r o p a e ,
L eaving the jn ewthat bob tud 11
| we ahoi o**r to Bootlend. Aj I
aJ tlbtwd from the tx*ed 1 beard
I Ac<A ^ r l l l D l U l U b l a l l U l a b a , b u l
| f a l l e n a r a t o a r d . I J u m p e d i n t o
t D a w a t e r , t e a m t o . t h e 1*4 e n d
bra* f t* khn aaiely eater* Hami t-
60 B u J i r u n M i i i I l e f t f o r B a r *
I h L A j 1 a i u d y b o f * n y I v l a l t a d
* > f a m i n e e n l m e j p a r k . W b e *
J w a n t t o t h a w i n d o w 10 b u y m y
t k k i l o f a d m l a a L o n ] a a w a m e n
W i t h . a a v A e t n a a e f a l l d r e * .
_ _ H e >*141 " H o I h a v e t * b u y
a e e e n t a a n t l c k e t a f o r a a m t i a c
c h i l d n n a a j a m t h a U t k e r o f t k e a a
a a r a n t a g n c h i l e r w u f *
IF YOU WANT T
WheretoSpendf ou
or Read What Your F
^^^elAlrea'dyJpn: aeaiior
THIS. IS THE SE
NEW Y011K, SUNDAY.. JULY a. H>H-

9 9
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p<Vj------The Hei>Htv-Ikpartmcnt4Jrgc^.Evcvfaf>dy._fo_Sccome_Famaiar WHh the Water___/g ^ DrUWJ l fO T t
. Thh Week and Lwm How to .Swim:Thc, .\rti.* Others aFcvTSu&gtition^ ts^CJ SeCtlOJl
T V o T PO M t
( DONT YqOl u CE1
M^'ORTHlNi^oSTUMC)-
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SPLASH -
SPLASHING J
AP^RT MCHT SPt*iH
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Jp l AJH
V : r r u p > v
THE WORLD, New York, Sunday, July 2, 1916
VISITING THE MYSTIC TEMPLE WHERE IMPERATOR LEWIS
(FORMERLY OF P.S. 16) PERFORMED AS AN ALCHEMIST.
As the June convocation of the supreme Council of the Ancient and Mystical
Order Rosae Crucis, held in the back parlor of the dwelling at No. 70 West Eighty-
seventh Street, which is fitted up as a temple. H. Spencer Lewis. Imperator of the
Order, performed the mystical transmutation ceremony. He placed fifteen
ingredients in a crucible, stirred them with his fingers and at the end of eighteen
minutes withdrew a bit of yellow metal. Everybody present was profoundly
impressed, believing he had produced a piece o f gold.
By Charles Welton
It will surprise some of the boys who were in Principal John Burke's graduating
class in P.S. 16a dozen or so years ago to learn that "Fat" Lewis, as some of them
used to call him, is now a high muck-a-muck in the occult business and aGrand
Master General and Imperator. It may also surprise some of the people who ten
years ago worked with Lewis in the Psychic Investigating League and helped him
round up spooks and experiment with hypnotism and telepathy.
But there's no going back of the words. Lewis is in the mystic line for fair. He
says he isn't out to make money and has nothing to sell.
There are strange goings-on at No.70 west Eighty-seventh Street - goings-on full
of mysticism and the pungent aroma of Eastern spices. Students of the occult, clad
in the robes of the Rosaecrucian Order, are as busy as an alarm o'clock trying to get
results in science, electricity and other things by following wheresoever the
symbols of the ancients direct.
Lewis is ashort person, with abig, round head, a big round face, abig, round
body and avery stouts arms and legs. He is thirty-three years old and talks
regular New York. His office is in the front parlor. He and Thor Kiimalehto,
Secretary General, sit back to back at rolltop desks, Kiimalehto is a printer by
trade, Lewis used to go to himwith an occasional job and in that way they became
acquainted.
I called at the temple on Wednesday. Mr.Roth, who is astudent of hieroglyphics,
and Mr. Callahan, who once explored an Egyptian tomb with me, went along.
Two glad hands were extended to us.
"Will you be good enough, Mr. Lewis," I asked, "to tell us just how you do the
alchemy stunt by which you transmute odds and ends into gold?"
"Stunt is good," replied the lmperator. "Now, to begin remember we may be nuts
or bugs, but we don't pretend to have wings growing on our shoulders. On the
night of our convocation, which was attended by Torch-bearer and the Vestal
Virgin, the twelve other officers and others of the advanced order to the number of
thirty seven, 1delivered an address saying that for the first time in America 1would
demonstrate the secret process of transmutation.
"For hundreds of years the Elder Brothers of our order in Egypt worked at their
crucibles and wrestled with the problems of alchemy in an attempt to apply the
fundamental laws of our philosophy and science. At last they succeeded in
transmutation on the material plane. The members of the Fourth Degree being the
most advanced, I felt the call to make the demonstration for the first time in this
country.
"1had directed each of fifteen members to bring a certain ingredient, and I may
say that these ingredients were such as might be found in any kitchen - say,
saleratus, ginger, etc., but these were not among them. Salt was one. A rose in full
bloom was another, although you would not pick a rose in a kitchen.
"Then we had a bottle full of distilled water and a cube of zinc. As accessories,
we were provided with acrucible, fire and a pair of pinchers - all the necessary
outfit.
"Well, when everything was ready 1asked the fifteen brothers and sisters to come
forward with their offerings. No one knew what the others had. The various
ingredients were plated in the crucible with the lump of zinc, which had been
tested with nitric acid and carefully weighted. This I stirred with my fingers for
several minutes and 1might add that I scorched my fingers in the process. At the
proper moment 1stopped stirring, and with apair of pincers took fromthe crucible
a bit of yellow metal - the transmuted metal which stood the acid test and was
found to be atrifle heavier than the zinc. Every one present saw it. 1might add that
there is no money in making gold that way. You get only a little bit for
all your pains."
"Was it the regular goods - the real stuff - gold?" 1asked.
"Gold transmuted fromother metals," said Lewis, making astatement instead of
a reply, "is the purest of gold. Now about the order. It was established way back in
the dynasty of Thutmose III, who was the husband of Isis. The obelisk in Central
Park, one of the two erected in Egypt by Thutmose 111, and intended to stand some
day in 'the country where the eagle spreads its wings, bears the cartouche or seal of
the order as well as many other authentic and Rosaecrucian signs.
I told Lewis that, while I was not familiar with all the symbols and cartoons on
the obelisk, his word that they were there was good enough for me.
"When 1went to Toulouse, France, in 1909 to secure permission to found the
order in this country, 1was informed that it soul be not until 1915, and so I waited
and studied and fitted myself for the work, and on April 1, 1915, the charter was
drawn up and signed, and the order took its place in the country where the
eagle spreads its wings."
At my suggestion we were permitted to enter the temple proper, which is the
third room back on the parlor floor The room was heavily curtained. The crucible
stands in front of the Imperator's desk. An electric bulb is inside the bowl, and
when the current is turned on lights of several colors show. The crucible has a
circular pan around its edge.
This was filled with what looked like powdered dried leaves.
Kiimalehto stepped into acloset, and, returning with a bottle, pour some of its
contents into the pan and touched a match to it. Immediately the temple was
filled with an odor like acombination of cayenne pepper, myrrh, sweet marjoram,
terebinth and other things.
The thick smoke rose fromthe pan, spread out over our heads and formed in a
thin cloud which floated to the ceiling and dispelled some of the darkness.
There was then disclosed the presence of a very tall and straight figure, garbed
fromneck to heels in abright red garment and topped with a turban. He stood at
the curtained window before an electrician's desk.
'May I ask what you are doingn" I inquired, and the figure turned and looked at
me through big. round glasses
"I amastudent," he replied, "and 1ambusy with the wireless."
I asked his name and he said he was Harry Koenig, a theatrical electrician. He
used to work at Cohan's Theatre and also at the Winter Garden, but was out of
a job at present.
While he was telling me these things the faint click of the instrument could be
heard.
"We do not do any sending here," said Koenig, "but we cut in and pick up bits of
news. It is rather dull to-day."
While Roth and Callahan were breathing the fumes of the burning incense at the
other end of the room I slipped the wireless receivers over my ears. Koenig
was right. It was a dull day.
The instrument was not adjusted properly, so student Koenig turned a
thumbscrew on a keyboard arrangement and, what to my untrained ears, sounded
like aHigh School of Commerce boy communicating a baseball result to a friend
in aManual Training, clicked down the wire.
Koenig was not the only student at his task. There is an average of dozen men
and women - at work. It isn't absolutely necessary that they all wear robes, but
most of them do. The different degrees have different robes - some red and others
blue or white.
The chemical laboratory is just back of the temple, in what used to be the butler s
pantry before the Imperator moved in. The vibration and philosophy departments
are in another part of the building.
Getting back to that yellow bit of metal that the Imperator said he had
transmuted, it can be said with authority that all suggestions that it might be sent to
the laboratory of Columbia University for examination or assayed will be turned
down The metal will be kept in the Eighty seventh Street Temple as a prized jewel
of the order.
The Imperator will not again give ademonstration of transmutation. Following
the long established custom, the fifteen members who delivered the raw material to
him are to keep their individual shares of the secret. No one individual knows the
mixture, but collectively they own the formula. In the event of the passing of the
Imperator the fifteen may come together three years thereafter and repeat the
ceremony.
Probably the next function of real importance in the temple will be the
christening of little Earle Cromwell Lewis. The date of this ceremony has not been
fixed, but the Grand Lodge will be present. Earle Cromwell is the youngest of the
Imperator's three children.
I
NEW ROSAE CRUCIS LODGE
A H i i n u mc r i H Mi l Is i n : n l " l v T h n r
Ki l n i i i U11111, i i n t i l n f t i n t
Ma it I m 11 a II 111 *I :: I . I l l . i l ;i n o w | ml ur > n f
Mi l 1 l l n s i i " I 'l i n- i s . 11111 n f t i l l 1 n | i | "Ht n f
f i i i t i ' i ' i i i i l ni ' r. u i i l / . ; i t i ni i M. i s h i Miti l i i I m
i , s I j i Ii | i mIh >i | h i Hi n i i U h n. A i M' i i n l l m; t o
HU1 nl l l i ' l i i l f i n - p h i 11h f u r t l i o n i W
l >r; i i k Ii i n i ' u i l l u i n l i , i \ \ i i y . T h " n p j " r .
it Is s i i i i i - i l , Ii i i . t i i i i n v i m i n l i r i ' H i l l
l l r n n k l y f i , i t l i m i t u t l i i ' i i i h i ' i i u i -'i m m i -
l l "| ' n f 11| i 111111<111 Ml l t n l l H It l.s i > \ -
Ji nrt i 11 f l l i l l Hl ". V w i l l t i l l l " Ji l l n i ' l i v "
p i n t 111 i l l " v i i l i i t i m i n f i l l " I m l g "
I 'l l " nl l l i 'l i i l f l l tl l l " n f 111" n p l ' T l:
A i . i i *nI i i ml . M\ . s i n : i l i ri l *, r, U i i h j i m
<*1111 >S l l III t i l l ' l m; | s i n | III" n t f | " | j i | s
n f t i l " nl ' HII 11i / l l I | n | | | | " | ' " t l l l l l | t | H 111"
nl / l "Nl n f Ji l l "Xi . Hl i l W, 11 il ( " Mi l l l "K. l l
l l l | l l l h " l "<l l l l l l n i m it - III*-II11<*!':< Il l t i l "
B i i i i s h l i n n i i ' l i I / n r i l l ' M\ \ ; i i ' i l ) i u l w " i -
L. Vl I nl l , ti l l * it 111 t i n t*. Wi l l i Wi l l i " I'll l| s l i l -
" i i i h l y i n pni l . H" nf Hu* ni *i | " r. It ; i "-
r i ' p l K \ v n 111" 11 i i i i n i i i " i i i l i " r s l i i p n i i f l
p i - r i n l l H t l i i ' i n In I ml i l ni l i "". It Ih
l l " l | " V" l | H i l l l l l l l l i y 111 n 111\ | V11 Wnl l l OI I ,
i l i ' l i V" III I III I " l l l l l I "I l l ' I i ' S. Wi l l Jnl l l
II I" I n d i ; " wi l l ' l l i t "i 11l l " M i l i l n l i o l n R
l i o n* .
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Brooklyn, New Y ork
August 22, 1916
Page 3
I hc Bay Book
Chicago, Illinois
September IS, 1916
Page 32
You can tall it in a mi nut a
That Or Winter's on the way.
P. S So summer. But the for
mer is coming and the latter going.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
31t ward branch Public Owner
ship leagu' meet* tonigh* and every
following Friday at f>904 t>. Morgan.
Members urged to attend.
Northwest Side Y. P. S. L. meets
" T W o r ^ r u ^ v o m e r ^ n v i T E I ^ ^ ^ f o a l t ?
crucian lecture by H. Spencer Lewis,
supreme grand master of the Order
of Rosa Cru-ils in America, to b* held
In Auditorium recital hail. 131 S Wa
bash av.. tonignt.
1917
The Washington Herald
Washington, District of Columbia
Saturday, J anuary 13, 1917
Page 2
M Y S T I C R O S I C R U C I A N S
T O C O L O N I Z E W Y O M I N G
-------------- . 1
Anci ent Or der Dat i ng from 1540 B. C |
Start* Settlement.
pwu. to TV* Wwfiiri' Ratild.
M onr-'roft. W mi J .-<n I 2- ' Th
rrueti i na r* pl annl nr i n l orad* and nl - |
ont** V-->rfhr**t. **n Wvnml rA "
I t pti untj a Ifk*' h hj l l )tl n. but it |
l nt I* m* rl y mrana that about nf tj r j
mmhf r* ol h* or.1* r of Ko*lcT'r1 *t afcld
by i cf mtH'm to b* the *<wr t my- |
, rto orrsni M M un i n fh# worl d, haw* **
ri vM h*r* an !h- advui rt* mart! of a
I l * rce body of col oni al s
Th*} rt*'# u h nf artwaxi taf'* of l h* M*Y-
I acr* hnntpal f H l aw to aatahl l ah ham-
sal ve* i n thi s e ~M n n of th* country.
l n r tl . - , i o-opef-at|Te methods wi l l ha
fal l ow *-d i n fbi- devel opment of fh col - I
i nr>y.
T he s_nl ! an t and myi U order t sai d
* t hnv* establ i shed in E rvpt in th*
, *!** of Tti otmn* . l:*4n B <"* * nd dornt*.*] \
> the a? dv of phi ! ^opb) . sci ence ant]
I f trt - a.- wtl l a rel i gi on I t h* a
i ,mhN hi t, ,.f p no nry an,] hut I ncl uded
a "tv-- wn*ld* tna* trr minds- such a* |
l * rd Hsif'ifi and Bul t** r l .yttnn. Ii cl ai m* (
. ....... - * IrrjMfV know led r* which la
r" v *n members
Fifty Members of Oldest Mystic
Organization in World A r
rive at Moorcroft.
MOORCROFT, WYO., Jan. 13.
i "The Rosicrucians are planning to in
vade and colonize northeastern Wyo
ming.
It sounds like a war bulletin, but it i
isn't. It merely means that about.
fifty members of the order of Rosi-
crucis, said by members to be the |
oldest secret mystic organization in
the world, have arrived here as the !
advance guard of a large body o f ,
colonists.
They are taking advantage of the
640-acre homestead law to eftabUA
themselves in this section of the
country. Practical co-operative meth
ods will be followed in the develop
ment of the colony.
The ancient and mystic order is j
said to have been established in j
Egypt in the reign of Thotmos, 1540 I
B. C., and devoted to the study of
philosophy, science and the arts, as
well as religion. It has a member-;
ship of 6,000,000, including some of
the worlds master minds, such as
Lord Bacon and Bulwer Lytton. It
claims to possess scientific knowledge
which is revealed only to members, i
The Morning New Bernian
New Bern. North Carolina
Sunday. J anuary 14, 1917
Page 7
MYSTIC ROS1CRUCIANS TO COL
ONIZE Wy o mi n g .
Moofcroft, V yo., J nn. 17."The lton-
(uruclnn* ate pl anni ng to J nvado mid
colonIxo northeastern Wyoming." _
K round3 ilka a. nr bul leti n, but It
I sn't I t merely means that ni>oul fifty
member*, ,pf Iho order of Hosl crj clu,
sai d by cumber* (o bo tho oldest secret
mysti c organi zati on I n the world, have
arri ved heira as tho advance guard of
u l arge body of colonist*,
i They are taki ng ndvur.tngo of the
four hundred and forty acre homestead I
J aw to establ ish themsel ves I n this sec
lion of the country. Practi cal co-oper
ati ve methods wilt be followed Id tho
dovcloprr.cnl of the colony.
Tho anci ent und niysllo order la said
1to havu been establ i shed In l&gypt In
j the reign of Thotmas, 1S41 li. C, uml
i devoted to the study of philosophy,
science and tho arts, as well as reli
gion. I t has a membershi p of sic mil
lion, I ncluding some of the world's
master minds, such as Lord nacoa and
I tul wtr l j ytton I t cl ai ms to possets
scientific knowledge which Is revealed j
oftly to members.
The Portsm outh Herald
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Wednesday, J anuary 17, 1917
Page 4
MY STI C R0S1CRUCI ANS
TO COLONI ZE WY OMI NG
Mmirerofe. \Vyr.. .Tan. 1*."The IJn<s-
'wnii'isins are (dnnniii;; to i nvade n*ul
rnl mi i /o nnrt Imnsi ern Wvimtii i;:.
It sounds l ike n war l ni ll cti n. hut it
i snt. H merel y moans that about I hty
moi nhets of*the order of Rosi rni ei nns.
mi id Ly members t ri ho the ol dest m'c-
ret mysti c #rir;tnixntion in (fie world,
have arri ved hero us thn advance "imi'd
of a I nris< body of colonists.
They are taki ng advantage of (ho
(idO-nere homestead l aw to establ i sh
themsel ves in t his soot ion of the eoun*
fry. I l aeti cn) eo-opei at ivc method?
will lie followed in the devel opment of
the colony.
'1he anci ent mid mysti c order is mi id
to have boon estnldi sl ied in Eirvpt in
the reijm of Tl mtmos. l.r>IO Ti. C.. mid
devoted to (lie study of phi l osphy.
science mid the arts, k well ns religion.
M bn- a membershi p of (*.(>00.000. in*
el udi ng some o f the worl ds master
minds. iie|i as Lord lhtcnn niul Khilwer
l .vtl oi i. 11 -lainis to possess seientifie
knowl edge whieli is reveal ed tml v to
*
mem hors.
The Evening Record
Greenville, Pennsylvania
Thursday, J anuary 18, 1917
Page 2
The Washington Post
Washington, District of Columbia
Sunday, J anuary 21,1917
Page 4
A Mystic Revival.
Word c o i t i ps from the far West that
the mystic order of the Roslcrucians Is
preparing to colonize in Wyoming on a
large scale. According to the report, an
advance guard of half a hundred of the
membership haB already arrived and will
be followed by many more. It is under
stood that they will adopt plain farming,
whatever may be their esoteric side Is
sues, and that practical cooperative ef
forts will be pursued in the development
of the colony
Perhaps the plain or garden variety of
the Roslcrucian will make as good a
farmer as any other. For reasons prob
ably connected with early reading of a
desultory nature, many may fail to Bee
how the role fits. The "Brethren of the
Rosy Cross are somehow invested by
those earlier impressions with midnight
and mystery, secret passwords, and lone
ly castles with trapdoors leading into
oubliettes. This impression has been
gained partly from veracious history, al
though in all accounts of the famous or
der the descent Into fiction Is not only
easy but pleasant. It was In "The Coun
tess of Rudolstadt and "Anne of Geler-
stein," If memory Is not faulty, that they
shone at their 6plendidest.
It may be that the declension of the
once mysterious society to the dead level
of agricultural pursuits has its own sig
nificant meanings. Its heyday was in the
times of despotism and the divine rights
of kings, times when bright minds could
not write what they thought, but were
The Washington Post
Washington. District of Columbia
Sunday, J anuary 21, 1917
Page 4
1 forced to bury in alleged treatises on al-
cheny the golden wisdom. Perhaps the
beet argument in favor of the Baconian
authorship of Shakespeares writings lies
in the suggestion that Bacon's promin-
ehce forbade his publicly fathering the
works that would mark him as an enemy
to the political systems of the times, so
that he foisted them on an obscure player,
just as in his Rosicrucian membership he
exchanged opinions with others of the
cult that could not have been expressed
openly.
But that day has passed, in free Amer
ica at least. Its last revival in modified
form may possibly be traced in the Ku
Kluk Klan. where the temporary exig
encies undoubtedly suggested the adop
tion of something Blmllar. in order that
and empire within an empire might carry
out its purposes. The Wyoming Rosicru-
cians in all likelihood will be to the broth
erhood that met in the dark forests, as
the monks of peaceful abbeys to the St.
Simeon Stylltes and fierce proselyting
Paphnutiuses of the days when the word
of a coming vengeance went out from the
Thebald in its pronouncement of doom on
a civilization already crumbling to Its fall.
preach at the morning service snd
I lev. J. Frederic Berg, D.D., in the eve
ning.
Society for I 'iililral Ciillum
0 < ; AN I /ATI ON MKl-ITI M i
ROSAECRUCIAN ORDER
OPKN TO Ti n: I' l ' Il MC.
Room .'2, .Iohnntii Muiklfng. 12 N t v l n s 3t.,
TuoMlfly Evening, February 1:71ii. 8 p.m.
t 24-3t #mtu
Spiritualist
Ppyehnlogienl Krifarrli Hoe. N. V., I n f . J 119
Wept HTtli *t, Sun., Mon.. Ttiur*.. 8; Sun., WK.
K p.nt. SiiUJirt Sunday: **N S|drlhiillm Ouug r-
o iipV* ChrUtpnwn Plipnompnal lrmo!i*tr.tttou*.t
Bi shop Fi
fhoersie of I.
n l etter to tl
vl cl nl ty cnlli
Mervl ce in tl
Tnyfituto for
ills the
copal rhurcl
i ng will be >
Messiah, (re
the Rev. T>r
at 4 o'cl ock
4. Si ngers fr<
Ral ei gh, N.
Lawrencevi tl
of the old i
Un i t ar i an
Rev. l)r. U
tentati ve of
make an ad
CHURCH OF THE SAVIOUR
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Brooklyn, New York
Saturday, February 24, 1917
Page 9
II' n I C i i i <u
<!* rn e m u r v * * n i i l l * " *<* >mI " I ' J s r f , ' ' Lf W * h
iihool exp<rl**nre. 3 *'* 11 -nJl <1
MusIruI In*lnii-tion.
DOSTAL
THE AMERICAN TENOR
___ A Singer of Songi
TALI EBEN MOROAN, Mgr.. 110 W. 4u, N T C
RKU(IOl\S NOTICES.
o i u ; a n l 7.a r ms me k t i n o
ROSAECRUCIAN ORDER
OPEN' 'I n 'I ME P I ' l l l . li'.
Room 2. Johnston HulM'ng, 1. Nvvlns 5?f.,
Tursdaj Erenlng, K*lruary J'lli, H p.ra.
t 24-31 pmt'i
DISSOLUTION NOTICES.
8TATB OF NKW YuRK i i FKR K " F TUP,
Rscr*'nry of Hint**. . This iPrt1rt<Htp lnPii*rl ,
In duplicate. h#*r*<hv tPat Tin? I'r^wr
Realty Iompanv. n Mnrl; corporation,
has flled In ihlN tfTn on ; 1 i N !.:?h flay of Wb
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Brooklyn, New York
Monday, February 26, 1917
Page 21
r e l i c ;tors n o t i c e s .
O H t ; A M 7. A TIO N* M E ItTI NO
ROSAECRUCIAN ORDER
OPEN TO THE It;UUC.
Romhi J obntton Building. U Nevln* Bt*
Eimlng, Februtry 27tb. 8 p.m.
24-11 ItHttl
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Brooklyn, New Y ork
Tuesday, February 27,1917
Page 15
ROSECRUCIANS CONVENE
TODAY JN PITTSfURQ
Pittsburg,*Pa., J uly 31,The first
convention of the Ancient end Mysti
cal Order of Rosecrucians ever held
in the United States began i ts .ses
sions here today. Delegates were pres
en from 25 states. H. Spencer Lewis,
of New York, i mperator ol the order
I n Amerio*. presided over the con
vention, which. will continue for .five
days.
The Evening Independent
St. Petersburg, Florida
Tuesday, J uly 31, 1917
Page I
--------1VEAB A nOSE"-------
Rosicrucians I n
J ournal Prai se
Hester School
Using Hester School as an example,
the spirit ot appreciation of schools
and their advantages, which has made
Oalilornla an outstanding State In
the educational world, is the subject
of the leading article published In the
current number of The Mystic Tri
angle. official organ of the Roslcru-
clan order.
The article, entitled The Impera-
tor's Monthly Message," written by
Dr. H. Spencer Lewis, Imperator of
the order, describes the custom main
tained at Hester School of keeping
fresh flowers In a vase under the
picture of M. R. Trace, former prin
cipal. This spirit of appreciation of
the services and friendship of a for
mer teacher, which persists after he
Is dead, Is symbolic of the attitude
of mind of California towards educa
tion, Dr. Lewis points out.
PRAISES SPIRIT
It Is the spirit of California that
creates this attitude of mind, and
when created In tho lives of children
It will last thew hola Ufa through,"
Dr. Lewis writes.
Another article in the same maga
zine discusses the widespread unfav
orable publicity which the Santa
Clara Valley received In connection
with the flood Ir. the Bantu Clara
River Basin Valley In Southern Cali
fornia.
The Mystic Triangle" Is widely
circulated among members of tho
Roslcruclan order who are scattered
throughout the United Slates. Pub
lication In the magazine of the true
facts in the case will be of value In
correcting the wrong Impression given
by misleading Southern California
publicity, it is pointed out today by
the local Chamber of Commerce,
---------- IVz a u a ItosK"------
The Evening Independent
St. Petersburg, Florida
Tuesday, July 31,1917
Page 1
#
UOSCBUCTAK S CONVENE
T ODA Y I N PI T T SB U R GH
PI TTSBURGH, P?u. J ul y 3 1 .T he
fi rst convention, of the A nci ent and
M ystical Order of RosecrucL ans ever
held in tlie United States began itn
sesi cns here* today. Del egates were
present from twenty-fi ve .states. H.
Spencer L ewis, cC New Y ork, impera**
tor of the order i n A merica, presi ded
over the conventi on, whi ch will con
ti nue f or five days.
T hl 3 organi zati on, which li as more
than 6 ,0 0 0 , 0 3 0 members in E urope and
the Ori ent, was not establ i shed in fbe
United Sl ates unti l two. years ago.
Duri ng the official sessi ons the fi rst
worki ng consti tuti on f or the A meri -j
can order will be adopted. I t Is
claimed for the R osecruci ans that the |
order antedates every other known
o r g a n i z a t i o n in the worl d by ninny
centuri es. I t is a secret order for
tho study and devel opment of anci ent
sci ences and arts and makes a f eature
i of educati onal work and sci enti fi c i n-
Ir e a l i s a t i o n .
Logansport Pharos-Reporter
Logansport, Indiana
Tuesday, J uly 31, 1917
Page 4
ROSECRUCIANS CONVENE
TOOAV IN PITTSBURGH
------ ,
tty luitrruu luJiui News {Service,
I'h., July Hi.Tim tifwt
I'-'ri k-! of tllu Alidulil il in I My a
I ini I Culler uf Hi i:;ni:ri):ii< ns rver hohl
In f l i t: Uiiilvil I Sains l i o^j i n I ts k d s -
sltm.i lino today. DelrpulOo wern
Irt:;nl fjuni twmif.v.fivp sralnv fI,
i i p t ' . n v r . r I a w K u T S i >w VorJi, l i i i f i er-
utot of llc order in Aftwrtesi pre.-dded
over tlia ctini*iiUn, which will coa-
Miiue five days.
Tli I ft urginl/.Hjunt. which Iiuh muro
(linn (1,000,000 mouiliora in L'urope BOtl
lllft Ofiutil, iMia nof established If)
Hie United yiule.t until (wo ycura ago.
Dmliwr lUo 4*ir<*:f.i| sessions flu*. flr.it
working fiimtitvUrin for the Aincrl*
can order V.II be miw te d- It I*
c.luirm:U for Mu riuvrcntcians the
order HnlcdHtr.-: every other known
organisation lit thy world by many
i:niiur(c. It In h xcicrot order for
the study and. development or ancient
5i:tcu<:Q>i a ml artn urnl makes a fea
ture of r<lil<:;iflni):il work and Udell-
lllii: luruAlljraiiiin.
Morning Herald
Hagerstown, Maryland
Wednesday, August 1, 1917
Page 2
1918
The Chicago Daily Tribune
Chicago, Illinois
Tuesday, J anuary 22, 1918
Page 19
OBITUARY.
MRS. MAY BANKS STACEY d.ed at
the reel ten re of her daughter. Mrs.
W. E. Muller. 1003 Davit street Evans
ton. yesterday, after a lingerie* illness
8h w m the mother of Col . Cromwel l
Btadey. senior instructor of I nfantry at
Port Sheridan. She was TO years old
sad was a lineal descendant of Oliver
Cromwell. She was the widow of Col.
M. If. Stacey and had traveled all over
the world.
The Chicago Daily Tribune
Chicago, Illinois
Tuesday, January 22,1918
Page 19
r OBITUAKY . I
e
MAY BANKS 8TACKY died at
of her daughter. Mrs.
WL Mt t l h r , IM t D i r t s street. Evens
tgPt yaatecdey. after a lingering illness
M g(ap the mother of Col. Cromwell
jfe d iy , MUbr instructor l infantry at
| p H ttiaridafi. She wee # years old
ntMini.il She was the widow of Col.
and had traveled all over
The New York Times
New York, New York
Tuesday, January 22,1918
Page 11
Obituary Mrs. May Banks Stacey
Mrs. May. Banks Stacey.
8pedal to The New York Times.
, CHICAGO* Jan. 21.Mrs. May Banka
StaCey, widow of Colonel M. H. Stacey,
died today a t the home of hep daugh
ter, Mfs.\ W. H. Muller, in Elvanston.
Site was 76 years old aiid the head of
the Kosi crucian Cult in American. Mrs.
Stacey was a native of Baltimore. She
claimed she and her two sons Were the
only living lineal descendehts of Oliver
Cromwell. One of her sons, Lieutenant
Cromwell Stacey, was senior instructor
at both Fort Sheridan officers* training
camp!. | ' ' :
At the time of her death Mrs. Stacey
wore a ring which is said to have been
made from a buckle on breeches which
were once worn by Cromwell. Mrs.
Staceys father was a distinguished
jurist. ;
The Sun
New York, New York
Tuesday, June 18, 1918
Page 14
[ D E T E C T I V E S r a i d
A M YSTI C A L C U L T
IT. Spcnror Lowis. Lender of
Rosarcrticlnn*. Arrested In
Lll> Langtry Home.
-_ _ *
ROND FRAUD CHARGED
He Is Said Aho to Have Sug
gested Means of Evad
ing Draft.
Three *<vr* or mnr mon find women
of varying agesthe majority of tha
mtn within the draft agowar eeated
Jaat night in parallel rowa In a room on
an upper floor of what wa* the old Idly
Langtry home, and be'ore that the Joale
Manpfletd repldcncr, at JO Wept Twen*
ty-thlrd aireet.
Any one who had ever been received
In that room when the Jersey Lily wa*
the chatelaine and who wai there taut
nkrht woulib have heen lmf>reaaed with
the change* that have taken place fine*.
They have heen peculiarly Imprewed
with the furnishings that were In evi
dence last night when Detective Joseph
Hubpo and four or Ave other men from
the District Attorneya olTlce entered.
But more abovt the detectlve later.

The Sun
New Y ork, New Y ork
Tuesday, J une 18,1918
Page 14
Aboat 0. o'clock sixty or seventy men.
ft id cmn were assembled In what was
onus Mt s . Langtry's drawing room. From
tlie front the old place would give the
Impression of a well appointed private
residence or club. The windows were
shaded and the iron fenoe that fronts
the place had just received a new coat
of paint. It was almost a place of dis*
tlnctlon and soldiers and sailors who
were strangers in Now York looked at
it while passing and inquired of one an
other what it was. An Inconspicuous
group or four or five men at a convenient'
comer were also watching the place, but
were not so Ignorant of its character. ,
Scene la Drowl sg Room.
Inside, in the drawing room, were as
sembled the members of the New York
branch of the so-called American
Rosicrueiana A- feeble light from
three candles on a triangular altar in

the centre of , the room wss the ont|r il
lumination. On a raised-.dlas at one
end, clad in all the robee of his office as
grand master and imperator of the order
in America, Brother H. Spencer Lewis.
F. R. C. whatever that means, was
giving the regular weekly lecture to the
members.
At the other end oft the room in the
sombre setting of a cheap black screen
stood a five foot wooden cross, with a
wreath of roses at its base. Ths fur
nishings were of the cheapest, and ths
floor jwaa uncovered except for a layer
of dust. An unprotected heating due
gaped in the middle of the floor; plaster
was hanging from the walls and celling, .
and the desk from which the Grand
Imperator was delivering his lecture on
the alchemy of life wss of the cheapest
unvarnished pine.
Across the entrance to the room that
once boasted of double sliding doors
there hung a cheap orange colored cur
tain, through which the light from the
three candles softly filtered to the hall
without. Downstairs on* or two mem-
The Sun
New York, New York
Tuesday, June 18,1918
Page 14
bera. to whom the ceremony i n the
rhom above wa no mystery, occupi ed
desk* mi d were l m*y goi ng through
card I ndex fl i es and cl assi f yi ng appl i *
cati ons f ar member mp
T hen the offi cer* came a ml I n n mo
ment the whnfe pl ate tv;i* in a tumul t.
Detecti ve ftuaao wi th lit* ai d* entered
and were on the top door bef ore the be
wi l dered Roaocruc .ana In thn busi ness
office knew what was comi ng off A mm
was pi eced at the door, and Detecti ve
Kusno. thrusti ng asi de the *heap orange
col ored *attai n* . stepped i nto the di ml y
l i ghted l odge room, wal ked to the dal e
and nonnuneed to the aeemhl ed mem
bers that everybody n the room a as un
der
T he I mperator attmt ted to expostu
l ate bl it w m tol d to keep qui rt and pre
pare to go to headquarter* . He qui ckl y
di gested hi msel f of I n* robe* of offt -e
whi l e hi * fol l ower a wondered what It
was till about and whi l e other detecti ve#
went to phone f or a pi i trul wagon.
Mglita a how Qaeer He* Be.
The (i rand I mi i eratoc w.i a m the mi dst
nf an I nterpretai i on and del i neati on of
name of the necul i my a tones I n the nn-
j ravel i ng of whi ch lie la regarded by hm
I fol l owers na a *e*r, when he wa r *o
' rudel y i nterrupted. When the l i ght*
I went up a queer scene greeted the of-
fii ** e Ti l e orsemhl cd men and
woi ne i wh<* )u*d been absorbi ng l lie
words of wiftdo.u f t cm the Hum >f the
eer presented i in iwld pi cture I n tee *!,-
l api dated room, that was not milk mir-nt
of 11a optc el aborate f urni shi ngs, but
whi ch showed unmi stakabl e evi dence* of
l ong negl ect.
Most nf tti e peopl e I n the room were
of German, f n-andi mi cl an <>r Hussi on ex
tracti on. Mt a? of the men were wi thi n
the draf t age, u.Hough there wi re * e\ .
era! ol der on on I n the gi oup Several
of the women were wel l tl rrssrd mi d
gave evi dent*! of edu.vi ti un and cul ture
Some of i hei n rcpl n-d to tit* quest tone nf
the detucti vt0 m an utunhi t l i kabl e fot-
igu ncreti ! Rut u.i of them expressed
tite greatcet concern m what was to be
fal l the Grand hnperato.
The Sun
New York, New York
Tuesday, June 18,1918
Page 14
After the detective* hud questioned
them end served several wifh subpoenas
two or three went to Pol We headquar
ters to await the arrival of Lewis.
Others went to a nearby restaurant to
await developments. Meantime with the
appearance of a police patrol wagon a
crowd of several thousand gathered in
Twenty-third street curious to know
whether it was Assistant District Attor
ney Jim 8m1th instituting a Monday
night raid, by way of change, or what
kind of an affair was being staged.
Bond F n a d Cha r g ed.
The raid followed Information that for
several weeks has had the attention of!
the District Attorney as well as Federal
official* and members of the Masonic
order in the city. The District Attorneys
Interest In the case comes through the
allegation that Lewis and his associates
In tha eo-called American Route, Cruel*
were selling fraudulent per cent, gold
bonds.
The Interest of the Federal authori
ties is in the allegation that Lewis and
his associates were soliciting member
ship in the order on the representation
that such membership automatically ex
empted men from the draft and gave
them a legitimate right to profess con
scientious scruples against war. The
interest of the Masonic officials was i
aroused by the representations of I^ewis ,
that he was a Mason. 1
Lewis is -net a Mason. But the first
question he asked Detective Russo when
he appeared on the scene last night was,
Are you a Mason?
According to the story of the career 1
of Lewis and his attempt to organise
his American Rosae Cruris, as it was
told to a reporter for Th k St n* Inst
night, the movement has made headway.
There have been several branches of the
o-called order established in Western]
The Sun
New York, New York
Tuesday, June 18,1918
Page 14
cities, but through, the i nstrumental i ty
of men who were watching his move
ments attempts in other places failed.
In New Tork city the affairs of the
cult seemed to reach a crisis last Friday
night. A. B. Brassard, Lewiss former
secretary, and the man who finally gave
the District .Attorney the information on
which he acted last night, became pui -
plclous 6t the genuineness of the 6 per
ce nt bonds that Lewis sold to prospec
tive members.
Brassard and some qf his fellow mcnv
beta went to the Twenty-third street
headquarters Friday night and accused
Lewis in the presence of several other
members of making suggestions hr
which men of draft age could gel ex
emption. Brassard's signature appear1'
on somb of the bonds that Lewis sold
On Friday nteht. according to the sto-.v,
he accused Lewis of certain irregulari
ties. Including the violation of another
Federal statute.
i
L e w i s As ke d f o r Proof .
I t i s said that L ewi s invited Brassard
to return on Saturday night wi th proof
of the charges he made. Brassard ac
cepted the invitation, and it is sai d, pre
sented Lewis with documentary* prbof
of the alieged i rregul arti es and de
manded his withdrawal as head of the,
Rosaecruclan order, whereupon. a<-
carding to Brassards story. Lewi s fore
the documents up and chal l enged Brar-
sard to go ahead i f he wanted to. in
the face of what Lewis thought was de
stroyed evidence. Brassard cl ai ms ">
have kept originals of the dorumci r-*
in question and to have handed Lew,*
only copies.
Another f eature of the case, and tn*
one that is most i nteresti ng the Fed
eral authorities, is the statement that at
a recent meeting of the members of the
organisation Lewis i s sai d to have ad
dressed his disciples as follows:
"I hold in my hand a l etter from Fr?i -
ident Wilson guaranteei ng exempti on
from the draft to members of the Ro-
saecrucian Order In Ameri ca.
The Sun
New York, New York
Tuesday, June 18,1918
Page 14
I At the headquarter of Tx*esl Romd
| irS. where it w r said certain of Lew!* ."'
followers had claimed exempti on on tnc
ground of membership in the order, of
ficials were not able to trace the rcccM*
i of any such cases without the nnnv-
i although the three members of the ho.T-e
'said they recollected tl at such <laiir*
|had been advanced.
I n i t i a t i o n P e e and One*.
Apart from the sale of bonds, one of
which a former member of the organi ze*
tlon showed to a Su n reporter l ast night
declaring at the same ti me that sh^
paid $100. for it and to whi ch was a*-
tached a receipt eigned by one L. I>i t -
rence, as secretary of the organi zati on
hew members were required to pay j
Initiation, fee of $5 or $10 and (
dues of $1,
The organization is al so sai d to hv
published it secret paper cal l ed tf'**
Cromaat. the letters of which back
wards are the f*rst l etters of the title :!-r
cult has assumedTh o Ancient and
Mystical Order (of) Rosae CtUCi?. '
other monthly magazine cal l ed 1 *
American Rosae Cruci e,* carri es on hs
first page the names of a number of as
sociate editors in various parts of tha
world. These, it is represented, roak'*
up the Supreme World Counci l of the
order.
Among the doxen or more are stu n
names as these: Emanuel S. CamWeri.
Upper Egypt: Prof. C. Magala IVsai.
Bombay; Mohamed Ismail. T- G. cv H.
Ceylon; Sir X. Jrnathellfekerjo L^min-
dar, Bengal; Lady Ida Brooks. Sharg-
hai. China; Sir William Samuel Gnn*.
Xatal, East Africa ; Lady Fl orence Bur
gess. London. England ; Raynaud C. d"
Bellecastle-Ligne, Toulouse. France, fttd
several others.
A more definite Address is not ghen it
the copy of the magazine, hut Titr
reporter yesterday saw a dozen of mote
such letters that had been sent to ad
dresses furnished by a former mrmbe-
of Lewis's organization, all of which
came back with the notation " S o uch
person known, or "No auch address."
New York, The Sun, Tuesday, June 18,1918
DETECTIVES RAID A MYSTICAL CULT
H. Spencer Lewis, Leader of Rosaecruci ans, Arrested
Lily Langtry Home.
He is Said Also to Have Suggested Means of Evading
Draft.
Three score or more men and women of varying ages
-the majority of the men within the draft age- were
seated last night in parallel rows in a room on an
upper floor of what was the old Lily Langtry home, and
before that the J osie Mansfield residence, at 361 West
Twenty-third street.
Any one who had ever been received in that room
when the J ersey Lily was the chatelaine and who was
there last night would have been impressed with the
changes that have taken place since. They have been
peculiarly impressed with the furnishings that were in
evidence last night when Detective J oseph Russo and
four or five other men from the District Attorney's
office entered. But more about the detectives later.
About 9 o'clock sixty or seventy men and women were
assembled in what was once Mrs. Langtry's drawing
room. From the front the old place would give the
impression of a well appointed private residence or
club. The windows were shaded and the iron fence that
fronts the place had just received a new coat of
paint. It was almost a place of distinction and
soldiers and sailors who were strangers in New York
looked at it while passing and inquired of one another
what it was. An inconspicuous group of four or five men
at a convenient corner were also watching the place,
but were not so ignorant of its character.
Scene in Drawing Room
Inside, in the drawing room, were assembled the
members of the New York branch of the so-called
American Rosicrucians. A feeble light from three
candles on a triangular altar in the centre of the room
was the only illumination. On a raised dais at one
end, clad in all the robes of his office as grand
master and imperator of the order in America, Brother
H. Spencer Lewis, F.R.C., whatever that means, was
giving the regular weekly lecture to the members.
At the other end of the room in the somber setting
of a cheap black screen stood a five foot wooden
cross, with a wreath of roses at its base. The
furnishings were of the cheapest, and the floor was
uncovered except for a layer of dust. An unprotected
heating flue gaped in the middle of the floor; plaster
was hanging from the walls and ceiling, and the desk
from which the Grand Imperator was delivering his
lecture on the alchemy of life was of the cheapest
unvarnished pine.
Across the entrance to the room that once boasted
of double sliding doors there hung a cheap orange
colored curtain, through which the light from the
three candles softly filtered to the hall without.
Downstairs one or two members, to whom the ceremony in
the room above was no mystery, occupied desks and were
busy going through card index and classifying
applications for membership.
Then the officers came and in a moment the whole
place was in a tumult. Detective Russo with his aids
entered and were on the top floor before the
bewildered Rosecrucians in the business office knew
what was coming off. A man was placed at the door, and
Detective Russo, thrusting aside the cheap orange
colored curtains, stepped into the dimly lighted lodge
room, walked to the dais and announced to the
assembled members that everybody in the room was under
arrest.
The Imperator attempted to expostulate but was told
to keep quiet and prepare to go to headquarters. He
quickly divested himself of his robes of office while
his followers wondered what is was all about and while
other detectives went to phone for a patrol wagon.
Lights Show Queer Scene
The Grand Imperator was in the midst of an
interpretation and delineation of some of the occult
mysteries in the unraveling of which he is regarded by
his followers as a seer, when he was so rudely
interrupted. When the lights went up a queer scene
greeted the officers' eyes. The assembled men and
women who had been absorbing the words of wisdom from
the lips of the seer presented and odd picture in the
dilapidated room, that was not only shorn of its once
elaborate furnishings, but which showed unmistakable
evidences of long neglect.
Most of the people in the room were of German,
Scandinavian or Russian extraction. Most of the men
were within the draft age, although there were several
older ones in the group. Several of the women were
well dressed and gave evidence of education and
culture. Some of them replied to the questions of the
detectives in an unmistakable foreign accent. But all
of them expressed the greatest concern in what was to
befall the Grand Imperator.
After the detectives had questioned them and
served several with subpoenas two or three went to
Police Headquarters to await the arrival of Lewis.
Others went to a nearby restaurant to await
developments. Meantime with the appearance of a police
patrol wagon a crowd of several thousand gathered in
Twenty-third street curious to know whether it was
Assistant District Attorney J im Smith instituting a
Monday night raid by way of change, or what kind of an
affair was being staged.
Bond Fraud Charged
The raid followed information that for several
weeks has had the attention of the District Attorney's
interest in the case comes through the allegation that
Lewis and his associates in the so-called American
Rosae Crucis were selling fraudulent 6 per cent gold
bonds.
The interest of the Federal authorities is in the
allegation that Lewis and his associates were
soliciting membership in the order on the
representation that such membership automatically
exempted men from the draft and gave them a legitimate
right to profess conscientious scruples against war.
The interest of the Masonic officials was aroused by
the representations of Lewis that he was a Mason.
Lewis is not a Mason. But the first question he
asked Detective Russo when he appeared on the scene
last night was, "Are you a Mason?"
According to the story of the career of Lewis and
his attempt to organize his American Rosae Crucis, as
it was told to a reporter for THE SUN last night, the
movement has made headway. There have been several
branches of the so-called order established in Western
cities, but through the instrumentality of men who
were watching his movements attempts in other places
failed.
In New York City the affairs of the cult seemed to
reach a crisis last Friday night. A.B.Brassard,
Lewiss former secretary, and the man who finally gave
the District Attorney the information on which he
acted last night, became suspicious of the genuineness
of the 6 percent bonds that Lewis sold to prospective
members.
Brassard and some of his fellow members went to the
Twenty-third street headquarters Friday night and
accused Lewis in the presence of several other members
of making suggestions by which men of draft age could
get exemption. Brassard's signature appears on some of
the bonds that Lewis sold. On Friday night, according
to the story, he accused Lewis of certain
irregularities, including the violation of another
Federal statute.
Lewis Asked for Proof
It is said that Lewis invited Brassard to return on
Saturday night with proof of the charges he made.
Brassard accepted the invitation, and it is said,
presented Lewis with documentary proof of the alleged
irregularities and demanded his withdrawal as head of
the Rosaecrucian order, whereupon ...carding to
Brassard's story. Lewis tore the documents up and
challenged Brassard to go ahead if he wanted to in the
face of what Lewis thought was destroyed evidence.
Brassard claims to have kept originals of the
documents in question and to have handed Lewis only
copies.
Another failure of the case, and the one that is
most interesting the Federal authorities, is the
statement that at a recent meeting of the members of
the organization Lewis is said to have addressed his
disciples as follows:
"I hold in my hand a letter from president Wilson
guaranteeing exemption from the draft to members of
the Rosaecrucian Order in America."
At the headquarters of Local Board 158, where it
was said certain of Lewis's followers had claimed
exemption on the ground of membership in the order,
officials were not able to trace the records of any
such cases without the names although the three
members of the board said they recollected that such
claims had been advanced.
Initiation Fee and Dues
Apart from the sale of bonds, one of which a
former member of the organization showed to a SUN
reporter last night declaring at the same time that
she paid $100 for it and to which was attached a
receipt signed by one L. Lawrence, as secretary of the
organization, new members were required to pay an
initiation fee of $5 or $10 and member dues of $1.
The organization is also said to have published a
secret paper called the "Cromaat," the letters of
which backwards are the first letters of the title the
cult has assumed - The Ancient and Mystical Order (of)
Rosae Crucis. Another monthly magazine called "The
American Rosae Crucis," carries on the first page the
names of a number of associate editors in various
parts of the world. These, it is represented, make up
the Supreme World Council of the order.
Among the dozen or more are such names as these:
Emanuel S. Camilleri, Upper Egypt; Prof. C. Magala
Desa, Bombay; Mohamed Ismail, I.G.O.H., Ceylon; Sir N.
Irnathellickerjo Lemindar, Bengal; Lady Brooks,
Shangai, China; Sir William Samuel Grant, Natal, East
Africa; Lady Florence Burgess, London, England;
Raynaud E. de Belcastle-Ligne, Toulouse, France, and
several others.
A more definite address is not given in the copy of
the magazine, but THE SUN reporter yesterday saw a
dozen of more such letters that had been sent to
addresses furnished by a former member of Lewis's
organization, all of which came back with the notation
"No such person known," or "No such address."
The Sun
New York, New York
Wednesday, June 19,1918
Page 14
G R A N D I 1 P E R A T 0 R
G R I E V E D A T A R R E S T
l
(Prying 1)<toi*iivcs Want to
i Know About TIiosp old
i
j Bonds and Things.
SPENT NIGHT IN* A (ELL
___________ -- i
Cult Leader Asserts Purpose of
Organization Had No T ai nt 1
of Money Getting*
Hal f n dozen detet'Ux'ee attn>hcd to
tli Dl strkt A ttorney's nTlco were exam-
f erts meani ng sateen sasher, rnbi " and
other regal i a taken In the rai d of ha
i
headquarters of thn so-cal l ed A meri can j
order of the Roane Crude. }
Whi l e they were sti l l goi ng oxer the
papers. hooka ami other paraphernal i a .
of vari ous kl nde col l ected In the rai d |
that wan deacrl bed exc.ual vel y In T hi s
Sl t w yesterday H. Spencer L ewi s. who
had been vari ousl y descri bed an the
mai n work.*, the grand I mperattSr. the
moat perfect ni anter profund i s ami I l
l ustri ous brother of i he I l l umi nati of '
the worl d, was expl ai ni ng to T i i k Sr v i
that bin arred. detenti on ami oxaml na- 1
ti nn taken al together compri sed one of )
the greatest outrages ever perpetrated
upon n real Hurt regul ar Rosue Cruci an
Grand I mperator I>ewts was arrested
on Monday ni ght in a spectacul ar rai d
on the headquarters of hi s organi sati on
in the ol d L i l y L antry house at 3fil
West T wenty- thi rd strwet. Two or
three dosen of hi s fol l owers tri ed to get
hal l , but the Grand Tmperator had to
The Sun
New Y ork, New Y ork
Wednesday, J une 19,1918
Page 14
spend the ni ght I n a cell.
Gold Bonds P l g e r e In r k i r g e .
7<ewls wan arrai gned yesterday in J ef
ferson M arket Court before M agi strate
Blau on a short affidavit sworn to by
Detecti ve-L i eutenant J oseph Russo, al
leging suspicion of l arceny of money
through the sal e of bonds of the so-
called A meri can Order of the Rosae
Cruri s. L ewis was l ater rel eased un
der fit,000 for exami nati on to-i norrow.
laewls gave hts name as Harvey S.
I deals, al though he l known among the {
members of hie cult as H. Spencer I .ewls.
The charge agai nst him Is based on
statements of M iss K l l zabeth M eeker
of 70 F i f th nrcnuc. who at one ti me was
a member of l ew i s's organi zati on, and
who. when the financial af f ai rs of the so- !
called order was wiruewhat strai ned, de- |
dares that she handed over a hundred I
dol l ar bill, subsequentl y recei vi ng one
of the * per cent, gold bonds of the A n
ci ent and M ystic Order of Uosae Cruets
Miss Meeker expl ai ned yesterday that
her contri buti on had been given wi th
out sol i ci tati on in October of 1916. that
she received the bond wi th a recei pt for
the money rai d, and that she had also
received 16 I nterest. She admi tted, how
ever, that af ter attendi ng several meet
i ngs of the organi zati on she fel t com
pelled to wi thdraw ns a member.
From hi s home In F l ushi ng l ast ni ght
L ewis told a reporter f or T h e .s v n that
st no ti me had hi s organi sati onthe
A ncient and M ysti cal Order Rosae C ru
etsever cliamod to b operati ng as a
branch of the Rosae Cruel* organi za
tion I n F rance. We have never clai med
to hold ary warrant, charter, patent nr
authori ty from any forei gn country, he ;
sai d over the telephone.
Studies of the Occult.
T he al l egati ons agai nst L ewis nre that '
he has disposed of several thousand ;
dol l ars worth of bonds upon the repre- !
nrntatl on that hi s organi zati on was a |
recognized branch of a worl dwi de I nvti- |
tut Ion devoted to studi es of the occult. i
A mong the papers seized In T/ewlss!
desk on Monday ni ght la a pie 'e of (
parchment headed Ironunzi amento It. ;
F U. C , No. it*76Al., T he document Is
adorned wi th a number of crude seal*,
dated Toulouse. France, September J ii. ;
1916. nnd signed hy one J ej rj .lordal n.
A fter the si gnature f.dlow a srrl es of
l hieroglyphic.* I n the body of rite docu- I
The Sun
New Y ork, New Y ork
Wednesday, J une 19,1918
Page 14
addressed to ls Secretai re-General .
Thor Ki nnal ehto, appears the announce- |
meat that a separate J uri sdi cti on of the
Ronac thuds order has been establ i shed I
in Ameri ca under the supreme pontl f. ;
Hth Anci ent Shekah El Morl a 1U of |
Memphi s and that the o?T1Mai seal is j
t*TTig forwarded to the Most Perfect ,
Master Profundl s I I . Spencer Lewi * at
New Y ork j
1
t
Honnri for American Master.
I n the F ebruary, 1flirt, number of the !
ti 'i cri ron Itona*' <r u r i s, wliich is dr- 1
scri bed on the fi rst page as a monthl y !
magazi ne devoted to science, phi l osophy '
and rel i gion, a pi cture of I /rwl s i n hla 1
robes of office Hjv>ears. and I n reference
to him is thi s statement:
But in 1909 our M aster J ourneyed to
F rance and E ngl and to compl ete hi s
preparati on for the R naaerruci an work |
which al ways seemed to be I ds goal t
and he was given several honors and 1
ti tl es by the French U, \ order. My
agreement wi th the supreme council in i
F ra ms* and Rgyin the permi ssi on, long
sought hy sci enti sts and earnest phi l o
sophi cal students, was given unto our I
M aster to establ i sh tiie R. t\ Order in
A merica in tbo year l f l l i ."
"When he was arrai gned J n c e u r i y e s
terday M ark K ills.oi. counsel for I ^ewis. 1
decl ared that the li-triot A ttorney had!
produced no proof 10 show that L ewis
ever received a dol l ar in cash for the
bonds lie n all eged to have sold
The Sun, New York, Wednesday, June 1918
GRAND IMPERATOR GRIEVED AT ARREST
SPENT NIGHT IN A CELL
Cult Leader asserts Purpose of Organization Had No Taint of Money Getting.
Half a dozen detectives attached to the District: Attorney's office were examining
effects, meaning sateen sashes, robes, and other regalia - taken in the raid of the
headquarters of the so- called American Order of the Rosae Crucis.
While they were still going over the papers, books and other paraphernalia of
various kinds collected in the raid that was described exclusively in THE SUN
yesterday, H. Spencer Lewis, who had been variously described as the main works,
the grand imperator, the most perfect master profundis and illustrious brother of
the illuminati of the world, was explaining THE SUN that his arrest, detention and
examination taken altogether comprised one of the greatest outrages ever
perpetrated upon a real and regular Rosae Crucian.
Grand Imperator Lewis was arrested on Monday night in a spectacular raid on
the headquarters of his organization in the old Lily Langtry house at 361 West
Twenty-third street. Two or three dozen of his followers tried to get bail, but the
Grand Imperator had to spend the night in a cell.
Gold Bonds Figure in Charge
Lewis was arraigned yesterday in J efferson Market Court before Magistrate Blau
on a short affidavit sworn to by Detective-Lieutenant J oseph Russo, alleging
suspicion of larceny of money through the sale of bonds of the so-called American
Order of the Rosae Crucis. Lewis was later released under $5,000 for examination
to-morrow.
Lewis gave his name as Harvey S. Lewis, although he is known among the
members of his cult as H. Spencer Lewis. The charge against him is based on
statements of Miss Elizabeth Meeker, of 70 Fifth Avenue, who at one time was a
member of Lewis' organization, and who, when the financial affairs of the
so-called order were somewhat strained, declares that she handed over a hundred-
dollar bill, subsequently receiving one of the 6 per cent gold bonds of the Ancient
Mystic Order of Rosae Crucis.
Miss Meeker explained yesterday that her contribution had been given without
solicitation in October of 1916, that she received the bond with a receipt for the
money paid, and that she had also received $6 interest. She admitted, however, that
after attending several meetings of the organization she felt compelled to withdraw
as a member.
From his home in Flushing last night Lewis told a reporter for THE SUN that at
no time had his organization - the Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis
- ever claimed to be operating as a branch of the Rosae Crucis organization in
France. "We have never claimed to hold any warrant, charter, patent or authority
from any foreign country," he said over the telephone.
Studies of the Occult
The allegations against Lewis are that he has disposed of several thousand
dollars' worth of bonds upon the representation that his organization was a
recognized branch of a world-wide institution devoted to studies of the occult.
Among the papers seized in Lewis' desk on Monday night is a piece of parchment
headed "Pronunziamento R.F.R.C. No. 987,601" The document is adorned with a
number of crude seals, dated Toulouse, France, September 20,1916, and signed by
one J ean J ordain. After the signature follow a series of hieroglyphics. In the body
of the document addressed to Le Secretaire General, Thor Kiimalehto, appears the
announcement that a separate jurisdiction of the Rosae Crucis has been established
in America under the supreme Pontiff High Ancient Shekah El Moria Ra of
Memphis and that the official seal is being forwarded to the Most Perfect Master
Profundis H. Spencer Lewis at New York.
In the February, 1916, number of the American Rosae Crucis, which is
described on the first page as a monthly magazine devoted to science, philosophy
and religion, a picture of Lewis in his robes of office appears, and in reference to
him is this statement:
"But in 1909 our Master journeyed to France and England to complete his
preparation for the Rosaecrucian work - which always seemed to be his goal - and
he was given several honors and titles by the French R.C. order, by agreement with
the supreme council in France and Egypt the permission, long sought by scientists
and earnest philosophical students was given unto our Master to establish the R. C.
Order in America in the year 1915."
When he was arraigned in court yesterday Mark Ellison, counsel for Lewis,
declared that the District Attorney had produced no proof to show that Lewis ever
received a dollar in cash for the bonds he is alleged to have sold.
The Sun
New Y ork, New Y ork
Sunday, J une 23,1918
Page 14
i .............................;------- ----------- ;
L#vrl Freed hyr Court, ')
Harvey S. t>wip>. lecturerjmd alleged*
**ent for the Ancient-And Myotic Order
of Roec Crude, was discharged yester
day by Magistrate Groehl in, Jefferson
Market Court. The prosecution asked 1
for an adjournment in order to vyoTk
up the presentation of the case. *The de
fendants counsel asked tor Lewiss dis
missal on *the ground of insufficient evi
dence. The tnotlon was granted.' Lewis
was arraigned on a short-affidavit sworn >
to by Detective Russo of. the District}
Attorneys office, charging suspicion1of'l
larceny under false pretences. |
i . - - _ - - - - - -- - - -- - A.. . * t
Lewis Freed by Court
Harvey S. Lewis, lecturer and alleged agent for the Ancient and Mystic Order of
Rosae Crucis, was discharged yesterday by Magistrate Groehl in J efferson Market
Court. The prosecution asked for an adjournment in order to work up the
presentation of the case. The defendants counsel asked for Lewiss dismissal on
the ground of insufficient evidence. The motion was granted. Lewis was arraigned
on a short affidavit sworn to by Detective Russo of the District Attorneys office,
charging suspicion of larceny under false pretences.
1919
P H v r m r A . 1 . s o r i K T Y t o n c e t
The Cal i f orni a Payrttl ral Reaearrh
Soci et y wi l l meet t omorrow evenl nr
in Nat i ve Kona' Hul l dl n*. ( The apeak-
rr wi l l be H. Kpenrer I^ewia, Imprra-
tor of Ih" Real crucl an Order for
Nort h Ameri ca, and f ormerl y preal-
dent of t he New York Inetl t ut n for
Payehtnal Keaenrch. The aubjert wi l l
be "Fact vs. Theory In Paychl cal R*-
I anarch."
San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco, California
Sunday, August 31, 1919
Page 6
1920
Woman Initiate Exposes Weird Rites of the Rosicrucians
Fearsome Oaths and Exhibitions of Ma^ic
Described as Chief Features in
Ceremony of Induction
I
\ (he a r ne / i l iwJ IndlJTtu-cfl cc In fh
mni r^^nt com pu in turn rl vrll 111**
cnml n* fnrrp and in tfc* Ut Ml
nnmleal and atrologlciU dafp. Irom >1n<mt
Fed** In 1lirrc a r* pr#ir In New Vnrh who
arc rai NDliri thfit many Lnni' hn* nr Ililt
Rwl rruel fl n fl nclrly et l M In Amcri ra H
SfH'BCW Lewi s F. R. C.. (frand mi s t e r
cri l and lini>*ralor of llie Ronareri mn
i r o n Ihe prl l l nBl i aJiarra thi s Icnar*"
wi Lh t hem. nr ai ms in. frr tin s a \ a n his
hlsinry of ih nrdrr in Avnrrlca
TTtltJn In 1*f t,*n!td SIMM them it *n
mr-rAy nf orfffl n l u Uflni nil pUlTOTtlPE t'*
i ruf Pft' flMPurl nni Itirr* In In l i ul h hul one
true order, the nrl uinil nm! prfecl Ro h c -
cruelan order, h!cl i | i bnnnn hy rne onl y
m m f Tim Anrl ent and Mysfl ral
CrufU.* mhos* unl vartal and world
wide itymhol l Hi* l ri an*l i | l h Min DOinl
d m r ward.'1
Annl hir sial*-fn*n t hv Founder (^tvl* will
urrrlAi a srWl mar t p i * r a h n Ihouf bt
Ihry knejr nil n>oui RnglcruvZarIftr In thin
country 1! In ifcM Di Amerl ran tocl Mv
flat** tkarfc from 1915 H# made miarend'nc
nf Mb qrfir^ia] i nst ruct i ons r,om Ihe Jnlll-
flJej. and vcliin In 1911 lie call rd upon Itie
fi orti ty fnr Pi j chicaJ Ra/iearch Io help him
form a Irulci here nf t he Rosy rpnss hf me!
w| | h IndJffrrefir^. It could not be otherwi se
for i he arinl9 had retarded Iho dal e to HIS
In the early r arl "f t hai i #at . l h the n -
lalanc* nf fluprrlnr 9*rrct arv- General Thor
KUmal rhin and when Ml he mrvin was In Sar-
lltarlUH.1' armed l i h chari er tnfl hlark
hoolt - Founder Lewi s cal led i n*rl her a M;tl*
band of nine iron nnd w^rmn Id fr.rm a enm
uni t es !n orirfriqic a S u n ^ n i i Counci l for
Ameri ca.
Cr owl h o f i ke Org* ni j a Ii nn
Ttia prf l l ml ni rv wnrl wrM f/ invipd
Hsd!l y, In Jl nreh flftv pnranns had mUffi
i ha "nrell mjnary eath in ij-r rtffr 1*1 Rlnrh
fin Anrll 1 Ihl rtv of Tin* nrinsl re-
five wnrknrs mrf *t n proposed lod^e rnnm
In Kevrntli n u n i r and i herr and then *brv
ronsi l t uted tiiem**! vc* itic ffrM irua R*.i,|
rnjc!ir> ennvenMon of <h* *rdr ever h*M
!n Ihe l empl e to America
"SInee t h e n / cl oal npl v rrpoi t? Ftiu^d^r
Td'wia. "lh* order l i m pf >*n aniaifi nclv
Tl i erf iire r nw H<w1:itr| et'l, na
nf mprelv11HiB Jjncl nirnprw %n* edi
l ori CovernmanT nfr i s l i n1iva| rni* e (ir
ceora l a f i ' n * Ir>n11 1w i.rofjL*imia1 rn<*'
s r d pTnrp arl l U arljnsn?; 111-
lie Irndf-a nil wo^hl nc a ATmvif, rnno
rid meafl ne ,n n rmtimijn 'et'rl
%l nfn'** | lie e;.rn r-r+ l r| tnri | f )
Ihr jjrLnl* mid " i- M, ' h .'nr <
t rdfirielu Tndc* * Ac ih H ***
rnjrl an* wrfe* *l.eg In - i # !n 1 1-iT
i bem- #L* Mh i i v nf |hf*m di - #n %* ^ d*
rlalmed i hf i mentki n n* r"ttrr*n I*
e!fllt r**es rpr'i e-rter Orr iif /
M lM H * b l d n | q r n : m * i * Mr,
lerl" 11. eM*| V'ed Mult In*
founded the TT#-Hi Irruri sn V-H . nu*
Jt nia^e no real rn wlnn 'n lenn-rienl r^w*-
li ra Marfa ff-i *s lan evnlniriiui h- ^ -%
In; *rid r " V f * nf hrr 'T> ivple .*f *li-
f*r n *
dl^lrjE the Firsl Forty nine1 llejEre'S *1 Iha
Illuminati nf the RnMorucInn Order*" TM*
book anid for 11n Gt any connecdon ha-
i s w r pr r i j i n f r and l*ie true Tosatcru
rjsna a i s f na l l y disproved
M^at la a Roai acruci an Mere la f>r.
Lea Is m i n e r
"A RoAaeorueUin I" n"r hn ]|a as a Ilf*
s i i j i nme n? dei arml ned thai Kefnre ho coin-
pl ei ei thi s cycl e or period of earthl y cxiat-
enr* ha ahnll have nneom pi lhcd IhroifRh
personal e deavnr mme di ed of coodnesi for
the Sel l er i e n l of l h human race
The I.oeaecruMn na hnre nni hi np m do
trlib any ot her reli gi on i ncl udi ng the Chria-
l i ar reli gion They created the symbol of
the cma. they any. and the C'hriMi*n
adopted ir They do noi l each aplriLunliam
nor mrdl um*hl p RoMPcrunlaniBni hilt not h
ing in do with Toe I or other phl l omphy It
anils no boot s or decrera purporti ng io con
tain eeerei s of i niti at ion It has regul ar
lndg*s or remDiea In v nr Jou* cl Ues. oar h with
Its mast er officer and under ofllriale: II hi "
Isa Us grand lodRi*, snrl Its aii prari a Indge
Is In thi s cJI. The work nf the Ameri can
l>rnrh l outl i ned hv the supreme rnun* il ipf
she world snd Is accrat. The f unds nre cot*
|erie<J hy rrffulftr eont rl hul i ons '
Th Ra r a e*"rur|Hnn loilge of New Tikrk clljf
has Apparently Jnrigerl It wlee io ue another
name i hsn Ha f. imouF o n e 11 fu noti ons s
a soci ety for *durni l nnal purpnsrs as the
Mei ropol l rsn Cnlleg^. tnror poral^d The
preside nl rit t hi s rol l eg# ffft* formerl y n
I*aull pries l anrl IB ll.ia a Inrc^ i oc' l y of
Hdepln and Inl l l al es and prnta Iloner* wH*h
branches and cnnnecUnng In oil i er cltl ^r
Teli a c f Wai rd l a i t a t i o n.
Meel l nga and cl asses nr trin col i cs " i r e
hejd In the Masoni c Tempi * In H irlern
Cl sasos for the Insi ructl nn rf prrbatlnner"
are lirId weekl y ard the "Inll latea " aari r of
r o m are rail ed ' I nl i i moa of Ti bet " mo**t
nr i he IRlh mid l ast of* each mnni h All
mreUnre are ni nl sht and the rel lcl mia
mPtlngs sn-cnllnd. star! ni midnlarht
^ r*und J(InTe Tar proiiallun h nlllg#l m
flhn* from ili^ee well Icimnn fllMlne s
m^n who hm\r hnnn hi m ff.u at h-Aal t vg
yearn l l i ese lift re heer passed r>n f-i-
vorahl y hv tli* ofTlreri he will be miRim f ed
to i he Ini tiation cei eni onl f * a Th aiiot^m
rid mvt t l cal a ni - r t ml y mvel l ca' atvff **-
croi , in know whfli ihnsa p-remonfe* nr** <
must depend rn whaf la hv person* wiin
hni'e aone fi far a to h i v e the *xperi t* e
rnd rhen b-irKed nut * woinjin oT a hl zh
ri-gTi-e of inlcMlger.re snd genul nel v onfc
Intf hud the cxper^MCr ftrH did rptr.n| e
i 'll* the t i ur : or h*o 1ntf|atJAti Sn g-M f|iI#h
end would ** nl l l l r e *0 afEH r c(flte|pEn<
If bn ilo ne a*-, nm gr>id rnul d hr c.ilnfi*.
* Finthei It nmi n x man wer*
ni hrr ramtldr* *r mirl nflnr beside* nu
# h e "IV* rc*rm ' o r ^ e l (it n *rr 'ill
n r ^ . l r t r r h * r tv V i e J| i f -o* tfi il-#
r 11i 4 In r h* mnf - i Ml 1 rf i rni m rjrr ' r*
n * Ilf Mr11 'H d t 'I a rf| }*C11 Ifi *fie-cl> *
i n n r #* - p i hn- * but ih^ee i ^nj r in n*
rriuftt'^l 1i "1 with Mmwflnnii rf#fi lidefe
**f-n o -a * ^f r - n#"VAin s nd l earned *ho* *he
m-Ufi d^e* rrlnft^a Ari,| fit t he h>pr nf
s ni ne i nto rrni rrvinir.itIon with hrr p|rif
* he I r n u 1 M Th e nlrl o f t h* Rn"l rruf *l an
The mule naniiirfai* impraateij rr,r a * hojiier
Infliielieert M jirf*i tv "Impu
\t *.# Wirnke ef ml dnl cbl f!ir f|o#rr roj *.
t * -r n n snr! e- Ihrrf per*1 adnfikM',1
ipii c11h K'?r r>ti..|*<|n*r I fi mlv Uchr-d
"i n 'Vi I4r r \ i* i* *( \ tJ q.rii Ihe* or "fir n^r**!*** *r h
liter -i * " - *n i p} 11ic . i -1. Mtr i i a 1'" Mil ,i h"J^Hrrs*
fhnri enl ,# r* ;t* Trofi' t *i ^ ' i 1 F pi.h ,iu'i nm"i- rrtmed f* uriM'***lnTi m il- nnil
l * i h |i r l nnf i B r M t i r hfti i tr* c *>? *? 1 . I 11'r l i ef l I*.* rh* Mr n,l 4 or
t.\A* nthvna 111 m no tnllrit A Rrcr* 1 tlnnlt wrl i i l 3 n i s i n 111 a rfl Uljun
a, ,ROSl CI?L' Ci AM y / j f f } * F S O C E 5 S 1 0 N 4 L R I T U A L
M P T R O P O L I T A N COLLEGE.
Il J !.** hv fifrl tf ll.*t> Al till H* All *
p**.LCeir*iii WHlkid h u nn-ji i *i i . 1 * v *
Ib'i w I ui ea 'rlftclsl ' -*i <1 llifi <t *
*ku\\ nnre a loo Jl iummfited 1m
i r i ut y .
Wf>pr 11ir prnCCHv1fiTI Id Pn j ,MMI
the i nn ni the n nm ve ' hv t:indnl.M t*M
hti ndfoHi il nr* i 1*>j he rue*- i i h Im Ti h
ofifha e.cr<- admi ni stered n* 1 ' 1
COUl d l eti ntl l J i . *li' * rm [ih
li|i I t|.i tint |'i . t u
fi *e| )e| . Ill Id I, (||<*|- *j I 1
rerr()e> f IS Mutt fin * * --='1
it - J i f |irlT)1 IlMl o It h w. i e COj ; hP<J
linitnt *.me n uln< u,e ner l aIJ
i i i i m tJnivn trum 11i-c f ourtevnt h g^murv
Hi ln-l a;ith ol (li*; seri es j i tl ial w*
is milil iirvi'i rt ve.i t the sOort l ol Ihr order
air i k lilhii to an iiul^ld*r .i ns of *he .Hp i o -
lurr nf l hr I'oslei'UVUiHS
The f<M* wore t hen removed from our
^ ai . r tsrri - gi v en M u l ' i n a ci r cl e
wui h 1(111nates s:me c:ihIbU.'inu nf mngl c
l a mi fMiiv' - can he giiincd ise u J |||
fjrri ti 1*1r-nI
Th mu shorn t hi s cxli l bl ll oti the ud| i o
Member Who Resigned Tells of Attempts
to Make Her Pay Penalty for W i t h
drawing From the Order
r iuin r* iiMine j di ml y li ghl cd. but i hs sl | . i r
iA<tli i hi croag and rnse ahons brlllla/iLly
In i he circle In whi ch I u l In wl l nsne
what ever msrvel a ni l sl i l i t vnurhsal ed ihpre
were I i hl nk. aLmit i wcnl y- f our prgsnns.
uW nfirmliers nrd * thre* es ndi ds i es In
. in niMst sinod an Ini ti ate of Tlhri with
hi - fo4*| real Ins *n th* hare floor ^Vc* l OU> I
M* him di ml y i rf f h rradnal l" Tadid from
\-i*w a- II hs sank Inin Ihe floor As soon
a* lie had cnmpleleTy di sappeared from mir
ci rcl e hie voi re was hear^ feom lh* ah*r
nd l urnl ng our evps Iher* * e hi m
stanrll ng In front of Ihe exour
Thi s seemed wonderful but It di(J not
cont ent ti le mal e i eek*r whn asked Tor f ur
ther mJraclea and his request was echr*d
Uy epveral vnl ce* Th- IrlHala N5 r*H in
ftrnducn 9 dnrn fnepti ms*9 wl l h t he (1n on
i hem and cause iberr to f i l l from Ihe si r In
Aur mldBI. Apparanl l v he did t hi s TTie
tneea fell or e br one In Ihe mldsi nf f h- clr-
In escl i one wri w lh dnw - If fr*aliW
pl urk-d The mb mi i i * la ft Inter i r * Ilia
Itil IInIP Blcod far removed from as rar Ihe
al i ar Fnl inedn'- Ihla d*mnn^Ira l| on nmh-
Ing l ut i h e r In l h* w j # at ms g l e s a e dnn*
jird IO re pentad requests fnr mure Ilie srtepfs
frnnkl y esl d t he* were exhauated
Rc ai | n li nn Carri es Pans l t y
*f wmi In am or t wo i Ii *! after Ihl*
pe ne i i l m- el l na, hut T itr|itnd I hi l I did
vc\ car* in parry out rny Plan lo h^ome
<vtt id*DI member and flaked tn be prrmUeil
if. r*Bl|gn The secret ary nf Metropol itan
f nl l e ae wh Is ( he wife of dealer In
ci si #or| et y equi pment In Mi de.i l ane re
plied lo my ref]ue*l l i n t I rnul d hs al lowed
i*. r Ml i i nnl r p. i yl ne Inin l hr aorlety
a sum qual io r ne - l e ni h of my Income and
hv ret urni ng all H* n mi r e that 1 had bar
rnwe d nr purcl i ai cd I bare done nei ther
.i d have received many l etters frnm of f l ors
and adppla whi ch are fai rl y i hi e a l a ni ns In
th*lr nal nrs | t li as come to my knnwl ed| e
s l um trvfna io frr* my- rt f from any rnn-
pe^lloti ni i h thr PafIcrvi clana t hat anmher
n*| tlrnn( In endravorl nr In hreak w- i l l th*
bqc Ip L' liftd an even mnm unhappy experl -
rn<e t han mi ne *
f l ur Ho me or the Hol v Ghos t " la th*
riled sdmlaaion f th* Soci et y nf Hnl
rrurl ans "though * hundred rimuaftnd men
aliniiM have looked lip*u l r V*l doomed
t- remai n i i nt o i r h' d Imueeturhahl e out of
ghi i nd unrevealAd to th* whol e gndt***
^orli l forever"
An If In agreement wi th iMn desired mV"-
*rv Iho bcg| nnl r c" of the Srurlelv nt the
Pns v MrnaB are dlfflcull to And In hl i orv
That M wm founded by on* Chri sti an Ro*-
ei i rrei i tr a German myoti c who rJwHl for a
Uni* in India nnd Fgypl and c hi me d tn have
hi orb*d thei r f erret wi sdom Ib vehemanl l v
Aenl*d and sn |g th-e al al nment t hat the name
nf the aeer-r order Is d- f i vnd frnm hi" cne-
nnmi n Levrla ri*nl*s t h i t it was rMnbll9| i*d
in Gnrmdny hv him nr b Andra Val ent i n*
..r b> Marl i n Lut her CIh Imi p o f 11a fm nda-
i | nn bi all nr t h' s e are made by di ff erml
l ut hor e s eeki ne 1h f ouni s l n head
l . ewl a t*1ls of a reek** named Arnau I wh
had heard of a wanderful soci et y In Ei yi l l
whi ch held the ke* >0 "M s ci ence and nil art
At t he Instance nf n i i r l * ma g r e Arnnud wenl
Thnhsm In ?7S t D rfurn<?il lo Franc*
Twrn l l t - r nnd establ i shed t he ffr*t
f ! ns| rruciRit lode* The I acc wsa Toul ouse
a nH i lie yen r Sfi t
Fi r m Ihn I si arl w- hear nf If nil over
Furope II pursued its course wi th lh*
vari ous l Itirlurns nr riiflerlnc mnt erial, m
l l onal habit and cuaiflRl, but never defl-
nl l - l v
From lh* begi nni ng lh* aocl ety pretended
lo tran*mut* mal ala to n>Til*>iir lifa,
re*'*eB know Indge of s l u l w.ta ooci lrri n? H
dlslnnt plac*a and tn forcicl l the future
Vaughan, whn plnnled it In America l oal '
Hie R<aecruel an smne in order, he asld.
IHai II rflighi *lrb Inin the sol* and lor tilts-
i he land s|ti ihe Mi ought and tpi f l l of
Roqrru*1"nlin
lllliouah krnwn i o t hr wnrl<j as HrntUr.-i
m thr Rnv Cio^s a m e n exact etytoni ngc
l> deri ved rrotn ra Irtewi and rtwa irnaal
Pe w wi s 'annsld*r*fl by Ihe anci ent s an the
n. 0 !*l prwarf i l i n K ' r i nf gokl and the ero
al chemy Is th* synonvm nf llgUL In UJft
j hit Eif d o | ( c i r l fixed its mi ssi on Lhu-
Fnr wl i al ere rtn pr * v n e } nt In croaje.
Fur w* srr firathers nr the Rosie Crosse
We li svn tli* Mawin n*o-fl an1 n^rond ilgnB
Thi ngs for to came s e ran fnrletf ari ght 1
^om* nf iha anci ent hooka of the soci ety
mav hr i ron arent di ng to a al aternent msd*
Vv the head nf ihe order h-r* tn car pacUn
horary "hut r*rlr In a pri vat e place v h e r e
hr per | aI prl vl l sce I ftwm% show l hani fnr
lh* *diflcaf| nn ol Iriia *4p| s There ?onks
ar* rudely hound, printed on p l f i v n u and
' ei t her -nm* of Ike l eaves nre cri i mbll nc
fMim vary age M
Mor* modern wi l i i ng s s i s ilil ed Ilk* rhs
roll nwlng "Astrol ogi cal Lettera ' Deatn
d i he U f - | n Purnai n- Y" " Uf a an d Ael l v-
l i v tri H*av*n" "E rth a Fourfol d
^sl rnuom Ira| All*gnrl*a at the B'hl* ** dk
Theae hooks nrd ntfaera llkfl "Con IIn u11*
or Life a Co; ml I* Tr ut h" by Frol , W M_
I.^h htvood B n nnd flip Rorderlln* of U f a . 1
v v Gt i a l i v u s Xl t#ri . may r# hud hr addreaa-
h | f th* nuhllahers and ^rH3kn*ll*rB lo iha
S5 T?. T A who i r * at IS John sl r**t New
Tnrk Mil ot her hooks ntended for Kinder, a
and fMstuiaiea r* clvaii out myaterlaual v
a! llie "cal l es* " and all are jrarni d no; tn
permit an outsi der in see them To do *o
1- lo commi t a crl m* hv maki ng hs Rnsl .
crn*lfl r s - cre l * ^ mmo n
Th* ITrrrifirrj Is l h* affMa) organ nf "Met -
r ' nnllion Pol lege" and Is i ssued aeml moni n-
1r II gl vee Ihe cal endar l or the month a
l i l orraphr nf some lllllet rioua Ini ti ate m i
l h*r Inno^noui i nai i er \ t noh of PHn-
rl pl rs and Pracl i r* for TtoaJcrvr lana" *a
isaued for neophvl e* 11 waa wri tten Tor
i he f raterni t y hv "Kbel 4nat h#r book
lirjq|iFrl hv te "Th* l anfl marka
he Most Hnlr Order of "he Golden arfl Row
r ra* and i h s r*ontflutlan of Bhe Sncl e' M
Ro^lorurlara In AmerSra: to whi ch ara ap-
nerided lh B* Ti * n f MeMnnoIHsn Cell e**
f? R 1 A "
Pr a y e r o f t he Rni l c r nc l aa
Her* la t i n St ayer c f !he BosJcrurl an
whi ch he la exported Id repeal *t l eas t Or t a
l i mes dally "In a slow f orcef ul and Inteflee
manner ":
"Grei i r**ntral Fl am* III** w* Mrari ra.
il iee s n ailnr*. the* w* Invoke noi ns a per
son hu a* E- aanre Pnsnr xl sdom l / r fc
s r d L I* I r u r f i ' * 1 Re wl ' h a In rhie and
all laudabl e il nffar la kings
"Inrlalhl* Fral rra of Ihe Rm i Croi s l ^ i
Vnut gui dance be mi nl f i ' t i through - ounaq1
of i he Worshi pful Ad*pi In tMa and *K #n-
ture cnnvoc a[inn* **
To all l'i* ecr*l publlratlRS frnm ffM-h
lh* ahn%e flat* were d***wn iDoenderi nls
1 \l l rgl i nce"
MeiroDai ii an Coll egr S R I A nrWnowi-
edree el l es l anre lo i he magi i nd ofllrers nf
Hie hIeh cnuncll *f Ihe ^orl etaa Rnaiewn &i n i
In America a* the s nr e r e l m annrre oP ' h*
ros l rruci au *r| In Ihe Drilled S i l i c a of
Ameri ca. The hous* cf i hi I S Ii H ri h
ent si t uat e in the ci ty of S i s Tc r k"
Catholic Charities Preparing to Americanize Expected Hosts of Immigrants
k k X t ' ' !K "I i . . . . . . ' rr,irr ...
* - . oi l I*, r. - . 1,1 i,n h i r , - -
Mil uniiriclaTmE i-l- irl r
I" . Inei nc all Inui slnnsiiK nr Ai u k mc .
They u i c m ILoi i l h IIi f v l:^rv Hi . mt*ii n
i r e nl t h' <rorJt nml annrr^ atr.l ?h." *IB' I
I c r r r Ti m. enne b, i l i oi l rl i f Yr -
Ii*.*. Ili*v klnre llir fiin^Ai', n . r . Pnil^h
mrn fi lio t i me long l .nown t h, nril l l t . , ' 1*
bill n , ' , r I n f . II* ITInnliic unl:l l l i rv m,
(n nrrt nrr<* l auchl h.- l h , t ' t r i r ,
of i hcl r rliurvl i u l i . i Amrrk. i mt shi *J
rul .l i n n In Ihrrr
Tlie InrrEol n; s1:i ltnci.l l t| uol i noo
from Hi , oiT)':lnl "-per' of , | . . i * l a u r i , '
romml . al on rnr t i l , Anrlull oco", of Vr
York eubml l l mj i o Archhl sl i on l U y ^ i It | .
c l l ^l (tn no r i ai npl r rif trhnl Mm Cal hnll.
chnrl l l c. nr hP An hHlo<.ise nf S , w VorL
hope 'D , T i e n l Into f c i > forei un [Kirliti In
Ihe Archrll ocme
T h , ul ngl nc of "Ai nerl ta l h al ui * in
i he fl<pr by n trroun nf Pol i . n m , n I,
weekl y oc. urrpnee III the imhoalrBom ur L
Joi c pn' , pari sh
In thi e parlsfl nf i he Arohriil Keie <j| \ , a
Tor i i l l , populati on I. nl mosl excl us i vel y
Pnllsh. *-<! more i hnn fifty per Cifni or ' he
stlii li a nro naturnll xel l hmerl cnre more t han
htilt of Ihe remal nner liftvo thei r flrsl cl t l i e n-
,1il| i panen. nnd t he fevr who <1n r ot know
Enellsb are at t endi ng ni ght clunora where
Ihey learn i he l angus c e . the cl ement* of
Amerl ran cl l l scns hl p and The elixnlfleanoe el
the "SLar Spalilfled Banner and "Amerlra
The Importance tit Ihe role hemp; plnyed
hy i ha Cai hol l c Cli urch In the wnrk of
Ameri cani sat i on can h , *r, n In Iheee fl eures
Uurl nE the Iasi period nl nct l rr Irmnlfcra-
n o e . precedi ng flio mar, tho hulk of Imml-
e r nr f . enme from Lati n Europe, especi al l y
l al y and Poland nr tlieae. ni nety pci cent.
o n l r e l j - d i e per ucnl . are Cathnli c*. nu
i . . oon as i l l ey eel t l e In a commi i nl i * t hey
ind ll ialr fnml l l r, at tend a Cnthol lc Church,
vor t hem t he poai or hc - o ny a Iha leader
nl Kuldc. not merel y In 'Iflnc* spiritual
ut al so in the sol uti on c f f i h e l r prac i kal
aroblem*
\ v a . t cnmpal i m ^ f > m*l cant wi t l nn has
can mapped out h:'T^Jpcrta under Arch-
Slshnp Patri ck 3 Mat es, mh k h Kill I , rar-
cd oul a* a pari of l h* Cmhnl l c charl tl en of
ho Acohdloresa of Ne w York now bei ng or-
mnlieil
Men in offi ci al poal tl on. agpeclaMy In Iha
tnml yral l on . ervi ce have reccnnl ced Ihe Im-
.orl ance of Mnklng Amarl cani ut l nn vrllh
ihuroh work. The chl et exami ner of Iha
inl ted Sc al e . Bureau of Nat ural i zat i on in
lew Tnrk ci t y, M m o r A. S i u r g , . s l i d
t in not a Catbnllr. hut wi t hout reserr1, 1
am Kil ling to go on record a s eari ng ihat
more actual re. ul l a li*ve been achi eved hy
the Catholics In thi s educat i onal work of
nuki ng c l t l . e n, of f or e l gn. r . t han by any
al her body of whi ch 1 nm c o nr e nunt .
"In t ho f orei gn di st ri ct , tho prl cets am
Educational Work Along Lines ThatHa\e Proved No Successful Among Poles and Italians
Will Be Expanded to Embrace Entire .ArchdioceseWomen Taught in Home Circles
fiu ,l rm, i cn ilr". n i l l fr, y Know hnth i bc
Isni ri mu, nl Hi* iiiitnii;r.ini nntl rn>;l|eli t | *y
: n Ii, , Iii ifideiirc vT the f orei gner . nd ted
him hi l e a l , , > i he nrnelir., i o he (Jerlved hv
Ii ulv aib.inilng l i ne new ci' UMry n* thei r own
In ni nny , Mie prl osl r cnv- l i tlicm in
ifmil l . . *. , ne i , | l t hem bow In m;i k, u.il
llmlr | i *uer* nd hel p i hcm In e vni v elrpi Ii
I* * viiiendld li isi ii ni. e pt const ruct i ve n*
t-ln:Il sn. ml work I hope ih> > k, c p II i n
mid exiernl II. nnd I mil cni l rcl y In Act'r<l
w11h III, i rcl i hl sl mp1* pl ans In tlilu mai l er "
h'nlhnr Sguol nsi l l aryompllsilica his end. In
an liiler.-Biliig ivnV l i e Inis u i ari i fllen fur
f i e r y (Hinllv , 11II s ticiMd uf Ihe rlllioriNhip
of i he f.nher. when nnLurallzetl when first
papers n r r t t oken oul and whe n II la ti me l o
apply for t i e second paper* In Mb pnrli h
i h , r e a r , si , out lour hundred vol es polled sr
every el ecti on. The numb. r of ndul l s noi
rl i l xeus and uMhuul i hcl r t l r. l | >ap,r* Ik le*
Ilian four P* r cent . T h e , people i I*p Ibrir
0UH> ci ti zens acrl aual y They ore Laught
thai Ihe i l ghl Io V.nc l* Ih i i h a dul y and ,
pi i vl l c ee which snouii i r.cu n, n o t f c t n l
! or i n , m*n .if the r>iil.li who >1" not
Ulum ICncli-h l-'Blher Srrtll'llisk I hit* nr
C.liilird an eveni ng rrmrre of loMorj* hrotu
T an In !I o' cl ock r.ip four nl cbl a a i H t
b Is i u i :iilri> men ni i l l cr in III" pirnrli lnl
p.-ioi m a; i l l , rjc*Ux rlu U . . hililre uoci i >>'
In t h , OB-, t i me nm1 stru.-gtr- m Icrirn Itie
IdPkUIgtf |T 111, c o u r i l f t i p y -Ml* t'l
a l ' p i It un i cany Mnny "I 'l l" Ui ,i l **
i . i *i f i f t y; f ew am youngnr thi-n f went y-
ilvp i hvy li nvc ir.llcd hai d H day /it heavy
rnniimtl lol'oi they are weary pbyBlciilly
niuj l h , i r mlnil* re not ul cr1 ^tlll Un'.'
unie nm] lenrn
Ti le memhera ol :i cl as s whi ch bogwn In
Nrvci nht t . I?ll) i-iiT no . in A| ul l . JSL'b
l e a d Olid wri i o elt ni> nl try 1"
Lngl ikli Ti l l s Ib progress l i n k , I "h. . ,>na
cnnel ders (lint ph i i i c ol i hrj p > . . cn
rear* anil ivrltn I heir o * n Innuuagr '<'n-jr
knutv l i e ward, mid minde ol .vm' c i ,
rtt.rl scrip, o' them bnowr Uic four s l i ms *, by
Ii n l They l ui v, reiri in cl ss* Ci vi c* for
AmcrIc.ir.v In 11 , Maki ng, and part , of
Kngl lbl i tur Comi ng Ci t i zen. , 11 rh* eui*er-
hii vi i. l ont of sohnnl s supplies the I, ocher
t l , church rroi Ides llte c| n**rrcim nnd pays
tr t he lira I I gi n mul Inri ecnfst expense*
Tin i r i r l u i Ptl>* Mi r y F* r r , | | . know* no
r o l h h i i i errforc i lie d i e s Is Lontlueied en-
llrol y In Engl lxh.
ril e vile. Ci/, uf t hi s vent ure In Engl i s h L*
MLiII.II 1,(1 in uni t by KiMhcr Hgusl nskl i o
i l l , filvt Ilui r ti |n a churvp ll prl e-bi kl ng,
' Tho l i o. rd tit Ed11oni on llns startl ' d pl ant
Inails 1ri te.mlil ng fnrclcnerii," s.iid Father
Si; min is In 'hut It i s al most | mpc*l bl e to
Induce thi'Ke men ro attend They are shy.
i ssl i ful , .Ur.ill] In nppri u ri di cul ous bef ore
rt i l i nger, . The> I'onin Lo our sohonl bveauns
i hry know t hey wi l l he among f ri ends The
i la held In the parochi al school , whi ch
l l i rv feci i s Their own, for It wp* built from
their nnn roni rl hul i ons
IT
%
j

w v v v - v v v y w v - V / V V V V d - V - W . V V b jigA* ^-U V / V aV AZ V I
Itnmc ci rcl es for l | i * women have been
n i . s n l z e d In the same pari sh but no c Ibk bs s
Have been held as yet because of the l i c k of
teachera Th . homo ci rcl es are so planned
i hat fire women l i vi ng In the same nel gl l
bnrhonj woul d meet aevcral af t e r noon. *
week at the h mi n of One member, and t hers
a vi si t i ng t eacher would Instruct t hem In
Engl i sh All pnsi or. RgT.-e on t hi s poi nt
that II I* MUi.h eas i er l o hrl ng the teacher
to the home than the mol hor i o i he trschnr.
xvi i l i ont the coope r , l i on or the hoard' ot
educati on tnia rannot be done ext ensi vel y.
tn the f l e he n c at ho l i c centre* thi s l ack or
t eachers I* felt m^re keenl v t han el sewhere.
Many of the I i ahnns are Illiterate. Tn- v
must be t aught not merel v Engl i sh, but tha
pl ei renl * of l endi ng and wri ti ng. Severn]
Ameri can ooi t ors of Ital i an descent are
1- achl ng Engl i sh in smnll groan* but th*
re nsre*sarl l y iLOlllod. fn an Ital i an di s
trict re ar i ha Ea*l El v>r and Thl rf y-lhl Td
t r, et Father Congrdo. pal l or of the Church
of the Sacred Heart , has a smal l group of
adult* which he hi msel f Inst ruct . In the
ev- nl rg.
The l i al t nn. are wi l l i ng to t eam, but t i
have rot yet enough faci l i ti es. Father Con-
pedo said
Tn many of Ills forei gn di st ri ct s Liners srs
s number cf chil dren who come to t hi s coun
t ry when Ihev are about l n or 1J and It Is
difficult for them l o go Id t he publi c school s
In Ihnsn dislrlclB. for none or tham have
cl as ses tor t h' s e embryo ci ti zen* wheoa i h
, i * t aught Engl i s h. Duri ng the s i r th* nead
for Engl i s h cl as ses for chi l dren was not
Tell brcntl M Imml gratl o 1 was at a al and, ti l l
Wi th Ihe arri val of t he new tide Imml granta
from sout hern Europe ti ll s problem will
hs V, to h , met. The parent s most of Ihem
Cathol ic, will want lo send ll i el r chi ldren to
school , but t hese chil dren cannot be put in
cl as ses wl l h ot her chil dren. They mus t ll rst
be t aught t he l anguage of thei r country.
Paper Made of Cotton Waste
* N PhM E.RI Cfe.M lZA .TiOh* C L A S S . F A T H E R . S Q U & I M 6K I P R E . 5 i D I M S
E
VEN In the days ol s n s c ut e pri nt
pnper Ihurl . i ee It la a far orr from
col inn in paper but t he Forest
Product i l abor s r or v of th* Uni vers i t y of
Wl i eonal n. af t er l ong experi ment , ha s *uc*
roe. i ed in t ur ni ng out * hi gh grade pi nn-
deri ved from wa.,1* cot t on seed hull !. The
new paper I* ext remel y fi ne In lextill'e. ex-
c l i e n t for hnnd nil bool; uae and Is di f f i
cul t (o tear.
Durtng the v e a i s nf [he war when cyn-
s ervai l cn waa the wai ehwni ' d In l ndu. l i ' 7 i n ,
l aboratory tool: a promi nent pnrt In tl ie
mni ' emsi i i Hml devoted i l l resources, Urn*
and st udy l o means of l es seni ng the nnnual
ronei impTlon of the namral produrt* of (he
cni i nl rr rapeol sl l y t hose de- ol ed ici n a i
uses. Wh i n the o a r n i l ended and l h ,
count ry ret urned lo the ari a of peace t h ,
Inbornlory In turn devoted Itself lo ai di ng In
i he ne w probl em* of ' ha qav. Tl i e e h i r l . g e
In new* print paper came nnd i he c r y was
beard from ocean l o ocean The l i b o r u n r e
he x t n experi ment i ng i n w . s i e mo ' e r l . l * In
Ihe hops of finding a new proce*. fm* i he
ms n u f a c l u . e of pri nt peper
Cotton seed hu l l , came l o l bs at tent i on of
Ihe men conduct i ng Ihe I n n . It nppy. ne
i IiaC in the gi nni ng of cot ton s ome fi brous
mi t i e r is lefl on the liiiMs of i he seed* anrl
I* Is Impossible l o r e mnr . It. Cninbined wi t h
llie hull* lh* two form Ihe bo els for Iha
rmnuf act ure of a wood pul p Then fol
'co-ed the const ant experl mems ana fi nal l y
Abe new paper wae produced and pronounced
nf n qual i t y sul t nbl s for the hi ghest grade
Not onl y has t oe new f ormul a s s s l . i e d In
obtai ni ng a new suppl y of pul p for t h , ma n
uf act ure or paper, but It l *a has gi ven to
tha Uni ted Si ai e* Government a means for
l i e di sposal of 710 GDI] 000 pnunds of ent tog
l inters. whi ch w*re ncpul red duri ng t he war
for t h- manuf ari urr rf expl osi ves Si nes e x
pl os i ve. no l onger are reededat l e s i t rot
on the scal e m wtiro bol l l e* were a dai ly f e a
ture In t he life of Europe the Government
found Itself with thi s l arge suppl y of laf*
over materi al l i s ui l l l ai t l on. accordi ng to
llie Forest Products Laboratory, in pep*'
mnnuf i r l ur e Is or great commerci al Im
portance
Ho far mu I. known there wa* no means
for t h' uti l i zati on of th* Government "up
ply of l l nl ere wi th Ilia possi ble cxcepl j rn ae
a ent i l e food Thi s w s . u n u t i . f n c t o r y be
t s use or lh* preponderance nf the fi brous
mai l er in i he hul l s and i he nllgbt nouri sh
ment In Ihe enti re cat i on seed
War dr obe Mystery Sol ved
t CFTTNESE Gorcrnmeni r i pre. ef uat l va
\ who was new to Ameri can ways
* e s me lo the home of sn -miner.!
New York usnker fi a week . vial I II vt a*
wi nter but hr came wl l houc baggi go and
yet every day lie appear. d ut dinner with a
change of garment s
A' first his lioateaa nondored now h. n a n -
ngeu It. but soon she di scovered t hat his
body was hla trunk, and that Instead )f p u t
ti ng his cl ot hes Into n trunk, ha put hi .
Irunk Into hi s cl c t h. e

THE SOW AND NEW YORK HER\t3 >, 8 TODAY, APRIL #8 , 1920.
Woman Initiate Exposes Weird Rites of the Rosicrucians
Fearsome Oaths and Exhibitions of Magic
Described as Chief Features in
Ceremony of Induction
T S t** gei#r*3 ra4 I r-J li fewpo to tfcs
I meat rtcenl eeseputat!'*-* or i d ?, tfca
m fumlog fane. acd to th# **at as'ro*
r V S: -f date, frrU Mount
. are In N(w f s f i who
; * - * * ar tha* rrany hran'tea of ths
1 - stoe.c y M ist In Aniri*s. H.
: L - t . F. F. c . ara-.d master B#n-
r : a H lasporBlor oP th* ^oA secrutiaa
- -he 0 tP S v>. shares ti t's I gnorarc#
*.) v 'i n, of lL.fi? to, for he navs in his
! *'.*>ni to* *?<*!in Air**r!e*:
tv t h l 'ti i l ' 4 Su?s t tt r t 1>as
9 ; cT p-gj-xtoi n-re :! purporting to b*
. r.*-'*r r!ur. ifcrre Is !c truth but ore
*. i**r. (iricinai and perfect Roan*
* * onti r, srtiirti i s known fc* one on'y
* A j r;* rt and M f tL M nr**r
T CraHs.' er .* u:tirersal end world
's' m.-yrt is 18* tr.angl* wiiS the Wtint
r trd
- - rrun4* p l eori a win
* a s'vr.| niin* person* -oho thought
- V: s *!! *'**.* E-?i<:ratl ar^m !n thi s
* *:ry I t Is thar the American society
ba Sr front 1513. l i t mad#a misreading
B wl ri nal inoretMona from th* I rtitf-
r"-,j *hi*n in l ?|S he called upon th*
r- ;- ' -f Ehvo; : '1 Ft^Fearefc help tl m
"' * l'.<sse r* of the Ttory rross h#met
-j T C'P* :i -f te c / j I-J ret te eth#riti#.
IT*,r t!: irfepts ?i*d rs>t*z;lcd the date to IMS.
I n tVr early prrt of That year. with. lh as*
.: - c? Serretary-ftorteral T hor
K . sc '* '* i'.-l nu<-r! tlw m-xjn wax i n Sag-
'.ar.j r." &rn-Q-J vi !i charter end "bla^te
i : U" F-'Ur.'i'T Lftwi'. cati-5* togrtter a l i ttl e
pf rin* rr***! and to frrni a cota-
Tfj V-'. to cr.s.r'jaTo a Snprara* Council Ter
A r. -|c?
G ravl h of the Orgi aci uti an.
Tt-.n> preliminary crk wrnt forward
fsid;iy. I n 31arclt fifty pcmjnw had takr?n
tii* "l.r!Lr!l!aary oath Irr the BiecX
On April i thi rty of the tnoat ac-
fjv^ Tcorkere tnct at * proposed trdg^ ronm
in Seventh ai rni j e and there sea then they
constituted ttisms^lwes the fi rst true
crucian convention of the order ever held
in the Wrap!* to America.
Since then.1 glowingly reports J hiunaer
Tjewls. "the order has grown amazingly
There are trow assoetatei with us huri'lr*>1s
ef ra,"T1chania, land owners. r.ew=pap*r cdl*
!o:J , Government officials, physicians, sur-
pft'r*. lawyers. srieBtiils. profeBSionar men
sr i women, artlata. arti sans, laborers at l!r-
tl f tritd^s. all working f or a common gcoa
m i i nHi lBs an a common level.*
AI on :q the aheep were separat'd from
the goats. ar>d societies which had gained
:.~rortety as being lodges. Sc, of the Rosue-
inelars were ealced to give an account o?
ilt-'rmnelves. Many o( them dl4 w and d!s-
iiaSmed the I ntention erf representing om.*
c* *Jly ths great aecret order One of ti.ce
t >i M ar Heindel. a wrl tf r on myrtle rub.
' rt. ETa pl al r,ea that he had. I nd'e-l
fo.-rtdsd the* Rosicrruelan Fellogehip. hut
I t medo no piwtenalen to temporal pi xer.
ATf k. Marie Russag al^o explained th* nt"nn-
Y\ z and perwera cf her ^Temple of the Rosy
C:TSe."
tha Rosleruelan faetorr of I>r. Cly-
ir.cr. at Alienloirn. Pa., the American au-
thorl ted eoclety had more trouble. From
th*s printing centre huoks went forth brn i i -
csst. among them one called a "Secret Bonk
G l ri - f rh F i rst Fprtj -nl n# D cgrtti ef the
I !!;a!ssi ! ef tha l U ^l attel i B OrStr." TU*
l ock ae'd for HO. But gey eosBadtSgn bg-
t Teen Dr. Climsp and th# true R sgcen>
cia?'s was finally disproved.
W l * t la a RosaecrueUa? Hez b Dr.
L ewis's assurer:
A R eneeuek a ene who U tet a Ufa at
attainment, di i etml atd that befora ha eom>
pistes thi s cycle or period cf earthly exll t-
rnco ho shall hare aocomplbhad througl
personal 4esrw soma deed dgoodness for
the betterment of the human ran.
"The R osaeondun have no thing to do
wt.h any ether relljiuB, l ndn^nf tho Chxia-
t!an religion They created tha i *d M Of
the cross, they say. and the Christiana
adapted It- They do not teach eptritasUHta
Kor reedlumshlp R oA ccrudaE l i a hae iUt-
i ra t#do with Topi or other phJ loettjphj. I t
ae'ia tin books or degrees purporting to con
tai n secrets ef I nitiation. I t has regul ar
'*** cr tempta I n vaj-lr-is cStieo, etch wtth
l i s i Blr ef i nr tod under ef c hi i ; I t fata
also It s grand I ndgra and tta guprama I Mga
is I n this city. The work nf the Ataerfcaa
branch I s outlined by the supreme nuadl nf
i be world and I* garret. Tfca funds are col
lected by rrruH f conirtbuilona.-
The ftosaccrucians lodge of New T ctk dty
has appvtentiy judged I t wise te use unU trr
name than He famous onei I t fuecti ecs as
a scclety f or eduraxtional purpoiaa as the
Metropolitan College, I ncorporated, The
president ef thi s college was formerl y a
J esui t pries* and I t tut* a lixge ssdi ty of
adepts asd i nitiates and prchatlontre, with
branches and conrecdons i n other cities.
T el ia of Weird i Bi tati oa.
V -cti rga and clashes cf the ^coUfgV era
h:d I n the Masonic Temple i n Harlem.
Classes f or ih* I nstruction of prohstiocers
no h'l d weekly and the 'ii:iL!a.tB." e:ms of
whom ere called "I ni ti ates of Tih^t,** meet
on the l oth and l ast cf each monlb. All
tsiefliltigs aro h^ld at night ard the reJ lglous
m-?;lrg*. su-cailed. etan at ml i cl ght
A !!d-v* for prohatloa is ottlyed to
sh-iw l etters from three well kEu*n business
men sho fcf.e known him for at 1c m: five
years. Wiien have ben passed on fa*
\cr-ihly by the oERcsrs he will be Eummyiicd
tc the I nltiiitlon ceremonlrs. As thaancl tnt
and tnvc(i*a! order I s truly mystical and R'-
r n , to kccr.* these cpriamnlfs are cna
must depend on what I s tol l by persons who
have pone far as to have the ejeptdence
and then hacked out. A women of n high
* r - t of *ntdi!g?nca ard genuinely **ee*l-
!nsr'r had Tht eape^I erca ar.^i old raireat. She
tells fh*- r>f her J aitlatfoa in gwd faith
ar.d t>e wiMirg *o sign her -taECmcnt
II by do.rg so any g'rM would be gfilned.
"A norher wnrmtn ami a man were th*
olh^r r-andldates t*-r initiation beside# my
self. tid ?he. Wf w*re fovked In a atosl?
ant-rhai rher while the society carried ca its
Tituai In the main aunlTorlum Gecesit rally
we harnt a H?-d vn!re raised !n epceeh or a
M ft of eo.r r ' ch:!':*. by* these Cttat to us
muffb1! I teiS'--* with the woman candidate,
who nac very n nrous. and learned that ebe
mourned a dear r>!at:r* and !rt the hope of
x^Uln.e ir.r-i veinmun!cation wish her spirit
-l i - had j=tniKlit th11 ild of the Rcslcruclsns.
T h' wai t candidate I mpressed me aa being
I nfiiiettcHl hy curiosity simply.
A* Eh- stroke of mlflnlyln tii* doors werw
thrown open anj we three were silmltied
I nto ike big chamber. I t was dimly lighted:
An at'tmV s* " vt 200 or 200 (-errors, ea-h
wear i re a Hack robe with a black headdress
and mnnk moved !n pruLtsalor. paar u and
around the halt. K aeh on?, whether mas or
uruniftit. carried a ere* wtth a red cose upon
Member Who Resigned Tells of Attempts
to Make Her Pay Penalty for With
drawing From the Order
A HOSiCRUCI A N i n f / t e PROCESSI ONA L R I T U A L a i {A c*
M E T R OPOL I T A N CQL L EGrE.
I t, lighted by electricity. At the head cf the
Precession walked two men, one beirl ne a
bowl of aacrlficjal bToad and the other 9
skull. These were also I lluminated by elec
tricity.
"When thn prBct*yipn patiitpfl rear
the lop nf the roooj v.e. the Candida'.?*, orpiu
hllndmltled-artj ted befqrx , them. Then
aihs * err edinlr !s!*fc(J tH us I wl-b I
could r-member liow th*E" wrr* pfc
bet I do nnt. Th^y wove t^ng jind we wtre
asR-d to repeat ih?m I n periinns. and al I
recoiled Is that the oaths were very weird
and wild. T h- principal oatb gaa couched
in quaint l anruf e. which were to I
cams down from fourteenth century.
The last oath or the serie? was that ec
would csvf-r reveal the Ectrrls of the order
tr exhibit to an ouui J rr any of the l i tera
ture f rite Ro=icnclfins.
The fold? were then removed Horn our
eyes and we wne glvsti seats in a circle
wrh|:<? fni?'a:es eave oshlbltions of magic *o
prrvo wimt powers can be gained by a dili-
ger.t si c >r.L
"T rroug'i oat thj* exhibition the ad|l-
num remalnea flimTy lighted, bat the altaP
gl i h th* cross end rt&a shone brtlliantly.
I n til* Hrclo i n which I eat to witness
whatever mirvela might he vouchsafed there
ware, f think, ghaut twenty-four persons,
new memhern end we three candidates. I n
ayr midst rl ooi sn iniitato of Tibet with
bLs feet rtoti af en tbe hare floor, w* could
n hfae dimly end ka gredusHy fade-a from
view ee I f lie Mnfc I nto the floor. As s-joa
u he bed K mpM ely dtoappeared tram eun
r i n k l f s vote* was htarl from the alts#,
end turni ng our eye* thhe we eew him _
standing I n (tent ef the crees
This i w nH wonderful hut i t did n
content Um male seeker, who asked f or f ur
ther miracle*, end hie request was echoed
by w ntsl vefsetL The I nltlsta agreed to
produce dmt f i etb rows with the dew on
them end reuse them te Call from the ai* lo
ear midst. A pparently be <itd IbLs. The
rowr f dl one hy one lti the midci of the cir
cle. each one wet wi th dew, a* IT freshly
pluekrf- The wesson was wi nrfr end ti n
I nitiate utoed rar removed from ui . near i he
al tar Following I bis demonstration h i l l
i ng further In the way of magic was don*,
and to repeated request* for more the adept#
frankly cafd they ware exhausted.
eri gaeti aa Carri es P n al tf ,
1 wont to one or two rla&sea after tWt
frer-eral meeting, but 1 decided that I eld
net care to carry out my plan to become
an adept member and asked to he permitted
te resign- Tbe aecreUry of Metropolitan
College, who I s the wife f a dealer In se
cret society equipment I n Maiden I tr#, re
plied to t ow request i h* t I could be allowed
to rwSyr only by paying I nto the society
a sum equal to ore-tenth of n r income ami
by returning sll l iterature that I had ;>r-
13wed o purchased. I have done mi l ker
red hate received many i cterg from officer*
and adepts which are felriy th.vn.it.iir.fi tu
thei r bbi ut e. I t has come ro my
ekicc tryi ng to I re1? rayjelf from any roj-
cteti an s^th the Rc-slerncuinv tl i at another
a-irlraiit I n endeavoring fu break wi th i l <
sociey had an even mure unite,-py exptri -
vcvv than mlno."
*'Our Ho=* of I ho Holy Gh-t.** I s lh#
vetted admi^*lon of the Smiety o? R-j s I-
crurians. iriotivh a hundred thcusaRd ir*n
fhould have^lcok-d upua li. is y-t doomtJ
1v remain untouched. J ?rrl urhabl e1 out o?
right, and unrvcaled I * l!:e wfcole gcd.CSS
world farever.-
As if I n ajrrewnent with Hds desired mys
tery the befrijinln.sv of i he y?.:ri y o- the
Rcsv f tota arc dHH-ult te F.rd I n history.*
T hat IE was foueded by <?r.e Christian Ror -
er; r5*,i. a l l ermar tmyctic who dwelt for a
lirsie In luflta and Fs>Tl Ctainsfl lo have
alr-nrbed ti ei r secret wisdom la veh^ir^ntly
d-nltd. and so I s I he statement that the svime
or eho secret ardor i#dertved from h!s 'yr-
nstneu: ! / ; ? denies ttwt i t was sT.iWii.V.?l
In r^rsnai(y by Tilmr hy Andren* Valentine
nr hr M l ri-i L uther. Claims of its f ourdi -
t an by all a? the**? are mad tT diilcfcut
autnr.n, s+ I hr fnunlsi-i V sl
l .-w|s ieJ2 of a : a. :*r narked A rcaint wj^o
h^d h- qrl nf wrnd*-rf<i? so'**: in K rvpt
which held tho key to all l i enee '*n<t ail art.
At the ItisotfjLe of Charlemagne Arnau-I went
t* Thtfcto I n T19 A. !>, r4arfitd to Fh-ancv
dx year* I vleh and tsl.iWlshtrt the ftrpt
f R eskri i tl m I ^bo. Th i*'*re n-us Toulouse
:iff the j ertr SOI.
From that s:art we h n r of I t ell over
T tiv-;? t? it par'i rd it? course with the
various nurture pf HiflJ rliij suteri i l , ra-
t'eml liab*t and cusiom. hat rovor BsS-
mieir-
From fh* bfgl i 'rk:^ The i wl el y prrl rrd- d
to traJ efifaut* metal*, to prolong life, t*
rouci s know!v1v of what waa occurring in
di stant pkem and ta foretell Um future.
V aughan, who planted I t I n A mol ea. K *t"
(hi RBstK nKlaE) ti ont tn order, be said,
'that It might sink I nto the toll and fertilize
the bind with the thought and aglrft or
Hoeicruvlea!m.1'
A lthough known te the world an Brothera
of the Rosy Crow* a mete exact etymology
I* derived from tos (d*> and r o do l l '.
Dew era* caoi U trtf by the ancient* an tbe
toast powerful solvent of geld end tbe cress
I - alchemy i s the aywasym of l i ght l o HJ I
bit f f of terti Axed I ts mJ ssloa thus:
For what we fin pi erage la not l a i r tu t.
F or we ere brothers of the Reel* Crosse:
Tt> hare the H uoe word and second sight
Thl rgg Cor to cotc* we eqn fortell ati gbt *
kerne cf the aTicicnt took* nf the terfei y
may be aeen. ac^rdl nj to staTenjent rai 'T
by the bead of the ardor be. In our v 't
l ibrary, hat only I n a private placv. wh-ro
by special prl cl i ffc I may *hw i tem f i r
|! #d!H- sljDR of true adept*. These
are rudely bourui. printed or, i-Apysus
l eather: i nt ef the leave* * i e crtirtaL inv
from H r* sge.*'
More modern writings are tilled tike the
following: Astrological L etters D si ii
and tbft L ife I n Purgatory,** L.lfa A ctlr-
l ly In Heaven," 'Bi rth, a Fourfold K v?::!.'
Astrocomicaj A l tffcri es *jf tbe Bible." A-.
There ixnkA and ethers like "Cbatinuity
wt Life, w CQQcnu T ruib." by Prof. W. j j
I jockwood. "Beyond the Borderline cl U!*-.*
by C osi atus Myers, may be had by addr*S-
I ng the publlsheia and booksellers tv (lie
S. R. f. A , who are at fa J ohn street. New
TorTt. bat other books I ntended for elude:, i*
ard popul ates ate given o j \ Tnyrterioutiy-
at the i rflfg* .* and all ai t esratd rot i<
permit an cr* W (r to *w- ihem. To do j o
1s to commit a edn- fty nai i us tbs
ecuchin secroi* cttimoi
T he Sfercxirp i#. the )!ticja1 *r3 ^n tf
v-pcllEBn CaHfsre'' and i - ! Femimor.tTi-
ly. is el vsi the rakndar for the munth. a
Uozni i l i y ef snme llluetrio^* |ri?*ic eus
othf r iRnocuuiis nr,atler. A l e k <>f "Pri n-
'cl rl rs ard Practice tor Rosicrurlmr.s IS
If su m for nrcphyi es. i t was written tor
ih f ni ernl ty by K hti ' Anciher book
cherished i y sreker* lT he L i ri snrk- i of
i t* M ist Holy O i hi of I t? Golden and K wy
Cres-. Ltid th* Constitutlnit of the SocI c^b#
Rorierucana in AnivHira: to which ate ap
pended tha By-Law* of Me.Topclltau College.
S E. r. A-
P rayer al the Roi l eracfen.
I !re Is The proyer of The Ftcrsicrticlan.
which he i s expect'd m rtprac at least three
i l oi -t dally "ict a alow, fororful and I nterne
cnanr^r'*:
U rtJ i Ctntral Want*: IftR* w*. nntri tB ,
The we adore. rty?e e invoke: not as a Der-
s,in b*JT. as Efs-nce. P-wer, wfedotn. L l ebl
and L ife I ncarnate. l u with ua I n this and
a'.l la::(iab%* narlerak,^se-
InvisIWe f-Vatcr*- of the F.a^e Croi s: L et
veur mvdanr' e K iaaifesj threueh counsel
o! :lt T urfhl pl ul Adept in this and i l l fu
ture Ct'3*OC3l:ullS."
To all thf s w m puMI roicons from which
tbe tl xtr di ta verdrawn i s appended thv
"Allegiance
'>ieirop*!Il,in Col-r*f S- R. I A. orknowl-
edsce V.lviZlanfe to th- mval nr>l offlcere
tile Tijsb c^unrll of til ? loSs Rialrrurlaii*
r- Air.-r': a a* t?:' Un s-ury** of rite
ucij.n ur; in l i ? I ritPii {';: < of
Arr.tr-'*a_ Tit: lieu.-** *;*f i h- ? S k a t yre3-
tr.! ?;?uit in Us* city of N*>r. Vcrk."
Catholic Charities Preparing to Americanize Expected Hosts of Immigrants
"M
MIE than a more ef voices, f or
eign in i c i tn t a bi t elr^rtgew
but enuncLaurtg clearly, joined
In singing ail four atAnvia of 'A merica.'
They sang a* fhaugh rhey krtew the min-
1r.fi of the words and appreciated thei r elgnif-
irtnee- Th^y *atig an tiiough inspired. Por-
hap* they were, sine* the singers were Pll?h
men wh-a have long known the word liberty,
hut ntr^er knew [ta meaning until they caitw
to America and * re taunht by the pastor
or th*!r church wtwt America mi ght and
could mn lo (hem."
the forcgolrg statement Ts a quotation
from the offl'-tal rporl ef a speWaJ survey
cnmmlulon tor the Arclutlooese of w
Tork. STibnilttaii to Archbishop Hayes. I t la
cited as an example of what th Catholic
UaHHfcS <rf th Arehdlo^ere nf New Y ork
hope to extend into every foreign parish I n
rh* Aryhdlorrs*.
The rfngir.g cf ''Am^iica** fh* estate fa
** by q grenp of Feleh men, la *
*AWr occurrence in the Whrtolroam of SL
T'-reph's p*j>h
fn til!* psrlcFt of the ArcMlocsre of New
T-'rk the '* ezclu-'Aely
T*!!*h, yel roar* thnrt fifty per cnt. of ?h*
-'.j 1:i nsfj rnl i z-d Amerlcc??. nor *b*n
y ,?f cf tT, rtmtl C 'l 'r hv * thei r Hr>t ci i i r'n.
e:'P r^p*re. *fid th* V v whn da net V iew
T'-.eiitU lire nti>r l ^i r r*.sev
< k\- Teyrft Rryi^q*. ;h.r' !'n* rl ef
.rr- an ->:f h * of
t . - vs-tr R ,n.i ' nr i "Am^ri-*
Th* I r o r 'f - r -* af th.o rn:* teSTrc pl sj 1
1 the rathal 1.': I 'hurrU 1r> the werk a?
A r'drti i l i U k n tiift b* f 'n l r th*** Pp*;re
1 the !k,l ef active irw.tigra-
i -t!, r.recellne *httvr. the ct iffini-
t *-i' ram* frem I in K*:r'ipe. A "
|- 'd ar.il refrand. tJ these niref-- per reri
X' v ? r*r* ere -?hailrv. qrd
- j they actiie in a *amri!>jrliv tlicv
>- : their families at?*'-'! x <~r*h.clh Ch*:r-h
j .- them l i rt r ^tor h- o" th-
a iri (tulae. r ot rnrTflr In thI t't ; I
i ,u aj*a i n the eoiuiion cf :h* :r ii
r rcv>m*.
A vast cartpaJ kn ef AmH .-i-t?"
>*n marptd c it hy *i*.-** 'i f .v *-
-i-hop pa*ri-_k J . I lvye*. h <,nt t ai
*>d ei 'aa a prt of tf * Cs:hoT' < ir *
>.a of >' V rA r. .t c *
t
< in of rU tt r-*?t*l"o. !: 'I t
Educational Work Along Lines That Have Proved So Successful Among Poles and Italians
Will Be Expanded to Embrace Entire ArchdioceseWomen Taught in Home Circles
I mmigration mo-Hc*. havs the 5ru-
tortaure of linking A trerlcfinlation with
rfii i vh work. The chief examiner of thi
Untifu Plains Bureau of Noturei i ottan Iff
Kew Turk city, M wtoa A. PUirge*. &aid:
T m ret a Catholic, bat without re**rv* I
am wining to go on rv-rerd aa eaylr.K that
iiiOro artoai reaults have been achieved by
tlie tai hol i rs lit thin pducfftlanffl work nf
ijtaklftg citizens of forcfgrera than by any
other tody of vhxh 1 am conversant.
"I n the foreign districts the priests era
often of forelBu d*s**nl: they know hath th
laRtr^aae *-t tha imtnlcmntRnd f:n*!leh; they
ra'n th tonfider.ee cf th- L n l p u r and 1*11
hlni by d'l ov* the fc-ftefite ta be derived by
trul y ailoptfpg thi s new retur.try ns their own.
I n nny -RfM th* prlesia coarh tnem in
thrfr toll them how to Thake out
blf r * t*r*- end help th#-n In **T*ry step I t
I s * !n>tirc pf oonstr^cllv*,
irtotii >>>rlal ar.rk. I hep* they krep j t un
r- d i*. Trd f en entirely in areord
n,*V Fh? Arch I rhep'a pisr.s lo tW* rtatter.,
F>*iir FviM rehl *-comptl?h* He erd* In
n ltttorr<tteB way. J<* ha* a card fl>d tor
w\ trv family. *lthi arreord of the cttizeniMp
of the father, when naturalized, when first
rapera were taken mil and when i t la liaip tn
appiy for t i t second papers- I n his parish
there are about four hundred vote* polled &t
every election. Th* number of adults not
citizens and without thei r first papers lo tore
than four per cent. Th^se people tnBih^lr
duties a#dtieen* seriously. They are taught
that the right to vote la hath a duty and a
privilege which shciCfl not te regTc^eA
For the men of the parish who to nnt
know Enrl i j h Father Sgublneki has or-
gsnlred an evening course of Frcm
M l to 9 o'clock on tour r l stl s a week
about thi rty men gtatitor In th? parochial!
school, elt at the desks thrl r chfl^rer occupy
I n the daytime end ntruggte to learn the
l*ngu%S' of tho cour.iry th^r want to
adopt- I t Isn't, es^y. Stony af *tv- men are
pst fifty; tow are j-mugct b i n tw-nty-
flv*: they have relied h*rd aJ . day at hc* ^
manual I i tw ; tliey are weary phvriraHy
and thti r minds i * not atori. b;::i th*y
com* and learn.
Tii* tnMnbers of a *li*a whl*h bessn !i
Nov/mNr. 151?. g*h n'v*. In .I rri!. *fi*.
read er.d write etomerttory i t
English. TMa In progress Indeed when one
considers (hat some of them co*i>d not enn
read end write ihcir own language. They
fcrow th wo, dH and music of 'America.*
and acme of them know the four stanza* by
hswt. They have read In class Civics f*r
Americans In the Making.-' and parts of
'English Per Coming Citizen*.** The super-
I niend^nt of school* *upp1iea the teacher,
the church provides the classroom aiuf pays
for the beat. t!?ht and limllenlal expend**,
*nia teacher. Miss Mary Forreti. kcows no
Polish, therefore th* class La cecd lifted en
tirely in English.
Th* Sliceera of this venture i n English to
tir'Mite-d I n part by Father Sgublneki to
tfe f'lct that ft I an church undertaking.
'T he Board nf Kducaion has started night
S'hr^!!; fni toachl .g forei*rere.' said F athar
SyuMnskl. but It is almost lmpo?*|bV to
I nf'tre thr* n;en to attend. Thuy are i by.
bashful. r.fratd tn app*ar ridiculous before
strangers. They entne toourwchoot tjecaure
they know th-v will be am^ng friend* Th
cJ i -s ^ h- i i |n i he psrOEhis; eehnol. which
*fc*y is their wr. for [t was built frarti
t'-.tlr own cfthlTil utinns.''
Home circles for the tromnn have been
organized In the same parish, but noclqases
hfcfc hern held as vet because of the J ack of
teachers. The heme clrcl-rs are so planned
i hat five women living I n the same neigh
borhood would meet tsreral aftezrsons a
w*?k at the Louse of an* member, and there
a visiting teacher would I ntir>ct tticm m
Engl if h. All pastors agree o:i this j o i a: -
I hat |t ]* much easier to bring the teacher
lo the home than the mother to th* uacher.
Without the cooperation ef !l*.e bo-irdi of
^.Cucation this o-annot be dene extensively.
I r the I tal ian Catholic centres this lack cf
todctisra i s felt more keenly ih*n elEewhrro.
Many of the I tal i ans are I ill if rate Th*y
mart be taught not merely Encilsh. hu; the
elements of reading and writing, ?over.il
American pi si ors ef I iariati <tosrrnt arc
('acl :l r? K nell h re grnu-?*. to,it tbess
ft-** nT f tf nt ly ?n -ft KftilB J*.*-
tri ct nosr th- K .io rtiv^r ami T lilrtv-thlrd
treei f 'fttiior Cft*:c. J pi*rv- i? th.-* Church
of fi: Sacred I I far*., i?as a snr.vil ^ti ap of
u*iitv wh.d: he In the
ev-'alrvr.
The I taHnns are wl 'l lns *o toarr. but ww
hav net yet enough f al i i i i e* .' F ti htr Cca-
Ktdo e i:a
I n m^ny of thr fc^relga dK rl .te th-re arw
a cumber cf th'l i ren vho c~mc l th!*
trv when tliey are about 10 or 12. and It ts
difficult lor thfrn to go tn the public scho-tis
I n those district*, tor none of them h-tva
classes for l li we -embryo dl l cens where they
*i * 'aught Engll?h. Curing th* nr thf i xtd
ft.r English c7asj< l or children was nnt
felt l ertU K I ran-.iaratio i was at u standstiU.
tVjtli the arri val f the rcv ua* I mmsKraiits
from soutiicm E'zTvye tide piohltm will
to t-e met. The pareiiU*. most ti them
C#thollc. will w*n: to re::J thei r chtidron t i
School, but lh?.e vliltdren cannot te put I n
dnss'.*s with tiisr children.They must nr*i
be taught tbe l anguage of tbetr country.
London in Clout)5
E
i - T B r rrtat 11ty ins :'* ?* *f nr - .
TTl* *tm-*rfc*re *r.- i bsa a :,ln 1 -*
r ai ri l l dot,h[*. i! i y, r <" |
r.** curronis sr.rt m i r r eh*r thto^- g.** *
parti cul ar chAraotor to tiie si r over
ke Pari* L rrirtm rr s t to rk vrh!- *1 evrn
r'i - c ttftnns o- r.^t .I '.-K 'ih*. f V ;tnv
r r d-|V* away,
Th Britton CApli1 to rspecally
I sr I ta elTecto upon the ai moT vWr. ttheq
era of ita treat fogs Is tn full swim
V*al city I I I on to sight tor a* fnhAMUnt*.
hut vtowoS from th* upper ai r I t trevdl
tfcaa preatnt tha appearar.oa of a mstrep-
R .i atf vapor a.
P a p e r M a d e o f
E
v e n I n l b* <tiys cf an aruio rri nt
pi*-r ah^rf^ge. I t In a tor cry from
cotton to tePT. but the Forest
rv-Tdicts L.bora(-%ry cf the f nl 'c.- si ty cf
T- li n.efn, .-f!r Toug ezj -r.tnent. 1i>n *'!!-
cred<<1 I n turni ng '! * high Ernd tvper
tl*r|vc-l f 1**11 ws*l's cation seed t.u *. Tls*
u*w ysp-r to ertrerw-.y f*i.e in toMure, m-
f l >r .t for i ^nd and teok ti .a wrl it* diTfi-
cuti to i -sr.
L uring tt*t jc*r> r r the wnr wh-a rm-
fr*r\aticn .> tl,* ^*ti,liwo7<I i n iTvtoMrv. the
iabtraierv to, ^ n prrmtotnt purl !n the
rn^xtm r nd d-^nt l ito re^ur- es. time
* v | tmi] t-t or l*(ntv.g ihe J rbnuil
r-nhijmrll*,i f'f tt-* natural prAlu-.is tf t!,s
r;. ?rg<|Vlly fU.e* eV | tc ti r
Li.t i t , iti a i f ti'-lsd mi l th*
I'Vir.l'y* remmd T-v rl arri el p-s-:'. tTu
TsKrrttor: *1** t h Mit r 1v
F A T H E R . B Q U B l N S K l
* v t.r.ir 'f , , i Vt*- i hvi xcg
to t ew* r-i t^r >vine n' 4 th* ' >*<
i v m ' i ' 'j c*-an l !i ! j |w '* ''r'
lr* e>[ et'inrcM' g in !*' t i%t*rl i l - in
tor -r? *' *: v r - ;re r*? fa; ipe
tri i i i fi j -ir* * p. li t r *r-r
i aftei: I j'ti's i ' t >(!.* i <<f
?1 < ,, g <* (*' 1* "| *,*
??*>; -s *J gi f >) ; r r f f f-I V:i : . ? ,
rtifltto* I?- l e:i au *. I ir.tiv *! the - - t > a d
-i i s I toft-'es i<V ta rrm'' 'if i r-.'btjv l v i 'l i
the hnVs s|.i- i t a C. rr-, t >- 1 ;-r r.
)r - rf n 1 t 1 - .t l--t.
'S 'd ;l r- ..K Tistort eyr'i-erlr-ient* ::;1 I|V i l l y
tht u'-rc rtf-pr wAf \ * edu'rd tiirt r"CiTia-in"*(1
'* n tj i l i iiy iUltaWC ttr th'' higliist. grsd*
W*?.
No' ari '' hi s fh* to"' '-'m-i i n arrlBt' 4 lo
btarami a new supply oi pulp Pat i te uu>
C o t t o n W a s t e
ufaclure pr pi pe, but It nro I ns given ta
The-Unitcu Slates Covcmmeiti a means tor
I he t)lrpp*al cr ).t*0 founds of coti rn
Tmlerr. svhlch er<- acqutreJ during the war
tor th#manufacture *1 explosives Sine* ex-
y-I-M-lvest no l orgcr arc tuertadzt least rot
on the * .ale as when hi ltl-.s were adsl l v'm -
ture In th* hfe cf Europethe Government
found j ise.f w[:h ti I s l>irg* cupp'y or left
c-r reaterial. I ts uulizAUcn, *ecr>rdin* to
tto Foreet P rol ua* L aboratory, I n ptp* r
manufnriura la el great cemt&srvUi lra-
pi-rtonc*.
^- ' r as i known thtr* wap no mesra
top h* utiliaailcn of tf c Ctovernmtnt euy
rl y ef .inters with the pcwethia exc*ptia aa
* icattlA [f t This wi t onaailgfactertr b*
to'U ' r? the f repcnderancs cf tha flbro-:*
matter In the hntle und th* Slight fietrrljll*
rnent tn the enti re cotton s-t-j.
Wardrobe Mystery Solved
\
CHI NESE. Gf>vern(nept Mrr#feTHtto
Pl;n ** "*-r tc A mtrlr*n WV
' m* t> the hern* cf an Mainet
X f * Vm h*rv.-,- fer a r tt k a vtm. I t wi
v tut h.c cam* -J ttihout haggigw. *rd
i n f " fifty b- t*pMr*d at dinner with s
' ' tirM h:* h'T tej r werdersfl hetch* mn-
eesd if, *ir * > ii.*fcverei1 tbi t I t*
t -lv c,u hn irik"T* #rd ta* i ru- art p i
li"** hie rla*hi** tore s i tark , H put te*
I r ii K i i'to h1.* tflotiiM.
Tils * urrtcnt' were Tike the layere cl **
crj rn, except that * rv layer might te w**-n
i th* cutoide. or.! ** aoipe of h'.a gowne
ti r 'u-'h they might Hi called tr#rf Si1*-
l mtd witn fur. or f ur ti api wita allgi M
ccuid v mt ibaaa a u * aida o wl ac wn4
[Proodi
\ spiir
-V . -.-s
%
in
* T n HE recoi
I Louis, r
preparti
atl antl c ( ndt a
frlddnr I he laltq
I nt-re.^l pal riot
ker gallant recti
che. more thn
sel, represents
reassert ion of
tspreoW' y iliat
T hat \ l 5lor no
fulfilment, a q>
gul s was halt
that would <au
tiDn or I Tic Aim
The launching
phr J ibs been
rid dr*w to th
ddphi a. on No
Cf A mericans i
pveBnion In onr
(I ons ever kno<
i T cri drnt firov
ef i lls cabinet, i
commercial anti
were present
aponsor of I ht
A merlmn clian
Cftn bow.
I t was lemas
Gair
W
ILT, th
cf th
annu
T heatre thin at
glory ef thr g
baa gleamed n<
dull tJ i ratrtcal
formatNW? of
morai Ms or ra
ln)na organi ral
Uki; tte Twrlf
f'-pl Oml t\ri pi
tnndard for |d
forgot *hr>rv<
th# agile \tol a
h<*n ah# wa*
Or I h- nspriiq
F i ; - h* r tn hr
On a eirtllinr *p
A ennia mlfi
trained w m
when mi one ftlr
With g>ien l i
Dan*, or IO to
or Betel# Tyr
pri vatel y rand
T hese b* I mnr
pangs of rheur
To#Ci ntnl a
ti aarti ngi for
tour as tb<
They instanci
amenc them,
feeling of
L arnte arfl th#
preform m put
land from tin
!>re>1h*r has
Si nr# 1SI 3. Bird
that i t had
prevton* *ha*
f thei r own i
ua of o#reona
have ti l tn it
ay# but onr
themaelvea tea
Affprap-iNlet
fh#|r name. <
rant* thei r a
mna th# tai n
w>m*ft. #n>1 i
rl", * h.%#
drawing i j <-<
meet brfluant
l ug doctors, ):
ulp*
Woman Initiate Exposes Weird Rites of the Rosierucians
Fearsome Oaths and Exhibitions of Magic Described as Chief Features in
Ceremony of Induction
Member Who Resigned Tells of Attempts to Make Her Pay Penalty for
Withdrawing From the Order
In the general sad indifference to the most recent computation of vril the
coming force, and to the latest astronomical and astrological data from Mount
Ecclesia there are persons in New York who are not aware that many branches of
the Rosicrucian Society exist in America. H. Spencer Lewis, F.R.C., grand master
general and imperator of the Rosaecrucian (note the spelling), shares this ignorance
with them, or alms to, for he says in his history of the order in America:
"While in the United, States there is an array of organizations all purporting to
be true Rosaecrucians, there is in truth but one true order, the original and perfect
Rosaecrucian order, which is known by one only name, 'The Ancient and Mystical
Order Rosae Crucis,' whose universal and worldwide symbol is the triangle with
the point downward.'
Another statement by Founder Lewis will surprise a good many persons who
thought they knew all about Rosicrucianism in this country. It is that the American
society dates back from 1915. He made a misreading of his original instructions
from the Initiates, and when in 1913 he called upon the Society for Psychical
Research to help him form a lodge here of the Rosy Cross he met with
indifference. It could not be otherwise, for the adepts had retarded the date to 1915.
In the early part of that year, with the assistance of Superior Secretary-General
Thor Kiimalehto and when "the moon was in Sagittarius," armed with charter and
"black book," Founder Lewis called together a little band of nine men and women
to form a committee to originate a Supreme Council for America.
I Growth of the Organization.
The preliminary work went forward steadily. In March fifty persons had taken
the "preliminary oath in the official B lack Book. On April 1thirty of the most
active workers met at a proposed lodge room in Seventh avenue and there and then
they constituted themselves the first true Rosicrucian convention of the order ever
held in the temple to America.
"Since then," glowingly reports Founder Lewis, "the order has grown amazingly.
There are now associated with us hundred of merchants, land owners, newspaper
editors, Government officials, physicians, surgeons, lawyers, scientists,
professional men and women, artists, artisans, laborers at little trades, all working
for a common good and meeting on a common level."
At once the sheep were separated from the goats, and societies which had gained
notoriety as being lodges, &c., of the Rosaecrucians were asked to give an account
of themselves. Many of them did so and disclaimed the intention of representing
officially the great secret order. One of these was Max Heindel, a writer on mystic
subjects. He explained that he had, indeed, founded the "Rosicrucian Fellowship,"
but it made no pretension to temporal power. Mrs. Marie Russak also explained the
meaning and powers of her "Temple of the Rosy Cross."
With the Rosicrucian factory of Dr. Clymer, at Allentown, Pa., the American
authorized society had more trouble. From this printing centre books went forth
broadcast, among them one called "A Secret Book Giving the First Forty-nine
Degrees of the Illuminati of the Rosicrucian Order." This book sold for $10. But
any connection between Dr. Clymer and the true Rosaecrucians was finally
disproved.
What is a Rosaecrucian? Here is Dr. Lewis's answer:
"A Rosaecrucian is one who lives a life of attainment, determined that before he
completes this cycle or period of earthly existence he shall have accomplished
through personal endeavor some deed of goodness for the betterment of the human
race.
"The Rosaecrucians have nothing to do with any other religion, including the
Christian religion. They created the symbol of the cross, they say, and the
Christians adopted it. They do not teach spiritualism nor mediumship.
Rosaecrucianism has nothing to do with Yogi or other philosophy. It sells no books
or degrees purporting to contain secrets of initiation. It has regular lodges or
temples in various cities, each with its master officer and under officials: It has
also its grand lodges, and its supreme lodge is in this city. The work of the
American branch is outlined by the supreme council of the world and is secret. The
funds are collected by regular contributions."
The Rosaecrucians lodge of New York city has apparently judged it wise to use
another name than its famous one; it functions as a society for educational
purposes as the Metropolitan College, Incorporated. The president of this college
was formerly a J esuit priest and it has a large society of adepts and initiates and
probationers, with branches and connections in other cities.
Tells of Weird Initiation.
Meetings and classes or the "college" are held in the Masonic Temple in Harlem.
Classes for the instruction of probationers are held weekly and the "initiates," some
of whom are called "Initiates of Tibet," meet on the 15th and last of each month.
All meetings are held at night and the religious meetings, so-called, start at
midnight.
A candidate for probation is obliged to show letters from three well known
business men who have known him for at least five years. When these have been
passed on favorably by the officers he will be summoned to the initiation
ceremonies. As the ancient and mystical order is truly mystical and secret, to know
what these ceremonies are one must depend on what is told by persons who have
gone so far as to have the experience and then backed out A woman of a high
degree of intelligence and genuinely "seeking" had the experience and did retreat.
She tells the story of her initiation in good faith and would willing to sign her
statement if by doing so any good would be gained.
"Another woman and a man were the other candidates for initiation besides
myself' said she. "We were locked in a small antechamber while the society
carried on its ritual in the main auditorium. Occasionally we heard a loud voice
raised in speech or a sort of song or chant, but these came to us muffled. I talked
with the woman candidate, who was very nervous, and learned that she mourned a
dear relative and in the hope of getting into communication with her spirit she had
sought the aid of the Rosicrucians. The male candidate impressed me as being
influenced by curiosity simply.
"At the stroke of midnight the doors were thrown open and we three were
admitted into the big chamber. It was dimly lighted. An assemblage of200 or 300
persons, each wearing a black robe with a black headdress and mask moved in
procession past us and around the hall. Each one, whether man or woman, carried a
cross with a red rose upon it, lighted by electricity. At the head of the procession
walked two men, one bearing a bowl of sacrificial blood and the other a skull.
These were also illuminated by electricity.
"When the procession had paused near the top of the room we, the candidates,
went blindfolded and led before them Then oaths were administered to us. I wish I
could remember how these were phrased but I do not. They were long and we were
asked to repeat them in sections, and all I recollect is that the oaths were very
weird and wild. The principal oath was coached in quaint language, which we were
told came down from the fourteenth century. The last oath of the series was that we
would never reveal the secrets of the order or exhibit to an outsider any of the
literature of the Rosicrucians.
"The folds were then removed from our eyes and we were given seats in a circle
while initiates gave exhibitions of magic to prove what powers can be gained by a
diligent student.
"Throughout this exhibition the auditorium remained dimly lighted, but the altar
with the cross and rose shone brilliantly.
"In the circle in which I sat to witness whatever marvels might be vouchsafed
there were, I think, about twenty-four persons, new members and we three
candidates. In our midst stood an initiate of Tibet with his feet resting on the bare
floor. We could see him dimly and he gradually faded from view as if he sank into
the floor. As soon as he had completely disappeared from our circle his voice was
heard from the altar, and turning our eyes there we saw him standing in front of the
cross.
"This seemed wonderful but it did not content the male seeker, who asked for
further miracles, and his request was echoed by several voices. The initiate agreed
to produce a dozen fresh roses with the dew on them and cause them to fall from
the air in our midst. Apparently he did this. The roses fell one by one in the midst
of the circle, each one wet with dew as if freshly plucked. The season was winter
and the initiate stood far removed from us, near the altar. Following this
demonstration nothing further in the way of magic was done, and to repeated
requests for more the adepts frankly said they were exhausted.
Resignation Carries Penalty.
"I went to one or two classes, after this general meeting, but I decided that I did
not care to carry out my plan to become an adept member and asked to be
permitted to resign. The secretary of Metropolitan College, who is the wife of a
dealer in secret society equipment in Maiden lane, replied to my request that I
could be allowed to resign only by paying into the society a sum equal to one-tenth
of my income and by returning all literature that I had borrowed or purchased. I
have done neither and have received many letters from officers and adepts which
are fairly threatening in their nature. It has come to my knowledge since trying to
free myself from any connection with the Rosicrucians that another aspirant in
endeavoring to break with the society had an even more unhappy experience than
mine."
"Our House of the Holy Ghost," is the veiled admission of the Society of
Rosicrucians, "though a hundred thousand men should have looked upon it, is yet
doomed to remain untouched, imperturbable, out of sight, and unrevealed to the
whole godless world forever."
As if in agreement with this desired mystery the beginnings of the Society of the
Rosy Cross are difficult to find in history. That it was founded by one Christian
Rosencreutz, a German mystic who dwelt for a time in India and Egypt and
claimed to have absorbed their secret wisdom, is vehemently denied, and so is the
statement that the name of the secret order is derived from his cognomen: Lewis
denies that it was established in Germany by him or by Andrea Valentine or by
Martin Luther. Claims of its foundation by all of these are made by different
authors seeking the fountain head.
Lewis tells of a seeker named Arnaud who had heard of a wonderful society in
Egypt which held the key to all science and all art. At the instance of Charlemagne
Arnaud went to Thebes in 778 A. D., returned to France six years later and
established the first Rosicrucian lodge. The place was Toulouse and the year 804.
From that start we hear of it all over Europe as it pursued its course with the
various tinctures of differing material, national habit and custom, but never
definitely.
From the beginning the society pretended to transmute metals, to prolong life, to
possess knowledge of what was occurring in distant places and to foretell the
future. Vaughan, who planted it in America, "lost" the Rosaecrucian stone in order,
he said, "that it might sink into the soil and fertilize the land with the thought and
spirit of Rosicrucianism."
Although known to the world as Brothers of the Rosy Cross, a mere exact
etymology is derived from ros (dew) and rosa (rose). Dew was considered by the
ancients as the most powerful solvent of gold and the cross in alchemy is the
synonym of light. In 1638 a bit of doggerel fixed its mission thus:
"For what we do presage is not in grosse.
For we are brothers of the Rosie Crosse:
We have the Mason word and second sight
Things for to come we can fortell aright."
Some of the ancient books of the society may be seen, according to a statement
made by the head of the order here, in our public library, "but only in a private
place, where by special privilege I may show them for the edification of true
adepts. These books are rudely bound, printed on papyrus and leather; some of the
leaves are crumbling from very age."
More modern writings are titled like the following: "Astrological Letters."
"Death and the Life In Purgatory," "Life and Activity in Heaven," "Birth, a
Fourfold Event," "Astronomical Allegories of the Bible," &c.
These books and others like "Continuity or Life, a Cosmic Truth." by Prof. W. L
Lockwood, "Beyond the Borderline of Life," by Gustavus Myers, may be had by
addressing the publishers and booksellers to the S. R. I. A., who are at 45 J ohn
street, New York, but other books intended for students and postulates are given
out mysteriously at the "college," and all are warned not to permit an outsider to
see them To do so is to commit a crime by making the Rosicrucian secrets
common.
The M ercury is the official organ of "Metropolitan College" and is issued
semimonthly. It gives the calendar for the month, a biography of some illustrious
initiate and other innocuous matter. A book of "Principles and Practice for
Rosicrucians" is issued for neophytes. It was written for the fraternity by "Khei."
Another book cherished by seekers Is "The Landmarks of the Most Holy Order of
the Golden and Rosy Cross, and the Constitution of the Societas Rosicruciana in
America: to which are appended the By-Laws of Metropolitan College, S. R.I.A."
Prayer of the Rosicrucian.
Here is the prayer of the Rosicrucian, which he is expected to repeat at least
three times daily "in a slow, forceful and intense manner":
"Great Central Flame: thee we venerate, thee we adore, thee we invoke: not as a
person but as Essence. Power, wisdom. Light and Life Incarnate. Be with us in this
and all laudable undertakings.
"Invisible Fraters of the Rose Cross: Let your guidance be manifest through
counsel of the Worshipful Adept in this and future convocations."
To all the secret publications from which the above data were drawn is appended
this "Allegiance":
"Metropolitan College S. RI A. acknowledges allegiance to the magi and officers
of the high council of the Societas Rosicruciana in America as the sovereign source
of the Rosicrucian art in the United States of America. The house of the S. S. is at
present situate in the city of New York."

San Francisco Chronicle


San Francisco, California
Saturday, J uly 17,1920
Page 8
Buddhist Church of San
Francisco (Inc.)
I N I M o p. nrar oei arl a
rtolrmn Ponti Oral H l h H i m wi th Nnrmini I
hi r t f ti tv . k i i i n m n o p u a z k t m a .n a n d a 1
M A I I i T HK RO. h mI p I M hr E l . R r A BBOT
HCMiAKU HI I A K I J . URV . A. K OB A L A B. A ., i
I ter, A aaJ I . I U r. M ol hrr M aha Dari . rol l
P n l l l l r i l r.rrmool al l a booftr of
AMORC, The Sl|pi of
the Master"
PA V L A * !* C R rR C H O f T T K I T I M A L T E tm i .
I m ., K . P. H i l l . J Scti aad A lloa. T ha B l ahm
praaekaa at S aad T :*0 P. M.
ROSAECRUCIAN LECTURES
F u u i u I m I i i { Xt<i t h e f i i i nl i i * nf n l l a w * a n d p r i n
c i p l e * o f <dol a n d N a t u r e .
S U N D A Y . 11. I T. A M . A M * . i r , I ' M .
BLACK MAGIC"
I l o o m o p e n t l n U r f r o m 2 t* 7 p . m .
N V f x I n a ml a v nf r>>rn<on t a l k * f r o m J t o 3.
361 WEST 23D ST. Z a ,..
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
rth av. 11th hlrxl 12th at*.
( l o ' i r g o A l e x a n d e r , P . I>.
R f v . H a r r y K m e r s o n K t a i ' l l r k , D . D .
I H*v Thorn** Guthri e Hpeem.
11 a m . U r K o s t l i c k
b p m . M r , S p e e r *
Chinatown
Th Kearua S o c i e t y ,
O l d r * f ctneo T h i i t i f .
1*7 Doyara Street.
W i de A v al * G onpel B er y l * . n i g h tl y . 1 0 o'cl ock ,
t T H O M A S J . N O O N A N , S U D crtoceadeat.
m A l O - t f a
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Brooklyn, New York
Saturday, October 16, 1920
Page 5
1921
San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco, California
Saturday. J anuary 15, 1921
Page 8
f t f t $ &
A t 8t. J oti n'i P rei byurl m Church.
A rfuHl o boulevard an<i u k s a(rct,
A. Btollltps will i peak tomor
row morning on 'T he Llf Com plot/*
I n th svenl na the topic will be
A merica's L atest K ellsh Safety
F i rst. Sailors from Terba Buena
I sland will attend.
< r m
Sunday morning at 11 Bishop Miami-
nl ananda will preach on Harmony In
Honor of lha A morc,
At Grace Met hod let Episcopal
Church. T w e n l y - * * t street, near M is.
Ion, Or. J . H. N. Wi l l i ams will praaafc
SUNDAY . OCTOBER 9. l i l
irtments, Hotels,
CH I' h i h n o t h K *
h. SPENCER LEWIS
l apmi i v at i ka RnuHTvni i i SnA lM % '^ will
h n a n I n ilia
San Francisco Society of
Applied Psychology
ON
The Conscious
Suggestion*
*a n j o a q i i n h a m.. \ ; w nux; .
414 MASON ST
h o n d a t . n<rimtJ i io. I r m.
ADUlhMuN m.r.
ELEC
THB <4U f f l
Supe
Moles
i i r ri
AND
i o nt. ,
A.XL l * t
No Pf
a i u r n
MkM
i t
San -ranci sco c i u p oV eM ^ r
A pplied Psychol ogy -r.r
i\Mfr!Eak kpk<'iai. i.i.i ti IT' rm _,
!>* T*.OCTTIin n. AT x r u ahast * r,1>T
San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco, California
Sunday, October 9, 1921
Page 1
San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco. California
Sunday. October 16. 1921
Page C I
lOSICRUCIAM
SEEKERS
Ton ara ad ' t i w d t h at l b * r * b u t one br anch
n t tba I n n n n al c r i i r i an Or d er m Kan ! t n i l w i ,
i d i al known (h e A M O R I ' , af f i l i at ed wi t h In d t f e
t*tl *nlIasi In all p * rla rf (h r I N A < anada.
M ai i r o and or er (w en l y f t w ei f n br anehe*. The
branch i n t h l a r | t y l i aa i t * H w y t i a n I ampi n
and r egul ar p r l r a l a |o d g f m * * i I W m t i m b ar
I i n n r ocni ar "**7 ^ . . . . . .
onl y. i Dd I h t P r i i f i n # ' C l w f d f . h o l (l j
i aer r i r i * i n Il i a < al t f ' .m *e ** b i i i l d l n * w only
! . nnbl l c f or m of ha " * . H r t l i on^a
on I
* nnbllc form of the wd*" " a.- ,. .. *W
there mni i bt and ink for Mlaratuw T Oal l n* th*
facta about (ha order lla orlffl". f 1*! "* *nd
Y ou will not be <^l!#ated.
authentici ty.
Publ ic Mer^lre J jjV.'fiL 1
17ro ri .A Y mni . K T
1922
Vancouver Daily World
Vancouver, Canada
Saturday, J uly 8, 1922
Page 26
AMORC STUDY GROUP
Lii >:! lii-blt*' *.> Know till* fui ul .l -
i nt-i i l ai l av of Hai ti tv anti tl i v Ulii-
fiTju*'* V al uabl e know UhI k c i> aui l -
iilJ** f i* puri u- st ami sinci-.r*; MU'i*-nts
..kitiK to i ivw i n harmony wi th tti e
I *iv i nc L-a For f urthpi pan. cul m .
appl y to tho Secretary, i '.U. Box
i*>.
Chicago Daily Tribune
Chicago, Illinois
Saturday, August 26, 1922
Page 12
THE TRIANGLE PRY C HO LOOT
ORG.A VtZATIOir
rOUY MK . 1. A i r 9WI H BASOV.
TtO I I ST8
THE I MPERATOR OF THE
ROSI CRUCI AN ORDER,
wjko will a tf w a ImCbvw spot
THE PSYCHI C SECRET OF
T HE ROSI CRUCI ANS.
RECITAL HALL. AUDITORIUM U l 8.
Wa b a s h a t . Mo n d a y a u o p. u
MqM p n c n a f l i w f o i of f tma I ri l !
Huaskaw's Oc i i m to r r i l Mtti M ia
Rmal a Oailbarl w arm MM UI U Oral.
$u5 te larltad Collactia
ff
Associated Bible Students
At Beott Hall, corner Appleton ami Berkeley
ts.. Monday, Bept. 24. at 8 and 5:30 p. in.
Address bj Pastor H. 8. Co k at 3 \\ m. Topic.
T B B OVfLiV BECOTTEX
Atl welcome. Wo collect lops, ________________
SsMttklsg Nsw it Ptyohsltgy
A lecture bp Bi t . U. Spencer Lewis, P.B.C.,
Ph.D.. of Call fora la, who will officially pro
m t the important laws practised by the Bye-
tie Boalcractana. Sunday. 11 a. m. 788 Boyl-
atoc a t . ; Wednesday erening at I , Btalnsrt
Hall, 182 Boylaton at. AH welcome.________
WM. Z. FOSTER i l l 0 . E. RUTNENBER8
tar rooted In recent Michigan raids \ will be
sncakori at a
Monster Defense Rally
to protest age loot workers* arrests. Paine
Memorial Hall. Appleton at.. Bonder, Sept.
Boston Post
Boston. Massachusetts
Saturday. September 23.1922
Page 17
1923
S a c r e d F i r e , R e d
R o s e , R i b b o n s ,
M a r k N u p t i a l s
SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 80.
Snored fire, a red rose, crossed
ribbons, and vows concerning &
mental and spiritual attunement
that would reach beyond tho
"earth plane," marked the mar
riage ceremony which united
Miss Harriet Klesener, (laughter
of a wealthy San Francisco man
ufacturer, to Paul Leaman, war
avilaor. The riles composing the
ceremony were those performed
on the banks of the Nile sev
eral thousand years ago. Yes
terday they took place In the
Egyptian temple of the Rosne
Crucia at 1255 Market street.
The marriage rites were per
formed by H. Spencer Lewis,
head of the Roslcruclan order
In tho United States, assisted by
n "vestal virgin, a chaplain,
and n priestess. The ceremony
symbolized the complete union
of souls of tho contracting
parties.
Afterward a church marriage
was performed In the temple.
Miss RIesener has completed
seven years service ns a vestal
virgin In the temple. One of the
requirements of this office was
that sho should not marry until
she was 21.
Oakland Tribune
Oakland. California
friday, November30. 1923
Page 12
1926
* f
f r>\
$ . 1
. ** VA'1 <'
'V, **.>
laii* "*W,', * '
.* r i* * #
v S ? # # : ^i i i Wd
J jSf *** *' *
' H ;;. flTOtt P
N.attsmpttag
*
to
Letter to Freemasoi
it of the fact that several former members of the AMORC, removed
in Tampa, and to further their private aims are making charges c
are attemptinglo secure the endorsement of the Masonic Bodies of theci
ittaeks / publish the following'signed statement:
start. thl* new, . local
Rosleruclan irbup In this city, then
several . ex-mem b ra of the nationwide
known ai AMORC, bare
madeserlous charges'against me as chief
attentive-* of AliORCT and against tbs
orranlsiitlon as a whe 11. 1.
t o srom e the ]t s :, indignity of Tampas
poimlat on they have principally charged that
the AMORC claims Itielf to big associated with
FT'uema ohry and Is Otlnirwlse sailing under false
' j * coIiTAj The faets art-lb
' branch, of a! wall Ner
been persistently claimlijg
Wlth-Frastaji lonry.
tinder the pretense
it this new Rosleruclan
Vorlc "uoclety has Itself
Intimate connection
of protecting the right-
ons lnt (rests of Freemhsonryas though such
Interests needed pro t<stlonlthis new group
hopes to secure Mason 1< endorsement here of Its
particular form of Rouli ruclan work and official
eondem latlon or the AMpRO, which high endorse
ment at d condemnation
wide o impalgn, accor<
threats.
To protect the good
Ahe same time to reveal
they will nse In a nation-
Ing to their Inglorious
name of AMORC and at
the Insidiousness of the
campaign now under why, I present these facts
to the hundreds of our
dreds of friends la thfn locality,
spirit of fair play.
This Othor organization has
for some years as a
members and many hun-
solely In the
been operating
Rosleruclan society In
America under the leadclmhip'of Khel, and It also
claims to be 9 chartered
In England**
We are not attemptli
for Its researches Into
teachings. Its purpose
knowledge, or Its lnetho
elude statements whlct
warranted.
of the parent (English)
doty we find In a>bd<
Interesting manner.
*{
After rstfewlng nil
of this modem society
unreasonable statemen
branch of a local society
g to criticise this society
Rosleruclan .and arcane
of .disseminating such
Is 6 t arousing an Interest
In Roslcruclanlsm, exci pt as such methods In.
.are misleading and Un-
In examining the eg ay propaganda literature
tody of this American so-
t written, bythelr own
(Supreme Magus, pnbllsb|ed In London In 1918, the
origin and purposes a t . he, society outlined In an
the early historical ref
erences to various Ancient Rosleruclan organise,
tlons In Europe, thctiho >k. comes to the founding
In England. Wo read:
The name RosicyaMan has suffered greatly
from the pretentions, ofknen, who falsely claiming
membership, have made exaggerated, falseand
a regarding the powers
and possessions of the. Rratres of the Rosy Cross.
Very true. Indeed!
CLAIMS MAlSONIC* BIRTH
base:for the collection and deposits of archaeo
logical and historical subjects pertaining to Free-
masonry, secret societies In general, anddnterest-
Ing provincial matter; to Inspire a greater dispo
sition to obtain historical truth'and.to displace
error; to bring to lltbt much In relation to a
certain class of scientists and scholars, and the
result oft their life labors, that were gradually
dying away In the memories of men. (The
emphasis In this paragraph Is mine):
LIMITED TO FREEMASONS
t If! we examine this paragraph-we And a dls-,
cropdney between It and the official statement as
to where Mr. Little secured his rituals and
authority; but tho moat Important points are
those to which I have given emphasis by black-
face type. To resurrect and rehabilitate the rem
nant and outline of an old association In Germany
In order to create a literary society. Is NOT an
official manner of establishing a Rosleruclan or
ganization. But, to make such a society the base
for tbe collection of subjects pertaining to Free
masonry and secret societies In general, and to
add such Rosleruclan forms, titles and numbers
of the degrees, so fhr as might be subservient to
his purposes." Is to confound Freemasonlc re
search and study with a relationship to Rosl-
crucian.
I t this Is not sufficient to show that the so
ciety started out solely to be a new attachment
to Freemasonry without any justification for It
In the requirements of Freemasonry, let us see
what happened a few years later. Wo Tend on-
page 10 of an official book of this society, pub
lished In America, that other Lodges or colleges
were established soon after 1879 and that by the
establishment of these branch bodies the society
was entitled to form Its own high council of
authority. This may be proper organization work,
but note that this line point Is stated:
Membership In these colleges was limited to
Freemasons of tho 82nd Degree; quarterly meet
ings wero held and their sessions were devoted
principally to a banquet, with an aftermath a t a .
literary and,philosophical nature.-.with'little If
any attempt to exemplify the'Rosleruclan De
grees with tho philosophy, thOy embodied."^
That does not sound like .Rosleruclan sessions .
with the traditional seriousness and sublime
sacredness which constitute the very foundation
of all truo Rosleruclan'conclaves, . But,..- It ,1s ..
typical of tho sessions of tho literary sodeles of .
that day and of this day, ..Note, however," that
It was a society for Freemasons-exclusively,.- - .
NO ROSICRUCIAN WORK ,
A further Indication that the society thus
t formed, and establishing branches of Itself la
, America, was not organized on Rosleruclan prin
ciples with Rosleruclan authority, ,1s shown by.
the words.or this society in other pieces of Its
own official literature. We note, for Instance,
that they did not permit women to unite with
them; and on page four of a book recently Issued
by them* as well as on page eleven Of another
Official pamphlet, they state that:
WA* member of the Massachusetts College
(lodge). In Boston, tboroly awake to tbe omission
of tho real Rosleruclan work, and having received*
the VIII Degree constituting him a Provincial
Magus of tho Fraternity, engaged In special re*
work to r> ***>v<r tbn oriHiy ' vtcl'at^.^hausen
read such matter, let us take some of its more
recent literature and see what It clams In un
mistakable language.. *
' CLAIMS TO BE MASONIC
PARENT
In tbe leet Issue of Its official quarterly,
dated September, 1928, we read on tho cover
that Us teachings and findings aro amplified
thru Its Intimate connection with Ancient and
Medieval Roslcruclanlsm, Freemasonry, Druld-
'lsm, etc. Note that It says Intimate connection!
On the same page we find that It offers aa one
of Its correspondence courses, to any one, lessons
on Esoteric Masonry.* In tho same Issue we
' read on page 140 those significant words:
First, Roslcruclanlsm la not an appendage
of Freomasoory. Tho Rosleruclan. Fraternity is
regarded by Its members and by several of the
beet Masonic historians and researchers, as tbe
parent source of Freemasonry. There are many
conditions that make this a plausible theory.
The Fraternity, today. In Its Constitution, re
quires certain of Its High Council members to bo
not only Master Masons, but Masons of all de
grees. However, even this la an Innovation of
recent years.
NOT TRUE ROSICRUCIAN1SM
We say that the above paragraph Is sig
nificant because It attempts to foster the Idee
, that Roslcruclanlsm la-not merely affiliated with
Freemasonry, but Is recognized today aa the
. parent body or guiding body of Freemasonry.
And the statement la misleading becanse It
attempts to associate the two. organisations and
to make readers believe that tbe Rosleruclan
Fraternity limits Its high councils to Free
masons. This la probably, tho.case with the
society we have been discussing. BUT IT is.
NOT TRUE OF THE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
Such claims to Masonic connection an
. further emphasized, by- this Society of Rosleru-
elans'by tbe official statement.lt sent to Hsrt-
mans 1925 Issue of a Directory of Occult and
Fraternal Societies. There, on page 126, this
Society.of Roslcruclans says of Itself that Us -
first;attempt to establish a branch of Us own
Cl In America In 1878 was on Masonic lines, and
. -at ihq uloss of the article we read this:
* yftTTher. Socletas Roslcruclans in America'.-
*"works In complete harmony and close assoc la* ,
tlon with the Masonic Fraternity, and ConstltU*
tlondlly. Its major officers are Masons of all
Rites and Degrees.
WHAT IT TEACHES
. Let us turn now to another, hook, tbe official .
test-book of this-Rosleruclan society, sold.by
man to anyone and purchasable-In book stores
a state of affaire that Is lnconalstent wlth the
traditions of tbe trne Rosleruclan order which
bet never published text books for tbe profane
with a claim that they contained Us teachings
and In this book of Fundamentals we find -
again and again the statement made that Free
masonry of today In America and England Is
not only associated with Roslcruclanlsm, bnt
"-.S'
i t
wiy.
this
name ot AUORC u i at
the Insidiousness ot the
I present these tacts'
members nod many boh*
locality, solely In the
To protect the good
A s sane time to moai
campaign newt under n
to the hundreds of our
died! of frlendt In
si Irlt of fair play.
This other organize
tor somo years as a
America under the lead'
cl ilms to be a ehai
In Itogland. ,1
We are not attdmpthjg to criticise this society
for Its researchesInto Roslerndan and arcane
teachings, Us purposed of ^disseminating such'
hi owledge, or ltd methods S t ahonslng an interest
In Roslcruclanlsuv* except aa such: methods "in-"
elide statements trhlcqjare misleading and tin-.
Ion has been operating
Roslerndan society In
ihlp of Khel, and it alto
branch ot a local society
warranted.
In examining the ta|
of the parent (English)
duty,we find In *o
Supreme Magus, pnbl
origin and purposes of___
tn.erestlng manner.
-*
"yri*'"'* -
propetnnda literature ,
ly of this American ,ao~
written by'their own-
(B .London in ISIS, .the .
'.Society outlined'In an
f. v, - . . t: .. v.
U till Is uot Suliic. ui .i' iilmir ill .i l i i <:
doty started out solely to be a new attachment
to Freemasonry without any Justification tor It
In the requirement* ot Freemasonry. 1st us see
what happened a few years later. We read on-
page 10 of an official book of this society, pub
lished in America, that other Lodges or "colleges"
were established soon after 1879 and that by the
establishment of those branch bodies the society
was entitled to form Its own high connctl of
authority. This may be proper organization work,
but note that this fins point Is stated:
"Membership la these colleges was limited to
Freemasons of the Sind Degree; quarterly meet
ings were held and their sessions were devoted
principally to a banquet, with an aftermath of a
literary and Jphilosophical nature,-with little If
any attempt; to exemplify the'vRosIcruelan'De
grees with the philosophy, thdy embodied."^' k -
Thqt does hot sound like .Roslerndan sessions
-with, the :traditional seriousness and sublime
acrodness which constitute- the Tory foundation
of all'true llosicruclan' conclaves. But., it . i s .
'typlealof the sessions of the literary soclelss ot .
that.Vlay and of this day; -.Note, however,'that
' It was.* society for Freemiasons-exclustvely.. }
NO ROSICRUCIAN WORK
y
Attar mlowlng i&J the* early historical, ref*
to various antfsat Roalcruclan orgahl *rraces,
th us la Europe, tM,
of this modem sod
i orgahl za-
Mf. comes to the founding
|tk England.': Wo read: -
Tb#asm* Rostefw[l*it^is^*iulfer*d grrntiy
from the pretentlOnaof mea. whd falsely claiming
mufflMrthlp, have mada -'axkgrerated. falsa and
uz reasonable statements, regarding the power*
and possessions of tbli Fratrta ot the Rosy Cross.
Very true. Indeed! - -
m '--'r *< . ,
CLAIMS
Theatre find had! I
bom and what clalmsl
IC * BIRTH .
i particular society was'
makes. It Is dearly*
stated that the Society in Englandthe parent
body of the American Coelctywas designed by
Robert Wentworth Little who rescued some rituals
from the store-room, ot Freemasons' Hall and
Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, who had received Rosl*
crucian Initiation In Austria, while living with
Count Apponyl as an I English tutor, and also
Authority to form an English Masonic Roslcntolth
Society.. * | '
Several Interesting points are Involved in this
Illuminating paragraph which presenta * very
strange origin tor any society. First, ws should
111:* to know bow It dame about that the,'only
at allable Roslcruclan iRItuals were located In
FrSamuoas Hell In England; which place has
bean the principal Masonic archives for many
S
ears. ; Second,* what dinger surrounded these
Ituals that they required such strenuous action
as rescuing? Third, how Is It possible tor an
Austrian Roalcruclan to authorise the establish
ment ot an English MASONIC Roslcruclan So
ciety T j ' ;
BECOMES LITERARY SOCIETY
It all thli Is not an {attempt to make It appear'
that the said Society was a now form of Masonlo
study and worth then 1st us retd a little further.
We find that ont y ear | after its foundation'With
raseuad rituals, the Drat Lodge or College of the
Society was opened, Mr. Little, referred to abort,
was Its Supreme Magus and William Junes
Hughan, tb* Masonlo Historian, was on* of the
"Substitute MsgL Now we recall that, as a
Masonlo Historian, MrJ Hughan hat an excellent
reputation for preciseness, and we recall that hs
wis one of the editors of "History ot Freemasonry,
! by BUUson and Hughan So wa turn, for a mo
ment, to see what Hughin permitted to be pub
lished in his history about thlskRoilcrudan Ma-
aonle Society, of which1be was A high officer and
lntladte associate. In Part V., p^gt 873, ws read:
"The modem and present existing Society ot
Itolleraclana was instituted through the Incep
tion and InSuenee ot Robert Wentworth Little, ol
England, who, In bis starches In Oormtny, cams
upon the rsmrarta and outline ef an eld tueola-
tlert, which, h > rasurracted and rehabilitated In
order to ortati a literary organization, retaining
tb* forms, tit ea, and numbers of the degress, so
far' at might be subservient to his. purposes,
which were diflned tOgba as follows: to errata la
A farther Indication that the society thus
.-formed, and establishing branches of Itself In
. America, was not organized on Roslcruclan prin
ciple* with Roslerndan-anthority.,lashown-by.-
the words, ot this'society In other pieces of Its
own offlclsl literature. We note, for Instance,
that they did not permit women to unite with
them; and on page four of a book recently Issued
by them, ss well as on page eleven of another
official pamphlet, they state that: ;
*A member of tb* Massachusetts College
Hodge), In Boston, thoroly awake to the omission .
of the real Roslcruclan work, and having received-
the VIII Degree constituting him a Provincial
Magus ot tb* Fraternity, engaged In (pedal re
search work to recover the original Ecksitahausen
Rltnals ot the Fraternity.
Thus w* to* that although the society was
establishing Rotlcrucltn lodges or "colleges and
was conducting Its members through degrees at
high as the VIII and conferring upon them one
of the Roslcruclan title* which had been made
"subservient" to their purposes, they admit hav
ing had' no real Roslcruclan Work, and on* ot
, their highest members engaged himself In the
labor of recovering some Rltnals possessed by a
descendant ot an early Carman llosicruclan
Lodge. Further on the sam page we read that It
was the ambition of this VIII Degree member to
t undertake "the formation and Institution of a
branch ot the Fraternity that would devote Itself
exclusively to the true Roslcruclan Art and
Operations, and at the samo time open Its doors
to both sexes on a basts of true equality."
NO -ROSICRUCIAN AUTHORITY
fn other words tbls member hoped to secure
. a proper authority and real system of the Rosl-
cruclan order for bis Amsrlctn society, even to
the extent ot following the ancient Roslcruclan
prlnclplo of admitting women, instead ot limiting
membership to Freemasons. But, according to
. this same booklet, the transition of this member
prevented the fulfillment of hie pereonsl ambition.
This setback In the Plans was overcome by the
officers of the American society who proceeded to
reorganize their almost extinct literary society on
the basis ot "authority given to them by that
conscientious member before ble transition. Thus,
the society in America today, says the official
book again, "Is the outgrowth" of the old society
In the United States, "most of the Colleges
(lodges) of which became cither dormant, extinct
or Inoperative, >
Hero we see by their own admission that the
present society, calling itself Roslcruclan, Is an
outgrowth of the parent bodys branches
founded as a literary society, formed by Free
masons, for Freemasons and to study Free-
masonic and other "archaeological and hletorlcal
subjocts."
Is It any (condor that persona reading such
literature In their search tor Roetcruclanlsm,
believe that this society, using the name
Roslcruclan and a symbol much like the ancient
one, . Is a part of or In some way officially
affiliated with .Freemason 7? If you are one
who may argno that It Is all In the way you
NOT TRUE ROSICRUCIANISM
We aay that the above paragraph is sig
nificant because It attempts to foster the Idea
.that Roelcruelanlim la-not merely affiliated with
Freemasonry, but la recognised -today as the
parent body or guiding body ot Freemasonry.
And the statement is misleading because it
attempts to associate the two. organizations and
to make readers believe that the. Roslcruclan
Fraternity limits Its high councils, to Free
masons. This Is probably the. case with-the
society we have been dlscueelng. BUT IT IS.
NOT TRUE OF THE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
Such claims to - Masonic connection are
. further emphasized, by tbls 8oelety of Rosleru-
clans'by the official statement.Tt sent to Hart
man's 1121 Issue of a Directory of Occult and
Fraternal Societies. There, on page 12S, this
Society .of Rostcruclans says' of Itself that it* .
. first:attempt to establish a brandy of Its own
- ' In America In 187S "was on Masonic linos,'. and
. at Jhe close of the article we read this: j
tf*3'The-Socleta* f Roslcructano in America-*
'works In complete harmony and close assocla-
' tlon with the Masonic'Fraternity, and Constltn-J.
tlonSUy, Its major officers' are Masons ot an.
Rites and Degrees. , ... . .
WHAT IT TEACHES -.
Let us turn now to another booki.fh* offlclsl.
text-book ot tbls- Roslerndan..'society, soldi by
melt to anyone add purchasable'M book stores
a state ot affair* that la Inconsistent;with the- -
traditions ot tb* true Roslcruclan order which
has never published text books for th profane
with a claim that they, contained Its teachings:
and In this book of "Fundamentals we .find
again' and again tb* statement mad* that Free
masonry ot today In America and England' la ;;
not only associated with Rotlcrndanltm, but
oven mors than this. For Instance, in the XIII
Chapter ot this official textbook,- whose author
Is given *t Khel. the head of the Society, and
whoso publication la anthorlsod by th* High
Council ot th* society, we read:
-It It th* teaching ot th* Brotherhood, that
Freemasonry owe* Its real origin to th* RoSlcru-
clans. In other words, this Society teaches this
.claim to It* members.
. Then on page i l l . In tb* same Chapter, w*
tlod that after tb* author has tried to show
that Masonry does not contain all th* secret*
and explanation ot th* symbolism of tb* Masons,
tb* seeker is told ho must tfo to th* Roslcruclan
tmchlngsl This is stated In these words:
8tnce Masonry, th* offspring, tails ns In
onr search for th* trn* exegesis, we mast turn
to Roalcruclanlsm, the parent
A TERRIBLE EXAMPLE
Such a misstatement of fact is unfair both
to Freemasonry and Rotlcrnclanlsm. There is
nothing In the true teachings of Roalcruclanlsm
that reveals the secrets or meanings of the
Frsamasonlc symbMsm or work from a Masonic
point ot view. Such a claim Is Intended solely
to make Freemasons believe that It they bave
not quickly and easily discerned all there is to
discern In Freemasonry, they need only unite
with the Roslcruclan society. It I* ridiculous
and without the slightest warrant.
How does the society proceed to Illustrate
such a point? We read on In th* same Chapter
of this official textbook. Ws approach an In
teresting point The author la ottering his
Rsslcruelsn explanation ot th* Masonlo symbol
ism Ot the "House not made with hands." We
wonder whet dsre be said In public print on
tbls subject. W* are assnred, however, tbat
what follows was retd before Metropolitan
Lodge No. 1, Ark Mariner Muons, New York .
City, In 1918, and that by publishing it freely
to the-world
"No Masonic Obligations have been violated
by this procedure and it Is hoped that, this In- .
structlon win be studied most caretulljr by all
Madons to whom It may come, whether they are
members ot the Rotlcrndtn Fraternity or not.
So, believing tbat what Is to follow was ap-
>proved by Masons and Is not prohlfiltod by
lOtr-
I f c
TEMPLE
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS FOR NORTHS AMERICA
5 . -- - r
m M *
:J?#'ROBICRUClKN SQUARE MEMORIAL BOULEVARD
\
b
f
la
tr
tli
A
t
, a
1
The Pv-bH: Is Always Welcome To Oar Non-Sectarian Serr
m
A w M
.'
Freemasons and Rosict^iiciS
s of the AMORC, removed for just cause, are forming on"iJosi
82
time are making charges of fraud against the Order I
te Masonic Bodies of the city and to claim such endorsement
atement:
read M i ch matter, let us take eeme ot Its more
recent literature and see what It claims la un-
mtstal able .language.
CLAIMS TO BE MASONIC
PARENT
In the laiit Issue ot Its official quarterly,
dated September, 10Z6, we read on the cover
that Its teachings and findings are "amplified
thru Its Intimate connection with Ancient and
Modleval ItOKlcruclanlsm, Freemasonry, Druid-
Ism," etc. Note that It saya Intimate connection!
On the same page we find that It offers as one
of Its correspondence courses, to any one, lessons
on Esoteric Masonry. In the same Issue we
read on page 140 these significant words:
"First, Roslcruclanlsm Is not an appendage
of Freemasonry. The Roslcruelau. Fraternity Is
regarded by Its members and by several ot the
beet Masonlo historians and researchers, as the
parent source ot Freemasonry. There are many
conditions that make this a plausible theory.
The Fraternity, today. In Its Constitution, re
quires certain ot Its High Council members to ho
not only Master Masons, but Masons of all de
grees. However, even this Is an Innovation ot
recent years."
NOT TRUE ROSICRUCIANISM
We say that the above paragraph is sig
nificant because It attempts to foster the idea
that Roslcruclanlsm Is*not merely affiliated with
Freemasonry, but Is recognised today as the
parent body or guiding body of Freemasonry.
And the statement Is misleading because it
attempts to associate tho two. organizations and
to make readers believe that the Roslcruclan
Fraternity limits its high councils, to Free
masons. Xlils is probtbly the case with the
society we have been discussing. BUT IT IS
NOT TRUK OF THE UOSICRUCIAN ORDER
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
Such claims to Masonic connection are
further emphasized by this Society of Roslcru-
claus by the official statement.'tt sent to Hart
man's 1935 Issue of a Directory of Occult and
Fraternal Societies. There, on page H i , this
Society of llosierucUns says of Itself that Its*
first attempt to establish n branch of Its own
in America In 1878 was on Masonic lines/* and
at ihe close of the article v e mad this:
Socletas . Roslcruclaiia* In America
works In complete harmony and close associa
tion with the Masonic Fraternity, and Constitu
tionally, Its major officers are Masons of all
Rites and Degrees.**
WHAT IT TEACHES
Let ue turn now to nnothor book, the official.
text-book of this-Roslcruclan aoclety. sold.by
malt to anyone and purchasable In book stores
a atato of affaire that Is Inconsistent with the
traditions of the true Roslernclsn order which
hss never published text books for the profane
with a claim that they contained Its teachings
and In this book of "Fundamentals" we find
again and n-;aln tho statement made that Free.
them as secret ptrta of their studies, we are
astounded and shocked to dlacorer that this'
author presents the matter that was glren In the
shore Masonic lodge, In the form of sex-teach-
Ings! Can anything he further away from
pure Roslcruclanlsm and true FreemaaonryT
Actually, the columns before the Temple of
Solomon and the entrance way, are associated
with sex matters In words that are too disgust
ing for ns to'think of using here and which
could never enter a lecture or discussion con
nected with real Roslcruclanlsm. .,
NONE WILL BELIEVE IT
How can Masons of today read such ma|ter
and belters that it la either Masonic or Roslcru-
elan! Roalcruclanlsra does not touch upon sex
matters anywhere In Its thousands of lessons. In
any of Its booklets, dWcusslona, symbols or phys
iological treatises. It Is this one outstanding
feet that has made the Roslcruclan teachings
notable in comparison with modern cults; and
we know the same thing can be said In regard
to the teachings of Freemasonry.
Tet. here la an organization, a aoclety, using
tho name Roslcruclan, claiming to be "Intimate
ly connected" with and tho "parent" of Free
masonry, appealing to Freemasons In every
broath, limiting Its high eonnell membership to
Freemasons and otherwise proclaiming an affil
iation or connection -with Masonic bodies, con
trary to all Masonic principles and at the same <
time offering as official teachings such things as
are an Insult to the Intelligence of either Free
masons or Roslcruclsna and nnflt for polite dis
cussion anywhore.
WHAT AMORC CLAIMS
In conclusion let us call the reader's) attend
tlon to what AMORC baa always said about the
connection of Roslcruclanlsm with Freemasonry.
We knew, too. that some Masons might think
that there was a connection between the Rose-
Crolx Degree of Freemasonry and the Rose
Cross ot our Order. Hence wo tried In a very
clear-cut emphatic manner and in every place of
official propaganda literature, to atato tho true
situation.
In the first propaganda book Issued by the
AMORC to be sent through the malls all over
the United States, we said:
"When wo say that the Order (AMORC) baa
absolutely no connection with any branch ot the
\
Theosophlcal Society, the New Thought More-;-* y n n ,
ment or Froemasonry, wo do not mean to say
sueh s connection would be displeasing or detri
mental: but It la unnecessaryand Impossible!
. , In respect to all these movements we
have only the kindest thoughts and good
wishes."
The book containing tho above statement, on
page six. was distributed for many yeats while
wa had onr headquarters In New York and San
Francisco, and not leas than 10,000 copies of
such books, outlining the nature and purposes
of the AMORC, were distributed.
On the same page, In tho same AMORC book,
is this very definite statement: "Lest there bo
* - i |* u that
passed away and then ware rovl
tlmately connected with; Freemasonry;;,
But, the fact remalni that; ______
bodies can he formed In-only op* .Urgy. hy apow c
sorshlp and- guldancc br a-snparioenRoelcruein*,'-,
body possessing and retalnlnd^the tancfept^nao,.
thortty, ritual,', constitution gad^iUmjag WMT J
ns the pure teachings, FREE. . . ____
WITH ANYTHING . BUT PURX t.^OSICZOi
0IANI8M. i .
The Roslernclsn Tnteftityia-<>enuvtW&:M;,v|
NOT the first aad parent bodytn, Enwpd.?Tliafc
la believed only by- those .whoi'alW ho'
there wu a parted or character Knrtig ,
. Christian Rosenkrenx vrlthoat raallaing that
was merely a pen-name naad i
gands books,- and-moans, whan
the Canaan. "The Christian M q
Order la Germany and Austria.-as
trie* at different periods,<waa,&
thorlty and approval- from a
that superior body of mena n a l t h k cemtett'A~l
Indeedexisted la Toolonee. France. fo r -s ev - 1. * :
aral centuries alter'having existed la India i M .
Egypt - - . v X ' A ' - S i
AUTHORITY FROM AN
INDIVIDUAL IMPOSSIBLE
To claim that nay one'poraonoonidgofrom
England ori Amorim to the koiaa of Rosters- '*
clan member In Austria ar Germany and' there jjwjgP
receive, at the hands of- one pane* Boafomctta .'1
Initiation and Authority to start .an "English-
Masonic Boslcraelaa Society." as this society ta-ii-U*"
England and Amerluwelalma, la too absurd to .*J
argue. It tnay make an appeal, under a ab-V
leading impression, to some Freemasons, but n o t . v.Sj;
to many, la tact If authority to organize bow.
jurisdiction! of any ancient. order could bo ^$3
grantor In {this , way, what n mean tboro-wonldvCKf
ho In all society circles. *>-: - v '"' JJ
No. Rosleruclanlam has abeohilely.no eounea- VJ
tloa with Freemasonry today, an&nas nofhad;. *2;
for hundreds ot years, oven though they a d f ^ g j i
have cooperated In many wayo-.fa years loss'by
In England; and even though many Freemasons; s \S*^
In Europe itoday ore also -Roaterndtana, -
soma of their conclaves are held, tnv the 1
ell lea In the same mention period ot'tho i
mar. In America, at any-rate, tho UfB.Wttl y.-i'l
have NEVER boon eianclatod oratflltatad, dO-- j . y |
pile any otjthe clalma and gi safflWloaolIMM dt*a
this "literacy" a o d A of JleeIcrfchlB*^ ^ ; ,^ -
THE FACTS ABOl ----i
The RaoieracMa Order.knSwn I ) i | R B i u n i i | ^ ;
as AMORO (or translations ot this aomo) la aot', tfi
only separate from all other hot Roslerudnu ygwi
societies, but In Its -very t i nt pibannsIamMifs -yy-J
Issued In this country It. proclaimed.- Itsalf to ho.^FU
n aeparato and distinct orgatlzatloa, andthts'.vyj|
proclamation was Incorporated la Tta Coaatttn-L - ^ I
tlon when each ot its various! paragraphs:war*1, I*(I'd
adopted by the great national qpnventlon oYROWyKj
sleructan Delegates from. all ever the United <v m
St* The' AtilORC In-America tAdty'la'. theVbfojO^fj
Roslcruclan1organization affUlhtodtVrlthstila. jb-T- "del
teraatlonal Ibodloa of RnalenMmna throngboat;vjdB |
** i *- tfcdbonlv Rwfpnehn Inwlf to * *
I
I
I
NO I IkUL UOSICUULIaNISM
We n r that the above paragraph la ale*
n If (cant because It attempts to foster, the Idea
that Roslcrudanlsm la-not merely affiliated with
Froomasonry, but la recognised today as the
parent body or guiding body of Freemasonry>
And the suiomont Ji misleading because It
attempts to iiHSodate the two organizations and
to mako readers believe that the lioslcruclan
Fraternity limits Its high councils, to Free*
masons. This Is probably, the. case with the
society wo have been dlscuselng.. BUT IT 18.
NOT TRUE OF THE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
Such claims to Masonic connection are
further emphasized' by this 8odoty of Roslcru-
- clans by tho official statement.Tt sent to Hart
mans 1925 Ihsus of a Directory of Occult and
Fiatcrnal Societies. There, on page 125, this
Society of Roslcrudsna saye of Itself that lte
first attempt to establish a branch, of Its own
In America In 1578 "was on Masonic lines/* and
at the close of the article we read this: -
l ;*Thec. Socletas . Roslcrudsna- In America -
works in complete harmony and dose associa
tion with the Masonic Fraternity, and Constitu
tionally, Its major officers are Masons of all
Rites and Degrees."
WHAT IT TEACHES
Let us turn now to another book, the official.
text-book of this- Roslcrudan society, sold.by
malt to anyone and purchasable-In book stores
a state of affairs that la Inconsistent with the
traditions of the true Roslcrudan order which
has never published text books tor the profane
with a claim that they contained Its teachings-
and in this book of "Fundamentals we find
again and again tbe statement made that Free,
masonry of today In America and England la
not only associated with Roslcrudanlsm, but
even morn than this. For Instance, In the XIII
Chapter of this official textbook, whose author
Is given ns Kliel, the head of the Society, and
whose publication Is authorised by the "High
Council of the society, we read:
it Is the teaching of the Brotherhood, that
Freemasonry owes Its real origin to the Roslcru-
clans.'1 In other words, this Society teaches this
.claim to its members.
Then on page 3 21, In the same Chapter, we
find that after the author has tried to show
that Masonry does not contain all the secrets
and explanation of the symbolism of tbe Masons,
the seeker Is told he must go to the Roslcrudan
teachings. This Is stated In these words:
Since Masonry, the offspring, falls us In
our search for the true exegesis, we must turn
to Roslcrudanlsm, the parent.
A TERRIBLE EXAMPLE
Such a misstatement of tact la unfair both
to Freemasonry and Roelcruclanlsm. There Is
nothing In the true teachings of Roslcrudanlsm
that reveals the secrets or meanings of the
Freemaaonlc symbolism or work from a Masonic
point of view. Such n claim la Intended solely
to make Freemasons believe that if they have
not quickly and easily discerned all there Is to
discern In Freemasonry, they need only unite
with the Roslcrudan society. It la ridiculous
and without the slightest warrant.
How does the society proceed to Illustrate
such a point? We read on In the same Chapter
of this official textbook. We approach an In
teresting point. The author Is offering his
Roekraclan explanation of the Masonic symbol-
lam of the House not made with hands. We .
woncer what dare be aald In public print on
thla subject. We are assured, however, that
what follows was read before Metropolitan
Lodge No. 1. Ark Mariner Masons, New York
City. In 1918, and that by publishing It freely
to tl e world
"No Masonic Obligations have been violated
by this procedure and It Is hoped that this lu
stra, tlon will be studied most carefully by an
Mad<ns to whom It may coma, whether they are
members of the Roslcrudan Fraternity or not.
1o. believing that what Is to follow was ap-
provtd by Masons and Is not prohibited by
smi i nr
d or A me:
emb^r In .
li -till. 1 -III 113 ils i;li i tl.). ll In -Ij W: In I"
Freemasons and otburr/Iio proclaiming un mtfIl
lation or connection with Masonic bodies, con
trary to all Masonic principles and at the aama
time offering as official teachings such things as
are an Insult to the Intelligence of either Free
masons or Roslcrudans and unlit for polite dis
cussion anywhere.
WHAT AMORC CLAIMS
In conclusion let ne call the render'd attend
tlon to what AMORC has alwsys said about the
connection of Roslcrudanlsm with Freemasonry.
We knew, teo, that soma Masons might think
that there was a connection between the Rose-
Crolx Degree of Freemasonry and the Rose
Cross, of our Order. Hence wo tried In a very
clear-cut emphatic manner tnd In every piece of
otfldsl propaganda literature, to state the true
ettnstlon.
In the first propaganda book Issued by the
AMORC to bo sent through the malls all- over
the. United States, we said:
4**Wfien we eey that tbe Order (AMORC) has
absolutely no connection with any branch of the
Thaosophlcsl Society, the New Thought Move*-, * | o u z,OiVv,f'lAUTHC
_ -.a vn_._____Jk*L. anon* Mammae Ia as* ' ..
Tllir n i P l f M ' J nVEl'COV t KP S
America to the home ot a ltoalcrn-
er a ate-. U'"
x, bat Mot,,
iniie w i ; 'ffiH
, M,
England
den member in Austria or Oar many tod than
receive, at the hands of one parson, Rosldudaa 4
initiation and Authority to Mart, an English'
Masonic Roslcrudan Society, as this society la
England anid America-claims, Ittoo absurd to ,
argue. It may make an appeal, under
leading Impression, to some Freemaeonz,'
to many, in fact. If authority to organise l
jurisdiction! of any ancient. order could^be
granted. In this .way, what a mas* there, would.
be In all society circles. - . j u f f p r x s
No, Roelcruclanlsm has absolutely no eounec- 3
tlon with Freemasonry today, and has n e f t M ^
tor hundreds of years, oven though they i s y ^ . .
have cooperated In many ways-In years
in Englandj and even though many Freemasons") irA.I
In Europe 'today are alio -Roslcrndans;/ snA-F;JL
some of their conclaves are-held.In the'eaShe--'^''
cities In the same vacation, period'ot tba.Mim-.,
mer. In America, at eny.rate, .the two, bod M i ,
have NEVER been, associated orh'
pits any of tho claims (
this literary" society of 0
I ; J WV
THE FACTS ABOt
mint or Freemasonry, wo do not mean to say
such a. connection would bo displeasing or detri
mental; but It Is unnecessaryend Impossible!
. . . . In respect to all those movements we
have only thd kindest thoughts and good
wishes. j
The book containing the above statement, on
page six, was distributed for many years while
we bad our headquarters In New York and San
Francisco, and not less than 50,000 copies of
sucb books, outlining tho nature and purposes
- of tbe AMORC, were distributed. *
On the same page. In the same AMORC book,
Is this very definite statement: "Lest there be
any-misunderstanding, let It be known that the .
Order. (AMORC) In America Is not affiliated In
anyjwaynor are Its Supreme Officerswith
any ether philosophical, scientific or occult or-
ganlistlon In America.
Thera le nothing Indefinite or misleading
about that statement.
The first newspaper articlessome covering
a whole page, such as that In the New York
World Mtgailne Section for March, 26th. 1918
announcing tho establishment of tho Order In
America, dlitlnctly state that the AMORC was
being sponsored solely by Roslcrudan bodies or
authorities of Europe and mentions no connec
tion with any other society.
When the time came to prepare a new na- -
tlonal propaganda booklet because ot the move
of tho headquarters to Tampa from San Fran
cisco, tho same precautions against misunder
standing waro taken. The new book, stilt In
use, with thousands of copies distributed In
every state of tho United States and In alt parts
of Canada and Mexico, and with at least five
thousand copies distributed right bare In Tampa
Itself, says in very plain language on page thir
teen:
v
NO MASONIC CONNECTION
"Just as the AMORC has no physical relation
ship with tho Froemasonlc Order, even though-'
this body has every right to nsa the term Rosa . .*
Croix and the Rosy Cross symbol In Its Scottish .
Rites (as mentioned om page 5) even so the
AMORC Is not physically connected with some-v*
ot tho other movements in Europe and Amar- v
tea," etc. Throughout the book tho statement
la emphasized that AMORC Is independent of v
all other societies or organisations and onr lit*. .
eratore, which has bean translated In seven
languages and disseminated through tho world
for many yean, presents the same consistent
The Roslcroclsh Order/i&Smfii
In summarizing, than, let ns repeat: Thera
may be a society In England using the term
Roslcrudan, founded by some man as a Rost*
crucian Maeonlo lltorary society and having no
real Roslcrudan rituals or work, and having,
some assistance from an Austrian or German
source tlireujh an Individual. And It may ha
that this English body, created wtthout-'.any
Intention of making It n pure RofKruclan body,
chartered noma branches in America which
as AMORC for translations o f this namitfiMota
only separata' from all Ather.rbub'iRoelBOdah,',
societies, bnt-ln Iti vary tint p^ngtttfMM*J
leaned In this country lt.Brocl*Inwd.*JtMlHO
a 'separate and distinct :OffxnliatIini/AnaBlfcyjjc
proclamation was Incorporated taJJtevCdHnH i f l
tlon .when each ot lti T t r t o v - n n v o i t t a N M ' S S
adopted by tho great national oonvantton'or Ko* tl
slernelan-Delegates fram.-aU/OverV^Jumted;;
State*. ** ''Ji?-
The AMORC In America. t6dar,)(.thSfShty,i
Roslcrnclin organization-stellated.iWlth.thakJh-^
tornationai .bodies of Boslerudan* thrr "
the world.' t It. ur the .only -RoxlcraeUn
America 'having';* inmmJU adthWtty.
rights an'd >inlathnce; DOBr88.eoMMtdt
o f RoelcruclaneOt? thfrlaneBOt ^UIIISgrf^And^
through, theSee ofTauiottM.,th*jMoognlt eland;
traditional International i a e i i p l ^ e z B e if c r i h -,
danism for, many..eanturim.v'J-, <'t'
Likewlie the AMORC. In Amarlcarae iu db*- , ^
translated, reviieft ahd adapted: tram asnMirito'.ljS.I
century under, oompetanUAnnthoilty^nnAynp-.-V"1
proved, by the various tnt*rMtlodhtBoahnCltt:i
Congreaeea.1 And/Ut- l o . f
Amaiiee-adhering to.tb*l u . .
keeping Itself dehtt and'.wilfS^iUteJ'frM';Mo^'aH
sex teachings, political argumeiUFO^ralilehdtag.;//.: I
affiliations,' bearing, tho -r- ~ --------*- A 5 - 1
Bellecaetle-Llgne as- Hie*
tlonal. connoll -and xhavli
repreaentet!ono:in^tk0|.fe8
tlonal Roslcrudan: Congn__
Wa say: alt thi*:wlth.hon
wa have* always
movements,' ln^'AjMrfea,'?
maeele;o4lmttf" *"
in.AmaMoaiihBMM .
on# 0t-*et<hee4qeart*teJ
groat eacriftce, to .maintain tba'tnuspenavam. ( E n u a
. Roslctndanlam'-and/at'.thtf w l i t t m i t h P m o l * . ^ I
wishes-of aya>y Other Of.
and In-- atcbrdas Se-wHh
. . ThSreilni mai^himdrii$iita
ten* In this.AtetrictTwbo are QnljrW. u
vouch for.'the cleeaaeas a n d ' t h i n W K j S i i o ^ ^
ttvitles ot AMORO/bnt Just OmthtfAXOMLgl**
tacted the Roslertda* Symbol*and, that AMORC.i
name with the Only RagMtratlott.
the Halted! States, Fstsot-Office,
Its organization focm'by-proper j
tlon. In many state*,'- conntrlaa-an______
AMORC wnbaso ItO.MaC MitlOMMnd I__
tlonal naeomteo to pratsctltfllfHM'at t t k j
The matter :preooflted: oh,thla.'pogo jrtlt.b '
national ahtt Intanktlonal ^latrttiqtloni t
Its own. magaxindi. m different*
through tho nswnpspers.^Ti
are being vacs tvad from all 1
Uonaarmy ahare.offering (o.amlat'tnU
presentation of tho-rani fada./AAtta-t
'the slogea'Of'theOrder la:/
(Signed) H. SPENCER LEWIS, Impnniar^l
Ancidnt and Mjntkal (Mk V
NonSecitarian Services, Sunday Eveningd
'J.V
PSeFJBrrKr
TAMPA MORNING TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1926
PAGE THIRTEEN
An Open L etter to Freemasons and Rosicrucians:
In view of the fact that several former members of the AMORC, removed for just
cause, are forming a Rosicrucian group in Tampa, and to further their private aims are
making charges of fraud against the Order / represent, and are attempting to secure the
endorsement of the Masonic Bodies of the city and to claim such endorsement to further
their attacks I publish thefollowing signed statement:
In attempting to start this new, local Rosicrucian group in this city, these
several ex-members of the nation-wide Rosicrucian body known as AMORC,
have made serious charges against me as chief executive of AMORC and
against die organization as a whole.
To arouse the just indignity of Tampas population they have principally
charged that the AMORC claims itself to be associated with Freemasonry and is
otherwise sailing under false colors. The facts are that this new Rosicrucian
branch of a small New York society has itself been persistently claiming
intimate connection with Freemasonry.
Under the pretense of protecting the righteous interests of Freemasonry - as
though such interests needed protection! - this new group hopes to secure
Masonic endorsement here of its particular form of Rosicrucian work and
official condemnation of the AMORC , which high endorsement and
condemnation they will use in a nationwide, according to their inglorious
threats.
To protect the good name of AMORC and at the same time to reveal the
insidiousness of the campaign now under way, I present these facts to the
hundreds of our members and many hundreds of friends in this locality, solely
in the spirit of fair play.
This other organization has been operating for some years as a Rosicrucian
society in America under the leadership of Khei, and it also claims to be a
chartered branch of a local society in England.
We are not attempting to criticise this society for its researches into
Rosicrucian and arcane teachings, its purpose of disseminating such
knowledge, or its methods of arousing an interest in Rosicrucianism, except as
such methods include statements which are misleading and unwarranted.
In examining the early propaganda literature of the parent (English) body of
this American society we find in a book written by their own Supreme Magus,
published in London in 1916, the origin and purpose of this society outlined in
an interesting d manner.
After reviewing all the early historical references to various ancient
Rosicrucian organizations in Europe, the book comes to the founding of this
modem society in England. We read:
The name Rosicrucian has suffered greatly from the pretentions of men, who
falsely claiming membership, have made exaggerated, false and unreasonable
statements regarding the powers and possessions of the Fratres of the Rosy
Cross. Very true, indeed!
CLAIMS MASONIC BIRTH
Then we find how this particular society was bom and what claims it makes.
It is clearly stated that the Society in Englandthe parent body of the American
societywas designed by Robert Wentworth Little who rescued some rituals
from the store-room of Freemasons Hall and Kenneth R. H. Mackenzie, who
had received Rosicrucian initiation in Austria, while living with Count Apponyi
as an English tutor, and also Authority to form an English Masonic Rosicrucian
Society.
Several interesting points are involved in this illuminating paragraph which
presents a very strange origin for any society. First, we should like to know how
it came about that the only available Rosicrucian Rituals were located in
Freemasons Hall in England, which place has been the principal Masonic
archives for many years. Second, what danger surrounded these Rituals that
they required such strenuous action as rescuing? Third, how is it possible for an
Austrian Rosicrucian to authorize the establishment of an English MASONIC
Rosicrucian Society?
BECOMES LITERARY SOCIETY
If all this is not an attempt to make it appear that the said Society was a new
form of Masonic study and work, then let us read a little further. We find that
one year after its foundation with rescued rituals, the first Lodge or College of
the Society was opened, Mr. Little, referred to above, was its Supreme Magus
and William James Hughan, the Masonic Historian, was one of the "Substitute
Magi. Now we recall that, as a Masonic Historian, Mr. J Hughan has an
excellent reputation for preciseness, and we recall that he was one of the editors
of "History of Freemasonry, by Stillson and Hughan. So we turn, for a mo
ment, to see what Hughan permitted to be published in his history about this
Rosicrucian Masonic Society, of which he was a high officer and intimate
associate. In Part V., page 873, we read:
The modem and present existing Society of Rosicrucians was instituted
through the inception and influence of Robert Wentworth Little, of England,
who, in his searches in Germany, came upon the remnants and outline of an old
association, which, he resurrected and rehabilitated in order to create a
literary organization, retaining the forms, titles, and numbers of the degrees, so
far as might be subservient to his purposes, which were defined to be as
follows: to create a base for the collection and deposit of archaeological and
historical subjects pertaining to Freemasonry, secret societies in general,
and interesting provincial matter; to inspire a greater disposition to obtain
historical truth and to displace error; to bring to light much in relation to a
certain class of scientists and scholars, and the result of their life labors, that
were gradually dying away in the memories of men. (The emphasis in this
paragraph is mine).
LIMITED TO FREEMASONS
If we examine this paragraph we find a discrepancy between it and the
official statement as to where Mr. Little secured his rituals and authority; but the
most important points are those to which I have given emphasis by blackface
type. To resurrect and rehabilitate the remnant and outline of an old association
in Germany in order to create a literary society, is NOT an official manner of
establishing a Rosicrucian organization. But, to make such a society the base for
the collection of subjects pertaining to Freemasonry and secret societies in
general, and to add such Rosicrucian forms, titles and numbers of the degrees,
so far as might be subservient to his purposes, is to confound Freemasonic re
search and study with a relationship to Rosicrucian.
If this is not sufficient to show that the society started out solely to be a new
attachment to Freemasonry without any justification for it in the requirements of
Freemasonry, let us see what happened a few years later. We read on page 10 of
an official book of this society, published in America, that other Lodges or
"colleges" were established soon after 1879 and that by the establishment of
these branch bodies the society was entitled to formits own high council of
authority. This may be proper organization work, but note that this fine point is
stated:
"Membership in these colleges was limited to Freemasons of the 32nd Degree;
quarterly meetings were held and their sessions were devoted principally to a
banquet, with an aftermath-of a literary and philosophical nature, with little if
any attempt to exemplify the Rosicrucian Degrees with the philosophy they
embodied.
That does not sound like Rosicrucian sessions with the traditional seriousness
and sublime sacredness which constitute the very foundation of all true
Rosicrucian conclaves. But, it is typical of the sessions of the literary societies
of that day and of this day. Note, however, that it was a society for Freemasons
exclusively.
NO ROSICRUCIAN WORK
A further indication that the society thus formed, and establishing branches
of itself in America, was not organized on Rosicrucian principles with
Rosicrucian authority, is shown by the words of this society in other pieces of
its own official literature. We note, for instance, that they did not permit women
to unite with them; and on page four of a book recently issued by them, as well
as on page eleven of another official pamphlet, they state that:
A member of the Massachusetts College (lodge), in Boston, thoroughly
awake to the omission , of the real Rosicrucian work, and having received the
VIII Degree constituting hima Provincial Magus of the Fraternity, engaged in
special research work to recover the original Eckartshausen Rituals of the
Fraternity.
Thus we see that although the society was establishing Rosicrucian lodges or
"colleges" and was conducting its member through degrees as high as the VIII
and conferring upon them one of the Rosicrucian titles which had been made
subservient to their purposes, they admit having had no real Rosicrucian
Work, and one of their highest members engaged himself in the labor of
recovering some Rituals possessed by a descendant of an early German
Rosicrucian Lodge. Further on the same page we read that it was the ambition
of this VIII Degree member to undertake the formation and institution of a
branch of the Fraternity that would devote itself exclusively to the true
Rosicrucian Art and Operations, and at the same time open its doors to both
sexes on a basis of true equality."
NO ROSICRUCIAN AUTHORITY
In other words this member hoped to secure a proper authority and real
systemof the Rosicrucian order for his American society, even to the extent of
following the ancient Rosicrucian principle of admitting women, instead of
limiting membership to Freemasons. But, according to this same booklet, the
transition of this member prevented the fulfillment of his personal ambition.
This setback in the plans was overcome by the officers of the American society
who proceeded to reorganize their almost extinct literary society on the basis of
authority given to themby that conscientious member before his transition.
Thus, the society in America today, says the official book again, is the
outgrowth of the old society in the United States, most of the Colleges
(lodges) of which became either dormant, extinct or inoperative.
Here we see by their own admission that the present society, calling itself
Rosicrucian, is an outgrowth of the parent bodys branches founded as a literary
society, formed by Freemasons, for Freemasons and to study Freemasonic and
other "archaeological and historical subjects.
Is it any wonder that persons reading such literature in their search for
Rosicrucianism, believe that this society, using the name Rosicrucian and a
symbol much like the ancient one, is a part of or in some way officially
affiliated with Freemasonry? If you are one who may argue that it is all in the
way you read such matter, let us take some of its more recent literature and see
what it claims in unmistakable language.
CLAIMS TO BE MASONIC PARENT
In the last issue of its official quarterly, dated September, 1926, we read on
the cover that its teachings and findings are amplified thru its intimate
connection with Ancient and Medieval Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry,
Druidism, etc. Note that it says intimate connection! On the same page we find
that it offers as one of its correspondence courses, to any one, lessons on
Esoteric Masonry. In the same issue we read on page 140 these significant
words:
First, Rosicrucianism is not an appendage of Freemasonry. The Rosicrucian,
Fraternity is regarded by its members and by several of the best Masonic
historians and researchers, as the parent source of Freemasonry. There are many
conditions that make this a plausible theoiy. The Fraternity, today, in its
Constitution, requires certain of its High Council members to be not only
Master Masons, but Masons of all degrees. However, even this is an innovation
of recent years."
NOT TRUE ROSICRUCIANISM
We say that the above paragraph is significant because it attempts to foster the
idea that Rosicrucianism is not merely affiliated with Freemasonry, but is
recognized today as the parent body or guiding body of Freemasonry. And the
statement is misleading because it attempts to associate the two organizations
and to make readers believe that the Rosicrucian Fraternity limits its high
councils to Freemasons. This is probably the case with the society we have been
discussing. BUT IT IS NOT TRUE OF THE ROSICRUCIAN ORDER
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.
Such claims to Masonic connection are further emphasized by this Society of
Rosicrucians by the official statement it sent to Hartman's 1925 issue of a
Directory of Occult and Fraternal Societies. There, on page 125, this Society of
Rosicrucians says of itself that its first attempt to establish a branch of its own
in America in 1878 was on Masonic lines, and at the close of the article we
read this:
The Societas Rosicruciana in America works in complete harmony and
close association with the Masonic Fraternity, and constitutionally, its major
officers are Masons of all Rites and Degrees.
WHAT IT TEACHES
Let us turn now to another book, the official text-book of this Rosicrucian
society, sold by mail to anyone and purchasable in bookstores a state of
affairs that is inconsistent with the traditions of the true Rosicrucian order which
has never published text books for the profane with a claim that they contained
its teachings and in this book of Fundamentals we find again and again the
statement made that Freemasonry of today in America and England is not only
associated with Rosicrucianism, but even more than this. For instance, in the
XIII Chapter of this official textbook, whose author is given as Khei, the head
of the Society, and whose publication is authorized by the High Council of
the society, we read:
It is the teaching of the Brotherhood, that Freemasonry owes its real origin
to the Rosicrucians. In other words, this Society teaches this claim to its
members.
Then on page 321, in the same Chapter, we find that after the author has tried
to show that Masonry does not contain all the secrets and explanation of the
symbolism of the Masons, the seeker is told he must go to the Rosicrucian
teachings: This is stated in these words:
Since Masonry, the offspring, fails us in our search for the true exegesis, we
must turn to Rosicrucianism, the parent.
A TERRIBLE EXAMPLE
Such a misstatement of fact is unfair both to Freemasonry and
Rosicrucianism. There is nothing in the true teaching of Rosicrucianism that
reveals the secrets or meanings of the Freemasonic symbolism or work from a
Masonic point of view. Such a claim is intended solely to make Freemasons
believe that if they have not quickly and easily discerned all there is to discern
in Freemasonry, they need only unite with the Rosicrucian society. It is
ridiculous and without the slightest warrant.
How does the society proceed to illustrate such a point? We read on in the
same Chapter of this official textbook. We approach an interesting point. The
author is offering his Rosicrucian explanation of the Masonic symbolism of the
House not made with hands. We wonder what dare be said in public print on
this subject. We are assured, however, that what follows was read before
Metropolitan Lodge No. 1, Ark Mariner Masons, New York City, in 1918, and
that by publishing it freely to the world
No Masonic Obligations have been violated by this procedure and it is hoped
that this Instruction will be studied most carefully by all Masons to whom it
may come, whether they are members of the Rosicrucian Fraternity or not.
So, believing that what is to follow was approved by Masons and I s not
prohibited by them as secret parts of their studies, we are astounded and
shocked to discover that this author presents the matter that was given in the
above Masonic lodge, in the form of sex-teachings! Can anything be further
away from pure Rosicrucianism and true Freemasonry? Actually, the columns
before the Temple of Solomon and the entrance way are associated with sex
matters in words that are too disgusting for us to think of using here and which
could never enter a lecture or discussion connected with real Rosicrucianism.
NONE WILL BELIEVE IT
How can Masons of today read such matter and believe that it la either
Masonic or Rosicrucian? Rosicrucianism does not touch upon sex matters
anywhere in its thousands of lessons, in any of its booklets, discussions,
symbols or physiological treatises. It is this one outstanding fact that has made
the Rosicrucian teachings notable in comparison with modem cults: and we
know the same thing can be said in regard to the teachings of Freemasonry.
Yet, here is an organization, a society, using the name Rosicrucian, claiming
to be "intimately connected" with and the "parent" of Freemasonry, appealing to
Freemasons in every breath, limiting its high council membership to
Freemasons and otherwise proclaiming an affiliation or connection with
Masonic bodies, contrary to all Masonic principles and at the same time
offering as official teachings such things as are an insult to the intelligence of
either Freemasons or Rosicrucians and unfit for polite discussion anywhere.
WHAT AMORC CLAIMS
In conclusion let us call the reader's attention to what AMORC has always
said about the connection of Rosicrucianism with Freemasonry. We knew, too,
that some Masons might think that there was a connection between the Rose-
Croix Degree of Freemasonry and the Rose Cross of our Order. Hence we tried
in every clear cut emphatic manner and in every piece of official propaganda
literature, to state the true situation.
In the first propaganda book issued by the AMORC to be sent through the
mails all over the United States, we said:
"When we say that the Order (AMORC) has absolutely no connection with
any branch of the Theosophical Society, the New Thought Movement or
Freemasonry, we do not mean to say such a connection would be displeasing or
detrimental; but it is unnecessaryand impossible! ... In respect to all these
movements we have only the kindest thoughts and good wishes."
The book containing the above statement, on page six, was distributed for
many years while we had our headquarters in New York and San Francisco, and
not less than 60,000 copies of such books, outlining the nature and purposes of
the AMORC, were distributed.
On the same page, in the same AMORC book, is this very definite statement:
"Lest there be any misunderstanding, let it be known that the Order (AMORC)
in America is not affiliated in any waynor are its Supreme Officerswith
any other philosophical, scientific or occult organization in America."
There is nothing indefinite or misleading about that statement.
The first newspaper articlessome covering a whole page, such as that in
the New York World Magazine Section for March, 26th, 1916 announcing the
establishment of the Order in America, distinctly state that the AMORC was
being sponsored solely by Rosicrucian bodies or authorities of Europe and
mentions no connection with any other society.
When the time came to prepare a new national propaganda booklet because
of the move of the headquarters to Tampa from San Francisco, the same
precautions against misunderstanding were taken. The new book, still in use,
with thousands of copies distributed in every state of the United States and in all
parts of Canada and Mexico, and with at least five thousand copies distributed
right here in Tampa itself, says in very plain language on page thirteen:
NO MASONIC CONNECTION
"Just as the AMORC has no physical relationship with the Freemasonic
Order, even though., this body has every right to use the term Rose Croix and
the Rosy Cross symbol in its Scottish Rites (as mentioned on page 5) even so
the AMORC is not physically connected with some of the other movements in
Europe and America, etc. Throughout the book the statement is emphasized
that AMORC is independent of all other societies or organizations and our lit
erature, which has been translated in seven languages and disseminated through
the world for many years, presents the same consistent claims.
In summarizing, then, let us repeat: There may be a society in England using
the term Rosicrucian, founded by some men as a Rosicrucian Masonic literary
society and having no real Rosicrucian rituals or work, and having some
assistance from an Austrian or German source through an individual. And it
may be that this English body, created without any intention of making it a pure
Rosicrucian body, chartered some branches in America which passed away and
then were revived as being intimately connected" with Freemasonry.
But, the fact remains that the Rosicrucian bodies can be formed in only one
way, by sponsorship and guidance by a superior Rosicrucian body possessing
and retaining the ancient authority, ritual, constitution and system as well as the
pure teachings, FREE FROM ALLIANCE WITH ANYTHING BUT PURE
ROSICRUCIANISM.
The Rosicrucian Fraternity in Germany was NOT the first and parent body in
Europe. That is believed only by those who also believe that there was a person
or character having the name Christian Rosenkreuz without realizing that this
was merely a pen-name used on some propaganda books, and means, when
translated from the German, "Christian Rosy Cross." The Order in Germany and
Austria, as in other countries at different periods, was founded on authority and
approval from a superior body, and that superior body of men a real high
council indeed existed in Toulouse, France, for several centuries after having
existed in India and Egypt.
AUTHORITY FROM AN INDIVIDUAL IMPOSSIBLE
To claim that any person could go from England or America to the home of a
Rosicrucian member in Austria or Germany and there receive, at the hands of
one person, Rosicrucian Initiation and Authority to start an "English Masonic
Rosicrucian Society," as this society in England and America claims, is too
absurd to argue. It may make an appeal, under a misleading impression, to some
Freemasons, but not to many, in fact. If authority to organize new jurisdiction of
any ancient order could be granted in this way, what a mess there would be in
all society circles.
No Rosicrucianism has absolutely no connection with Freemasonry today,
and has not had for hundreds of years, even though they may have cooperated in
many ways in years gone by in England, and even though many Freemasons in
Europe today are also Rosicrucians, and some of their conclaves are held in the
same cities in the same vacation period of the summer. In America, at any rate,
the two bodies have NEVER been associated or affiliated, despite any of the
claims and great insinuations of this "literary" society of Rosicrucians.
THE FACTS ABOUT THE AMORC AUTHORITY
The Rosicrucian Order, known internationally as AMORC (or translations of
this name) is not only separate from all other but Rosicrucian societies, but in its
very first pronunziamento issued in this country it proclaimed itself to be a
separate and distinct organization, and this proclamation was incorporated in its
Constitution when each of its various paragraphs were adopted by the great
national convention of Rosicrucian Delegates from all over the United States.
The AMORC in America today is the only Rosicrucian organization
affiliated with the international bodies of Rosicrucians throughout the world. It
is the only Rosicrucian body in America having received authority, power,
rights and assistance from a competent body of Rosicrucians of the ancient
lineage and through the See of Toulouse, the recognized and traditional
International seat of true Rosicrucianism for many centuries.
Likewise the AMORC in America, as in dozens of foreign lands, is die only
Rosicrucian organization using the original and true Rituals, Titles, Degrees,
symbols and secret work, as translated, revised and adapted from century to
century under competent authority and approved by the various international
Rosicrucians Congresses. And it is the only such body in America adhering to
the true ancient traditions, keeping itself clean and wholesome, free from sex
teachings, political arguments or misleading affiliations, bearing the authority of
Count de Bellecastle-Ligne as Hierophant of the international council and
having the only American representation in the recent and past International
Rosicrucian Congresses.
We say all this with honor and respect, as we have always said, to all other
orders and movements in America, especially the Freemasonic; and many
incidents in our work here in America have shown and proved that each one of
us at headquarters has labored often at great sacrifice, to maintain the
independence of Rosicrucianism and at the same time the good wishes of every
other organization acting fairly and in accordance with facts.
* * *
There are many hundreds of reputable citizens in this district who are only
too happy to vouch for the cleanness and fairness of the activities of AMORC,
but just as the AMORC protected the Rosicrucian Symbols as the AMORC
name with the only Registration of this kind in the United States Patent Office,
and protected its organization form by proper legal incorporation in many states,
countries and lands, so the AMORC will use its vast national and international
resources to protect its name at this time. The matter presented on this page will
be given national and international distribution through its own magazines in
different countries and through the newspapers. Telegrams and letters are being
received from all Rosicrucian jurisdictions everywhere offering to assist in this
open presentation of the real facts. As in the past, the slogan of the Order is
Soli Deo Gloria!
(Signed) H. SPENCER LEWIS, Imperator for North America,
Ancient and Mystical Order Rosae Crucis (AMORC)
Tampa, Florida, November 1st, 1926
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS FOR NORTH AMERICA
AMORC TEMPLE
ROSICRUCLAN SQUARE - MEMORIAL BOULEVARD
The Public Is Always Welcome To Our Non-Sectarian Services,
Sunday Evenings At 7 o'clock
San Bernardino Daily Sun
San Bernardino, California
Friday, November 12,1926
Page 6
ORIENTAL
SACRED LAWS
Bosioruelaas Of far
Mjstlo Teaching's to Bashers
^he Rosicrucians! Described bl
Tvord Lytton, Marlp Corelli am
scores of eminent authorities as thi
most illustrious fraternity of Sagei
preserving the great mystic knowl
edge of all ages. They offer througl
their hundreds of branches the Ar
cane Teachings In modern language
to those anxious to master the l&wi
of personal attainment. To tin
sincere seeker a Sealed Book" will
be loaned. Send four cents foi
actual postage on book.
Librarian No. 125
AMORC TEMPLE
Rosicrucian Square, Memorial Blvd
Tampa, Florida
1927
Plan of 5,000 American to make ex-
odous late next year to Egypt and
settle on banks of Nile for Harmon
ious and progressive life without be
nefit of modem conveniences is an
nounced at San Francisco by Dr. H.
Spencer Lewis, president of Rosecru-
dans.
Decatur Review
Decatur. Illinois
Wednesday. November J O. 1927
PaceI
5,000 Americans Going to Egypt
To Prove They Can Live Without
Benefit of Modern Conveniences
SAN FRANCISCO. Nov. 30. ( AP)
Five thousand American men. wo
men and. children plan to move *o
an ancient Egyptian city by the Nile
and prove they con live there har
moniously and progressively, without
bencllt of modern conveniences. This
was the announcement made today
by Dr H. Spencer Lewis, national
president of the Rosocrucian Order, a
phlllsophlcal cult.
, Dr. Lewis declared plans were be
ing made to have the expedition call
late next year.
The city of Tcl-El-Amarnn. Sun
City of A menhotep the Fourth,
founder of the Rosecruclan Oraer,
is the spat picked for the cxpei l -
m^nt. Dr Lewis said. The expedi
tion will contain art approximate
even number of men and women,
all carefully selected for their phy
sical fitness and devotion to the
principles of the teachings under
which they are to live
There will also be several chil
dren." Dr. Lewis said. "And as sev
eral expectant mothers will take
the Journey, there will be children
born in the Sun City of the Nile.
Establishment of families will be en
couraged "
The colony will abandon modem
dress for costume of the ancient
Egyptians and will forsake mechani
cal implements for the ciude tools of
1^00 B C They are to live accord
ing to the principles propounded by
! Amenhotep In an effort to demon-
' strate that these laws have not lost
their value for the human race t s
Particular efforts wi l l -be made to
encourage use Of the international
language known as Ilo. which Dr
Lewis said, has been approved by the
Rosecruclan Order.
The Bee (Danville. Virginia)
Wednesday. November 30, 1927,
page 3
5,000 AMERICANS TO ABANDON
LIVING AND SETTLE ON BANKS OF NILE
SAN FRANCISCO, No*. II (A.
P.).F1v tboasand American
men, women and children pUn to
more to u indent Efyptian city
by the Nile end prove they can
lire there harmonlnuly and prs-
fremlrely wltheel benefit of
modem convenience*. This was
the annonneement made today
by Dr. H. Spencer Lewie, national
president of (he Roeecrnctan Or
der, n philosophical edit.
Dr. howto deolared piano nan
elnc nude to have the expedition
call lata neat poor.
The alt* of Tel-el-Annoa, Son .
city of Amer-'Hep the Fourth,
foander of the Roeecrmian Or
der, la the elte picked for the
experiment, Dr. Lewie mid. The
expedition wQl contain on ap
proximate even ntuner of men
and women, all earefaRy eel acted
for their phydcal fltnea and de
votion to the princtplco of the
teaehlnye ander thlch they are -
to Urn,
"There win also * several
children,1* Dr. Lewis mid, "and
a* several expectant mothers fH
take the Journey, there will e
children orn hi the Son City of
the Nile. Establishment of fam-
Ulm will be eneearaced.
The colon ay will abandon mod
em drem for costume of the an
cient Eryptlans and will forsake
mttrhan^*1 Impiement* for the
S5d * * * j x * * fa 3 7
i n to lift ^ tlw priii-
fltple* MOtsflad kfc4*mfe(ta*
In an effort to demonstrate that
three laws have not tort their
vnlae for the hanun race,
Partlealar efforts will bo made
to enoearace n e af the Interna-
tional lanroare known m Ido,
which Dr. Lewis said, has been
approved by the Rosecrnolan Or
der.
The arrival of Dr. Lewi* In San
Francisco is connected wttb re
moval of the national head (Bar
ters af the' Rosecrwelans from
San Famlaos |a Ban Joan
The Scranton Republican
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Wednesday, November 30, 1927
Page I
5000 Americans to Set Up
Cult City in Ancient Egypt
SAN FRANCISCO Nov. N UP)
Five tboUMhd American men, wo
men and children plan to move to an
ancient Egyptian city by the Nile
and prove they can life there tjar-
raonloualy and progressively without
bjneit of modern conveniences. This
waa the announcement made today
by Dr. H. Spanner Lewie, national
president of the Roeecruclan 'order,
a phlloeophlcal cult.
Or. Lewis declared plana were be
ing made to hare the expedition sell
late next pear.
She city of TeMSfAmarna, aun
city of' Anrnihalip tha Fourth,
f f o sttl v f i m f e f l m i m t M i ?
the afte picked for the experiment,
Dr. Lewie aeld. The expedition will
contain an approximate even number
od^mon and women* all carefully se
lected for their physical fltaeas and
.devotion ta the principles of tho
teachings- under which they are to
I tv*
The colony will abandon modern
dress, for costume of the ancient
ftrypllane and will forsake, mechani
cal Implemeale for the crude tools
of 1100 B. Ok Particular effortwill
be made to encoureie uee of the
International language known aa llo,
which Dr. Lewis said, baa bean ap.
provfd nr lie hM tnoui order,
Reading limes
Reading, Pennsylvania
Wednesday, November 30, 1927
Page I
Rose Cross Head
Meets Opposition
i SAN FKANCI SCO, Nov. .,0. (tf)
| Pl ans of Dr. H. Spencer Lewi s,
:nati onal presi dent of the I l osi cruci an
order, a phi l osophi cal cult, who yes
terday announced a proj ect for a
col ony on Egypt, today faced op
posi ti on at a poi nt much nearer
home.
j The headquarters of i ho order
here di scl ai med knowl edge of the
!col oni zati on proj ect, hut further an
nouncement that the nati onal head
quarters of tlie Rosi cruci ans woul d
he moved from Tampa, Fl ori da, to
San J ose, ('al i forni a, and that a HOo
I watt radi o stati on woul d he estab
l ished at I tosi cruci an Park, brought
sharp protests from San J ose resi
dents. Advi ces from San J ose stated
that ci rcul ati on of peti ti ons protest
i ng to the federal radi o commi ssi on
had started. Al bert l l oepner, who
lives near the si te of the proposed
radi o stati on stated that the stati on
woul d create an i ntol erabl e nui -
sanee."
------------- * -------------
Santa Cruz Evening News
Santa Cruz, California
Wednesday, November 30, 1927
Page 9
Sau Jose Evening News
San Jose, California
Wednesday, November 30, 1927
Page 1
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------
High Imperator
We'll build," declares Dr. H. Spencer Lewis, imperator of the
Ancient Mystic Order of Rosicrucians, who arrived hero last
night, to run into some opposition to the Amore temple which
the order plans to put up on Naglcc Street. A Lomar Service
photographer found Dr. Lewis studying plans for the temple.
U T O P I A I N E G Y P T I S
Plans of Dr. H. Spencer Lewis, na
tional president of the Roslcrucian
Order, a philosophical cult, who yes
terday announced a project for estab
lish Ins a colony In Egypt, today fared
opposition at a point much nearer
home.
Tho headquarters of tho order In
Ban Francisco disclaimed knowledge
of iho colonization project.
When shown tho dispatch carrying
the above Ban Francisco statement.
Dr. H, Spencer Lewis, national hend
of tho order, said here this morning
that the Egyptlnn colony would be
started, as originally announern.
They undoubtedly told the truth
when they said they had no knowledge
of tho plan," said Dr. Lewis. buL
they are only one of 133 chapters of
our order and they hnvo not taken
Lho trouble to canaull all of the other
branches. The colony will be estab
lished, ns outlined yesterdny."
Characterizing the opposition of
residents of Die western part of lho
city In Live neighborhood ol Rn*l-
cruelnn Park to tho order's pro|>osed
radio stnUon ns proof of the ignor-
anco of the residents there regarding
tho great university of fine arts and
music which ho Is Ilia head, Dr. II,
Spencer Lewis, grand J inporlntor of
the Roslcruclnn Order, now moving
Its International headquarters from
Tampa, Fla., to San J ose, early this
morning seared the statement made
yesterday by certain residents Hint
his organlnztlon wns a religious order,
Wo nre not a cult, and Its mean
la say so, Nor have wo any bolshe
viks, wlznrds, fortune tellers, or blnok-
rnbed priests in our midst." ho staled,
"You might J ust ns rightfully call
Yale or Harvard a cull."
mOTEST GREETS LEADER.
Tho international torchbcarcrs of
lho order arrived In San J oso yester
day, claiming to havo fanned to life
lho dlvtno flame inspired by Amcn-
hotep tho Fourth hack In 1300 B. O.
A warm and unusual reception
greeted them.In the form of aroused
cl mens, proclaiming that the estab
lishment of a radio station here, ns
the order Intends doing, would cre-
nto an Intolerable condition here for
radio reception,
DISCLAIMS ANTAGONISM
At tho same time that Dr. Lewis
was detailing tho largo plans for the
national headquarters here, Al
Hoepfnor, 064 Emory Street, who Is
circulating a petition addressed to
the Federal Radio Commission ask
ing Hint tho new station bo granted
a high wnvo length which he thinks
would prevent Interference with other
bay stations, disclaimed any Inten
tion of giving tho impression Hint
he wns antagonistic to lho station or
sought to prevent Its entry here.
I have nothing against the or*
gnnlazilon," said Hoepfner today, "ns
I am for everything that Is mind-
broadentng and educational.''
Dr. Lewis referred to the attnefc by
other San J osrans on his proposed
station as cxLrcmcly unwarranted.
"Why they didn't even know enough
nbiut it to form an opi ni onhe said,
HAS HIGH QUALITY
"To compare ua with KQW Is quite
unfair," explained tho hnpcrnlor. "Our
programs ucmuiin no advertising tol^,
no church services or long lectures.
Instead we produce only the highest
class musical and dramatic entertain
ments obtainable, such as high-grada
classical and dance music, dramatic
ploys of n comedy nature, and other
popular features of regular radio
broadcaFlIng.
"Through our affiliation with ths
American Academy of Fine Arts and
Music, founded by Theodora Rooscvt'ft
and Madame Nordlka, and due to tho
International character of our broad
casting units, we will be able to send
through the nlr the best programs f it
the Opera Comlquc and the Odoon,
two or tho greatest drnmatlc societies
of PnrlH.
WONT INTERFERE. SAYS
"Besides tlinl, it will be posslblo for
lho really big and great singers and
performers of the clay to broadcast
over our set, as It Is not a commercial
station."
Dr. Lewis further reasoned that ths
programs broadcast hero would In no
way Inlcrfcro with reception of other
Pacific Coast programs, ns five night*
a week the broadcasting would not
begin until midnight. Tho other two
occasions will start nL 10 p. m.
Programs of local Interest, carrying
weather data, news summaries and
household information, of a character
especially pleasing to wives, will take
the nlr, according to tho chief of the
order, In the early morning hours and
early In the afternoon.
FROWNS ON FICTION
"I f tho petition of Mr. Hoepner
and Mr. Nickels is successful," de
clared tho lmperalor, it may tie up
(ContliniPft on ln*e Ninel
Rosicrucians
4 ft
#------------------------------------------- --
(Oontlnned Frnm r a t e Ona)
the radio situation on the Pacific
Coast for two years. In accordance
with tho rules of the Federal Radio
Commission.
Believe meT know from experi
ence In tho radio world for a num
ber of yearstho people In tho eastern
part of tho country feel tho same wny
about radios as tho residents of San
J ose.
Chlrago alone has twice 11s many
broadcasting stations os oil tho entire
Paclfio Coast, and yet they manago to
got along and hear their various pro
grams. Tho pcoplo thcro ralso a con
stant wall and cry for tho purposo or
shutting their atntlons up so they can
get the East and West Coast broad
casts.
"In Boslort the local stations btd In
continual disrepute. Tho same situa
tion la here. Tho Italians have to be
somewhere, and a good set will not be
botherrd by being located too near to
tho lending location.
TO BENEFIT SAN J OSE
Tho coming of the order to Ban Jose,
which was selected for Its Ideal ell-
mate, according to Dr. Lewis, nod the
lock of congestion, will bo a very great
thing for tho city, duo to the fact
that 00 per cent of tho annual In
come of tho university would bo re
ceived through tho local postofflcc. In
addition aproxlmatcly 05 per cent
would bo spent locally, ho claimed.
"Wo oro referred to in tho World
Almanac as tho largest university In
America," Interjected tho man who
proposes to load 6000 of his adhoronts
to tho Nilo next year. Our enroll
ment totals 30,000, and we liavo 30
branch college offices In tho country,"
Tho main purpose of the Roslcru-
clan Order, as explained by the leader,
Is to enheneo tho study of the fino
arts and music, for which service tho
students sign for four to six year
courses at $2 a month.
The office in Ban J ose will be
merely executive, and no degrees will
be conferred here, the right being re
served to the particular local branch
where tho course of atudy may be
completed.
IS 3000 TEARS OLD
I n tho words of Dr, Lewis the or
ganisation la moro than 3000 years
old, having been founded by King
IS 3000 TEARS OLD
I n tho words of Dr. Lewis tho or
ganization Is moro than 300D years
old. having been founded by King
Amenhotep of tho Egyptians, centuries
beforo tho advent of OhrlBt. I t Is to
Amenhotep's recently excavated city
that tho expedition plana to head next
year, and there, amid tho recon
structed ruins, lead a llfo similar to
the tradilton of the ancient people.
I t will bo a trip primarily proposed
for tho collection of scientific data
regarding the fine aclonccs, which tho
Ill-fated Amenhotep fostered during a
brief reign.
Tho symbol of tho orderAMORG
Is taken from tho ancient and mystical
order of rosao crucli," Tho order
already operates four stations, at
Tampa, New York, Montreal and
Vancouver and has already applied for
a transfer of tho Tampa license to
San J ose.
Tho contract for tho Egyptian
temple to bo erected on the half block
of property owned by the order at
Naglee and Ghapman Streets, has
already been awarded to tho Minton
Company of this vicinity, and many
ether local contracts will be prepared
bortly.
I n addition. I t Is expected that many 1
new homes will be built In San J ose 1
by the attraction here of atudents of
the organisation.
San J ose Evening News
Sao J ose, California
Wednesday, November 30, 1927
Pages I and 9
AMERICANSPUN
ANOVEUOURNEr
5,000 Will Try Primitive
Life in Ancient Egyp
tian City
SAN FRAN CISCO Nor 30 (AP)
Five thousand America! men wo
men and children plan to move to
mi ancient eqyptlan city by the Nile
nntl prove they can live there har
monlousiy nnd progressively with*
out benefit of modern conveniences
I hls was the aniiouncer.ient made
today by Dr II Spencer Lewis no
tJ ouflJ president or the Hosecurclau
order a Phlllsophlcal cult
Dr Lewis declared plans weir be
infy madn to have the expedition sail
lati next year
The city of Tel el*omarna Sun
city of Ainenhotep the fourth foun
dor of the Rosccurculan order Is
the spot picked for th expeilment
Dr Lewis said The expidltlou will
contain an approximate even num
ber of men ana womeh all careful
ly selected for their physical fitness
and devotion to the nrlnclplcs of the
teachings under which they are to
live
there will also be several child
ren Dr Lewis said And a. sev
cr&l expectant mothers will take the
J ourney there will be children bom
In the Bun city of the Nile Estao
llament of families will be cncour
uged
The colony will abandon modem
dress for costume or the Ancient
Egyptians and will forsake tncchnui
cal implements foi the crude toots
of 1300 R C I hcv are to live ac
coding to the ptluclplos profounded
by Amrnhotep ]n in effort to dc
monstratc that the** laws have not
lost (heir \olue for the human race
Florence Morning News
Florence, South Carolina
Thursday, December I, 1927
Page 8
The Gettysburg Times
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Thursday, December 1,1927
Page 2 ,
C U L T T O L I V E I N
I N N I L E V A L L E Y
Will Wear Garments of Ancient
Style and Do Without Mod-
-ern Conveniences.
San Francisco, <5)ec. 1.(AP)
I Five thousand American men, -women
i
| and children ])lan to move to an an-
1cient Egyptian citv by the Nile and
! prove they can live there harmoni
ously and progressively without bene
fit of modern conveniences. This
was the announcement made yester
day by Dr. H. Spencer Lewi*;, national
president of the Rosecrucian Order,
a philosophical cult.
Doctor Lewis declared plans were
being made to have the expedition
sail late next year.
i Sexes Evenly Represented
The City of Tel-el-Amarna, Sun
City of Amenhotep the Fourth, found
er pf the Rosecrucian Order, is the
i site picked for the experiment, Doctor
I Lewis said. The expedition will con
tain an approximate even number of
men and women, all carefully sclect-
]ed for their physical fitness and de-
| votion to the principles of the toaeh-
i ings under which they arc to live,
i "There will also be several chil
I dren, Doctor Lewis said, "And as
j several expectant mothers will take
The Gettysburg Times
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
Thursday, December 1,1927
Page 2
j the journey, there will be children
, born in tire Sun City of the Nile. Es
tablishment of families will bo en
couraged.
To Use Tools Of 1300 li. C.
The colony wili abandon modern
dress for costume of the ancient
Egyptians and will forsake mechani
cal implements fen* the crude tools of
1300 B. C. Thev are to live accord
ing to the pi incinlcs, propounded by
Anvenhotep in an effort to demon
strate that these laws have not lost
their value for the human race.
Particular efforts will /be made to
encourage use of the international
language, known as Ilo, which Doctor i
Lewis said has been approved by the j
Ra&ecrucian order. The arrival of
Doctor Lewis in San Francisco is con
nected with removal of the national
headquarters of the Rosccrucians
from San Francisco to San J ose.
P U N F O R C O L O N Y
P R O V E S S U R P R I S E
Headquarters of Rosicru-
cian O r d e r Disclaim
Knowledge of Egyptian
Project
San Francisco, Doe. 1 (A.P.)
Flans of Dr. H. Spencer Lewis,
national presi dent Dr tbe Roslcrucifiii
Order, a philosophical cult, for es
tabl ishment of a colony of K,000
Americana in Egypt, where they
would live to the mauner of Nile
culture of 8,311(1 yrars ago, causer]
surprise tnilny at the headquarters
of the orgnnlsnllon here.
The headquarters ot the order dis
claim Pil IrmiwlcdfiG of the coloniza
tion projert, hut furLher announce
ment that the national headquarters
of Lho RoMcruclaua would bu moved
from Tampa, Fla., to Sou Jose, Cal.,
and that SOb wait radio elation
would be established at San Jose,
brought sharp pioleslB from resi
dents there.
Dr. Lewis said Ills plans provided
for the Balling of 6.&00 American
men, women and children next year
lt>Telul-Armana, a city by Lhe Nile,
in Central Egypt, founded by Amen-
liolup IV, who reigned In Egypt
about 1468 D. C.
Dr, I/iwls Mated that hi* colonists
would nhandon modern dress, as-
suino the costume of thu ancleui
Egyptians aud love according to
Ihe principles propounded by Amen-
hmep ir. an offort to prove that these
lawa have not lost their value for
the human race.
The North Adams Transcript
North Adams, Massachusetts
Thursday, December 1, 1927
Page 9
AM ERICAN S P U N
1 N O VEU O U RN EY
5,000 Will Try Primitive
LifeinAncient Egyp
tian City
SAN FRANCISCO Nov 10(AP)
rive thousand American men wo
men and children plan to move to
nn undent cqyptlan city by the Nile
ant! prove they can live there hur
monlouAly nnd progressively with
out benefit of modern conveniences
Hits was the announcement made
today by Dr II Spencer Lewie na
tioiml president of the Rosecurclan
order a Phlllsophlcul cult
Dr Lewis declared plans wen* be
iim niacin to have the expedition sail
InLc l uxt year
The city of Tel el-amarna Sun
city of Amenhotep the fourth foun
tier of the Rosecurculan order 1h
the spot picked fer the expeilmcnt
l)r Lewis aald The expedition will
cantalr. an approximate even limn
ber of men and women all careful
ly selected for their physical fitness
and devotion to the nrlnelples of the
tcixcfiIrifjs under which they are to
live
There will aLso be severnl child
rori Dr Lewis .said And a. sev
oral expectant mothers will take the
J ourney there will be children bom
In the Bun city of the Nile Estan
lisment of families will be cticour
aged
The colony will abandon modem
dress for costume of the Ancient
Egyptians and will forsake tucciiutil
cal implements foi the crude tools
of 110O R c I bcv are to live ac
coding lo the piluclples propounded
by Amenliotep In m effort to tie
monxtratc that tlu.se laws have not I
i lost tholr iclue for the hnmun race |
Florence Morning News
(Florence. South Carolina)
Thursday, December 1. 1927, page 6
ROUGHING fT ON THE NILE.
Talk about old-fashioned roughing
it! Five thousand Americans in Cali
fornia arc planning to move to Egypt
next year and settle down in the
ancient sun-city of Telel-Amaroa, to
live and work after the manner of
3.200 year ago.
They will adopt ancient Egyptian
dress. They will discard modern tools
and machinery for the crude imple
ments used in liie reign of Anteti-
hotep IV. thirteen centuries before
Christ. Moreover, they will try to
regulate their lives according lo the
teachings of that monarch, who is
said to have laid down the principles
on which the liosicrucinn order is
based.
Here is a change indeed, it is rare
for people to migrate eastward. It is
unusual to go sc* far as the Xile. Tt
is probably unparalleled for any peo
ple to move backward into bygone
history for more than yea vs.
with a view to making a coni pie* e job
of If.
Can they gel away with it. There
is never any telling what human be
ings can get away with, when they arc
in earnest about it. One thing, how
ever. may be safely prophesied. Those
California-Egyptians. however accus
tomed lo sunshine, will be hunting for
shade trees before they've built very
many pyramids.
* m *
Press-Courier
Oxnard, California
Tuesday, December 6, 1927
Page 2
Rosecrucians
Dr. H.. Spencer Lewis, grand im-
'eraior of-the Ancient Mystic Or*
der of Rosecrucians, looking over
plans for a temple at San Jose.
Calif. Opposition has arisen be
cause the order plans a radio sta:
tioni' and it is claimed the air
around San Francisco", already -is
overburdered with.radio waves, . I
I he Ogden Standard-Examiner
Ogden, Utah
Thursday, December H, 1927
Page 12
r
Radio Plea For
Rosicrucians Is
Sent Coast Chief
Application of tho Hoslcruclan
Brotherhood to operate a 1000-watt
radio station horo has been received
by Bernard H. Linder of the San Fran
cisco Federal Department of Com
merce, according to announcement by
Dr. H. Spencer Lewis, lmpcrator of
the order.
He docs not expect th'o local oppo
sition to the proposed station, which
developed shortly after Its arrival hero
last month, to continue after the
plans of the station become generally
known, Dr. Lewis said. The station
will do practically all its broadcasting
Rftcr 10:30 or 11 o'clock at night and
will work for distance, he declares.
Dr. Lewis arlrved here recently
from Tampn, Fin., to establish head
quarters of the Hoslcruclan order.
Work Is well along on tho headquar
ters building on Naglcc Street and tho
staff of the order will movo In soon,
It Is announced. Temporary head
quarters aro on Tho Alameda.
------------------ 4--------------------
San J ose Evening News
San J ose, California
Monday. December 19,1927
Page 11
Worlds Way!'
By ftliOY S PATTERSON* |
LOOK].VC ItACK IVA Ml)
Or>>-- hundred iind I wnl .y first-yei w*
:<iys at the Uni versi ty o* Wi i ror-si l l
are ;iui sui .i i ' tJ i uir studi es accordi ng
to "he iv.etliod :u . ir. (tie ti me of
l*criclo#. Thi s hi gh ci ti zen of Al l i ens
lived *00 years i rel ore Chri st. I n
| i.'inse days there urns much i ti wl y
I mid debate, bi l l not af ter (he man-
Hi t of l he modem .-allege. The i dea
of ti l l ? (hock ::irli-.cd whi ch i.; cx-
i i ^r.ni enl ci l wi th at t]i~ " ni vcrsi l y [
of Wi sconsi n is to gi ve young peopl e
i an undctMandi rri ; of compl i cated mj -
ial or pol i ti ml Mtnal mns ami ern.i te
, in l l i rm a desi re to ?.olvr>pi ohl cms.
The experi ment may succeed ~r
fai 'i . A t r.i y rate i t :> i nlerpr.'.inr:
in l hat it. l ooks back f or i deas i n
stead of l ooki ng for somethi ng new. ,
'ml ,.11 I*.!- Ifr-a-, r~ *hl! concl usi on I
that somoti mcH the old i s better than
Die :*cw.
AND ClO'NC HACK Aft AIX
l )r. [. SptT.ecr I /"vi s, ni t ion a',
presi dent tiT un order known a:; the
Rosoi ni ci ans, ni mouti nrs that 6,000
men, women, and chi l dren ant goi ng I
lo move to Egypt and livu ns the I
Mgypl i nns di d i n J 200 P. C. They
1'i f: goi ng l.j rl j ccatd ni eTem tool s and
u.c the inplcmar.*.* of '-hnl earl y ape.
vy 1el Love more happi ness h; to lift !
,'i<und i n a crude an:', primitive sys-
Vi n of l i vl i n: (han under modem I
rarx'M'ons. Thr>os~iids who do n ' t l
enro to make sue!: a drasti c expert- I
i nerti but -vko ti ad that the modem
\r:i y 0f 'i fo V ir.":; mo: e worry tar n i
I ',cate of r.i i nd, will wr.tch the expert- I
l arnl wi th deep i ntOl ui t. I
The J ournal News
(Hamilton. Ohio)
Saturday. December 24. 1927
page 6
A N D GOI NG BA CK A GA I N
(>r. 5C. Spencer liO.wisr nati onal
presi dent of an order known ns tho
Roseonidjitis, announces tl i nt 6,000
?ne2i, women, arid children are going
lo move lo E gypt and live ns the
E gypti an3 <1i<l in J 20l) F. C. They
"va ftniii^r t>rlircard modem tools and
use the i mplements of that earl y ape.
hey 1o!love more happiness J s lo h<\
roud in, a crude and pri mi ti ve sys-
#cm of. Hvhif? than under modem
Thr>ppnm!s who do n^t
cure to make such n drasti c experi
ment hut who fiari that the modem
way of Hfo lvitVTS inoie worry th^n
peace of :mind, will watch the experi
ment wi th deep I nterest.
1928
.5,000 FROM AMERICA
j TO MOVE TO EGYPT
1 __
Will Try Living Under Ancient
1 L e w s .
i
i ,
| San Francisco. Five thousand
I American men, women and children
j plan to move to.no ancient Egyptian
city by the Nile and prove they can
live there harmoniously and progres
sively without benefit of modern con
veniences. This w ub the announce
ment made by Dr. H. Spencer Lewis,
national president of the Rosecru-
dan Order, a philosophical culL
Doctor Lewis declared plans were
being made to have the expedition sail
late next year.
The city of Tel-el-Amarne, sun city
of Amenhotep the fourth, founder of
the I losecnidan Order, is the site
picked for the experiment, Doctor
Lewis said. The expedition will con
tain an approximate even number of
men and women, all carefully selected
for their physical fitness and devotion
to the principles of the teachings un
der which they are to live.
There will also be several ch 11-
dren,'* Doctor Lewis said. Estab
lishment of families will be encour
aged. '
The colony will abandon modern
dress for costume of the ancient
Egyptians and will forsake mechan
ical implements for the crude tools of
3300 B. C. They are to live accord
ing to the principles propounded by
Amenhotep in an effort to demon
strate that these laws have not lost
their value for the human race.
llkiah Dispatch Democrat
llkiah, California
Saturday, J anuary 28, 1928
Page 7
2n
THE EVENI NG NEWS. SAM I PSE. CALI FOPNTA. SATUPTAV. EFPWUABY 18, IO?l
Staff Occupies
Local RosicrucianHeadquarters
Center of Rosierncianism
H rrr't Ihp a r r l i l ^r l 'i of llir nrw DMlrriHhin Tcmpli' ahlrh l i now rapidly nearlni camplr|Inn M l on
S l r w t U bllc acalfalillni and lumber *4111 ih ( ic fM tk r n n r ilra rlg rr, the KaaicrucUn alaff today look
and ara rtarllni work ai anc.
Frablcana and plan* far i p t n l l u i f Ilia new iha rt w a n radla Iran*-
la lll ln r^iU lla a , IICZ, la be a p r i i i next ttk al Iha paU anil head-
l a a r l m al (he "aaltruclan ardrr, In Naglca blreel. era balnt dUaiuecd
here b; Dr. I I . Bpcnacr L twli, I mptraiar al Iha ardcr, and ILalph M.
Ualt aaprrve (ternary.
FURNI TURE MOVED TO BUILDING
While carpenters and painters and
masons and other members of the
building trades arc still hard at work,
rushing the new building to comple
tion, the national headquarters of the
Ancient Mystic Order of Roslcruclans
was occupied today by the headquar
ters' staff.
The last piece of office furniture
and equipment was moved to the new
plant In Nnglee Avenue today. White
work still remains to be done on the
new building, all of the office records
and nil of the office staff, have been
transferred from the temporary head
quarters on The Alameda, In use for
somo weeks past.
EGYPTIAN STYLE
The front of the new structure Is
In the classic Egyptian style. It was
designed by E. T. Steward Roslcru-
clan of Tampa. Fla., designer of many
Masonic building*, who has traveled
extensively In the Orient, gathering
information and material to aid In the
design of Just such structures. Two
tall battlement flagpoles arc to be
erected at the front.
The main entrance way. also In pure
Egyptian style, has two Egyptian an
tique doors, fitted with stained glnss
windows, and further ornamented
with hammered antique knockers and
hinges.
LOnRY EGYPTIAN
The main lobby Is also Egyptian In
character, with three Egyptian doors,
the bronze handles of which repre
sent mummies In their caskets. The
door casings taper, being narrower at
top than at bottom. The reverse side
of the doors arc of conventional mod
ern design.
One of tho doors from the lobby
leads Into the AMORO radio broad
casting studio. The walls and cell
ing of the studio arc being lined with
double thicknesses of material of
echo-proof qualities, to permit cleat
broadcasting without confusion from ,
Interference of reflected sound waves.
ORIENTAL DRAPERIES
Many thousands of dollars arc In
vested In rare Oriental rugs which
will cover the studio floors. Still
other thousands represent the Invest
ment for costly Oriental draperies and
couches and a clever lighting system,
which will convert the Interior of the
studio Into a replica of an Oriental
seraglio.
On the opposite side of tho lobby
are halls leading to a Ubcrary room,
finished in mahogany. Here also are
the offices of the Imporator. Dr. H.
Spencer Lewie, and the supreme sec
retary. Ralph M. Lewis.
EXPERIMENTAL LABORATORY
In this building will also be located
the experimental laboratory. Accord
ing to Dr. Lewis, considerable experi
ments have already been conducted
by the Roslcruclans, many of them of
startling significance.
Wo plan to continue our experi
ments In television here, as well as
high and low frequency radio trans
mission. Wc have actually performed
the feat of transmission of matter ay
radio, for a distance of about 20 feet,
using beam transmission. The ex
periment was carried out with gold,
which was broken down into electrons
by a process of i. Jlo-octlvlty. and then
sent out on a carrier wave, and gath
ered together by an accumulator.
In 1012, at the same time that Dr
Hcrrold was experimenting with radio
telephone broadcasting here, wc were
experimenting with radio reception at
the AMORC laboratory In New Vork.
Wc perfected the method of radio
phone reception by crystal detector
receiving voice broadcasts from aa far
away os Chicago. We donated the
circuit and the results of our experi
ments to the United States Navy
Yard at Brooklyn, and It was adopt
ed for Navy use.
TRANSMUTATION TESTS
Wc have even reached that goal
of the alchemists of ancient days
TRANSMUTATION TESTS
"We have even reached that goal
of the alchemists of ancient days
the transmission of baser metals Into
gold. In some of our chemical experi
ments. We have made the experi
ments In the presence of newspaper
men and scientific men of first rank,
transmuting zinc to gold. It costs
about $150 to make a dolar'a worth
of cold, so It Is not a process that Is
commercially practicable.
"The gold produced stands all tests
of pure, natural gold, except that of
hardness and specific gravity. It Is
harder than natural gold. It is more
compact. The electron arrangement
seems more compact.
BOX OF ELEMENTS
"In a month or two you will see
here a box containing every knaAvn
element a truly remarkable collec
tion. Wo have one unique rock which
contains all three of the radlo-actlw
elementsradium, uranium and van
adium. While examining this rock
we found that If held in the hand It
changed color. We passed It from
person to person, trying to note any
peculiar performance or variation.
There was one person In the group
troubled with kidney disease. He held
it for a few minutes and when we
looked at the r^fc we found It cov
ered with moisture. Bis hand was
moist We examined the structure pf
the crystals of the moisture drawn
from the hand, and found It to be
uric add. Thereupon, we treated this
Individual by letting him'hold the
rock dally for a half hour. He was
shortly cured completely of his trou
ble. Since then, the rock has been
used successfully on many occasions
for the same purpose.
"There arc many men of national
note who are Roslcrucians. and It Is
when they visit headquarters that
most of the outstanding experimental
work Is done "_____________________ j
MAILING DEPARTMENT
At the rear of tho building Is a ,
large, airy, well-lighted room, used as
the mailing department. Here girls
prepare and mail out the orders pub
lications.
"We send out In the neighborhood
of 100.000 pieces of mall a month,"
Dr. Lewis declared. "With every piece
of mall goes a circular advertising the
beauties and advantages of 6an Jose.
We are hero to do what we can to
build up the community.
"We are the biggest customer the
Postal Telegraph Company has In San
Jose. Our telegraph bill runs from
$300 to $500 a month.
"Our postage alone costsf rom $100
to $150 per day, on the average. In
Florida, we maintained one branch
postoffice by our stamp sales alone
We didnt get our mall deliveredIt
was so large that we always called
for i t And me Doom eonSfcscd, -wun'
the result that our stamp purchases
maintained the branch postofflcc.
"I believe we have the only metered
mailing machine In the country. It
automatically stamps, cancels and
1seals our mailing matter, and a
meter keeps accurate count of the
number of pieces stamped. At the
Iend of the month we pa:* th post-
office department what the meter
reading indicates. Most of our mall
leaves here bundled and sacked, ready
' to go on the mall trains.
"it is our Intention to do all our
business In San Jose, so far as pos
sible. Already we are keeping two lo-
' cal printing houses suppllc- with our
work. We shall try to employ local
people, so far as possible."
RADIO STATION
Two tall steel masts arc now being
erected for the AMORC radio station.
The radio control building is separate
from and In the rear of the main
structure. Some $30.000 is being ex-
pended tor the radio Installation.
"The radio will not bo used for prop
aganda, Dr. Lewis declared. "We
aro not going to broadcast sermons
or religious services of our orderfor,
despite the symbol o* the cross 1n our
Insignia, we have no denominational
creed to preachwe arc not a church.
We arc going to try to give only the
best of music, and programs that will
reflect credit to San Jose."
The short wave brnadrast work will
begin next week, the transmitter now
being In process of Installation. Thd
short wave station will 1: oadcast on
a wave length of 41. meters, using a
250-watt transmitter. A counterpoise
antenna wllNbe used instead of a
ground, giving &wave of exceptional
sharpness.
San J ose Evening News
San J ose, California
Saturday, February 18,1928
Page 2B
R osier ncia ns
Had Origin
In Ancient World
Severe Moral Code
Held By Members
Of Unusual Order
By O. A. SEAVER
Eagle Qiven U. S. Centuries Ago
Thh map. found on (he trail* of the Koaleruelan Temples and (he Pyramid Cheops during excavation* In
Egypt, show* (he Symbols and planetary characters which the indent Roslcrudans assigned to the countries
of the world. An interesting fnct fs that they allotted the eagle with the arrow* of Sagittarius to the
United States. This same eagle was many centuries later adopted a* the official bird of the United Slates
and Is found on many of our coins.
By O. A. REAVER
The very wide and Increasing Inter
est In the subject of ifosicruclanism
at the present time Indicates a nat
ural revlvnl of one of the earliest
forma of philosophical and scientific
knowledge systematized In America.
In fact, It may be said that Roslcru-
danism and the Roslcruclan princi
ples were closely allied with the foun
dation of America and certainly played
an Important part In the establish
ment of many of Its cultural systems,
as shown by the historical records
preserved In Philadelphia and Wash
ington.
Ever since tho first Rosicructans
came to America In 1694 and estab
lished the first non-sectarian Sunday
school, 1Gyears before a Sunday school
was established In Europe, and pro
moted astronomical, botanical, chemi
cal and medical research, the Rosl-
cruclans have been Instrumental In
advancing the fine arts, the sciences
and the religious activities of many
organizations.
VIA ROSAE CRUCI5
J ust as "via cruets was the cry In
tho crusades of the middle ages, so
has tho cry "via Rosne Crucls been i
the cry of countless thousands for
many centuries In tho united effort to
contribute to the personal evolution of
man and his general advancement In
civilization.
By way of the rosy cross, the cross
with the slnglo red rose In Its center,
tho symbol of Rosicructans, or fra
ternity of the red rose and golden
crossl Mystical though the name and
symbol appear, the organization In all
ages and all climes has boon one of
practical effort and distinct efficiency
In meeting the material problems of
life. Roslcruclanlsm Is not tho doctrine
of a cult, nor the philosophy of a
school of esthetics.
ORIGIN IN ANTIQUITY
With its origin lost In antiquity wc
can find references to ft In the sane
and rational writings of the earliest
scientists. Among Its first advocates
In the Orient wc find men- and
womenwhoso names and fame are
associated with the discovery of medi
cine and therapeutic systems, astrono
mers, herbalists, cosmotologlsts and
chemists.
I t is true that In the middle ages
man;* of its most learned apologists
weer alchemists and wrote much about
their "art of transmutation but their
work with crucibles and fire was not
always for the purpose of proving na
ture's processes of purifying the dross
Into the refined gold; It was tho
higher purpose of demonstrating that
In the nature of man there was that
which could be mentally transmuted
Into the spiritual essence of perfec
tion.
SEVERE MORAL FRECEPTS
Wherever and whenever the brothers
of the rosy cross ware united In their
official duties, there advances were
made In tho name of their symbol,
without ostentation, personal credit or
aggrandizement, and the literature of
the world Is replete with references
to the organization like that tribute
Ulterod by Lord Bulwcr Lytton, who
said In his Roslcruclan story called
Zanonl, that it was "an august fra
ternitymost jealous of all secret so
cietieswhose doctrines, hinted at by
tho earliest philosophers, are still a
mystery to the greatest scholars not
initiated. Its members still prosecute
their profound researches Into natural
sciences and occult philosophy, and
no monastic order Is so severe In the
practice of moral precepts.
PRACTICES HUMANITARIAN!SHI
Known throughout the world as
tho Ancient, Mystical Order Rosoe
Crucls, or by its abbreviated name In
every land, Amorc tho organization
numbers Bmong Its present adherents
and followers the most learned of men
and women and those most devoted to
good citizenship. Christian living and
charitable thinking. From the highest
offices In governments in all countries
to tho quiet and undisclosed efforts
of those who have retired from tho
business world, there Issue the direc
tion and promulgation of the many
humanitarian activities of the order.
Funds are sent to the Egypt Ex
ploration Society in Boston for carry
ing on the special excavations at Tel-
el-Amarna, from which must llghi has
been thrown upon the history of sci
ence and civilization; other funds are
sent to branches In Copenhagen, Ver
dun, Berlin, London and Rome for the
care at war orphans; while through
the agency of specialized workers
clinics are maintained in many cities
for the care of tho sick, tho rehabili
tation of soldiers, the promotion of
education and the prevention of dis
ease. Libraries are established In ac
cordance with the first Roslcruclan
manifesto to this effect issued by Ben
jamin Franklin, who was an officer of
the early foundation in Philadelphia,
ROOSEVELT WAS MEMBER
Through Us teachings, men Bnd
women are helped in their projesslona
and arts. Its chief officer. Dr. H.
Spencer Lewis, la one of the directors
of the American Foundation of Fine
Arts as planned by the laic Theodore
Roosevelt and Mmc. Lillian Nordica.
Who were enthusiastic Rosicructans.
Ho is also the American represenut-
tivc of the International fine aria
bodies of Europe, of wnich Fermm
Qcmier of the Opera Cormque In Paris
Is the president.
Through these and many other
similar connections, tho AMORO In
North America assists many to attain
a high degice o( perfection In tncii
chosen lieids, while it contributes to
the advancement of the sciences
through ns period revelation of facts
discovered in us many American aud
foreign laboratories.
NOT I l LL I GI UUS SCHOOL
Tho organization is not a religious
school, fliihougn the foundations of its
teachings are laid in Us lust principle
of the Rosierucian ontology, which is.
"And Oud breathed Into man the
Breath'of life and the man became a
living soul." with emphasis upon the
'act that many became essentially a
out rather than a living body.
Since clergymen and follower* of
- all denominations are members of the
organization, one may see that sec
tarian doctrines play no part In the
teachings. However, applicants for
membership must vouch for their be
lief In the existence of Ood as well as
pledge to respect and honor the Hag
of the country and Bfflrm that they
have never been guilty of treason or
engaged In any unlawful practice.
NOT AKIN TO YOGI
The teachings of the organization
are graded Into classes and subjects
like the curriculum of a university and
Include such matters a a physics, chem
istry, psychology, ontology, cosmology,
dletlcs. biology, metaphysics, tho ap
plied and practical sciences and the
professional arts. There Is not the
slightest relationship to the vague and
Oriental Ideas of the Yogi exercises,
or tho Hindu methods of mysticism.
In fact, the AMORO is not a part of
any of the Efficient or foreign systems
of occult study.
The principles of Roslcrucianlsm are
very -strict In regard to moral and
ethical standards. To RoGlcruclans,
marriage Is a most holy and sacred
tie, not to be entered Into lightly nor
easily severed. Each member Is taught
that next to his duty to God is hts
duty to his wife, family or parents,
then to his country. He must be
charitable in his political and busi
ness dealings, broadly humanitarian In
his desires and actions and enthusi
astic in his support of every move
ment, every institution and every plan
contributing to the uplift of man or
the personal evolution of character.
NO FANATICAL DOCTRINES
There arc no fanatical or extreme
doctrines. Roslcruclans are not vege
tarians, teetotalers, antl-vlvlscctlonlsts
or reformers In any sense through
commands of the organization. Each
Is made acquainted with the laws of
nature, the penalties for all violations
and allowed the privilege of choos
ing personal courses in life. The mem
bers arc not the. blind followers of
some leader to whompersonal allegi
ance Is pledged, but equal associates
with all others In an International
body with branches In every civilized
land.
FREE OF PARTY TIES
Thomas J efferson, one of the early
officers of the organization, was one
of the first to establish the custom of
pledging co-operation with the gov
ernment In Its activities, and since
then the AMORC in America has been
a loyal supporter of State and na
tional laws and principles. Through
many channels and with the assist
ance of many In high office the order
Is ever alert In the protection of the
best Interests of the citizens, and
being free from any political connec
tions It Is able to carry to fruition
many projects which might be frus
trated by party Influences. w
Since tho organization functions as
a fraternal body, with Its lodges and
temples, it naturally has rituals and
ceremonies, but these are not in the
form of Oriental rites of barbaric
pomp. Each ritual of Initiation is
a dramatic presentation of some of
the fundamental laws of nature, ar
ranged to impress the members with
the beauty and significance of the
principles Involved.
USE EGYPTIAN COSTUMES
The order has Its own temple
buildings and lodges in the principal
cities of North America, and these are
usually of Egyptian style and decora
tion, with all officers robed in Egyp
tian costumes of the 17th dynasty.
Tho reason for this is found In the
fact that the Roslcruclons trace much
of their philosophy to the wonderful
writings of Amenhotep IV, Pharaoh
of Egypt, He it was woh established
the first monotheistic religion known
to man and by official decree pro
hibited the practice of heathen, idol
worship throughout Egypt.
He claimed that tho sun disk was
not to be worshipped except In adora
tion to it as the medium of life power
which emanated from the sole living
Ood.n iHe changed the art, literature,
moral and ethical customs of his
land, arid although he lived but a
few years he left an Inldelble im
pression upon civilization. He is gen
erally regarded as the founder of the
philosophncal, religious and scientific
schools of the Orient, and for this
reason he is honored by the Rosleru-
dans.
ANTIQUITY MERE BACKGROUND
While the ancient philosophies are,
therefore, referred to In their dra
matic ceremonies, they form only the
background for the stage-setting of
the present-day teachings. No mystic
or historical character of the past Is
worshipped by the Rosleruclans and
all their sacred prayers arc directed
to "the Ood of our hearts," meaning,
thereby, the Gad of man's conscious
ness and emotional comprehension, the
Inner being of ail men, tho image of
the God of the universe.
The government of the order In
each land Is autocratic, as is that ot
practically every fraternal organiza
tion. But each branch or lodge Is
composed of 144 Members who elect a
council of 16. This council then electa
mmaii ui 1ana other officers are un
der the direction of the supreme coun
cil for North America, elected to that
body by the general councils of all
lodges. The Imporator of the order.
Dr. H. Spencer Lewis, Is the chosen
leader of the supreme council as well
as a member of tho International
council and a lagtc of the other su
premo councils of the world.
IIAS OWN COLLEGES
The organization has Its own col
leges and university In America, In
which specialized courses are given to
members who arc preparing them
selves for definite missions In life
along very practical lines. As In the
past, tho organization Is noQ-commcr-
clal, since It publishes no books for
public sale, has no merchandise or
items of equipment to be purchased
and gives its instruction to Its mem
bers without fees of any kind.
However, the order in this country
has the same reputation as has Its
parent bodies in Europe; J t Is gener
ally believed to be enormously wealthy
and able to raise any sum of money
to carry on Its activities. For this
reason it has often been accused of
using Its alchemical knowledge to
transmute the base metals Into rare
ones or to direct the affairs of Its
members In such ways as to bring un
stinted prosperity Into their lives and
thereby Into tho coffers o' the order.
RECORD IS CLEAN
Be that as it may, the fact is that
tho organization has never been known
to want for means to carry out Its
natlon-wldo plans, nor has It ever been
sued In any court or charged with
any Irregularity from a moral, ethical
or financial point of view. Its Im-
perator Is a member of many boards
of directors and Is affiliated with
many corporations and big business
propositions and Is one of tho prin
cipal supporters of the orders hu
manitarian activities,
to, the organization's reputation with
those who arc unacquainted with its
real nature, and because the order
seldom seeks publicity, very few of the
real facts arc popularly known.
Staff Occupies Local Rosicrucian
l urniuirc LVtifa0/ Nowriuidiuim , ~ *-
MortJ To a - fi -~-
II11i11|inii
Headquarters TcmjA^v
Rosicrucians Had Origin In Ancient World
Severe Moral Cmlc 1LogieO'
H c l J B y M e m b e n t .
Of I 'mrtuul O rden .j l v
~ 1Pafalimtli . jfr*j
AMORC COLLEGE
J. BOTUELLA
MM!.
A n i o r c C o l l e g e
Say*
AMORC
COLLEGE
True Craflnunhip
iuknD. PoiUI:
Joists to Rafters
AMORC
COLLEGE
Another Good Job
Well Done
AMORC
COLLEGE
In Modem Unmet
And Building*
Paul N. Anderson
TU N. N.j-,1 H
AMORC COLLEGE
Klcctric Wiring
k
i w k b MUrfw
Lighting
Rxtum A Tinker, o r a Thinker.
Ulllch Do Yon l*re/er to
Do Ymtr Qarpentryf
Xonvuin, Wheeler
& Scedham
mL a ww w
Rrtl Art In
lUnJ nutr IVm^i
Refiiblf DfrtrkCo.
Ki.F.cnuc
a>.vi nACTING
ASITKA 00.
isrAcr xtmxt TU.MINTONTOUTANY. U*
PEABODYS
PEERLESS
PLUMBING
The Evening News
San J ose, California
Saturday, March 17,1928
Page 3
Rosicrucian Announcement
Free Book
Surprises Many
San Jose Readers
Y ou May Have a Copy
Hundreds of men and women in tiic Santa Clara
Valley answered our first announcement offering
free copies of the new and interesting book called
The Light of Egypt. The .Supreme Council nf
AMORC, the Rosicrucian fraternity, offered to give
away, without obligation, one thousand copies of tins
book, in order to inform our inquiring neighbors
about the real purposes and bcncficicnt activities of
this oid organization.
Ail who have road the book arc enthusiastic. They
say it has opened a doorway to peace, happiness and
prosperity that they did not know was so available.
"We are simply surprised beyond words. We never
suspected what the Kosicrucians were really offering
to do to make men and women more successful,
healthy and happy. It is a marvelous work'and we
arc so thankful for your presence in this city." Thu>
writes the head of a large firm in San Jose.
Let me send you this free Irook by mail, postpaid.
Men and women of every walk of life, of every pro
fession of faith, of every social or business interest,
have found it acceptable and lylpful. just address
me personally: Librarian A.S.N., care of AMOKC,
Kosicrucian Park, tsan Jose, California.
Remember, we invite you to come
and visit our new Egyptian building
and attractive sanctums on any Thurs-
da) evening from 7 to 9. You will be
interested in seeing how we keep in
touch with many thousands of success
ful, happy men and women in all parts
of North America.
The International Rosicrucian Fraternity,
Naglee Avenue, between Chapmen and Park
W E A R A R O S E "
Rosicrucian Head
T el l s A udi ence
Of M inds Poiver
Dr. H. Spcnccr Lewis, head of the
Amorc Rosicrucian Brotherhood, ex
plained to a large audience last night
the principles which underlie the
creative power of man's mind. It was
the second of the series of public scrv-
. Ices conducted at the Chamber of
Commerce Hall and again there was a
capacity attendance. In the course
of his lecture Dr. Lewis said:
We are prone to think that the
material creations which we enjoy so
abundantly are the work of mechanics
and that machinery and physical
labor really constitute the creative
powers or forces which brought them
Into existence. We fall very often to
appreciate the fact that long before
the material thing was eve* started In
its process of moulding or assembly,
it existed, complete and perfect, In
the mind of some bolng.
MASS CREATIONS
"We think that the inventor, the
architect, the artist, the musician and
the designer may create their products
in their minds before putting them
upon paper, but we do not realize that
these were not the greatest of
creators on this earth plane. The
most revolutionary changes for man's
betterment have been the result of
the mental creating done by the mil
lions of Individuals which compose
the mass of mankind.
"It Is a fact that the things for
which wc long, the things which oc
cupy our day dreams and arouse the
keenest desires, are the things which
most often come Into realization for
us.
SUCCESS RULE
"It Is because we visualize these
things, create tliem In our minds, and
finally perfect them so in our mental
world that their forms, their natures,
dominate our thinking and living and
bring to us replicas In the material
world. The laws making this pos
sible are systematic and can be ap
plied Intelligently and specifically by
everyone to bring the necessary things
for our comfort and success.1*
At the close of the lecture Dr.
Lewis answered 10 more questions
submitted to him covering a wide
range of Interesting information of a
practical nature. These public
Jectutes will continue for some weeks
at the request of prominent persons
of San Jose who sec in them a new
/orm of interesting enlightenment.
--------"WEAR A ROSE"-------- *
The Eveaiag News
San J ose. California
Monday. May 14,1928
Page 7
Fi tchburg Sentinel
Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Monday, August 6,1928
Page 2
^jiiiintimiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniHiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiimiiiiiuimiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiii^
| ROSICRUCIAN TEACHINGS [
| Give Key To Secrets 1
I ROSE-CROIX MYSTICISM I
| IN MODERN FORM
i i New Book Loaned To Sincere Seekers
|
1
I
Tl - * Jy**vcrt:c:ATi -.itr* t he Mas t er Uy e l l c a in all nce.n an I t oday t h e y are or-
g i i r . i *11 n S'fl ees, croup* HP'S mlfeilrei* m at! p . t i l s nt t h e worl d In t hei r
irit'-!- n r f t hv s r - r rz l v rr"<rrvp t.he i i n n e n t yrlnrlnm t hat n md e t he Pyrami d In
r . t ' i - t he f yref. el t f, lodny Wi th t he h l c h e r o c ^ j i i i - m* an>l eprret e oT nvynti i al
p o u e r yp:i i i n i Di n e * t he rtmree t-i '. our l i f e and a i l r a r t s ut c heal t h Jiao*
j> n"s< i i t d .i ' - r \ e | . | |j;i-ni u( t i i ert . i l t i ' m cl tt *lmt w l l -tsl Minil you n<l aiirpnne
you- JriiT.d# . T T l eucl r. ngs c o n i : | i n: nr t he tr. ue knoa l e d c e o f ' t h e
t-a ysr!I'"! arr r. et er .**M >n he"** But . ' !! m a y W>rrnw n Ii q o k ca l l e d "The
1. cl - l of I' Pyrt . " in tehii'h i !io et. ' nnc* nrorv of i hn rtnj'rrtirliinp. in tol d and an
n n i t rn nf _ypu m e y h a v r t l . e i / r: i . t i e t e t t t l v n f e of t ho RonscrueUn
i r a t e r n - t \ tn Ant er1'.a.
A -I dreaB:
AMORC LIBRARY,
------- -------RoaicEDcisB Park, Saa J oCal i f.______ _
g i N o i connes t ed wi t h K oiicruclap FellomMpi' or 1Soci t t e. "7 ~
liiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimnmiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiijuHiiimiiiiiiuniiiiiiiiinniil
Fitchburg Sentinel
Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Monday, August 6,1928
Page2
ROSICRUCIAN TEACHINGS
Give Key to Secrets
ROSE-CROIX MYSTICISM
IN MODERN FORM
New Book Loaned To Sincere Seekers
The Rosicrucian were the Master Mystics in all ages and today they are
organized in lodges, groups and colleges in all parts of the world. I n
their teachings. In their teachings they secretly preserve the ancient wisdom that
made the Pyramid in Egypt the marvel of today. With the higher Cosmic laws and
secrets of mystical power you can change the course of your life and attract
success, health, happiness and a development of mental foresight that will astound
you and surprise your friends. The Rosicrucian teachings containing the true
knowledge of the mystics are never sold in books. But, you may borrow a book
called "The Light of Egypt," in which the strange story of the Rosicrucians is told
and an explanation given of how you may have the private teachings of the
Rosicrucian Fraternity in America.
Address:
Scribe 111
AMORC LIBRARY
Rosicrucian Park, San Jose, Calif.
(Not connected with Rosicrucian "Fellowships" or "Societies.")
Pilgrimage of 200 to Egypt
Will Make Start From Here
Ban J oss will be the starting point
o( one of the most unique pilgrimages
of modem times when 200 members
of the Rosicrucian order leave here
J anuary 4 to visit the Egyptian tem
ple in which their records declare
their organisation waa founded 1360
years before the Christian era. The
pilgrims will embmlc from New York
on ihn White Star liner Adriatic J an
uary 10 for a trip to iho Orient and
Europe, H. B. Lewis, Imperator of the
order, has announced from the na
tional headquarters in Ban J ose.
LEAVE FROM HERB
Reservations are limited to 200, of
whom about 160 are expected to
gather here for the start, Including
representatives from the Western
States, Canada and Mexico. Thero
are about 30.000 members of the so
ciety in the United Btates and
branches In nearly every country of
the world.
The temple at Karnnlc. built by
Amen-Hotep IV, father-in-law of the
late King Tut, la a principal objective
of the lour. At midnight on February
28 the pilgrims will re-enact It In the
ceremony of Initiation which, the
order teaches. Is the same as that
which was regularly used when the
temple was In Its prime
Througn connections with the Egyp
tian Eiplorauoq Society of London
which is largely financed by the order,
costumes mid equipment of great an
tiquity will be secured. 11
American Express Company officials
are quoted as saying that auch a tour
as the one planned has never been
made Into the Orient In the way the
Rosicrucians are intending to make it.
These being no hotel accommoda
tions In J erusalem for so large a
party, the members will stay In mon
asteries whicn dot the surrounding
hills.
"The trip is to be no exhibition of
fanaticism and reports that a per
manent colony will be attempted are
incorrect,' Imperator Lewis states.
The tour Is for acientilic research
and to visit the places associated with
the fiiyswrles of the ancient order."
CALIGOHTRO'S TEMPLE
I n Buropo the |>aily will gather at
Tulouae. which la the French head
quarter* and also go to Geneva where
n old Roaicrucian building ielocated.
P o ttp o n es F l i g h t
NEW YORK. Dec 1 lAPi.Lady
Mary Heath, British aviatrix, this
attrmoon postponed until tomorrow
morning her proposed attempt to break
her own altitude record for women of
21.too feel. Weather conditions caused'
the revision of plans. I
San Jose Evening News
San Jose, California
Saturday, December 1,1928
Page I
Tbe Kingston Daily Freeman
Kingston, New Y ork
Friday, December 14,1928
Page 21 _______ _______________________
Rosicrucians Going [
to Egypt to Cotiduct ;
Old Initiation
Atitrrlcmn a*eoiN+ o f Ibr AarD-at Order R o w t'rarl*
! mill la k e p i n l a * tnalllJoftal < w n i nuy at Karan k, Kx |K. a r \ t IVhrasry
J l . Kr. Jor ph Durham. keeper o f t h e i r arw temple at Man J o t e . t a l . , K
h<iwa jtiaatllne bcfnrv t h e Wall or S i lra r r. H. S | a acer ln*ar|s. ( i a a e l l
M liaperalnr.
(

t
l
I

f
I
The Sunday Times - Signal
Zanesville, Ohio
Sunday, December 16, 1928
Page 10 Section 1
16, 1928
R O S I C R U C I A N S T O
E G Y P T T O C O N D U C T
I N I T I A T I O N R I T E
Two Hundred Americans Will
Travel Half Way Around
World For Ceremony
San Jose,. Cal Dec. 15.(/P)At
midnight next Feb. 28 in the temple
of Karnak. Egypt, - 200 Americans. |
who will have traveled halt way
aroun l the world, wil enact a cere
mony dating back 3.000 years into
the mystic past.
The ritual which will be employed
by a party of Roslcruclnns is to be
patterned an ancient forms believed
to have been devised and carried on
in the same room of that temple by
Amen-Hotep IV. son-in-law of King
Tutankhamen, 1350 years before the
Christian era. -
The members of the Roslcrucian
order, having headquarters here, plan
to embark from New York Jan. 10
on a four-month tour Into the more
n accessible places of the Orient.
They will be headed by H. S. Lewis,
lmperator for the United States of
the Ancient Rrder Rosae Cruets. The
party will assemble here Jan. 4 from
many points along the Pacific coast
and from Canada and Mexico.
Farther along on the trip they will
be Joined by others from Roslcrucian j
centers in Europe and Asia.
The ritual in the temple at Karnaki
will be pa. t of an initiation cere
monial and Is 'one of the principal!
objectives of the tour. The order
Clair i as Its founder Amen-Hotep IV.
The famous King Tut is declared by
the order's historian to have married
Into Amcn-Hotep's family and goi
possession of the throne. One o:
Amen-Hoceps teachings was a belief
In a singe diety. whereas, ic is set
forth against Tut, lie was a backslider:
from this faith and reestablished the)
ancient priesthood. In conjunction!
with the Egyptlna Exploration society;
of London, the Roslcrucian Order has]
provided costumes and equipment of!
considerable antiquity for the cmple!
ceremony.
Accommodations for the American
visitors have been arranged for in
monasteries in and near Karnak.
A m e r i c a n s t o E g y p t f o r O l d R i t e
o
200 Rosicrucians to Conduct Old Initiation Pcb. 28
Two hundred Ameri can m*mb*ra of the Anci ent Order Rosae Cruri s wll
l akn part In a tradi ti ons] ceremony at K arnak, Egypt, next Feb. 2H Fr
J oseph Durham, keeper of I h.i r m-w templ e at San J ose, Cal i f , la shown
standi ng before the Wal l of Si l ence. H. Spencer L ewi s (i nset) is imp<?raior
SAN J OSE. Cali f., Dec 21 (AP)
At mi dni ght next Feb. 2* m the tem
pl e of K nrnak. Egypt. 300 Ameri cans.
| who wil l have travel ed hal f way
round the worl d, wil t ena t a cere
mony dati ng back, 3000 years i nto
the mysti c past.
The ri tual whi ch will bn empl oyed
by a party of Roi i cruci ans i s to be
patterned on anci ent forma beli eved
to have been devi sed and earned on
j In lht same room of that templ e by
Amen Hotep I V. son i n-taw of Ki ng
! Tutankhamen, 1330 yci rs before the
1Chri sti an era.
Four Month*1 Tour
The mcmtx'ra of the Knsfcruci an
order havi ng headquaren h-re. pl an
to embark from N* w Y ork J an. 10
on a four months tour I n j thw more
| I naccessi bl e pl aces of the Ori ent
They will ba headed by i t S L ewi s
. tmperator for the I 'mted States of
the Anci ent Order Rosar Trucl s The
party will ass^mbe hrt> J an 4 from
many poi nts al ong the Paci fi c coast
and from Canada and Mexi co.
| Farther ninny on the tri p they
j wi l l be J nod bv others from Ron-
| cruci an ** ln - "ori Asia.
I ni ti ati on Ceremoni al
1 *The rL ual In the tempo- m K amak
will h part of an i ni ti ati on cere
moni al and is one of the pri nci pal
obj ecti ves of the tour. The orde
cl ai ms as i ts founder. Amen-Hol ei
I V. The famous K i ng Tut Is de
dared by tha orders hi stori an L
have marri ed i nto Amen-Hotep
( fami l y and got possessi on of th
throne One of Amen-M( -ep teach
mgs was a bel i ef In a si ngl e dei tj
whereas. It Is set forth a.-ai nst Tu
h* was a back-ahder from thi s fait
and reestabl i shed me anci ent prieni
1ho d. I n conj uncti on wi th the Egyf
ti an expl orati on soci ety of Londor
j the Rnsi cructan order has provi de
I costumes and equi pment of cnnsl det
abl e anti qui ty for the templ e earn
mony.
Accommodati ons for the Ameri ca
vi si tors hsve been arranged for 1
monasteri ca i n and near K arnsk.
The Waco News-Tribune
(Waco. Texas)
Saturday, December 22. 1928.
page 9
The Perry Daily J ournal jRo sicru cian s Goina To Equpi To
Perry, Oklahoma __ u
n_I Conducts Old Initiation Rite
Tuvo Hundred A meri can members of the A nci ent Order Rosae
Crucl a wi l l l ake part In a tradi ti onal ceremony at K arnak, Egypt, next
February 28. Fr. J oseph Durham, keeper of thol r new templ e at San
J ose, Cal., le shown standi ng bef ore the Wal l of Si l ence. H. Spencer
L ewi e (I nset) la perator.
SAN J OSE, Uni., Dec., 20</P)I
At midnight next February 2K in the |
temple of Knvnak. Egypt, 200 Amer-
ienns, who will have traveled hnlf
wny mound the world, will enact n
ceremony dnting hack 3,000 years in
to the mystic past.
The ritual which will be employ
ed by a parLy oT itosicrucinns is to
be pattcrened on ancient forms be
lieved to hnvc been devised and cur
ried on in the same room of that
temple by Amcrrllolcp IV, son-in-
law of King Tutankhamen, 1350
years before the Christian era.
The members of the Hosicrucinn
order, having headquarters here,
plan to embark from Now York J an
uary 10 on a font months tour into
the more inaccessible places of the
Orient. They xPIll rbe hchtltfd by'Tt.'
S. Lewis, imperntor for the United
States of the Ancient Order Rosao
f'rucis. The purty will assemble here
J anuary 4 front' many points along
the Pacific coast nnd from Canada
and Mexico.
Further nlorg on the trip they will
be joined by others from Uosicrueian
centers in Europe and Asia.
The rilunl in the temple at K ur
nnk will be part of an initiation cere
monial and is one of the principal
objectives of the tour. The order
claims us its founder, Amcn-Kotcp
IV. The funtnus King Tut is declared
by the orders historian to have mar
ried into Amen-FI ntep's family and
got possession of the throne. One of
Amcn-Hotrp's teachings was a be
lief in a single deity, whereas, It is
set forth against Tut, .he was n back
slider from Lhis faith and reestablish
ed the ancient priesthood. I n con
junction with the Egyptian Explora
tion society of London, the Rosi-
'cWelniT UPHU' has provided "cofctunios
nnd equipment of considerable anti
quity for the temple ceremony.
Accommodations for the American
visitors hnvc been arranged for in
monasteries in nnd near Karnak.
A m e r i c a n s t o E g y p t f o r O l d R i t e
4
200 Rosicrucians to Conduct Old Initiation Feb. 28
Two hundred A meri can members of the A nci ent Order Roane Cruci a will
take part in n trndnl pr.nl ceremony at K'-'mi tk, Rgypt, next Feb, 2H Fr. i
J oseph Durham keeper of thei r new templ e at San J onc. Cal i f , is shown I
standi ng before* the Wal l of .Silanes. H. Spencer L ewi s ti nge!) w tmpearator. i
| SAN J OSE, Csl i f., Dec 21(API obj ecti vaa of the tour. The order |
At mi dni ght next Feb. 2s in the tern- cl ai ms as i ta f ounder. A mcn-Hotepi
pi e of K nrr.ak. Egypt, 200 Ameri cans, I V. The f amous K i ng Tur is de- i
I who wi ll hsve travel ed hal f way
round the worl d. Will enti t a cere
mony dati ng back, 3000 years i nto
the mysti c past.
The ri tual whi ch will be empl oyed
by n party of nosi cruri ans i s to he
patterned on anci ent f orms bel i eved
I to have been devls, d and carri ed do
! I n the same room of that templ e by*
Amen Hotep I V. son i n-l aw of K i ng
I T utanahamen, 1359 years before the
' Chri sti an era
F our Months' Tour
The members of th Uusi rruei nn
. order, havi ng headquarera here, pl an i
to embark from N*w Y ork J an 10
on a f our months tour inis) the more
I naccessi bl e pl aces of the Ori ent, i
They wi ll ba headed by l i S. L ewis,
i mperator for the I 'mted S'atos of
the Anci ent Order Rosa* f ruef a The
partv wil l assembl e here J an t from
many poi nt* al ong the Paci fi c coast |
, and from Canada and Mexi co,
F arther ni ong on the tr;p they ;
] wi l l be } ted bv others from P.i ai -
cruri an **- r ' '" d Asia.
I ni ti ati on Ceremoni al
The ri tual In the temp , K amak
wi ll h^ part (; nn m.ustton cere
moni al and is one of the pri nci pal
cl ared by the orders hi stori an tn [
have marri ed I nto Amen Hotep a
fami l y and got possesuki n of the
throne One of Amen l b ?p * teach
i ngs was a bel i ef in a j ungle deity,
whereas, It Is set f orth arai nst Tut
he wa* a back-al l der frum thi s fai th 1
and reestabl i shed the anci ent pri est-
hn d. I n conj uncti on wi th the Egyp
ti an expl orati on soci ety of L ondon,
the Rosi crucl an order has provi ded
costumes and equi pment of consi der
abl e anti qui ty f or the templ e cere
mony.
A ccommodati ons for the Ameri can
vi si tors have been arranged f or in
monasteri es tn and near K arnak.
The Waco News-Tribune
(Waco, Texas)
Saturday, December 22, 1928,
page 9
Abilene Reporter-News
Abilene, Texas
Sunday, December 30,1928
The Western Weekly Magazine Section
P , ' ! R O S I C R U C I A N S G O I N G T O E G Y P T
T O C O N D U C T O L D I N I T I A T I O N R I T E
Two bnudred American members f the Anolcnt Drdor Rosac Croeis will t i k s
part in a traditional ceremony at Karn&k, Egypt, next February 2B. 1 r.
Joseph Durham- keeper of their new temple e l San Joao, OeL, is ihown aland-
in before the Well of Silonce- H. Spencer Lewie (inset) is imperator.
S
AN JOSE, Cal., 2'J At midnight
next February 28, in the temple
of Kamak, Egypt, 200 Americans' wlin
will linvc traveled half wav around
tho world, will enact a ceremony dat
ing bock 3,000 yenra into lltc mystic
peat.
The ritual which Will btt employed
by a party or Kosicrucians in to be
patterned on um-ii-nt forms believed
to have been devised end carried on
in the same room of tlml temple by
Amcu-Hotep IV, soQ-in-laW of Klug
Tutankhamen, 1350 years before tha
Christian era.
The members of tho Roaicrucian
order, Laving hoBdfpiartera here,
plan to embark from New York
January 10, on a four months tour
into the mure inaccessible places of
the Orient. They will be headed by
CCcntlnoM on pate 10-1
Abilene Reporter-News
Abilene, Texas
Sunday, December 30,1928
The Western Weekly Magazine Section
Page 10
II. 8. Lewis, imperator foe the United
States oC tltc Ancient Order Kosuo
Crucis. The party will assemble
bore January 4 from many poiuls
along 1lie Incific coast und from Can
ada iiotl Mexico.
.Farther along on the trip they will
be joined by others from llosicriicinn
centers in Europe and Asia.
The rilnal in tin; Icmplc at Karnul;
will be pari ot au initiation cerc-
uumiul uutl is one o the principal
object ive of the tonr- The order
claims as its rounder, Aincn-Uolep IV.
The famous King Tut is declared by
(he order's historian to hove married
into Ainrn-lfotep'u family and got
possession o the throne. One of
Amnit Ilotrp'j teachings was a belief
ill a single deity. whereas, it w set
forth iigciiiisl Tut, be was a back
slider from thin faith and reestab
lished the ancient priesthood. In con
junction with the Egyptian Explora
tion .society of London, the Hosicru-
cion order Las provided cos turned
and cijiiipmotit of considerable an
tiquity for the temple ceremony.
Accommodations Tor the American
visitors has a bivni urrauged for in
luomistei'ivs in ami near Kainak.
1929
San J ose Evening News
San J ose, California
Thursday, J anuary 3,1929
Page 1
A more Party-
Leaves Friday
For Pilgrimage
Like tho crusades of old, a little
pnrty will Icnvc Ban Joso tomorrow
night on a pUgrimuuc to fnr lands.
But unlike tho old crusades, this
pllgrlmngo will travel in the luxury of
modern transportation to tho mystic
laud of Egypt.
It is a pligrimago of members of the
Ancient and Mystic Order of Ro&uc
Cruel, headquarters for which In
North 'America aro located In the
Amorc Temple on Naglco Avenue.
Tho long Journey will start from
Ban Joso tomorrow night at 7:30
o'clock with a party of 12, which will
pick up additional groups cn route
until moro than 200 members of the
order will bo gathered from all parts
of America and Europo at the end of
tho trip in Egypt.
Dr. 11. Spencer Lewis of San Jose,
Impcrator for North America of the
Rosicruclan order, will conduct the
pilgrimage. Tho Itinerary, as already
mapped out, is: San Joso to Los An
geles, where 50 members, representing
the Pacilic Coast, will board the
private car of tho Sunset Limited:
thenco through tho south to St.
Louis and Chicago, where 30 more will
join the party; and thenco to New
York, whero 20 moro will bo picked up
for the voyage to Europe, In Europo,
moro than 100 arc expected to join
tho pilgrimage.
ANCIENT INITIATION
One of the features of tho long
pligrimago will bo the ancient Initia
tion ceremonies qmong tho ruins of
Kamak Tcrnplo at Tcl-el-Amurna,
The Mystic Sun City.
Rosicrucians Going
To Egypt To Conduct
Ol d /ni tati on Ri te
, San Joe, Cal.( A P I At.mid- lieved to have been devised and
i nigh: next February 2S in the carried on in the same room of
temple of Karnak, Egypt. 200 that temple by Amcn-Hotcp IV,
, Americans, who will have traveled son-in-law of King Tutankhamen,
half way Toun.l Lhe world, will en 1350 years before the Christian
act a ceremony dating back 3,000 era.
years into the mystic past. ! The members of the Rosicrucian
The ritual which will be employ-. order, having headquarters here,
ed by a party of Rosicrucians is to plan to embark from New York
be patterned on ancient forms be- January 10 on a four months' tour
into the more inaccessible places
of the Orient They will be head
ed by H. S. Lewis, imperator for
the United States of the Ancient
Order Rosae Crucis. The party
will assemble here January 4 from
many points along the Pacific
coast and from Canada and Mexi
co. *'
Farther along on the trip they
! will be joined by others from
Rosicrucian centers in Europe and
Asia.
The ritual in the temple at Kar-
: nak will be part of an initiation
l ceremonial and is one of the prin-
j cipal objectives of the tour. The
order claims as its founder Amen-
1Hotep IV. The famous King Tut
is declared by the orders histo-
i rian to have married into Amen-
j Hotep'a family and got possession
j of the throne. One of Amen-
j Hoteps teachings was a belief in
I a single deity, whereas, it is set
i forth against Tut, he was a back
slider from this faith and re
established the ancient priesthood.
In conjunction with the Egyptian
exploration society of London, the
Rosicrucian Order has provided
!costumes and equipment of consid-
| erabie antiquity for the temple
i ceremony.
Accommodati ons for the Ameri
can vi si tors have been arranged
for i n monasteri es i n and near
i Karnak.
I
The Gettysburg limes
Gettysburg. Pennsylvania
Saturday, J anuary 5, 1929
PaRe2
The Helena Daily I ndependent
Helena. Montana
Saturday, J anuary 19, 1929
Page 4
The Haskin Letter
By Frtdarlo
J. Haifcla
BELIEVERS IN OCCULTISM.
Washington, D. C., J an. 15.To
southerner?, especially, the tale of
present-day belief in witchcraft
conics as i >surprise, for southern
ers were brought up in the knowl
edge that all about them their ne
gro sersants ant] neighbors believed
in witches and that some held secret
rites, I t is c\en stated that some
of the white illiterates of the moun
tain regions set great store by an
cient societies.
There arc many types of witches
and many types of strange worships
and practices which (heir devotees
would be offended to hear called
witchcraft. Every one is based on
the hope of mental peace or physical
cure of some ailment; the basic idea
always embodies the recognition of
a higher power. I t must be remem
bered that J esus Himself was put
to death because lie practiced mira
cles and instructed the people in a
doctrine inimical to the elder gods.
Witches were burned in European
countries, notably in Germany, Eng
land, and Scotland, and <put to death
in Massach isctts, The Y ork episode
is but an unfortunate incident in the
history of witchcraft. I t is an old,
old story and while there doubtless
arc many believers ill Pennsylvania,
the believers living in the United
States today arc to be found in
every section.
i
I
Perhaps the strangest and certain
ly the oldest body is the Ancient
Order of Rosac Crucis No one is
aware how many members the order
has but some index may be obtained
from the fact that 200 Americans arc
sailing this month for Egypt to en
gage in a ritual said to be about
3,300 years old. It will be noted that
they belong to an order reputed to
have been cs.ablisltcd centuries be
fore Christ, so I hey could hardly he
deemed Christians.
'I llerr. is a material divergence in
the claims of the branches of the
Rosicrucians. The original story
known in i/iodcrn limes is that be
tween 16M and 16)0 three lmn''S
v/cre pi lishid at Casse! in Germany
winch purported to tell the *tory of
^ irrrti "O'lelys formation m the
fourteenth century On** Christian
R/nerkreui / v..n -aid to have I n n
the founder. I he order was o *e-
ret, H was flats.d, hat our ui<tuber
was not knovn to another J n some
forme the ale runs that a member
of one PHgr knew no member of an
other badge wai a ICoticrucian but
sll members knew there wer* many
brdgr
l ai r * Brought f rom P.fjrpl.
'J hr ,!//ry ran }; s l u t P o s e n
r r r u / bao been many ye ar * a m o n g
The Helena Daily I ndependent
Helena, Montana
Saturday, J anuary 19, 1929
Page 4
tlic Arabians and Egyptians from
whoma groat portion of the knowl
edge which Europe then had c^mc,
especially in matters of astronomy
and mathematics. It was popularly
bchcrcd that Rosenkreutz had
brought back and transmitted to the
Rosicrucians the long-sought secrets
of the elixir of life and of the phil
osopher's stone which transmutes
base metals into gold.
A great stir was caused and there
was much running to and fro and
much furtivcncss. No one could be
sure that lus neighbor was not one
of the eastern maguians. Many per
sons thought the whole work a sa
tire and it has been attributed to
a German writer, J ohann Valentin
Andrea.
Finally some secret societies did
arise, calling themselves Rosicru
cians. These were almost all organ
ized in Germany and from the towns
of Germany may be traced the York j
witchcraft as that section was to a
considerable degree populated by
Germans.
It is a very notable fact that the
symbolically inscribed tokens and
charms which have come to public
light as the result of the York trial
display queer characters having a
quite definite resemblance to Egyp
tian mid Arab' ancient writings and
carvings from that part of the
world.
The American branch of the Rosi
crucians contends that their society
and their ritual conic down from the
Pharaoh Anicn-Hotcp, who is de
clared the f milder. Amcn-llotcp
was the son-in-law of Tut-Aukh-
Amcn, whose sumptuous burial pal
ace in the Valley of the Kings in
Egypt has been excavated recently.
The 200 Americans who will be
joined by Rosicrucians front other
parts of the orfd, particularly Eu
rope, plan to hold a great ritual in
the Temple of Kariiak at midnight
on Feb. 28. They claimthat the rit
ual will be the same as that gone
through with some 1,350 years be
fore the Christian era. They have
induced the Egyptian Exploration
Society of London to assist them in
perfecting proper costumes for the
occasion and arrangements have
been made for lodging the Rosicru
cians in monasteries near Karnak.
I t is expected, ns a part of the
ritual, that m-iiy new members will
be initiated into the order.
The Helena Daily Independent
Helena, Montana
Saturday, January 19, 1929
Page 4
Actiritiei of Count Caglioatro.
Probably the most interesting fig
ure who ever practiced Rosicrucian-
ismwas Joseph Dalsamo, whom the
caustic Thomas Carlyle character
ized as "the quack of quacks, the
most perfect scoundrel th t in these
latter ages has marked the worlds
history." Balsnmo was born in 1743,
the son of a shopkeeper in a small
way at Palermo He is known to
history . s Count Caghostro Even
his early life seems to have been
marked by dishonesty but he did not
set forth in full career until he mar
ried Lorenza Feliciana, daughter of
a Venetian girdle maker. Perhaps
some of the glory and credit for his
tremendously incredible rascalities
belong to her fthey set out from
Venice as Count and Countess Cag-
liostro. Th :y were richly equipped,
traveling in r. coach and four for
which doubtless they owed. If they
did, then soon paid for them for as
they proceeded 'across Europe, no
one questioned the title and the gold
was good.
The connection is that the subtle
count had revived Rostcrucianism
ami end cllishcd it with consummate
art. 1Ic claimed lie I ad discovered
that it was the forerunner of Ma
sonry and that he could work as
tounding cures. Whether or not he
h,..l some skill in medicine or traded
on the faith of his patients it ap
peared from contemporary docu
ments that hr did cure people of nil
the diseases in the almanac. Wealth
.showered 01 him. In London his
fame had arrived before himand he
was met with ovations. He claimed
that the Prophets Elijah and Enoch
were tlie originators of Masonry.
From England thr Count and
Countess traveled to Russia where he
again was received with honors and
finally sen led in Str.isburg m Ger
many. His fame in healing spreal
all over Europe The TV.ire Cardi
nal dr Rohan, a great French prince
of both eliiirrh and state, either be
cause of icmr illness or because of
curiosity, lent word to Straahurg
that he would like, to *ep the Count.
The. Count immediately returned
word that If ihe Prince wni lit hr
khoitld come to him; if not he did not
care 10 are him. This only increased
the Prince. Cardinal's curiosity and
he went to Siraabiirg and from that
time on completely fell under Cag-
liostro's domination. The Count and
Countess returned to Paris with him.
lint the Prince Cardinal fell into dis-
fa.or at the court and both he and
the Count were thrust into the bas-
tilc where they languished foi nine
months. Then tlicv were released.
Tlio Count was expelled fromFranc-*,
and never again did he find the old
welcome fromthe courts of Europe.
On visiting Rome he fell into the
hnnds of th* Holy Office which made
short work of the whole matter, or
dered Ihe Egyptian Masonry manu
script burned by the common hang
man, cursed any who adhered to the
belief, and sent the Count to prison
for life where he died in a short time.
The Countess, who had been impris
oned in a convent, survived him for
some lime.
Modern Method*
Dr. Spencer Lewis, who is lend
ing a colony to the Nile, where they
will settle nnd live in the antique
manner, eschewing nil thiugs mod
ern, said to a San Francisco reporter:
Modern methods weaken and nar
row us. The manual laborer who did
beautiful work in the past is only a j
machine minder today. And its the
same with education.
Our Mamies musical education is
unique. a Nob Dill mother said.
'Yell?' said another mother.
*Ych. Give her the name of any
record, I dont care what it is. and
shell tell you rigid off the bat whats
on the other side.*
The Nashua Reporter
Nashua, Iowa
Wednesday, J anuary 30, 1929
Page 4
C A L I F O R N I A . S A T U R D A Y . F F B R U A R V |6. 1Q?Q
Rosicrucians From Here Join
In Ceremony in 3000-Year-Old
Temple; Cable Gives Details
Seventy American*. Including ofM-,
cers of the Roalerurlan headquarters
In San Jose, took part In a 3000-ycsr- |
old Initiation ceremony In the mined
temple or Karnak. Egypt, at midnight |
Thursday, according to an account
cabled Tho News by Dr. H. Spencer
Lewis, head of the order In the United
SLatcs. i
Tho chnnts and ritual were the
samo as the society teaches were first
used In that same temple In the four
teenth century before tho Christian
era.
Tho parly of Rosicrucians headed ,
by Dr. Lewis. Imperator of the order. I
left San Jose In Jonunry. They were 1
Joined by others from different tern-1
pies In the United Stales nnd Europe.
RETURN IN MARCH
The lour party will spend seveml'
weeks visiting other shrines of Uttir I
organization In Egvpt, Italy, France.
Switzerland, Germany and England,
nnd will return to America during the
last week of Marrh.
Tho 70 members of the group who
took part In the ceremonies Thursday
thereby beenma true Initiates of the
original Egyptlnn order, according to
Uic account cabled by Dr. Lewis to
Tho News. Ills description of Uic
ceremonies describes It ns tho climax
of a scries of preparatory riles.
Arter visiting Uio Holy Land and
viewing tho ancient sites of the
branches of the order Uio noslcructnn
tourists Journeyed to Cairo and then
to a special camp on tho edge of the
desert whero at moonlight, they pre
pared themselves for tho first step
of the Initiation, which consisted of
going through the very old form of
pledging allegiance to the order at tho
holy altar In front of Lho Great
Sphinx.
After this, cneh of the candidates
passed through the shadows or tho
pyramid, another phase of tho Initia
tion. Tho following day. tho candi
dates Journeyed to Lake Mocrli In lho
Fayum of Egypt, and Uiorc In the
Utile known nnd secluded oasis on a
great desert, received the benedictions
rrom the water where It Is'written
the first Christian baptism waa estab
lished. nnd where tha Rosicrucians
teach tho great spiritual leader Kuot-
Tioomlo HVcfl &HdIhuoni lho principles
of tho purification by tha sacred
water In tho fourteenth century, B, O.l
TORCHES FOR LIGHT
After this ceremony, and a long
Journey In primitive manner across
lho sands of Egypt, the candidates'
wero brought to the great Hall o f .
Illumination In tlio temple of Knrank. I
This templo has been the holy place1
of the Roslcruelan order for many I
centuries and records of the order
assert tho original Initiations wero
performed hare In 13B0 B, O.________
Standing tn tha deep shadows of
the many huge columns with burning
torches os tholr only lights, nnd wiLh
the director of the ceremonies garbod
In symbolical costume, the Americans
participated In the rites of the ancient
ccramony which made them honorary
members of tho foreign section of
their organizauon. It was by tho per
mission of Suttcn-Tschotle, represent
ing the supreme council of the Rosl-
crudans In Egypt, that tho strange
'Symbolical ceremony representing tho
coming of holy illumination Into the
iheait* nnd minds of the tmuates was
Ionce again conducted tn the anmo hall
where eminent philosopher* of ancient
Ilimes stood and received their warrant
to go out Into the world nnd preach
the first doctrines of a monotheistic
. religion.
SYMBOLIC ROBFS
During the ceremony, each candi
date was Invested with a replica of
tho ancient symbolical apron of lho
organization containing the Egyptian
emblems of life and wisdom. From
tho alcoves of tho great hall came the
approbation and Oriental IntonaUmn
Iof the highest members of tho Rosl-
Imirlnn Brotherhood In foreign lands
| who witnessed tho ceremony and gave
It the official support. At the c l w
of lho ceremony, cneh candidate was
Ialso given a parchment certificate
*establishing his association with the
organization through tills unique
ceremony, and making each one of
the candidates a reprcaeniatlvc In
NorUl America of the lugli council
of lho order,
San J ose Evening News
San J ose, California
Saturday, February 16, 1929
Page 5
The Zanesville Signal
Zanesville, Ohio
Monday, April 15.1929
Page 11
Rosicrucian
Secret Book
Loaned to You
Hi* nn'dr Thousand* Hp?r. <n'-r-es-
f a!. ; . i d M i : M y *n I hr C ontrr I of
Nslnril lavs
Tlrra m* r h r r x b-vs^ c.. 7*.*-
**!>. a*--; ' ;rr:r, i': so e c . ; r ' . * * A
71 . <* Cv:rr:i of : Hr Rn<*cr**f:sr.< b. '
< -Ol'ir'i lorn PRIVATE CnP?5_=: '
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v prnr*.:>:- :o rt-id^ n ,;nj b*p
?'.< r.r'A: r. rz< nl prcmotl'-.r
'" J h n ' t h ;r. It i ea!>d T r
I .'h; ol r=-pJ 3rd :c .<* ;rrf hy
r :rvt rr' M.CA! f r at r r ms r :r. : * *
' r-M ,* .M t ritr nrd s s r fb.at vo.:
. i rra.-t !t at your con-.rr.ir-.cr
A d d r v v .
l t r t mr i w v. vc.
AMORC LI BRARY
R O S I C R V C I W PARK
> . W JObL. CALIFORNIA
(Not conncrtrd nith Rosicrucian
F c l l o n s h i o " )
Rosicrucian
Secret Book
Loaned to You
Has made Thousand Happy, Successful,
and Mighty in the Control of Natural Laws
Because this new book is so remarkable and difficult to secure, the Supreme
Council of the Rosicrucians has decided to loan PRIVATE COPIES of it to sincere
and worthy seekers who will promise to study it and help in the great work of
promoting success and health in life. It is called "The Light of Egypt" and is issued
by the oldest mystical fraternity in the world. J ust write and say that you will read it
at your convenience.
Address:
LIBRARIAN V.W.
AMORC LIBRARY
ROSICRUCIAN PARK
SAN J OSE, CALIFORNIA
(Not connected with "Rosicrucian Fellowship")
C O L L E G E W I L L H A V E
M U S I C W E E K R E C I T A L
Program to Bo Presented in
Chapel at Kutztown
School Tonight
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE,
May 6.Tuesday evening the follow
ing musicale will be given in the col
lege chapel: a talk, Origin and
Significance of Music Week," Miss
Dorothy Potteiger; violin solos. The
Bees," Schubert, and The Swan,
Saint-Saens, Norman Laub; a trum
pet solo, Stars in a Velvety Sky,
Clarke, Max Landis; cantata, Child
hood of Hiawatha." Wilson, girls
cnoms, under tne direction or m i s s
Besse Waldrop, public school music
teacher in the college department.
Accompanist for Messrs. Laub and
Landis is Miss Ruth May Rothermel
and Miss Beatrice Young accom
panies the girls chorus.
Misses Lucile Welsh, Mary Funk,
Ruth May Rothermel and Henrietta
Purnell of the college faculty and
Miss Mildred Denniston of the train
ing school faculty attended a lunch
eon-bridge given at the Thomas-
Jefferson tea room by Miss Ruth
Bonner of Kutztown.
Talks to Young People
Supt. Wm. D. Landis addressed a
meeting of the Young Peoples so
ciety of New Bethel church near
Albany.
Misses Luelia Fogelsanger and
j Ruby Arneson spent the week-end
in Philadelphia.
Leader of the Sunday evening
vesper service was Emery Fry. The
topic for discussion was Giving and
the Law of Compensation, by Dr.
H. Spencer Lewis, was read by Edith
Oden welder. Miss Dorothy Seltzer
read a paper on Stewards of Divine
Friends. by Dr. H. Spencer Lewis.
A selection from Emersons essay on
Compensation, was read by Martin
Miller. Miss Lucy Lachnor played a
piano solo.
Reading Times
Reading, Pennsylvania
Tuesday, May 7, 1929
Page 12
The Ogden Standard-Examiner
Ogden. Utah
Sunday Morning, June 2,1929
Page 8-B
PERSONAL
ROSICRUCIAI'T MYSTERIES
AH sincere seekers for the great
truth, and power known to the An
cients, write for the. free hook*
"Light, of Egypt/* .mailed without
obligation to occult students.
-.Librarian .111
AMORC TEMPLE
San Jose, California..
6710
Order of Amorc Files
Incorporation Articles
Article* of Incorporation for a 60'
year porlod at the Supreme Qrnnd
Ladgo of A more In Ban J ose, to pro
vide Instruction as given In universi
ties, colleges and other educational
institutions, liavo been filed with
County Clerk Henry "Rick" Pflster.
The organization operates without
capital stock and on a non-profit
basis, according to the Incorporation
papers. Trustees aro named ns II
Bpenccr Lewis, R. M. Lewis, Martha
R. M. Lewis, aindys Lewis and
Charles D. Dean, all of San Jose.
San J ose Evening News
San J ose, California
Wednesday, J une 19, 1929
Page 3
Noted Expert
On Forgery
Coming Here
A. R. Lewis, acknowledged as the
dean of the world's experts on forgery,
and his wife will arrive here Sunday
to spend the months of J uly and
August as the guests of their son, H.
Spencer Lewis, lmperator of the
Roslcruclans, on Naglee Avenue.
For over thirty years Mr. Lewis was
associated with Harvey Spencer, one
of the two famous Spencer brothers,
originators of the Spencerian penman
ship sysytem used In all schools for
many years.
I t was at this time that the science
of chemical and microscopic exami
nation of writing, Ink and paper was
developed In connection with the
study of suspected documents or ques
tioned chlrography. In the develop
ment of the science Mr. Lewis became
the associate of Daniel T. Ames,
Americas foremost authority on un
conscious habits and tendencies In
normal and abnormal writing. After
the death of Mr. Ames, Mr. Lewis be
came the dean of the science and
profession and has held that attain
ment over since.
IN THAW CASE ,
As an expert In criminal chlro-
graphy, Mr. Lewis has not only served
the United States Government for
many years In Federal and local
courts, but he has been the chief ex
amining expert in such famous cases
involving forgeries or questionable
writings as the Dr. Kennedy, the
MoUneux, Rlce-Patrlck and Harry
Thaw cases. Many of the most
prominent wills and legacies Involv
ing millions of dollars, but containing
some clement of doubt in the wrting
or signatures, .have passed through
Mr. Lewis' hands for final decision, as
have many Important documents
bearing upon national and Interna
tional problems.
San J ose Evening News
San J ose, California
Thursday, J une 27, 1929
Page 3
M A S T E R Y O U R
L I F E !
I t Can Be Done the
Rosicrucian Way
New FREE Rook Tells
How You May Do I t
Tnr nosl cri i el aas know haw!
For n they have- i -
Mratecl rea'er k nr * l rd^e
and a f cup'r.vr power over al l
obstacl es i n We
L et thvm help you solve your
problems. T T r:r gu:rtnr.ee wi l l
reveal n s y c h i r l aw a n d Mys t l f c
principles which v.:ll make yev:
mtehty i i t u l stir r -r111jn eV.-iln-
lru health, prosperity end cell
nuisu-rAtiip
L i b r a r i c n C. K . S.
A MO R C T E M P L E
Fosicrucian Park
SAN JOSE - - - CALIFORNIA
M A S T E R Y O U R
L I F E !
It Can Be Done the
Rosicrucian Way
New FREE Book Tells
How You May Do I t
Th" Roslcrurlana know howt
F'or a km they have demonstrated
a greater knowledge and a au-
f
ierlor power over all obstaclea
n life.
l et them help you solve your
prob'ems. Their guidance will
reveal psychic laws and Mystic
pr'nclples which will make you
mighty and successful in attain
ing health, prosperity and solf-
masterahlp.
The new free book. "The
Light of Egypt. will tell you
how to change the whole course
of vour life In a short time
Write a letter asking for It
today.
Librarian V. B.
AMORC TEMPLE
Rosicrucian Park.
I S A N J O S E ----- C A L I F O R N I A
The Kansas City Star
Kansas City, Missouri
Saturday, September 7, 1929
Page 5
The Kansas City Star
Kansas. Missouri
Saturday, October 5,1929
Page 5
A NFAV L I F E
O P E N T O Y O U
Rosicruciu ns Reveal
a i\'ew Wof
Possibilities
Strange Hook Loaned
to Those Seeking
New Start
At . *. a .*< m r t i i o d o f R w - M i n f
o. ir live* and r j ttl ti f all thr nbtar>
o i jiCf i . ari d |j ni n,. i n thei r proper
p . Ac'1 h a 1 b e e n <,tiili. d bv t h e Huprer.'.r
Cotr.t .1 td t o r U o . t r r i m a n s
A r d . bv n >,prria1 > sa lnn. c opie *
of thi n - p Im. i a n d *i: r is;.!* n a t i o n o f
* h a t it ilJ tin, v i 71 fc - l o a r . d t o lhoa<*
w h o wi?h l o m a ke u lit**- s t a r t i n l i f e
and r l . a t . t h e f o u r s * t f t h e i r r a r r r .
I Tin* Rome r ' l f t a n . . ha*.* e \ e r be e n k no w n
for t h r i r r a t i o n a l . :.d l i m r o u p h
k i . n a l e d a e o f i f ? r r . a r " f n n a o f i i f r .
n . r r u f t i at) I hr a r r t t h e v l i * \ e jetrt U,r
L i i h t o f K n o n l e r t * * a s a a a r r r d t r u s t ,
a n d t h o u s a n d * o f rrr.'.nrnt \ * r l t r ' a n d
h t M o n a i . * I av*> c o ncert ed t h e h i s h r u
t r i b u t e U> t! rni
I I . is"-*- ho o k . r a i l e d t h e " I . l e h t of
Hcvt*: ; ; i hr rr.aiUd t o s l n r e r e Im -
t .inrrra >thOul c o l n a t i o n e n d rot , r r
n r r p a i d W r it e a l e t t e r m o t n o s i c a r d i
a d d r t .rd i<
LI BRARI AN C. S. K.
AMORC LI BRARY, San Joie, California.
Knowing Mind Is
Cal l ed Secret
Of Advertising
T h a t the dfccret of success In adver
tising was In knowing t h e human
mind, was the st at ement l a s t night
of John H. Rice, president of t he Rlce-
Orelsen Company. Sa n Francisco. In
his talk las t n ig h t before members
of the Advertising Club.
"Today there Is no power l ike t h a t
wielded by advertisers," Mr. Rice
6ald. They create and destroy business
over night. In one form or another,
each of us Is a slave, s t r iv ing and
working to satisfy the desires adver
tising has created.
"Advertising Is one of the greatest
forces In the United S t a t e r today. If
you would take the millions of dollars
they are spending today to enforce
prohibition and p u t It Into the hands
of 50 good advertisers and cartoonists
It would do more to dry up this coun
try than all of t he prohibition forces.
T h e power of advertising would make
liquor unfashionable and i t s use would
cease."
Dr. H. Spencer Lewis, lmpcrator of
the Roslcrucian Order of North
America, spoke briefly on: "What arc
Roslcruclans?" Mac Howell, singer at
KQW, presented three vocal numbers,
accompanied by Lena May Leland.
President J. Elmer Morrlsh, pre
sided.
San J ose Evening News
San J ose, California
Tuesday, October 8,1929
Page I
TheHelena Daily Independent
Helena. Montana
Friday Morning, October 11,1929
Page 4
EDITORIALS
Bf OUR READERS
INFORMATION WANTED.
Editor The Independent:
So much is being published these
days recarding the Rosierucisns as
a famous fraternity oi mystics and
metaphysicians of the middle ages,
that I wonder whether you or the
readers of your valuable paper can
throw some light on the history or
the origin and present activities of
these workers in tha fields of science
and metaphysics.
So far as I have been able to trace
it, the organization started in the
mystery schools of Egypt, where it
reached a high degree of evolution,
with the Roiicrocian principles high
ly developed. It spread its teachings
and activities thaoughout the wotld,
and then seemed to have been a
period of silence, but later burst forth
in a strange way in Germany in the
seventeenth century.
Although some encyclopedias inti
mate that the organization finally
died out in Germany, I have seen
some records which show that they
continued their activities in1various
parts of Europe, and actually came
to America, in a large following in
<594, and established buildings,
schools and laboratories in what is
now .the City of Philadelphia.
Since that time the work o f this
unusuil organization has been car*
ried on quietly in America, and the
increasing reference to them in
American literature would indicate
that the Ancient, Mythical Order
loiae Crucisusually referred to in
a veiled way through the use of the
abbreviation of their name in the
form of AMORCis still very active
in various parts of the world, and
especially in America. As it is a non.
commercial and non-sectaran organ
isation, it does not enter into the
limelight as do so many other organ
izations.
There appears to be a national
headquarters of the AMORC in San
Jose, Cal., but I understand from
some occasional public references
that there are branches in every large
city of America, and I would like to
knew more about them and their
ideals, purposes, and activities in be*
hall of humanity. Any information
in this regard will be greatly appre*
ciated.
V4ry truly yours,
FRATRO,
_____________Care The Independent
Fitchburg Sentinel
Fitchburg, Massachusetts
Friday, October 11,1929
Page 9
imimininRRnimmiianuiaanHniBnmHiaiinaBaiiaiioiiuntiumnimiii
ROSICRUCIAN
New Secret Book Loaned To You
Hi* Made Thootandi Happy, Soccewful, end Mighty in the
Control of Natural Laws.
uncJT of (be Roeteruettue b u decided to loan SEALdETD COPTBS or U to
ALnoem and worthy eeekers who will promise to atud> I t and help in the freml
work of prcj nutl nr eucceai and heal th In life. I t ia called the moft XScaarkAblf
book of oeentt rrrel atton. and lamed by the oldeet myntlcaJ f raterni ty in the
world. Just write BAX. .that joou w lli n 4 i t aad th e m e l a M
f iawwr Chcroae Two cents for actual poata#e. and I t win be mailed* Addreea:
LI BRARI AN i n. AJ IORC LIBRARY , g^N J OSE. CALI FORNI A.
rimuuiiiHmmnmnRuiimHmim
f l l M l l i i M MMi l Ui . l '
ROSI CRUCI AN
New Secret Book Loaned to You
Has made Thousand Happy, Successful, and Mighty in the
Control of Natural Laws
Because this new book is so remarkable and difficult to secure, the Supreme
Council of the Rosicrucians has decided to loan SEALED COPIES of it to
sincere and worthy seekers who will promise to study it and help in the great
work of promoting success and health in life. It is called the most remarkable
book of occult revelation, and issued by the oldest mystical fraternity in the
world. Just write and say that you will read it and study the wonderful laws.
Enclose two cents for actual postage, and it will be mailed. Address:
LIBRARIAN 111, AMORC LIBRARY, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA
Santa Ana Daily Register
Santa Ana, California
Thursday, October 31,1929
Page 9
THURSDAY, OCT. SI
L. A STATIONS
3 to 4 P. M.
K.'SO Hotheads hour.
KFi -Tollck and Howell at 3 80.
KEJK-Hob Roe at l:8S.
KMTRThe Melodlona.
KPLABanjo Boya.
KHJMusic.
KNXFrench lesson: Louise John*
n, astro-analyst at 3:10. FJs
son, astro-analyst, at 8:80.
4 to B P. M.
K K J K Mualc.
K F L AOre h e t ra,
KNXMualc
KF1Beta Kllmar: Big Brother at
4: JO.
KGFJRecords
7 *o P. M.
KMTRPlaylet.
K GFJ Soloists.
KF1L. A. Philharmonic Orches
tra at 7:80 i
KFWBH A C Quintet; recorded
?
ro*ram at 7:80; sporta talks at
:4R
KNXBill Hatch's orchestra; Wal
ter Psrner at 7:80.
KHJ Sierra Svmphonfste.
1o # P. M.
KMTR'Fhmsus Melodlsi.**
KKWB-Lyric Entertainers; Bart
Buttsrworth.
K FIPhilharmonic. N. 9. C. at
80.
KGFJPlays; Pastel Trio.
KHJContinuity. ___
KNX Rehroadcastlnp KFWB;
AWORf OnlJeae S t 8 80.
K. '*QZ-FYom KFWB
KTMSerial playlet, "The Cobra;**
S M. Band at 8:3fo.
KFSGBantlsmal servlets.
to 10 P. M.
KHJPjrmnhony
KFWB"Who Killed ths Care-
trker-" Ray Martinss' Orchestra i t
-Sft
KTMConcart orchestra *nd solo
ists
KFJKOrchestra and soloists.
KFTFlnhrl and Hurd at 9:10.
The Kvening News
Harrisburg. Pennsylvania
Thursday, November 14. 1929
Page 4
Mail Bag
(THE EVENING NEWS will be algd to
print Ipttrrn from It* readrrii on thefnra
oT l Mi hl l r liifrrpHt. i t ankM only that the
wrilprs hIk ii all rommunUMitlons ai an
evident* of smid faith if not for publica
tion! that only on* side of th* paper b
useds that reummuble length be observed
mid that nhj*rtn of rellaloua differences
b B T ni drd. Naturally THE EVENING
NEWS will print nothin* of a nmndalnun,
rrliolnal or profane nntnre, nnd reserves
th* rleht to reject all manaiiertptn. Un-
nnlfnhle letter* will be returued If post
age In Included.)
ASKS FOR INFORMATION
Editor, THE EVENING NEWS:
Dear Sir: A great multitude of peo-
, pie have their curiosity aroused now-
I ndays about press accounts and
i magazine articles concerning the an-
} cient Rosicrucian brotherhood es-
; pecially because so little can be
learned about them.
It is gathered from Lord Bulwcr
Lytton's reference to the Rosicru-
cians in his unique novel Zanoni
that this body of mystics and philoso
phers have always had a hale of glory
and honor around them and many of
the writers today refer to the Rosicru-
cians with great respect and high es
teem notwithstanding the fact that
some encyclopedias assume the atti
tude that the organization was only
a emporary one and of an awesome
nature.
In seeking to learn more about
them, it has been found that the or
ganization is established in all lands,
operating under the strange name of
AMORC pnd that there ere branches
in the principal cities of the United
States, and an Egyptian temple >f
great wealth and power in Son Jose,
Calif.
It has occurred to the writer
whether any of your readers know ]
the real meaning of the word AMORC
nnd what the real principles of the
Rosicrucians are ihat has held them
in such high esteem and given them
as an organization such an unusual
length of life through many centu
ries.
Not being a religious cult (for it is
found that they are highly regarded
by writers of various denominations
and religious beliefs) there must be j
some great purpose back of their !
work that carries them on, and since
the organization does not appear to
be commercial, political, or religious,
it is evident they possess something
of value to humanity.
Any facts that can be added to
those already learned will be appre
ciated.
Very sincerely *
R. A. M.