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>> 7:00 a.m.

: REGISTRATION
Continental breakfast; sponsor booths
>> 7:30 a.m.: WELCOME
Mei-Mei Chan, President and Publisher of The News-Press Media Group
>> 7:45 a.m.: KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Florida Governor Rick Scott
>> 8:15 a.m.: STATE OF EDUCATION
Terry Eberle, Executive Editor/Vice President of Content, The News-Press Media
Group and Cindy McCurry-Ross, Senior Managing Editor, The News-Press Media
Group presents a sweeping overview of key metrics of success for
Southwest Florida from K to 20.
>> 8:40 a.m.: BUSINESS LEADERS
MODERATOR: Steve Shimp, founder and past president
of Owen-Ames-Kimball Company
Jon Cecil, Chief Human Resources Officer of Lee Memorial Health System
Matt Chambers, President of JRL Ventures/Marine Concepts
Todd Gates, Chairman of Gates Construction
Patricia Heath, Chief Financial Officer, Interop Technologies, LLC
Nate Swan, Group Vice President of Sales, Gartner, Inc.
Paul Woods, Chief Executive Director of Algenol Biofuels, Inc.
John Wysseier, Vice-President and General Manager of LYNX Services, LLC
>> 9:40 a.m.: NETWORKING BREAK, SPONSOR BOOTH CONNECTIONS
>> 10:00 a.m.: EDUCATION LEADERS
MODERATOR: Lois Thome, WINK-TV
Dr. Wilson Bradshaw, President of Florida Gulf Coast University
Dr. Joseph Burke, Superintendent of Lee County Schools
Dr. Terry McMahan, President of Hodges University
Richard Murphy, Superintendent of Hendry County Schools
Dr. Kamela Patton, Superintendent of Collier County Schools
Dr. Kenneth Walker, District President of Edison State College
Dr. Douglas Whittaker, Superintendent of Charlotte County Schools
>> 11:15 a.m.: YOUNG AND FUTURE LEADERS
MODERATOR: Jim McLaughlin, WINK News Radio
Real world voices and best practices for building the talent supply chain
>> 11:45 a.m.: LUNCH, NETWORKING BREAK
>> 12:40 p.m.: LEGISLATIVE AND STATEWIDE VOICES
>> 12:50 p.m.: GOING FORWARD
>> 1:25 p.m.: CLOSING REMARKS
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ AGENDA ]
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MEI-MEI CHAN
President and Publisher
The News-Press Media Group
>> Welcome to this landmark regional conversation about educational
excellence and economic prosperity.
We are honored by the esteemed business, education and communi-
ty leaders gathered here today, representing the five counties of Lee,
Collier, Charlotte, Hendry and Glades, as well as the entire state of Flori-
da.
You are here because you care about education, and you care about
jobs. You know that educational excellence and economic success are
intricately connected.
You see our world changing rapidly and feel the urgency for our com-
munity to change as well, in order to stay competitive. You know we are
doing many good things, and you know that we have a lot more we want
to achieve. And, finally, you embrace the power of a regional perspective
around such fundamental issues as education and jobs.
As we all know, the United States has fallen behind in numerous aca-
demic areas, especially science and math, compared to other developed
countries.
The leading companies and clusters that will emerge over the next
20 years will locate themselves wherever they have access to a top-
quality workforce, reported the Council of 100 in its Closing the Talent
Gap report of January 2010. Unfortunately, Florida today is not leading
the race. In fact, we face a crisis in human capital.
The time to build Floridas future workforce is now, and education
must be its foundation, the Council said.
That message resonated with Southwest Florida leaders: in CEO
roundtables hosted by The Horizon Council and The News-Press earlier
this year; in strategy sessions as Collier, Lee and Charlotte welcomed
new superintendents, and with our top leaders in education, who all
enthusiastically welcomed a renewed partnership with the broader
community.
The News-Press Media Group has long been committed to serving
the greater Southwest Florida community. We love bringing key individ-
uals together and driving productive conversations to help improve the
quality of life for all. Our foundational principles as a free press are to
connect, reflect, challenge and lead.
And so, with many partners and sponsors at our side, The News-Press
is pleased to produce this Education Summit under our Market Watch
brand, which provides fresh insights and perspectives to community
leaders.
Today is the start of a conversation. Today we begin to grapple with
the gaps at a high level.
Youll hear provocative questions and ideas, starting with our keynote
speaker. Youll gain insights about what businesses are confronting and
what they anticipate for the future. Youll hear our top education leaders
discuss key metrics, challenges and priorities. And, best of all, youll hear
from youngsters just finding their way in the world.
The Alliance of Educational Leaders, representing CEOs of the
five school districts and five accredited colleges and universities in
Southwest Florida, will take key themes from the Education Sum-
mit and develop strategic roadmaps based on today with your
help.
Together, we can align our strategies to close the talent gap.
Together, we can set a vision to build a world-class workforce in
Southwest Florida.
And, finally, you embrace the power of a regional perspective
around such fundamental issues as education and jobs, and you
value the power of diverse mindsets in developing better solutions.
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ WELCOME ]
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The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ KEYNOTE SPEAKER ]
>> Welcome to the Educational Excellence Drives Economic Pros-
perity Market Watch Education Summit. Im honored to be the
keynote speaker of this event. It is critical that we start a dialogue
between business, education and community leaders in Southwest
Florida to discuss the strategies needed to foster the most educated
and talented workforce in the nation.
Floridas economy depends on developing and retaining a skilled
workforce to attract new businesses and industries, which is why
education is one of my leading priorities as Governor. Our students
must be prepared to work in a competitive, global marketplace and
that will only happen with access to quality teaching and an innova-
tive curriculum.
A greater focus on science, technology, engineering and mathe-
matics (STEM) education is critical because these fields are the
future of our economy. STEM fields will undoubtedly play a role in
Floridas long-term economic development efforts and priority
should be given to putting an adequate focus on these topics to
effectively prepare our students, and keep Florida competitive in the
21st century.
Florida must have the best-educated workforce in the nation and
meetings like this, which align our business and education commu-
nity, are vital to ensuring we have the most effective strategies in
place.
Best wishes for an enjoyable summit.
GOVERNOR
RICK SCOTT
>>
RICK SCOTT, the 45th Governor of Florida, is focused on cre-
ating jobs and turning around Floridas economy. He is working to
ensure every Florida family has the same opportunity to live the
American dream, to provide children an opportunity for a great
education and every adult an opportunity to get a job.
Born in Bloomington, IL, and raised in Kansas City, he enlisted
in the U.S. Navy after attending community college. The G.I. Bill
enabled him to attend the University of Missouri-Kansas City and
law school at Southern Methodist University. After graduating,
Scott worked for Johnson & Swanson the largest law firm in
Dallas. His specialization was in health care mergers and acquisi-
tions, and it was during his work on these transactions that he
recognized how patients could be better served by improving
hospital efficiency, lowering costs and focusing on better out-
comes.
In 1987, he started Columbia Hospital Corporation. He also
started Conservatives for Patients Rights, which advocated for
free market principles of choice, competition, accountability and
personal responsibility in health care. When he left Columbia in
1997 at age 44, it was one of the most admired companies in the
U.S. It had grown to become the worlds largest health care com-
pany with more than 340 hospitals, 135 surgery centers and 550
home health locations in 37 states and two foreign countries.
Columbia employed more than 285,000 people, making it the
seventh largest U.S. employer and the 12th largest employer
worldwide.
Before moving to Tallahassee, the Scott family lived in Naples.
Governor Scott has served on the National Board of the United
Way, and he and his wife, Ann, worked with World Vision to cre-
ate a primary health care system in Kenya. In addition, the couple
fund scholarships for graduates of the Kansas City high school
they both attended, as well as one that enables a low-income
student to attend SMU Law School each year. They also fund an
entrepreneur contest at George Washington University where
one of their daughters received a business degree.
Scott and Ann have been married for 39 years and have two
married daughters, Allison and Jordan. This year they will
become proud grandparents.
RICK SCOTT,
7 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
JON CECIL
>> Jon Cecil is the Chief Human Resources Officer at Lee Memorial Health
System. With more than 9,500 employees, Lee Memorial Health System is the
largest employer in Southwest Florida and has received the AARP award for
being a Best Employer for Workers over 50 for three years in a row.
Cecil joined Lee Memorial Hospital in 1972 as a management trainee and held
various management and administrative positions. He was promoted to Vice
President of Human Resources in 1987. With the affiliation of Sarasota Memorial
Hospital and Lee Memorial Health System in 1997, he accepted the additional
position of regional Vice President for Support Services of both health systems. In January 1999, he
assumed the responsibility as the Systems Chief Human Resources Officer.
He graduated from the University in Florida in 1972 with a BS in Business Administration and
earned his MS in Public Management in 1979 from Nova Southeastern University.
MATT CHAMBERS
>> Matt Chambers, president of Marine Concepts/JRL Ventures Inc., joined the
company in April 2006. He was recognized as a leader on the 1995 USA Today
Quality Cup during his five years with K2 Industries which markets skis under
the K2, Olin and PRE brand names before turning his attention to the marine
industry.
Chambers was honored with the Brunswick Leadership Award for US Marine,
while plant manager for Bayliner Yachts in Arlington, Washington. Additionally, he
was vice president of manufacturing at Wellcraft Marine and plant manager for
Westport Shipyard in Washington.
As president of Marine Concepts, Chambers has led the efforts to diversify the company from a
supplier to the recreational marine industry by starting their sister company, JRL Ventures Inc. By
expanding into the aerospace, simulator, renewable wind, land-based transportation and other mar-
kets, the company survived the recession.
In 2010, Marine Concepts/JRL Ventures was recognized for their accomplishments and the efforts
made with diversification by being awarded the 2010 Oswald Tripp Southwest Florida Community
Blue Chip award and the 2010 Manufacturing Association of Florida Manufacturer of the Year.
TODD E. GATES
>> Todd Gates is the chairman of the board of Gates, a fully integrated
construction management, general contracting and design-build firm that he
founded in 1993 with offices in Florida and the Republic of Panama. A native of
Virginia, he moved to Southwest Florida in 1984 and has been involved in such
projects as The Ritz Carlton Hotel, The Registry Resort and The Philharmonic
Center of the Arts.
A past chairman of the Economic Development Council of Collier County, he is
currently on the Board of Directors for the Presidents Forum. He is on the Board
of Trustees for the Florida Chamber of Commerce Foundation and is a member of the Board of Gov-
ernors. He is also a member of Lee County Economic Development Horizon Council and on the Board
of Directors for The Childrens Hospital of Southwest Florida, Lee Memorial Health System Founda-
tion and Junior Achievement.
Gates was named a finalist by Ernst & Young as a 2008 Entrepreneur of the Year of the state.
Junior Achievement named him the 2008 Hall of Fame Laureate in recognition as a role model for local
area youth. In 2008, Gulfshore Business Magazine named him as one of the Top 50 Power Players in
Southwest Florida. In 2007, he was named Entrepreneur of the Year by Gulf Coast Business Review.
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ BUSINESS LEADERS ]
STEVE SHIMP
MODERATOR
>> Steve Shimp, founder and
past president of Owen-Ames-
Kimball Com-
pany in Fort
Myers, is no
stranger as
an advocate
for, and con-
tributor to,
education
improvement
in Southwest Florida. A product
of public education, Shimp has
focused years of volunteerism to
raising the achievement bar in
not only public K-12 systems but
also higher education.
Shimps accomplishments
include being a founding director
and later president of The Foun-
dation for Lee County Public
Schools and serving as a board
member and president of the Edi-
son Community College Foun-
dation. He chaired early efforts
to establish the Work Skills pro-
gram in Lee Countys high
schools and provided early advo-
cacy for career-based education
and business guidance that led
to the establishment of Career
Academy High Schools in South-
west Florida.
Shimp was a board member of
the Constitutional Accountability
Commission, a statewide panel
assembled to provide an opinion
as to the obligations of the state
to its citizens within the 1998
amendment known as the Qual-
ity in Education Amendment.
He also chaired the Education
Sub-committee of the Horizon
Council for several years and
chaired the Advisory Board that
guided the development of the
U.A. Whitaker School of Engineer-
ing at Florida Gulf Coast University.
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ BUSINESS LEADERS ]
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NATE SWAN
>> Nate Swan is the group vice president of sales for
Gartner in Fort Myers. He has been in information
technology sales for 23 years in a variety of roles.
For the last 14 years he has been with Gartner, the
leading information technology research and advisory
company, in several senior roles.
Swan currently leads the Inside Sales channel for
Gartner. His team consists of 170 associates selling to
small and mid-size organizations in the U.S. and Canada.
Through the resources of Gartner Research, Gartner Executive Pro-
grams, Gartner Consulting and Gartner Events, the company works with
clients to research, analyze and interpret the business of IT within the
context of their individual role. Founded in 1979, Gartner is headquartered
in Stamford, Connecticut and has 4,600 associates, including 1,250
research analysts, consultants and clients in 80 countries.
JOHN F. WYSSEIER
>> John F. Wysseier is the Vice President and General
Manager of the Insurance and Services business seg-
ment of Pittsburgh Glass Works the worldwide
leader in the production and distribution of automo-
tive glass products and related services. He is also
President of LYNX Services, L.L.C. a leading provider
of insurance claims management and business
process outsourcing services. Established in 1994,
LYNX Services operates a major customer service operations center in
North Fort Myers, employing more than 400 associates.
Wysseier launched LYNX Services and selected Southwest Florida to
support its major business operations in 1997. He spent 24 years with
PPG Industries through late-2008 when Pittsburgh Glass Works was cre-
ated as a spin-off company. With PPG, Wysseier successfully launched
several innovative claims management businesses throughout the pan-
European marketplace while living in Barcelona, Spain for more than five
years.
He earned a BS Degree in Finance from Pennsylvania State University
and an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh.
He and his wife Dina, have two daughters.
REINHOLD D. SCHMIEDING
>> Reinhold Schmieding is president and founder of
Arthrex, Inc., a worldwide leader in sports medicine,
arthroscopic surgery technology and medical device
manufacturing. His industry experience spans more
than 30 years, beginning in Germany as the European
Marketing Manager for Richards Medical before
founding Arthrex, Inc. in Westport, Connecticut in
1981.
Arthrex, Inc. has operated out of its Naples headquarters since 1991.
PAUL WOODS
>> Paul Woods is co-founder and CEO of Algenol. He
has led the growth of Algenol from its inception to
over 130 employees with laboratories located in Fort
Myers and Berlin, Germany. Under Woods direction,
Algenol has raised over $180 million for the advance-
ment of Algenols proprietary DIRECT TO ETHANOL
technology, built a state-of-the-art 50,000 square-
foot research facility and begun construction of its
Department of Energy-sponsored Integrated Biorefinery. Woods was
named The News-Press' 2011 Person to Watch for his leadership in the
community and the biofuels industry.
Woods conceived of the idea of making ethanol from algae as a genet-
ics student at the University of Western Ontario in 1984.
Algenol LLC is a global, development stage, industrial biotechnology com-
pany that makes biofuels and high-value industrial chemicals cost-effective-
ly from abundant, renewable resources. Algenol uses hybrid blue-green
algae and specially designed photobioreactors as a sustainable, proprietary
platform for making its products from carbon dioxide, sunlight and saltwa-
ter. The companys first product is ethanol for the biofuel and ethylene mar-
kets that it produces with its patented DIRECT TO ETHANOL process.
PATRICIA HEATH
>> Patricia Heath is the Chief Financial Officer of
Interop Technologies, a position she has held since
Interop was formed in 2002. Headquartered in Fort
Myers, Interop is a leading developer and provider of
wireless solutions to the wireless and broadband
industries.
Heath is responsible for financial accounting and
reporting, customer billing, human resources and risk
management for Interop. A member of Interops senior management
team, she is also actively involved in establishing the companys strategic
initiatives, systems and product development.
Previously she served as CFO of Wireless One Network, the Cellular
One wireless provider in Southwest Florida. Heath is a CPA with more
than 30 years accounting experience, of which 16 years were spent in
public accounting with Arthur Andersen and Price Waterhouse Coopers.
Currently employing more than 1,000 corporate and manufacturing staff,
the company has 600 additional employees in 13 countries.
Schmieding has led the development and manufacturing of over 6,000
medical products and the issuance of more than 350 patents with more
pending. The Arthrex Medical Education division has successfully hosted
hundreds of surgical trainings for the worlds top orthopaedic surgeons
exclusively within Arthrex Labs.
His vision is to continue to establish the Southwest Florida communi-
ty as a global medical education destination.
9 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
DR. TERRY McMAHAN
>> Dr. Terry McMahan has been president of Hodges University since 1991. Under his
leadership, the school has grown to over 3,000 students on two main campuses in
Naples and Fort Myers, and four learning sites from Tampa to Key West. With four
schools of study, Hodges currently offers 33 degree programs in 19 disciplines and, to
date, has more than 6,000 alumni.
A Florida native, Dr. McMahan was raised in Boca Raton. He earned an undergraduate
degree from Florida State University in 1971 and attended Cumberland School of Law at
Samford University in Birmingham, AL.
Dr. McMahan has been active in Leadership Collier; the Alliance of Educational Leaders; the Independent
Colleges and Universities of Floridas Council of Presidents; and the Florida Association of Colleges and Uni-
versities. He has been a member of the Florida Bar Association since 1974. In 2005, Dr. McMahan was
inducted into the Sigma Beta Delta International Honor Society. The following year, he was named Interna-
tional Educator of the Year by the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education. In 2007, Junior
Achievement of Southwest Florida inducted Dr. McMahan into the Collier County Business Leadership Hall
of Fame and he was recognized as Educator of the Year by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.
He and his wife, Susan, have two daughters and two grandchildren.
DR. WILSON BRADSHAW
>> Dr. Wilson Bradshaw was appointed president of Florida Gulf Coast University
(FGCU) in August 2007. He is the institutions third president. Previously, Dr. Bradshaw
was president of Metropolitan State University in St. Paul, Minn. and had been provost
and vice president for Academic Affairs at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania; vice
president and dean for Graduate Studies and Research at Georgia Southern University;
and dean of Graduate Studies at Florida Atlantic University.
Born in Sanford and raised in West Palm Beach, he earned his associate of arts degree
from Palm Beach Community College, Bachelors and Masters degrees in psychology
from Florida Atlantic University and Doctorate in psychobiology from the University of Pittsburgh.
Dr. Bradshaw serves on the Board of Directors for the Alliance of Educational Leaders; Naples Botanical
Gardens; Lee County Education Foundation; and, American Association of State Colleges. He serves on the
natonal Board of Directors for Campus Compact.
President Bradshaw and his wife, Jo Anna, have three adult sons.
DR. JOSEPH P. BURKE
>> Dr. Joseph P. Burke was appointed Superintendent of Lee County Public Schools on
July 1, 2011. Previosuly, he was appointed Monroe County Superintendent of Schools on
August 2009 by former Governor Charlie Crist and was Superintendent of Schools in
Springfield, Mass. from 2001 to 2008.
Dr. Burke earned his Bachelors degree from Holy Cross College in Worcester, Mass.;
his Masters degree in Education Supervision from Florida International University; and his
Doctorate in Educational Leadership from Nova Southeastern University.
Dr. Burke began his career as a classroom teacher at Miami Killian Senior High School
in 1974. Other leadership roles include principal of Thomas Jefferson Middle School (1985- 1989); region
director for Exceptional Student Education and Federal Programs (1989-1992); region director for Personnel
and Labor Relations (1992-1997); and, district administrative director of Math and Science (1997-2001).
Dr. Burke served as the executive director for the Florida Department of Education, Region 3, from August
2008 through August 2009 where he was responsible for implementing Floridas Differentiated Account-
ability Model and reviewing and approving school improvement plans for schools in 10 school districts in
Central Florida. Dr. Burke has been part of unique leadership development studies, including one at the
Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University), sponsored by the Wallace Foundation.
MODERATOR
>> Lois
Thome
co-anchors
WINK News
at 5, WINK
News at 6
and WINK
News at 7.
She joined WINK-TV in 1992
and has received many awards
including the Best News Anchor
in Southwest Florida, the Phi
Delta Kappa Lay Person of the
Year and the Quill Pen Award
from the Florida Association of
School Administrators. She was
named a Woman in History
from the American Business
Women's Association, the
Library Advocate of the Year by
the Southwest Florida Library
Network and was voted one of
the top Women of the Year by
Gulfshore Life magazine.
For more than 10 years,
Thome has been a committee
member for the Southwest
Florida Reading Festival and is
on the board of Gulf Coast High
School's Sports and Entertain-
ment Marketing Academy. She
is also a board member for the
National Center for Missing and
Exploited Children in Southwest
Florida.
A graduate of the University
of Wisconsin with a Bachelor's
degree in Journalism and Public
Relations, Thome has covered
major stories including Hurri-
cane Charley, the Columbine
shootings, the Oklahoma City
bombing, the Republican
National Convention and the
Cuban refugee crisis for WINK.
Thome and her husband
John live in Fort Myers with
their son, Nicholas, and daugh-
ter, Isabella.
LOIS THOME
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION LEADERS ]
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The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION LEADERS ]
DR. KAMELA PATTON
>> Dr. Kamela Patton was appointed Superintendent
of Schools for Collier County on April 20, 2011, and
began her tenure on June 1.
Dr. Patton spent 24 years in the Miami-Dade County
Public Schools, the fourth largest school system in the
U.S. serving 342,000 students (90 percent minority).
Her previous positions include Assistant Superinten-
dent; Office of the Superintendent and District/School
Operations; Differentiated Accountability Administrative Director; Region
Administrative Director; Instructional Support Director; Curriculum Direc-
tor; Principal; Assistant Principal; and teacher at all levels of the K-20 con-
tinuum.
She was an adjunct professor at Nova Southeastern University and
president of the Dade Association of Administrators.
Dr. Patton received her Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
from Messiah College in Grantham, PA., her Master of Science in Reading
Education from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale and a
Doctorate of Philosophy in Educational Leadership from the University of
Miami, Coral Gables. Superintendent Patton also has a certificate from
the Institute for School Leadership (Harvard) and the School Redesign
Network (Stanford).
Dr. Patton has received many awards including the Cervantes Out-
standing Educator Award for Hispanic Students; District PTA President of
the Year; and Floridas Commissioner of Education Assistant Principal of
the Year.
DR. KENNETH P. WALKER
>> Dr. Kenneth P. Walker has been president of
Edison State College (ESC) since 1991. Under his
leadership, enrollment has doubled to 21,000
students annually. Edison State College now serves
Southwest Florida with campuses in Charlotte,
Collier, Lee and Hendry counties.
Prior to coming to ESC, Dr. Walker was president at
Navarro College in Corsicana, Texas, and at Oklahoma
City Community College. He began his career as a Government Instructor
after serving in the U.S. Air Force.
In 1973, he received his Ph.D. in Higher Education Administration from
the University of Texas at Austin.
Dr. Walker chaired the Board of Trustees of the Thomas Edison and
Henry Ford Winter Estates, Inc., during the recent restoration project and
served on the board of the Florida Council of 100. He is a member of the
Downtown Fort Myers Rotary Club; Association of Community Colleges
Trustees; Florida Association of Colleges and Universities; Greenleaf Cen-
ter of Servant Leadership; Hispanic Association of Colleges and
Universities; Horizon Foundation; and, Florida Tax Watch Center for Edu-
cational Performance and Accountability Advisory Board.
Dr. Walker and his wife, Mary Jo, have five children and seven grand-
children.
DR. DOUG WHITTAKER
>> Dr. Doug Whittaker has been Superintendent of
Schools in Charlotte County since January 2011. He
has been involved in Florida education for the past 38
years as a teacher, elementary and middle school
principal and central office administrator. He has also
served as an adjunct professor for National Louis
University, University of South Florida, Barry
University and Nova Southeastern University. He has
been a consultant to textbook companies and has several articles pub-
lished in professional journals.
He spent his early years in Westfield, N.J. and then Wheaton Academy
in Chicago. His post-secondary educational pursuits began at Taylor Uni-
versity (Indiana) and continued at Ball State for his Masters degree. Dr.
Whittaker received a certificate for elementary education from University
of South Florida.
He is a trainer for 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Teacher
Expectations/Student Achievement (TESA), Interaction Management,
Facilitative Leadership, School Improvement and Leading as the Speed of
Trust. He is also active in the community including his membership in the
Sundowners, a service-oriented flying club that patrols Floridas coastal
waters.
He and his wife Susan have been married for 42 years have two mar-
ried daughters and seven grandchildren.
RICHARD A. MURPHY
>> Richard A. Rick Murphy was elected as
Superintendent of Hendry County Public Schools in
2008. He was an elected member of the School Board
of Hendry County from 1994-2008 and has experi-
ence as a teacher in Highlands County. He was in
business management for 12 years.
Murphy is a lifetime resident of Hendry County.
He received his Bachelors of Science degree from Palm
Beach Atlantic University and his Superintendents Certification from the
Florida Association of District School Superintendents.
Murphy is active in various professional organizations including the
Florida Association of District School Superintendents; the Florida Associ-
ation of School Administrators; the Alliance of Educational Leaders; and
the Southwest Florida Workforce Board. He is also a Heartland
Educational Consortium board member.
Murphy has two children and two grandchildren.
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[ ALLIANCE OF EDUCATIONAL LEADERS MEMBERS ]
DR. JOSEPH D. PEPE
>> Dr. Joseph D. Pepe is the interim executive direc-
tor of Nova Southeastern Universitys (NSU) off-cam-
pus locations throughout Florida and in the Bahamas.
Under his leadership, the Fort Myers center has expe-
rienced significant enrollment growth leading to the
introduction of new programs. He continues in his
role as Regional Director of the off-campus locations
in Southwest Florida.
Prior to Fort Myers, Dr. Pepe aided in the acquisition, design and build
of centers in Miami, Orlando, Palm Beach, Tampa, Jacksonville and Las
Vegas. He also served as director of the Student Educational Center in
Miami-Dade and director at SEC Headquarters in Fort Lauderdale.
A native of Florida, he has been a resident of Southwest Florida for
more than 20 years. Dr. Pepe received his B.A. in Psychology and Sociolo-
gy from the University of South Florida and his Masters in Administration
from Central Michigan. He recently attained his doctoral degree in educa-
tion at Nova Southeastern University. Before joining NSU, he worked for
five years as an area manager for GTE Wireless (now Verizon).
Dr. Pepe has also been honored by the Fort Myers Police Department
and City of Cape Coral for his cooperation and support and received a
proclamation from the City of Miami Dade for the advancement of educa-
tion in the region. He also supports local charities such as the Muscular
Dystrophy Association, American Cancer Society, Habitat for Humanity
and Boys and Girls Club.
WAYNE ALDRICH
>> Wayne Aldrich was elected Superintendent of the
Glades County Public Schools in 2000.
He began his career in 1976 as an ESE teacher in
Fort Myers. In 1978, he was a math teacher with the
Glades County School District. During his 25 years in
the Glades district, Aldrich gained extensive experi-
ence as an elementary, middle and high school
teacher. He also served as a drivers education teacher
and an adult education teacher, principal and director. In his spare time,
he enjoyed coaching.
DR. CHARLES BELL
>> Dr. Charles Bell was appointed Assistant Dean,
Regional Administration, for Barry University in 2005.
Currently, he is an Associate Dean for Enrollment
Management.
Dr. Bell began his career in education in the School
District of Lee County. During his 35-year tenure, he
was a teacher, coach, school counselor, summer
school coordinator, curriculum specialist, assistant
principal, principal, Principal-on-Assignment for Student Services, Interim
Director of Student Services and Director of Student Services Depart-
ment. He also served in several positions at Nova Southeastern Universi-
ty as an Instructor and Practicum Advisor.
Dr. Bell received his Bachelors Degree in Psychology and History/Polit-
ical Science and a Masters Degree in Administration and Supervision
from Sterling College. He earned his Doctoral Degree in Educational Lead-
ership from Nova Southeastern University.
Dr. Bell is an active member of the Association for Supervision and Cur-
riculum Development, the American School Counselors Association and
the National Association of Pupil Services Administrators (Past Presi-
dent). His community involvement includes working with Crimestoppers,
the Juvenile Justice Board and Child Watch.
A native of Enfield, N.H., Aldrich has a B.S. in mathematics from Ply-
mouth State College (N.H.) and a Masters degree and Specialist Certifi-
cate in Educational Leadership from the University of Southern Mississip-
pi.
Aldrich directed several improvement projects for the district including
the construction of a new elementary school, the first built in the district
in 38 years. He is a member of several educational and community organ-
izations.
Aldrich has been married for 32 years and has four grown children and
one granddaughter.
12
JOHN REECE ATTWOOD
>> In middle school John ReeceAttwood had no
idea what he wanted to be when he grew up. He
started learning about careers in a Freshman Suc-
cess class at Ida S. Baker High School. The teacher,
Ms. Petrie, had him take career aptitude and interest
tests. He had an interest in law but his career path
changed after visiting the engineering academy. As
he walked in the door, he encountered robots, elec-
tronic monkeys and line-tracing cars. He was hooked.
Junior year, the Cape Coral Junior Leadership program gave him a
view of the city most students dont get to see. Also, an important ini-
tiative by the Foundation for Lee County Public Schools STEM at Work
allows students to visit firms like Shaw Development and Cement
Industries, and the Imaginarium and Edison State College. A new inter-
est in mechanical engineering resulted from the trip to Shaw Develop-
ment.
Now a senior, Attwood will again be participating in the STEM at
Work program. He says that attending Baker was one of the best deci-
sions of his life and has prepared him for the future.
JIM McLAUGHLIN
>> A native of Oneida, NY, Jim McLaughlin received
his BA in Modern Languages from St. Bonaventure
University after spending his junior year at the Uni-
versity of Madrid in Spain. His first job in broadcast-
ing was at WCCF-FM radio in Punta Gorda in 1976. He
started at WINK-TV in September 1977 as Charlotte
County Bureau Chief and general assignment
reporter and by March 1978 he was weekend anchorman. He was the 6
and 11 oclock anchor from 1980 to 2005.
After leaving TV news, he has been a freelance photographer and
hosted the Connect! weekly program for WGCU-TV on PBS at Florida
Gulf Coast University for four years. In August 2010, he became an on-
air radio news anchor for the All News WINK News Radio from 3-6 p.m.
He also hosts a talk show at 6:30 p.m.
He served on the board of the Uncommon Friends Foundation, South-
west Florida Addiction Services, the Drug Free Coalition of SWFL and
the Advisory Board of the Dubin Alzheimers Center. He was honorary
chair of the Harry Chapin Food Bank Capital Campaign and co-chair of
the SWFL Council of Boy Scouts 100th Anniversary Celebration.
MODERATOR
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ YOUNG AND FUTURE LEADERS ]
www.news-press.com/educationsummit 13
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ YOUNG AND FUTURE LEADERS ]
JESSE YOUNG
>> Jesse Young is currently a sophomore at Florida
Gulf Coast University where he is majoring in biology.
He commutes from his dorm to his job at Chicos
Technology Service Desk where he assists people
with computer issues.
Young attended Dunbar High school and earned
several entry-level certifications including Microsoft
Office and Outlook as well as professional-level certi-
fications such as Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator.
Without his industry certifications from the Academy for Technology
Excellence, he says he would not be where he is today.
VICTORIA HAMM
>> Victoria Hamm was born in Connecticut. In
December 1989, she relocated to Southwest Florida
from California where she had worked in the hospital-
ity industry for eight years. A self-employed sign
painter, Hamm attended Edison State College and
earned her Associates Degree in Physical Therapy in
1997. She was a physical therapist for the next 10
years.
She became a Realtor in 2002 and worked for Pulte Homes for eight
years, where she was named Salesperson of the Year in 2005. She won
the Lee County Building Industry Association (BIA) Pinnacle Award
based on sales volume that same year.
Due to the downturn in the economy and housing market, Hamm
made a career change. She is currently attending High Tech North Tech-
nical School in Cape Coral where she will graduate from the Web Design
and Development program in December, 2011. Her goal is to have a suc-
cessful career in freelance website design and development.
STEVEN ALEXANDER TRENT
>> Steven Alexander Trent will receive his Masters
Degree in Public Administration this December from
Florida Gulf Coast University. He earned his Bachelors
degree in Political Science from FGCU in May 2010,
graduating with honors with distinction.
While at FGCU, Trent served in two branches of
Student Government and is currently the Legislative
Chair of Student Senate. Additionally he was an
officer in multiple clubs including the American Democracy Project and
is a founding father of the Lambda Zeta Chapter of Sigma Chi. He
recently transferred as the Graduate Assistant for the Dean of Students
to work as the Graduate Assistant for the Vice President of Student
Affairs Office.
Upon his graduation, Trent will relocate to his childhood home of
Washington D.C. to pursue a job in the government sector.
BRADFORD BAILEY
>> Bradford Bailey graduated from Naples High
School in 2006 and went on to study government
and economics at Harvard University.
During his summer breaks from college, Bailey
interned with the Community Foundation of Collier
County and also founded his own test prep and tutor-
ing company. He graduated from Harvard in 2010 and
returned to Southwest Florida to continue his work
with both endeavors.
Using his own original curriculum, he has coached more than 350
students to reach their maximum potential on the SAT and ACT, and has
helped some students raise their scores as much as 400 points on the
SAT and seven points on the ACT.
He continues to work with the Community Foundation where he is
the Program Officer for Collier 211 a fledgling information and referral
service for Collier County.
In June 2010, Bailey was named the 2011-2012 Rotary International
Ambassadorial Scholar and received a full-ride scholarship to study
abroad at any graduate school. He plans to get his MBA at Oxford Uni-
versity starting next fall.
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ REGIONAL AND STATEWIDE LEADERS ]
14
REPRESENTATIVE GARY AUBUCHON
>> Gary Aubuchon was first elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2006 and
has been re-elected twice. A Republican who resides in Cape Coral, Aubuchon
represents District 74, which includes parts of Lee and Charlotte counties.
He chairs the Rules and Calendar Committee and serves on the Appropriations Commit-
tee. He is also chairman of the Lee County Legislative Delegation and served as the chairman
of the Charlotte County Legislative Delegation from 2006-2008.
Founder and president of Aubuchon Homes, he studied at University of Michigan and
holds a B.A. in history. A Michigan native, he has served on a number of community organi-
zations including the Community Foundation of Cape Coral, Make-A-Wish Foundation, Chamber of Commerce
of Cape Coral and Ronald McDonald House. He holds a black belt in Hayashi-Ha Karate and his awards include
Small Business of the Year in Cape Coral and Cape Coral Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year.
He is married to Andrea and they have three daughters.
SENATOR LIZBETH BENACQUISTO
>> Lizbeth Benacquisto was elected to the Florida Senate in 2010.
She lives in Fort Myers and represents District 27, which extends coast to coast from Lee
County to Palm Beach County and includes Hendry and Glades.
Benacquisto, a Republican, is Deputy Majority Leader of the Senate. She chairs the
Communications, Energy and Public Utilities Committee and also serves on the Budget,
Education Pre-K-12 and Reapportionment committees, among others.
A Realtor and marketing and special events consultant, she received her B.A. at Palm
Beach Atlantic University.
A New York native, she served as a Village of Wellington councilwoman from 2002-2010 and is affiliated
with the Early Learning Coalition of Palm Beach County and the American Lung Association Board of Direc-
tors. Her awards include PACE Center for Girls Senator of the Year, Boys and Girls Club of Fort Myers
Childrens Advocate of the Year and Southwest Florida Library Network Library Champion.
Benacquisto has three children.
REPRESENTATIVE KATHLEEN PASSIDOMO
>> Kathleen Passidomo was elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2010. She
lives in Naples and represents District 76, which includes North Naples, the City of Naples,
western Collier County and Marco Island.
A Republican, Passidomo serves on the Judiciary Committee, K-20 Innovation Subcom-
mittee, the Higher Education Appropriations Subcommittee and the Congressional Redis-
tricting Subcommittee, among other assignments.
She is a practicing attorney and received her bachelors degree from Trinity University
and her law degree from Stetson University. In law school, she was involved in the Stu-
dent Bar Association, Trial Advocacy Society and National Moot Court Competition.
A New Jersey native, her affiliations and other public service include being chairman of the Florida Com-
mission on the Status of Women (2006-2007), Collier County Bar Association president (2007-2008), found-
ing chairman of the Collier County Juvenile Justice Council and co-chair of the Collier County Foreclosure Task
Force.
She is married to John Passidomo, and they have three daughters.
BILL
HOFFMAN
>> Bill
Hoffman
is a mem-
ber of the
Voice of
Florida
Business
in Educa-
tion and served on the
Executive Committee of the
Consortium of Florida Edu-
cation Foundations.
He was president of the
Hillsborough Education
Foundation for nine years.
He has written extensive-
ly on topics related to edu-
cation foundations, their
performance and best prac-
tices. He has presented to
and served on panels for
the National School Foun-
dations Association, Public
Education Network and
Mid-Atlantic Consortium of
Education Foundations.
A long-time resident of
the Tampa Bay area and a
product of the Florida
public school system,
Hoffman graduated from
the University of South
Florida. He has served as a
Take Stock in Children
mentor for one of the
Foundations scholarship
recipients as well as his Big
Brother. He is also a
member of Tampa Bay
Workforce Youth Council,
a member of the United
Way Empowering Teacher
Work Group and a board
member of the National
Schools Foundation
Association.
He and his wife, Deborah,
live in Tampa and have
three sons.
15 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
16
17 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
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Educationin
Southwest
Florida
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Education. Our Most Valuable Asset for the Future.
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HOW DOES SOUTHWEST
FLORIDA SCORE WHEN
IT COMES TO PRODUCING
A WORLD CLASS
WORKFORCE FOR TODAY
AND FOR THE FUTURE?
Thats the question The News-Press Media
Group set out to answer. A team led by
Business Editor Steve McQuilkin pored
through reams of reports, spoke to a wide
spectrum of stakeholders and reviewed
mountains of data.
Some of that data is included here: key
metrics for education in Southwest Florida
and the state, snapshots of our K-12 schools
and colleges and universities, and job
market benchmarks.
To review the whole series and hear
what stakeholders said, please go to
www.news-press.com/educationsummit.
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ STATE OF EDUCATION ]
TERRY EBERLE
Executive Editor /
The News-Press Media Group
CINDY McCURRY-ROSS
Senior Managing Editor /
The News-Press Media Group
STEVE McQUILKIN
Business Editor /
The News-Press Media Group
>>
22
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
ACT Scores
by County
In 2011, just three of 32 area high
schools with reportable data
fared better than the national
average of 21.1 on the ACT, the
more popular of the two college
readiness exams. The ACT
measures skills in English, math,
reading and science reasoning,
and the maximum score is 36.
SOURCES: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION; ACT
HIGH SCHOOL 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
State Average 19.9 19.8 19.5 19.5 19.6
National Average 21.2 21.1 21.1 21 21.1
Lee County District Average 19.3 19.3 18.6 19 18.9
Cape Coral 18 18.3 18.7 19.8 20.9
Cypress Lake 20.3 20.7 19.8 20.3 19.2
Dunbar 17.5 16.7 16.3 17.1 16.9
East Lee County NA 16.8 16 16.7 16.4
Estero 20 18.6 18.7 19 19.3
Fort Myers 22.1 23.7 23.2 23.2 22.7
Gateway Charter 20 19 19.5 19.1 18.9
Ida S. Baker 19 18.4 18.3 19.5 19.5
Island Coast NA NA 15.2 17.3 18.1
Lehigh Senior 17.2 17.2 17.1 17.2 17.8
Mariner 18.9 19.1 18.5 19.2 18.7
North Fort Myers 19.9 19.4 18.9 20 20.2
Riverdale 18.1 17.5 19.5 19.5 20.4
South Fort Myers 18 18.3 18.5 18.8 17.6
Gateway Charter NA 19 19.3 19.1 18.9
Richard Milburn Academy NA NA 14.2 12.8 13.6
Lee Alternative Charter NA NA NA 13.6 14.3
North Nicholas Charter NA NA NA 14.4 14.6
Coronado Charter NA NA NA 13.9 13.6
Collier County District Average 19.5 19.6 19.4 19.3 19.5
Barron Collier 21.9 23 22.8 23.8 22.7
Gulf Coast 21.2 21 21.7 21.5 21.9
Immokalee 16.5 16 15.9 15.8 16.1
Lely 18.3 19.1 18.7 18.1 17.9
Naples 21.3 21.3 20.8 20.9 21.1
Golden Gate 16.6 16.9 17.2 16.4 17.2
Palmetto Ridge 19.2 18.9 19 19.3 19.3
Charlotte County District Average NA 20 20.2 20.3 20.5
Charlotte 21.2 20.8 20.7 20.3 20.5
Lemon Bay 20.3 20.7 20.6 20.7 20.6
Port Charlotte 19.9 19.5 20.1 20.9 20.9
Hendry County District Average NA 17.8 17.9 17.1 17.9
Clewiston NA 17 17 16.9 17.6
LaBelle NA 18.8 17.2 17.4 18.1
Glades District Average NA 16.2 16.9 17.6 17.8
Moorehaven NA 16.2 16.9 17.6 17.8
Charlotte
County
Glades
County
Hendry
County
Collier
County
Lee
County
23 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
SAT Scores
by County
Students attending public high
schools in Southwest Florida
historically have struggled on
the SAT, a college readiness exam
that measures performance in
reading, writing and math. Each
section is worth 800 points, with
a maximum score of 2400. Only
seven of 28 area schools with
reportable data topped this
years national average of 1500.
The College Board does not publicly release scores from
schools or districts with small sample sizes, and the company
cautions against comparing states or schools because some
test only their top students while others administer the test
to larger numbers.
SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION;
THE COLLEGE BOARD
AVERAGES 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Florida Average 1472 1474 1444 1473 1447
National Average 1511 1511 1509 1509 1500
Lee County 1436 1444 1432 1466 1447
Cape Coral 1342 1366 1443 1517 1520
Cypress Lake 1441 1463 1429 1461 1430
Dunbar 1309 1247 1304 1347 1269
East Lee County 1333 1334 1259 1331 1281
Estero 1393 1410 1493 1470 1483
Fort Myers 1622 1627 1629 1628 1575
Gateway Charter 1406 1363 1345 1350 1334
Ida S. Baker 1391 1362 1365 1414 1411
Island Coast NA NA 1377 1332 1332
Lehigh Senior 1347 1339 1361 1440 1398
Mariner 1384 1410 1429 1405 1371
North Fort Myers 1413 1429 1422 1479 1476
Richard Milburn Academy 1270 NA NA 1390 NA
Riverdale 1390 1404 1480 1533 1490
South Fort Myers 1374 1379 1390 1401 1380
Oasis Charter NA NA NA NA 1555
Collier County 1475 1502 1500 1489 1444
Barron Collier 1507 1540 1547 1576 1557
Gulf Coast 1489 1533 1538 1528 1492
Immokalee 1399 1384 1351 1563 1151
Lely 1432 1466 1474 1428 1345
Naples 1512 1593 1532 1549 1540
Golden Gate 1362 1393 1410 1251 1265
Palmetto Ridge 1451 1410 1429 1454 1374
Charlotte County N/A 1478 1502 1526 1514
Charlotte 1553 1490 1535 1543 1496
Lemon Bay 1444 1481 1483 1508 1521
Port Charlotte 1422 1465 1486 1523 1524
Hendry County N/A 1470 1398 1360 1375
Clewiston NA 1465 1400 1315 1304
LaBelle NA 1474 1395 1403 1459
Glades County N/A 1115 1272 N/A 1352
Moorehaven NA 1115 1272 NA 1352
Charlotte
County
Glades
County
Hendry
County
Collier
County
Lee
County
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
24
Nearly all public high schools in Southwest Florida offer Advanced Placement courses,
but some locations have larger programs than others. Students who pass end-of-course
exams receive college credit for those classes. Pass rates vary widely by school.
SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
2010 2009 2008 2007 2006
TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT.
Lee
TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED
Lee County Total 6,095 1,894 31.1% 3,582 1,314 36.7% 2,649 1,042 39.3% 2,430 1,057 43.5% 2,302 1,462 63.5%
Cape Coral 666 27 3 41% 326 135 41.4% 292 146 50% 205 81 39.5% 139 55 39.6%
Cypress Lake 289 151 52.2% 238 123 51.7% 245 125 51.8% 297 150 50.5% 392 167 42.6%
Dunbar 184 NA NA 94 5 5.5% 89 8 9% 121 13 10.7% 161 29 18%
East Lee County 316 NA NA 51 10 19.6% 3 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
Estero 264 84 31.8% 198 64 32.3% 147 37 25.2% 111 38 34.2% 156 56 35.9%
Fort Myers 734 386 52.6% 685 374 54.6% 687 365 53.1% 901 548 60.8% 859 423 49.2%
Gateway Charter 314 69 22% 121 35 28.9% 94 20 21.3% 60 15 25% 61 10 16.4%
Ida S. Baker 561 91 16.2% 429 102 23.8% 304 76 25% 178 45 25.3% 100 14 14%
Island Coast 389 85 21.9% 77 13 16.9% NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
Lehigh Senior 484 62 12.8% 165 24 14.5% 30 2 6.7% NA NA 1% NA NA NA
Mariner 529 175 33.1% 461 159 34.5% 316 107 33.9% 183 67 36.6% 210 48 22.9%
North Fort Myers 589 258 43.8% 267 119 44.6% 185 66 35.7% 203 75 36.9% 104 29 27.9%
Riverdale 402 119 29.6% 359 97 27% 206 55 26.7% 150 20 13.3% 107 7 6.5%
South Fort Myers 354 124 35% 103 54 52.4% 50 32 64% 21 5 23.8% 12 NA NA
Life Skills Center 12 NA NA 7 NA NA 1 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
North Nicholas Charter 1 NA NA 1 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA
TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT.
Collier
TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED
Collier County Total 4,689 1,978 42.2% 4,747 2,112 44.5% 3,571 1,930 54.0% 3,156 1,760 55.3% 3,352 1,877 60.0%
Barron Collier 1202 621 51.7% 1176 599 50.9% 875 542 61.9% 712 443 62.2% 937 498 53.1%
Gulf Coast 758 446 58.8% 765 450 58.8% 621 413 66.5% 680 398 58.5% 794 432 54.4%
Immokalee 308 42 13.6% 231 50 21.6% 147 26 17.7% 128 43 33.6% 145 12 8.3%
Lely 481 134 27.9% 367 111 30.2% 294 110 37.4% 337 144 42.7% 280 118 42.1%
Naples 752 377 50.1% 879 444 50.5% 643 453 70.5% 564 388 68.6% 611 320 52.4%
Golden Gate 151 72 15% 596 116 19.5% 428 101 23.6% 257 91 35.4% 263 87 33.1%
Palmetto Ridge 560 252 45% 613 313 51.1% 526 271 51.5% 472 252 53.4% 321 144 44.9%
Lorenzo Walker Institute 147 34 23.1% 120 29 24.2% 37 14 37.8% NA NA NA NA NA NA
Everglades City School NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1 NA NA
TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT.
Charlotte
TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED
Charlotte County Total 889 525 59.1% 813 496 61.0% 645 392 60.8% 593 373 62.9% 505 324 64.2%
Charlotte 272 204 75% 292 200 68.5% 245 153 62.4% 277 183 66.1% 182 136 74.7%
Lemon Bay 236 102 43.2% 230 142 61.7% 158 95 60.1% 144 71 49.3% 133 50 37.6%
Port Charlotte 375 217 57.9% 291 154 52.9% 237 142 59.9% 172 119 65.5% 190 105 55.3%
TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT.
Hendry
TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED
Hendry County Total 466 111 23.8% 59 14 23.7% 62 11 17.7% 36 16 44.4% 47 42 89.4%
Clewiston 265 36 13.6% 48 5 10.4% 45 1 2.2% 22 2 9.1% 37 14 37.8%
LaBelle 201 75 37.3% 11 NA NA 17 10 58.8% 14 14 100% 10 NA NA
TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT.
Glades
TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED
Glades County Total 23 10 43.5% 2 NA NA 2 NA NA 2 NA NA 24 17 70.8%
Moorehaven 23 NA NA 2 NA NA 2 NA NA 2 NA NA 24 4 16.7%
TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT. TESTS TESTS PCT.
State total
TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED TAKEN PASSED PASSED
State Total 278,720 114,430 41.1% 233,851 100,356 42.9% 210,321 88,279 42.0% 186,152 83,339 44.8% 163,547 90,677 55.4%
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
25 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
2011 School
District Profiles
Southwest Florida
comprises five counties,
but location may be the
only trait they share. Lee
educates more children
than the other four
combined, and by far has
the biggest budget and
teaching force. Glades and
Hendry are rural, while
Charlotte, Lee and Collier
are a combination of
suburban and rural.
Collier
County
Hendry
County
Glades
County
Charlotte
County
Lee
County
Fort Myers
Naples
Port Charlotte
Moore Haven
LaBelle
SOURCE: FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF
EDUCATION
Charlotte Collier Glades Hendry Lee Florida
Headquarters Port Charlotte Naples Moorehaven LaBelle Fort Myers Tallahassee
Employees 2,295 5,446 278 827 8,997 327,168
Students 16,640 42,920 1,442 6,821 81,968 2,643,826
Minority students 24.5% 60.0% 58.3% 74.8% 51.2% 57.0%
Low-income students 59.5% 58.6% 55.6% 77.7% 62.3% 56.0%
Budget $272,421,226 $938,517,893 $12,163,250 $81,569,603 $1,381,457,668
Public schools 21 48 6 12 117 3,800
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
26
School Grades 2007-11
Florida grades its public schools using scores from the Florida Comprehensive
Assessment Test. Points awarded for overall performance and student improvement
in all subject areas determine if a school receives an A, B, C, D or F grade.
SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
MIDDLE SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Alva Middle B B A B A
Bonita Middle C B B B A
Caloosa Middle A A A A A
Challenger Middle B B A A A
Cypress Lake Middle A A A A A
Diplomat Middle A A A A A
Fort Myers Middle C B C C C
Gulf Middle A A A A A
Lee Middle D B C NA NA
Lehigh Acres Middle B C C C B
Lexington Middle B A A A A
Mariner Middle C B C B B
Oak Hammock Middle NA NA C C B
Dunbar Middle A A A A A
Three Oaks Middle B A A A A
Trafalgar Middle A A A A A
Varsity Lakes Middle B B A B A
HIGH SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Cape Coral High C B C A NA
Cypress Lake High A A B B NA
Dunbar High C B D A NA
East Lee County High C D D C NA
Estero High C C C B NA
Fort Myers High A B A B NA
Ida S. Baker High B B A A NA
Island Coast High NA B D B NA
Lehigh Senior High D C C B NA
Mariner High C B C B NA
North Fort Myers High C A A B NA
Riverdale High C C C B NA
South Fort Myers High C B C B NA
Sanibel School A A A A A
OTHER SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
James Stephens International NA NA NA C C
Veterans Park Academy A B A A A
Michigan International Academy D C B NA NA
North Fort Myers Academy B A A A A
Bonita Springs Charter A A A A A
Bonita Springs Prep. & Fitness NA NA NA NA A
Cape Coral Charter C B C A B
Christa Mcaulliffe Elementary A A A A A
Gateway Charter Elementary NA NA A A A
Gateway Charter Intermediate NA NA A A A
Gateway Charter (K-8) A A NA NA NA
Gateway Charter High A A B B NA
Lee Charter Academy D A A A F
Oasis Elementary A A A A A
Oasis Middle B B A A A
Oasis High NA NA A NA A
Six Mile Charter Academy D C A B B
Lee County
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Allen Park A A A A A
Alva A B B C A
Bayshore A A A A A
Bonita Springs B B C B B
Caloosa A A A A A
Cape A A A A A
Colonial C B A C B
Diplomat A A A A A
Littleton A A B C A
Edgewood B B A C C
Edison Park A A A B B
Fort Myers Beach A A A A B
Franklin Park B B B C C
G. Weaver Hipps NA NA NA A A
Gateway A A A B A
Gulf A A A A A
Hancock Creek A A A A A
Harns Marsh A A A A A
Hector Cafferata B A A A A
Heights B A A A A
J. Colin English C A A A A
Lehigh B A A A A
Manatee NA B C B B
Mirror Lakes B C B B A
Orange River C B A A B
Orangewood A A A A A
Patriot NA C A A A
Pelican A A A A A
Pine Island A A A A A
Pinewoods A A A A A
Ray V. Pottorf B B B C C
Rayma C. Page A A A A A
River Hall C B A A B
San Carlos Park A A A A B
Skyline A A A A A
Spring Creek A A A A A
Sunshine A A A B A
TanglewoodRiverside B A A A B
Three Oaks A A A A A
Tice C C B B C
Trafalgar A A A A A
Treeline NA C A C A
Tropic Isles A A A A A
Villas C B B A A
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
DISTRICT GRADE B B A A A
The state will announce 2011 high school grades later this fall. Spaces
in the graphics marked NA indicate a school did not receive a grade, was
not open in that particular year or was not yet available.
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
For over 10 years Southwest Florida Parent & child magazine
has been the primary resource parents in Lee, Collier and
Charlotte counties rely on for tips and expert parenting advice
from local professionals and writers. Pick up a free copy every
month at all CVS stores, public libraries, daycare & preschools,
parks and recreation centers, and many other locations.
Moms connect online at
gulfcoast.momslikeme.com
Dont miss the
SWFLBaby Shower &Toddler Expo
Saturday, October 22 Germain Arena from10 am- 3 pm
27 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
28
School Grades 2007-11
Collier
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
DISTRICT GRADE B B A A B
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Avalon Elementary B B C C C
Big Cypress Elementary A B A A A
Calusa Park Elementary A A A A B
Corkscrew Elementary A A A A B
Eden Park Elementary NA NA F D C
Estates Elementary B B A A B
Golden Gate Elementary C C C C D
Golden Terrace Elementary C A B C D
Highlands Elementary B B C C C
Lake Park Elementary A A A A B
Lake Trafford Elementary C D A C D
Laurel Oak Elementary A A A A A
Lely Elementary C B A A C
Manatee Elementary (Naples) C A B B C
Mike Davis Elementary NA NA B C A
Naples Park Elementary A A B A A
Osceola Elementary A A A A B
Palmetto Elementary NA NA A A B
Parkside Elementary NA C C D D
Pelican Marsh Elementary A A A A A
Pinecrest Elementary F C C C D
Poinciana Elementary A A A A B
Sabal Palm Elementary A C A B C
Sea Gate Elementary A A A A A
Shadowlawn Elementary C C B C B
Tommie Barfield Elementary A A A A A
Veterans Memorial Elementary NA B A B A
Village Oaks Elementary C C C C C
Vineyards Elementary A A A B A
MIDDLE SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Corkscrew Middle A A A A A
Cypress Palm Middle NA A A B B
East Naples Middle A A A A A
Golden Gate Middle B B C B B
Gulfview Middle A A A A A
Immokalee Middle D D C C B
Manatee Middle C C C C B
Marco Island Charter Middle A A A A A
North Naples Middle A A A A A
Oakridge Middle A A A A A
Pine Ridge Middle A A A A A
HIGH SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Barron Collier High B A A A NA
Golden Gate High D F C C NA
Gulf Coast High B A A B NA
Immokalee High F F D C NA
Lely High D D C C NA
Lorenzo Walker Technical High C D D D NA
Naples High C A C B NA
Palmetto Ridge High C B C B NA
OTHER SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Everglades City School C C C B NA
Golden Gate Intermediate North NA NA NA NA C
Golden Gate Intermediate South NA NA NA NA C
Immokalee Community School C F C F C
Charlotte
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
DISTRICT GRADE A A A A A
MIDDLE SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
L.A. Ainger Middle A A A A A
Murdock Middle A A A A A
Port Charlotte Middle A A A A B
Punta Gorda Middle A A A A A
HIGH SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Charlotte High C B D A NA
Edison Collegiate High NA NA NA A A
Lemon Bay High A B B A NA
Port Charlotte High C A A B NA
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Deep Creek Elementary A A A B A
East Elementary A B B B A
Kingsway Elementary A A A B A
Liberty Elementary A A A A A
Meadow Park Elementary A A A B A
Myakka River Elementary A A A A B
Neil Armstrong Elementary A A A A B
Peace River Elementary A A B B A
Sallie Jones Elementary B A A A A
Vineland Elementary A A A A A
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
29 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
School Grades 2007-11
Glades
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
DISTRICT GRADE C B B C A
SCHOOL 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Moore Haven Elementary C C A B A
Moore Haven Junior/Senior High D D C C NA
SCHOOL 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
P. Emahakv Charter Elementary NA A B B B
P. Emahakv Charter Middle NA NA NA NA C
West Glades School C A B A A
Hendry
2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
DISTRICT GRADE C B C C C
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Central Elementary C C C B B
Country Oaks Elementary B A A A A
Eastside Elementary A B A B B
Edward A. Upthegrove Elementary A A A B A
LaBelle Elementary A A A B B
Westside Elementary A B C B C
MIDDLE SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Clewiston Middle C C C C C
LaBelle Middle C B B C C
HIGH SCHOOLS 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Clewiston High D C F D
LaBelle High D C D B
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
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Powering Education
30
The Florida Department of Education measures public
schools and school districts using a point system based
upon student performance and improvement on the
Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test. Districts
need 525 points to earn an A rating. Lee, Charlotte
and Glades counties landed A grades in 2011, Collier
had a B and Hendry received a C.
Florida
District Rankings
500-
525
Pts.
525-
550
Pts.
550-
600
Pts.
400-
500
Pts.
SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Jackson
Calhoun
Franklin
Gadsden
Gulf
Leon
Wakulla
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Miami-Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa
Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Liberty
Orange
Osceola
Nassau
Palm Beach
Indian River
RANK DISTRICT POINTS RANK DISTRICT POINTS RANK DISTRICT POINTS RANK DISTRICT POINTS
25 Alachua 532
51 Baker 499
26 Bay 531
58 Bradford 487
8 Brevard 566
27 Broward 531
18 Calhoun 544
21 Charlotte 538
14 Citrus 550
13 Clay 554
33 Collier 521
48 Columbia 508
37 Dade 519
64 Desoto 469
12 Dixie 557
50 Duval 503
44 Escambia 510
29 Flagler 530
60 Franklin 485
62 Gadsden 474
5 Gilchrist 573
20 Glades 539
23 Gulf 534
65 Hamilton 452
61 Hardee 485
63 Hendry 470
38 Hernando 517
52 Highlands 498
39 Hillsborough 517
42 Holmes 512
30 Indian River 529
31 Jackson 522
66 Jefferson 441
32 Lafayette 522
45 Lake 510
22 Lee 537
24 Leon 533
41 Levy 515
28 Liberty 531
67 Madison 411
47 Manatee 509
46 Marion 510
3 Martin 575
9 Monroe 566
15 Nassau 550
6 Okaloosa 572
54 Okeechobee 494
34 Orange 520
40 Osceola 517
16 Palm Beach 548
35 Pasco 520
49 Pinellas 504
59 Polk 486
56 Putnam 491
2 Santa Rosa 576
4 Sarasota 574
7 Seminole 569
1 St. Johns 594
43 St. Lucie 512
10 Sumter 559
55 Suwannee 492
57 Taylor 488
19 Union 540
36 Volusia 520
11 Wakulla 558
17 Walton 546
53 Washington 496
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
31 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
Jackson
Calhoun
Franklin
Gadsden
Gulf
Leon
Wakulla
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Miami-Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa
Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Liberty
Orange
Osceola
Nassau
Florida average
DISTRICT GRADUATION RATE DISTRICT GRADUATION RATE DISTRICT GRADUATION RATE DISTRICT GRADUATION RATE
SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Florida defines its high school graduation rate as the
percentage of students who graduated from a Florida public
school within four years of their initial enrollment as ninth-
graders. Locally, Lee, Collier, Charlotte and Hendry counties
exceeded the state average in 2009-10, while Glades had
the fifth worst rate among Floridas 67 districts.
Students who move out of state do not count against graduation rates, while students who transfer into
Florida schools are included in the data. Floridas graduation rate includes students who earn regular
diplomas, special diplomas and GEDs.
2009-10
Graduation Rates
Palm Beach
Indian River
Alachua 76.4%
Baker 75.9%
Bay 81.1%
Bradford 63.6%
Brevard 95.3%
Broward 77.7%
Calhoun 88.2%
Charlotte 79.3%
Citrus 82.9%
Clay 78.4%
Collier 79.4%
Columbia 87%
Dade 72.1%
DeSoto 61%
Dixie 66.4%
Duval 66.6%
Escambia 77.9%
Flagler 83.5%
Franklin 78.7%
Gadsden 58.1%
Gilchrist 92.1%
Glades 63.6%
Gulf 95.5%
Hamilton 63.0%
Hardee 75.1%
Hendry 81.4%
Hernando 79.0%
Highlands 73.4%
Hillsborough 82.3%
Holmes 80.6%
Indian River 82.1%
Jackson 81.5%
Jefferson 50.8%
Lafayette 88.3%
Lake 80.8%
Lee 80.3%
Leon 77.6%
Levy 70.7%
Liberty 75.3%
Madison 65.0%
Manatee 76.4%
Marion 77.8%
Martin 89.8%
Monroe 85.4%
Nassau 89.5%
Okaloosa 89%
Okeechobee 64.9%
Orange 79%
Osceola 83.3%
Palm Beach 81.9%
Pasco 81.9%
Pinellas 77.7%
Polk 73.2%
Putnam 74.6%
St. Johns 92.1%
St. Lucie 79.1%
Santa Rosa 88.3%
Sarasota 84.3%
Seminole 93.8%
Sumter 86.9%
Suwannee 62.7%
Taylor 73.7%
Union 76.4%
Volusia 81.2%
Wakulla 82.7%
Walton 83.2%
Washington 84.4%
Florida 79%
50-60% 60-70% 70-80% 80-90% 90-100%
79%
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
32
Jackson
Calhoun
Franklin
Gadsden
Gulf
Leon
Wakulla
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Miami-Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa
Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Liberty
Orange
Osceola
Nassau
Florida average
DISTRICT DROPOUT RATE DISTRICT DROPOUT RATE DISTRICT DROPOUT RATE DISTRICT DROPOUT RATE
In Florida, a dropout is a student who withdraws
from any school during the academic year without
transferring to another school, home education
program or adult education program. Lee and
Glades counties had the lowest rates last year among
Southwest Florida districts.
2009-10
Dropout Rates
Palm Beach
Indian River
Alachua 2.2%
Baker 3.8%
Bay 1.4%
Bradford 5.1%
Brevard 0.5%
Broward 1.6%
Calhoun 2.2%
Charlotte 3.1%
Citrus 1.2%
Clay 1.3%
Collier 2.0%
Columbia 0.6%
Dade 4.0%
DeSoto 5.2%
Dixie 4.2%
Duval 2.2%
Escambia 1.6%
Flagler 1.8%
Franklin 0.3%
Gadsden 1.6%
Gilchrist 0.2%
Glades 1.4%
Gulf 0.3%
Hamilton 4.4%
Hardee 3.3%
Hendry 3.5%
Hernando 2.6%
Highlands 3.2%
Hillsborough 0.7%
Holmes 2.2%
Indian River 1.7%
Jackson 1.8%
Jefferson 7.8%
Lafayette 0.3%
Lake 3.0%
Lee 1.3%
Leon 0.8%
Levy 5.5%
Liberty 1.8%
Madison 3.1%
Manatee 4.3%
Marion 0.5%
Martin 0.6%
Monroe 1.1%
Nassau 1.3%
Okaloosa 0.4%
Okeechobee 4.6%
Orange 0.7%
Osceola 1.4%
Palm Beach 2.8%
Pasco 1.1%
Pinellas 2.4%
Polk 4.1%
Putnam 3.9%
St. Johns 0.9%
St. Lucie 2.3%
Santa Rosa 0.9%
Sarasota 2.0%
Seminole 0.4%
Sumter 2.0%
Suwannee 2.7%
Taylor 3.5%
Union 1.5%
Volusia 1.1%
Wakulla 3.4%
Walton 1.3%
Washington 1.6%
Florida 2.0%
0-1% 1-2% 2-3% 3-4% 4-5% 5-10%
SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
2%
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
33 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
A look at the winners and finalists for the Broad Foundation Prize for Urban
Education, which awards hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarship money
to students in winning districts. The award honors the large school districts that
demonstrate the greatest overall performance and improvement in student
achievement while reducing achievement gaps among poor and minority students.
Broad Foundation
2008 Broad Prize winner
Brownsville Independent School District, Texas,
outperformed other Texas districts serving
students with similar income
levels in reading and math at all grade levels.
Finalists
Aldine Independent School District, Texas
Long Beach Unified School District, Calif.
Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Broward County Public Schools
2009 Broad Prize winner
Aldine Independent School District, Texas
articulated a set of specific, measurable goals,
complete with performance targets, one-year and
three- to five-year milestones.
Finalists
Broward County Public Schools
Gwinnett County Public Schools, Ga.
Long Beach Unified School District, Calif.
Socorro Independent School District, Texas
2010 Broad Prize winner
Gwinnett County Public Schools, Georgia for
frequently assessing students learning, providing
students with opportunities to collaborate, teaching
essential content-related vocabulary, and using
technology to plan, teach and assess.
Finalists
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, N.C.
Montgomery County Public Schools, Md.
Socorro Independent School District, Texas
Ysleta Independent School District, Texas
AL
AK
AZ
AR
CA
CO
CT
DE
DC
FL
GA
HI
ID
IL
IN
IA
KS
KY
LA
ME
MD
MA
MI
MN
MS
MO
MT
NE
NV
NH
VT
RI
NJ
NM
NY
NC
ND
OH
OK
OR
PA
SC
SD
TN
TX
UT
VA
WA
WV
WS
WY
2007 Broad Prize winner
New York City Department of Education
increased the percentage of minority students
at the most advanced level of proficiency in
elementary school math
Finalists
Bridgeport Public Schools, Conn.
Long Beach Unified School District, Calif.
Miami-Dade County Public Schools
Northside Independent School District, Texas
2011 Broad Prize winner
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools, N.C.
25 schools have undergone strategic staffing, in
which a proven principal is allowed to bring in a
top team to underperforming schools.
Finalists
Ysleta Independent School District, Texas
Miami-Dade County School District
Broward County School District
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
Monday, May 21, 2012
JetBlue Park
Top High School Athletes Celebration honoring all the All-Area Stars chosen by The News-Press
for 2011-2012 based on their athletic accomplishments in each varsity sport.
One top male and female athlete will be announced based on recommendations, academics, community
engagement, and overall achievements, and the top School Spirit Award will be presented.
For more event and athlete information visit
news-press.com/allarea
34
35 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
Jackson
Calhoun
Franklin
Gadsden
Gulf
Leon
Wakulla
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Miami-Dade
De Soto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Gilchrist
Glades
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Levy
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa
Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Walton
Washington
Liberty
Orange
Osceola
Nassau
Florida average
PLAN TO
PURSUE
TOTAL HIGHER
DISTRICT GRADS EDUCATION
PLAN TO
PURSUE
TOTAL HIGHER
DISTRICT GRADS EDUCATION
PLAN TO
PURSUE
TOTAL HIGHER
DISTRICT GRADS EDUCATION
PLAN TO
PURSUE
TOTAL HIGHER
DISTRICT GRADS EDUCATION
Florida high schools survey seniors each spring
about their post-graduation plans. Almost 75 percent
of Southwest Florida graduates in 2010 planned to
continue their education at a technical school,
college, university or with the military. That mark is
slightly higher than the state average of 72 percent.
Plans for
Higher Education
SOURCE: FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Palm Beach
Indian River
Alachua 1,898 80.0%
Baker 294 73.1%
Bay 1,614 83.5%
Bradford N/A N/A
Brevard 5,188 83.1%
Broward 17,043 78.6%
Calhoun 127 89.8%
Charlotte 1,406 76.0%
Citrus 1,126 66.3%
Clay 2,847 63.6%
Collier 2,752 80.5%
Columbia 603 83.1%
Dade 21,746 76.7%
DeSoto 241 73.0%
Dixie 112 65.2%
Duval 6,892 67.6%
Escambia 2,302 50.0%
Flagler 828 84.7%
Franklin 59 94.9%
Gadsden 289 72.0%
Gilchrist 168 83.9%
Glades 49 93.9%
Gulf 152 88.8%
Hamilton 105 51.4%
Hardee 272 83.1%
Hendry 463 77.1%
Hernando 1,549 80.1%
Highlands 736 49.9%
Hillsborough 11,284 75.9%
Holmes 198 89.4%
Indian River 1,200 77.3%
Jackson 512 49.8%
Jefferson 39 92.3%
Lafayette 73 63.0%
Lake 2,716 31.2%
Lee 4,879 71.2%
Leon 1,880 67.1%
Levy 325 83.7%
Liberty 87 86.2%
Madison 184 78.3%
Manatee 2,595 70.4%
Marion 2,510 38.6%
Martin 1,312 80.4%
Monroe 538 82.7%
Nassau 756 86.8%
Okaloosa 2,185 52.7%
Okeechobee 367 81.5%
Orange 9,865 57.1%
Osceola 3,725 68.3%
Palm Beach 12,103 63.8%
Pasco 4,063 72.9%
Pinellas 6,811 70.3%
Polk 5,333 81.3%
Putnam 630 62.5%
St. Johns 2,005 73.7%
St. Lucie 2,365 71.7%
Santa Rosa 1,855 84.9%
Sarasota 2,845 70.1%
Seminole 4,658 89.7%
Sumter 440 87.7%
Suwannee 325 90.5%
Taylor 143 83.9%
Union 122 84.4%
Volusia 3,989 84.2%
Wakulla 263 86.7%
Walton 425 84.9%
Washington 235 69.8%
Florida 167,142 72.2%
50-60% 60-70% 70-80% 80-90% 90-100% 0-50%
Total graduates
167,142
Plan to pursue
higher education
72.2%
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
36
The Colleges of
Southwest
Florida
Eleven accredited colleges
and universities operate in
Southwest Florida,
educating more than
38,000 people. Nine are
private schools and two are
public, and combined the
institutions offer 286
degree programs.
SOURCE: THE NEWS-PRESS RESEARCH
Collier
County
Hendry
County
Glades
County
Charlotte
County
Lee
County
Fort Myers
Naples
Port Charlotte
LaBelle
DEGREES OFFERED
INSTITUTION LOCATION(S) TYPE WEB SITE
Ave Maria School of Law North Naples Private avemarialaw.edu 1
Ave Maria University Ave Maria Private avemaria.edu 12 2 1
Barry University Fort Myers Private barry.edu 5 4 1
Edison State College Fort Myers, Naples, Port Charlotte and LaBelle Public edison.edu 20 10
Florida Gulf Coast University San Carlos Park Public fgcu.edu 52 31 1 2
Hodges University Fort Myers and Naples Private hodges.edu 12 11 9
ITT Technical Institute Fort Myers Private itt-tech.edu 12 5
Keiser University Fort Myers Private keiseruniversity.edu 11 8 3
Nova Southeastern University Fort Myers Private nova.edu 1 6 11 1 1
Rasmussen College Fort Myers Private rasmussen.edu 15 13
Southwest Florida College Fort Myers, Estero and Port Charlotte Private swfc.edu 15 10
A
S
S
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C
I
A
T
E
B
A
C
H
E
L
O
R
M
A
S
T
E
R
S
P
E
C
I
A
L
I
S
T
D
O
C
T
O
R
A
T
E
J
U
R
I
S

D
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T
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1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
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11
3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 & 11
4 & 6
4 & 11
2
4
1
North Naples
Estero
San Carlos
Park 5
11
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
37 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
Southwest Floridas 10 colleges and universities offer a combined 264
majors, but schools have latched onto criminal justice, education,
management and health care programs. Their popularity ties directly into
workforce needs as demand for law enforcement officers, teachers, business
leaders and medical personnel remains strong.
Here are the 10 most common majors across all levels associate, bachelor,
master and above offered at local institutions.
Popular Degrees
SOURCE: THE NEWS-PRESS RESEARCH
Business management
Computer design/drafting
Computer information systems
Criminal justice
Education (administration)
Education (teaching)
Health care management
Paralegal studies
Public administration
Nursing
38
Vocational and
Technical
Education
School districts in
Southwest Florida provide
workforce and vocational
training to teenagers and
adults, offering courses in
cosmetology, engine
repair, computer
programming, culinary
arts, drafting and other
fields. In addition,
numerous independent
schools and centers
provide short-term
programs in technical and
vocational areas.
Collier
County
Hendry
County
Glades
County Charlotte
County
Lee
County
Fort Myers
Naples
Port Charlotte
LaBelle
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
INSTITUTION LOCATION PROGRAMS WEB SITE TELEPHONE
Charlotte County Charlotte Technical Center Port Charlotte 25 ctcdevelopersite.com 941-255-7500
Collier County Immokalee Technical Center Immokalee 16 itech.edu 239-658-7500
Lorenzo Walker Institute of Technology Naples 28 lwit.edu 239-377-0900
Glades County Adult Education Program Moore Haven 1 glades-schools.org 863-946-0202
Hendry County Clewiston Adult School Clewiston 5 hendry-schools.org 863-983-1511
LaBelle Adult School LaBelle 5 hendry-schools.org 863-674-4118
Lee County High Tech Central Fort Myers 33 voc.leeschools.net 239-334-4544
High Tech North Cape Coral 21 nvt.leeschools.net 239-574-4440
1
2
3
4
Moore
Haven
6
7
Cape
Coral
8
5
Immokalee
Clewiston
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
39 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
Skin care specialists 37.9%
Dental hygienists 36.1%
Veterinary technicians 35.8%
Physical therapist assistants 33.3%
Environmental engineering technicians 30.1%
Education Pays
SOURCE: BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS
Physicians assistants 39%
Industrial organizational psychologists 33.6%
Physical therapists 30.3%
Anthropologists and archeologists 28.1%
Environmental scientists and specialists 27.9%
Top growth jobs by 2018
by education level and percent growth since 2008
* Except epidemiologists
** Research
Post-secondary education
or training below a bachelors degree
Bachelors degree
Biomedical engineers 72%
Network and data analysts 53.4%
Financial examiners 41.2%
Athletic trainers 37%
Computer applications engineers 34%
Masters degree
Doctoral degree
Medical scientists* 40.4%
Biochemists and biophysicists 37.4%
Computer and information scientists** 24.2%
Mathematicians 22.5%
Biological scientists, all other 18.8%
Doctoral degree
Professional degree
Masters degree
Bachelors degree
Associate degree
Some college, no degree
High school diploma
Less than a high
school diploma
Unemployment rate in 2010 Median weekly earnings in 2010
Average: 8.2%
Average: $782
1.9%
2.4%
4.0%
5.4%
7.0%
9.2%
10.3%
14.9%
$1,550
$1,610
$1,272
$1,038
$767
$712
$626
$444
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ EDUCATION ]
40
Employment by
Job Sector
Some of Southwest Floridas historic powerhouse industries
have suffered the most from job losses from the recession,
including construction, financial activities and retail trade.
Education and health service jobs have been steadily growing.
Figures below represent thousands of jobs
2006 2010 PERCENT 2006 2010 PERCENT 2006 2010 PERCENT
AVERAGE AVERAGE CHANGE AVERAGE AVERAGE CHANGE AVERAGE AVERAGE CHANGE
Total nonagricultural employment 44.4 40.7 -8.3% 132.6 109.6 -17.3% 231.8 195.7 -15.6%
Total private 38.2 34.3 -10.2% 119.2 96.1 -19.4% 198.4 159.4 -19.7%
Goods producing 6.9 3.0 -56.5% 27.2 11.4 -58.1% 45.5 20.3 -55.4%
Natural resources, mining, and construction 6 2.5 -58.3% 23.9 9.0 -62.3% 37.9 16.0 -57.8%
Manufacturing 1 0.5 -50.0% 3.3 2.4 -27.3% 7.6 4.2 -44.7%
Private service providing 31.3 31.4 0.3% 92 84.7 -7.9% 152.9 139.2 -9.0%
Trade, transportation, and utilities 9.8 9.2 -6.1% 24.5 21.2 -13.5% 47.9 41.4 -13.6%
Wholesale trade 0.7 0.6 -14.3% 3.2 3.0 -6.3% 7.2 5.7 -20.8%
Retail trade 8.9 8.1 -9.0% 19.5 16.7 -14.4% 36.8 32.3 -12.2%
Transportation, warehousing, and utilities 0.3 0.5 66.7% 1.7 1.5 -11.8% 3.8 3.4 -10.5%
Information 0.6 0.4 -33.3% 1.9 1.6 -15.8% 4 2.8 -30.0%
Financial activities 2.6 1.8 -30.8% 8.2 6.6 -19.5% 14 10.9 -22.1%
Professional and business services 3.6 3.6 0.0% 13.6 11.9 -12.5% 28.1 24.0 -14.6%
Education and health services 7.7 8.6 11.7% 15.9 17.0 6.9% 21.1 23.1 9.5%
Leisure and hospitality 5 5.9 18.0% 22.2 20.9 -5.9% 28.4 28.7 1.1%
Other services 1.9 1.9 0.0% 5.8 5.6 -3.4% 9.4 8.3 -11.7%
Total government 6.2 6.4 3.2% 13.4 13.5 0.7% 33.5 36.3 8.4%
Federal 0.3 0.5 66.7% 0.7 0.8 14.3% 2.3 2.8 21.7%
State 0.9 1.1 22.2% 0.9 0.9 0.0% 4.3 4.1 -4.7%
Local 5 4.9 -2.0% 11.8 11.8 0.0% 26.8 29.5 10.1%
Charlotte County Collier County Lee County
SOURCE: AGENCY FOR WORKFORCE INNOVATION
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ ECONOMY ]
Together wemeanbusiness.
Our People Mean Business
People may come here for the weather, but they stay here for life. They work hard so
they can enjoy our beautiful location. They guide the growth of our schools, the evolution
of our infrastructure and the excellence of our arts. From the young creative class and
experienced technicians to savvy veterans who share priceless nancial and intellectual
capital, our people have made Lee County one of the best climates for recruiting and
attracting a skilled workforce which makes the perfect place for business to locate
and expand. To nd out more, visit Together4Business com or call 239.338.3161.
Zhe Teresa Wang
Algenol Biofuels, Inc.
Naples Fort Myers Sarasota Tampa Kissimmee
www.manhattankraft.com
Florida Gulf Coast University
Solar PV Installation
Florida Gulf Coast University
Academic Building 7
Veterans Administration Ambulatory/
Outpatient Surgical Center
Boston Red Sox Spring Training Facility
Poinciana Boulevard Widening Seminole Casino Immokalee
Building with Excellence
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41 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
42
Jobless Rates in Southwest Florida
2006-11 annual averages
Inland counties Coastal counties
SOURCE: FLORIDA AGENCY FOR WORKFORCE INNOVATION
CHARLOTTE 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Labor Force 68,723 69,345 69,366 69,032 69,969 68,954
Unemployment 2,253 3,410 5,524 7,953 8,684 7,726
COLLIER 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Labor Force 150,694 150,820 148,102 143,773 144,557 141,816
Unemployment 4,593 6,371 10,043 15,503 17,293 15,475
LEE 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Labor Force 283,837 288,723 285,405 279,485 277,533 273,424
Unemployment 8,098 13,057 22,725 33,356 35,491 31,451
GLADES 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Labor Force 4,635 4,753 4,666 4,860 5,475 5,769
Unemployment 175 217 314 437 524 509
HENDRY 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Labor Force 17,478 17,848 17,499 17,229 17,406 17,565
Unemployment 1,080 1,279 1,852 2,388 2,711 2,613
FLORIDA 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Labor Force 8,880,000 9,069,000 9,193,000 9,139,000 9,224,000 9,243,000
Unemployment 296,000 365,000 572,000 930,000 1,065,000 1,016,625
UNITED STATES 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Labor Force 151,428,000 153,124,000 154,287,000 154,142,000 153,889,000 153,399,375
Unemployment 7,001,000 7,078,000 8,924,000 14,265,000 14,825,000 13,840,500
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Charlotte
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Lee
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2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011* 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011*
Glades
Hendry
Florida
United States
* 2011 figures reflect an average of January - August * 2011 figures reflect an average of January - August
* 2011 figures reflect an average of January-August
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ ECONOMY ]
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Construction Management | GeneraI Contracting | Design-BuiId Construction Management | GeneraI Contracting | Design-BuiId
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Global leader
in renewable energy
creating high tech
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Visit us at www.Algenol.com
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Taxable Sales Data
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
2011 2010
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
Charlotte
Collier
Lee
Glades
Hendry
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JULY AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
2011 2010
00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
Coastal counties
Inland counties
2000-10 MONTHLY AVERAGES MOST RECENT 12 MONTHS
2000-10 MONTHLY AVERAGES MOST RECENT 12 MONTHS
Charlotte
Collier
Lee
Glades
Hendry
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$2
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$1.9
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$21.4
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MILLION
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The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[ ECONOMY ]
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48
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Bachelors, Masters, Specialists and Doctoral
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49 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
50
The News-Press Market Watch / EDUCATION SUMMIT
[
T
H
A
N
K

Y
O
U
]
>> SPONSORS
Platinum sponsors:
> Edison State College
> Florida Gulf Coast University
Gold sponsors
> Hodges University
> Nova Southeastern University
Silver sponsors
> BB&T
> GATES Construction
> Lee Memorial Health System
> Manhattan Kraft Construction
Company
Bronze table sponsors
> Algenol Biofuels, Inc.
> Arthrex Inc.
> Ave Maria University
> Chicos FAS, Inc.
> Florida Power and Light Company
> Gulf Citrus Growers Association
> Keiser University
> Marine Concepts/JRL Ventures Inc.
> Owen-Ames-Kimball Company
> Pavese Law Firm
> Shaw Development
> Southwest Florida College
> STEM team of SWFL
>> PARTNERS
> Marshall Bower and Janelle Beaber
The Foundation for Lee County
Public Schools, Inc.
> Susan McManus
The Education Foundation of Collier County
> Pat Riley
The Alliance of Educational Leaders
> Horizon Council
> Joe Paterno
Southwest Florida Workforce
Development Board
> Jim Moore
Fort Myers Regional Partnership,
Lee Countys Economic Develop
> Jennifer Berg
Fort Myers Regional Partnership,
Lee Countys Economic Development Office
>> THE NEWS-PRESS MEDIA GROUP
Summit planners
> Mei-Mei Chan
> Terry Eberle
> Cindy McCurry-Ross
> Mark Bickel
> Marc Beaudin
> David Breitenstein
> Cindy Burgess
> Karin Cherwick-Skala
> Lissa Craig Ford
> Mike Donlan
> Tim Engstrom
> Buddy Finton
> Michelle Hudson
> Amanda Inscore
> Kathryn Kinsey
> Steve McQuilkin
> Miriam Pereira
> David Plazas
> Ric Rolon
> Jason Thompson
> Chris Umpierre
>> SPECIAL THANKS TO
> Florida Governor Rick Scott
> Randy Antik, Imagine Solutions
> Keith Arnold, J. Keith Arnold and Associates
> Richard Botthof, The Naples Trust Company
> Mary Chance, Consortium
of Florida Education Foundations
> David Dunn-Rankin, The Charlotte
Sun Herald
> Amy Graham, Deputy Communications
Director, Governor
> Dr. Gary Jackson, FGCU
> Lamar Advertising Company
> Edward A. Morton
> Susan Pareigis, Council of 100
> Mike Reagan, Naples Chamber of Commerce
> Wasmer, Schroeder & Company, Inc.
> Wayne Simons, WINK-TV
> Jen Wulf, The Charlotte Sun
51 www.news-press.com/educationsummit
52