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SLIPGRIP –

THE LOW COST ROTARY STEERABLE TOOL
“Providing rotary steerable functionality
at steerable motor prices”
Background
Market & Applications
Technology
Commercialisation
Mental Models
• Rotary steerable tool means
– Complexity
– High capital cost
– High day rate
– Specialist operators
– Not suitable for low cost applications
• Not necessarily so ….
Market needs
• Improved drilling performance
• ROP improvements
• Extension to operating envelopes
• Lateral extension
• Cost similar to steerable motors
• Low cost of ownership
• Reduced specialist crew numbers
• Minimum MWD
• GR only
RST Characterisation

Maintenance and
Service costs
Specialist operators
$ $$$ $$$$$ LIH cost
$ $$$ $$$$$ Capital cost
3-D profile
Geosteering
FEMWD
Closed loop control
SlipGrip Intermediate Premium
SlipGrip
Competitor Positioning
Price
Perceived Value
Steerable motors
Premium RST
Intermediate RST
Applications
TTRD
3 3/8” prototype
R1 BHA
Disposable BHA for
mature fields and infill
drilling
DDWC
Disposable BHA
Directional control
TBL
Through Bit Logging
SHD
e.g. US coal bed
methane
Motor Replacement
RST functionality at
motor prices
Specialist
Applications
Low Cost RST
Technical Description - SlipGrip
•Low cost rotary steerable tool
– Uses drillpipe reciprocation to cycle the tool between
“performance” and “directional drilling” operating modes.
– No electronics or hydraulics to activate the tool.
– Limit build up rate to a preset rate.
•Two operating modes
– Performance drilling – for straight hole, tangent and
horizontal drilling, and
– Directional drilling – for drilling build up sections and for
making course corrections.
Technical Description –
Dual operating mode
Locking
piston
Outer sleeve
Inner sleeve
Torque
transmission
Drill string
connection
Locking piston
return spring
The tool is cycled between directional drilling and performance
drilling mode by a combination of reciprocation and pressure
drop. The locking piston acts to couple the inner and outer sleeve
for performance drilling and decouple the two sleeves for
directional drilling.
As the tool cycles from performance drilling to directional drilling
mode the three concentric stabiliser blades are forced out to
engage with the borehole wall. These blades act to prevent the
outer sleeve from rotating during directional drilling operations.
At the same time as the stabiliser blades are being manipulated
the rotation of the inner sleeve creates a bit offset in a point the
bit fashion.
Technical Description –
Directional drilling operations
-
Inner sleeve
Concentric stabiliser Outer sleeve Pre
-
load springs
Technical Risks
• The product benefits from simplicity
• Principle technical risk
– Slippage during directional drilling
– Washouts, collapse
• Mitigation
– Pad design and length,
– Anti rotation device
– Weighted bias
– Operations procedures
• Possible limitation due to geology but needs to be
tested.
Path to Market
• Phase 1 Complete
– Proof of concept complete through SMART award
• Phase 2
– Investment in commercial prototype and field
trial
• Phase 3
– Commercialisation
– Sales to third parties
– Revenue from initial sale, annual royalty and
service agreements
– Target markets
• USA
• North Sea
Phase 2 Field Trial Project Plan
• Tool design
– 3 3/8”, 4 ¾” or 6 ½” field trial prototypes
• Bench test
• Secure field trial participation
• Manufacturing
• Field test
• Contingency & retest
DEA Proposal Summary
• Development of a field ready 3 1/8” rotary steerable tool for
TTRD applications
• Reservoir access using high build up rate RST
– High BUR 35
0
/100ft
– Simple mechanical operation by pipe reciprocation
– Low capital cost
Proposer (s)
Duration Total cost Funding sought
15 months £540 k £190 k