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NOVEMBER 2014

$3.00

Woods-N-Water News
Michigan’s Premier Outdoor Publication

HUNT
THE

RUT

HUNT CORN
T
H
E

Little Bay de Noc

BIG WALLEYES
• Field-Expedient Rifle Scope Sighting • U.P. Smallmouth Fisheries Under-Utilitzed
• ORV Club Hosts Senior Color Tour • Spey Casting • Youth Hunt Success • Pluggin’ Away
• November On The Big Water • Mark Martin Selected To Hall Of Fame

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

SALES: 810-653-0490

3

Field Notes...Tom Campbell

Great adventures and reminders

T

wenty-something years, (I guess it's closer to 30
years) at this job and it's still amazing to see what
Michigan's fall generates in the outdoors...spectacular adventures, big bucks, huge fish, gorgeous birds
creating wonderful memories and stories. And I never
grow tried of hearing, reading and/or seeing them.
Here's a fine sample of what you'll find in this issue;
Larry Ross's unique piebald turkey and young, veteran
hunter, Mark Fischer.
There's plenty of items hunters need to be aware of
before heading afield:
Deer Check Stations
I preach this every year, you can be a part of deer
management by taking your deer to a checkstation,
along with information about where and when the deer
was taken. This important information is used to make
future management decisions and monitor the health
of the herd. For a list of deer checkstation locations
and hours go to
www.michigan.gov/deer.
Michigan Sportsmen Against Hunger Program
Remember, the Michigan Sportsmen Against
Hunger (MSAH) program is a great way for hunters to
share a part of their harvest this fall, or donate a whole
deer. A network of processors and charities has been
organized to help channel wild game donations into
the hands of those in need. Check out their website at

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

SEASONS

4

Now - Oct. 19 - Independence Hunt (deer)
Now - Oct. 31 - Zone 1 pheasant season
Oct. 20 - Nov. 14 - Zone 2 & 3 pheasant season
Now-Oct. 31 - Sharp-tailed grouse
Now-Nov. 3 - Woodcock season statewide
Now - Nov. 14 - Ruffed Grouse hunting
Now-Nov. 14 - Turkey season by special permit
Now-Nov. 14 - Archery deer season statewide
Nov. 15 - 30 - Regular firearm deer season
Now-Nov. 23 - North Zone: ducks, mergansers, coots
season
Now-Nov. 30 - Great Lakes and Connecting Waters all
inland waters (except Otsego Lake, Otsego Co. and
Black Lake, Cheboygan Co.;) Note special possession
rules and seasons
Now-Nov. 30 - Middle Zone: ducks, mergansers, coots
season
Now-Dec. 7 - South Zone: regular goose season
(Exclude GMUs)
Now-Dec. 7 - South Zone: ducks, mergansers, coots
season
Now-Dec. 11 - North Zone regular goose season
(Canada, snow blue and Ross)
Now-Dec. 25 - Middle Zone regular goose season
(Canada, snow blue and Ross)
Now – Mar. 1 - Squirrel season statewide
Now - Mar. 31 - Rabbit season
Dec. 1 - Jan. 1 - Archery deer season
Dec. 1 - Jan. 1 - Ruffed Grouse hunting
Dec. 1 - Jan. 1 - Zone 3 (parts) pheasant season
Dec. 5-Dec. 14 - Zones 1 & 2 muzzleloading deer season
Dec. 5-Dec. 21 - Zone 3 muzzleloading deer season
Dec. 13-Dec. 14 - Middle Zone: ducks, mergansers,
coots season
Dec. 22-Jan. 1 - Late antlerless deer season
Dec. 27-Dec. 28 - South Zone: ducks, mergansers,
coots and goose season
Jan. 17-Feb. 14 - South Zone: late goose season
MJC
ARCHERY
MACOMB

MJC
ARCHERY
OAKLAND

19744 15 Mile Rd
Clinton Twp. 48035

3001 Rochester Rd
Royal Oak, MI 48073

586-791-4600

248-589-2480

www.sportsmenagainsthunger.org.
New Laws
Note the 'shotgun' zone is now the 'Limited Firearm Deer Zone' with new weapon rules, checkout the
Hunting Digest for more information. Also Muzzleloader season now starts on Dec. 5 statewide this year.
Zones 1 and 2 end on Dec. 14, Zone 3 ends on Dec.
21.
Good luck, put safety first and be sure to share you
adventure with us; email wnw@pageone-inc.comn

BEAUTIFUL
BIRD!

This rare
jake piebald
with a 5 inch
beard was
taken by
Larry Ross
Jr. on
October 4 in
Lapeer Co.
with a
crossbow!

What a year
for 11-year old
Mark Fischer!
It started for the young
hunter from Traverse City
in March where David won a
cow elk hunt from Jack Pine
Safari in Lewiston at the NE
Michigan Safari Club Banquet held at Grand Traverse
Resort & Spa.
On May 10, he coaxed two
jakes from 200 yards away
and harvested one in his second year of turkey hunting.
During David's Sept. 14 cow
hunt after excitingly spotting
a big bull elk, the owner of
the ranch upgraded his tag to
a bull and the next morning
David tagged this monster
with a 100 yard shot.
He took his third buck in
three years of hunting during
the Sept. youth hunt, thanks
to his older sister passing
on the shot. David hunts with
his older sibling twins; sister
Paige and brother Jack, part
of a family that loves hunting
and the outdoors! And David
has a lot more seasons left.

Four conservation officers honored for lifesaving efforts
(lt to rt) DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler; DNR Director Keith Creagh; Officer Brian Lebel; Officer Mike Wells; Officer Jeff Ginn; Sgt. Mike
Bomay; Natural Resources Commission Chair J.R. Richardson; Lt. David Shaw; and Dean Molnar, assistant chief of the DNR Law Enforcement Division.

The Department of Natural Resources’ Law Enforcement Division recently honored four Department of
Natural Resources conservation officers who worked as
part of a search and rescue operation and who ultimately
found a missing 2 1/2-year-old child in the woods in Newaygo County last year. The officers were honored at last
week’s meeting of the Natural Resources Commission in
Cadillac, Michigan.
Sgt. Mike Bomay and conservation officers Jeff
Ginn, Brian Lebel and Mike Wells were presented with
Lifesaving Awards by DNR Director Keith Creagh and
DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler
for their role in locating Amber Smith, a toddler who
disappeared Oct. 8, 2013, from her Barton Township
home.
“Our officers go through extensive training to locate
lost persons in the woods and they are experts in the
areas where they work, knowing the terrain better than
anyone,” said Hagler. “I would like to congratulate all of
the officers involved for their diligence on this search.
Some had already worked a full shift when they were
requested to help and did not hesitate to assist.”
The DNR conservation officers responded to a re-

quest from the Newaygo County Sheriff’s Department to
assist with the search of the heavily wooded area around
the girl’s home. The area is part of national forest land
and contains a maze of two-track roads and power lines.
The officers searched the area until 1 a.m. and then were
relieved by another search team. The conservation officers reported back once the sun came up and continued
their search, locating the little girl approximately 24
hours after she was reported missing.
The conservation officers used an off-road vehicle
and utility task vehicle in their search. As they searched,
the officers retrieved items that were potential evidence
and turned them over to an evidence collection team. After a brief meeting at an intersection of two-track roads,
the officers separated to continue the search and, shortly
after that, while cresting a hill, CO Ginn stopped short,
got off his ORV and walked into the woods and returned
carrying the toddler, alert and unharmed. CO Wells
immediately contacted Incident Command to report the
missing girl was found and that she was alive.
To learn more about Michigan conservation officers
and the work they do, visit the DNR website www.michigan.gov/conservationofficers.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

5

HUNTING
HUNTING THE RUT
Kenny Darwin page 12
Field-expedient
riflescope sighting
Len McDougall page 20
HUNT
STANDING CORN
Lane Walker page 24

MDNR'S 2014
Deer Hunting
Prospects

David Maddox wins
Keeler Society award
page 57
Black Powder Hunting
Brutal classroom lessons
Dennis Neely page 68

High and sly for pike
UNDER ICE
Mark Martin page 72

My Maine bear hunt
Darryl Quidort page 50

OUTDOOR NEWS

REALITY OF
BOWHUNTING
John Eberhart page 74

November on
the big water
Dave Mull page 92

U.P. hunter bags
HUGE GRIZZLY
Betty Sodders page 60

Silver carp environmental
DNA detected in
Lake Michigan tributary
page 8

Michigan Meanders
Deer Hunting...then & now
Tom Huggler page 100

"2 Minute warning" for
Walleye Success
Gary Parsons/Keith Kavajecz
page 102

Hillsdale College and
the shooting sports
Len Jenkins page 77

Learn from the
October "Lull"
Babe Winkleman page 120

First case involving
enhanced deer
violation penalties
page 15

PERSPECTIVE

Gun Chat...
Hillsdale Fall Shoot
Lee Arten page 82

FISHING

Caught in the act
The opportunistic coyote
Randy Jorgensen page 36

105 POUND
STURGEON
page 18

Scopes: Aging eyes are
changing my attitude
Tom Lounsbury page 62

BIG WALLEYES
on Little Bay de Noc
Robert Dock Stupp page 26

Diversity of opportunity;
for hunters, fishermen
and turtles
Jonathan Schechter page 66

ORV club gets
seniors on the trail
page 86

When we lose them
Mark Sak page 83

Antler growth is
complicated
Mark Spencley page 88

U.P. smallmouth fisheries
UNDER-UTILIZED!
Bill Ziegler page 40
Spey Casting
One more trick up a fly
fisherman's sleeve
Tom Carney page 46
Kavajecz-Parsons win
Escanaba walleye event
page 52
NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

page 112

Big Bore Accuracy
Joe Delaney page 64

River Fishing...
The incredible, edible egg
Mark Romanack page 32

6

Governor signs
NEW ROADKILL LAW
Jeff Pendergraff
page 106

BLACK POWDER

Deer Biology...
Timing of the RUT
is important
John Ozoga page 29
Venison;
from the woods to the table
George Rowe page 48

Agencies unite to combat
invasive species in Lake Erie
page 90

Volunteers team with
Adopt-a-Forest to clean up
page 104

FEATURES
Youth Hunt Success
It doesn't get any better
Ed Spinazzola page 44

-Water News

Pluggin' Away
Mark Romanack page 54

COVER
PHOTO

By Robert Peltz

Michigan’s Premier Outdoor Publication

Boat Smart...
Wall of water
Capt. Fred Davis page 84

"Holly Mackinaw...
Bridge It Now!"
Betty Sodders page 94
TRAIL CAM PHOTOS
page 110-111
Sporting Collectibles...
Hartford and Cream City
Minnow Floats
Terry McBurney
page 118

2015
Wildlife
Habitat
Grant
recipients
page 43

OPINIONS
I love our great state
page 106
The harvest is not always
the essential sensation
Rick Fowler
page 107

"Just go hunting"

MBHA
offers
scholarships
page 49
Winter
took a toll
on U.P. deer
Richard P.
Smith
page 58

Jerry Lambert...page 10

Mark Martin selected to
FISHING HALL OF FAME
Roger Beukema page 81

Dear Fish Diary...
"Click it and Ticket"
on federal forest lands?
Ron St. Germain page 107

DEPARTMENTS . . .
Trophy Page. . . . . . 78-80 Classifieds . . . . 121-123
Letters-Op-Ed . . . 106-109 Real Estate . . . . . 123-137




THE

E

Little Bay de Noc

BIG WALLEYES
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Pure Michigan Hunt
winners hit the woods

E

very year Pure Michigan Hunt winners get to spend their fall hunting season living out a big dream
- pursuing elk, bear, antlerless deer,
turkey and ducks in Michigan’s
outdoors. For the most recent group of
winners, the hunting adventure has begun.
On Sept. 14, Frank Zrepskey of Algonac successfully harvested a large 6 x 7
bull elk with the help of his guide, Gene
Skiba, and sons. Zrepskey used his 30.06,
given to him by Michigan Gun Owners as
part of his Pure Michigan Hunt prize package, to harvest the elk.
“This elk hunt was great. The weather
was perfect, we saw lots of game, and
when the right bull came along, we were
successful,” said Zrepskey. “The whole
Pure Michigan Hunt contest win has been
a great experience for me!”
Bruce Shaneour of Osseo also was
successful in his elk hunt. He harvested
a nice 6 x 6 bull elk on Sept. 27 in the
Vanderbilt area with help from his guide,
Kevin Johnson of Big Boys Adventures.
“What a hunt! The elk were in full rut
and bugling all around us. I’ve hunted elk
out west a few times, but I’ve never had
an experience like this,” said Shaneour.

For hunters who dream of experiences
like this, there’s still plenty of time to
make 2015 the hunt of a lifetime by applying for the Pure Michigan Hunt. Along
with all of the hunting licenses, each winner will receive a hunting prize package
valued at more than $4,000. Visit www.
michigan.gov/puremichiganhunt for more
information and to purchase applications.
Waterfowl season is coming up next
for the Pure Michigan Hunt winners; look
for more about their adventures coming
soon.n

(lt) Bruce Shaneour and guide Kevin Johnson with Shaneour’s Pure Michigan Hunt elk.

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“Kevin Johnson and his team at Big Boys
Adventures were excellent. It was the most
phenomenal Michigan elk footage they’ve
ever captured.”
Bill Kring of Cadillac is still awaiting
his chance to harvest a trophy Michigan
bull elk.
Bear season is also under way for the
Pure Michigan Hunt winners.
This year, there was a Pure Michigan
Hunt license transfer of a bear tag. Kring
generously transferred his bear tag to
a Michigan veteran from Manton. This
veteran had the opportunity to hunt with
Rob Nixon, on land southwest of Cadillac,
and was able to harvest a 217-pound black
bear. The veteran reports having a great
time on his hunt and being “extremely
happy” with his harvest.
New this year, Pure Michigan Hunt
winners can now transfer one or all of their
licenses to another eligible hunter of their
choice or keep the licenses for themselves.
This will allow anyone to buy as many applications as they want for themselves and
others instead of needing to know someone else’s driver’s license number, address
and birthdate to apply for the other hunter.
All three Pure Michigan Hunt winners
have the flexibility to hunt many different
times and places, with the ability to pick
and choose hunt areas and seasons that fit
into their schedules.

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

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black bear he harvested and guide Rob Nixon.

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7

Silver carp environmental DNA
detected in Lake Michigan tributary

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

T

8

he Michigan Department of
Natural Resources (MDNR)
and U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service (USFWS) are collaborating to assess a recent
positive environmental DNA
(eDNA) result for silver carp – a species of Asian carp -- within the lower
Kalamazoo River, Allegan County,
Michigan.
Two hundred water samples were
taken in July 2014 along the Kalamazoo, from below the Caulkins Dam
in Allegan County to the mouth of
the river. Laboratory results, which
take several months to process, were
reviewed by the DNR Oct. 2. One
of the of 200 samples tested positive
for silver carp eDNA. The positive
sample was taken from just below the
Caulkins Dam.
An additional 200 eDNA samples
were collected in the same vicinity
in June and resulted in no positive
results. The July sample represents the
first time that Michigan has experienced a positive result for silver carp
eDNA in Michigan’s Great Lakes
waters outside of Maumee Bay.
The findings indicate the presence of genetic material of silver carp,
such as scales, excrement or mucous.
However, there is no evidence that a
population of silver carp is established
in the Kalamazoo River. In addition
to live fish, genetic material can enter
water bodies via boats, fishing gear
and the droppings of fish-eating birds.
The lower Kalamazoo River is popular for recreational activities including
fishing and boating. Activities such as
these may increase the possibility of
eDNA entering the river without the
presence of a live silver carp.
“Although not conclusive, this
finding heightens our vigilance and
sets into motion a specific response,”
said MDNR Director Keith Creagh.
“We will work with our partner organizations and anglers on next steps to
protect the Great Lakes and its tributaries against this significant threat.”
In response to the finding, the
MDNR:
• Requested last Friday additional assistance from the USFWS to
implement a third eDNA surveillance
effort on the lower Kalamazoo River.
The collection of an additional 200
samples begins today. Analysis of the
samples will be expedited and results
should be available within a month.
• Will increase the presence of
MDNR staff along the Kalamazoo
River to enlist anglers to report any
Asian carp sightings.
• Will place information in local
bait shops to broaden public awareness.
“At the state’s request, the U.S.

This is a photo of a silver carp (a species of Asian carp) found in waters outside Michigan boundaries. Though no live
silver carp has been found in Michigan waters, a recent positive environmental DNA (eDNA) result for silver carp was
found within the lower Kalamazoo River in Allegan County, Michigan.
Fish and Wildlife Service is providing all the resources and technical
expertise we have available,” said
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Deputy
Regional Director Charlie Wooley.
“The Service is committed to working in a coordinated, landscape-level,
approach to prevent the establishment
of self-sustaining populations of Asian
carp in the Great Lakes.”
The results from this third round
of sampling will inform and guide
any future assessment and response
actions for silver carp in the Kalamazoo River. “We appreciate the
assistance and technical expertise that
the USFWS brings to the table in the
development and implementation of
a comprehensive eDNA surveillance
plan to further evaluate the Kalamazoo River,” said Creagh. “We have
well-established and practiced protocols for addressing eDNA results.
Our coordinated efforts represent an
important and prudent response to this
detection.”
MDNR has put significant effort
toward assessing the fish populations
of the Kalamazoo River with specialized gear that is capable of capturing
carp. The MDNR has received no
reports from anglers in this area that
indicate the presence of live Asian
carp.
In preparation for response to findings of bighead, silver or black carp in
Michigan’s waters of the Great Lakes
and tributaries, MDNR has conducted
field and tabletop response exercises
to prepare for a possible invasion
of Asian carp species such as silver
carp. Field exercises, funded through
the Great Lakes Restoration Initia-

tive, were conducted in the St. Joseph
River in 2013 and the Western Basin
of Lake Erie in September 2014. In
addition to these exercises, nearly
1,800 eDNA water samples have been
collected this year from Great Lakes
tributaries in southwest and southeast
Michigan.
With implementation of the
recently signed Council of Great
Lakes Governors’ Aquatic Invasive
Species Mutual Aid Agreement, the
response exercises brought together
staff from other Great Lakes state and
federal agencies, including Canada
and Ontario, to test response scenarios
and various equipment and gear used
to capture Asian carp species. Michigan has a comprehensive Asian Carps
Management Plan to guide prevention, early detection and management
responses. In addition, the state has
recently launched a comprehensive invasive species effort to address threats
to Michigan’s waters and land.
Asian carp, including bighead and
silver carp, pose a significant threat
to the Great Lakes ecosystem, the $7
billion fishery, and other economic interests dependent on the Great Lakes
and its tributaries. Silver and bighead
carp are likely to compete with native
and recreational fish species and are
known to quickly reproduce.
“The Kalamazoo River results further point to the urgency of the Great
Lakes states to be vigilant in seeking
all solutions to keep Asian carp and
other invasive species out of the Great
Lakes basin,” said Creagh. “Michigan
continues to advocate for hydrological separation between the Mississippi River basin and the Great Lakes

basin as the best long-term solution
to the threat of Asian carp. By working together as a united front, we can
address the imminent threat invasive
species pose to our quality of life.”
Anglers and boaters are vital stewards to prevent movement of Asian
carp and other invasive species that
threaten Michigan’s waters. Anglers
are urged to become familiar with the
identification of Asian carp, including both adults and juveniles, as the
spread of juvenile Asian carp through
the use of live bait buckets has been
identified as a potential point of entry
into Great Lakes waters. Anglers and
boaters are strongly encouraged to
drain all water from their boats and to
clean boats and gear. Invasive species
and eDNA are known to “hitchhike”
within live-wells and attach to boat
trailers, anchors and fishing gear.
A video demonstrating how to
identify bighead and silver carp
can be viewed on the USFWS YouTube channel at http://youtu.be/
B49OWrCRs38?source=govdelivery.
A video focused on identification of
juvenile Asian carp species can be
viewed at http://www.michigan.gov/
dnr/0,4570,7-153--317128--s,00.
html. Identification guides, frequently
asked questions, management plans
and an online reporting form for Asian
carp sightings are available online at
michigan.gov/asiancarp.
More information on eDNA is
available here: http://www.asiancarp.
us/edna.htm. Results of eDNA monitoring from the Midwest region are
posted here: http://www.fws.gov/midwest/fisheries/eDNA.html.n

Prepared By The MDNR

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

9

11-Year Old Takes Trophy Buck; Advice For Other Hunters...

“Just go hunting!”

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

T

10

he hunting demographic
displaying the strongest
growth is the incredible
increase in the amount
of women hunters.
This phenomenon is
also occurring with our youth hunter
participants throughout Michigan. The
internet has been buzzing with hundreds if not thousands of successful
youth photographs after the two-day
youth season which was held in late
September. A high percentage of the
photographs posted were of young
girls proudly donned in camouflage
and hunter orange.
Eleven year old, Anna Winkleman’s picture was posted on the
MIBUCKPOLE Facebook page and
as of September 29, 2014 it received
1,802 LIKES. Kim Kerns commented,
“WOW AWESOME!! One can only
hope to see something like that let
alone shoot it!! Makes me Smile I
love seeing woman hunting! Congrats!” Kyler Butterworth added,
“Seems like the girls got the best of
the youth hunt this year! Lol stud of a
buck.”
The photograph displays a smiling Anna holding onto the antlers of a
big Lenawee County 12-point. Anna
was hunting with her father, Steve.
The father-daughter combo set up a
tent blind on Saturday morning and
returned in the evening for Anna’s
first deer hunt in which she would be
the one looking to pull the trigger. She
had accompanied her dad in previous
years on his hunts but this would be
her first hunt as a licensed deer hunter.
That evening a storm blew in.
Anna saw a doe and was preparing
for the shot when a gust of wind came
up and the deer ran off into the cover.
Rain soon followed and no more deer
were sighted.
Sunday evening the family went to
church and got out around 5:30 p.m.
Steve was contemplating taking Anna
out and his wife encouraged him to
do so. The hunters rushed home and
made it to their blind by 6:00 p.m.
More rain came and Steve and Anna
hunkered down in the tent trying to
stay dry. When the rain let up, Steve
sneaked a peak out of the rear window
and saw a buck
behind them. He
got Anna’s attention and they
quietly readjusted so that they
could shoot in
that direction.

Eleven-year-old, Anna Winkleman of Ogden Center, a sixth grader took this monster 12 point that field dressed at 210
pounds, had 24 inch main beams and six inch circumferences at the bases. Sunday evening of the Liberty Hunt.
Steve had Anna use a Caldwell tripod
to steady her shot and Anna placed her
Savage 20 gauge onto the device and
took aim. At this point the 12-point
buck was only twenty yards away.
Anna pulled the trigger and the deer
lurched forward and dropped to the
ground. Her shot severed the jugular
vein in the neck.
There was no ground shrinkage
with this great buck. Anna told me via
a phone interview, “I was surprised at

By Jerry Lambert

how big the buck actually was. I just
wanted to get a deer period and this
is what showed up. It’s big and I like
it!”
I asked Anna if she was nervous
and she said, “I wasn’t that nervous
because it happened so fast but afterwards I was excited and wanted to tell
all of my friends.”
I asked Anna one last question,
I asked her if she had any advice for
other youth hunters and she answered,
“Just go hunting. If you sit inside and
play video games you won’t shoot

one!” Sound wisdom that I think applies to all ages.
Anna’s dad added, “what did
happen is more precious than my
thirty eight prior years of hunting,
to see her smile and excited response
to hopefully creating a lifelong
experience that will take her beyond
the confines of an I pad or computer
game.”
Congratulations Anna, if the future
of deer hunting is as bright as your
smile than I think we all have a lot to
look forward to!n

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11

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Bucks test does by smelling their urine,
raising their nose and fleming, which
passes scent over the buck’s sensory organs that can determine the doe’s sexual
readiness.. Kenny Darwin photos

12

D

on’t overlook the narrow
window of opportunity
when bucks go bonkers
chasing does and sex
crazed monsters
wander from
hideaways in search of a
mate. Peak rut occurs in
Michigan every year during
November when cool temperatures, fallen leaves and
the lunar cycle kicks deer
activity into super high gear.
Actually the ritual is ignited
when days become shorter
and the amount of
sunlight passing
through the deer’s

in the world on his feet, out dancin’
and prancin’, and preferably so love
crazed they are stupid. Truth is peak
rut when breeding activity has reached
fever pitch all time high is when
bucks are very vulnerable. Full blown
rut can make harvesting the buck of
your dreams a cake walk. Provided
you follow some simple rules.
First, I must admit Michigan is
filled with a bunch of numbskulled
idiots that don’t understand whitetail deer rutting activity. Why do so
many archers get all fired up about
the October 1 opener when chances
of anchoring a decent buck is almost
non-existent? When cold weather arrives, leaves are down and the bucks
are running like crazy many hunters
are not around.
I’ve learned decades ago to not
begin buck hunting until November
1 and hunt every day until the gun
opener. After the orange army hits
Michigan’s great outdoors all bets
are off for seeing rutting activity and
enjoying a hunt unobstructed by other
hunters. Now, don’t get me wrong,
there is still plenty of rutting activity
during gun season but often it is more
subdued, hidden from plain sight,
often conducted under the cover of
darkness because deer know humans
are afield. My suggestion is to spend
as much time in the woods as possible
during rutting season.
If you are a treestand hunter using
bait to draw deer your chances of taking a mature buck go tube city during
the rut. Here’s why. Ever noticed how
big bucks are never taken over bait
when the rut is in full swing? Well, I
can tell you why. During the rut does
lead buck around like they have a ring
in their nose. Wherever the hot doe
goes bucks follow and adult does do
most of their breeding in secluded
locations. Oh sure there are always
bucks tending does in open fields but
my point is few are tended near bait. I
learned years ago bucks in rut would
seldom come to my sweet spots that
were baited to draw deer. It is my
opinion based on years in Michigan’s
deer woods that whitetail doe do not
want to be bred in baiting areas. I
think they prefer to not have sex at the
eye jump starts hormones and does
trains and vehicles on the expressway community center where other doe,
come into heat and rut crazed bucks
and in some cases chase humans, dogs fawn and younger bucks congregate.
If they did all your pals would have
absolutely go nuts. You have seen the and farm animals. It is the time of
craziness when bucks that are noryear when hormones reach their peak stories about big bucks they harvested
mally hiding in thick cover and bucks go on a breeding rampage. while tending does over bait. Come to
think of it, taking a dandy buck tendare suddenly wandering in
One look at a rutting buck and
ing a doe around bait never happens.
plain sight during broad
he is easy to identify because of his
Get my point?
daylight. What about those stature, muscles are bulging, neck is
My suggestion is to leave your
crazy critters you spot in
swollen, eyes are often red and scent
bait
spot and use rut hunting tactics to
wide open fields that are
glades are stained black. Rutting
locate
and harvest more bucks, forget
running flat out, dashing
bucks have a walk that signals they
bait during the rut. Try to set up over
after prospective does from are looking for a mate, a strut or stiff
one section to the next?
legged gate that shows off their eager- trails bucks use. Carry a grunt call
or doe bleat and use them to attract
Peak rut is when love
ness to please a doe or fight other
bucks. Sometimes you need to scout
sick bucks challenge corn
bucks.
new areas in an effort to locate bucks
pickers, attack ceWhile some hunters prefer huntment deer statues,
ing pre-rut I’m totally in love with
that are henned-up with a hot doe in
get smacked by
hunting the rut. I want every buck
surrounding areas.

By Kenny Darwin

Buck sparring sessions are common during rut but battles can occur between equally matched bucks to determine breeding rights.
antlers bumping the stalks and see the the ground after the Spitfire sliced his chest sent him packing.
I walked into the harvested bean
lungs.
tops wiggle as he finally stepped into
field where the fight took place. The
More than likely the big bucks
plain view, stepped out of the corn
ground was all tore up and I could
and lowered his head and smashed his downfall was it was full rut time and
see where antlers ripped the earth
tall rack into a sapling and began rub- he heard me rustling in the woodlot
and hoof prints were at a weird angle
leaves and he came to investigate.
bing. I could see the muscles in his
indicating the animals were pushing
The grunt call convinced the love
neck were swollen through the Scoreach other sideways. The area the
pion scope as he turned broadside and sick buck another buck was in the
I touched the trigger on the crossbow. area and his first move was to rub and fight took place was about the size of
display his dominance. But instead of an average yard and the ground was
He jolted forward, mule kicked and
covered with hoof prints with hooves
dashed full throttle through the wood- a warm welcome from a hot doe he
that were spread wide open. I have
lot before he finally came crashing to was greeted by a lung piercing New
Archery Products Spitfire broadhead. seen similar locations where dirt and
leaves are disturbed where two bucks
I love watching two similar size
have done battle.
bucks when they encounter each
If you can catch two bucks fightother. They get all bent out of shape,
ing you can slip into easy range. The
swagger in a semi-circle around
trick is to move quickly the direction
each other, lower ears in a mule-like
the sound is coming from. With fond
intimidating manner and puff up
memories I recall a hunt in Isabella
their hair to appear larger. Often the
County when the sound of antlers
encounter is brief because one buck
crashing sent me running. When I
turns chicken and hightails out of the
came over a ridge I found two dandy
country. But sometimes the intimida8-point bucks locked in battle. I
tion escalates and bucks lock antlers
stalked within twenty yards and came
in a battle to the death. Most serious
to full draw, but each time I tried to
fights between bucks are short lived
but extremely violent. I’ll never forrelease the arrow the battling duo
get a battle between two huge bucks
would switch ends and I didn’t have
on Judge Begole’s farm in Shiawasa clear shot. Finally the battling pair
see County. The two equally matched pushed each other within 10 yards
monster bucks locked antlers and
and slightly downwind of me and
began pushing back and forth while
someone got a whiff of my sweaty
violently twisting their heads to gain
body after the sprint to the location
advantage over each other. Stomping
and the match ended with both deer
hooves and bulldozer pushing sent
blasting through the cedar swamp the
clods of dirt flying through the air
opposite direction. I clearly rememas they slammed their massive racks
ber standing in the battle zone, earth
together like two train cars crashing,
ripped to shreds from pointed hooves,
shoved each other back and forth like bow in hand, heart pumping, astonSuma wrestlers with noses close to
ished to see such an easy opportunity
the ground and antlers digging into
to kill a big buck go sour in the blink
the soft earth. At one point the sound
of an eye.
of the clashing antlers was so loud it
On another occasion the sound
sounded like the pair was very close
of clashing antlers sent me sprinting
and from the surrounding woods
through standing corn and tall ditch
several deer suddenly appeared to
grass in search of the fighting bucks.
watch the titans clash. The duo fought They sounded close; I knocked an
for at least 30 minutes, until both deer arrow, and then noticed some moveAuthor expects hunting to be ideal from Halloween until gun opener when mature bucks in
were breathing heavily, sides heaving ment in an oak tree nearby only to
search of receptive does venture from secluded hideouts into openings during broad daylight.
and finally one buck was tossed on
Rut crazed bucks increase activity 300% during the rut but the window of ideal hunting ophis side and a quick antler spear in his
Hunting The Rut page 14
portunity only lasts a couple weeks.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Never go scouting without a
weapon. Don’t make the silly mistake
of traveling on new turf in search of
an ideal treestand site and blow out
the biggest buck you will ever see.
Learn to go scouting by stealthfully
stalking through new turf. Sure your
goal is to locate new hunting grounds
but learn how to stalk/scout and if the
opportunity arrives sneak into range
of the buck of your dreams. Sometimes you need to adjust your thinking about how to hunt a particular
buck and use different hunting tactics
to score.
I’ll never forget the tall tined buck
that roamed grass fields, cornfields
and ditches in Clinton County. He
was impossible to hunt because there
were no trees on his home turf. Come
peak rut I’d stalk the edge of standing
corn, sneak through the ditches and
grass in search of the high tined four
years old. Trees along the fencerows
were all rubbed, the edge of the corn
was highlighted by big scrapes and
the tiny woodlot nearby was covered
with fresh tracks, rubs and scrapes
big as my dinner table.
I was slipping up the edge of the
woodlot when I heard noise in the
standing corn. That’s when I knocked
a bolt and gave two short grunts.
Immediately the sound stopped and
started again as the mega deer walked
directly toward me. I could hear his

13

Hunting the rut:

Author proudly
admires a mature
buck that was
rubbing and actively performing
rutting activities
during broad
daylight.

from page 13
tail, lick the vaginal area and eventually slide their head and neck up the
side of the doe and put pressure on
her back in readiness to mount. Bucks
mount a doe several times and the
actual tending ritual takes place in
a relatively small location about the
size of your living room.
Perhaps my deadliest hunting
strategy during the rut is to locate
and stalk tending bucks. Sometimes
I drive country roads in locations
where I have permission to hunt and
locate breeding pairs. Other times I
slip through the countryside looking
for bucks standing over does. Spot
and stalk deer hunting is very exciting, requires advanced woodsmanship skills, agility, flexibility, cat-like
prowling skills and nerves of steel
as you slip into easy range of a high
scoring monster buck. For this brand
of hunting you need to concentrate
on a direct frontal approach, keep
body movement to a minimum, hold
your weapon low to the ground, move
without making noise and using trees,
tall grass, ditches, brush and more to
block your slow approach.

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the forest like a lioness on the prowl,
slowly using cat-like skills to move
ever closer to a big game animal until
you are close enough to see the blood
pumping through the veins on his
neck, see his eyes blink. Now you are
the true predator, the ultimate hunter.
What about you? Do you have
plans to hunt peak rut this year?
I hope you get serious about buck
hunting around Halloween and chase
deer until the gun opener. I guarantee
the experience will be an eye opener
and you will look forward to rut time
every year.n

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Keep in mind that 90 percent of
the time you will get busted by the
doe that notices you and blows out of
Dodge with the love sick buck in tow.
The trick is to use cover to conceal
your approach, move at a snail’s pace,
make certain you are completely camouflaged, including face, hands and
especially your weapon. If you think
scoring on a big buck is exciting by
ambushing him from a treestand I
want to warn you the adrenalin rush
you get while stalking is 10 times
more addicting. Few thrills in life are
more exciting than slinking through

Expires 11-14-14

discover I charged directly into another hunter that was rattling antlers.
I felt embarrassed.
My point is this; during full
blown rut bucks are at the peak of
their game. Rutting activity has them
moving in search of partners 24-7.
It is a short window of opportunity
Michigan hunters need to utilize to
their advantage. A time when bucks
are over-active, chasing, rubbing,
scraping, fighting and presenting
hunting opportunities like no other
time the entire year.
Tending begins when a buck scent
checks a doe and he raises his head,
slightly opens his mouth and allows
his sensory organs to test her readiness. If she smells right he pursues
her using a short-step trot with nose
close to the ground Smart old bucks
will allow younger bucks to chase
does all over God’s creation until they
are fully in rut and ready to breed.
The actual breeding process takes
place over a couple days as receptive
does signal their readiness by lamb
wiggling their tail. Bucks pick up on
the signal, slip their nose under the

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Kent County man has pled
guilty in a deer-poaching case
that occurred in September
in Montcalm County and is
the first case of a violation
meeting the new enhanced sentencing
guidelines for poaching that became
law in Michigan earlier this year.
On Sept. 21, Michigan Department of Natural Resources conservation officers responded to a complaint
phoned in to the Report All Poaching
(RAP) Line involving an adult suspect
who allegedly killed two trophy
white-tailed deer in Montcalm County
during the 2014 Youth Hunt while
acting as a mentor to an 8-year-old
hunter. Jacob Powers, 25, of Lowell,
Michigan, was arraigned Oct. 3 on
the charge of taking two white-tailed
deer during the closed season before a
magistrate of the 64B District Court at
Stanton in Montcalm County.
At arraignment, Powers entered a
plea of guilty to the charge and was
sentenced. He was assessed $335 in
fines and costs, $12,000 in restitution
for payment to the state’s Fish and
Game Protection Fund, and five days
mandatory minimum jail time
to be served
as community
service. In addition, Powers
now faces up
to five years of
hunting license
revocations in Michigan and 41 other
states that participate in the Interstate
Wildlife Violator Compact. Powers
has yet to appear on charges in Ionia
County for littering.
After receiving the information
from the RAP Line dispatcher, three
DNR conservation officers (Sgt. John
Jurcich, Officer Cary Foster and Officer Dave Rodgers) began an investigation in Lowell and Grand Rapids
attempting to locate Powers and two
deer. Locating Powers at approximately 3 a.m. at his workplace, officers
were able to obtain a confession to the
incident and return to his residence,
where they were assisted by the Lowell City Police recovering evidence to
complete their investigation.
Officers seized two large antlered
heads, meat and a shotgun used to
take the animals while at the Powers
residence. It was determined Powers had taken both deer himself that
morning in Bushnell Township of
Montcalm County, while accompanying an 8-year-old youth on his first
hunt. Powers illegally tagged one deer
with the Mentored Youth Tag issued
to the young hunter and procured

a second license tag from a 6-yearold female family member prior to
transporting the animals. Officers
established Powers had captured trail
camera images of the deer prior to
the hunt and knew trophy deer were
present in the hunt area. Officers
concluded their investigation issuing
an appearance ticket with a court date
and left the home. Five days later, a
conservation officer discovered two
hides and evidence of deer processing
that had been dumped in a parking
lot at the Lowell State Game Area in
Ionia County. Having not recovered
these items on the night of the original
investigation, the officer returned to
meet with Powers and obtain a confession to the littering on state lands,
leading to an additional charge.
“The tougher poaching penalties
were developed last year and approved by the Legislature and governor, and represent the first major
changes to poaching laws in our state
since 1990,” said DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler.
“Concerned hunting organizations
and conservation officers have noticed
an increased
interest and demand for large
antlered deer,
which are frequently targeted
by poachers
who trespass,
hunt at night
and without a license. This is the first
case prosecuted under the new law
to enhance penalties and represents a
great case of our officers and the local
justice system working together to
bring justice to individuals targeting
trophy animals.”
Recent changes to penalties increased fines in this case by $10,000
and added two years of additional
license revocations. Under the new
law, antlered deer are assessed an additional $1,000 in restitution plus the
standard $1,000 for illegally killing
any deer. Deer with eight points but
not more than 10 are $500 a point,
while deer with 11 points or more are
assessed a penalty of $750 per point.
“Ethical hunters, wildlife viewers
and our officers are hopeful that increased penalties will cause potential
violators to rethink the temptation of
poaching a trophy deer while providing additional protection for this valuable wildlife resource,” Hagler said.
For more information on the laws
and regulations for hunting and fishing in Michigan, go to
www.michigan.gov/conservationofficers.n

Prepared By MDNR

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

DNR COs report first case
involving enhanced deer
violation penalties

15

By Tom Lounsbury

he young
girl avoided
stepping on
downed leaves and twigs and
quietly eased up to the tree
trunk for steady brace, slowly
brushed a wisp of blond hair away from
her shooting eye, shouldered her gun,
took careful aim at her quarry as she
eased off the safety, and then touched
the trigger. At the shot, a little green
apple lying on the ground several yards
away rolled over with a direct hit. The
girl re-cocked her little lever-action and
shot the apple again to make sure it was
down for the count.
My 10 year old granddaughter
McKenna and I were performing a
favorite pastime of mine, which is
plinking with a BB gun, and duplicating a hunting scenario in my orchard
near our house. While this might appear
like we were playing a game of pretend,
we were actually in training and I have
found that BB guns are the perfect training tool for young hunters and readily
teach safe gun handling practices as

well as hones shooting
skills. All the safety
rules that apply to firearms should also apply to BB guns, and
I have never assumed a BB gun as being
a mere toy, and requires adult supervision (and shooting glasses in the event
of a BB ricochet – which can happen if
a hard surface is struck).
Like many American shooters, my
earliest shooting experiences were with
a Daisy BB gun, the first being a handme-down Daisy Red Ryder. My three
sons would each begin their shooting
experiences as well with their personal
“Red Ryder”. Due to her smaller stature, McKenna presently shoots a Daisy
Model 105 “Buck”, which is made in an
ideal size for littler sized kids.
I will never forget the Christmas
morning as a kid, when the package
for me under the tree contained a brand
new Daisy (Model 25) pump-action
BB gun that featured a very unique rear
sight that could be flipped over from
a regular iron sight to a peep-sight. I
have no idea as to how many BB’s I

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The super plinkers (top to bottom): • The author’s Daisy
Model 96 is no longer made, but is his favorite BB gun and
fits him well. • The lengendary Daisy Red Ryder is an all
around BB gun for just about everyone. • The Daisy Model 105
“Buck” is a good starting BB gun for smaller-framed kids.

fired through that gun, but it would have
added up to a whole bunch, believe me.
Having been developed in 1911 and first
produced in 1914, the Daisy Model 25
pump-action is for a fact celebrating its
100th anniversary this year.
The Daisy BB gun has its original
roots in Plymouth, MI, where watchmaker and inventor Clarence Hamilton
first developed an all wooden BB gun.
In 1888 he created an all metal BB
gun and approached the Plymouth Iron
Windmill Company to see if they would
produce it. When the company General
Manager L. C. Hough handled and fired
the newly designed BB gun he said
– “Boy, that is a daisy”, which was a
common colloquialism of the time (I remember Doc Holliday using that phrase
“you are a daisy if you do” in the movie
Tombstone). Hence the name “Daisy”
came into being.
Originally, Daisy BB guns were primarily given as an incentive to farmers
who purchased windmills, but by 1895
it was clear putting a focus on manufacturing and selling BB guns, which
were becoming quite popular, was more
lucrative than windmills and the Daisy
Manufacturing Company came into
being. Manufacturing Daisy BB guns
would continue in Plymouth, MI until
1958, when the business moved to its
present location in Rogers, Arkansas
(which also features the Daisy Museum).
From the last part of the 19th Century all the way to present times, Daisy
BB guns have played an important role
in the American shooting scene and the
term “Daisy”, at least in my vocabulary,
refers to the epitome of BB guns. I have
never considered a typical BB gun as
being a hunting arm, although I had
downed my share of starlings (a nonindigenous pest bird) while carting my
Daisy around the farm when I was a kid
(and when my parents determined I was
trustworthy to do so). For a fact, my
Daisy BB gun was a constant companion whenever possible.
Daisy BB guns are surprisingly
accurate when used at the typical close
ranges they are designed for, but it is
a whole lot of fun trying for targets
further out. I learned a lot about the
shooting term “holdover” when firing a
BB gun at targets a bit out there.
The shooting practice McKenna
and I were performing in the orchard
actually entails a bit of competition, not
unlike the basketball game known as
“Horse”. It is also similar to the archery
practice bowhunters call “stump-shooting”. It was something I did regularly

with my sons, and obviously now enjoy
doing with my grandchildren. I was
carrying my personal BB gun (a Daisy
Model 96 that is basically a proportionally beefed-up Red Ryder that fits
me well, but sadly is no longer made)
as well, and whatever shot McKenna
made, I had to duplicate. Besides green
apples that had fallen off the trees,
fallen leaves lying on the ground were
also a prime target for our Daisies. It is
actually a whole barrel of fun and what
I would call quality time spent in the
outdoors.
Another fun target I also employ is
balloons bouncing and weaving a bit
along the ground in a gentle breeze,
which provides the perfect moving target and adds a little spice to any shooting adventure. There are also the typical
paper targets we shoot at, but this is
primarily done to check the accuracy of
the BB gun, and the shooter. Plinking
is done to hone actual hunting skills by
duplicating various in the field shooting positions. We also practice from our
deck to duplicate shooting down from
a raised platform (our home is located
literally in the woods and the beauty of
BB gun practice is that it doesn’t disrupt
any serenity with a loud blasting noise
and I’ve seen no reason for wearing
hearing protection, although wearing
proper eye protection is very important).
And shooting practice with a BB gun is,
as always, quite economical.
Now that squirrel season is here,
and this is a pastime that I particularly
enjoy. It is a great way to literally witness late summer transcend into autumn
in the woods. McKenna also really
enjoys squirrel hunting, and instead
of her Daisy BB gun, she will be
using a (Mini-Henry) single-shot .22
carbine (which we also practice
regularly with, as well as a bit of
plinking too, on my shooting range).
And of course later, there will be deer
hunting with yet a bigger firearm.
Thanks to regular plinking with her
Daisy BB gun, McKenna has her safe
gun handling and shooting technique
honed and down pat.
This of course all works for me too
because I’ve discovered getting older
doesn’t necessarily make me a better
shot, only regular shooting practice
does, and plinking with my BB gun
(and having a good time with family
and friends in the process) is all a part
of the picture. And plinking to me is
always a real “daisy” of a time in the
outdoors.
For more information about Daisy
Airguns go to www.daisy.com.n

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CARIBOU ISLAND
OUTPOST!

17

A 105 pound sturgeon
Guest Column By
Don McChristian Jr.

O

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Dennis Moritz caught this 105 pound sturgeon fishing the St. Clair River in late September.

18

n September 27, 2014 Dennis
Moritz and I were sturgeon fishing in my 18 foot Smoker Craft
fishing on the St. Clair River.
We had entered the first St. Clair-Detroit River Sturgeon For Tomorrow’s
Catch and Release Sturgeon Tournament. A six hour tournament; 6 p.m.
to 12 a.m. where the longest sturgeon
was award half the entry fees and SFT
received the other half for sturgeon
preservation.
We motored downriver until I
found a spot that looked promising.
We had high hopes of catching a monster and around 7 p.m. Dennis hooked
the first sturgeon. It jumped a few
times and we both guessed it was a
little over 40 inches. It ended up being
45 inches and was leading the Tournament. After a few quick photo’s with
the special logo and tape measure it
was released unharmed to be caught
by another lucky angler another day!
An hour later Dennis set the hook
again and yelled, “Sturgeon!” Two
minutes into the fight, it jumped clear

of the water as I was clearing the last
rod. I missed it but heard Dennis say,
“Whoooaaaa, Oh My!”
I knew it must be big and asked
Dennis if he knew how big it was and
he excitingly proclaimed, “I think it’s
my 100 pounder!”
When we saw it jumped the
second time, I was stunned and my
jaw dropped. We were whooping and
hollering like two kids on Christmas
morning. Another couple fishing nearby stopped began watching and sharing our excitement as they watched us
battle this prehistoric fish. It was her
birthday and he told us that he’d show
her a big fish tonight. Little did they
know how big this fish was.
After two more jumps the monster
finally surfaced and I was in awe, but
we had to figure out how are we were
going to get that thing in the boat. I

from our grip! Luckily the spectator boat was still there and said they
could help and put their hand in the
fish’s mouth and floated it downstream. We were so beat we couldn’t
pull the anchor. They I cannot believe
the size of the fish. We saw a big
splash and they cheered as it swam
down back into the depths of the
river. They actually thanked us for the
experience and we thanked them for
the help.
What a fish. We were so beat and
exhausted we just sat there taking it
all in for a good 10 minutes then I
called Jim Felgenauer, the President
of St. Clair-Detroit River Sturgeon
For Tomorrow and told him we were
done fishing. Jim asked what happened and I told him that we just
caught and landed a 68 inch 100
pounder and it kicked our butts. I

grabbed our big net and tried three
times to get it in the net but it was
just too big! So, I put the net down
and grabbed a hold of the giant’s tail
and had to use both hands to hang on.
Dennis put the rod in the holder and
I told him to bear hug it and lift with
all his might. I yell for Dennis to lift,
which he said he was, however the
fish didn’t move.
We gently let go and Dennis
grabbed the rod as it was still hooked.
I tried the net again I heard from our
spectators in the boat watching, “I
think you need a bigger boat!”
The net didn’t work so the plan
was I would grab the tail with both
hands and lift, hand the tail off to
Dennis and I grab around his head.
We got it half way in and Dennis
drop the tail and grab next to me and
slowly the beast made its way into the
boat and was on the floor and the high
fives and whooping and hollering
started to echo from Algonac to Port
Huron!
After measuring the length at 68
inches and the girth at 32 inches Dennis knew the weight chart so well he
yelled, “This is my 100 pounder Don!
My dream fish! Thank you so much!”
We quickly got the fish on Dennis’ lap for a few pictures and both
grabbed hold of the prehistoric fish
and slowly lowered it over the side.
We couldn’t hold it upstream with
its size and the current and it slipped

could hear Jim’s happy chuckle as he
congratulated us.
This is what it’s all about...making
sure every fisherman has the chance
to experience catching a prehistoric
fish that is almost as big as you that
was almost extinct and now with the
help of people like Mike Thomas
from the Michigan DNR, James
Boase from U.S. Fish and Wildlife,
Jim Felgenauer who founded St ClairDetroit River Sturgeon For Tomorrow, all the board members and all
the people who buy a membership we
can catch these awesome fish right
in our own backyard in the St. Clair
River.
Oh...and yes Dennis’ fish won
the tournament for us but that night
and fish will forever be etched in my
mind and that’s worth more than
any tournament winning ever in my
book.
After the tournament ended at
midnight we fished until 5 a.m. and I
caught a 57 incher. What a night.
For more information on sturgeon
and sturgeon fishing in the
St. Clair River check out
http://www.stclairsturgeon.org
and on Facebook: St. Clair-Detroit
River Sturgeon For Tomorrow. Don
McChristian Jr. is a board member
and they have a monthly tournament
during all open months of sturgeon
fishing. See complete details on their
Facebook page.n

R.J. MEYER ~ Master Taxidermist
N O RT H A M E R I C A N • A F R I C A N • E XO T I C S

“Capture the Moment”
www.trophyroommichigan.com
trophyroom@journey.com

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

The author, Don McChristian Jr. with his 57 inch St. Clair River sturgeon.

19

Field-expedient riflescope sighting

A hunter should know how to sight-in his or her own gun before using it to shoot
at live game, because a bullet that misses its target is dangerous to everything else...

C

By Len McDougall

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

alibrating a telescopic sight to make its
point of aim coincide with a rifle bullet’s
point of impact at a specified distance isn’t
a skill anyone is born with. But it is a fundamental component of marksmanship. A
hunter should know how to sight-in his or
her own gun before using it to shoot at live game,
because a bullet that misses its target is dangerous
to everything else.
Having a scoped rifle collimated, or bore-sighted, to put its point of impact “on paper” helps, but
it seldom brings scope and gun to zero, where every
bullet bullseyes its target at (typically) 100 yards.
Being preset for an established average, a collimator can’t compensate for ballistic changes caused
variation in barrel lengths, propellants, elevation, or
temperature.
Adjusting a rifle and scope to the setting at
which both components agree at a given range requires shooting holes into a target. The technique
described here enables almost anyone to mount a
scope on a rifle, then zero it, without a collimator,
and without the frustration of missed shots. This
procedure also allows a scoped rifle to be zeroed in
the field, on any fixed target, from a standard paper
target to a coffee can lid nailed to a stump.
The first step is to eliminate mechanical accuracy problems. All screws used to fasten scope base
to rifle receiver must be snug; absolutely no movement can occur between rifle and scope. Rings
must be fully seated onto their bases, and screws
between scope and rings must be snug (check them
occasionally). A loose mounting system guarantees that the rifle it’s on won’t put bullets where the
crosshairs are, yet this is the most common cause of
inaccuracy.
Position of a mounted scope should be such that
a shooter can snap the rifle to his shoulder and see

20

It doesn’t get much more impromptu than this.

Any changes in air density, bullet weight, or even mounting a different scope are addressed using the methods described here.
a clear, bright sight picture immediately, without
moving his head. This distance between a shooter’s
eye and a scope’s ocular lens is known as “eye
relief,” and is typically engineered to be 4 inches.
A scope that is mounted too far forward or rearward
presents the shooter with an occluded sight picture
that has reduced size and brightness, and surrounded by a dark circle. A properly positioned scope
presents a clear sight picture that fills the eyepiece
from a natural shooting position, and, importantly,
doesn’t thump its shooter’s eyebrow during recoil.
“Your crosshairs are crooked.” is a comment
scoped rifle owners are sure to hear. Ideally, crosshairs should be perfectly vertical and horizontal to
a rifle’s bore, and the rifle should never be canted in
either direction while shooting. In the real world,
eyeballing crosshairs to their true position, where
a shooter thinks they look straightest, is usually
precise enough to keep groups inside 3 inches at an
honest 200 yards.
If your bullets consistently land more left or
right as you adjust the elevation turret upward, the
crosshairs may indeed be cocked to one side. Loosen the ring retaining screws, and gently twist the
scope barrel until the crosshairs look straight each
time you shoulder the gun. To keep the crosshairs
in that position, tighten each ring retaining screw a
quarter-turn at a time until they feel equally snug;
called “pattern torqueing” by machinists, this procedure insures that all points of a mounted fixture
remain level under pressure.
If your scope appears to be positioned correctly,
yet the sight picture looks blurry, the ocular lens the lens you look through - is probably out of focus.
This problem is corrected by loosening the ocular
lens’ locking ring, just ahead of the eyebell, and
turning the entire eyebell (usually) clockwise until
the sight picture becomes clear. When maximum

clarity has been achieved, secure the lens in that position by turning the locking ring counterclockwise
until it presses tightly against the eyebell.
The right ammunition is critical. A 220-grain
.308 caliber bullet fired from a rifle that has been
zeroed using 150-grain bullets will impact lower on
its target at a given range, and that difference will
increase as range increases. Even the same weight
bullet from different manufacturers can have slightly different points of impact, depending on barrel
length, type of action, and bullet shape. Hunters
should always sight-in using the same make and
type of ammunition that they intend to use in the
field, and rifles should be re-zeroed following any
change in bullet weights or brand.
Terrain is an often overlooked factor in the
sighting process. Shooting downhill, for instance,
will result in a point of impact slightly lower than
it would be on level ground, because gravitational
influence is greater, which causes trajectory rise to
decrease. This is seldom a problem in the flat terrain of established target ranges, but it is something
to bear in mind when circumstances dictate that a
rifle be zeroed in the field.
Proper targets help to take the frustration out
of any sighting process, particularly with a newly
mounted scope. Shooting soup cans is fun with
an already-sighted rifle, but attempting to sight-in
for the first time using a small target can be impossible. A shooter needs to see where his bullets land,
because bullet holes are the points of reference used
to adjust point of impact. If you don’t know where
the last bullet hit, you can’t determine how many
clicks of the adjuster turret are needed to place the
next shot on target, or even in which direction to
make those adjustments. Large targets, especially

Riflescope sighting page 22

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21

Riflescope sighting:
from page 20

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

those with one-inch grids, are easiest
to use, but a paper plate with a cross
of contrasting vinyl tape in its center
suffices in a pinch. Bits of masking
tape can be used to cover bullet holes,
extending the useable life of your
targets.
Now you’re ready to sight-in
your rifle. Regardless of caliber,
or the range at which you intend to
zero your rifle, the first 3-shot group
should be fired from 12 yards, and
it should be fired as carefully as if
it were from 100 yards. Rifle foreend must be rested solidly, its barrel
should touch nothing, and each shot
should be aimed at the target’s center,
regardless of where bullets actually
land. Never compensate for a bullet’s
point of impact by shifting your point
of aim, and never shoot without a secure rest, because doing either defeats
the sighting process.
Using the center of this initial
group as a point of reference, remove
your scope’s turret caps and adjust
the windage and elevation knobs to
bring the crosshairs into alignment

22

Zeroing a telescopic sight on-the-spot, without the benefit of a collimator, is a technique that every shooter needs in his bag of skills.
with point of impact. Presuming a
traditional “1 click = 1/4-inch at 100
yards” (marked on the adjusters),
crosshairs will move at a rate of 32
clicks per inch at 12 yards. If the
group’s center is 1 inch left of the
bullseye and 1.5 inches low, adjust
the windage (side) turret 32 clicks
right, and the elevation (top) turret 48
clicks upward.
Next, move back to 50 yards and
fire another 3-shot group. Using the

center of that group as a reference,
adjust windage and elevation turrets at 8 clicks per inch. If the group
center is 2 inches high and 1/2-inch to
the right, adjust 16 clicks down and 4
clicks left.
The next, usually final, group is
fired from 100 yards, the optimum
range for most whitetail hunting.
Again, the group should consist of
3 shots, minimum, and should be
placed with as much precision as its

shooter can muster. At 100 yards,
4 clicks of the elevation or windage
turrets is equal to 1 inch of movement
on a target. If your group’s center is
1.5 inches high and 2 inches left of
the bullseye, adjusting 6 clicks downward and 8 clicks right should place
your bullets’ point of impact directly
on the target center.
While the above holds true for
scopes marked “1 click equals 1/4inch at 100 yards,” do not expect

that it will be exact for all telescopic
sights, because all scopes are not
created equal. If your rifle is sporting a tactical sight that retails for
$1,000, it had better move the point
of impact exactly .250-inch per click
at 100 yards. But if your gun wears a
low-end model that sold for $50 at a
department store, it cannot be expected to contain the same clockwork
precision. An inexpensive scope
can get the job done very well once
it has been sighted-in, but you may
have to twist 5 clicks to equal 1 inch
of movement on a target 100 yards
distant.
Experienced marksmen recommend that turret adjustments be made

Telescopic Riflescope Sighting Chart
Yards To Target Clicks Per Inch
12.5
32

25
16

50
8
100
4
150
3
200
2
250
1.75
300
1.50
350
1.25
400
1

1 Click Equals
1/32" (.031)
1/16" (.063)
1/8" (.125)
1/4" (.250)
1/3" (.333)
1/2" (.500)
2/3" (.666)
3/4" (.750)
7/8" (.875)
.0" (1.00)

using a procedure known as the
“there-and-back” technique. With
this method, a shooter who determines that his scope needs, say, 4
clicks of adjustment will actually
turn the turret 6 clicks in the desired
direction, then come back 2 clicks.
This practice helps insure that tiny
adjustor gears inside fall into place
completely.
If you can’t seem to change your
bullets’ point of impact, no matter
how many clicks you adjust, try rapping the scope tube lightly around
its turrets with a soft tool (a rubberhandled jackknife…). The delicate
inner workings of a telescopic sight
can become sticky with time and
exposure to heat and cold, causing the
crosshairs inside to hang up. Rapping
the turret area gently is usually sufficient to free the mechanism.
Keep scope lenses clean using a
soft cloth, like those made for cameras, and keep them covered when not
in use. Never use saliva to clean lenses; digestive enzymes in saliva erode
the metallic coatings responsible for
gathering and transmitting ambient
light to a shooter’s eye, resulting in
a less vivid sight picture. Treat your
telescopic sight well, regardless of
its price, and it will reward you with
years of accurate shooting.n

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23

Deer Hunting 2014--Tips for Bowhunting…

tanding cornfields can be an excellent place
to tag an early season buck. Especially
this fall, due to heavy rains and a lot of
wet cornfields, farmers will have to wait
even longer to harvest their cornfields. That
means there will be a lot of standing corn
still in the fields well into November.
Cornfields provide great cover and food for
whitetails, making hunting them difficult.
Most bowhunters hunt from a treestand or
ground blind.
But what can hunters do when there aren’t any
good places for either a tree stand or ground blind?
Hunters looking for a new exciting hunting experience should try stalking in the
standing corn this bow season.
Having standing corn near
your hunting spots will change
the landscape and pattern of
whitetail deer. While whitetails
inhabit a variety of terrain, acres
of unpicked cornfields offer a
perfect sanctuary for deer. Cornfields offer all the essential
resources whitetails need,
including food and security.
This makes it especially challenging during October
and early November. Deer tend to depend on the
safety of standing cornfields making it difficult to
pattern them.
While hunting standing corn is hard, it’s not
impossible. There are few advantages that hunters
have when it comes to stalking and using the corn
to their advantage.
Deciding when to try to stalk standing corn
is vital. One huge advantage hunters can use is
Mother Nature. Weather plays a major role in the
success of corn stalking whitetails. Hunters should
use the weather to their advantage.
Deer have a keen sense of sight, smell and hearing so any advantage Mother Nature can provide
could be a huge help. The best time to stalk in the
corn is when the weather conditions aren’t the best
for traditional stand hunters; wind, rain and snow
are adverse weather conditions but offer hunters a chance to get close enough into bow range.
The wind is a great mask that will cover the noise
created during the stalk. The wind also will make
plenty of noise between the corn stalks and nearby
trees. It also helps minimize a deer’s keen eyesight
since corn stalks are constantly moving. A hunter’s
movement is less obvious with thousands of corn
stalks blowing lazily in the wind.
A light rain will add moisture to the dry ground.
The rain will help soak up the noise made from
leaves or crunching corn stalks, it serves as an excellent noise dampener. The usually hard, noisy dirt

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Lane Walker

24

• Hunting The Corn... Being patient, knowing the hunting terrain, having a good pair of binoculars and
using the weather to advantage are keys to a successful cornfield stalk. Author photo
will absorb the moisture from the rain making for
easier and quieter travel.
Snow is another great weather condition to stalk
hunt in standing corn. A small snowfall can help
mask movement and moisten the ground enough for
quiet travel. It can also provide an excellent way to
follow tracks into the corn.
While hunting in these adverse weather conditions aren’t always the greatest for treestand hunting, they can be perfect for stalking standing corn.
Anyone that has ever tried to stalk a deer knows
how difficult it is. One reason that makes it such a
difficult hunting strategy is the fact that deer usually
see the hunter before the hunter can see the animal.
Being patient and knowing the hunting terrain
are two keys to a successful stalk hunt. Terrain is
often uneven and ever changing, this makes spotting deer difficult. Whitetails are already comfortable and know the landscape much better than even
the most seasoned hunter. Hunters should plan on a
long hunt and keep a patient pace while stalking.

Good binoculars are essential and hunters need to
make sure to look very carefully between the rows.
A good pair of optics will buy big dividends when
scanning corn rows looking for a bruiser whitetail.
When the weather conditions are right, the art
of stalking comes into play. The stalk has to be
designed with the wind direction in mind. Hunters should always hunt the cornfield with the wind
blowing parallel with rows and blowing in their
face pushing the scent behind the hunter.
While moving into wind, slowly peek and examine each row. Slowly meander your way through
the field until a deer is spotted. Once a deer is spotted, use the wind and row direction to sneak into
bow range.
Stalking deer in standing corn can provide
lots of excitement and adventure. It can be a great
strategy when the weather isn’t ideal for stand hunting or for hunter’s looking who are sick of sitting
around waiting for something to happen.n

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9

25

BIG Little Bay

de Noc walleyes
By Robert Dock Stupp

Why are the months of
October and November
prime time for catching
numbers of large walleyes
up to 10 pounds and more?

W

ell, a few years ago I
asked that question to
Phil Schneeberger, DNR
fish biologist for the state
of Michigan. Phil was
considered by many to be an expert

on Little Bay de Noc. “The primary
reason for the abundance of large
walleyes in the bay is the protection
from open water the bay provides
during the winter months,” he said.
“Other reasons are the abundance of
forage such as alewives and smelt and
an advance movement or staging for
spawning near the rivers at the north
end of the bay.”
Little Bay de Noc is world famous. Anglers from all over the
Midwest come here for the walleye
bite of a lifetime. And they
are seldom disappointed and usually

The author needed three hats to stay warm walleye fishing the U.P. but it was worth it!

Rob Shalvis

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FULL TIME Taxidermist

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

with 38 Years Experience
(over 6000+ Whitetail Mounts)

26

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plan another visit.
At the right time it is possible to
catch a legal walleye on just about
every bite. No doubt, many walleye
tournaments have put the towns of
Escanaba, Gladstone, and Kipling on
the map.
With 75 square miles of prolific
sport fishing fun, this is the place to
catch the trophy of a lifetime. Yeah,
but what about now - 2014? What
about the zebra mussels?
Well, it is my opinion that
the bay is as good as ever and it
is well protected by very wise
management. You can keep one
walleye over 23-inches and four
15-inches or more, securing the
future of this fishery. Also, it is
well known that many sportsmen
have been practicing catch and release here long before any regulations
were written.
This is refreshing news but so are
the winds of October and November. Yes, the bay is protected and it
is a walleye magnet that connects
to Green Bay and Lake Michigan to
the south. At times it can get rough
though, as the water pours through a

natural funnel from the south.
Not to worry, though, plenty of smaller boats do very well on this bay.
So, you have to watch the wind
but what walleye anglers really need
to consider is water temperature.

Water Temperature
What’s the magic number?
Action usually heats up for bigger
walleyes once the autumn water temperatures drop to 45 degrees or less.
Historically, the cooler water draws
the big, female ‘eyes into the bay.
Experience has taught my fishing buddies and me that patience is
the key for a successful trip. Fishing
is still productive at 50 degree water
temps and sometimes that magic
number occurs in November, so we
wait. Or go two or three times a year.
It’s always a good idea to familiarize
yourself with the bay and fishing is
rarely boring – right?
But how can you check this
temperature? You can get this data on
water temperature by visiting www.
coastwatch.msu.edu. Now, let’s go
fishin’.

Keith “the Snowman” Genereotzke is appropriately named Snowman because it indeed snowed in
November on Little Bay de Noc -- but the walleye fishing -- wow!
fish. These rivers provide nutrients,
forage, and good spawning habitat.
From the Kipling Landing, fish
Near the Days River, fish the 12 to 18
the Three Reefs area. Troll along
foot flat just off the river mouth. Also
the sides of the reefs or drift over the
try the small exposed rock pile and a
tops with a simple jig and minnow. A small island. Both of these structures
north or south wind works best.
are excellent for night fishing. South
North of the Kipling Landing, four of the Days, try the area that contains
rivers flow into the upper bay; the
Days, Tacooch, Rapid, and the White- Little Bay de Noc walleyes page 28

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

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27

BIG Little Bay de Noc walleyes:

Rigging Up

from page 27
a small 10 to 12 foot finger and a
long tapering ridge in 16 to 26 feet of
water.
Near the mouth of the Whitefish,
be sure to try the rocky humps south
of Garth Point.
There is also the new launch site,
HBS_FP-Robbed_D&D

bottom or suspending, then plan your
strategy accordingly.

the Northshore Boat Launch, located
on the Escanaba River off Sheridan
Road, near the Escanaba Power Plant
with plenty of good walleye fishing
here also.
As always, use your electronics to
detect whether the walleyes are on the

Before cooler water arrives, most
walleye anglers troll crawler harnesses in shallow water.
Zebra mussels have caused a
clearer water situation in the bay so
planer boards and the lighted planer
boards are popular and productive in
the evening.

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

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28

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Also, Connie Brooks, co-owner
with Naomi Johnson of Bay Shore
Resort (906)-428-9687 at the Kipling
Boat Landing, say that many of the
successful anglers are still using snap
weights. Just set the depth according
to the chart. Downriggers and leadcore line are also popular. And we
sell lots of lures like Rapala’s Deep
Down Husky Jerks, Reef Runner Rip
Sticks, or Storm’s Thundersticks.
But just today I talked to Naomi
Johnson who informed me of a new
bait (new to me) called a Moonshine Shiver Minnow. This artificial
bait looks somewhat like a Jigging
Rapala which tends to run or work in
a circular motion. The Shiver Minnow is normally cast out and has an
enticing darting action from side to
side. It is more of a weight-forward
lure. Naomi says that this lure is so
popular that they sell them all over
the place on their website – www.
bay-shore-rsort.com I believe you
could vertically jig them for ice fishing purposes. Lots of hot colors for
this hot lure!! Naomi says muskies
love them too.
A side note; the perch are biting
too.
Keeping things a little simpler,
longtime Escanaba resident and
notable walleye angler, Joe Couchene
(a great friend and angler who pasted
away) said, that jigging works well in
the bay and any jig color is great as
long as it’s red.
Passing along a few more tips,
Joe always said that he also believes
in long-lining crawler harnesses with
purple blades. He would put a single
split-shot about 3-feet up from the
crawler and troll over the weeds.
Still keeping it simple for deeper
walleyes, he uses various sizes of bottom bouncers.
Finally, drifting is still a good
tactic and is made more productive
with the use of drift-socks, especially
when the wind prevents a slower
presentation. Try this along the steep,
eastern shoreline when the electronics
show that walleyes are on the bottom.
The Little Bay de Noc walleye
possession limit is, more precisely:
no more than one walleye over
23-inches may be possessed in daily
limit north of a line drawn from Peninsula Point Lighthouse to the mouth
of the Ford River. Therefore, you can
still keep your trophy of a lifetime
and protect the resource at the same
time.
Be sure to dress like you are going snowmobiling or ice fishing and
watch the winds on the bay.
Other information: Contact the
Delta County Chamber of Commerce
(906)-786-2194.
Can’t wait to try that Moonshine…Shiver Minnow…that is!n

Kenny Darwin photo

Timing of the RUT is important
S
Hence, natural selection has minimized poorly
timed breeding/birthing schedules among whitetails. Breeding schedules that might hinge upon
cues other than photoperiod, and contribute to
untimely births, are soon lost from the gene pool
because the resultant progeny die.

The Breeding Window

In the words of noted professor and deer
researcher, Karl V. Miller from the University of
Georgia, “The whitetails’ breeding season
can be viewed as a window of opportunity. Its opening and closing varies with
latitude.” This window tends to be quite
narrow in the North, but widens southward
North of about 36 degrees latitude,
most whitetails breed between mid-October and mid-December, with peak breeding occurring during November (hence,
peak fawning occurs during late May and
early June). If an adult doe does not
become pregnant, she will probably
recycle in 23 to 30 days. A Northern
adult doe in top physical condition might even
recycle a third time. However, the tight Northern
breeding window is closely regulated by photoperiod, and promptly closes with the onset of cold
weather, snow cover, and reduced food availability.
By comparison, the Southern breeding window
is potentially much wider. And I emphasize, potentially. The best managed deer herds exhibit relatively brief and intensive ruts, even in the South.
Between 28 and 36 degrees latitude, most
whitetails breed between late September and late
March. In some areas of the South, peak breeding
occurs in November, but in other areas not until
December of January.
In the South, an unbred doe might come into
estrus as many as seven times in one season. This
accounts for the South’s potentially long breeding
season.

By John Ozoga

According to Miller, “the late breeding in some
regions of the Southeast may be self-perpetuating.
For instance, a fawn’s timing would have been affected by when its mother’s cues were set, and her
mother’s, and so on.”

Disruptive Forces

A number of stressful factors might lead to a
poorly timed or prolonged rut and impact whitetail
physical condition, reproductive performance, and
survival. High herd density, poor nutrition, and social disorder, often the result of poor herd management (i.e., inadequate or excessive harvest of one
or both sexes) are key factors that can disrupt and
delay the whitetails’ breeding/birthing schedule.
Although the Northern rut tends to be brief and
rigidly controlled by photoperiod, studies conducted in the North have shown that poor nutrition
and high herd density can delay peak breeding by
a week or two -- which is sufficiently delayed to
result in a number of consequences. Southern herds
are equally affected by poor nutrition and herd density, but also seem to be more responsive to social
imbalances.
For example, studies conducted by Professor
David Guynn at Clemson University showed that
unbalanced sex ratios and improper buck age structure can contribute to delay and protracted breeding
seasons in Southern deer herds. He concluded that
the presence of mature bucks produced certain biostimulating effects on does that resulted in earlier
and more synchronized estrus cycles. In his studies,
proper deer harvesting to restore herd social balance resulted in less estrus recycling and earlier and
shorter breeding seasons.
In contrast, we found no evidence of such biostimulating effects in our northern Michigan studies.
Depending upon the environment, deer may
respond differently to various stresses. However,

Whitetail rut timing page 30

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

ince whitetails are seasonal shortday breeders, the timing of deer
births is critically important for
the species survival. Regardless of
the environment, in the Northern
hemisphere, whitetails are adapted
to conceive at the proper time each
autumn, so that fawns are born
(about 200 days later) in spring when weather, food,
and cover conditions are favorable for maximum
fawn survival.
It’s noteworthy that other larger North American
cervids such as caribou, elk, and moose
also exhibit this adaptive breeding/birthing
schedule. Although they have an earlier
breeding season and longer gestation (220
to 260 days), as compared to whitetails,
they too typically give birth during late
May and early June.
Given the importance of this breeding/
birthing schedule, reliable environmental
cues are required to trigger the reproductive process in a timely fashion.
Among whitetails, this cue is decreasing photoperiod -- the ratio of daylight to darkness. Without fail, shortening periods
of daylight in autumn cause physiological changes
responsible for the whitetail’s breeding cycle.
Other environmental cues just are not reliable.
And, most importantly, not adaptive. Although
some contend that such things as moon phase, cloud
cover, and temperature act to modify the effects of
photoperiod on the whitetail’s reproductive cycle,
no scientific studies support such thinking.
Most importantly, there is little or no adaptive
reasoning behind these other theories. If not for the
infallible photoperiod cue, timing of the rut and resultant fawn birth dates would fluctuate wildly from
year to year and from one area to the next. Such a
wide swing in the reproductive cycle would result
in ridiculously early births some years and exceptionally late births during other years. In either case,
newborn fawn survival would suffer.

29

Whitetail rut timing:
from page 29
there is plenty of evidence that delayed and protracted ruts are detrimental to herd welfare. Invariably, proper herd management -- aimed at improving nutrition and restoring natural social balance
-- will result in breeding/birthing schedules that
favor deer physical development and maximum
newborn fawn survival.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Social Order

30

Deer populations that are well-balanced – nutritionally and socially -- exhibit a breeding order
among does that helps maintain social order during
the fawning season. Normally, older maternally
experienced does breed earlier than young firsttime breeders. This is important because it assures
proper distribution of fawn-rearing does, orderly
use of available fawning grounds, and maintenance
of cohesive kinship groups.
Because does aggressively defend fawn-rearing
territories, competition for available space could
be intense, and even chaotic, if not for orderly
birthing. Ideally, older matriarchs should give birth
first and reclaim their traditional fawning grounds.
Younger related females should give birth a few
days later and establish fawning territories nearby.
Does fawning for their second time tend to disperse
a short distance, of a quarter-mile or so, to establish
new fawning territories and thereby expand the
family’s ancestral range.
All of this, of course, hinges upon orderly
sequential breeding and likely involves certain
behaviorisms (and physiological processes) we currently don’t fully understand.
Buck age structure seems to be an important
(and I might add, natural) factor in orderly mating of does during the rut. Although recent DNA
studies indicate that all older bucks tend to do
some mating, regardless of their dominance rank, a
number of investigations suggest that does respond
more favorably to mates closer to their own age.
In the absence of mature bucks, as occurs in many
areas of excessive buck harvesting, older does
more likely shun the advances of younger sires and
delay mating. On the other hand, yearling bucks
might play a more instrumental role in the rut than
formerly believed.
Miller postulates that primer pheromones
deposited at rubs and scrapes by dominant bucks
stimulate does and bring them into estrus early.
Since younger bucks do minimal scent-marking,
intense buck harvesting may contribute to less
orderly mating and untimely birthing. In turn, this
results in intense and chaotic competition among
does for fawning space and leads to increased newborn fawn mortality.
Although rarely mentioned in the scientific literature, excessive doe harvesting might also cause
social disruption by preventing the formation of
cohesive kinship groups.
Since matriarch females are usually does
greater than five years old, intensive female harvesting and a shortage of these social leaders could
cause a break-down in natural grouping tendencies
among related does. How this might impact breed-

Whether or not a Northern fawn survives its first winter may hinge heavily upon when it was conceived
and when it was born. Kenny Darwin photo
ing/birthing schedules is unknown. However, I’m
willing to guess that such social disruption would
be especially detrimental among migratory deer on
Northern range.

Hiding Cover
Nursing does require ideal nutrition in order
to nourish their rapidly growing fawns. However,
because the young fawn’s chief defense against
predation is hiding, dense low level vegetation is
also critically important wherever whitetails and
predators such as coyotes coexist.
Investigations conducted in southern Texas
rather clearly demonstrated how important fawn
hiding cover can be. There, annual fawn mortality rates varied appreciably, depending upon the
amount of rainfall, which in turn determined the
quality and availability of deer foods and fawn hiding cover during spring and summer. Fawn losses
ranged from 10 percent during years of heavy rainfall, and good fawn hiding cover, to as much as 90
percent during years of drought and scant low level
vegetation. Predation of exposed fawns by coyotes
was the primary factor causing high fawn mortality
-- as it would be in other populations if fawns were
born before the flush of spring vegetation.

Prey Saturation
The importance of fawn birth dates was also
demonstrated by University of Wyoming researchers Donald Whittaker and Frederick Lindzey. They
studied the effect of coyote predation on survival
of 120 whitetail and mule deer fawns in Colorado.

Tagged fawns born outside peak parturition, when
density of newborns was low, had lower survival
that those born during the peak.
According to Whittaker and Lindzey, “Of
fawns surviving more than 30 days (11 whitetails,
49 mule deer) most (92% and 55% for mule and
white-tailed deer, respectively) were born during or
immediately after peak density of fawns…coyote
predation accounted for 79% of early fawn mortality for both species. Date of parturition was the best
predictor of early fawn survival. Because whitetailed deer fawns were born an average of 8-10
days earlier, and mule deer outnumbered whitetailed deer 4:1, mule deer were afforded protection
through predator swamping.”

Late-born Runts
If fawns are to survive their precarious early
life, attain their maximum growth potential before
the onset of winter, and survive their first winter,
they must be born at the proper time.
In the South, where whitetail breeding seasons
are potentially long, but winters are mild, even
late-born fawns stand a good chance of surviving
their first winter. However, late-born buck fawns, in
particular, are at a distinct disadvantage. Compared
to early born males, late-born individuals typically have smaller body size and smaller antlers at
yearling age.
Noted scientist Harry Jacobson, from Mississippi State University, has shown that antler growth
among yearlings in the South is closely related to
fawn development in the first year of life.
“This becomes evident,” claims Jacobson,

“when we look at the month a male fawn is born
and his antler quality at 18 months. Antler data
from deer raised in captivity show that date of birth
is very important for antler quality. Regardless of
birth date, all bucks cease antler growth for the
year at about the same time. This takes place during September and October, when the antlers mineralize and velvet is shed. Thus, when fawns are
born over a six-month period, as they are in some
areas of the South, some have had only eleven
months of growth to complete yearling antlers
while others are as old as 16 months.”
In Jacobson’s studies, 89% of the yearling
bucks born September-November carried only
spike antlers, whereas none of those born in June
had spikes; 21% of the yearling bucks born in July
and August grew spikes.
“Fortunately,” says Jacobson, “how a buck
begins life may have little to do with antler qualities late in life. There is often little relationship between a buck’s antlers at age five. A buck may get
a bad start because of a later birth or poor nutrition
but still can catch up in antler growth if adequate
nutrition is available later.”
Unfortunately, however, late-born bucks often
experience poor nutrition later in life. As a result,
stunted late-born yearling males quite often grow
up to be sup-par bucks even at maturity.

Importance Of Two Weeks
Physical consequences of late-birth are not limited to deer in the South. Even on Northern range,

save a

time for growth is extremely important, especially
for bucks, because they have higher nutritional requirements for body growth compared to females.
Even a week or two can make a big difference in a
buck fawn’s body growth should cold weather and
snow cover restrict nutritious forage earlier than
usual.
In fact, we found that birth date was even important for fawns provided with unlimited supplemental feed in our Northern Michigan Cusino
enclosure studies.
Quoting from an unpublished report: “our data
demonstrate the relative importance of birth dates
between sexes of white-tailed deer. Males born
earlier (i.e., in late May) had 10% greater mass the
following spring at 9 months of age than late-born
(after 6 June) males. Early-born females also had
greater mass the following spring than late-born
individuals, but the difference between groups was
less (3%). Although these data do not measure
future fitness, they provide strong support to the
hypothesis that birth date could differentially influence future fitness in male and female white-tailed
deer.”
On average, if a Cusino enclosure buck fawn
did not weigh more than 85 pounds by late fall, it
was also under-sized as a yearling and grew only
spike antlers. These poor quality individuals were
usually born during late June, and also weighed
less and carried smaller-than-normal antlers when
two years old -- despite supplemental nutrition.
In the North, a fawn’s chances of surviving
its first winter depend a great deal upon its body

size going into winter. Small­bodied individuals
are least likely to survive. Even those born during late June may be smaller and disadvantaged as
compared to others born two or three weeks earlier.
Hence, whether or not a Northern fawn survives
its first winter may hinge heavily upon when it
was conceived and when it was born -- and even a
couple of weeks may make a big difference.

Conclusions
The whitetail rut is primarily controlled by
decreasing photoperiod, an adaptation that allows
fawns to be born at the proper time in spring. This
assures maximum newborn fawn survival and sufficient time for their physical development before
winter.
Given the extreme importance of the timing of
the rut -­hence, birthing dates -- delayed or protracted ruts are generally symptomatic of poor deer
herd management. Inadequate nutrition, herd density stress, and poor social structure are key factors
responsible for an untimely rut.
Protracted ruts are a common malady in the
South, because of the Southern whitetails’ potentially wide breeding window. However, even a
week or two delay in peak rut can be detrimental to
Northern deer.
Proper herd management -- aimed at maintaining nutritional and social balance -- will restore
breeding/birthing schedules that assure maximum
newborn fawn survival and favorable physical
development.n

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31

It Dominates The Steelhead Fishing Scene...By Mark Romanack

The Incredible, Edible Egg

I

t sounds a little strange, but
freshly spawned fish eggs are
one of the most natural of all fish
baits for trout and salmon. Lots
of fish eat eggs because eggs
make for both a convenient and
abundant food resource.
The desire trout and salmon have
to eat fish eggs goes deeper and is a
little sinister. Trout and salmon eat the
eggs of other salmonids not just for
the food value, but also to keep other
species and the blood lines of their
own species from dominating in any
given fishery. Just like a coyote will
readily attack and kill a fox (who also
eats the same foods as a coyote) in his
territory, fish instinctively are competitive to the point of eating the off
spring of other fish.
The irony of this complex survival
strategy is that fish like steelhead
or salmon can’t readily identify the
species of egg they are eating and
you guessed it trout and salmon often
end up eating the eggs of their own
species! Apparently it’s not a perfect
survival system, but it does set up a
fishing opportunity we’ll simply call
the fall “egg bite”.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

THE EGG BITE

32

Not surprisingly, fresh eggs, cured
eggs and a multitude of egg imitations
are among the best fishing baits for
steelhead, salmon and stream trout.
Here in Michigan eggs from a host of
species are spawned in rivers during
the fall. Starting in September and
stretching right into early December
king, coho, pink and atlantic salmon,
plus brook trout, lake trout and brown
trout deposit a steady supply of eggs
into Michigan’s most popular rivers.
Collectively these species are
providing an abundant food source for
one of the most sought after fish in the
Great Lakes, the steelhead. Steelhead
move into select rivers in the fall to
gorge themselves on the spawn of
other fish.
In fact, it’s pretty common to see
steelhead positioning themselves
just downstream of salmon spawning redds waiting for an easy meal to
drift within striking distance. Because
salmon tend to spawn on shallow
gravel bars, much of the best fall
steelhead fishing action also takes
place in water less than six feet deep.
Late in the fall when the supply
of eggs starts to decline, steelhead
slip into deeper pools where they
spend the winter. In the spring when it
becomes the steelhead’s turn to spawn
eggs again become one of the best
fishing baits, because steelhead don’t

Trout like this stream rainbow consume a lot of fish eggs as part of their daily diet. One of the most natural of all trout baits,
fresh or cured eggs and egg imitations should be part of every trout and steelhead angler’s bag of tricks. Author photos
hesitate to eat the eggs of their own
species!

the eggs from the skein, wash them
and dry them on paper towels. When
the eggs are dry, put them in a plastic
bag and sprinkle borax soap or a commercial egg cure over the eggs to coat
them throughly. Properly cured eggs
will stay good in the refrigerator for
several weeks.
Most anglers make up spawn sacs
from the cured eggs and then freeze
the spawn sacs for later use. Ordinary
borax soap is a common preservative
used to cure fish eggs, but a host of
commercial products that not only
cure the eggs, but color them in the
process are also popular with fishermen.

the terminal end.
Slinky sinkers are another popular alternative to using split shot for
weight. A slinky sinker consists of a
SPAWN SACS
length of parachute cord with various
size lead balls slipped into the hollow cord. A lighter is used to melt the
Eggs and egg imitations are fished
ends of the parachute cord and anglers
a number of ways depending on the
customize these sinkers to any weight
target species, water clarity and curnecessary for achieving a slow but
rent speed. For steelhead fishing the
steady drift.
always popular spawn sac has been
Slinky sinkers are renowned for their
the “go to” bait of Michigan anglers
ability to avoid snagging bottom.
for decades. Spawn sacs can be made
Most anglers rig up for slinky fishing
with fresh or preserved eggs and are
by threading a snap swivel onto their
normally about the size of a dime in
line and then tying on a small barrel
diameter. Small foam floats are often
swivel. The leader, hook and spawn
added to the bag to give the eggs a
sac is tied to the barrel swivel and the
little more buoyancy and a better
slinky sinker is attached to the free
drift. Different color netting is also
COMMON RIGS
sliding snap swivel above. This simple
employed to appeal to the highly
to rig and fish spawn sac set up is
developed sense of sight steelhead and
Getting the spawn sac to bottom is amazingly snag free and can be fished
other trout/salmon are known for.
normally achieved by pinching a few in fast or slow water as conditions
Spawn sacs tied from fresh eggs
split shot on the line about three to six dictate.
are considered the best possible
The length of the leader is nor“bait”, but preserving eggs using a va- feet in front of the bait. A No. 8 beak
mally determined by water clarity. In
riety of commercial egg cure products or egg hook is the most typical hook
is necessary to insure a good selection size used with spawn and most anglers the fall when the water clarity is often
will fish 6 to 10 pound test monofila- murky a leader of about 36 inches is
of eggs for the entire fall, winter and
ment as main line and one size smaller
spring fishing season.
Incredible eggs page 34
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To cure fresh eggs simply break

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WHILE
SUPPLIES
LAST!

33

Incredible egg:
considered normal. As the water levels stabilize and becomes more clear,
seasoned steelhead anglers extend
the length of their leaders up to six or
seven feet if necessary.
The need for fishing long leaders is one of the primary reasons that
most steelhead anglers favor longer
rods that allow the angler to cast
effectively even when using longer
leaders. My “go to” steelhead rod
for fishing spawn sacs is an Okuma
T-40X series model TX-S-992ML,
which is a nine foot, nine inch long
medium/light action high modulus
graphite rod. I match this rod up with
a RTX series spinning reel in size 35
and load that reel with 150 yards of
eight pound test Maxima Ultra Green
fishing line.

cal to the current speed. It’s also important to use a sensitive rod that can
telegraph the “tick, tick, tick” of the
split shot or slinky weights as they
are washed downstream and collide
with the bottom.
A bite can be detected as a subtle
tap on the line, or simply a sensation of weight on the line. The best
anglers use high quality graphite rods
and concentrate intently on every
inch of the drift. Once this rig has
been swept downstream, the angler
simply reels up and makes another
cast, often casting many times to a
particular current seam.
If a fish bites and is missed, it’s
best to rebait with a fresh spawn sac.
It’s also a good idea to frequently
switch out spawn sacs that have been
fished awhile and are “milked out”
with fresh bait. It’s also very important to experiment with the netting
color used to tie up spawn sacs as
steelhead can become very color
sensitive at times.

ROLLING BOTTOM

BEAD RIGS

Drift fishing or what many
steelhead anglers refer to as “rolling
bottom” is best practiced from an
anchored boat or wading from shore.
From this fixed position the angler
casts across and slightly upstream
and allows the rig to sink to bottom.
When just the right amount of weight
is used, the rig will sink to bottom,
but be washed downstream slowly
creating the illusion of an egg cluster
naturally tumbling downstream in the
current.
The trick in “rolling bottom” is
using just the right amount of weight
to achieve a drift that’s nearly identi-

If the always popular “spawn sac”
has a rival on the steelhead stream
it would have to be the single bead
rig. A bead rig is a single plastic
bead usually 6 to 8 mm in size that
is designed to replicate a single egg
drifting downstream in the current.
The “bead rig” starts by threading
a bead onto the main line and then
using a piece of toothpick to secure
the bead on the line. A No. 8 hook is
tied on the terminal end leaving about
two inches of line between the hook
and the bead.
The same split shot and slinky
rig described above can be used to

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

from page 32

34

Nicely colored steelhead like this one have been in the river awhile gorging on salmon
and trout eggs.

In the fall steelhead like this hen become “egg eating machines” and one of the best
ways to catch them is by fishing with real eggs, plastic eggs, beads, yarn flies and
other egg imitators.
beads that closely resemble
fish a single bead. When a fish grabs
eggs, there are a number of other
the bead as it drifts downstream, the
options stream steelhead fisherman
angler sets the hook and the fish is
commonly employ. Yarn flies,
generally hooked on the outside of
soft plastic eggs and scented soft
the jaw making it easy to release fish
baits like Gulp and PowerBait eggs
unharmed.
all have their place on the steelhead
Beads come in lots of different
stream.
sizes and colors designed to imitate
Because yarn flies are light they
the different species of fish eggs in
drift naturally with the current and
the water. Bead color also replicates
produce exceptionally well in clear
eggs based on how long they have
water conditions. Yarn flies are also
been in the water. For example,
available in a host of subtle color
a fresh king salmon egg is bright
options.
orange in color. That same egg turns
Scented plastic eggs and soft
almost white in color once it has been
baits bring to the party egg imitain the water a few days.
Many bead fishermen go so far as tions that smell and taste the part. The
to custom paint their beads to show
idea here is that when fish bite they
details like embryos and veins. Going tend to hang onto a scented or flavor
to such extremes may seem over-kill, enhanced egg longer than beads or
but hard core steelhead anglers are
yarn flies.
known for going the extra mile in the
pursuit of angling success.
SUMMING IT UP
Many bead fishermen use fly fishing gear. A typical set up consists of
a 10 foot/eight weight rod and a 10’
The “egg bite” dominates the
leader of 20# test monofilament and
steelhead fishing scene for most
a short tippet of 10# test fluorocarbon anglers in Michigan. As soon as
line. A few small split shot are added
salmon start spawning steelhead
to the line to get the bead to bottom
show up in the same rivers to gorge
and a strike indicating float is added
themselves on salmon spawn. This
near the fly line to help detect subtle
fishing bonanza reaches a peak in
strikes.
late October and remains hot through
This rig is casted upstream of a
November and into December.
drifting boat. Meanwhile the boat is
Countless steelhead come to net
kept downstream so the bead is alevery year because of the incredible
ways presented upstream of the strike edible egg!
indicator.
When fly fishing bead rigs from
RESOURCES
shore the angler casts upstream and
mends line as the rig drifts downstream past the angler’s location.
www.okumafishing.com
www.youtube.com/
watch?v=FbRFCj9IBS8
(curing
IMITATORS
salmon eggs video)
www.fishermanshack.net/Slinky.../
Besides fishing with real eggs or
Standard-Slinky-Tool-p902.htmln

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© 2012 Bombardier Recreational Products Inc. (BRP). All rights reserved. ™, ®, and the BRP logo are trademarks of Bombardier Recreational Products, Inc. or its affiliates. In the USA, the products are distributed by BRP US Inc. BRP reserves the right, at any
time, to discontinue or change specifications, prices, designs, features, models or equipment without incurring obligation. Some models depicted may include optional equipment. BRP highly recommends that all ATV drivers take a training course. For safety
and training information, see your dealer or, in USA, call the ATV Safety Institute at 1-800-887-2887. In Canada, call the Canadian Safety Council at (613) 739-1535 ext 227. Read the Operator’s Guide and watch the Safety DVD before riding. Wear appropriate
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35

Caught in the act
Coyote predation is a natural fact as this series of trail cam photos illustrates.

Opportunistic coyote is whitetail fawn’s #1 predator

W

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

e’ve often heard a picture is
worth a thousand words. These
series of trail camera photos sent
by a reader easily tell a story of

Mother Nature’s way.
Simply put, all things in nature have a
purpose. This fawn’s purpose was to feed a pair
of coyotes. Mother Nature can be harsh, brutal
and bloody .
Ryan Curtis, 35, sets multiple trail cameras

36

on his Lapeer County farm 365 days a year.
The cameras are always out, providing him
with every opportunity to see what creatures
are wandering his farm. And, of course giving
himself an excellent whitetail scouting tool.
Ryan and his brother grew up in an outdoor
family, always tagging along with his grandfather, father and uncle on many hunting trips.
Today, he and his wife maintain and enjoy an
outdoor lifestyle on their land. Hunting both

deer and turkey.

Since 2009 Ryan
has noticed an increase in
coyotes on the property. He
has attempted to hunt them
but has had little success.
He hears the coyote and sees
them more often now. His

By Randy Jorgensen

Coyotes are the #1 killers of fawns, followed by bobcats, bears and wolves in that order according to Upper Peninsula studies.
“Studies have shown though, that newborn
fawn mortality can be 20 to 25 percent once
fawns reach four or five weeks old and become
more active,” Ozoga stated.
You can read more about the fawn mortality
studies on page 29 of this issue of Woods-NWater News, written by John. It is an interesting piece on how the timing of the whitetail
rut is critically important to newborn fawn
survival.
Ryan has a mineral lick on the trail cam
where he took this series of photos of the fawn
attack.
“I actually think the coyotes knew the deer
had been using the lick and ambushed the fawn.
I know you hear reports of wolves checking
U.P. bait piles for deer, I don’t know why this

would be any different?” Ryan explained.
As stated earlier, coyotes are supreme opportunists. One reader recently reported that
the sound of a gun shot puts coyotes on alert
for an easy whitetail meal in the area. Now it
may certainly be a stretch to say the gun shot
is a dinner bell to coyote but it does make you
wonder.
It just may be happenchance a coyote is in
the area of a recent kill and takes the opportunity to feed before being chased off by the
tracking hunter.

A few years back I shot a coyote during
the whitetail muzzlelader season which had
spooked a family of deer on a freshly frozen

Caught in the act page 38

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

trail camera photos are littered with coyote.
Ryan free ranges chickens on his land during
the summer and has noticed some are coming
up missing. He thought fox, raccoon or hawks
were getting them and most likely they were,
but so were the coyotes.
Coyote are opportunity seekers, they will
eat most anything that is available. Most often
the coyotes diet is mice, rabbits, squirrels,
birds, snakes, frogs, fruit and seeds. They will
also feed on vehicle killed deer, dogs, cats and
small farm animals.
John Ozoga, Woods-N-Water News whitetail specialist and wildlife biologist has been
quoted saying, “Predation by coyotes on adult
deer is a fraction of what many hunters believe
it is.”

37

All things in nature have a purpose, evidently these trail cam photos show this fawn’s purpose was to feed these two coyotes.

Caught in the act:
from page 37

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

lake.
It’s exciting to watch nature unfold in front
of you.
The adult doe stopped, looking straight
ahead, stomping with her front foot as they
have at me on many occasions. She and the
other younger deer changed direction. She ran
across the lake with little trouble, slipping a
little but made it across the frozen lake easily. The other, younger deer didn’t have the
experience the wily mama deer had on ice,

38

they slipped and slide across the lake in comical slapstick fashion. I remember chuckling to
myself as they fell and tried to get back up on
the ice. Little did I know at the time they were
running for their life. One of the yearlings fell
splayed legged on the ice and just couldn’t get
back to her feet.
Out of the corner of my eye I saw a coyote
running across the ice headed directly for the
young deer struggling to get up and escape. It
wasn’t funny any more, the brutal side of Nature was about to unfold before my eyes.
Just before the coyote reached his prey,
about 50 yards in front of me, I greeted the
coyote with my Thompson Center muzzleload-

er. The young deer had escaped a gruesome
death. The coyote didn’t fare as well, nor as expected.
The truth as illustrated by this series of photos taken by Ryan’s trail cameras is; “Coyotes do
and can kill deer.”
With that being said, it’s fair to say the more
coyotes, adds up to more fawn deaths. Without
question hunters can help in the bulging population growth of coyotes in their area. Clearly we
are the ones who can help keep Mother Nature
in balance. It is our responsibility, our purpose in
nature.
Ryan, thanks for the outstanding and rare photos of Mother Nature in action. n

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operated sawmill located in the heart of Northern Michigan. We
work hard to staff the most experienced professionals and we
believe in investing in the most current technology. As a team,
our departments of forestry, wood processors, timber haulers
and sawmills are striving to provide the most efficient, professional and quality timber services available in Northern Michigan.

FREE EVALUATIONS OF STANDING TIMBER
FORESTER
Our forester has the education and experience needed to meet the specific needs of any landowner. We will meet with you to discover your goals and help you select the best harvest
method to reach those goals. (Management plans, Wildlife plans, chipping of tops, clearing
trees for food plots, ect)
LOGGING CREWS
Our seasoned logging crews use state of the art wood processors, feller bunchers, forwarders
and chippers, our mechanized wood crews are using the latest technology to provide the most
efficient removal of forest products with minimal impact to residual timber and underlying soils.
TRUCK FLEET
Since we maintain our own fleet of self-loading log trucks to haul wood to our mill, we have the
unique advantage of being able to schedule the hauling of your timber products around hunting
or weather issues.
SAWMILL
Our mill is located just north of the beautiful little town of Comins, Michigan and consists of two
modern sawmills and one scragg mill operation. A distinct advantage that we have is specific
markets for what is referred to as industrial lumber. As a sawmill, we are paying good money
for the best quality wood out there, but we also pay well for lower quality industrial timber as
well. Another advantage that we have is the scragg mill. This mill allows us to utilize smaller
diameter material that in the past would have been sold as firewood or pulpwood which is worth
two thirds less than scragg material.

REFERENCES AVAILABLE

We would honor the opportunity for us to meet and discuss in more detail how we may be of
service to you. We also encourage the land owners to visit all our operations to see what products we turn your standing timber into.

Michigan Lumber & Wood Fiber, Inc.

Comins, Mi • (989) 848-2100 or (989) 848-5946 • Fax: (989) 848-7252

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

We are your complete source for buying your timber! Our operations take your standing timber from the tree to delivered green lumber. We have eliminated the need for all of the “middle
men”. By obtaining strong markets for our products and investing in technology, we are able
to get the most out of every last log we process. All this means savings for us and more money
for you. We are locally owned and we live and shop in the same communities that you do. We
value our reputation above everything else. And we are committed to earning your trust and
building a lasting relationship.

39

U.P. SMALLMOUTH
BASS FISHERIES
UNDER-UTILIZED!

T

he Upper Peninsula
has some outstanding native smallmouth
bass fisheries. These
fisheries often maintain themselves better than
walleye, for example, because
many ardent smallmouth bass
anglers release all or most of
their fish. Smallmouth bass
are often caught incidentally by local walleye,
pike, and muskie anglers
and released because most Yoopers do not care to eat them. This is
in contrast to walleye, where a legal

sized fish is rarely released.
In inland areas of the Upper
Peninsula smallmouth bass
have flourished as walleye
maintenance stocking has
diminished. In the last
decade natural reproductive
conditions have been good
for smallmouth and local
populations have increased
significantly.
DNR bass surveys
have indicated that
sometimes when largemouth and
smallmouth bass are both present in a
lake, one species population appears

By Bill Ziegler

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Erich Ziegler from Crystal Falls holding up a nice size smallmouth bass before releasing it at Ottawa
Lake in Iron County. Author photos

40

Benji Wood of Iron Mountain with a nice smallmouth taken
on an Iron County Impoundment while muskie fishing.

to dominate the other for a few years.
Sometimes this relationship changes
back and forth in terms of bass species
dominance. One example is the Fortune Lake chain in Iron County where
this alternating species dominance has
been evident over the last 25 years.
At Fortune Lakes the largemouth
population was higher during the late
1980s to early 1990s and by 1996
largemouth had started to drop back as
smallmouth increased in abundance.
Smallmouth abundance has increased
in many of the local lakes in the past
decade. At Winslow Lake - Iron
County, largemouth bass were introduced in 1937. Smallmouth bass had
been present in the initial lake survey
prior to the introduction of largemouth
and were not found again until recent
fisheries surveys there.
Bass fishing regulations changed
back in 1993 and the state minimum size limit was increased from
12 inches to 14 inches. This added
protection has led to an improvement
in size structure of both smallmouth
and largemouth bass in lakes. We
did not observe a significant shift in

smallmouth size structure in area rivers although our survey efforts were
limited in rivers.
Often the smallmouth catch and
keep season starts in the UP at about
the same time smallmouth normally
spawn. Smallmouth spawn at about
62 degrees that often falls around Memorial Day. They are more vulnerable
when on their beds as they will strike
at most lures or any aquatic organisms
to come in contact with their nests.
The overall DNR fisheries records
indicate that the following U P waters
are notable for smallmouth bass populations and size structure: Portage
Lake in Houghton County; Lac La
Belle in Keweenaw County; Menominee River and Green Bay in Menominee County; Ottawa Lake and Peavy
Reservoir in Iron County; Big and
Little Bays de Noc in Delta County;
Brevort Lake and Les Cheneaux Islands in Mackinac County; and the St.
Mary’s River and and lower Taquamenon River in Chippewa County.
Large numbers of walleye fin-

U.P. smallmouth fisheries 42

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41

U.P. smallmouth fisheries:
from page 40
gerlings have been stocked over the
last two decades in Big Bay de Noc
although walleye habitat is lacking.
The smallmouth have flourished during this period despite the attempts to
force in walleye. I see anglers from

dominated by smallmouth. This was
carried out as a method to control the
exotic rusty crayfish. Although there
is no evidence that the smallmouth
controlled the crayfish, the regulation has remained in effect partly to

Two large smallmouth bass cruising the drop-off and checking out the author while snorkeling at
Ottawa Lake in Iron County. Author photo
all over the central United States
fishing smallmouth at Big Bay de
Noc during May and June. As you
can see most of the better smallmouth
bass lakes are larger waters or have
a Great Lakes connection. There are
other relatively shallow bays and
islands not listed on the great lakes
with rocky habitat that are well worth
smallmouth fishing
In 1995 and again in 1999 DNR
fisheries biologists conducted fish
population estimates on the 478 acre
Fumee Lake in Dickinson County.
We found
For over 30 years, Harmon has been making effective products
to an extremely strong population
of
For over
30 years,
has been
making effective
make
your
huntHarmon
a success.
Harmon
offersproducts
over ato100 scents,
lures, smallmouth bass with an
exceptionally large size structure;
your huntscent
a success.
Harmon offers over a 100 scents, lures,
andmake
related
products.
73 percent
For over 30andyears,
to were 14 inches in length
related Harmon
scent products.has been making effective products
or larger and 26.4 percent were
make your hunt a success. Harmon offers over a 100 scents,20lures,
inches or larger. DNR set this
formerly
“unfished” (there was
and related scent products.
ample evidence of illegal fishing
activity) water supply lake up for
an extremely limited short duration
catch and release fishery. Unfortunately, the Dickinson County Commissioners blocked this catch and
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release season.
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ty. Ottawa Lake’s bass population is

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get his

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

get
his
attention
attention
attention

42

protect a unique fishery. The smallmouth bass size structure improved
significantly and smallmouth anglers
have experienced good fishing for
larger than average smallmouth in
recent years.
Locating smallmouth bass can be
similar to walleye fishing. Post spawn
they often are located near the drop
off on down tree tops or log cribs.
They often cruise drop-offs and sand
and gravel humps and bars. Fishing
live bait on a lindy rig or crayfish and
minnow imitations are always good
baits. Many anglers (myself included) catch and release bass which
maintains the quality of the fishery
and allows some fish to grow large.
Although most consider smallmouth
poor eating, my conservation teacher
from my old high school days grilled
a couple of them on a cedar plank
and I have to admit they were pretty
good. Whatever way you fish smallmouth bass they are fun to catch and
fight well.
If you need more information,
call the closest DNR Fisheries Office
to the area in question with contact
information found on page 67 of
the 2013 Michigan DNR Fishing
Guide.n

784 N. Van Dyke Road
Imlay City, MI 48444

810-724-2357 Office • 810-724-5341 Fax

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New License Fees Provides Over A Million Dollars For Habitat...

2015 Wildlife Habitat Grant recipients

The MDNR announced the recipients of the 2015 Wildlife Habitat
Grants. A total of $1,062,807 was awarded to various conservation organizations, units of government, landowners and nonprofit organizations.
The Wildlife Habitat Grant Program, which began in October 2013, is
funded with a portion of the revenue from the hunting and fishing licenses
sold each year. This grant program is directly related to the new hunting
and fishing licensing structure passed by the Michigan Legislature that took
effect in March 2014. The Department of Natural Resources administers
the program through a cooperative effort between its Wildlife Division and
Grants Management Section.
The program aims to enhance and improve the quality and quantity of
game-species habitat in support of a specific goal from the Wildlife Division’s strategic plan, The GPS (Guiding Principles and Strategies). The
grant program's primary goal relates to GPS Goal 2 – Manage habitat for
sustainable wildlife populations in a changing environment.
“Hunting generates more than $2.3 billion for Michigan’s economy,”
said Russ Mason, Wildlife Division chief. “This program impacts wildlife
habitat across the state to ensure there are quality hunting opportunities. In
addition, these grants benefit everyone who enjoys the state's world-class
natural resources. We appreciate what hunters and anglers do to fund the
professional management of Michigan's woods and waters.”
Mason added that these grants provide additional resources to the
DNR's partners so they can help do the work that wildlife need. “It expands
our work force by having partners spend time on important wildlife priorities."
Examples of funded projects include the expansion of wetland areas for
improved waterfowl habitat and improved food sources for upland game
birds in several locations across the state, as well as increased food and
shelter for white-tailed deer.
Below is a list of successful applicants, their award amounts, and the
counties in which the habitat projects will take place:

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43

Deer Hunting 2014--Youth Hunt Success...

It doesn’t get any better

Benjamin Gofitz, 13 with his 5-pt. taken at the Spinazzola Farm.

T

he deer in the Counties of Gladwin and Clare weren’t ready for
four young sharp shooters during
the 2014 youth hunt. For 2014 the
Mid Michigan Branch, Quality
Deer Management Association,
QDMA sponsored their yearly youth hunt at
Spinazzola farms.
These QDMA sponsored hunts
have been in play since year one
of Michigan’s youth deer hunts.
Many stories to tell and memories
held forever. Every one remembers
their first deer taken. Youth hunting
should be more than just the taking of
deer. With our program, prior to the
hunt, first time deer hunters
experience safety in weapon
handling, basic deer biology,
hunting tactics, courtesy among fellow hunters, DNR hunting rules to follow and more.
This may take a good part of a day.
They learn that hunting is the best form
of wildlife management and any deer taken
impacts the herd and any deer taken is a trophy. Our sponsored youth need to take a doe
or fawn prior to taking a buck. They can hunt

yearly at the same property and into their 16th
year to take that buck which needs to have at
least three points on one side. Note the emphasis on stewardship. The deer belong to you and
you do have some responsibility in managing
them.
First time hunter 13 year old Carson
Wright of Waterford took a 1-1/2 year
old doe 120 yards distance within the
first hour of hunting. Carson spent
a weekend with his Dad Phil at the
Spinazzola farm. We covered a lot of
territory on deer hunting and safety
for Carson didn’t have the time for a
hunter safety class and bought a mentor license. Carson got his .243 caliber
shooting iron on target. Sure
enough, one deer, one shot and
one doe down.
Ask Carson if this was a big deal?
Ask Carson if he is looking forward to next
year? Now we have a journeyman hunter.
Thirteen-year-old Benjamin Gofitz of
Gladwin has taken a doe the last two years.
Ben had an opportunity last year to take a five
pointer but passed on him. This year, in the
morning hunt of the first day Ben and his Dad

By Ed Spinazzola

First time hunter, Carson Wright, 13 took this doe.

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seen several does and fawns along with three
young bucks with the biggest being a five
pointer, which Ben elected to pass.
In the evening hunt of the first day, Dad,
Trent, pointed out a six pointer a hundred
yards out. This was 6:30 with at least 1-1/2
hours of hunting time left. Trent asks “Ben,
you have a lot of time left plus tomorrow, what
do you say?”
Bang goes Ben’s 25-06! Another deer and
a nice buck down. You don’t have to ask Ben
if this was a big deal. Ben was born talking
and has never stopped.
Old Timer Reed VanWormer, a grisly
seven-year-old from Lansing has years of
connecting on deer. He even has taken a five
point buck. Not much we can tell Reed. On
the morning of the first day Reed and Dad
Gabe, seen a few does and fawns along with
five bucks with a fork within three feet of the
camouflaged blind. Reed decides to save those
bucks for someone else. At lunch Reed relates
the morning experience. I look at Reed and tell
him, “I’m only 79 Reed but when I grow up I
wanna be just like you.”
Sure enough, Saturday evening hunt
and Dad points to a fine 2-1/2 year old eight
pointer 40 yards away, one buck, one shot with
a 44-60 and another buck down for Reed.
Fourteen-year-old Cal Barlow of Gladwin
fits the role. For the first day morning hunt

Cal and Dad, Bruce, DNR Field Biologist, for
Arenac, Gladwin and Clare Counties didn’t
see a single deer. I believe that the blind they
used is the best one, yet this is hunting and
who knows for sure.
For the first evening hunt they used the
blind that Carson connected on. Cal took a doe
in 2012 and was aiming for a buck. Cal seen a
nice buck in 2013 but this is hunting, you see
him and zip you don’t.
Observations Saturday evening, three does
one fawn, no bucks. Sunday’s a.m. hunt was in
Reed’s smoke house, several deer were seen.
A nice buck was seen just before daybreak, it
was legal time but Cal couldn’t see him clear
enough. Sunday evening hunt and back to the
smoke house, it’s now or next year. The wind
was blowing right at us and it was getting
cold. At 6:05 a big buck was seen 215 yards
away in the 5-1/2 feet tall switch grass. All one
can see is rack as he drops down to bed and
hope also drops.
At 6:15 a couple of does get him back up.
“He’s a ‘bigun’ Cal, take him,” urges
Bruce. Crack goes the .243 and down goes the
‘bigun.’ Four shots, four deer, can’t be all luck.
Being with the DNR Bruce calls the buck a
nine pointer. My antler scoring rules predates
Boone and Crockett. I can hang a ring on the
point in question and I say ten pointer Cal.
It doesn’t get any better!n

Seven-year-old Reed VanWormer with his nice 8-pt. buck.

Calvin Barlow, 14 and his father Bruce with Cal’s 10-pt. trophy

Buck Pole Contest Nov. 15th & 16th 2014 1pm-9pm
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deer must be completely field dressed, deer must be shot November 15thor 16th , deer must be hanging by 8:30 pm to be 
eligible for prize ,  hunter must be present  to win daily or grand prize, ONE PRIZE PER DEER.

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Final decision of awarding prizes for deer will be the discretion of the Commemorative Bucks of Michigan 

45

This angler is learning the technique called the “Spey cast,” which
allows him to cast to greater
distances without stripping in as
much line as with a traditional
cast. Tailfeather Communications,
LLC photos

One More Trick Up a Fly Fisherman’s Sleeve...

F

rom the Blarney Castle
pit stop on State Road just
south of the Muskegon
River in Newaygo, a group
of about eight motorcycles
pulled out and headed

north.
As they passed, a guy enjoying
his chocolate malt from Tiny’s Tasty
Treats noted, “Gettin’ in one final ride

for the season.”
That was certainly one way
to enjoy the spoils of the beautiful
weather on Saturday, Sept. 27, 2014.
Had the bikers turned right at the north
end of the bridge and driven a few hundred yards to the EH Henning County
Park, they could have beheld a group
of people who had a different idea for
how to enjoy the day.

Henning Park is the location of the
Great Lakes Spey Fest held the last
Saturday each September. And that
was what attracted a couple hundred
participants, all anxious to learn about
or improve upon their Spey
casting skills and to see the
latest available gear.
To the untrained eye, anyone using an extra-long rod
and casting with two hands is
“spey fishing.” That observation, however, is wrong in so
many ways. To begin with, it’s
an upper-case letter S.
“The Spey is
a river in Scotland,” explains Bob
Braendle, Spey Fest’s organizer.
“It’s fast and dangerous. In order
to fish it well, people needed to make
long casts.” So they developed this
type of casting.
So if one fishes the Spey, he is
angling in a famous Scottish salmon
river. But if he is Spey fishing, he’s
using a special technique to extend the
distance of his casts. To confuse the
matter even more, because that deep,
fast, dangerous river led to the development of that type of long distance

casting, and because the longest distances are gained by using two hands,
the fly rods requiring two-hands for
this pursuit are generally known as
“Spey rods.”
Spey casting allows one to fish
areas otherwise inaccessible because of
deep, fast water, such as the river with
the same name.
“It’s not just a long distance thing,”
says Braendle, who is the manager
of the Great Lakes Fly Fishing Co. in
nearby Rockford. “You can also use
this technique when there is no room
for a backcast.” Even from within a
boat, he says.
Also in attendance at the festival
were Ray Schmidt and Kate Smith of
Double SS Outdoors in Bear Lake.
They were representing a number of
fly fishing gear manufacturers. Schmidt
gives more detail about the benefits of
Spey casting.
“A Spey rod will conservatively
help you reach twice the distance (of a
traditional cast). The more water you
cover, the better opportunity you have
for a fish.”
He explains the twohanded cast in terms of
simple physics: the top
hand pulls; the bottom hand
pushes; the reel acts as a
fulcrum.
Just when one thinks he’s
got all of this understood,
Braendle slips in
another nugget.
“You can use
the Spey cast with
any kind of a rod, even a six-footer. …
And with a single- or double-handed
rod.”
With those two facts in mind, he
says, Spey casting does not limit one
in the species he fishes for. “Steelhead,
trout, bluegill, anything.”
“The Spey cast repositions the line
so you can cast. It’s a roll cast with a
drastic change of direction.” Or, to put
it in even simpler terms, “The final
movement is a roll cast. Everything

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else is just positioning of the line.”
Braendle’s boss, Glen Blackwood,
owner of the Great Lakes Fly Fishing
Co., dissects the importance of the
Spey cast in terms of modern Great
Lakes fly fishing.
“Is the Spey cast better than using an indicator? No. Is it better than
bottom bouncing? No. But where we
have big water we need to cover in an
efficient fashion …”
He explains. The “typical” sequence for long casts, say of 70 feet
goes like this: after the fly begins to
“dangle” at the end of the drift, one
has to “strip, strip, strip, strip” line in,
then false cast a few times, and then
start the drift anew.
“With a two-handed rod, you’re
lifting it and repositioning the line.
You’re not having to strip in all that
line. There’s no need to false caste.
“It’s more efficient because you
are spending less time casting and
more time fishing.” In other words,
Spey casting allows one to spend more
time with his fly on the float than
“normal” casting because there’s no
wasted time pulling in line or false
casting to get the line out again. Plus,
more line out means a longer drift,

another factor that adds to more time
for the fly to be attracting fish.
“If we’re in big water up to our
waist, it’s difficult (to strip line in and
position the line for another cast).
With a two-handed rod, we’re lifting
it and repositioning it, not having to
strip in all that line. There’s no need to
false cast. We can cast without great
linear space behind us. So if you have
trees overhead or you’re pinned to the
bank for some reason,” the Spey cast
requires no backcast.
In addition to the efficiency of
the cast, Blackwood also explains its
appeal.
“Two-handed fly fishing is a growing niche in the upper Great Lakes region. A lot of fishing is governed by an
‘opportunistic hierarchy.’ When you
start, you want to catch a fish. Then
you want to catch a lot. Then you want
to catch big fish. Finally you begin
exploring different ways to catch fish.
Two-handed casting is an opportunity
– just another way to learn, experiment, and grow.”
The Spey Fest is held at the end of
September, Blackwood says, because
October and November bring with
them the steelhead runs in Great Lakes

Spey Rod Reel – The most common image associated with Spey fishing is a twohanded fly rod and a large reel with lots of line and lots of backing.
kegon, Lower Au Sable, Manistee, and
streams.
St. Marys. Scale down the rod size and
“Depending on the water
try the technique on the Rogue, White,
temperature, it’s the prime time to
and Pere Marquette rivers.
get steelhead. Their mind is on
To find out more: Great Lakes
feeding, not reproduction. We Spey
Spey Fest, Bob Braendle, 616-866-6060,
cast as we come into swinging season
www. http://greatlakesspeyshop.com
for fishing.”
bob@greatlakesspeyshop.com. (Phone
He mentions the following rivers
number is for Great Lakes Fly Fishing
as candidates for Spey casting anglers
this fall: the Grand River system, Mus- Co.)n

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47

Venison; from the woods to the table
No Small Task And It
Has Several Big Steps...

C

to slit the
By George Rowe desirable
throat to “bleed” the

ongratulations.
You stand there
in the woods,
all a-tremble, looking down at
a large, dead deer. It represents
a great thrill and a big problem. You
have to get that large package of meat
cleaned and out of the woods in good
shape if you are going to enjoy some
fine venison tenderloin. This is no
small task and it has several big steps.
Let’s look at them, one at a time.

Field-Dressing

Field-dressing the deer is the first
step and, while we won’t go into great
detail here that deer can’t be as good
as it could be unless it is field-dressed
properly. Be sure to make your entry
cuts without damaging any organs and
remove the rectal tube and the bladder
intact. If this deer is destined to be a
wall-hanger, be sure your cuts are kept
below the rib cage, so that the taxidermist has plenty of cape with which
to work. It is not necessary or even

deer. As soon as you
have removed the viscera, prop the
body cavity open with a stick, elevate
the head and arrange the carcass so
that any blood remaining in the cavity
will drain out, while you go get some
help to get the deer out of the woods.
If you must drag the deer, try to do
that in such a way that you don’t get
leaves or dirt into the body cavity.
If you don’t have access to an ATV
to get the deer out, at least use a big,
deep sled, to keep the deer clean and
preserve the hide. If you must drag it,
be sure to wash it out when you get
home. There is no harm in rinsing the
body cavity out with a garden hose, if
the deer is hanging up, head high and
the water drains out readily.
If the deer is taken during the archery season or if the weather should
be unseasonably warm in November,
during the firearm season, it could be
critical to get that deer cooled down

Okay, deer down, now what does it take to convert it into tasty dinners? Author photo
and processed quickly. While we all
like to have that deer hang for a few

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days, hanging it in 50 degree or higher
temperatures could lead to spoilage
so we have to hurry and get it skinned
and cut up pronto.
There is a good deal of disagreement about skinning the animal
quickly, as opposed to letting it hang
with the skin on. If you are going to
hang the deer for a few days outside
or in a garage or someplace like that,
it will be better off with the hide in
place, to keep off insects and any
airborne dirt. If the deer can be hung
in a cool room, at the processing
plant, it will be better off with the hide
removed. The meat will always cool
more quickly and thoroughly with
the hide removed. Most hunters (and
butchers) agree that the meat will be
best if hung in a cooler for a number
of days, perhaps as long as five or six
days. If you deer is going to be cut up
by a commercial processor, be aware

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Processing

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Choose a processor carefully. You
will want to see that the place is clean
and that the cutting area is neat and
tidy. One would be leery of any place
that had stacks of dead deer lying
about, inside or outside. A facility
that has a cool room large enough to
hang many deer, ready to cut, would
be ideal. If the processor is going to
do a good job on your deer, he should
be able to skin and hang it within a
few hours, for the meat to be its best.
While some processors seem to pride
themselves on doing the whole job
with knives, avoiding the saw, others
use a power band saw to considerable advantage and it doesn’t seem to
have any deleterious effect on the end
product.
Expect to pay somewhere around
$75 or $80 this year for your basic
processing. Some will charge less if
you take the deer in skinned and it
will cost more if you elect to have
sausage made from some of the meat.
By adding pork to the venison a processor can prepare breakfast sausage
or summer sausage from some of the
ground meat. Be prepared to specify
how you want the meat cut and packaged. You can ask for the maximum
number of steaks, for instance, or you
can have just a few steaks, just the
best roasts and grind the rest. You can
have the steaks and ground meat in
just the right-sized packages for your
family. Some processors are prepared
to add beef suet to the ground meat,
to make it juicier. You may have to
say so if you don’t want suet in your
venison burger. Venison is naturally
very lean and low in cholesterol and
you may want to keep it that way.
Some hunters like to add ground beef
(80% lean) to their venison burger.
This, of course, will also add to the
cost of processing. An alternative
plan is to add the ground beef when
you are cooking the chili or spaghetti
sauce or meatloaf. There are several
optional cuts that you may want to
ask for, including the neck roast and
the ribs.

Normally, the processor will saw
off a piece of the skull and save the
antlers with that piece suitable for
mounting the antlers. If you plan to
have the deer head mounted, be sure
to tell the processor that right up
front, so he can prepare the head and
the cape for mounting.
If you skin the deer yourself,
you will be able to sell the hide for
a few dollars. If the processor does
the skinning, he will get those dollars
and earn them. Normally, you will

get perhaps 50 or 55 pounds of meat
from a fat and healthy young buck.
A mature doe will yield a little less
and a big, mature buck will produce
perhaps 20 pounds more, if it weighs
as much as 175 pounds, field-dressed.
If the meat is processed properly and
wrapped well for the freezer, you
should be able to enjoy the venison
for many months. Some processors
will use vacuum packing and that
insures viable meat for as long as a
year.n

MBHA offers scholarships

In 2015, the Michigan Bear Hunters Association will again offer scholarships to students who express an interest in natural resources conservation.
Since 2002, the first year the Michigan Bear Hunters Association/Bill Walker Scholarship program granted awards, 60 students have received $36,000 to
help pay their college tuition.
Over the past eight years, J5 Incorporated, of Mill Valley, Calif., has contributed to the program, matching the outlays from MBHA’s treasury dollar for
dollar.
J5 Inc. is an independent oil and gas exploration and production company,
which does business in Michigan. MBHA created the scholarship to encourage
people to pursue higher education.
The scholarship, named after a former MBHA president, is for those now
or soon to be attending a college or technical institution. It’s open to anyone
– MBHA membership is not required – who has maintained a grade point
average of 2.0 or better.
More details and an application can be found on MBHA’s Web site, www.
mibearhunters.org. The application deadline is Dec. 31.
The 2015 scholarships will be awarded to successful applicants March 21 at
MBHA’s annual convention at the Park Place Hotel, Traverse City.

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that the number of days it will hang is
more likely to be set by the press of
business than by the ideal timing.

49

There Are Several Parallels Between Michigan And Maine...

My Maine bear hunt
M

y friend, Mike Yancey,
owner of Pine Hollow Longbows in
Van Buren, Arkansas,
called me last summer
with an offer for a fall
bear hunt. I hadn’t
hunted bear in several
years and when I found out that the
hunt was in the state of Maine, I said,
“Count me in!” I’d never been to
Maine and was anxious to see new
country, eat fresh lobster, and yes,
bowhunt for bear in the legendary
“North Woods” of Maine.
Since Mike was coming from Arkansas, Lyle and Ethan were coming
from Missouri, and I from Michigan,
we decided to meet in Ohio and drive
two vehicles on to Maine. The boys
didn’t show up at our meeting place,
but technology kept us in contact. A
text informed me that a flat tire, and
a flat spare tire, had delayed them
a couple of hours. That’s when we
found out that Lyle’s van had almost
200,000 miles on it. “I wouldn’t trust
it to get me to work on time, let alone

Maine.” Mike whispered.
Luckily, the old, overloaded
van made the rest of the trip
without a problem.
Our Registered Maine
Guides were Penobscot
Indians. Brothers, Gavin
and Eric, and friend, Charlie, had recently started their
own guide service.
They guide hunters
on public land as
well as on Penobscot tribal land.
Every outdoorsman has probably dreamed of building a cabin
deep in the woods. The cabin that
we stayed in was just like the one in
your dreams. Surrounded by miles
and miles of heavily wooded Penobscot tribal land, with a nice sized
stream bubbling by the front door, the
cabin seemed to blend perfectly into
the north woods setting. Gas lights
gave a soft glow to the knotty pine
interior. A rustic, wooden table and
chairs made a sit-down meal possible.
The kitchen sink had a drain, but no
faucet. All water had to be carried

in from the gravel road, 150
yards away. Of course, the
“facilities” were down a path
behind the cabin.
As Charlie took me out
for the first night of hunting,
he explained, “I’ll walk you
in to the ladder stand, re-bait
the site, and then leave. Text
me if you shoot a
bear. Stay in the
stand ‘till I get
there. If I don’t hear from you, I’ll be
back after dark to run off any bears at
the bait so you can get down.”
When we approached the bait site
I noticed that the stand was a good 25
yards or more from the bait. “Re-bait
at half that distance.” I whispered to
Charlie. I didn’t feel comfortable in
shooting at a bear from 30 yards with
my stickbow. Limiting my archery
equipment to a simple, wooden longbow also limits my effective range,
but it makes every encounter with
game an exciting, “up close” adventure.
From the ladder stand, I viewed
the area around me with interest. It
had been lumbered about 30 years ago
and second growth timber, so thick
that I couldn’t see very far, surrounded me. I noticed balsam fir, white
spruce, birch, and aspen trees. The
Maine woods looked very much like
our northern Michigan woods.
Then, a bear silently appeared.
It circled to my right and seemed to
study the bait for a few minutes from
the thick cover. Then it circled back
and came into the bait facing me head
on. After briefly sniffing and licking at the bait, it turned and walked
straight away. The coal black, medium sized bear never returned. Even if
it had been at half the distance, there
was never a good shot opportunity for
a bow and arrow. That was all the excitement I had before I saw Charlie’s

By Darryl Quidort

flashlight coming toward me a half
hour after dark.
I was carrying a 53# bamboo
backed Osage longbow with a snakeskin backing that I had made myself.
Mike was shooting a similar weight
sinew backed Eastern Red Cedar bow
of his own making. Ethan and Lyle
were both shooting compound bows.
Our daily practice sessions were a
friendly competition to see who could
break the plastic nock off the other’s
arrow when in the target. At close
range the stickbows could hold their
own, but at longer ranges the compounds ruled.
No one saw a bear on the second
evening. It had been unseasonably
hot that day and we had hopes that
the hunting would improve when the
weather cooled off.
There are several parallels between Michigan and Maine when it
comes to bear hunting. Both states
have similar habitat and a healthy,
well managed population of black
bear. Michigan has about 20,000 bear
and Maine has about 30,000. Both
states harvest from 1600 to 2000
bear each year during a fall season.
Neither state has a spring season.
Unlike Michigan, Maine does allow
bear trapping, using a specialized
foot snare type of restraining device.
Hunter success rates are also similar,
with Michigan about 20% and Maine
about 25%.
I saw another bear on the third
evening. I had been on stand for
several hours when I noticed a black
form out in the thick bush. I was sure
that it hadn’t been there before. It was
a nice sized bear standing upright on
its hind legs studying the bait area.
He soon dropped down on all fours
and walked out of sight to my right.
I slowly rose to a standing position
and turned to be in position for a shot
if he returned. I held my bow ready

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know it. And, as we learned from the
Michigan dove hunting vote, once it’s
gone it will be very hard to ever get
it back.
Lyle saw a huge bear on the fifth
evening of our six day hunt, so he
returned to that same bait for the final
hunt. Mike went to a new site. A
game camera revealed that a big bear
had visited an unhunted bait the night
before, so I went there for my last
evening hunt.
This time the bait was within
good shooting distance for me and I
had hopes of getting my bear on the
last night of our hunt. However, after
a long sit, and with darkness setting
in, I had seen only a squirrel and a
snowshoe rabbit. I texted Mike, “No
bears here. See anything?”
“Nope,” came his quick reply.
Then, just at dark, a big bear appeared at my bait. He walked quickly
through the bait site a couple of
times, circled around the area, and finally, committed to the bait. By then
it was well after dark and past legal
shooting time. I watched the dark
shadow below me and listened to his
teeth crunching dog food for twenty
minutes before Gavin’s approaching
flashlight scared him off. What an
exciting evening!
Ironically, Mike had the same
thing happen. A bear hit his bait
just after he texted me. It stayed
there, slurping away in the darkness,
until it was spooked off by the
guide coming to get Mike from
his stand.
That’s the way bear hunting goes.
It’s never easy, always unpredictable and always exciting. No one
was disappointed with our hunt. Our
success rate of 25 percent is in line
with Maine’s average success rate.
We had a wonderful camp and it was
a great hunting experience. I only
hope the citizens of Maine will vote
to keep bear hunting as we know it:
exciting, challenging, sporting, and
just plain fun.n

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and waited until dark in hopes that he
would approach the bait, but the bear
never came in.
Ethan saw two bears that night
but couldn’t get a shot at them. Action seemed to be picking up.
Our mornings in camp were spent
relaxing, drinking coffee, shooting
our bows, telling each other hunting
stories, and just enjoying the fellowship that only a hunting camp seems
to provide. Mike is a great campfire
cook and his creations from a Dutch
oven placed over hardwood coals
were anxiously awaited. Each noon
meal was a feast, complete with
peach cobbler for desert. Then, by 3
p.m. each day, we’d go bear hunting
and stay until dark.
Ethan shot his bear on the fourth
evening. It was the young man’s first
bear and he was excited about it. He
told us the story (several times) while
we hung his bear from the game pole
in camp and skinned it out. Ethan
had made a perfect shot on the bear
with his compound bow. That night
was a highlight of our trip. We
laughed and worked together to flesh
and salt the bear hide and ice down
the meat in a large cooler. There is
nothing quite like the atmosphere in a
successful hunting camp.
Those camps may soon come to
an end though. Maine has the same
problems that Michigan has had with
anti-hunting groups. The Humane
Society of the United States, a notorious anti-hunting group, has forced a
vote on this fall’s ballot to basically
end bear hunting in Maine. The vote
will be to end bear hunting with the
use of bait or dogs. Ninety-three percent of all bears taken by hunters in
Maine are taken by the use of bait or
dogs. Only 7 percent of the harvest is
by “other means.” The anti-hunting
group, HSUS, is busy misrepresenting bear hunting (and accepting cash
donations) in the cities of Maine right
now. If the ballot proposal passes it
will end bear hunting in Maine as we

51

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on the surface”, explained Kavajecz.
Parsons added, “This was a tactic we
had never used here before, but it’s
had some success in other areas of the
country and considering how the fish
were setting up, it just made sense to

and cast to those individual fish.”
Parsons added that the tactic was just
more efficient that trolling, “allowing
us to target individual fish or small
pods of fish on these structures rather
than spending time setting up trolling
passes to try and hit them.”
As with any tactic, precise boat
control played a huge role. “I’d use
the Key Fob control for my MotorGuide Xi5 bowmount trolling motor
and once I positioned the boat where
I wanted it, set the motor in “Anchor Mode” to hold the boat where I
wanted it.” offered Keith, “That motor
could then hold my position, whether
I was in 4 foot rollers or calm water,
and the key fob made making small
adjustments to my position effortless.”
The lures the guys were casting
were Moonshine Lures’ #3 Shiver

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Monday-Friday

52

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Minnows – a horizontal-minnow-like
jigging lure. The bait’s unique minnow shape and fan tail give this lure
an enticing action as it swings off to
the side on the up-stroke and smoothly glides back down on the free-fall.
“Cadence was key,” Kavajecz said,
“We had to work the bait close
to bottom without hitting bottom too
much. You want to sweep the rod up
3 foot - almost to the point of snapping it up. That would make the lure
dart to one side. Then immediately
drop the rod tip to give it slack and
let the bait glide as you reeled in the
slack line. Then, just before the lure
would hit bottom, you repeat the
cadence.” Keith explained that
most bites would come on the
drop when there was slack in the
line, so as he went to make his
next pull, he’d feel the weight and
set the hook hard.
Fine-tuning the presentation,
the guys would replace small “ice”
treble on the belly of the lure with a
#4 Mustad Triple Grip Treble (model
TG58BN). This gave the bait a bigger “bite” for better hooking and the
inward bend of the Triple Grip help
keep fish on. In general “glide” lures
like these are heavy and not the best
hooking lures because the heavy body
can be more easily thrown during a
long fight. A second advantage is that
with the inward bend the Triple Grips
seemed to pick up less moss and
fewer Zebra Mussels when the baits
did hit bottom.
Proper rigging for this tactic was
also important to success. The guys
utilized a bright colored main line
– 8# test Berkley Nanofil in Hi-Vis
Chartreuse, in order to better help
them see when the bait made bottom contact. The no-stretch of this
line also gave it the sensitivity to feel
everything the lure came in contact
with as well as making long-distance
hook-sets more productive. “These

fish hit and fought really hard so a
strong line like Nanofil was crucial,
“ stated Kavajecz, “Nanofil is also
really thin so it reduces the amount
of loop in the line in when fishing in
the wind. To help cut down on visibility and add some protection from
Zebra Mussels, the guys used a 3
foot leader from the main line to the
lure utilizing 10# test Berkley Trilene
100% Fluorocarbon. “The fluorocarbon is thicker so doesn’t get in zeeb
crevices as much,” said Parsons, “We
had to be constantly checking for
nicks in the line – those Zebra Mussels are like fishing in razor blades
and we had to continuously retie our
set-ups.
Parsons added, “This tournament
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owns Moonshine Lures is going to
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say there is no innovation in walleye
fishing are dead wrong. You can
never stop innovating and never stop
learning in this sport.”
The guys were so excited about
what they learned this past week using this tactic that plans were immediately made to shoot an upcoming
episode of The Next Bite TV show
on the technique. Look for that to air
in early 2015.
Keith and Gary would like to
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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Gary Parsons with two walleyes. Bear Solis Outdoors photo

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53

• PLUGGIN’ AWAY ...River guide Bob Ison favors the 3.5 Mag
Lip for most of his plug fishing on the Big Manistee River.
This Metallic Flame Gold color is a “go to” choice among many
river guides. Mark Romanack photos

The Pluggin’ Set Up

Plug fishing is a game for baitcasting gear. The
ideal rod for plugging is a medium/light to medium
action triggerstick in the 8’-6” to 10’-6” range.
Most guys like cork handles, but plugging requires
the rod to be placed in and out of a rod holder constantly. Over time this abuse wears heavily on cork
handle rods.
My favorite pluggin’ rod is an Okuma T-40X series which features a carbon handle that is not only
sensitive and lightweight, but nail tough as well.
Anglers can choose from either a split grip or full
carbon handle option.
On this reel I would recommend a low profile baitcasting reels such as the Okuma Komodo
364 which is available in either left or right hand
retrieve and also with paddle handles or a power
handle option. Loaded with 150 yards of Maxima
Ultra Green 20# test monofilament, this combination is virtually bullet proof for steelhead and
salmon plug fishing applications.

Good Plug Water

With A Modest Selection Of Plugs And Essential Rods/
Reels Anyone Can Get Involved In Targeting Steelhead...

PLUGGIN’ AWAY

T

To most of Michigan’s avid outdoor
enthusiasts November is a time for renewing the tradition of deer camp. To a
select few, November is about targeting
steelhead that literally explode on key
baits! In the fall steelhead can be caught
on a variety of presentations, but high action plugs fished from a drift boat, jet sled
or even wading from shore remain one of
the most popular and productive options.
Steelhead are especially active in the fall
and vulnerable to baits sporting aggressive actions and steelhead friendly colors.
Classic baits in this category
include the Storm Rattle Tot,
Storm Wiggle Wart, Luhr Jensen
Hot Shot, Luhr Jensen Kwikfish,
Heddon Tadpolly, plus Yakima Bait’s original U-20
Flatfish and the Mag Lip 3.5 model. Each of these
baits feature a distinctive side-to-side wobbling action that angers steelhead into savage strikes.
The popularity of pluggin’ soon spawned a
series of “knock off” baits including the Producer’s
Willy Worm, Brad’s Wiggler and Lindy Riverwalker to name a few. Of this list of baits a handful
continue to dominate in the pluggin’ scene. The
Yakima Mag Lip 3.5 is perhaps the most versatile
of these lures because it has great action in fast and
slow water, comes in over 40 different steelhead
colors and is available in multiple sizes including
the 5.0, 4.5, 3.5 and the new 3.0 versions.

Getting The Most From Mag Lip
The Mag Lip comes with a factory installed
cross-lok snap attached to the eye-tie. Most anglers
simply tie their fishing line directly to this snap and
hit the water.
“What sets the Mag Lip apart from
other crankbaits is it’s built-in “skip beat”
action,” says steelhead fishing legend
Buzz Ramsey. “This “wandering” plug
action triggers strikes when other baits
don’t and is a big reason why the Mag
Lip is growing in popularity everywhere
anglers fish plugs for steelhead. To get
the most pronounced “skip beat”
action, I recommend attaching a
cross-lok snap to the end of your
line and attaching this snap to
the snap on the Mag Lip. The combination of the
two snaps gives these baits even more freedom of
movement and really brings the Mag Lip action to
life.”

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

By Mark Romanack

54

Good Steelhead Plug Colors
Steelhead are among the most “color
selective” of all fish species. Certain colors
of plugs consistently work and others rarely
produce. Some of my favorite all time plug
colors include Metallic Gold Flame,
Metallic Copper Black Bill, Double Trouble,
Metallic Gold Black Bill and Mother of
Pearl Black Bill.

Most plug fishermen concentrate on the deeper
pools in rivers like the Manistee, Little Manistee,
Muskegon, St. Joe, Pere Marquette, Betsie and
AuSable. The typical set up is to start at the upstream edge of a hole and to set out four rods each
with a wobbling plug 30 to 50 feet downstream of
the boat. Two of these rods are positioned straight
out the back of the boat and two are placed in rod
holders off the port and starboard sides of the boat.
Once the plugs are deployed and wobbling in
the current, the anchor is lifted and the boat allowed
to drop back downstream slowly. Typically the boat
is controlled by oaring which slows up the boat’s
drift and allows the angler to sweep the boat laterally, covering more of the hole in the process.
Gradually the boat is eased downstream and
often the most savage strikes occur just as the
baits are reaching the tail-out portion of the hole.
This classic approach to plug fishing has produced
countless steelhead across the Great Lakes region.
The deeper pools concentrate steelhead and
most anglers spend the majority of their time
pluggin’ in these pools. The obvious deep water
pools are however not the only good plug water to
explore. Faster runs with much shallower water can
also be great plug fishing locations. Plugs can also
be worked up into washed out banks and along log
jams.
This short video clip shows the Mag Lip in action http://youtu.be/zLhcSxz_Ygc.

Board Fishing

Most plug fishing is conducted from a drift boat
or jet sled, but for the innovative angler plugs can
also be fished by simply wading from shore and
using an in-line board to steer baits into productive
waters. Simply cast the plug of choice about 40
to 50 feet and clip on an Off Shore Tackle OR-34
Mini-Board onto the line. This board is reversible
and can be rigged to fish from either side of the
river.
Once the board is attached to the line, simply
set the board in the water and play line off the reel,
allowing the board to pull the plug off to the side.
By simply adjusting how much line is played out
and also by wading the shoreline it’s easy to steer
plugs into holes, shallow runs, undercut banks, log
jams and other places steelhead frequent.
When a fish strikes the board is jerked down-

Pluggin’ away page 56

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

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55

Pluggin’ away:
from page 54
stream and the angler simply comes
tight against the fish, releasing the
board in the process. The board can
be rigged to slide down the line to the
bait or it can be pinned to the line and
reeled in as the fish is being fought.
If the board is rigged to release
and slide, placing a “speed bead” or a
split shot on the line about three feet
ahead of the lure will insure the board
doesn’t slide all the way down to the
lure. The bead or shot also functions
in keeping leaves and other debris
from sliding down the lure and fowling the plug.
If the board is rigged to stay on
the line, I recommend using an OR10
(yellow) release on the tow arm and
an OR16 (red) release on the back
of the board. When a fish strikes the
line will trip from the yellow release,
leaving the board attached to the line
via the stronger tension OR16 clip.
Because the board is tripped, it can be
reeled in easily and removed from the
line while fighting the fish.
This short video link shows how
to use the Mini-Board to target steelhead in rivers on plugs

• PLUGGIN’ AWAY...Plugs are one of the best ways to target fall and winter steelhead across Michigan’s many steelhead rivers.
http://youtube/p7yGDn_0CRA.

Summing It Up

Plug fishing for steelhead starts to
heat up in October, reaches a peak in
November and continues to produce

great results in December and even
works into the dead of winter.
With a modest selection of plugs
and essential rods/reels, anyone
can get involved in targeting steelhead in a host of rivers on both
sides of the state.

Resources

www.fishing411.net
www.yakimabait.com
www.offshoretackle.com
www.okumafishing.com
https://www.youtube.com/
user/411Fishingn

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David Maddox inducted into the Keeler Society
of outstanding individuals nominated
by their peers for displaying the values
Roy Keeler lived by: friendship, sportsmanship and a passionate devotion to
preserving America’s rich black powder
heritage.
Born in the mid-Michigan town
of Eaton Rapids in 1917, Keeler quit
school at the age of 10 to help raise his
eight brothers. He was not the oldest,
but his brothers depended on his leadership, wisdom and ingenuity. They called
him “Pa,” a name he carried throughout
his life.
Soft-spoken with a quick wit and
wry sense of humor, Pa Keeler was a
respected and formidable competitor
at many black powder clubs and at the
National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association’s national matches. For 25 years,
“Pa’s Powder Horn,” a popular muzzleloading column, appeared in Michigan
Out-of-Doors magazine, published
by the Michigan United Conservation
Clubs. He penned articles for Muzzle
Blasts, and Keeler was the first inductee
in the NMLRA’s Black Powder Hall of
Fame.
“I started shooting black powder
in the mid-1980s, just after I married my wife, Marty,” Maddox said.
“Doug Reedy and Charlie Webster were
instrumental in getting me into muzzleloading. We went to a few blanket
shoots and the bug bit me. They got me

involved with the Columbiaville Sportsman’s Club. I helped start the Frosted
Paw shoot with Doug and Charlie at
Columbiaville.”
Maddox attended his first MSMLA
State Championship Shoot at the Lansing Muzzle Loading Gun Club. “I was
in search of new shooting experiences.
I didn’t win any medals. The competition was fierce, just as it is now. I shot
offhand then. I thought I was Daniel
Boone, but learned I wasn’t.”
A long-time member of the MSMLA
board of directors, Maddox has served
as the association’s vice-president and
is now the president. “I’ve always been
a little opinionated. I’m always trying
to make changes for the better,” he said
with a matter-of-fact smile that fits his
character.
David Maddox joined the NMLRA
in the late 1980s. He is a Michigan field
representative and an NMLRA certified range officer. He is respected for
his keen knowledge of the intricacies of
the “NMLRA Rules and Regulations”
that govern most black powder shooting events. He is also an NRA certified
CPL instructor. On countless occasions,
Maddox has driven across the state to
present a black powder range safety
class for newcomers.
When he is not working as a range
officer or tending to state association
business, Maddox can be found on

David Maddox, the 2014 inductee,
proudly displays the Spirit of Roy Keeler Society traveling trophy.
the heavy bench gun line. “Roy Felix,
another Columbiaville member, got me
involved in bench shooting. He’s gone
now, but he sold me one of his guns.
He called it ‘BB.’ It was .60-caliber and
hardly shot BBs.”
With predictable regularity Maddox
is chided for “dry-balling”—loading
a ball without a powder charge in the
barrel. He smiles and goes along with
the good-natured kidding, but the root
cause is always the same: he stopped in
the middle of shooting for score to help
a fellow competitor in need. But then
again, Pa Keeler did that, too.
Submitted by the members of the Spirit
of Roy Keeler Societyn

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

D

avid Maddox is the latest
inductee into the Spirit of Roy
Keeler Society, Michigan’s
highest black powder shooting sports
honor. Randy MacInnes (inducted in
2012) presented the traveling trophy to
Maddox at the conclusion of the awards
ceremony at the Michigan State Muzzle
Loading Association’s State Championship Shoot in July.
MacInnes prefaced the announcement of this year’s winner by telling
about the formation of the Keeler Society and the selection process. Before
naming Maddox, he told of the many
achievements attributed to the award’s
2014 inductee.
“As Randy spoke,” David Maddox later
said, “I’m looking around to find a new
face in the crowd that could be the next
recipient of the Keeler Award. I wasn’t
really listening to Randy, because I was
trying to find that face, then Randy said
‘Dave.’ I looked up and said, ‘Oh no,
you’re kidding.’ I’m in awe. It’s great to
be selected, an honor and a privilege.”
Shortly after Roy “Pa” Keeler’s passing in 1998, the MSMLA established
the Spirit of Roy Keeler Society to
honor Keeler’s many contributions to
the muzzleloading community and the
black powder shooting sports at all
levels: local, state and national.
Current members of the Keeler Society
select one Michigan resident from a list

57

Fewer Adult Does Means Fewer Fawns Being Born...

Winter took toll on U.P. deer

M

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

ost U.P. deer hunters,
especially those hunting
in the northern half of the
region, should see fewer
whitetails this fall than
last year, and the following article explains why.
Last winter took a much higher
toll on U.P. whitetails than the winter
before, according to the latest results
of a fawn survival study that’s underway in Iron County north of the
Michigamme Reservoir by students
with Mississippi State University in
Cooperation with the DNR. Safari
Club International (SCI) has contributed a large share of the money to
carry out the project, but other groups
have also provided some funding.
“As I’m sure most folks are aware,
the winter conditions in the mid snowfall zone study area were severe,”
DNR wildlife researcher Dean Beyer
wrote in an email with the latest report
about the study, “and adult doe mortality was greater than we typically
observe. We collared 45 pregnant does
last winter and only 11 were alive at
the beginning of the fawning period.

58

“With fewer adult does
on the landscape, fewer
fawns were born. As of July
1, we have captured and collared 25 fawns, with 19 still
alive. For context, during
phase 1 (3 years) and the first
year of phase 2, we collared
over 40 fawns each year.”
As Beyer’s comments clearly point
out, the number of
deer that die during a severe winter
only represents the most obvious segment of winter losses. Fawn production the following year is also negatively impacted. There are not only
fewer fawns born. Due to nutritional
stress that surviving does suffered
during the winter, some fawns that are
born are too small or weak to survive.
Beyer said that all of the factors
that made last winter so severe, “deep
snow with no structure, cold temperatures and the duration of winter, likely
contributed to the greater mortality
of adult does” than any other winter
since the project has been underway.
The DNR employee said weather data

from the study area has been
collected each of the last two
winters, but that data has not
yet been summarized, so he
couldn’t comment specifically what differences between
those winters made such a
difference in doe survival.
The differences in the
total amount of
accumulated snow
between the last two
winters, however, goes a long way
in explaining why last winter was so
tough on deer in the study area. The
DNR monitors the amount of snowfall
at various locations throughout the
U.P. on a weekly basis and comes up
with a total at the end of winter. According to a table provided by DNR
wildlife biologist David Jentoft from
Sault Ste. Marie, a total of 321.5 inches of snow was recorded at Crystal
Falls (the closest location to the study
area) during the winter of 2013-2014
compared to only 183 inches for the
winter of 2012-2013.
Last winter’s snowfall in Iron
County exceeded the previous win-

By Richard P. Smith

ter’s total by 138 inches or 11.5 feet.
The amount of added snow that fell
last winter equals the total accumulated snowfall at Crystal Falls during
the winter of 2011-2012, which was a
mild winter.
During the course of the fawn
survival study, the winter of 20122013 was the hardest on U.P. deer
until last winter, but that winter started
late. December and January were mild
without much snow. Snow started
piling up by late January, however,
and was deep enough to keep deer in
winter yards until the end of April.
Even though deep snow covered the
ground during late winter, temperatures were moderate, with monthly
averages above 0.
The late start of winter two years
ago and moderate winter temperatures
allowed many deer in the study area
to conserve enough fat reserves to
carry them through to the late spring
breakup.
The winter of 2013-2014 started
earlier than the winter before and
hung on almost as long. In between
the beginning and end of winter, more

This photo taken the Spring of 2014 shows a whitetail that survived walking past the remains of an adult doe that
was killed by coyotes. Richard P. Smith photo
six and a bobcat brought one down. In
four more cases that does were preyed
upon, no determination was made
about the predator that was involved.
Nine does that were part of the
study died of malnutrition, one
drowned, one was attributed to poaching and the cause of death of the final
four is unknown. The total number
of adult does that died last winter as
part of the study was 35. The previous

winter, 10 collared does died. Predators killed nine of those and one died
of malnutrition.
While in the process of attempting
to capture fawns born to radio collared
does during May and June of this year,
one fawn that was stillborn was located. Through August 25, eight of the
25 collared fawns had had been killed
by predators. Bears killed four and
a coyote, bobcat and an unidentified

predator ate one each. The cause of
death of one fawn was undetermined.
Even though fewer fawns were
born in the study area during 2014, a
higher percentage of them survived.
According to a report on the study,
65 percent of the fawns collared
this year were still alive by September 1. In 2013, the apparent survival
rate of collared fawns was only 27
percent.n

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

snow fell than the year before and
temperatures were brutally cold, with
below 0 readings common. A weather
recording station operated by the
National Weather Service that’s closest to Iron County had 16 days with
below 0 readings during December,
22 days during January and 21 days
in February. And those temperature
readings don’t take into account wind
chill. More than two months went by
that the temperature never rose above
freezing.
With temperatures remaining
below freezing for so long, no crust
formed on the snow, making it extremely difficult for deer to move
through the snow.
“The snow as so deep last winter in Iron County that deer had a
hard time traveling anywhere,” DNR
wildlife biologist Monica Joseph from
the Crystal Falls Office said. “It was
so cold that no crust formed to make it
easier for them to get around. Moving
through the snow wasn’t just hard for
deer, it was tough for predators, too,
due to the lack of crust.”
Predators did account for their
share of the radio collared adult does
that died last winter, however. Wolves
claimed nine of them. Coyotes killed

59

Extreme Road Trip--British Columbia…

Betty Sodders

U.P. hunter bags huge grizzly

A friend had the following
to say after Luke Jarosch of
Cedarville took his seventh
black bear at the closing day
of a slow bear-hunting season; “Luke, that bear will
make a great bathmat!”

I

n the days prior to cell phone
cameras, I got down on the
ground to shoot a photo of his
bear, adding 100 pounds to the
bruin’s weight. It also added an
extra 100 pounds to Luke as well!

First Black
Bears Then Grizzly

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

That incident seems like yesterday,
yet it proved to be close to 20 years
ago. Luke had several bear stands
that season; I was feeding one for him
situated on federal land off St. Martin’s Point, Mackinac County. The
black I was watching bedded down in
tall marsh grass bordering the Lake
Huron shoreline just southeast of the
mouth of Nunn’s Creek.
But that was not the bear Luke
shot that particular year. We had been
working together on an article titled,
Bear Hunting 101, and we had agreed
that as soon as Luke shot his bear,
he would call me so I could learn the
details as they happened. I followed
the action via the phone in his search
for the black bear.
Since that day, Luke has taken six
more blacks; one of record proportions that qualified for a Boone &
Crockett score; some in Michigan;
others in Ontario. This spring, he was
off after larger game…grizzly!
Jarosch, as with all of his hunting
trips, set up the grizzly hunt through
Cabela’s Outdoor Adventures; his
outfitter’s agent is Eric Pawlak, who
for a nominal fee, sees that Luke is
registered for tags in states and provinces he has chosen to hunt including Alaska, Washington, Montana,
Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Nevada,
Idaho, Arizona, New Mexico; plus
Ontario and British Columbia. To
date, Pawlak has set Luke up for hunting whitetail and mule deer, elk, bear
and moose.

60

Talk About A Road Trip
The grizzly hunt took place north
of Kiniskan Lake in northwestern
British Columbia, Canada. Jarosch
began his journey by flying into Vancouver, followed by a flight to Smithers. Then he drove six hours to reach
Kiniskan Lake. The lake was still
frozen in May thus he and his guide
had to travel the last 25 miles in the

Luke Jarosch of Cedarville pictured with his trophy-scoring 1,000 pound grizzly bear taken in British Columbia, Canada.
saddle with packhorses in tow, instead jumping in the water right after us.
of completing the trip by boat. Their
I found it hard to fathom, but at
goal was the Togin Mountain Range,
night the guide did not tie the horses;
May 18-28, 2013.
instead, the six horses were fitted out
with bells and turned loose to graze,
Luke Describes His
than rounded up at daylight for the
next day’s ride.”
Extreme Grizzly Hunt
The terrain was extremely moun“I embarked on this trip by
tainous and at the higher elevations
myself with exception of my
we saw feeding mountain goats, sheep
Native American guide, as this was
a reservation hunt. Accommodations and bears. The habitat supported
wolves, mountain lions, and both
were basic to say the least; the
black and grizzly bears.
shack was thrown together with
On this British Columbia, hunt,
cedar slabs allowing enough space
I saw at least seven grizzlies; one
in between so that snow often
was a sow with what I assumed were
invaded the interior.
2-1/2-year-old cubs…the cubs looked
My guide was Indian and previas though they weighed at least 300
ously had a difficult experience with
pounds. I went into this hunt knowa grizzly that raked its claws across
the man’s face, taking off the tip of his ing absolutely nothing about grizzly
nose, split his lip and removed part of bears.
We steadily climbed to 700-800
his jaw.
The 25-mile journey by horseback feet in the Togin Mountain Range of
British Columbia. We went up one
proved rugged. Amazingly at one
point, we had to cross a rushing river side of a mountain to glass the other
side for bears. We spent hours glassthat was four foot deep from spring
ing both brown and black, feeding on
run-off. But making it even more
last year’s berries, roots, and fresh
difficult was the fact that our horses
had to jump off a four-foot high shelf emerging spring grasses.
An excellent view of the bears
of solid ice down into the fast movwas afforded as they fed, watching in
ing river itself. We had a total of six
horses; two for the wranglers plus four particular a sow with cubs feeding on
a downed moose calf. After about a
pack animals that were not tied, as
they merely followed our two horses, half hour, a large boar grizzly came

into the area and chased the sow and
her family away. The terrain was
extremely thick with small alders,
stunted willows, serving as good
moose country as well as bear.
My gun was a 300 Remington Ultra mag using a 200-grain bullet, ballistic tip; hunted with it successfully
over several years. I was comfortable
with it.
Now it all becomes extremely personal between the grizzly and I…
We were glassing the edge of the
mountain. The grizzly was moving
down the mountain and my guide and
I both figured the bear would follow the river. But instead, the huge
grizzly came up the other side of the
mountain and we continued to watch
it for probably another hour and a
half.
As the bear approached us, the
guide motioned for me to go first.
This was somewhat unnerving since
he was obviously going to serve as my
backup should something go wrong.
The Native American guide’s gun barrel was actually split and held together
with black electrical tape making
the front sight off center. In spots
the electrical tape was torn. The tips
of his bullets were so rusted that he
could not identify which ones fit his
gun, so he would have to try to find a

proper fit before being able to fire the
gun.
Personally, I felt the guide stayed
behind as my backup due to his
previous encounter with a bear, as he
certainly was not too reassuring for
safety sake. Later he advised that he
fell back to circle around me to have
better aim should the bear attack. I
had serious difficulty with his reasoning. I felt it most likely gave him an
advantage of beating me out of that
situation should the bear charge as he
certainly would have had a running
head start.
I was careful not to insult my Indian guide, as I had to strictly adhere
to reservation rules and regulations.
Furthermore, these were Native
Americans of original descent, which
must depend on the land for sustenance.
When I first saw the bear, I kept
the wind in my favor; grizzlies have
extremely weak eyes and simply do
not see well…they depend a great
deal on their excellent sense of smell.
Suddenly the grizzly was just 15
yards away. Moving along the edge
of the mountain, we were literally
facing each other. I did not know if
he was going to charge or not…we
appeared to be frozen in time. The
guide moved back. The bear tried to
wind me. I moved up the mountain;
found a shooting lane; shot the grizzly as he moved through.
Once hit, the bear turned and
growled then bit ferociously at his
shoulder wound. The side of the
mountain was thick with brush and I
fired twice more. Later we found but
one bullet, thus the others undoubtedly missed their mark. It proved to

FLOTATION DOCKS

ROLL IN DOCKS

Feelings

I can’t describe my feelings other
than it was perhaps a combination
of extreme excitement coupled with
respectful fear. Later… realizing I
shot a 1000 pound grizzly bear at 15
yards in thick brush, appeared to be
absolutely amazing.
I own and operate The Maples
Saw Mill and I am probably in the
woods, both in Michigan’s Upper
Peninsula and Ontario, Canada, six
days out of seven; often experiencing
black bear encounters; yet, I was not
prepared for such a feeling; not one
quite so awesome, that is!
How do you pack a 1000 lb. grizzly bear out of the bush?
I skinned the big bear out myself,
which took a very long time. Most
of the meat would go to my guide’s
people. I quartered the animal, sealed
everything in bags as we had to keep
blood to a minimum for the scent of
‘bear’ could scare our pack horses
off. I had previously been warned
that when such an event occurs, the
horses race off often not stopping for
miles.
And of course, we also had to
pack out the grizzly’s head and hide,
which proved to be silver-tipped and
beautiful. Our newly built home has
a high-vaulted ceiling and my bear
hide and head will be mounted on one
of the walls.
My trophy grizzly’s skull, greenscored at 24-inches. Later, I saw a
bear skull on display at the Smithers
Airport that measured 26-inches and
it looked enormous.”
I asked Luke, if he would go back

to hunt British Columbia, Canada
again or was he thinking of a different trophy hunt elsewhere?
“I have another moose hunt
scheduled for next fall in Alaska.
I would also like to take a bighorn
sheep from the Alaskan Brooks
Mountain Range. The upcoming
Alaska trip has been arranged for August by Cabela’s Outdoor Adventures.
Thus far, I have taken trophy whitetail, mule deer, elk, moose, black and
grizzly bear.”
Luke explained his difficulty
leaving the Vancouver Airport where
he received a lengthy lecture against
hunting that certainly was inappropriate and unappreciated. He added, “At
the twin Sault Ste. Marie crossings, I
have a Nexus Card and I got through
Customs quickly; we are not so
fortunate the further west we travel.
My Nexus card was programmed
for making this trip to British Columbia, yet I was told Customs and
Immigration in both countries did
not honor it to the west. The crossing
back into the states was uncomfortable as well as I was taken to task
for not having my Zeiss binoculars
registered…something I had no possible way of knowing should have
been done.”
Last month I wrote a feature story
for this publication, regarding Denny
Geurink’s outfitting service that
books hunters to Russia and Siberia to hunt the ultimate of bear, the
Russian Browns that can weigh over
2000 pounds and stand up to 11 foot
tall. Could such a hunt be a possibility for you in the future?
Luke excitedly responded,
“Absolutely!”n

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61

I Was Set In My Ways Regarding Scopes...

Aging eyes are changing my attitude

A

favorite deer gun of mine
I’ve bagged my share of local (Thumb) whitetails with
over the years is a 12 ga.
Marlin Model 120 pump. It
has a 20 inch smooth-bore
barrel that has been ported by MagNa-Port many seasons ago (to control
recoil on follow-up shots – for more
information go to www.magnaport.
com) and the shotgun is topped with a
ghost-ring peep rear sight and a bead
front sight. This a favorite sighting
system of mine because when shooting with both my eyes open (with a
full field of view), my dominant eye
naturally centers through the peep
onto the bead, and in reality it is a fast
matter of simply placing the bead on
where I want to hit and touching the
trigger.
I have discovered that as I have
aged, my eyes have changed and don’t
dilate in low light like they used to
and the “owl-eyes” of my youth are a
thing of the past. I will always remem-

ber an opening morning when
I was in my mid-forties and
the day was dawning quite
gray due to impending rain
moving in. I was in dense
cover and when starting time
and shooting light arrived I
sighted down the Marlin to
make sure of everything and
was totally dismayed
that while seeing
through the peep was
fine, I couldn’t make
out my polished brass bead at the
muzzle. Needless to say this was the
first opening morning I was praying a
nice buck didn’t show up, at least not
until I could make out my front sight.
It was a good 30 minutes into the
hunt before I finally could see my
front sight, much to my relief, and
shortly after that I bagged an 8-point.
The brass bead was soon changed to a
fiber-optic front sight that still does a
fine job (during that same timeframe I
would also discover I needed bifo-

By Tom Lounsbury

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62

cals).
Using deer vocalizations is a favorite hunting
technique of mine and the
majority of bucks I have
taken for some time now
have been lured into range in
this fashion. Not that many
seasons ago I was sitting in
dense cover and doing my best to sound
like a lonely and
wanton doe during
the whitetail rut. Evening was settling
in with quitting time for hunting not
far away when I spotted a buck that
had suddenly materialized in the brush
15 yards away and was looking in my
direction. I was certain it was a bruiser
I had spotted earlier bedded in the
middle of an open field nearby (and
unapproachable for a shot), and was
the main reason for my calling efforts
at that location.
The buck’s neck was clear in a
maze of autumn olive branches that

pretty much covered everything else
and I placed the fiber-optic bead on
the center of the white throat-patch
and touched the trigger, dropping the
buck in his tracks. When I approached
the downed deer, I discovered it was
a nice 7-point and I certainly wasn’t
disappointed any, but it wasn’t the
bruiser I had assumed it to be. I could
tell right then that the older I get, the
better off I am using a scope for local
deer hunting, especially in low light
conditions. And a beauty of a scope is
that it allows more clarity in low light
as well as defines any obstructions for
a shot not seen by the naked eye.
I’m no stranger to scope use and
have taken my share of local whitetails with scoped shotguns (rifled),
muzzleloaders and handguns, as well
as using scopes on rifles for bear,
varmint and western hunting (not to
mention small game hunting with a
scoped .22). It is just that I’m set in
my ways with certain firearms for
larger game in close range and heavy

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cover environments, but ageing eyes
are changing my attitude.
The new law that allows certain
straight-walled cartridges in rifles
in Michigan’s “shotgun zone” for
firearms deer hunting has me quite
excited, and I have opted to order
a new .44 magnum rifle barrel for
my (Mag-Na-Port customized) T/C
Contender G2 system. Since T/C no
longer offers .44 magnum barrels for
Contender rifles, I discovered a business in Utah that does, Match Grade
Machine (www.matchgrademachine.
com). Originally I was thinking about
putting a ghost-ring peep-sight on this
barrel, because the ballistics of the
.44 magnum are not considered outstanding at long range (it is at its best
for shots kept to under 100 yards –
which covers most whitetail encounters) but I did some serious pondering
and have decided to go with a scope.
Due to rugged reliability and clarity, I’ve long been a Leupold scope
fan and I opted for a “VX-Hog”
scope which is a compact 1X to 4X
variable that has a unique crosshairs
for up close and personal shooting.
In the 1X setting I have all the quick
sighting advantages of a peep-sight
but with the additional advantage of

Doug Reiff of Leupold Optics demonstrating proper scope installation during a recent seminar held in Okemos.
the scope’s visual clarity in low light
and brushy conditions. And due to
.44 magnum ballistics, I don’t need
anything higher than the 4X setting.
It was a real pleasure for me
to attend a “Leupold Optics 101”
seminar, held in Okemos recently. I
saw quite a few folks in attendance I
know as well, who are professionals
in the firearms business. There was
little doubt in my mind that I was in
good company and I learned a whole
lot about scopes, binoculars and
other optics I didn’t know or fully
understand before. Although I dearly

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love shooting and know how to sight
matters in, I have never personally
mounted a scope on a firearm, and
have always left that matter up to
professionals I trust. Improper mounting can actually damage a scope,
and after the investment I’ve already
made on a scope, I want it mounted
properly. I’m also not the best handyman you’ll ever meet.
After the “Leupold Optics
101”seminar, I now know how to
properly mount a scope and the tools
it requires to do so (such as leveling
bars and a torque screwdriver, just to

name a few). Lacking those proper
tools (and having two left thumbs),
I’ll still leave scope mounting to the
professionals, but it was a great learning experience and understanding
how it is all performed.
For a fact, I’m really looking
forward to the local firearms deer
season that is fast approaching and to
trying something new, which include
(Leupold) optics in heavy cover encounters with the .44 magnum round
in my T/C Contender G2 rifle.
For more scope information go to
www.leupold.com.n

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Deer Hunting 2014...

Big bore accuracy

W

Bench Accuracy In The Deer Blind...By Joe Delaney

hen I was five years old,
back in 1947, my family
and I lived on Drexel
off of Warren Ave. on
Detroit’s east side. On
Thanksgiving morning that year I had my first great deer
hunting experience.
I remember it
like it happened yesterday. Several of
my neighborhood pals and I were given a detailed post-mortem of a huge
buck by my future brother-in-law, Jim
Markle. Jim’s dad, Walter Markle, had
taken the deer earlier while hunting in
the U.P.
The Markles lived several houses
north of us on the same block. This
deer hung head down, in their garage
and I had the thrill of a lifetime. I got
to see the “perfect shot” bullet hole
pointed out and how and “why a deer
was gutted,” etc. I loved every moment of it. This was when I decided
to become a deer hunter. Note that
earlier, at age four, I was a fisherman.
I was learning how to clean fish, for
example smelt and perch, with my
older brother, Jim. It was fun every
time I got to watch my dad cut up
chickens and prep the annual holiday

turkeys. Cutting up an animal never
bothered me. On the contrary, seeing
natural raw meat on a “hanging pole”
back in 1947 was a not a common
experience for most wide-eyed city
kids of five years. But I was delighted.
This was a positive experience! I was
taught that a clean harvest and a good
shot placement make sweet meat on
the table and that “it was good.”
In the years that followed, my
family moved out of Detroit into rural
farm country. My older sister Anne
married Jim Markle and you guessed
it, Jim and his dad became my future
hunting partners/mentors.
Let the good times roll!
I had a slow start to the early
deer season in 1997. I recall that well
because of the strange occurrence of
some uncommon wondrous events.
I needed venison, but I saw no good
bucks early on, and I had shot no
does. However, in late November I
took the largest muzzleloader, eight
The 50 year buck...at 125 yards through a narrow opening the author bagged
pointer of my life.
Initially, what made this so amaz- his largest muzzleloader 8-pt. on Thanksgiving 1997. Author photos
ing was that I shot this deer at over
100 yards, through a small opening
was my only shooting lane and it was years to the day and approximately at
in a maze of thick understory. This
the same hour of what had happened
tight between two big angled oaks.
back in 1947. Good deer hunting
With his rack flashing through the
trees, the buck almost ran out of view. experiences are often a treasured
paradox.
He stopped suddenly! I grabbed and
The following material is some of
mounted my rifle with the crosshair
on his shoulder. Then, I quickly pulled the good lessons I learned from my
late hunting partners/mentors, Jim and
the trigger. Immediately at firing, I
Walter Markle; as well as others.
saw his feet flip up in the air. It all
Bench rest accuracy in the deer
happened so quick, it was surreal.
blind can be easily maximized by doLater upon examination, I was
absolutely flabbergasted at the magni- ing three things:
1) Use a sand bag rest under the
tude of this prime animal. My Encore
muzzleloader was Magna-ported and forearm. Never, never rest the weapon
on the barrel. Bad barrel harmonics!
weight forward balanced. For me it
You will miss the target.
has no muzzle jump at ignition.
2) Hold the rifle solidly with two
Hitting him high in the shoulder and
hands. Always wrap your thumb
the spine, the buck expired right
around the pistol grip and grasp like a
where he fell. Thank goodness; because this all happened at the edge of firm handshake.
3) Pull the rifle into your shoulder
a very thick swamp.
against your cheek, securely against
Only long after in retrospect, did
the stock comb. Always hold the
I realize what I had done. This hunt
occurred on Thanksgiving morning 50 forearm with your left hand (for right

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

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
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64

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hand shooters); again with a firm
grip.
Big bore rifles and shotguns usually have a lot of recoil and muzzle
jump. Good shooting form substantially reduces felt recoil and maximizes accuracy.
I was taught to always shoot with
two hands stabilizing the rifle.
(There are a few exceptions.) The
U.S. military promotes marksmanship by instruction of proper form,
i.e., different stance training and then
lots of repetitive practice. Also dry
firing (in a safe manner); away from
the shooting range. This is standard
procedure. A little of this drill is fun
and its good for the average hunter.
The best deer blinds are dark
inside because of the roofs and small
windows. You have better vision and
the deer (almost) can’t see you. I
deer hunt out of multiple hunting
hides, some with different viewing/
shooting ports. Prior to every hunt,
I practice drawing the rifle into a
shooting position quickly and quietly
without a loud clunk or thud. It scares
the deer! I should know, “been there
done it”. This little “in the dark drill”
with no noise and no wasted motion,
exactly duplicates when a marksman
shoots a deer. Sometimes the window
of opportunity is only a brief moment.
In the middle of the hunt, after
two hours of motionless sitting, a
little stretching and gun mounting
reduces muscle anxiety and nervous
tension. If you are an old fart like

me, this is really important. It’s like
a sprinter warming up before a race.
Accurate shooting is an athletic event
to be sure. Note that there are multiple shooting events in the Olympic
Games. A clean harvest of a live
game animal is the ultimate test of
any good hunter. He is more than just
a marksman.
Cold barrel accuracy, or the first
shot out of a big bore weapon, is the
basis of success in the deer woods.
Over 95% of all deer are taken this
way. But this “one shot one kill”
philosophy is not just the footing of a
clean humane harvest. Obviously,
it also promotes hunter safety. The
trained hunter then is a very deliberate, careful marksman. He can shoot
fast when necessary, but he always
knows his target and his back stop.
The experts tell us that the easiest
way to shoot and miss a deer is to
shoot over the top of the animal. I
know that this is true. I’ve been there,
made this mistake. Fortunately, in my
youth I was trained to stop making
this error (and others) in two important ways. Allow me to explain.
More than several decades ago I
was given specific training on proper
stance, correct breathing and trigger (pull) control. Two of my former
hunting partners’ dads were ex-military personnel with rifle team and/or
battlefield experience. They offered
their sons and me rifle training of
good effect. With my practice and
their instruction I corrected my obvious bad shooting habits. This was my

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first big step
in developing
marksmanship
in the deer
woods.
Learning
to improvise when in
any hunting
condition was
the second
important lesson. What is
the mid-range
trajectory of
my rifle at
any distance; By using a sand bag, two hands and face firmly against the
stock, the author can achieve bench rest accuracy in the deer
not based
on just one blind.
zero point.
of different calibers.) Therefore, all
Stats tell us that the average deer in
of my long guns are sighted in with
Michigan is taken at 65 yards. Yet
a minimum two targets, (sometimes
most sighting-in is done at 100 yards. 3) at different ranges. Initially at 25
Today I hunt with several center fire
yards, then I go to 100 yards, and
rifles, muzzleloaders and shotguns.
sometimes longer depending on caliThis seems a very complicated matber and purpose. Last, but not least
ter, however, it is not. First of all, I
50/65 yards are my final targets. This
was taught to “aim point” just below
is my mid-range trajectory.
the center of the chest at the top of
In my office files I store the tarthe heart of the animal. This is the
gets of each deer rifle; with distance,
largest “kill spot” on a deer. “Shoot a date, ammo and wind duly noted.
little high, a little bit low or to either
Simply stated, that one preseason
side and still get a clean kill.” This
shot at the gun range, with last years
shot takes out massive blood vessels
zeroed-in rifle confirms; Big Bore Acabove the heart and both lungs and
curacy in the Deer Woods.
produces quick clean kills.
Note: To reduce recoil and
Because of this all of my rifles are muzzle jump, contact
zeroed at the approximate same point Mag-na-port International, Inc. @
of impact with target differences
www.magnaport.com or (586) 469indicated. (Note, varied trajectories
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65

A Special Wildlife Report--Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge...

Diversity of
opportunity;
for hunters,
fishermen
and turtles

T

he Shiawassee National
Wildlife Refuge is perhaps
one the best kept secrets of
central Lower Michigan. The
refuge offers peaceful solitude for late season kayakers
and nature-hungry hikers that explore
the 9,400 acres of habitat. And it’s a
near magical place on foggy mornings when the woods of autumn and
swamp like backwaters blend with
the horizon. It’s the sort of place
visitors are more likely to see a bald
eagle than another human. Thirteen
miles of trail meander near the dikes,

bayous and fields providing incredible
views of migratory and resident birds
that frequent the fields, wetland, rivers
and open-water habitat that are the
very essence of the world of Shiawassee.
The refuge is a critical migration stopover site for waterfowl and
a dream world for photographers;
perhaps the kind of setting Aldo
Leopold envisioned when he penned

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two powerful sentences in his classic,
A Sand County Almanac. “Once the
first geese are in, they honk a clamorous invitation to each migrating
flock, and in a few days the marsh is
full of them. It is at this moment of
each year that I wish I were
a muskrat, eye-deep in the
marsh.”
Hunting And Fishing:
Hunters and fishers are
lured to excellent opportunities at Shiawassee. Goose and
deer hunting are available
in fall and winter by permit
only and fisherman find walleye,
smallmouth bass,
northern pike, channel catfish and
crappie. Be certain to visit their official website of the refuge for rules,
regulations, special situations, public
events, closures and updates: www.
fws.gov/midwest/shiawassee and
“friend” Shiawassee on Facebook to
stay up to date on events and sightings. Note: Refuge Manager Steven
Kahl reminds hunters that although
deer hunting is by far the most popular hunting opportunity at the refuge
a permit to hunt the refuge is required

and that closed back in August.
Blanding’s Turtles:
In late August I was privileged
to have a close up view of one of the
least seen creatures of Shiawassee, the
Blanding’s turtle, a protected reptile
that struggles to hold its own
in much of its habitat. The
Blanding’s turtle lives longer
than many humans and lays
eggs into their seventies.
Refuge Manager Kahl explained that the Great Lakes
Region is a stronghold for the
Blanding’s turtle, a species of
special concern in
Michigan. (Species of special
concern is an official designation of
the Michigan Department of Natural
Resources and refers to species that
are declining or relict populations in
the state. Should the species continue
to decline, they would be recommended for threatened or endangered
status.)
In much of their habitat they are in
serious decline due to extremely high
predation on eggs by raccoons and
heavy road mortality during nesting
season. Countless turtles are killed

By Jonathan Schechter

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

SUCCESSFUL TURKEY HUNTERS

66

Lane Walker
• Author
• Outdoor Writer
• Professional Speaker
Book Lane for your next wildgame dinner or event

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tles again and can study them to learn
more about their life history. One of
those students, Melissa Szymanski,
is a graduate student working on her
masters in biology at the University
of Michigan, one of three graduate
students involved in the Blanding’s
project. She paddle alongside me
and shared details of the project as
one bold and eager Blanding’s rode
with me for a few hundred feet in my
kayak and tried to peer out.
The turtle stretched its neck out
from its black-and-yellow spotted
shell as if to ask, “Are we there yet”?
I felt like saying, “Not yet, my friend”
as a great egret flew low overheard
and then settled on a refuge dike. A
few more paddle strokes nudged my
kayak through cattails that rattled in
increasingly restless winds. And then
just as we reached a turtle release
point on a secluded raised hummock
away from raccoon territory, a hidden
pied billed grebe exploded into a loud
rhythmic repertoire that in a word is
“startling”. The turtle loitered for a
few seconds as I slowly lowered my
hand into the water and then it almost
bolted forward in turtle full speed and
swam a few feet before disappearing
into submerged vegetation.
The story of the turtle release
actually started a little over five years
earlier when in an effort to increase

University of Michigan -Flint biology students and Detroit Zoo personnel paddle to
one of the release sites. Jonathan Schechter photos

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An anxious Blanding’s turtle peers out from the author’s kayak moments before release.
the number of Blanding’s turtles in
Michigan, the Shiawassee National
Wildlife Refuge partnered with the
Detroit Zoo. To date 147 Blanding’s
turtles that were raised at the Detroit
Zoo have been release into the refuge’s waters.
Szymanski explained the process
of the turtle head start program that
entailed female Blanding’s turtles
being collected from the refuge and
then transported to the Detroit zoo
where hormones were used to induce
egg laying. The females were later
returned to the locations from which
they were gathered while the eggs are
incubated and hatched at the zoo. The
hatchlings are raised for over a year
at the zoo until they are big enough
for release.” Their size at the time of
release is critical; they must be larger
than a crunchy “Turtle-McNugget”
tidbit for ravenous raccoons.

The last turtle in this round of
head-start releases swam slowly away
between the cattails before disappearing under the duckweed. With
significant storm clouds developing
overhead we paddled back to the
shore with an eye to the sky. Szymanski smiled and remarked, “It is
wonderful being able to do something
positive for a species in decline, the
Blanding’s turtle. Being a part of important research to answer questions
about the Blading’s turtle’s behavior
and habitat is a great experience.”
Jonathan Schechter is naturalist/
paramedic living in Brandon Township and the Nature Education Writer
for Oakland County Parks. Note:
Four hours after the last turtle was
released severe weather slammed into
Lower Michigan causing multi-day
power outages.
JonathanSchechter@Frontier.comn

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

when emerging from wetlands and
crossing roads to search for suitable
locations to lay eggs.
A Head Start Paddle To Freedom:
On the day I captured these
photos among the duckweed coated
bayous and cattail-rich backwaters
of Shiawassee the only Blanding’s
turtles I saw all looked identical and
under two years old. And they all had
just been lifted out of a big box lined
with moss to ease a 100 mile transport from the Detroit Zoo to the refuge. After the turtles vital statistics
were recorded and small identifying
marks were made on the shells it was
time to return them to their ancestral
home.
Detroit Zoo wildlife specialists had inserted PIT tags; know to
researchers as passive integrated
transponders into the turtles before
release day. The PITs act like barcodes that last the life of the turtle
and can be scanned for identification
purposes. The University of Michigan
Flint donated them to the project for
all the turtles.
Refuge manage Kahl empathized
that little is known about the natural
history of young turtles and with
new knowledge gained their chances
for survival may increase with new
management plans. In years to come,
UM-Flint students may find the tur-

67

Traditional Black Powder Hunting...By Dennis Neely

Brutal Classroom Lessons

A

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

n overnight snow dusted
brown leaves. The morning
dawned bland and gray and
calm with a haunting hush
that cloaked the hill’s steep,
eastern slope. The crisp air
tingled the nose, but was ordinary and
devoid of any telltale fragrance. Three
blue jays flew about like night sentinels making their final rounds, never
uttering a sound, not even a contented,
“Swip-it, swip-it.”
Twenty paces down from the
ridge crest a forked oak top, dislodged
in a violent storm, lay contorted on
the snowy leaves. Two powder-kegsized branches afforded ample cover,
concealing all but the head and upper
shoulders of a returned captive who
found it difficult to abandon the
woodland ways of his adopted Ojibwe
family.
On a frigid November morn in
1798, deep in the Old Northwest Territory, a short distance from the River
Raisin’s murky channel, Msko-waagosh, the Red Fox, sat cross-legged.
Wrapped in a half-folded, scarlet,
wool trade blanket, the cultural
outcast watched the upwind trails in
hopes of returning to his lodge with
fresh venison.
An hour after first light the forest
tenant adjusted a blanket fold with
an almost imperceptible motion. A
Northwest trade gun, charged with a
death messenger, its firelock primed
and waiting, rested across his lap.

68

A grey squirrel scrounged in the
oak leaves, a dozen or so paces from
the top’s splintered butt. The old
woodsman’s dark brown eyes followed the squirrel’s antics, but also
maintained a watchful vigilance on
the two well-used trails that exited the
thick swamp. The grey squirrel zigzagged its way down the hill, spiraled
up a white oak, then vanished.
About mid-morning the air grew
colder and a light snow began to fall.
A fat fox squirrel bounded from a red
oak, two dozen paces to the south. It
dug here and there, flinging leaves
and dirt. When another fox squirrel
descended a nearby red oak, the fat
one instigated a wild frolic. The pair
chased south to north, then to the base
of the hill. They scampered along a
rotted log, around two poplar trees,
under and over a fallen oak branch,
then straight uphill. The first squirrel
angled along the treetop, but the fat
one halted three paces distant, sat up
straight and stared at Msko-waagosh,
who smiled.
Down the hill, a scrawny doe
emerged on the north trail. The doe
stopped at the base of the rotted log,
sniffed the air and nibbled at the
supple twigs of a young oak. A littler
deer walked from the swamp, stopped
and watched its mother. Neither offered the prospect of many meals.
With an abrupt hop, the older doe
started up the slope, not too far off
of the squirrels’ course. Oblivious to

• Black Powder Huting... By carefully folding the scarlet trade blanket, Red Fox
learned that three layers could be positioned over the shoulders for added warmth
when the mercury dipped below freezing. Wild Rivertree photo
death’s presence, the pair meandered
closer to the tree top. At ten paces, the
matriarch turned south and plodded
away. The fawn advanced three steps
closer than her dam and stared at the
lair as the fox squirrel had.
My alter ego squinted to avoid
eye contact. He breathed down into
the blanket folds for fear of exhaling an incriminating white cloud, but
in doing so, he had to fight to hold
back the shivers. The fawn hung its
head, glanced south, then north, then
returned to staring. An eternity later,
it flicked its ears, shook its head, then
turned and bounded after its mother.
A second moment of truth befell
the would-be forest tenant as a fit
of involuntary shivers overtook the
historical me. I propped the Northwest
gun against the back branch, got to
my feet and pulled the blanket close
about my body with my left hand.
Grabbing the trade gun with my right
hand, I struck off to the north with a
steady gait.
Keeping warm during Michigan’s
deer seasons is a matter of personal
choice. Today’s modern hunters have
a myriad of options for dealing with
the mid-20-degree temperatures

hands width above the knee, and
when worn with a breechclout, left
the thigh and outside hip area exposed to the weather. I soon discovered that the upper thigh and hip
area are less sensitive to cold; cuts
and scratches from briars and broken
twigs proved more of an issue than
a frosty morning. Adapting to the
Indian dress was not a problem until
the morning temperatures dipped into
the mid-30s.
Donning the second trade shirt
helped, and while still-hunting, I
found wearing the blanket over my
left shoulder and letting it hang held
the chill at bay. Both practices are
consistent with paintings or illustrations of Native Americans from the
late 18th-century. By managing the
blanket I learned to tolerate the cold
down to freezing.
November’s onslaught harbored
fast-falling temperatures that produced harsh and sometimes unbearable conditions. Wool leggins replaced buckskin leggins, and I added
an old wool weskit over two heavy
linen shirts. Sunny stands that offered
maximum shelter took priority, like
the forked oak tree top. I wrapped
the trade blanket tight, and when on
a still-hunt, I stayed to the heavier
cover in the lee of the wind.
On that particular morning, the
mercury wavered in the mid-20s, and
I sat for three hours, accepting my
woodland circumstance. The temperature drop combined with sitting
motionless became too much to bear.
After the doe and fawn passed, the
intended warming walk did little to
fend off the early stages of hypother-

• Black Powder Hunting... During October, a common trade blanket draped over the
left shoulder provided sufficient warmth for most wild turkey hunts, morning and
afternoon. Wild Rivertree photo
year was 1798, and the temperature
mia. To some, such behavior flirts
never rose above 18 degrees, but the
with foolhardy. From prior excurRed Fox overcame a daunting chalsions, I learned to recognize the
lenge and survived another brutal
symptoms and retreat to safety, but
classroom lesson.
not before experiencing a deep sense
Give traditional black powder
of kinship with Tanner, Alder and
hunting a try, be safe and may God
Smith.
bless you.
With determined perseverance
and constant experimentation, my
Dennis Neely maintains a web site
alter ego pushed his comfort level
devoted to traditional hunting at www.
down into the high teens in eight
traditionalblackpowderhunting.com.
short weeks. On a snowy, lateDecember Saturday, Msko-waagosh,
Michigan State Muzzle Loading
wrapped in his scarlet trade blanket,
Association State Shoot
survived for four hours in the Old
Northwest Territory, overlooking the
Nov 1-2--Turkey Shoot: Sauk Trail
bottom lands of the River Raisin. The
Long Rifles: 517-879-3096n

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

common in late November, and most
provide satisfactory comfort. But for
traditional black powder hunters, the
possible choices are limited to the
natural materials and hand-woven
fabrics available in a specific time
period, geographical location and
societal station in life.
The challenges, and the resulting satisfaction and exhilaration,
associated with donning periodcorrect clothing, picking up a favorite
black-powder arm and heading out
on a fair-chase pursuit of white-tailed
deer as our forefathers once did are
unmatched in today’s outdoor world.
Traditional black powder hunting is
not mainstream, but for those willing
to try turning back the clock, the process becomes a rewarding addiction
that pays fabulous dividends over and
over, hunt after hunt.
An outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) in 2012
decimated our local deer herd. By
conscious choice, the deer season was
over before it started. As a traditional
hunter, I view the glade as a living
wilderness classroom, and although
I would not shoot a deer, there were
still lessons to be learned and history
to be re-lived.
The silver lining that accompanied EHD was an abundance of
time for reflection. I decided to try
something new for the 2013 hunting
seasons, to create a different outdoor
persona based on the lives of John
Tanner, James Smith and Jonathan
Alder. These three, and others like
them, were referred to as “returned
captives,” individuals captured in
their youth, adopted into Native
American families, taught to survive
in the harshness of the Old Northwest
Territory, who later returned to white
society, but found it difficult to abandon the wilderness lessons of Native
American society.
Careful research and meticulous
documentation play a key role in recreating any history-based persona,
but of equal importance is the handson experimentation that fleshes out
the true-to-life meaning that remains
hidden within yesteryear’s journal
passages. In the latter case, learning
to keep warm while limiting myself
to the clothing listed in John Tanner’s
narrative proved to be a brutal classroom exercise.
The common “Indian dress,” as
Tanner’s clothing and accoutrements
were called in 18th-century white
society, included moccasins made of
deer, elk or moose skin and leggins of
wool, cloth or buckskin. Tanner wore
a breech cloth, owned one or two
trade shirts and tied a black silk handkerchief about his neck. He never
mentions a hat or head covering, but
favored a capote, or blanket coat, or
sometimes wrapped a single blanket
about his body for added warmth.
Woodland leggins stopped a

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High and sly for pike under ice
Big Northerns Frequent The Upper
Reaches Of The Water Column More
Often Than Most Anglers Realize...

W

By Mark Martin

hat’s the
most
common
thought when it comes to
the whereabouts of northern pike in winter? Why, bellied to
bottom and prowling the thickest of
weeds beds, of course.
While it’s true many monstrous
northerns wrapped in a heap of
vegetation have been pulled through
a hole in the ice over the years, the
truth of the matter is the trophy-size
fish frequent the upper reaches of the
water column more often than most
anglers realize.
And it doesn’t matter whether
it’s an inland lake, reservoir or Great
Lake, in any waterway where deep
water—even those with depth registering into triple digits—it’s the larger
fish that tend to suspend high in the
water column.
What are they doing here? Like
their lesser kin that tend to hunker
tight weeds near a lake’s floor, these

marauders are searching for their next
meal. After all, they
didn’t get to be the biggest in the
bunch by skimping on food.
But big pike are not just swimming any ol’ where under the surface
when in search of forage. They often
suspend over the very structure the
smaller fish are prowling in, or, swimming directly above the drop-offs
found fathoms below.
In short: Although trophy pike
might not be lurking tight to structure,
if you target the upper half of the water column very near cover, you stand
the chance of catching larger than the
average pike.

Aiming High
Fishing high in the water column
has not been a foreign technique to
me for quite some time now. Since
the mid 80’s, when I started my career
as a professional walleye/tournament
angler, catching fish just under the

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

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72

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From within his Otter shanty, the author, Mark Martin, lift a nice northern pike that hit a Northland Live-Forage Moxie Minnow. David Rose photos
ous types of structure, aiming specifisurface while over deep water has
cally for weeds, but also place them
been a common ploy. And within the
over wood and rock if they are in the
mix of big walleyes have been many
pike larger than average. And just like area. All these types of structure will
walleyes, northern pike suspend year hold bait fish, thus predator fish, especially if the cover is very near a drop
round.
The first pike ploy I like to employ offs. And over deep water near points,
underwater islands, over cuts or any
once on the ice usually involves my
irregularity in the shape of a strait
buds and I setting a swath of tip-ups.
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Hop To It
Once my tip-ups are set, it’s time

to start jigging in the
same high-above-bottom
regions.
A Berkley Lightning
Rod Ice Spinning Rod
coupled with an ABU
Garcia spinning reel is
my preferred combo.
And when jigging, I use
10-pound-test Berkley
FireLine Micro Ice, and
tie a small Berkley BallBearing Swivel its end via
a Palomar knot. A 1-foot
section of 30-pound-test
fluorocarbon come next,
and then a Berkley CrossLok Snap in which to
connect my lure.
Both spoons and
solid-body jigs are my
go-to baits when jigging
for pike, with Northland
Live-Forage Moxie Minnows and Rapala Jigging
Raps both great choices
to start out with. And you
may find you never have
to try another.
In general, I like to
just lift the tip of my ice
rod about a foot and then
quickly drop it so that the
jig flutters on the fall. And
there will be no denying
it when a pike strikes as
the hit is usually quite ag- Tip-ups with a minnow dangling high off bottom take a good number of northern pike when fished over structure.
gressive. Just remember to
hang on to that rod tight.

High And Sly

This coming winter, don’t hesitate
to fish for northern pike in the upper
reaches of the water column. Trust
me, they will be there.
Use tip-up with lively minnows,
and then jig with hard baits. One or
the other, if not both, will take trophies on any given day.
Mark Martin is a touring walleye tournament pro, and instructor with the Ice-Fishing Vacation
Schools, who resides in southwest
Lower Michigan. A few openings
are still available for both of 2015’s
ice schools, and you can find more
information at Mark’s website at
markmartins.net.n

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

I like to use my StrikeMaster
power auger and bore all my holes at
once, so as not to keep making noise
and spooking fish throughout the day.
This means drilling way more holes
than we have tip-ups right away.
Once my holes are drilled, I’ll
check the depth of each one with my
Lowrance Elite-5 Ice Machine. Now
I am not necessarily looking for fish
when in search of suspended pike
as rarely will you mark one. I am,
however, looking for structure and/or
baitfish. And to make sure I am right
on target when looking to drill a hole
over a breakline, I have a Navionics mapping program in the SD card
holder of the unit, which shows me in
great detail the lay of the land under
me, allowing me to be spot-on over
the break.
Once all my holes are drilled and
I’ve scanned the area with my sonar,
I’ll reach into my Plano bait bucket
and grab only the liveliest of minnows for my tip-ups. Because tip-ups
are hands-off devices, I want only
the healthiest bait below one. The
minnow must wiggle… a lot. And it
needs to stay alive a long while and
be full of vigor the entire time.
Over all, I like to nip a minnow
onto a thin-wire Daiichi treble hook,
and prick it closer to the tail rather
than the head. And often times, I’ll
hook it through the bottom of its tail
section so that it’s always struggling
to right itself. When you hook it here,
the minnow continually squirms in
an attempt to right itself. (Tip: In
clear water, instead of a heavy steel
leader, I’ll tie on a one-foot section of
40-pound-test Berkley Fluorocarbon
leader material. The line is nearly invisible underwater and holds up well
to the razor-sharp teeth of pike.)
Now comes the tricky part for
many anglers: lowering down the
minnow down only a few feet rather
than letting it fall to bottom. Even in
water 40 feet and more, I’ll often let
out enough line so that the minnow
is only eight to ten feet under the
surface, and then set the tip-up into
place.

73

I love the intense challenges of hunting in Michigan...By John Eberhart

Reality of bowhunting
that only hunt lightly hunted and micro-managed
areas (which the vast majority of them only do). An
HCHP area hunter’s attention to detail has to far exceed that of the high profile personalities if they are
to have any chance at somewhat consistent success.
Whereas a moderately successful hunter from
an HCHP area could kill big bucks with regularity
if allowed to hunt on the same properties as the TV
and video personalities do, the same would not be
true if the roles were reversed and the high profile
personalities had to hunt on HCHP area properties.
If hunting personalities were to hunt HCHP properties in the same manner they hunt on TV and in videos, they would rarely if ever take a mature buck.
I actually get rather bored (although I try not to
let it show) when a hunter shows me picture after
picture of good bucks taken from managed areas.
It’s just not that big a deal to me.
My Michigan HCHP area story from 2013 was
one of those disappointing ones. It was the most
banner year for mast and fruit production that I
could remember in my 50 bowhunting seasons.
The apple trees in every such location had apples on them, not just a few, they were loaded. Even
trees that hadn’t produced in years were loaded to
the point of bending and breaking branches. There
were so many apples on the ground everywhere
during the early season that no single tree stood
out as a specific destination feeding location, over
another.
By Early November however there were only a
few trees left with apples and they became destination feeding locations with active ground scrapes
dotting their perimeters. I knew there was a 3 ½
year old 10 point in one area and he was the only
buck of interest.
The author with his dandy Kansas 9-point. John believes many Michigan hunters reading this article would
On an evening hunt at one of the apple trees I
be just as successful given the opportunity to hunt out of state.
had my opportunity. This tree was about 40 yards
west of a picked corn field with tall weeds and
hen it comes to deer hunting
gratification level more than the taking of a record
I love listening to the excitebook buck in Michigan from a heavy consequential brush between the field and apple tree that was well
ment level of a hunting story
suited as adequate security cover. 15 yards west of
hunting pressure (HCHP) area.
told by a Michigan bowhunter
the apple tree was a thin line of trees and brush and
In fact, statistically in Michigan in 2006 (the
far more that telling one of my
immediately west of them was a small wet marsh
most heavily bowhunted state in the country) only
own. Listening to hunters start
with waist high weeds. Farther west was a shallow
one out of every 3,647 bowhunters entered a Pope
by describing their background
& young buck (85 total entries) in the record book. north/south river lined on either side with adequate
seasonal trials and tribulations
places for deer to bed.
To put that into perspective, if 91 bowhunters
is interesting and is sometimes a
I was set-up relatively low (about 22 feet) for
hunted for 40 seasons each, statistically only one of
learning moment for me. Then as the opportunity
me in a large red oak which was about 12 yards
them would enter a 125 inch buck into the Pope &
moment approaches their excitement level rises and Young record book during his lifetime.
south of the apple tree. Being I hunt from a saddle
without thought, heavy voice inflections are used to
I had the option of setting up behind the trunk and
An HCHP area will have 10 to 25 bowhunters
emphasize the special moments leading up to and
use it to hide my body figure from deer entering
and close to twice that number of gun hunters per
including the final moments.
from the west.
square mile (640 acres) and many of them will be
If the hunt was successful, which is typically
It was rather early when I caught movement
targeting any legal antlered buck. The few bucks
the case when a story is told, their eyes light up
surviving beyond their first set of antlers seemingly of the first deer moving through the marsh. A few
with elation as they scroll their cell phones gallery
have Master’s degrees in avoiding hunters and tak- steps would reveal it as the 10 point and he was
of pictures for verification. Sometimes however
slowly walking through the shallow water as if trying on nocturnal movement habits. The taking of
the event or recovery is unsuccessful and a sense
ing not to make any splashing noises.
a 2 ½ year old buck in an HCHP area is far more
of anger, disappointment and defeat is obvious in
He was making a direct bee line to the apple
difficult than taking a 4 ½ year old or older buck in
their voice. Even unsuccessful hunts are interesting lightly hunted or managed areas.
tree and while watching him I was getting ready. By
though, as hunters usually learn from their failures.
the time he hit the tree line edge of the marsh, by
I would go as far as to say that given the opTaking a mature buck in a heavily hunted area
design, the oak trunk was blocking my view of him
portunity, most Michigan bowhunter’s that hunt
within Michigan with a vertical bow is as tough a
and his of me. The plan was going perfect and all I
in HCHP areas with a moderate success rate on 2
test of hunting skill as bowhunting offers. There is
had to do was wait for him to take a few steps and
½ year and older and older bucks would kick butt
nothing else in bowhunting that peaks my selfand take names against TV and video personalities into my lane.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

W
74

Bryan with this beautiful Kansas 13-point taken last year.
the second morning he took a perfectly symmetrical 10 point that taped about 140 inches. The buck
came in right at first light to one of the primary
scrape areas we had set-up on the first day and
Jon made a perfect shot and watched the 10 point
expire within sight. When we checked the camera’s
SD card it showed the buck working the scrape
the evening prior and also showed him coming in
seconds before he was shot.
On a 20 acre parcel we had passed over the
year before, we found a primary scrape area location but had difficulty finding a suitable tree. There
were huge trees along two of the runways that fed
into the scrape area, but the only tree within shooting distance of the entire small destination scrape
area was a short, leafless locust covered with
clumps of long 2 to 6 inch thorns.
It took me over an hour just to hatchet off the
clumps of thorns. Cutting clumps of thorns from a
locust is anything but fun, but it was the only tree
that made sense. We hung a stand a mere 12 feet
off the ground and the locust was only 10 yards
from the scrapes, making it seem as though a deer
would basically be in your lap. Scent control at this
location would be critical.
Even for Kansas, this set-up was so low, so
exposed and so close to the destination scrapes
that we all had doubts as to whether an opportunity
could be had. In Michigan there would have been
no way we would have set-up in that exposed tree
because getting picked would be nearly 99.99%
guaranteed.
After a couple days we checked the camera
and it showed two 150 inch range bucks using
that scrape area with regularity. Since Bryan was
the tree stand guy he hunted it and scored the first
evening.
As the buck was coming in from behind the tree
through the tall weeds, Bryan said the buck became
a bit leery and stopped at about 16 yards. When the
buck turned his head away, Bryan twisted around
in an attempt to find an opening to shoot through.
We hadn’t cleared out anything for a shot anywhere

other than at the scrape area because we were too
concerned about concealment cover in the leafless
locust.
Bryan located a small opening a bit low and
back on the buck, and took the shot through the
branches. The arrow entered exactly where he
aimed and Bryan decided it would be best to leave
him overnight. After my hunt the next morning we
found the 13 point in a nearby picked Milo field, he
had only went about 150 yards and he was one of
the 2 bucks we had on camera.
Hopefully my turn would be next. I had already
passed on several 125 to 130 inch class bucks and
as the week was winding down I was considering lowering my kill criteria. Several years prior
we found a local butcher that added just the right
amounts of pork and beef suet to his burger and
all of us were now having our deer totally ground
(other than the straps) up and one Kansas buck
makes enough burger to last me a year and strange
as it may seem, I didn’t want to go home without it.
Yes, Kansas non-resident licenses also come
with a doe tag, however we give the does we take
to the property owners.
Jon had previously sat in the tree I would hunt
next in an unsuccessful attempt to take a doe. Our
camera at this location showed a P&Y class 8 point
and a weird antlered buck that wouldn’t score well,
but was unique enough to consider taking.
The small primary scrape area that finalized our
decision to set it up was located at the end of a long
brush and tree filled draw that meandered through
the section. To the east of the draw was a short
green field and to the west was a picked milo field.
To the north was a large pasture holding two
huge bulls and its makeup consisted of tall weeds,
sparse trees, and a small pond. About 20 yards
north of the scrape area and running east and west
was the 4 strand barbwire pasture fence.
Although I have 100% total confidence in my
Scent Lok activated carbon scent control regiment

Bowhunting next page

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Things don’t always work out as planned and
after about 15 seconds I peeked around the trunk
to see him casually heading north down my side
of the tree line. A few yards in front of him was
some heavy brush, so it was now or never on this
given hunt. I moved another step over to swing into
position and hurriedly took the 28 yard shot. My
right and left aim point was perfect, but the arrow
entered a bit high.
The buck was not recovered but I felt better
when I found out he had been taken during gun
season. It had been 16 years since I hit and didn’t
recover a buck in Michigan, and while I can hope it
never happens again, it likely will.
Out of State
I must admit however that while I love the
intense challenges of hunting in Michigan, I look
forward to taking my annual out-of-state bowhunting trip during Michigan’s gun season. In states
like Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska, and Missouri
to name a few, there are simply a lot of big bucks
everywhere and they are relatively easy to pattern
and kill.
Taking a book buck is so easy that of the 16
mature bucks I have taken out of state, I have never
had any officially scored and entered into P&Y,
whereas every Michigan buck that’s close, gets
scored and entered into Commemorative Bucks of
Michigan.
There are so many in fact that the kill criteria
on the public and free knock on doors for permission properties we hunt have climbed to the 140
inch level. These are regular average Joe properties with absolutely no management criteria’s. For
a one week hunt in areas none of us have been in
for the previous 51 weeks that criteria level seems
almost unrealistic to most Michigan bowhunters
that have never hunted out-of-state.
2013 Kansas Trip
In 2013 our group trip would be to Kansas and
as always we drove all night (2 vehicles) and arrived just before daybreak so we could drop off our
trailer at the house we rented and then spend the
entire day scouting and setting up locations.
Nothing had changed as every primary scrape
area we hunted the year before was again active.
By the end of the first day we had prepared 7 locations and the second morning we slept in until 8 am
to catch up on some much needed rest and then we
hit it again and set up 4 more locations before the
evenings hunt. Of the 11 locations, 9 were at active
scrape areas and the other 2 in pinch points of transition cover. Three of the locations had Lone Wolf
hang-on stands for Bryan and the other 8 were set
up for saddle harness style hunting systems for my
son Jon and I.
It would also be the second year we set up motion cameras at each location and what’s interesting
about low hunting pressure areas is that several
human intrusions at hunting destination locations
don’t affect the daytime movement habits of the
mature bucks. That is not the case back home in
HCHP areas where any pre or in-season human
intrusion at a hunting location can cause severe
alterations in mature buck daytime activity. To say
it’s another world from just about every hunting
perspective, would be a gross understatement.
My son Jon was the first to draw blood when on

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76

Bowhunting:
to the point I never allow wind direction to dictate where I hunt, it was out
of the south and the scrapes were 15
yards to the east.
The first deer to come visit was a
4 point and he came in from the draw
side and quickly worked an overhanging licking branch and moved on
towards the green field. Next was a
mature doe that crossed the milo field
and passed just south of me towards
the green field.
Then it got quiet for a while. I
wasn’t really paying a lot of attention to the north as I doubted a buck
would show from the pasture area. I
was wrong.
I have no clue exactly where he
came from, but all of a sudden there
was a huge buck slowly walking
along the pasture side of the fence to
the north. While keeping focused on
his every movement, I moved around
the tree in my saddle. At the same
time I was ready he stopped directly
north of me facing the scrape area
with his head over the top wire.
I counted 9 points and patiently
waited for him to make his next
move. My assumption was that he
would jump the fence, but then I
thought, we didn’t have any night or
day pictures of this buck. He definitely knew the scrape area was there, but
he hadn’t worked any of the scrapes
in the 5 days the camera was there.
With head over the top wire he
nose-curled several times to scent
check the scrapes that were directly
upwind of him. With nothing arousing his testosterone driven curiosity, he turned broadside and slowly

The author’s son, Jon on the second morning of a Kansas hunt took a perfectly
symmetrical 10 point that taped about 140 inches. Author photos
continued down the fence.
At a distance of 22 yards the gap
between the top 2 wires perfectly
framed his vitals. I made a vocal doe
bleat to stop him and took the shot
with my 57 pound Mathews Conquest bow. The Maxima Hunter arrow
tipped with a G-5 T3 broadhead
found its mark and I watched him run
about 80 yards through the pasture
before disappearing behind some
brush.
After mentally marking his last
sighting with an easily identifiable
landmark, I slowly packed up my
stuff and descended the tree. While
always keeping track of the 2 bedded
bulls, I took my time searching for
my arrow at the shot sight and then
along the route he took without finding it. During the process I saw some
blood, but not as much as I thought I
would.
Since daylight was beginning to
wane and at least half an hour had
passed since taking the shot, I began

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searching beyond the last point I saw
him. There was a very shallow and
narrow dry creek bed in the direction
he went and it had a runway along it
that was littered with active runway
scrapes.
I hadn’t gone far before sighting
the white belly of the buck in front
of me. The beautiful 9 point had
expired on the runway and as always
when out of state I checked to make
sure there weren’t any broken tines.
There are so many mature bucks and
they compete so fiercely for breeding
rights, that broken antlers, no matter how big the buck, are extremely
common. Nothing was broken and his
brow tines uniquely bent over at the
top to form a heart.
I called the guys to inform them
that all we had to do now was finish
filling the doe permits, which we did.
We each feel extremely fortunate
to be able to afford and have the
time to hunt out of state, but make
no mistake about it, Bryan, my son
Jon and me are very aware that our
hunting credibility and skill level
should never attributed to the big
bucks we take in other states. I feel
comfortable stating that many Michigan hunters reading this article would
be just as successful given the opportunity.
John Eberhart is an accomplished
Michigan hunter that specializes in
heavy consequential hunting pressure
(HCHP) areas. John has produced a
3 volume instructional DVD series
titled “Bowhunting Pressured Whitetails” and co-authored the books
“Bowhunting Pressured Whitetails,”
“Precision Bowhunting” and “Bowhunting Whitetails The Eberhart
Way.” They are available at:
www.deer-john.netn

My Thoughts--My Views By Len Jenkins...

Hillsdale College and the shooting sports
assuring that an educated and reasonable force supportive of the right to
bear arms will continue to protect
this constitutional right. It just makes
common sense. We live in a dangerous world in which government can
usurp freedom from the people. Look
what’s happening in the Ukraine, the
Middle East, and many other places.
Thugs can gain control over a completely unarmed population. An extreme historical example of this would
be Nazi Germany in which the people
were unarmed and the government

wasn’t. Perhaps if there was more balance, the Holocaust would never have
occurred. Brutal armed tyrants have
been a threat to the peoples’ security
since 1776, when our young country
overthrew a brutal tyrant and declared
its independence. Look at what’s going on in the world today. Nothing’s
changed.
For more information about shooting events, the shooting sports, center
and facilities, firearms lessons and
safety; contact Bart Spieth at 517-6105593 or email bspieth@hillsdale.edu.n

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

L

ocated in the idyllic “hills and
dales” of beautiful Hillsdale
County is a liberal arts college
adhering to the highest of academic
standards. This school, Hillsdale College, is known for its emphasis on rigorous scholarship, American values,
history, and above all, The Constitution of the United States of America.
This small college is beholden to no
governmental bureaucracy, declining
all state and federal “aid” yet abiding
by American principles of honesty,
fair play, and clarity of purpose. All
funds used are derived through private
means, not public, because “what the
government can ‘giveth,’ the government can ‘taketh’ away.”
This school has been “pursuing
truth and defending liberty since its
founding in 1844 and has been grateful to God for the inestimable blessing
resulting from the prevalence of civil
and religious liberty and intelligent
piety.”
This school committed to these
principles, stands resolute in its defense of liberty, personal freedom, and
constitutional government and to this
end has established the John Anthony
Halter Shooting Sports Education
Center.
The facilities devoted to the shooting sports are sprawled on a 103 acre
campus about five miles from the
campus proper. The facility features
four American trap fields, a five stand
sporting clays field, a small arms
range, a skeet field, an International/
Olympic bunker trap field and a lodge
and education center. Future plans for
additional development and expansion
including a 12 station sporting clays
course, a combination 100 meter rifle
and 50 meter pistol range, an indoor
air gun, an indoor archery range, an
outdoor archery range that will meet
specifications for National Collegiate
Association (NCAA) competitions
and Olympic shooting. We are
indeed fortunate to have this
spectacular facility in Michigan
and available for Olympic and
competitive shooting and also
available to the public.
The development of this facility
attests to Hillsdale College’s unwavering support for our constitutional
way of life, including the right to bear
arms and the Second Amendment. We
could probably agree that some compromise between pro and anti-Second
Amendment thought can be reached.
For instance, we can probably
agree that those individuals convicted
of violent crime or those so mentally deranged that having access to
firearms would make them a danger to
themselves and others but that should
have nothing to do with the rest of
us having our firearms for hunting,
shooting sports or personal protection. To this end, Hillsdale College,
through its Shooting Sports Center is

77



Nick Rule, 12
of Goodrich,
fishing out of
Petoskey caught
this 22 lbs king
salmon thanks
to Diabolical
sports fishing
and Captain
Mark for another great trip.

TROPHY PAGES

Nick Campione, 13 of Cedar Springs, killed a
6-point on his first hunt ever. He was hunting on
private property in Manistee Co. with his dad during the youth hunt in September.

Nathan Simon, 9 of Pewamo took
this Ionia Co. 8-pt. with a 17”
spread during the youth hunt.

Ben
Snyder
of Vestaburg shot
his first
buck on
Sept. 21
with a
100 yard
shot.

Katelyn
Hellebuyck
took this
beautiful buck
hunting
the 2014
youth
hunt.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Oscar Chamberlain, 8 and
cousin, Zoey Chamberlain 10,
both from Cheboygan, are proud
of the big bucks they took during
the youth hunt with their dads.

78

Joshua
Gormley,
10, took
his first
buck
hunting
with his
dad and
grandpa
Larry
(photo)
hunting
Lapeer
Co.

Evan Goode, 12 of
Sterling Hgts. took this
6-pt. hunting with his
dad Gary in Lapeer Co.

Brett "Ice" Still (left) wanted one last hot pursuit prior
to marrying the love of his life. He got it with this big
bodied female muskie he charmed out from under a
weed bed in Lake St. Clair. This fresh water fantasy
fish weighed 31 pounds and stretched the tape to 51
inches. Congratulations to Brett and Danielle, we wish
you the very best life has to offer.

Ben Szyperski took this nice
6-pt. hunting in Gladwin
Co. with his Grandpa.

Anne Ziegler formerly of Crystal Falls, joined a
Pediatric Dental Practice in Wasilla Alaska and
took this bear hunting with her boyfriend in
Cantwell on a stalk. According to her dad, Bill,
it’s the first thing larger than a ruffed grouse
she has ever hunted.

Jack Sczepanski (left) and Macklan Gay
(right) from Midland double up during
the youth hunt. Both bucks were taken
near Harrison.

Eightyear-old
Eve
Lanni
took
her first
deer in
hunting
near
Posen
with an
80 yard
from
her
.243.

Kylie Sczepanski from Midland proudly shows off her
first deer, a dandy Gladwin
County doe!

Logan Root and his friend Jordan Wolma of Hudsonville both harvested these
bucks within 5 minutes of each other
on the youth hunt. The 4-pt. buck was
Jordan’s first deer and the 10-pt. buck
was Logan Root’s 12 deer harvested for
his hunting career. These two are outdoor nuts and love all types of hunting
and fishing. This is Logan’s third year
hunting and Jordan’s second year.

Tripp Wagner, 8, took
this beautiful
8-pt. hunting with his
dad, mom
and grandpa
on the family
farm. This is
Tripp’s third
deer and
according
to his dad,
“We are very
fortunate to
be able to
live in a state
that allows
and supports
youth hunting.”



TROPHY PAGES

The Thorner brothers of Capac
hunting with their dad took this
beautiful 8-pt. with a 19" spread!

Riley
Bertram,
13 of
Imlay City
got his first
deer a nice
Lapeer
Co. 8-pt.
taken on
his grandBreana Daleski with two
parents'
nice smallmouth from
property.
long lake of Alpena

caught back in late May
during the mayfly hatch.

Tyler
Dimmick, 8
of Burtchville Twp.
took his first
wild pig at
Backwoods
Hunt club in
Brown City.

Ashley Johnston 12, caught
this dandy lake trout just
over 13 lbs. in Lake Huron
out of Harbor Beach on the
last weekend of the season.

Ciara Laursen, eight
-years-old from Marlette
took this dandy buck
with her crossbow.

Sam Lanni, 11 took his
third deer but first buck,
a nice 8-pt. near Posen.
Cousins Kailyn Williams, 16 and
Jayme Randolph, 13 second
year in a row they nice very nice
8-pts. hunting Huron Co.

MotherDaughter: First
time hunters
Jen Budek
along with
her daughter
Linnea both
scored on
opening morning with these
dandy does.

Lauren Bielby,
10 of Saginaw
took 8-pt. buck
Sept. 20, while
hunting with
her Grandma
in Hale. Her
second 8-pt. in
two years.

Jonathan Stone
of Fostoria caught
this big salmon.

Sam Lanni, 11
took his third deer
but first buck, a
nice 8-pt. near
Posen.

Dawson
Cloud, 13
of Attica
took this
beautiful 9-pt.
hunting
with a
muzzleloader
during
the youth
hunt.

Donald
Landerschier, 13 of
Imlay City
took this
Lapeer Co.
7-pt. hunting with his
dad Don
and brother
Dillian
during the
youth hunt.

Brendan DeWitt took
this 8-pt. buck in
Ogemaw Co. on Sept.
21 using his 243.

Jesse and Jacob Jacobusse,
15 year old
twins of Jackson Co. hunting the 2014
youth hunt,
Jesse bagged
the 9-pt. buck
using a 20ga
Mossberg
pump.

Kirsten Sparks
of Clyde with
her first deer
harvested
during the
2014 youth
hunt.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Noelle Rommell,
8 years old,
of Frankfort
took her first
ever buck, a
dandy 8-pt., on
opening day
of the Youth
Hunt. Using
her Ruger .223
on private land
in Benzie Co.,
she placed a
perfect shot
at just over
10 yards. This
was Noelle's
second youth
hunt, last
year's resulting in a dandy
doe!

79



TROPHY PAGES
Molly
Mueller
took this
beautiful 9-pt.
hunting
Sept.
28 with
her 20
ga. Her
monster
buck field
dressed
at 213
lbs.

Father and son Canadian bear in August was
very successful for Joey and Rober Messenger
of Linden.

After many years gun hunting and four
years bow hunting Bryan Panetta finally
harvested his first buck and first bow kill
on Oct. 3, a very nice 8- pt. at 22 yards
in Washtenaw Co.

Dawson Kopp, 16 of Carleton in his second
year of hunting took his second buck, this
very unique “Unicorn” buck on the second
day of the youth hunt after raining for three
hours in Monroe Co.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Hunter
Thomson, 7
with his
first deer
a 6-pt.
taken in
Clare Co.
Sept. 20
with a
crossbow.

80

Sam Sleiman
and his daughter Jessica of
Warren hunted
last spring turkey in Ontario
Canada. After 10 minutes while his
daughter was calling, a 10" inch
bearded Tom came in at 30 yards,
his first turkey hunt.

Eight-year-old Haylee
Smith with her first
big buck, a 6- pt.

Fourteenyear-old
Aidan
Francis
and his St.
Clair Co.
doe taken
with a
crossbow.

Clayton Childers has been applying for a bear tag since
he was 11, finally at 18 he draw a tag and took his first
bear, a dandy 332 pounder thanks to the help of Uncle
Jimmy, cousin Jason and friend Woody. The big bruin
was caught on trail camera prior to the hunt.

Kanon Gracey, 11 with
his St Clair Co., 4-pt., his
second deer, first buck in
two years of hunting.

Hannah Trinklein of Tawas City took
this 8-pt. on Sat., Sept 20 while hunting with her dad in Iosco Co.

Shay Lynn Riker, 16 of West Branch took
this 9- .pt buck on her grandpa’s farm during the youth hunt. She was proudly hunting with her dad and took the buck with a
.243 caliber rifle.

Ben and
Brice
Miller,
father
and son
both
took
nice
toms
during
fall turkey season in
Oceana
Co.

Emma Honsowitz 9, 20 minutes into her
first deer hunt ever, took this beautiful
8-pt. hunting with her dad in Ionia.

Mason Crane, 13 of
Manitou Beach, took this
dandy 6-pt. during the
first day of the youth.

Keith Carl
Bennett III,
10 of North
Branch took
this 5-pt. hunting Lapeer Co.
with his uncle
Merl Crisman
on Sept. 20.

Pro Walleye Angler And ‘Good Guy’...

Mark Martin
selected
to

HALL OF FAME

County Fair where
an estimated 3,000
children saw him present four different seminars with his pro staff.
Why does he work so hard at fishing? For Martin it’s more than cashing
a check. “I try to promote fishing as
a way to give back because of all the
knowledge I have acquired over a lifetime all around the country. Knowledge goes both ways. I’m always
learning and am still a student of the
game. The more knowledge I get, the
more I can return.”
He continued, “I still fish tournaments but these days it’s more about
what I learn from them. That’s because you are fishing with the best of
the best.”
Through his “Vacation Schools,”
Martin not only shares knowledge,
he’s trying to get people interested in
fishing and the outdoors. One benefit
that comes with teaching is seeing
success in students. “I enjoy seeing
people become successful. That’s one
of the main reasons I do these schools
and seminars. It brings me joy to
know that my books and videos have
been an impact,” he said.
Martin even has been asked by
schools to come in on career day and
speak about professional fishing as a
career. “I tell them that there is more
to being a professional than fishing.
That’s just one slice of the pie. It takes
a lot of work. In the early days all you
had to do was fish, do some seminars
and write a little. Now you have to do
the other slices of that pie including
schools, seminars, video and photography along with writing.”
Like players in other sports strive
to get into the World Series or super
bowl, anglers have thoughts of getting
into the hall of fame. “A lot of people
get nominated in a category or two.
I was nominated in every category.
That brings a lot of joy to my heart,”
Martin said.
“I only knew two of the 20 people
that voted for me,” he said. “The process is kept secret. Several interviews
are conducted and the voting board
requests letters of recommendation.
“It is an honor (to be nominated),
but I didn’t count my chickens before
they hatched. I kept my mouth shut,”
he said.
Martin learned about his final
selection at a fishing tournament. “I
got a text at 5:50 a.m. as I was getting ready to pre-fish that I had been
elected. That’s a great wake up call,”
he said.
“It’s the ultimate award that any

It’s the ultimate award that any fisherman who makes a living at fishing strives for. It
was Mark Martin’s dream to get to the Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame.
fisherman who makes a living at fishing is what they strive for. That’s the
goal line. You can hold the ball up
and say I made it through all of the
tackles. There are a lot of obstacles
you have to go through. Anyone that
makes it into the hall has worked
really hard, kept their nose clean, promoted the sport and did it well. That
was my dream to get to the hall of
fame. Just because you fish and make
tournaments doesn’t qualify you,”
Martin said.
“When I was young and had a 40hour- a- week job, I would fish with
my grandpa, dad and my friends. I set
my goal and got my captains license.
About that time I was preparing to
be laid off. I thought if I was fishing
I would have a steady job. People
wanted to pay me to fish with them
because I was catching nice fish. My
other goal was to be a charter boat
captain. I studied on my own didn’t
know what I needed to know. I studied
everything back and forward.”
Martin’s introduction came about
by taking hosts Bob Garner and
Fred Trost of the TV show Michigan
Outdoors, fishing. Martin approached
them following an appearance. “You
want to catch fish,” he asked? Some
really big walleyes? It would make a
good TV show,” he said. In a couple
of hours Garner and Trost each had a
limit.
Describing himself as a goof off
in school, Martin says if he had paid
attention and done what he was told

he would be further ahead.
At Spring Lake High School,
Martin was asked to help develop an
accredited course about fishing. The
teachers said students should have
such a course. Located on the shore
of Grand River and near other lakes
in the area, Spring Lake High School
was an ideal spot for a fishing course.
“Kids would bring their rods to
school to fish during breaks at school.
We had a class in scuba diving too.
It was a pretty cool school,” Martin
said.
Martin’s advice for anyone wanting to fish professionally, “Don’t let
anyone tell you that you can’t do
something. I was told that early on.
You live in America and can do what
you want. But remember, stay in
school.”
The Fresh Water Fishing Hall
of Fame was founded in 1960 and
incorporated in 1970 as a non-profit
501(c) 3, making contributions tax
deductible. Any person may nominate
someone for the Hall of Fame. For information on the nomination process
visit www.freshwater-fishing.org.
Martin will go into the Hall of
Fame with the class of 2015.
For more information about
Martin, his schools and some fishing
video visit Markmartins.net, or www.
facebook.com/markmartinsfishing, and
www.utube.com/usermarkmartinfishing.
Roger Beukema writes for WoodsN-Water News. Email him at
dutchbeuk12@gmail.com.n

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

F

By Roger Beukema

or the past 35
years Twin
Lakes resident Mark Martin
has been a popular figure on
the water fishing tournaments
and conducting many of his
popular schools. All of his hard work
has paid off. Martin has been recognized for his contributions to the
fishing world by his selection to the
Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame.
Martin is the original champ in
the first PWT championship walleye
tournament. He’s also been an original
with his ice fishing and open water
fishing schools. The writer of three
books and numerous articles he’s
made time to make a DVD. During 35 years of work he’s been on
thousands of TV and radio shows and
made many appearances at sporting
shows presenting his popular seminars. In his spare time he’s talked to
school students on career day, made
appearances at shows and fairs, helped
kids, and personally worked with
Wounded Warriors.
That’s’ just a part of what walleye
champion, fishing instructor and all
around good guy, Martin has accomplished.
Those are the same things that got
him into next year’s class of the Fresh
Water Fishing Hall of Fame.
“I had to be nominated, but I have
no idea who did that,” Martin said.
Following nomination, candidates
submit information demonstrating
their influence on kids and adults
toward fishing, influence on media,
enhanced the sport, demonstrated
safety on the water for clients and
himself, respect for the resource, recognized for excellence and contributions to sport fishing, an inspiration to
others, promoted fishing to the public
by writing, radio/television, and
photography, maintained a large part
of his livelihood by freshwater fishing
and guiding, demonstrated all-around
skills and creations that reflect art,
encourage or inspire sportfishing, and
extensively studies the water he fishes
along with other topics.
After 35 years of learning to
fish, guiding, tournament fishing and
hosting a variety of schools, Martin’s
mailbox is still loaded with copies of
stories written about him. “I have a
room in the basement where I save
everything in plastic tubs. Every three
months I make copies of things that
are sent to me to forward to sponsors,” he said.
His latest charity benefit included
an appearance at the Muskegon

81

Gun Chat... By Lee Arten

H

Hillsdale Fall Shoot

illsdale College in Hillsdale, MI held its annual Fall
Seminar and Shoot Saturday,
September 13th. My wife and
I had known about the event
for a while but were unable to
attend until this year.
The day began at 8:30 am with
registration on campus. Along with
forms to fill out there were pastries,
fruit, and beverages available. The
seminar portion of the event began
an hour later. David Raney, Associate Professor of History at Hillsdale
discussed the Constitution and the 2nd
Amendment.
Bart Spieth, Hillsdale Range
Master, gave the safety brief after
Professor Raney’s 2nd Amendment
talk. The attendees then found their
way to the range, five miles from
campus, for lunch. Tents, chairs, and
tables were set up on the lawn of the
AcuSport Lodge at the John Anthony
Halter Shooting Sports Education
Center. The lodge is an impressive
building with a fireplace and mounted
game heads in the greatroom, and
sporting prints on the walls. There is
a conference room on the first floor

Pistol and rifle shooters were able
to use Beretta and S&W pistols, and
a .22 caliber S&W M&P rifle on the
temporary rifle range. They were also
able to shoot their personal handguns
there. Winchester supplied ammo for
this part of the event too. Coaching
was also available for beginners at
handgun shooting at the rifle range.
Permanent rifle and pistol ranges,
indoor and outdoor archery ranges, an
airgun range, and a “walking sporting clays course” are planned for the
range. Improvements are planned for
the AcuSport Lodge as well.
By the fall of 2014, 300 Hillsdale
College students had taken a basic
handgun course at the college. The
college is also offering “Ladies For
Liberty Seminar And Shooting Camp”
for women. The most recent was held
the week after the Fall Seminar And
Shoot.
The 2013-2014 Hillsdale College
Coaching was available on the trap and sporting clays ranges at the Hillsdale Fall
Shotgun
Team did well in shoots in
Shoot. Lee Arten photo
Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, and
and another planned for upstairs. The sdale College Shotgun Team demTexas and at the USA Fall Selection
lodge is a very comfortable place. One onstrated how clay targets should be
Match for Junior Olympic Shotgun in
broken. Then attendees had the chance Tucson, Arizona on October 5, 2013.
I’d like to spend more time in.
After lunch, members of the Hill- to try trap, five stand sporting clays,
Before attending the shoot, I’d
and International Trap on the Hillsknown Hillsdale had some shooting
dale ranges. Some of the ranges were scholarships. While there I found out
reserved for new shotgun shooters
that more are available than I thought.
using college-owned guns. On others, Hillsdale offers three scholarships for
shooters could use their own guns. My shotgun shooters, one for members of
son, Ethan shot on one of these, us“shooting advocacy clubs and orgaing the J.C. Higgins Model 20 he has nizations,” one for a shooter from
hunted grouse with since the age of
“the Mountain West” one for a female
12. Winchester donated Super Target
member of the “intercollegiate shootshells for the shoot. There were a lot
ing team,” and an archery scholarship.
of spent red shells on the ground at
Some of these are full and some
each range by two p.m. that day.
are half tuition. Readers who have
The day was windy and cool, but
children who shoot shotgun and are
the weather didn’t dampen the enapproaching college age, might want
thusiasm of the shooters very much.
to look into Hillsdale College.
Lines were long at the first two trap
I may not be able to attend the
ranges, a bit shorter at 5 stand, and
Fall Seminar And Shoot at Hillsdale
shorter yet at the International Trap
in 2015, but I hope I will be able to
range. The Olympic Bunker Trap
squeeze it in at least every now and
range was not in use on September 13. then.n

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82

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Our Chocolate Lab--Champ...By Mark Sak

When we lose them
M
ost folks who have read
Woods-N-Water News for
a time know all about my
chocolate Labrador retriever Champ. He regularly found his way into
my articles at least yearly for 12 years.
Unfortunately, we had to euthanize
Champ in late September. It was easily
the worst day in our family’s life, losing
such a beautiful animal and friend. But
we all know it too well if we are animal
lovers, the end eventually comes. Without going into detail on that sad day,
we knew it was time. The many medical issues we had helped him manage
for years had become unmanageable.
We didn’t want him to suffer for even
an hour. This remarkable friend had a
golden heart and an unmatched sense of
closeness to us we have never witnessed
in any previous pet or human for that
matter. I’m sure one can imagine how
tough it was.
Now that he is gone the suffering
has shifted to us. Our profound sadness
kept my wife and me from sleeping for
several days and watching our black
lab mope around the house tells us she
is certainly missing him as well. I often
catch her with her nose buried in a dog
bed where he slept I’m sure catching a
faint smell of him.
There are constant reminders in
our life of a dog we loved a great deal.
There are collars, balls, and pictures
every where. I couldn’t even look at
his picture for a week without crying.
We actually received condolences from
around the country from some very
busy folks who were kind enough to
take time out of their busy day to say
they were sorry and were thinking of
us. Fellow writer Mark Romanack sent
a message that summed things up very
well and did help us in our depths of
grief and loss.
Mark said, “Mari and I feel your
pain. I feel sorrier however for those
who haven’t experienced the love and
companionship of a good dog. Your
lives are richer for the experience and
you will meet up again.”

Boy was that a healthy and healing
perspective. Thanks again to Mark and
Mari Romanack.
Our healing has started even though
we will never fully be the same. The
days are becoming easier to get through
and I can again look at his picture and
smile and remember what an incredibly lucky family we were to have this
great canine for 12 years. We spread his
ashes in his favorite places to help our
healing process and a very interesting
thing happened when I went to the Vet
to pick up his ashes. A young gal was
in the lobby with her twelve-week-old
black Lab puppy. When I opened the
door and walked in the lobby he saw me
and immediately ran to me jumping on
me licking, nipping and squirming like
puppies do. I belly laughed for the first
time in weeks. It was a clear cut case of
puppy therapy.
Obviously, there is no way to ever
replace Champ. He has a very special
place in our heart that has changed us
forever. But there is a puppy out there
somewhere waiting for us and we will
give him the best home he could ever
hope for. That is a big part of what
makes a good dog great. Rest in peace
Champ, I love you buddy and I’ll see
you again.n


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83

Boat Smart: Wall of water
O

Although In The Many Years I’ve Spent At Sea I Have Only Seen
That One, ‘Monster Wave,’ But It Was One I Won’t Ever Forget...
expressed my concern regarding how
much higher they might rise to my
two mates.
I hailed a large trawler traveling just ahead of us and inquired what port he was headed
for. We were all relieved when
the captain responded he was
going into the same port we
were destined for. We fell in
behind him and
rode his wake
as he broke the
seas and were all soon safely in port.
The storm, although quite intense,
passed quickly. An hour later all that
remained were gentle rolling seas and
the wind had completely subsided.
After checking the latest weather forecast and learning no further squalls
were predicted, we topped off our fuel
supply and headed out to sea once
again.
As we traveled toward the next
port, the waves continued to settle
until we were once again cruising
along on flat water, making good time.
I calculated we had traveled a total
of 70 miles and had only 30 to go.
The next weather broadcast called for
north winds and rain later in the day. I
debated as we drew abeam of the last
harbor of refuge before our home port
about whether we had a sufficient fuel
supply. I calculated we had more than
enough to safely make our destination
but also recalled the intensity of the
earlier storm and how rapidly it had
approached. With that in mind, the
decision to go into the nearby harbor
and top off our fuel was made, just in
case the unexpected should occur.
As the dock attendant filled our
tank, I chatted with a coastie stationed
at the nearby Coast Guard station.

Pappy (as his friends referred to him)
told me the next lighted navigational
aid had been reported extinguished
and a lighthouse, near the aid, was
inoperable. I was certain we would
be well past the shoal area marked
by the aids he mentioned before dark
and expressed no concern regarding
their condition. I did double check
my chart and set course a little further
outside the shoal, just in case.
A southwest wind freshened as we
got underway, creating gentle rollers.
After cruising 5 miles, with 25 to go,
I felt a quick cooling of the air and
noted darkness in the distant sky. I
was secure in my knowledge of the
waters near my home port and was
sure we could make landfall before
the approaching dark skies dead ahead
could build into a sever storm.
Halfway along the last leg of
our cruise, everything changed. The
warm southwest wind was met by a
very cool north wind and the darkness
in the sky rapidly approached. Fortunately, my two mates had just made
sure everything was secure when
it happened. As the wind changed
quickly to the north, a wall of water
approached us. I had never seen such
a monster wave.
A quick calculation in my mind
determined our only option was to
hold course into the sea. A change
in course would allow the wave to
overtake us. As I shouted to the crew
to “hold on”, we began to ride up the
gigantic wave, then quickly dropped
off its back. Our vessel smashed to
the sea below as I fought to maintain control and bring her bow back
up. When the wooden hull slammed
into the water, the passenger seat was
ripped from the bulkhead and one

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ne morning we prepared to get
underway headed for home in
our small cruiser. We stowed
all the loose items and tuned
the marine radio to the weather
channel, anxious to learn how conditions would be for our trip. The report
had just been updated and called for
possible rain and some wind later in
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Our destination was only 100
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A slight breeze rippled the water as
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Water Bridge spanning the river. We
maneuvered our vessel to avoid the
wash of two freighters passing in the

narrow outlet to the seaway.
The wakes of the freighters, combined with a strong current,
sent my twenty-six foot, small
wooden cruiser bobbing about
like a cork. Soon we were
clear of the turbulence, up to
cruising speed over a flat sea,
and enjoying our first cup of
coffee. A security call broadcast by the Coast
Guard interrupted the serenity.
It advised a small weather front would
enter our course path in about an hour.
We knew we would be within reach of
the next harbor by then (some twenty
miles distant), and could wait out the
brief storm there.
The weather front arrived sooner
than forecast, as they often do when
over open water. Winds increased
rapidly and seas were building much
faster than we had anticipated. I

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The Blue Water Bridge at Port Huron, the same bridge the author traveled under with two freighters.
by changing speed. Slow first, as
firm hand hold.
Keep a cool head, set your speed
the wave passes, and then you
Dealing with so called “tidal
just fast enough to maintain headmay need to increase power to
waves” or rogue waves is not the
way but not so fast you bury your
maintain control and bring your
same as running in rough seas.
bow in the sea. Taking the wave at a
bow up.
slight angle off the bow may increase You seldom have time to make many
An experience with a rogue wave
changes in course or fasten down
control; however, excess angle will
will test your skills in seamanship
loose equipment. Before
cause loss of steerage. A quick shift
but with a cool head and a bit of luck,
of weight, such as moving passengers you can prepare for it, the wave is
you too may sit around the bait shop
past. Your best course is to remain
to adjust ballast may be possible but
talking about the “Monster Waves.”n
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mate was thrown to the deck. The
other mate had been sitting in a deck
chair and he too was tossed about the
deck. I nearly choked on the lump in
my throat but somehow managed to
keep control of my small boat.
There was only one rogue wave
followed by a brisk north wind which
built the seas rapidly to three to five
foot. A quick check revealed the hull
had remained intact and we were not
taking on any water. We were very
lucky, damage to the boat was minimal but one of the mates did suffer a
fractured arm.
After we were safely moored,
with the injured mate on his way to
the hospital, I began to recall my
youth when I would sit around the
fish house, listening to old timers
talk about mystery tidal waves on the
lake. I often wondered, “Are these
tales true?” I now knew they were,
although in the many years I’ve spent
at sea I have only seen that one but it
was one I won’t ever forget.
These mysterious waves have
been reported on oceans as well as
large bodies of fresh water. Varied
opinions abound regarding their
cause, from rapid wind shifts to the
position of the moon. One thing is
certain; they will surely test your boat
handling skills.
Rogue waves move with great
speed and force. With few exceptions, you have to ride them out. The
possibility of turning your vessel and
out running the wave is slight. If you
should take this type of wave broadside or astern, you could easily be
overtaken by its strength and possibly
capsize. Should you encounter a monster wave, as I did, quick thinking and
fast response will be of the utmost
importance.

85

Over The River And Through The Woods...

citizens on the trail
A

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

change in America’s taste
in off-road vehicles –
namely, the increasing
popularity of side-byside ORVs – has opened
up the world of off-roading to whole new set of
participants: senior citizens.
That much was abundantly clear
during a recent event held in the
western Upper Peninsula that offered
a chance for seniors to try ORVing for
the first time.
The seventh annual Senior Fall
Color Tour traveled a 19-mile route
from Greenland to Twin Lakes State
Park in Ontonagon County. Nearly
100 senior citizens occupied the passenger seats of two-, four- and sixperson ORVs, traversing a forest trail
that crossed state, federal and private
land.
The ride, which is always held the
third Thursday of September, coincided with this year’s Michigan Trails
Week, a celebration of the 12,000plus miles of hiking, biking, equine
and motorized trails in Michigan – a
system that allows citizens countless
opportunities to get off the pavement
and into the woods anywhere in the
state.
“We take about 100 seniors on
the ORV tour each year – 50 participants go one way in the morning, the
other 50 take the return trip in the
afternoon,” said Don Helsel, president
of Michigan Trails and Recreation

86

MI-TRALE’s 19-mile fall color tour attracted 100 senior citizens, many of whom were riding an off-road vehicle for the very
first time. MDNR photos
the woods in full Technicolor glory.
great thing for the seniors.”
Alliance of Land and the EnvironThis year’s ride – held on a warm, dry,
The participants, both riders and
ment (MI-TRALE). “We’ll get calls,
drivers, would agree.
starting already tomorrow, about next partly sunny day – closely coincided
with peak fall color, Helsel said.
“I loved the ride,” said Sylvia
year’s ride.”
“The riders lucked out this year.
Heikkinen, a retired farmer from
The ride takes about 90 minutes,
There’s a lot more reds in the trees
Baraga, who was attending her first
transporting folks over a variety of
terrain through hardwood forests, and and they’re more brilliant than usual,” event. “I heard about it on the radio,
he said.
called a friend, and we signed up.”
across three trestles that span river
MI-TRALE is a western Upper
gorges and offer spectacular views of
Rechel Keranin, from Baraga, was
Peninsula club that plays a role in
on her second ride, having particimaintaining and caring for an estimat- pated last year.
ed 500 miles of trails in five counties.
“I had to come back,” she said.
The club relies entirely on volunteers “The colors were so gorgeous. You
to organize and host the senior ride,
don’t go by yourself to look at fall
with assistance in staging the event
colors. You want to enjoy it with
from the Department of Natural Reothers. This is wonderful; it’s really
sources, the U.S. Forest Service and
appreciated.”
local business and sporting clubs.
To help attract new riders to
Krupp’s Mini Market at Twin
the ORV community and meet the
Lakes donated 200 pasties to provide requests of customers, the DNR is
lunch for the participants and Rich
investing heavily in Michigan’s ORV
Pirhonen, a park ranger at Twin Lakes trail system to make improvements
State Park, enlisted his wife to bake
and create more routes that connect to
enough cookies so everyone had des- communities and other trails.
sert.
Steve Kubisiak, the DNR’s ORV
The state park is one of only four
program manager, said the state has
in Michigan where visitors may use
recently approved a new 28-mile ORV
ORVs to get from parking areas or
route in the Upper Peninsula and a 38campsites to trailheads, making it a
mile expansion of trails in the northperfect location for an ORV-centric
ern Lower Peninsula that will connect
event.
six communities.
“This is the park’s biggest event
Additionally, in recognition and
in the fall,” Pirhonen said. “We have
support of the hands-on work local
wonderful weather this time of year
Paul Bush and Barbara Voltz took in the western Upper Peninsula’s spectacular fall
ORV clubs take on to help maintain
color from their vantage point in a side-by-side driven by a volunteer from MI-TRALE. and the colors are perfect. This is a
the trails, the DNR provided approxi-

mately $2.7 million for trail improvement and damage restoration grants
to ORV clubs and organizations in
2014.
“The grants and additional miles
of trails have been made possible
thanks to a recent increase in ORV license fees, including the addition of a
new $10 ORV trail permit,” Kubisiak
said. “These changes are expected to
raise $6.1 million in new revenue for
the trail system on an annual basis,
which will allow us to keep making
the improvements our customers are
asking for.”
MI-TRALE is one of the clubs
that participates in the DNR’s grant
program.
“We maintain 250 miles of DNRdesignated trails,” Helsel said. “We
use the grant money mostly for signage; much of the other work is done
and paid for by volunteers.”
Volunteers and donations are
also key to the success of the annual
senior ride.
Local power sports retailers
donated vehicles for the ride to make
sure there were enough to handle the
crowd. And two emergency medical
technicians accompanied the riders on
the transfer bus (provided by EwenTrout Creek schools) and on the trail

“just in case,” Helsel said.
MI-TRALE’s sergeant-at-arms
Kim Sims organized the event for the
second time, after helping out for the
previous five years.
Putting the entire event together
and keeping all the balls in the air is
quite the production, Sims said as she
rode a quad alongside the side-bysides and maintained order at road
crossings. “It takes a lot of coordinating between the communities and
agencies to get it done, but the appreciation we hear from the participants
makes it all worth it.”
No one was checking IDs, of
course, but John Turpeinin, who
drove his ATV during the event for
the second year in a row, claimed to
be the oldest participant at 85 years
young.
“I love it,” he said. “I had a quad
for years but I moved up to a sideby-side. It’s easier getting into that
machine than throwing my leg over
the side.”
Turpeinin – who said he still goes
dancing every week – said he’s likely
to be back driving again next year.
And although many of the participants had been eagerly awaiting the
annual event, some were accidental
tourists.

The tour participants stop to take in the view from the Firesteel River trestle bridge
on the Bill Nicholls ORV route. MDNR photos
Paul Bush, a 71-year-old full-time
motor-homer who winters in southern
Texas, happened to be in the Upper
Peninsula visiting friends and was
invited along for the ride.
“I’ll probably try to make it back
next year and do it again,” Bush said.
“It was a fantastic trip.”

For information about next year’s
senior ORV ride, visit www.mi-trale.
org.
To learn more about riding ORVs
in Michigan, visit www.michigan.
gov/orvtrails.n

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Antler growth is complicated
T
he antler growing process is one
of Mother Nature’s most impressive feats and it’s in full-swing
throughout Michigan. From a biological perspective, antler growth is a
fairly complicated process that begins
in early spring, peaks in mid-summer,
and winds to a stop sometime in
August. Here’s a basic rundown of
the complete process and what you
can expect to see as bucks racks take
shape throughout the summer.
Spring is the season of renewal
for most wildlife, deer included. After
enduring a long winter with little
food, spring sparks the regeneration of
the deer herd. Fat is stored for the first
time in several months, a new crop
of fawns are born, and winter coats
are shed for lighter, brighter summer
versions, but each of these pale in
comparison to antler growth.
Between late March and early
September bucks will completely
grow a new set of antlers. In the largest bucks this can be in excess of 170
inches of newly developed bone in
less than five months.
To help explain how dramatic the
antler development process is, Bill
Armstrong, a Texas Parks and Wildlife biologist, came up with an easy
to grasp equivalent. “That’s like you
cutting off both your legs and growing
them back in three months,” he said in
a Texas Parks and Wildlife report.
Antler growth, like any natural
process, is fraught with variables.
Genetics, age, and nutrition all play
pivotal roles in determining how
much antler a buck will grow during
the five-month antler growing season.
In Michigan, there is another factor that plays an important role. The
severity of the previous winter often
determines how impressive a bucks
fall antlers will be.
“Deer have to devote a lot of
energy to rebuilding their bodies and
getting healthy after hard winters,”
said Brian Mastenbrook, wildlife
biologist with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. “Following tough winters, it takes them longer
to get into the antler growing process
and we usually see smaller racks the
following year.”
While the finished product garners the most attention, the physical
changes bucks endure while sprouting antlers are equally impressive and
start shortly after the previous set of
antlers is dropped. It all starts with
a change in the amount of daylight,
which biologists refer to as photoperiod.
As the days lengthen and spring
approaches, a biological alarm goes
off within each buck, signaling the
beginning of antler production. Once
this alarm goes off, bucks are in for
a physical roller coaster ride until the

MDNR photo
antler development process draws to a
close in late summer.
The two main mineral ingredients in
antler are calcium and phosphorus,
but these minerals are rarely consumed in the quantities necessary for
antler growth, explained Armstrong.
The only way antlers can be supplied
with enough calcium and phosphorus
is if they steal it from other parts of
the skeleton.
During this process, a buck’s bone
density can decrease by as much as 30
percent. Antler growth is sluggish initially, mostly due the dietary demands
of recovering from winter and growing a new summer coat.
As spring progresses, hair growth and
antler growth compete for the same
nutrients.
According to a University of
Georgia study, developing antlers are
comprised of 80 percent protein by
weight, the same nutrient that forms
hair.
This competition is short-lived
through. Once bucks’ winter coats are
fully replaced with summer versions,
antlers start developing quickly.
As June gives way to July, antler
growth is kicked into high gear.
“At peak periods as much as ½ inch
of antler can be added to each tine in
a single day,” said Mastenbrook. By
the time mid-July hits, older age-class
bucks will be sporting a basic version of the rack they will be carrying
come fall. While tines and beams will
get longer and mass will increase, in
is unlikely that a buck will add tines
during the last month and a half of the
growth process.
As antler growth continues
through the end of summer so do
bucks’ voracious appetites. During
the summer and early fall, when food
is plentiful and the rut is not distracting them, bucks will each as much as
seven pounds of food per day, fueling
their antler development.
During this development process,
antlers are encased in a soft, blood-

rich covering called velvet. This antler
skin gets in name from its texture
and appearance, which is remarkably
similar to velvet fabric.
The softness of the velvet is indicative of the condition of the developing
antlers underneath.
“During the growth period,
antlers are very fragile and bucks
carry them tenderly,” Mastenbrook
explained. “Antlers can actually be
sheared off if bucks catch them on
a barb-wire fence or something like
that.”
Damaging an antler during the
summer will severely hamper antler
development for that year, and will often have detrimental effects on antler
development in upcoming years, according to Armstrong. This is one reason that bucks are very passive during
the summer. Any confrontation could
result in a lost or deformed antler.
Once September hits, antler
growth is complete and with that
comes a physical and psychological transformation. In a period of
24-hours bucks antlers will go from
being completely velvet covered
to clean and polished. As the days
become shorter, velvet shedding is
sparked by a large increase in testosterone, which stops the blood supply
to the velvet, Mastenbrook noted.
Once the velvet is dead, bucks will remove it by rubbing on bushes, weeds,
trees, almost anything.
The end of antler development
signals the start of sperm production,
sending bucks’ focus from feeding to
preparing for the breeding season.
For the next few months bucks
will eat little while chasing does
during the annual breeding phase.
Meanwhile the days will become
progressively shorter, leading into
the dead of winter. Once the amount
of daylight diminishes to certain
level, hormone levels will change
and bucks will drop their antlers,
starting the entire, amazing process
all over again.n

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89

Staff from 10 federal, state and provincial agencies gathered in Monroe, Michigan, in early September to test
invasive species’ response capabilities and increase knowledge of invasive carp biology and behavior.

Agencies unite to combat invasive species in Lake Erie

W

ith the prevention and
management of invasive
species a top priority for
natural resource agencies in the Great Lakes
region, it didn’t take much convincing
when the Michigan and Ohio natural
resources departments offered the
opportunity to participate in a recent
invasive carp field exercise on Lake
Erie.
In total, staff from 10 federal, state
and provincial agencies jumped at the
chance to gather in early September
in Monroe, to conduct the Michigan/
Ohio Lake Erie Field Exercise, a
three-day effort designed to test the
capability to respond to the threat of

invasive bighead and silver carp and
other aquatic invasive species, while
providing the chance to learn more
about these species and how they
behave.
According to Nick Popoff, manager of the Michigan DNR’s Aquatic
Species and Regulatory Affairs Unit,
it was no easy task uniting that many
agencies. But with previous experience gained by holding a similar exercise on the St. Joseph River last year,
the DNR’s Fisheries Division was up
for the challenge.
“That previous exercise allowed
us to develop a command structure
for use during actual response activities and training drills like this one on

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Lake Erie,” said Popoff, who serves
as the event’s logistics officer. “Implementing and testing a unified command system was a big priority for us
to accomplish with this exercise.”
“With so many employees from
various agencies on the ground during
the Lake Erie training, the Incident
Command Structure brought a military-type precision to our work, which
led to an efficient and successful training opportunity.”
Another priority for the Michigan
and Ohio DNRs was complying with
the Mutual Aid Agreement developed
by the Great Lakes governors and
premiers this past spring to combat
invasive species, including Asian carp.

Signed in April 2014 by members
of the Council of Great Lakes Governors and the provinces of Ontario and
Quebec, the Mutual Aid Agreement
directs agencies in those jurisdictions
to share expertise and staff if invasive
species posed a serious threat to a
particular region.
Just a few short months later,
representatives from the Michigan and
Ohio DNRs started coordinating the
Lake Erie Field Exercise, with the focus being on Asian carp – particularly
grass carp.
Grass carp were first imported
from Asia in 1963 as a biological
control tool for aquatic vegetation;
since 1984, the species has been

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havior study that would monitor their
movements over time to see where
they congregate and/or spawn.
Although implementation of the
exercise was textbook, the outcome
did not entirely meet agency expectations.
“Unfortunately, only two grass
carp were caught during the three-day
effort and one died following the surgery required to implant the transmitters while the other never even made
it to the operating table,” Popoff said.
According to Cleyo Harris, acting
Fisheries Biologist out of Waterford
and the co-lead on the grass carp
behavior research project, work will
continue post-exercise in an effort to
collect enough grass carp to monitor
their movements.
“Together with Ohio DNR we
will work with Lake Erie’s commercial fishers to tag any grass carp
found,” he said. “Hopefully as we get
into the fall and the water temperatures cool off we will be able to find
more fish and continue on with our
plans.”
Popoff is quick to point out it’s
not necessarily a problem the exercise
didn’t capture an abundance of grass
carp.
“Although we would have liked

to catch more grass carp for the
purposes of the transmitter study, it’s
slightly comforting that with more
than 60 folks out on the water in 17
boats we only caught two fish,” he
explains. “That might tell us that
grass carp aren’t nearly as prevalent
as we might have thought.”
Despite the lack of grass carp,
the field exercise provided copious amounts of information about
working together with a variety of
agencies to reach a common goal,
and allowed staff to test mechanical
response capabilities in vast stretched
of public waters, Popoff said.
Both the Michigan and Ohio
DNRs remain focused on what they
identify as a critical activity: preparing for a potential Asian carp invasion.
“We learned so many things from

this exercise,” said Popoff. “We
hit all of our objectives and experienced great coordination among
the agencies involved. We couldn’t
have asked for a smoother
process.”
Conducting a field response
exercise in Lake Erie waters was a
requirement of the 2014 Great Lakes
Restoration Initiative (GLRI) Grant.
The GLRI is awarded to the states
by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Environmental Protection
Agency.
To learn more about the Lake
Erie Field Exercise, watch a video
interview with Popoff, found on the
DNR’s YouTube channel at www.
youtube.com/MichiganDNR.
For more information about
Asian carp, visit www.michigan.gov/
asiancarp.n

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reported in Lake Erie by commercial
fishers. By way of the field exercise,
the Michigan and Ohio DNRs hoped
to increase scientific knowledge about
grass carp abundance, demographics
and distribution in western Lake Erie.
“It’s important to note that
although grass carp are considered
Asian carp, they are not at the same
level of concern as bighead carp and
silver carp. Currently there are no
known bighead or silver carp populations in Michigan’s waters of the
Great Lakes,” said Popoff. “But just
the same, grass carp are a prohibited
species in both Michigan and Ohio
and the exercise allowed us to see
what their populations really look like
in the waters of Lake Erie.”
Back in Sept. 9, boat crews from
Michigan, Ohio, Illinois and Minnesota DNRs; New York State Department of Environmental Conservation;
Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service;
U.S. Geological Survey; Ontario
Ministry of Natural Resources; and
Fisheries & Oceans Canada deployed
electroshocking, gillnetting and
commercial seining to catch as many
grass carp as possible.
All grass carp caught would be
implanted with transmitters for a be-

Minnesota
DNR fisheries
biologist Nick
Frohnauer
brings in a gill
net, deployed
on Lake Erie in
an attempt to
capture grass
carp during a
multi-agency
invasive species
field exercise.

91

November on
The Big Water

N

ative American tribes had
names for each of the full
moons during the year, and,
according the Farmer’s Almanac, they called the one in
November “The Full Beaver
Moon.” That’s because it was
time for the hunter-gatherers
to set traps to catch the big
rodents and use their heavy
pelts for warm clothes. Probably to make some beaver
stew, too.
These days, especially
in the Michigan waters
of Lake Michigan, and
especially towards the
bottom half of the big
lake, it might be appropriate to call
the November full moon “The Full
Salmon-Trout-Steelhead Moon.” It’s
time to get out and catch them!
While steelhead and some brown
trout head up rivers in November,
quite a few fish often hang around the
piers in the big lakes, and you can also
find salmon and lake trout not far off-

shore out of many ports in Michigan
and nearby Indiana. You can catch big
lakers, and although the salmon aren’t
huge this time of year, the cohos and
smaller kings are just the right size for
the frying and it’s highly possible to latch into a king that
weighs in the low teens—
smoking size.
Looking over logs from
years gone by, I’ve had some
excellent trips in November out of New Buffalo,
Michigan’s southernmost
port, close to the Indiana
border, as well as farther
south in Indiana waters.
One time off Milwaukee,
Wisconsin in November, three-yearold kings were driving young-ofthe-year alewives against the surface
where gulls and terns were having
a saltwater-style field day, gorging
themselves. We’d hook up every time
we got close to the birds, but only our
smallest spoons took strikes.
The point is, don’t give up troll-

By Dave Mull

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

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Outdoor Adventures TV 

92

“This is a volume that not only belongs on your 
outdoors bookshelf to read and reread in and out of 
deer season, but a second copy also should be kept at 
deer camp. It will certainly be in demand.” Betty 
Sodders, Woods‐N‐Water News contributor.  
 Order your copy at Amazon.com or 
jerrylambertoutdoors.com 

Big lake trout are available in southern Lake Michigan in November. This one was released
after it hit a fly behind a Dreamweaver Coho Dodger on November 10. Author photo.

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ing the big lake in November. There
are often plenty of days with wind
and waves friendly enough to fish
without too much consternation. Do,
of course, make sure you have the
necessary safety equipment—flares,
a whistle or other noisemaker and a
marine radio. It’s a good idea to put
the closest U.S. Coast Guard phone
number on your cell phone, too, and
make sure your cell phone is waterproof, either in a protective case or
just a zip-style plastic sandwich bag.
Personal flotation devices are a no
brainer, although in the chill water of
autumn, the reality is that if you go
overboard, you won’t have much
time before hypothermia sets in. A
charter captain friend once joked that
PFDs in cold water are good for helping find your body. It’s a sobering,
truth.
But on to happier thoughts: How
to catch a good bunch of fish by trolling this time of year.
First, if you’re after coho in
Michigan, (and you should be, since
they’re the tastiest salmon in the
lake) you need to be in the southern
waters. The fish seem to migrate to
the southern tip, and New Buffalo
gives trailer-boat anglers great access.
The municipal launch costs $7 for a
Michigan-registered boat shorter than
27 feet, and it’s a short cruise to the
lake. Plus, it’s a nice little town that

loses most of its tourists after Labor
Day, with nice eating and drinking
establishments, and the seafood buffet at the Four Winds Casino there is
awesome. For a great value on Italian
food, check out Mario’s in nearby
Union Pier. (Tell Connie you read
about her place here.)
After you launch, head down the
Galien River and after you clear the
bridge and make a right turn toward
the lake, put out a couple of shallow plugs—orange, jointed Rapalas
or the down-size Bomber Long As
in the multicolored Wonderbread
pattern are good bets. Just troll these
right out into the lake (being mindful
and respectful of shore anglers). You
might catch a coho, brown, steelhead

or even a northern pike or walleye.
Once you clear the seawalls,
check for fish right around the river
plume, along the color change. You
might end up spending most of the
trip here catching a mixed bag of
browns, cohos and steelhead. If
they’re not in the plume, do a quick
troll west along the shore in 20 feet of
water. By now you’ve put your shallow Rapala and LongA (Reef Runner
Little Rippers and Brad’s Thin Fish
are other good crankbait optons) out
on planer boards and added a couple
of medium-size Disco Divers with
spoons or other stickbaits out to
either side of the boat. Set them
on “3” and put them out just to
where you can’t see the disk. The

Adam Pyle, proprietor of Pyle’s
Porthole in South Haven, recently
told me that a group of fellows has
been having great success in the late
fall, fishing from shore with golden
shiners for bait. The rig is simple: A
slip float, enough weight to keep it
straight up and down, and a No. 2
single hook, either circle or octopus style. Simply hook the shiner
under the dorsal fin, set the bobber to keep the bait off the bottom

and soak the shiner until you get
bit. Pyle noted that the Black River
at South Haven also has a good
population of pike, and steelheaders are occasionally surprised when
a toothy critter attacks their live
bait at the pier. They also get action
from big smallmouth and the occasional catfish on golden shiners. For
more info, check out Pyle’s Porthole
at www.pylesporthole.com or call
Adam at 269-637-6720.

Going old school: shiners for steelhead

boat might herd shallow cruisers into
the path of the lures.
Set a couple of downriggers, one
right near the prop wash and one halfway down with small metal dodgers
and small flies. If the shallows don’t
produce within the first mile or two,
follow this advice: When in doubt, go
out. Point your boat towards deeper
water and set a course back towards
Michigan. Be careful about wandering across the Indiana state line unless you and your crew have Hoosier
fishing licenses.
You can keep pretty much the
same spread out—it’s very similar
to springtime. Out here you can
catch cohos, steelhead and kings
of various year classes. The big
difference between now and spring
is there are more lake trout in this
area, often spread from the bottom
to the top and hunting scattered
bait. Any of your lures might
catch one and it might be a really
good one. One of the biggest trout
my boat ever caught came on
November 10 on a red-orange
Dreamweaver Coho Dodger and
an aqua-colored tinsel fly.
This November, keep your boat
ready to go for silver fish and trout in
Lake Michigan. With a weather eye
and common sense safety measures,
you can have a great time harvesting
some fine eating fish.n

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NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Field Judging

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93

Where Would Sportsmen Be Without The Mackinac Bridge?
The ‘Mighty Mac!’ The Mackinac
Bridge Authority photo
found the state ferries running wild
(Not following their normal schedule)
to accommodate irate, anxious deer
hunters. Without the ferries, passage
of the Mackinac Straits was impossible for the ferries were the only
transportation available. That may be
hard to imagine at today’s drive-on,
drive-off Mackinac Bridge crossings.
Howard Blust of Bath, Michigan
recalled that he and his father, Mike
Blust of Tawas City, often made
the ‘opening day’ trek north during
deer season and had to contend with
crossing the Straits via the State Ferry
system. On most occasions the wait
was six to eight hours; however, one
time they sat in line for ten hours
with vehicles lined up as far back as
Cheboygan. Howard mentioned that
the return trip was speedier as hunters
more or less filtered across at different
times and days.
While I was attending the University of Michigan, during my freshmen
year, I came home (Ironwood) for
Christmas. On the return Greyhound
Bus trip we reached the St. Ignace
Ferry Dock about 11:00 p.m. and the
weather was horrid. The bus driver
backed the bus onto the ferry and the
bus was so crowded with students that
he had to ask those standing in the
aisles to sit down on the floor so he
could see to back up.
Once the ferry was loaded and
on its way; halfway across the Straits
the ferry became stuck in the ice. We
sat there for three hours listening to
ice scraping on metal, until the vessel
could finally break free.
Over and above vehicle back-ups
the St. Ignace Enterprise of July 31,
ing winter months, but declined to
during
peak tourism and hunting sea1914 states: Mackinac Island:
ferry motor vehicles unless a $40 fee
The State Bridge Authority,
was levied. In the late 1800’s, $40 was sons, it was a fact that the ferries often
proved to be unreliable. The followheaded by S.T. Stackpole of Detroit,
a lot of money.
ing news clipping was published in
decided at a conference here to proDuring 1923 the Michigan State
the St. Ignace Enterprise on July 16,
ceed at once with the surveying of a
Ferry Service was established and
l914:
direct short route for a bridge across
a more reasonable rate of $2.50 per
“Monday evening, as the carferry
the Straits from St. Ignace to Mackivehicle was charged. During its first
Ste.
Marie was leaving Mackinaw
naw City.
year 10,351 vehicles made the fourCity
with the train that is scheduled to
The survey, the second made here, mile long crossing; by 1956, five car
leave St. Ignace at 5:50, north- bound,
is being done in anticipation that the
ferries were in operation with over
next Congress will authorize the loan 1,000,000 vehicles transported. These a cylinder head blew out, disabling
her. The Algomah, having made her
of funds for the building of the bridge were by no means small car ferries
trip to Mackinac Island, went to the
to link the upper and lower peninsufor they averaged 130 vehicles and
aid of the ferry and towed her to St.
las.
carried some 600 passengers during
The first survey was made on
the 45-minute Straits crossing. In bad Ignace where she docked about eight
o’clock.
the longer route, taking in a series of
seas and plowing through winter ice,
Later the Algomah took the pasislands. The long route covers about
the crossing took considerably longer.
sengers of the night train across, the
25 miles, while the direct route should
Hunters Waited Hours
City of Cheboygan going on the Alhave a span of only seven miles of
Bottlenecks were common, espegoma’s run; abandoning her own.
water.
cially during deer and bear hunting
During the night the forward
seasons when some 9,000 cars were
First Came the Car-Ferries
engine of the Ste. Marie, and the
ferried daily, resulting in delays up to low- pressure parts of her engines aft,
Most folks agreed; a solution
12 hours as cars often backed up as far were got into use so that the boat left
needed to be found. First bridge talk
as Cheboygan. Local residents sold
surfaced during the 1880s as three
here about six o’clock next morning.
soda pop, pasties, and sandwiches
railroads joined to operate a railcar
She returned making both the mornalong the ferry line-up route to disferry service across the Mackinac
ing transfers. But Tuesday her slow
gruntled nimrods. The busy three days
Straits. They operated year-around
Bridge it now page 96
prior to opening day of deer season
serving as surrogate icebreakers dur-

“Holy Mackinaw…Bridge it now!”

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Just examine the daily crossing
numbers and compare them to what
was accomplished by car ferry and
you will realize the impact.
The Mackinac Bridge has
achieved just about every iconic
engineering award it can possibly
acquire. But at the same time, it
never transformed the U.P…it will
take more than a bridge to do that.
What it does do is offer an incredible convenience of access to the
vastness of the U.P. for tourism,
camping, hiking, skiing, golfing,
hunting, fishing, boating, commerce, education, etc…and I’d say,
that’s pretty good!
Craig Homes, president
Green Oak Solutions, LLC

“H

94

oly Mackinaw…
Bridge it now!”
Those enthusiastic words were
uttered by bridge
proponent, Gil Nelson in response to
apparent foot-dragging over financing
of the Mackinac Bridge. Like Rome…
the Bridge was not built in a day!
The following news clipping from

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

95

Bridge it now:
from page 94
service was found impossible for the
task and the after battery of boilers of
the Chief Wawatam were steamed up
and that boat, with one smokestack,
went on the route.
The carferry crew is glad, however, to get back on the Chief, handicapped as she is. The Ste. Marie is
very unhandy for passenger service.
It takes too long to load her, and also
to unload, hindering her and preventing her keeping up with the traffic.
Whether the second stack of the
Chief Wawatam is in as bad shape as
the one torn down is not known, but
it is supposed not. The forward stack,
which is down, was completely done
for…porous like an old worn, corroded and rust-eaten stovepipe. It may
be the leaky boilers had something
to do with it, and the forward stack
facing the weather, is something of
protection to shield the other (stack).”

Over the Years
Proposals Abounded

Thomas Bates, editor of The Grand
Traverse Herald was nearly laughed
out of town for suggesting the Straits
be bridged. In 1888, while attending a board of directors’ meeting
at Mackinac Island’s Grand Hotel,
Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt
stated, ‘What this area needs is a
bridge across the Straits.’
Little action occurred until 1920
when Horatio Earle, Michigan’s first
highway commissioner, published
an article suggesting the erection of
a floating tunnel to connect the two
peninsulas.
Yet another proposal surfaced
as bridge engineer, Charles Fowler,
called for a 24-mile-long series of
causeways and bridges from Cheboygan to Bois Blanc, Round and Mackinac Islands, crossing the channel to
St. Ignace.
Skeptics were numerous. Most
felt bridging the straits was virtually
impossible…area rock would not
support a bridge’s weight…winter’s
violent storms would wreak havoc on
the structure…gigantic ice buildups
would take out piers.

The Ups And Downs

Proponents of the bridge theory
were numerous and vocal. In 1884,

During an extra session, the l934
Michigan Legislature created the
Mackinac Straits Bridge Authority.
Research indicated that a bridge was



feasible. Two attempts undertaken
during l934-l936 to obtain loans and
grants failed.
Bridge backers renewed their efforts. In turn, 1946 studies included
boring possibilities, proposed traffic
usage, geological surveys, ice and
water current patterns…all of which
afforded a positive approach to the
bridge being built. But World War II
caused a discontinuation of a causeway jutting out some 4,000 feet into
the Straits at St. Ignace. The Bridge
Authority was disbanded.
Legislation was passed in 1950 to
recreate the Authority and authorize
it to consult with three of the world’s
foremost suspension bridge engineers regarding the erection of such a
structure.
By January 1951, the Bridge
Authority advised that the Mackinac
Bridge could be built and financed
through the sale of revenue bonds for
$86,000,000. Again war intervened.
A police action in Korea delayed
bridge building until 1952. Additional
delays surfaced as myriad financial
and legislative problems arose until
finally in 1953, a group of investors
underwrote the sale of bridge bonds.

A Brief History
Of The Building

Former U. S. Senator, Prentiss M.
Brown, served as head of the Bridge
Authority, Dr. David Steinman was
bridge engineer, Merritt-Chapman &
Scott as builders, American Bridge
Company for superstructure.
Building the bridge proved
monumental. On December 17,
1954 bridge bonds were accepted
and groundbreaking ceremonies were
held at St. Ignace and Mackinaw
City on May 7 and 8. Work began in
earnest!
Lawrence A. Rubin, Executive
secretary of the Mackinac Bridge
Authority, saw a need to hire a
photographer to record the bridging
of the Straits and Herman Ellis was
appointed and during bridge construction took thousands of pictures and
filmed several movies.
Merritt-Chapman & Scott were
awarded the contract for bridge foundations; caisson and superstructure
work went to firms in Ohio, Indiana
and Pennsylvania. The American
Bridge Division of U. S. Steel Corporation was given a contract to build
superstructure plus a variety of steel
plates, bars, wire and cables.
On August 31, 1954 a caisson for
the north main tower foundation was
a float at Wiltse Brothers Shipyard,
Alpena. By October, test borings for

n
e
J
kins
n
e
L

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The car ferry, City of Cheboygan. Cheboygan Daily Tribune photo
Pier #11 were made with a drilling
rig. Later that month, two survey
crewmembers on survey tower No. l,
carefully utilized triangulation techniques for plotting exacting foundation placements.
Dolomite from Drummond Island
(Eastern Upper Peninsula) was loaded
and delivered to the bridge site for
use in concrete.
Caisson dredging was started late
in October. As stone-laden caissons
reached bottom, clam-shell buckets
dug out overburden from the center
of the caisson, reducing resistance
against cutting edges of tapered caisson walls, forcing the overburden to
the center…eventually dumping it
outside the structure.

On December l1, 1954, the rectangular caisson for the south cable
bent pier of Pier 18 was anchored on
rock at the bottom of the Straits. The
form was cut off eight feet below the
water. Two circular concrete towers surrounded by wrought iron were
constructed from eight feet below the
surface to ten feet above. Later steel
towers were erected to a height of 90
feet above the foundations.
The end of 1954 finished most underwater construction. Foundations
for main towers were in place before
winter ice set in. By l955, pylons
were completed, as was the erection
of the main towers. The project was
beginning to look like a bridge!
By July of 1955, the north tower

was taking shape. Using a creeper
derrick, sections of the tower were
hoisted into position. By August, the
derrick was working on the fourth tier
of the tower. It is interesting to note
that by October, riveters’ cages had
been attached to the sides of the north
tower and an elevator was delivering
needed materials.
December 1955 found the north
backstay span under tow to its site.
The major project for 1956 was spinning the main cables. Thousands of
steel wires were individually spanstrung during a three-shift, seven-day
workweek lasting most of the summer. Each tiny wire was two miles
long and capable of supporting 50
times its own weight. Upon comple-

tion, cables were compacted with
steel banding and covered with steel
skin to keep out the elements.
During summer of l956, catwalks
were erected and a motor driven hoist
pulled sections of the catwalk into
place.
Early in May of 1957, three lateral beams were simultaneously lifted
during erection of the span between
Piers 22-23. And with the lowering
of the first steel chord connection
from the bridge’s truss span to the
rear wall of the south anchorage,
there was finally a continuous steel
bridge across the straits of Mackinac.
In June, the suspended roadway

Bridge it now page 98

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97

Bridge it now:
from page 97
trusses were delivered by barge and
lifted by sections into position. By
the end of August, the American
Bridge Division crane put roadway
stringers into place…curbs; railings
and finishing touches to roadway
grating were being installed. Piece
by piece, the immense structure was
completed. It opened for traffic November l, 1957.
Dr. Davis Steinman, bridge designer, viewed it as his finest career
achievement. One of his main goals
was to preserve the pristine beauty of
the Straits and to make ‘his’ bridge
complement that remarkable setting
rather than detract from it!

The Bridge Took
Its Death Toll
Five men died during construction. Frank Pepper, a hardhat diver,
contracted ‘bends’ during a dive
to inspect Pier 19, Sept. 10, 1954.
A second fatality occurred when
Merritt-Chapman & Scott employee,
James LeSarge fell 40 feet inside a
caisson on October 10, 1954. While

walking a beam just four feet above
the water, Albert R. Abbott fell into
the water and became the third victim
during a 40-day construction period.
Two men, Jack C. Baker of Pagosa Springs, Colorado and Robert
Koppen of Plymouth, Michigan lost
their lives through a 550-foot fall
from the North Tower on their first
day of work on the job. A spinner’s
platform they were installing broke
loose of its restraining lines and the
men were thrown from the tower to
the Straits below. The body of Robert
Koppen was never recovered.
The names of these men were engraved on a bronze plaque located on
the west side of Pier 1 in Mackinaw
City. It was put in place by the Michigan Building and Trades Council and
dedicated on November 1, 1957…the
day the bridge opened to traffic.

Bridge Completed & Open
While the Mackinac Bridge
opened to traffic November 1, 1957
the actual celebration occurred June
26, 1958. The first official car crossing that November bridge opening,
held Michigan Governor G. Mennen Williams, driven by wife Nancy.
They paid the first bridge toll of
$3.25. First to cross the bridge of the
general public was Al Carter, a jazz

Love Life at Lake Huron Woods!

musician from Chicago whose hobby
was to be ‘first’ at events.
The first sanctioned bridge walk
took place June 25, 1958 with a
group of 60 International Walkers
Association members. The governor
served as official starter. Labor Day
1959, some 250 participants enjoyed
their trek across the bridge and by
1960; the walk was sanctioned by the
Michigan Amateur Athletic Union.
Gradually increasing their ranks,
1,500 walkers took the 1960 Labor
Day tour; 2,500 in 1962; 4,000 by
1963. Today, this has become a
popular event. September 7, 2000
found over 65,000 walkers crossing
the Mackinac Bridge and enjoying
the dramatic view of the Straits.
The bridge is so designed as to
move with the wind…changes in temperature…weight loads. It is possible
that the deck at center span would
move 35 feet east to west during high
winds. The deck would not swing per
se, but move slowly in one direction
and due to force and direction of the
wind. As winds subside, weight of
crossing vehicles would slowly move
it back into the center position.
On December 14, 1999, Michigan’s Lieutenant Governor, Dick
Posthumus, announced that the
Mackinac Bridge was selected as the

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state’s number one civil engineering
project of the 20th Century by the
Michigan section of the American
Society of Civil Engineers.
Posthumus remarked, “Crossing
over to the U. P. on the Mackinac
Bridge has become second nature and
it is easy to forget the planning and
design that went into constructing this
amazing structure.”
The Mackinac Bridge, affectionally called ‘Mighty Mac’ or ‘Big Mac,’
awash in the flow of 96 amber light
globes, is indeed a spectacular sight
night or day. It has served as backdrop
for advertising and movies…a U. S.
Postage Stamp was issued in its honor.
For all its fanfare, lest we forget…the bridging of the Straits linked
Michigan’s two peninsulas; opening the door wide for sportsmen and
tourists alike. It’s time we all shouted
loud and clear; Holy Mackinaw –
They Bridged It!
Bridge statistics courtesy of the
Mackinac Bridge Authority and
personally, through numerous interviews, Lawrence A. Rubin, (now
deceased) contributed statistics to this
writing. Note the ‘Mackinaw’ spelling
as when those words were uttered,
“Holy Mackinaw...Bridge it now!”
that was one term of the varying
spelling of the Straits. n

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Michigan Meanders...By Tom Huggle r

Deer hunting…then and now

The Youth Deer
Hunting Program Makes
a Big Difference...

have a much better chance at bagging
a deer, even on their first try. Thanks
to hunter safety certification, they are
better schooled, as well as being safer.
Today’s firearms and scopes are better
and the bows, in particular, are more
accurate. Clothing is much improved,
ad took me deer hunting for the helping young hunters to be warm and
first time when I turned fourdry.
teen years old in 1959. It was
And we now have electronics. Last
not a fun experience. A foot of fall, I was able to text my 13-yearsnow blanketed the woods in
old grandson, Camden, perched in a
Roscommon County, and the tempera- treestand a hundred yards from my
ture was stuck at one degree above
ground blind. I told him a small herd
zero. Outside the restaurant where we was moving his way and that one deer
had breakfast early that morning, the
might be a buck.
thermometer blood was pooled below
It was a buck; Camden shot the
zero.
four-point, his first whitetail, at 30
Lest you think this is history reyards. This occurred on the second
vised 55 years after the fact, I scoured day of the gun-hunting season.
the Internet for official readings on
Try doing that back in 1959.
that November 15, which was, and
Thirty years would pass before we had
is, the opening day of the firearms
cell phones, clunky devices though
deer-hunting season. Older readers
they were. Text messaging would wait
might also recall that 1959 was the
another 20 years.
coldest opening day ever recorded, a
I believe there are more deer in
dubious mark that stands yet today. I
Michigan now than there were then,
built a fire that frigid morning to keep at least in southern Michigan where I
my toes from freezing in the cheap
have hunted in recent years. Thanks
Kmart boots I wore. Too bad the bolt- to consecutive mild winters—last year
action on my little gun, a Mannlicher- being the anomaly—the deer herd
Schoener 6.5 caliber, jammed, probis healthy. There seems to be more
ably due to the cold.
bucks, and bigger ones, too, probably
So, I missed a chance to score on
the result of antler-point restrictions
the only living animal I saw all day,
and maybe the Quality Deer Managea red fox loping through the snowy
ment Program, too.
woods.
As luck would have it, I shot a fine
I saw zero deer on that zerosix-point the same day my grandson
degree day and was tempted to say to tagged his buck. He’s a confirmed
hell with deer hunting. But I stayed
deer hunter now and can’t wait to
with the sport and three years later, in come back from Florida and hunt with
1962, managed to tag my first buck,
his Papa Tom again. Naturally, that
a fat spikehorn. I say “managed” bemakes two of us.
cause I’m not much of a deer hunter.
Perhaps the most gratifying exI move too much. I spend more time
perience for “old bucks” like me is to
reading on the stand than I do looking watch young sportsmen and women
for deer. If I do spot antlers, I get buck grow their wings and take flight. I
fever pretty easily.
know the hunting and fishing bug has
At least another 20 years passed
bitten Camden pretty hard because
he now saves his allowance money
before I killed my next buck.
to buy sporting gear. Along with four
Fast forward to 2014. Kids today

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

D

100

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• ATV-in island outpost on Wenebegon Lake for Walleye & Pike
• Train-in outpost on Goldie Lake for Pike & Smallmouth
• Black Bear hunts, high success rates, area over 300 sq. miles
• Limited availability remaining at both outpost camps

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Below right; the author’s grandson,
Camden Kruis, shot his first buck, a fourpoint, last fall on the second day of the
gun-hunting season. Above; his grandfather, the author shown with a six-point,
says deer hunting is better today than
when he was a boy. Tom Huggler photo
other Florida youths, he’s been chosen
to be mentored, in a special one-onone program with a veteran adult
outdoorsman who has taken him dove
hunting in Georgia and fishing for
redfish in South Carolina. Hunting for
boar and deer are next.
The program provides a rifle,
shotgun and bow to each youth, which
are theirs to keep. Where were these
programs 50 years ago?
Michigan kids ten years old and
younger have a special opportunity
thanks to the Mentored Youth Hunting Program, now in its third year. In
2006 the Michigan DNR started the
popular Apprentice License Program
for youth 10 and older. Several
thousand kids have taken advantage
of both programs every year since. In
fact, last year’s participants increased
by 18 percent over 2012 to 12,429.
The Meijer Corporation offers
free hunting licenses for youth 16 and
younger during a designated weekend
in September. The DNR has stepped
up by making available special Youth
Waterfowl and Youth Deer hunts.
These, too, are excellent programs for
bringing new recruits into the hunting fraternity and for helping to retain
them.
Two years ago, my wife and I allowed a local boy named Sam Hodge
to hunt deer with his supervisor father
on our property. Sam responded by
shooting his first deer, a nice doe.

We invited Sam back and on
September 24, he killed his first
buck, a seven-point, from the same
stand where Camden scored. His
dad, Randy Hodge, sent me this text:
“Sam shot a seven-point at 7:30 this
morning and is giddy with joy!”
I’ll never forget that feeling of
pride when my little spikehorn joined
several other bucks on the family deer
pole.
Young hunters know and appreciate that the good old days for deer
hunting are now.n

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101

The Next Bite...

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

By Gary Parsons and Keith Kavajecz

102

ave you ever imagined the
pressure a football quarterback feels during the two
minute warning in the 4th
quarter of the game when
his team is down by four
points and it’s up to him
to take his squad down the field for
the winning touchdown? It’s a “now
or never” situation. Well obviously
there’s not that kind of pressure in
walleye fishing, but for many anglers
this time of the year means there isn’t
much time left in the open-water
season and it won’t be long before
the snow will flies and ice covers the
lakes marking a new winter season.
So now’s the time for that final drive
down the field to some of the best
walleye fishing of the year, not only
for numbers, but also for some of the
biggest walleyes of the season.
The biggest factor for successfully catching late season walleyes is
to know their seasonal migrations on
your particular body of water. That
will tell you where to find the fish, and
in turn, give clues as to what the best
presentation will be to catch them. In
rivers for instance, walleyes begin to
migrate up river toward spring spawning areas. While they won’t necessarily set up in the same spots you’ll find
them come spring, they will be close.
Deep, main river holes just down river
from spawning flats are good places
to start the search. Vertical jigging the
head and tail end of the holes should
yield some fish and indicate whether
or not you’re on the right pattern.
There are a couple of things to
keep in mind that may increase the
odds when jigging this time of year.
While it’s true that the walleyes are
feeding to bulk up for the upcoming
cold water period, it doesn’t mean that
they’ll be smashing your offering with
reckless abandon. Bites can be subtle
in the cool water of fall, so paying attention to details in your presentation
is important. Anytime you’re vertical
jigging, sensitivity is critical. You’ve
got to feel what’s going on with the jig
at all times. A quality, high-modulus

graphite rod like the Walleye Angler
Signature Series WX60ML-HM85
(available from Bass Pro Shops),
coupled with a small diameter, nostretch line like 6-pound test Berkley
Nanofil will ensure you’re rigged right
for the task. Using the right rod and
line cannot be stressed enough!
Finding walleyes on the Great
Lakes in the fall is a matter of knowing migration patterns too. On Lake
Erie for example, walleyes move from
the eastern and central basins toward
the western waters. Open water trolling tactics are still effective this time
of year, but you’ll do better to concentrate your efforts more “in-shore,”
than out over the main basin. Look for
the majority of fish to relate closer to
breaks, where the basin transitions to
shallower water. The same principal
holds true on Lake Michigan, be it the
northern reaches near Bay de Noc,
or the waters around Door County
Wisconsin. Walleyes will move from
the main lake toward the bays and
shoreline breaks where they’ll spawn
come spring.
Daytime fishing can be productive, but in these gin-clear waters,
trolling after dark is often prime-time
for big fish. Subtle action “stick-bait”
style lures that have the slow, rolling action will trigger cool water
walleyes like nothing else. Since this
style of small-lipped minnow bait
typically only dives a few feet below
the surface, it’s often necessary to
use some sort of weighting system to
get them down to the fish. Off Shore
Tackle’s OR20 Pro Weight System,
lead core line and in-line weights like
Bass Pro’s XPS Keel “Fish” Weights
are just a few options. A little experimentation will get you dialed in on
the set-up that will trigger more biters.
This is still “big water” territory, and
covering water is the name of the
game. That means the use of planer
boards like Off Shore’s OR-12 Side
Planers will absolutely increase your
odds of catching fish.
Smaller lakes and reservoirs have
their own set of fall patterns that re-

The biggest factor for successfully catching late season walleyes is to know
their seasonal migrations on your particular body of water. That will tell you
where to find the fish, and in turn, give clues as to what the best presentation
will be to catch them.
quire some unique approaches. From
their summer hang-outs on flats and
feeding shelves, walleyes in these
waters like to move to such locales as
main-lake points and shorelines that
feature sharp breaks and access to
deep water. These types of structures
harbor the most baitfish this time of
year, and walleyes will always be
where their food source is.
The fish will be loosely concentrated in spots, which makes hunting
them down with your electronics efficient. Cruise likely structure searching out signs of life such as clouds of
bait, and those tell-tale “arcs” indicating larger predators. With the locator/
GPS technology available to anglers
today, searching for and spotting fish
is easier than ever. Where once we’d
have to cruise a spot at 5 mph to effectively mark fish, units like the Lowrance HDS 12 Touch, have the power
and resolution to allow us to search at
speeds closer to 20 mph. That saves
a lot of precious fishing time over the
course of a day.
Once a school is located, a slow
and deliberate presentation will get
the most bites. It’s tough to beat a
big minnow put right in the fish’s face
this late in the season. Creek Chubs
are a favorite bait preference, but Red
Tails, Dace and Suckers will work too.
Keep the bait selection on the large
side … if a six to seven inch min-

now looks too big, then it’s probably
just right. Remember, fall on many
of these waters is trophy time, and a
big minnow offers a walleye the most
meal for the least amount of effort.
Using bait that big means you’ll
need to choose a hook with enough
“gap” to get the job done too. A Mustad Double Wide Fine Wire Livebait
Hook in size 1 or 1/0 (to match the
size of the bait being used) is a great
choice. This hook features Mustad’s
Ultra Point technology (meaning it’s
super sharp right out of the package
and will stay that way in the toughest fishing conditions), a wide gap for
better hooking and it’s a super finewire hook giving it superior penetration.
It’s nearing the end of the season
… it’s big game time now. Late fall
to a walleye angler is like the Super
Bowl, because this is trophy season.
This is not the time to be putting away
the rods and reels and storing the boat
for winter. The best part of the game is
at hand. The Two-Minute Warning has
sounded, so call your play, and take a
shot at the end zone … this could be
your year to score the winning “Next
Bite” on late season walleyes.
If you have questions or comments on this or other articles of ours
you may have read, contact us through
our website at www.thenextbite.
com.n

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103

Estimation: At Least 200 Sites Are Cleaned Up Annually...

Volunteers team with Adopt-a-Forest to clean up

P

ete Laplaca has broken a sweat.
He’s been stacking sheets of
plywood and particle board
onto a trailer and, with the
assistance of a couple others,
heaving large, water-soaked mattresses on top of them.
“Well, I wanted to get a workout
today,” said Laplaca, an engineering consultant from Traverse City. “I
thought it would be on a bicycle, but
this will suffice.”
Laplaca is one of 17 volunteers
who gave up their ordinary Saturday
morning routines in order to help
clean up illegal dump sites in Grand
Traverse County. An avid trail user
who skis, hikes and mountain bikes,
Laplaca has been volunteering on
local trail improvement projects for
more than a decade. He’s worked on
widening trails, controlling erosion,
and removing deadfalls. But this
Saturday morning marked the first
time he enlisted in an Adopt-a -Forest
project to clean up the woods.
Although illegal dumping is a
problem occurring on public land
in many parts of Michigan, Grand

Traverse County, until recently, was
home to more illegal dump sites than
any other county in the state, with
45 known sites on public land in the
county. Now, thanks to the combined
efforts of volunteers and the Adopt-aForest program – a joint effort involving several agencies and administered by the Department of Natural
Resources – 25 of these sites were
cleaned up over the past six months
and additional work is planned to
address the remaining 20 before the
snow flies, squarely knocking the
county from the top of that illustrious
list within a matter of months.
“These trash dumps have been
an eyesore for years,” Laplaca said.
“Nobody can figure out what to do
with them,” other than cleaning them
up after the fact.
And cleaning up three of the dump
sites is exactly what Laplaca and his
fellow volunteers set out to do on a
beautiful Saturday in early October.
To accomplish their task, the
volunteers initially split into separate
crews to tackle two smaller sites –
consisting of mostly scrap construc-

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tion materials, along with some old
furniture, bedding, appliances and
household refuse – found near popular
trails.
Following those efforts, they regrouped at a county-owned parcel that
has seen illegal dumping for many
years. On an old well pad, illegal
dumpers would back up to the adjacent ravine and throw the trash over
the side, leaving the trash out of sight
– until you walked up to the edge of
the river and looked down.
Getting the stuff out of there
would prove to be a Herculean task.
But with a DNR fire truck, complete
with a winch, the volunteers and DNR
staff were able to lower a trailer down
the slope, fill it with refuse, and have
it winched back up.
When the cleanup was completed,
DNR forest fire officer Dwayne
Morse took the fire truck back to its
base in Kalkaska and returned with
a bulldozer to cut furrows in the pad
site, making it impossible for anyone
to drive up the edge of the ravine to
dump trash ever again.
By the time the mission was ac-

complished in early afternoon, the
crew had filled a 20-yard dumpster
with trash (well-compacted by a frontend loader provided by the county
road commission).
The event was an unqualified success, said Jim Heffner, a retired engineer/real estate appraiser who brought
the day’s event to fruition.
“It’s hard to get volunteers on a
beautiful fall day, but we were able
to come up with 17 people who were
willing to come out and pick up rubbish,” he said.
The volunteers ranged from young
professionals to retirees, including a
financial planner and a former community college teacher.
The Adopt-a-Forest program was
launched in Roscommon County in
1989 by a pair of DNR employees
from the former Waste Management
Division (now part of the Department of Environmental Quality); the
program then expanded statewide in
1991, immediately attracting partners
from local, state and federal agencies, and continues today with a focus
on cleaning up illegal dump sites on

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Shown
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clothing.
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course. For safety and training information, see your dealer or call the ATV Safety Institute at 1-800-887-2887. ATVs can be hazardous to operate. For your safety: Always avoid paved
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public land across Michigan.
“We estimate at least 200 sites
are cleaned up annually, but that’s a
low-ball estimate,” explained Ada
Takacs, who manages the program for
the DNR’s Forest Resources Division. “Sometimes the local community groups – such as Scout troops and
hunting, ORV and ski clubs –
just take it upon themselves to join
in the effort and take care of organizing and funding an event without
getting the DNR involved, which is
great.”
But, Takacs said, for those groups
that want to help but are in need of
some assistance – technical or financial – the DNR and the other agencies
involved in Adopt-a-Forest are available to help.
“Annually we spend about
$15,000 statewide on disposal costs
related to these clean-up events. It
can cost up to $1,400 to rent a dumpster,” she said. “But it’s worth every
penny, since the in-kind services
– equipment donations, free landfill
space and volunteer labor – are worth
much more than what we spend.”
Takacs said illegal dumping
became a problem when state landfill

requirements changed in the mid-tolate 1980s and townships had to close
local dumps and begin routing trash
to lined landfills. Citizens who were
accustomed to the previous way of
doing things and didn’t want to pay
for the use of improved landfills began dumping illegally at a noticeably
higher rate.
“Years ago when we started this
program, you couldn’t drive through
the woods without finding miles and
miles of trash. Major, major trash
piles,” Takacs said. “Now, dumping does still occur, but the piles are
smaller and less frequent.”
In addition to the creation of the
Adopt-a-Forest program, other changes have been made to curb the illegal
dumping problem. Legislation raising
the penalties for illegal dumping – up
to $10,000 in fines and/or five years
of incarceration – provided an incentive for paying for trash service or
driving to a designated landfill. And
most young adults today grew up
with recycling as a societal norm.
“Disposal laws have also
changed, which has addressed some
of the items commonly dumped in the
past,” Takacs said. “We used to see

Open Since 1987

More than a dozen volunteers provided the manpower to remove trash from
the bottom of a ravine while the Adopt-a-Forest program and Department of
Natural Resources provided the fire truck necessary to winch the trailer up
the steep slope. MDNR photo
a lot of car batteries; now you turn
in your battery when you get a new
one, so there are fewer of those being
dumped. Scrap metals have become
worth more, so we very rarely find
scrap metal or metal appliances anymore.”
Through the combined effect
of changes in regulations and the
marketplace, along with the increased efforts of volunteers like the
citizens who helped with the recent






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Grand Traverse County clean-up,
the outlook for illegal dumping in
Michigan is certainly improving, but
Takacs said there is still much work
to be done in many counties across
the state.
Anyone interested in supporting
Adopt-a-Forest and being part of the
solution can find more information,
including a calendar of scheduled
cleanup events, online at www.cleanforests.org.n

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Letters And Hot Topics In Michigan Outdoors...

Governor signs new roadkill law

I

By Retired MDNR CO Captain Jeff Pendergraff

n July’s Woods-N-Water News
edition I wrote an article stating
that a new bill introduced by
Senator Darwin Booher (R) of
Evart was not needed and didn’t
make a lot of sense. That it would
open loop holes in the law and provide poachers with a way to illegally
keep animals that they poached under
this new law.
In the last several weeks, hunting
groups and the legislature worked
out a compromise that seems to have
settled the issues that the sportsman

clubs and the DNR had with the bill as
it was first introduced.
In the past if you hit a deer or bear
with your motor vehicle you were
allowed to keep it after you received
a roadkill permit from a law enforcement officer. If the driver didn’t want
it or the animal was found along the
roadway a law enforcement officer
could issue a permit to anyone who
wanted it. But, you needed this permit
to legally keep the animal.
Senator Booher’s concern was that
it could take hours for law enforce-

ment to arrive on scene to issue a
roadkill permit and that there were
too many animals lying along the side
of the road wasting. This law would
make it easier for the public to be able
to pick these animals up and make use
of them and it would help get a lot of
these animals off the roadway.
Generally in the fall until the warm
weather appears in the spring most
dead deer along the road side don’t
last very long. Either it is taken for
personal consumption or used for bait
for coyotes or bobcats.
Most other species such as turkey,
spotted fawn, elk, and birds of prey are
illegal to keep in any form. Animals
such as fur bearing or small game
could be kept if the season was open
and the person had a valid license to

keep that animal.
Under this new law there will be
a system that would help protected
animals from being poached and kept
illegally while trying to say it was a
roadkill animal and at the same time
make it easier for the public to possess
and keep roadkill animals.
Drivers who hit a deer with their
motor vehicle or find one along the
roadway can obtain a salvage tag by
contacting the DNR by phone, or website, or to a 911 system. Keep in mind,
that if you have an accident with a
deer and there is more than $1000
damage to your vehicle you must
report the accident to police immediately. There are very few accidents that

New roadkill law page 108

I love our great state!

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Dear Woods-N-Water News:

106

Summer has finally faded into
fall, so the Michigan deer-hunting
debate is kicking into high gear. Just
this morning, a good friend forwarded
a report that put Michigan on the
TOP 10 WORST deer hunting states
in the nation. It tries to compare the
deer hunting in Michigan to trophy
deer states like Iowa, Kansas, Illinois,
Indiana and Kentucky. It’s almost
laughable, but I hear hunters try and
make the comparison every fall lately.
I have deer hunted in our great
state for more than 30 years, mostly
on public land, and fished here even
longer. About 15 years ago I began
traveling out of state, making multiple trips over that time to hunt in
Illinois and Iowa. I even went to
Wyoming once to do the Mule deer
thing. Admittedly, the deer hunting I
experienced was phenomenal. I saw
some of the biggest bucks I’ve ever
seen, and was fortunate enough to
kill a few trophies with my bow. But
every year I come back and rush to
my favorite treestands, with realistic expectations, on public land in

northern Michigan - and enjoy every
bit of it!
According to a report by the
National Wilderness Institute, 23%
of all land in Michigan – more than 8
million acres - is owned by the state
or federal government and open to
the public. Great for us who enjoy the
outdoors, but not so much for the trophy deer hunting statistics. Now the
top five trophy deer states, according
to the same report, have virtually no
public land, statistically.
In Kentucky, 3.5% of the land
is public. In Indiana it’s 2.3%. In
Illinois it’s 2%. Kansas and Iowa
are roughly 1% each public land. So
for the most part almost 100% of all
deer hunting done in those states is
done on private, controlled property.
I would bet if someone compared
Michigan’s southern third, which is
mostly privately-owned fertile farm
land, to the other states in the report,
we would fair just fine.
Don’t get me wrong, I love being
in a tree with my bow during the rut

I love our state page 108

Deer Hunting--0 For 30 Years During Rifle Arms Season, But…

The harvest is not always the essential sensation

have to admit, I’ve never harvested a deer, though not for lack
of trying. On my first hunt at 16,
I only saw raccoons and grouse
moving. At 17 I shot three times
during the season at button bucks and
came back with nothing but spent
cartridges. During my twenties I fired
my 30.06 a few more times but with
no success. Yet, over these and the
ensuing years I still looked forward to
November 15th with anxious anticipation and dreams of my first deer.
Didn’t happen! In fact, I could have
been Reuben Soady, the protagonist
in Jeff Daniels cult film, “Escanaba in
Da Moonlight.”
It seemed I would always be the
guy who would help drag a friends
“success” out of the woods to a waiting truck or out of a deep swamp or
assist in tracking for hours. It’s not
that I didn’t have my opportunities
to fill my tag, I did. But-the clear,
kill shot evaded me, I only had a doe
license, I failed to pop the safety off,
no shell in the chamber, wind shifts
and other calamities that befall white
tail hunters.
Still I managed to get out during rifle arms season for many years.
Though given grief during many
buddy hunts I managed to survive the
slaughter to my ego without too much
damage to my psyche. I read books,
leafed through a slew of outdoor
magazines and talked to many older
hunters so I didn’t have to depend
on luck alone which obviously was
avoiding me. The more I read, and
the more conversations I had, brought
me to the realization that deer hunting is indeed an art. In other words,
the most successful deer hunters are
those who cling closest to the methods stressed. They find a spot where a
deer is likely to pass at a certain time
in the morning and evening, choose
a position that will enable them to
have a clear view of surroundings and
patiently await developments. I followed that adage year after year. But,
as one older guy told me,” Ambition
and persistence will accomplish a lot
in this world but they can’t altogether
be depended on to keep venison in
the freezer.”
November 15th in Michigan
doesn’t have me in the woods as a
hunter anymore but I still look forward to being with friends who invite
me along to share a ground blind and
conversation. I still enjoy wearing
hunting orange and relishing the climate change, the smells, the silence,
and also the sounds which are encapsulated in an early morning hunt. I
still feel a thrill when a hesitant but
inquisitive young doe approaches the
blind, and then suddenly shuffles off.
It’s not that I have a chip on

my shoulder in regards to my futile
efforts to harvest a deer. I DON’T!
It’s more that I lost interest over the
years. In fact, I sold my deer rifle
years ago and purchased two shotguns. Bird hunting now takes up most
of my time in the fall woods now.
Yet the stories of friends and family
who still venture into the woods with
bow and rifle are dazzling at times. I
can see the excitement in their faces
as they recall a new tale of success
or failure while pursuing deer in this
sacred season.
Ironically, last year while bird
hunting one family member asked,
knowing full well of my success rate
with deer asked, “What was your
most memorable hunt?” Without
hesitating I explained the images of
one particular opening day of rifle
season that remain vivid.
My hunting partners (high school
pals) and I had synchronized a ren-

dezvous for the opener at a small café
in Michigan’s Emmet County, for
a 4 a.m. breakfast. Talk this morning centered on old hunts, today’s
hunt, ribbing about the guy who still
remained deerless and old-fashioned
bull. As dawn approached, we were
full, coffeed, talked out and ready
to set off. Our location was a hilly,
heavily wooded eighty-acre parcel
north of town.
Though the morning was crisp and
clear the coolness of the air is not
what remains etched in my memory,
but the dampness and the eerie fog
that encased the valleys where we
waited quietly for dawn to fully
break. Though none of us would
admit it our secret quest was a
large buck many of us had seen
periodically for the past two years,
wandering the hills where we now
lay in wait.
As the sun continued its ascent

a myriad of colors soon provided an
excellent backdrop for the crest of
the hill I had staked out. Though the
damp air remained, the fog began to
drift upwards as daylight crept closer.
My eyes were fixed to the east like
sentries awaiting any movement. The
foggy mist acted like a reflector for
the sun and glared back at me; making any shot I might be able to get,
difficult at best.
Within minutes a movement
no more than seventy-five yards
away startled me. My finger slid
to the safety, ready to release in a
second. The movement became an
image that appeared as a silhouette in
the fog. My finger moved the safety
to off as I mentally prepared myself;
finger on the trigger, eyes on the cross
hairs. Then a buck appeared out of
the mist, and turned his massive head
towards me. I knew what I had to
do, but hesitated for a second or two,
stunned by the absolute beauty of the
scene being played out before me,
which was magnified by the sun and
fog.
Somehow he knew something
wasn’t right and lit off into the hardwoods, without so much as a word,
shot, or groan from me.
I wasn’t that upset or angry. I had
just witnessed one of nature’s most
splendid scenes.
Recalling that event while eating
lunch on a bird hunt on a two-track
deep into the woods brought a smile
to my face. In a few hours we would
be at the cabin cooking partridge
and veggies on the grill and savoring venison stew slowly simmering
in a crock pot. I will have supplied
one entrée for the table. The second,
donated by family and friends who
have my back.n

“Click it and Ticket” on federal forest lands?

Dear Fish Diary:

I

imagine it would be just my luck.
I finally hook and land
that monster trophy fish,
have a few photos taken of
me with that monster fish,
publish them in a story,
then get slapped with a
$1000 fine from the U.S.
Forest Service. Why? Because I didn’t buy a permit
to allow me to take and
publish my images. And,
if current legislation
goes through, they
could fine me up to
$1000 per published shot taken on
Federal Forest Service lands.
That is the current rumor floating around as the U.S. Forest Service

looks to create a permit system, or
reinvent one for photographers and
film-makers. A permit system for
photographers?
When the story first
broke it appeared anyone
who wanted to take photos
on protected Federal Forest
Service land would have
to purchase the permits,
which could range in
price anywhere from $35
- $1500 per day. Now, as
the dust settles, it looks
like they are purely
targeting the commercial media. That
would include me.
I have one question for the
Federal Forest Service. What makes

By Ron St. Germain

people want to visit a National Park
or Federal Forest Service Park?
That’s right, it’s a radio commercial.
Because in that 30-second radio spot
we can envision how beautiful Yellowstone is. I’m sure it was a radio
commercial that made people want to
visit Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, probably a Tim Allen, “PureMichigan” advertisement that caused
traffic jams leading into Munising all
summer long.
I’m sure the second biggest
contributor to visitors flooding our
National Parks is chance. Yes, people
are probably just driving around and
by chance come upon Yosemite and
want to stop and visit. A lot of those
people are probably from Michigan,

Click it or ticket page 109

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

I

By Rick Fowler

107

Letters And Hot Topics In The Outdoors Continued...

I love our state:
from page 106

in Illinois and Iowa. I am also fortunate enough to be able to pay for that
privilege. You can’t just drive down
the road, find an interesting piece
of land, and hang a stand and hunt
without paying in those states. Also
in many of those trophy deer-hunting
Mecca’s, deer hunting is the only
game in town.
A few years back, a good friend
and I were hunting in west-central
Illinois the first week of November.
We had five straight days of record

New roadkill law:
from page 106

have less than $1000 in damage.
Drivers who hit a bear must obtain
a salvage tag directly from the DNR.
People who want to keep roadkill
beavers, coyotes, mink, fox, and other
small game animals must keep a written record of the incident and keep
it their possession while they are in
possession of that animal. The record
must contain the date, time, location,
the type of animal and whether or not
they have requested a salvage permit,

heat, near 80 degrees, that killed the
hunting. We tried all-day hunts, but
eventually spent a few afternoons
visiting sporting goods stores, doing
laundry and sitting in a sports bar,
because there was literally nothing
else to do.
I am a West Michigan native,
and have a cabin in the heart of the
Manistee National Forest. When
the weather knocks us out of our
treestands, we can grab our fishing
rods, and within 5-30 minutes be at
multiple rivers filled with salmon and
steelhead. The same rivers that people
travel from all over the country to
fish.

Over the years, I have killed some
big bucks in Michigan, and have a
few hanging on my cabin walls. A
good friend killed his best-ever, a
giant 3-year-old, public-land 9-point,
on the second day of gun season last
fall. And just a few weeks ago, I sat
with my 14-year-old son as he killed
a great 8-point in northern Michigan
during the youth hunt.
Michigan has made some regulation changes recently to let some of
the yearlings live another year, which
will have a positive impact on buck
sightings. Incidentally we have been
doing that for years, and every fall
we at least see a few 3-plus-year-old

bucks “up north”, and get trail cam
picture of multiple true trophies. I
realistically understand, as a state
though, we will never and can never
compete with the “trophy” states. We
will never be Iowa, Kansas, Illinois,
Indiana or Kentucky…and that’s just
fine by me.
For all you Michigan bashers,
move to one of those trophy states…
or take up fishing - or one of the
umpteen other great outdoor activities available in the fall - and leave
the deer woods to me. I love being an
outdoorsman in our great state!
Frank Campione
Cedar Springs, MI

and their intended purpose for keeping the animal.
This document also must contain
the person’s full name, date of birth,
mailing address, telephone number
and driver’s license number.
Animals that may not be kept
are badgers, bobcats, brants, coots,
crows, cub bears, ducks, elk, and
fishers, Florida rails, spotted fawns,
Virginia rails, wild turkeys, wolves and
woodcock.
I had a lot of concern with the first
proposed bill and the poaching of wild
turkeys. As I mentioned in the previous article I had driven down a local

road during this past turkey season
and saw a trophy tom standing on the
side of the road. If the first bill had
passed as it was written, I could have
hit this trophy tom with my vehicle.
Then if anyone asked, all I had to do
was write down on a piece of paper
where I had hit it and no one would
have been the wiser. That would be the
same for keeping a deer or bear. With
the new version of this bill, turkeys are
still protected and may not be kept.
I think this new law as written will
help prevent poachers from abus-

ing the system and at the same time
allow people to salvage more roadkill
animals.
This new law became effective
September 28, 2014.
If you are aware of anyone using
this new law to poach or are violating
any other fish or game law please call
the “report all poaching hotline” at
1-800- 292-7800. Your name will be
kept confidential if you request it.
The author, Jeff Pendergraff, is a
retired Captain with the Law Enforcement Division of the MDNR.n

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108

10 States To Share $900,000...

Michigan to receive USFWS Wolf
Livestock Demonstration Project Grant

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced $900,000 in grants
under the Wolf Livestock Demonstration Project Grant Program. Grants
will be distributed to the states of Arizona, Idaho, Michigan, Minnesota,
Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.
The grants assist livestock producers in undertaking proactive, non-lethal activities to reduce the risk of livestock loss from predation by wolves,
and compensate producers for livestock losses caused by wolves.
The
program provides funding to states and tribes, with federal cost-share not
to exceed 50 percent.
Proposals were evaluated considering the extent of depredation of livestock by wolves, program evaluation and record keeping, and commitment
to reporting and coordination. Proposals were also evaluated based on the
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from page 107

or West Virginia, or maybe even
New York, just on a casual California drive. Those driving the forested
road along Pictured Rocks National
Lakeshore probably envision the gorgeously colored cliffs and spontaneously want to visit the park and take
a hike to actually view them. Because
you can’t see them from the road,
and I doubt it was a photograph that
piqued their interest to visit the area.
Photographs in magazines, newspapers, calendars, websites, blogs,
television spots, postcards or galleries
probably have little to do with why
someone would want to visit a National Park. Which, is understandably
reasonable as why the Federal Forest
Service would want to charge photographers and publications for that
kind of useless free advertising. That
phrase, “A picture is worth a thousand words,” is null and void to them,
because I’m guessing they think the
thousand words without the photograph is why people actually visit the
Federal Forest Service lands.
Really? How many Federal Forest
Service employees have stood in line
at a fast-food restaurant for 15-minutes only to have the person in front
of them ask the cashier how much a
hamburger is? The price is only in
100-pt, bold type, located on the giant
light-up sign. But now, that picture
that was supposed to be worth a thousand words suddenly might cost you a
thousand bucks.
People don’t read, which is why I
write! Let me describe “Old Faithful” without the imagery to back up
the description. Allow me to describe
Sable Falls, or the beautiful Lake Superior coastline in a thousand words
or less. I’m guessing if you still don’t
know the price of a hamburger in
15-mintes of standing in line, you
probably won’t read my descriptions
and you probably won’t be visiting any of these places. That’s just a
hunch, but a hunch the Federal Forest
Service doesn’t appear to agree with.
As I watch local parks in my area
being used less and less. As I see
unused and rarely visited State lands

being sold off to foreign investors. As
I see playgrounds being run down and
overgrown because of lack of interest,
I realize, all of these people must be
inside reading about Federal Forest
Service National lands and planning
their trips. What was I thinking when
I wanted to become a photographer?
During a time when parents are
using video games and cell phones as
babysitters and children are getting
outside less and less, I totally understand why the Forest Service would
want to make it more difficult for
people like me to photograph these
amazing places and use those photographs in a media outlet that would
make anyone want to visit them. But
let’s clear the air here, the Forest Service really just wants us to pay if we
are using models, you know, like your
mom or kids in the photos at Glacier
National Park. Which means “selfies”
should be okay. They really just want
to be paid if say “State Farm” wants
to film a commercial where Yellowstone buffalo scare a couple teenagers
in a car. However, wording on the
current re-writing of the photo rules
inside Federal Forest Service lands is
rather vague and has a lot of wilderness photographers, myself included,
a little on edge.
I don’t know about you, but I
often stumble on movie scenes being
shot, and nude model composites
being photographed as I am hiking, fishing and photographing in
the backcountry. I can see why the
Federal Forest Service would want
to monitor and charge extra money
for these acts in order to limit them
from being so problematic. So the
phrase “Click it or Ticket” might not
just apply to wearing your seatbelt
any longer in Michigan, it could also
apply to taking photos on Federal
Forest Property. Which, I thought was
property that belonged to all of us. I
totally understand why they would
want a piece of the millions I’ve
made having my images published or
sold in galleries. I just hope they use
the extra money to put toilet paper
back in the outhouses.

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Shame on the author for posting an image that would make you want to visit the
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Click it or ticket:

Hot Topics In The Outdoors...

109

Reader Trail Cam Photos
Send your Reader Trail-Cam Photos to:
wnw@pageone-inc.com

Joe Lunkas sent us this photo of what calls his yard doe. Here Joe says the yard doe is
giving one of her fawns a hug. This particular doe has produced 11 fawns since Joe has
been watching her.

Rob Weller has another interesting photo of nice young buck
who seems to be sticking his tongue out at something. You just
never know what the camera is going to catch next.

Webb Wood, a regular
contributor from Atlanta,
Michigan has a couple of
very nice bucks for us
this month. These bucks
were caught on trail cam
just north of Atlanta.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

DAn Sopinski of Redford captured these two great bucks on
trail cam in mid-Michigan on his hunting property. Dan tells us
this is only two of many bucks in that area. Good Luck!

110

Lauren Trainor of Bellevue captured these nice
young bucks on trail cam in late September.

Larry Piotrowski of Troy captured this Oakland County monster buck on trail cam. Larry described this buck as a brute and we here at Woods-N-Water News would have to agree.

Jeff Eibling got this enormous spike on
trail cam in September in Isabella county.
It is the biggest spike we have seen in a
long time.

Ray Androl captured this photo of a black bear near Harrison. Here the bear is eyeballing a
feeder that was eventually destroyed. Most likely by this fella.

Joe Henry caught this bobcat on trail cam in Ogemaw county as it strolled by his camera set.

Tom Spillane of St. Helen captured this trail cam
picture of a black bear taking a break on the edge of
a swamp.

Bob Westphal
of Alma captured this interesting trail
cam of a piebald whitetail.
He mentioned
he thought our
readers would
enjoy seeing
this unique
deer.

Sometimes there simply isn’t a need to offer a caption with
photos. We think this is one of them. Thanks for sending in this
trail cam photo Mike Kusmack.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Curt Kuipers sent us this photo of a mother caring for
her young fawn on trail cam. A great photo.

111

MDNR’s 2014
Michigan Deer
Hunting Prospects
By Brent Rudolph, Wildlife Research Specialist
Ashley Autenrieth, Northern Regions Deer Biologist

T

he leading reason many
individuals participate in deer
hunting is simply the opportunity to spend time outdoors
with friends and family, but
actually harvesting a deer
is still very important to many deer
hunters. No amount of hunting guarantees a harvest, but preparation and
hard work are keys to producing the
best chance to see and take deer, or to
mentor a new hunter through a safe
and enjoyable season. The 2014 deer
season is expected to be a successful
year for many hunters, and as always,
will certainly offer the exciting challenge we call ‘hunting’.
Persistence can pay off for deer
hunters. Nationwide, successful

deer hunters hunt an average of 18
days – slightly more than the average of about 14 days that Michigan
deer hunters spent afield last year.
However, chances for success are
greatest for those who are prepared.
Part of hunting preparations each
year includes becoming familiar with
the most recent regulations. The deer
website of the Michigan Department
of Natural Resources (DNR) – www.
michigan.gov/deer – provides highlights of regulation changes, information about deer management, and
links to additional resources, such as
a list of deer check stations. Please
refer to the 2014 Hunting and Trapping Digest and Antlerless Digest,
available at DNR Operations Service

The average Michigan deer hunter spent about 14 days afield last year. Robert Peltz photo

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Centers, license vendors, or available
in electronic formats through links at
this site, for a map of all Deer Management Units (DMUs) and other
regulation details.
Some successful hunting trips are
just a result of being in the right place
at the right time. Overall, deer activity tends to be highest a few weeks
prior to breeding. The peak of breeding activity for Michigan deer generally occurs just prior to the opening
of the firearm deer season. These
peak breeding dates are earliest in
the southern Lower Peninsula, except
that many does in the region that
were born just this spring will already
conceive their first fawns this year.
Those breeding events for young does
often occur a month or more later
than they do for older deer, often not
until mid-December. Hunters often
seek to take advantage of these times
of high deer movements, so archery
hunting activity is often highest in
late October and early November,
followed by the busiest deer hunting
day of the year -- the opening of the
firearm season. In southern Michigan,
another late period of deer activity can
occur several weeks prior to the late
breeding events among young does,
which can coincide with the end of the
firearm season.

What To Expect Statewide
The 2013 season saw a drop in
deer harvest in the majority of the
Midwestern United States, and Michi-

gan was not an exception. Hunting
success decreased somewhat across
the state; though a little more than 4
out of every 10 hunters were still able
to take home at least one deer last
season. The biggest decreases in deer
harvest occurred in the upper and
southern lower peninsulas. The Upper
Peninsula experienced a severe and
prolonged winter in 2012, and deer
harvest was expected to decline as a
result. Areas in the Southern Lower
Peninsula were still recovering from
the Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease
outbreak that occurred in the summer
of 2012. More restrictive regulations along with lower than typical
deer populations led to fewer antlerless deer in particular being taken in
southern Michigan.
The winter of 2013 started
early and continued late into spring
throughout most of the state. Record
low temperatures and above average
snowfall made for difficult conditions for deer, most notably in the
Upper Peninsula. Some areas may
see decreased numbers of fawns and
yearlings as a result but overall there
appears to be good survival throughout much of the Lower Peninsula
regions.
The 2014 deer season is forecasted to have similar success rates to
last year. Please see below for more
detailed information about the area
you hunt and what to expect. Though,
this may help to get you started with
what to look for there is no substitute for scouting. The opportunity to

find out which trees are producing,
what deer trails are being utilized
and what patterns deer are following
this year is priceless information for
a deer hunter. So, whether your goal
is to get meat in the freezer, go for a
wall hanger or simply get outdoors,
Michigan’s deer seasons offer something for everyone. Best of luck to
you hunters and have a wonderful and
safe deer season.

Upper Peninsula
The Upper Peninsula (UP) has experienced back to back severe winters
over the last two years. This has led
to decreased deer numbers throughout the region with losses occurring
most notably in this year’s fawns and
yearlings. Biologists recommended
closing all public land and all but
three private land deer management
units for antlerless licenses this year
in order to allow deer numbers to rebound over the next three years. The
three units currently open for private
land antlerless licenses are located
in the south central portion of the
UP which typically has higher deer
populations than anywhere else in
the UP. Antlerless permits are available in Deer Management Units: 055
(Menominee), 122 (Norway), and 155
(Gladstone).
The production of mast (fruit
and nuts) in the UP has been low
throughout much of the region this
year. There is some acorn and apple
production but it is spotty throughout

Whether your goal is to get meat in the freezer, go for a wall hanger or simply get outdoors, Michigan’s deer seasons offer something for everyone.
the region so hunters will need to
scout in order to find these areas. Although mast production was low this
year there was enough rain and heat
to have a productive growing season
giving deer many other food sources
to seek out.
In general, hunters should expect
to see fewer deer, especially in the
younger age classes (fawns and yearlings). Always keep in mind that each
area is influenced by local factors and
conditions that affect deer density
and sightings in that area. The largest
bucks (heaviest and largest antlers)
typically come from agricultural
areas, but nice bucks are also taken
from forested areas where access is
limited and they have an opportunity
to get older.

Northern Lower Peninsula
The deer population for the
Northern Lower Peninsula (NLP) is
expected to be similar to last year.
Even with the severe winter this past
year deer in the NLP came through it
in fair to good conditions.

2014 Deer Prospects page 114

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113

2014 Deer prospects:
from page 113
Deer sightings have been good
throughout the region and many have
reported seeing healthy fawns including many sets of twins. Though it
appears some deer may have been
lost due to the severe winter the main
impacts observed from winter will
likely be smaller body size and antlers rather than lower populations.
Mast production (fruits and nuts)
has been good throughout the region.
High production of acorns, apples
and beechnuts has been reported.
Deer should be targeting these areas
frequently. Scouting to find these
areas will be very important. Contacting your local wildlife office may be
a good first step; they may be able to
give you insight as to which areas are
producing.
Expect to see similar deer numbers to last year throughout most of
the NLP. Many areas may see more
2.5 year old bucks this year as well
since a number of NLP counties began a 3 point antler point restriction
last year which allowed the majority
of 1.5 year old bucks to mature to
the next age class this year. All NLP
Deer Management Units are open for
antlerless hunting so be sure to look

in the 2014 Antlerless Deer Digest
if you are interested in obtaining an
antlerless license.

Southern Lower Peninsula
Abundant food and cover in the
form of agricultural crops and scattered swamps and woodlots provide
very good habitat across the southern
Michigan landscape. This high quality habitat, combined with relatively
mild winter conditions, typically
results in a more abundant and productive deer population compared to
other regions of the state.
Over the last decade or more, deer
population estimates and indices (including deer/vehicle collisions, crop
damage complaints, and observations
of deer by the hunting community
and field staff) in the Southern Lower
Peninsula have stabilized or declined.
In many instances, reductions were
intended to reduce conflicts that can
occur when deer populations are high,
though the Department still desires
to keep adequate deer for enjoyable
hunting and viewing experiences. Repeated outbreaks of Epizootic Hem-

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cycle will last three years in length,
with the first occurring from 2014–
2016. The goal of multi- year regulations is to establish consistency.
This consistency will reduce
confusion among hunters, give biologists the opportunity to evaluate the
impacts that regulations are having,
and provide more time for developing
predictions and generating input on
proposed new regulations. Regulations may still be changed within the
cycle under emergency conditions –
such as in response to a severe winter
or disease outbreak – but the stability
of a multi-year approach should be a
benefit to hunters and wildlife managers alike.

New License Package
In 2013 the Michigan Legislature
passed a new license package that
increased hunting and fishing license
fees for the first time in over 15 years.
These increases will help to increase
conservation efforts across Michigan
including increased habitat work,
improvements to our retail sales
system, promotion of Michigan’s
long tradition of hunting and fishing,
and a greater number of Conservation
Officers in the field. Under this new
license structure there is no longer
a single archery and single firearm
license. Instead, there is a new single

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114

orrhagic Disease (EHD), however,
have also occurred over this period.
Though individual EHD outbreak
sites affect deer at the scale of a
township or smaller, these outbreaks
have likely produced more variability in deer densities across southern
Michigan than has occurred in many
years. Populations in a number of
locations are likely now at or closer
to goal than they have been for some
time and in some cases deer population should be increased. Management efforts are now being directed
towards distinct areas at a smaller
scale than larger, regional regulations
and Deer Management Units that
were formerly in place. Research is
underway to improve understanding
of the duration of EHD impacts that
hunters and landowners should expect
to see where outbreaks have occurred.
Given the higher proportion of land
in private ownership in this region,
and the often small property sizes, the
Department is working to find more
ways to support good deer harvest
and habitat management decisions
among networks of private landowners and hunters.

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deer license valid throughout archery,
firearm and muzzleloader seasons, or
as an alternative there is a deer combo
license, which includes two kill tags,
one regular and one restricted.
Hunters who want the opportunity to harvest two bucks must buy
the deer combo license instead of the
single deer license. An antlered deer
harvested with the restricted tag of
the deer combo license must have
at least 4 antler points on one side,
while the unrestricted tag is only
subject to antler point restrictions in
some individual Deer Management
Units. See below, as well as pages 32
& 33 in the 2014 Hunting and Trapping Digest at www.michigan.gov/
hunting for additional information.
Antlerless licenses also continue to be
available based on quotas established
for each Deer Management Unit.
Among the most significant
changes affecting deer hunters, a base
license is now required for hunters of
any game species. The purchase of
a base license includes small game
hunting privileges at a reduced price
compared to previous years. Whether
they choose to hunt small game or
not, hunters’ base license dollars

h incredible
ear up wit

vings
year-end sa

will be used to enhance and expand
hunting opportunities, which benefits
hunters of all species. Deer hunters
that may have overlooked small game
hunting in the past should consider
the benefits of scouting for a prime
deer hunting spot while participating
in the opportunity that now comes
with your base license. For more
information about deer licenses and
the base license please refer to pages
8 and 31 in the 2014 Hunting and
Trapping Digest.

DMUs For Southern Michigan
A number of new Deer Management Unit (DMU) boundaries were
established for Southern Michigan
starting with the 2013 deer season.
DMU 486, which formerly encompassed most of Hunting and Trapping
Zone 3, was dissolved into several
smaller DMUs. Most all DMUs follow county lines, though some consist
of multi-county units. This is still
the case in 2014, with the creation of
only a single new DMU 312, consist-

A number of different antler point restrictions have been implemented in
Michigan in recent years. Be sure to double check the regulations. MDNR photo

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The perfect gift for
every outdoorsman on
your Christmas list!

Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy  Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays

Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy  Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays ~ Happy Holidays

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2014 Deer prospects:
from page 115

Where To Hunt
As any deer hunter knows deer
are not stationary animals, they are
constantly moving to new places and
just as often, they are returning to
familiar spots. Michigan’s deer herd
is no exception. It is spread out across
the state and often, locally pocketed
in areas with the best habitat and
resources available. For this reason
there is no better way to locate deer
than by getting out on the landscape
and scouting. Learning where this
year’s deer trails are, finding which
oak trees are producing acorns and
discovering where a group is bedding
down each night are often the keys
to a successful hunt. Michigan also
offers a number of online interactive
tools such Mi-HUNT, an interactive
web application located at www.
michigan.gov/mihunt, to help you
hone in on good habitat and potential
spots. If you find yourself short on
time these tools are an excellent way
to save some time and narrow down
your selection.

Antler Point Restrictions
A number of different antler point
restrictions, or APRs, have been
implemented in Michigan in recent
years, and other areas have received

consideration for APRs. There are
no new APR areas or regulations in
Michigan for the 2014 season, and no
proposals are currently being considered for implementation in the next
few seasons. The new license package, however, does add some new
considerations by simplifying how
some existing APRs apply. Specifically, within the “Hunter’s Choice”
APR areas of the Upper Peninsula
and DMU 487 in the bovine tuberculosis zone, the single deer license is
only subject to APRs in a few individual, smaller DMUs. Antlered deer
taken in the “Hunter’s Choice” APR
areas using the unrestricted tag of the
combo deer license must have at least
3 antler points on one side. An antlered deer harvested anywhere within
Michigan using the restricted tag of
the deer combo license – including
within the “Hunter’s Choice” APR
areas – must have at least 4 antler
points on one side.
See the 2014 Hunting and Trapping Digest at www.michigan.gov/
hunting pages 32 & 33 for complete
information on these regulations. You
may also visit the APR Corner page
located at www.michigan.gov/deer
for more information and history on
APRs in Michigan.

Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease
EHD has not been confirmed or
reported anywhere in Michigan this
year. Michigan EHD outbreaks were
confirmed in 7 of the last 9 years, primarily in Southern Michigan. In some
areas, deer populations are still recov-

No amount of hunting guarantees a harvest, but preparation and hard work
are keys to producing the best chance to see and take deer.
ering from past outbreaks. In 2012,
deer die-offs from EHD occurred in
30 counties across the Lower Peninsula, with 14,898 deer reported dead.
In 2013, laboratory confirmation
only diagnosed EHD in 7 deer in 6
counties, with total losses likely only
including several hundred deer. For
more information on EHD, visit
www.michigan.gov/wildlifedisease.

Bovine Tuberculosis
In the northeast Lower Peninsula
the prevalence of TB continues to
be on a downward trend for the long
term but has remained at the same
levels in the population over the last
seven years. Hunters are still strongly
encouraged to harvest antlerless deer
to help maintain reduced deer numbers and keep TB in check. Older
antlered deer should also be harvested
and are especially important to take to

a check station, as these animals are
more likely to contract TB. Bringing
in a deer or deer head to a checkstation for testing allows us to track
the prevalence of the disease in the
population and is an integral part to
eventually eradicating the disease.
In 2013 a dairy herd in Saginaw
County tested positive for Bovine
Tuberculosis. There is no evidence of
TB in deer near this location, but it
is important to continue to test deer
in this area to accurately assess the
situation.
We encourage anyone hunting in
the following counties to please bring
your deer head in for testing: Alcona,
Alpena, Arenac, Bay, Cheboygan,
Crawford, Genesee, Gratiot, Huron,
Iosco, Midland, Montmorency, Ogemaw, Oscoda, Otsego, Presque Isle,
Roscommon, and Saginaw.
For more information on these and
other wildlife health issues go to:
www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases.n

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

ing of Kalamazoo, St. Joseph, and
Branch counties. Please consult the
2014 antlerless digest at:
www.michigan.gov/hunting for more
information.

117

The Hartford and Novelty

MINNOW F L O A T S

The First Tow Behind
Minnow Buckets

F

ishing was a lot different in
1905. Anglers could only
choose between simple fly
reels or casting reels, and
fishing rods were made either
from several different species of wood
or from Calcutta cane. Lures were
primarily metal spoons and spinners
as wood lures were just starting to
be manufactured. The most popular
method of catching fish was still using
live bait - primarily worms and night
crawlers dug from the garden or a
compost pile or with minnows trapped
or seined in a nearby stream or lake.
Anglers carried their minnows in
wood or metal buckets found around
the home or the farm, or they could
purchase round tin-plated minnow
buckets from their local hardware or
sporting goods store. They also rowed
their fishing boats, because outboard
motors had yet to be developed.
Innovations started
coming quickly during this
period. A better glue for
bamboo rods was developed,
rod ferrules, guides and reel
seats were improved, and
rods with better actions were
designed. The anti-backlash
mechanism and
the star drag for
casting reels
were invented,
both major improvements for the freshwater angler.
The revolution in wood lures transformed the fishing world by adding
great new lures that not only caught
more fish but also captured the interest
of anglers. New lure manufacturers
sprung up to meet the demand creat-

The Shinners-Russell Hartford Minnow Float patented in 1905 was the first tow behind minnow bucket. And the close up of an
oval brass plate on top of the front cone. Author photos
ing many new jobs.
The introduction of Charles Waterman’s “Porto” gas powered single-cylinder rowboat motor in 1906 started
the fledgling outboard motor industry
and the way sportsmen
powered their boats. And a
little known invention from
Hartford, Wisconsin in 1905
changed the way fisherman
carried their minnows when
William Shinners applied for
a patent for an “improved
bait receptacle” on July 26,
1905. Patent #807875 was
granted on December 19, 1905
and production
of the ShinnersRussell Hartford
Minnow Float apparently started
quickly. This torpedo-shaped minnow
container was not intended to be carried in a rowboat and then hung over
the side but towed behind the boat as
the angler quietly rowed from spot to
spot keeping the minnows aerated and

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Sporting Collectibles
By Terry McBurney

lively.
William Shinners’ torpedo-shaped
design was revolutionary. It combined
two end air chambers with a ballasted
bottom, which kept the minnow float
upright and partially submerged as it
was pulled through the water. It held
the same amount of minnows as a
standard 10-qt. minnow bucket within
its uniquely designed center chamber.
The enclosed front portion protected
the minnows from rough water while
the rear chamber had perforated holes
all around the cylinder allowing for a
constant exchange of fresh water. The
minnows were accessed through an
easy-to-open self-locking top cover,
and the entire minnow float could
be picked up and carried by the wire
handle.
There are many similarities to
Shinners’ 1905 design and the number one selling minnow bucket in the
U.S. today, Frabill’s yellow and white
Flow Troll minnow bucket. Both
were designed to be pulled behind the
boat and balanced to keep the bucket

118 This may be the only surviving example of the 7 ½-ft. Hartford Storage Minnow Float. Howard Harlan collection

upright with the bait door facing up,
all the time aerating the minnows with
fresh water.
William Shinners was born on
August 9, 1859 in the small farming
community of Erin, Wisconsin located
a little over thirty miles northwest of
downtown Milwaukee. He married
Hannah Garvey in 1880 and apparently stayed on the farm until the Shinners family moved to nearby Hartford
in 1897 where he was employed by
the Portz Brothers Malt and Grain
Company, a business selling malt,
grains and hops to the beer industry.
The following year, Shinners was
elected sheriff of Washington County,
Wisconsin, a position that came with
a new home for the family in West
Bend, Wisconsin. They lived in the
sheriff’s home, which was attached to
the two-story jailhouse. The sheriff’s
home was equipped with “a hot air
furnace, water, sewer and piping” not a bad benefit! The growing family
moved again to nearby Thompson,
Wisconsin in 1900 where he ran a
store. The 1905 Wisconsin State Census shows the Shinners family again
living in Hartford listing his occupation as “Capitalist”. He was re-elected
as County Sheriff in 1906, again
living in West Bend in the sheriff’s
home.
During this period, he also found
time to design a sophisticated minnow float, apply for a patent and then
promote it to the hardware trade. One
newspaper account dated March 6,
1906 was headlined “GET’S MANY
ORDERS - William Shinners returned
last Saturday from Minneapolis where
he had been to attend the three-day
convention of the Minnesota Hardware Men’s Association. The trip was
made by Mr. Shinners in the inter-

The dark green Novelty Minnow
Float was made from japanned
tinplate and is the rarest of the two
models. Randy Spagnoli collection
ing the Hartford Storage Float shows
a painted float presumably in a dark
green. The retail in 1907 was “$16
each, shipped from the factory, F.O.B.
Hartford, Wis.”
I have only found one 1907 flyer
showing both the Hartford Minnow
Float and the Hartford Storage Float,
which is shown on page 421 of the
“The Fishing Lure Collector’s Bible”
and only one undated ad for the Hartford Storage Float. I have not found
any hardware wholesale catalogs that

ally made the Hartford Minnow Float
for William Shinners?
The answer is most likely the
Geuder and Paeschke Manufacturing
Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin,
one of the major manufacturers of tinware, porcelain and galvanized products for the home and the farm and
located only thirty-nine miles from
Hartford. They were well known for
their brand name “Cream City” products, but they also contracted with
wholesalers and larger retailers for

An early ad promoting both models of Geuder and Paeschke’s Novelty
Minnow Floats.
promoted the Hartford Minnow Float
either. Regardless of the lack of ads,
there are a surprising number of them
that show up at antique shows, auctions and in collections, so William
Shinners was successful getting them
out into the market and selling his
invention.
The second question is who actu-

products manufactured under these
other companies’ house brands. They
were also the largest manufacturer of
minnow buckets, bait containers and
tackle boxes during this period.
The 1907 Geuder and Paeschke
catalog lists thirty different styles
and sizes of minnow buckets ranging from the tiny 1-qt. minnow and

The light green version of the
Novelty Minnow Float was made of
japanned galvanized iron. Photo
courtesy of Lang’s Auctions, Inc.

frog bucket to 6-qt., 8-qt., 10-qt. and
12-qt. round and oval models made
from japanned tinplate and japanned
galvanized iron. The featured minnow
bucket in their 1907 catalog was the
Novelty Minnow Float, their version
of the tow behind minnow bucket.
The Novelty Minnow Float had some
differences as compared to the Hartford. It measured 24-inches in length
by 7 ½-inches in diameter, so it was
4-inches shorter.
Its self-locking lid had an added
round knob to make it easier to open
or close. The Novelty was finished
with fancy embellishments and lettering similar to other Cream City
minnow buckets, and it was available
in two models. The first was a version made from dark green japanned
tinplate and embellished with gold
and silver decorations. It sold for $1
wholesale. The second model was
made from a lighter green japanned
galvanized iron and trimmed with
gold and silver decorations. It sold
for $1.20 wholesale. A “japanned”
finish was enamel or lacquer used
to produce a durable glossy finish
applied initially over tinplated steel
and later over galvanized iron. The
Novelty Minnow Float continued to
be cataloged through 1914, which is
the last Geuder and Paeschke catalog
I have found so far. I also have found
mail order catalogs that list the Novelty Minnow Float through the 1919
and 1920.
William Shinners patented the
Hartford Minnow Float in 1905, and
was out promoting it to the hardware
trade at least by March 1906. The
Novelty Minnow Float shows up
in the Geuder and Paeschke 1907
catalog, so their production must have
started sometime in 1906. My best
guess is that the two companies came
to an agreement with Geuder and
Paeschke manufacturing the Hartford
for William Shinners, as well as paying him a royalty for every Novelty
Minnow Pail they sold.
I would like to thank Howard
Harlan, Randy Spagnoli, and Debbie
and John Ganung, Lang’s Auctions,
Inc. for allowing me to use photographs from their collections and
auctions.
Feel free to contact me at antiquefishing@comcast.net with your
questions. Photographs are important,
so please send them. They help with
identification and give an idea of the
condition of the item.n

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

est of his minnow float, and he was
successful beyond his expectations
in introducing it. He took with him
a large tank in which the merits of
the float were demonstrated…While
at the convention, Mr. Shinners took
over 125 orders for the float…” The
Minnow Float sold for $2.50 retail.
The business was named The
Shinners-Russell Company of Hartford, Wisconsin, and they apparently promoted just two products.
The first was the Hartford Minnow
float, which weighed 3 ¼-pounds and
measured 28-inches end to end and
7-inches in diameter. It was made
from galvanized iron and painted
green, though many surviving Hartford Minnow Floats show almost no
trace of the original paint, only the
galvanized metal. Did the original
green paint not adhere well to the
galvanized surface, or was the green
paint worn away after years of being
trolled behind a boat?
Each Hartford Minnow Float had
an oval brass plate on top of the front
cone that read:
HARTFORD MINNOW FLOAT
Pat’d, Dec. 19, 1905
By
Wm. Shinners
Hartford, Wis.
The company also marketed a
second product that is so rare that I
know of only one surviving example.
This was the Hartford Storage Float,
which looked like the smaller Hartford Minnow Float in design but was
super-sized for use by resort owners
to store their minnows. It measured
7 ½-ft. long by 18-inches in diameter and according to the 1907 flyer
would hold 2,000 minnows! The flyer
went on to describe that “it can be
anchored out in the lake or stream
where the water is always cool and
fresh” and that “the storage float
would pay for itself in a month”. A
undated black and white ad promot-

119

Good Hunting By Babe Winkleman

Learning from the October “Lull”

A

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

s a hunter, you put hours,
days, weeks, and even months
into preparing for opening day
of archery season. Well now
that cooler weather is arriving
and leaves are changing colors, so are
a whitetails pattern. Many refer to this
time period as the October lull. Those
whitetails you had patterned out at the
end of summer, have moved to differ-

120

ent areas, leaving you scratching your
head.
A few factors that change a
whitetails pattern when October rolls
around are; food, cover, and hunting
pressure itself. The first factor is food.
Deer are no longer feeding at the same
food source evening after evening,
which means whitetails have changed
what is on the menu for a tasty meal.

Agricultural crops like soy beans and
corn are beginning to be harvested,
which only leaves deer to feed on the
remnants that are left behind. But a
major factor when it comes to food
is that acorns are falling from the
trees, allowing deer to feed in the
safety of cover. With that said, the
second factor is cover. As leaves fall
and the woods become bare, deer

will seek out new bedding areas that
provided more security in regards to
cover. The last factor is hunting pressure. Many of you have been in and
out of the woods in hopes of tagging
a early season buck, which deer can
start to sense. Also, other hunting
seasons are taking place during this
time, which can add unwanted pressure in the woods, alerting deer. These
changing factors combined to create
the theory of the October lull.
Do not let this discourage you
and keep you on the couch at home.
Trust me, the deer have not disappeared, they have been adjusting and
changing their previous patterns. This
means you have to continue learning
and figuring out where these deer have
shifted too. With that said, here are a
few things I like to do when battling
the October lull. I like to scout from
a distance trying to locate the areas
the deer have moved to. This means
glassing new fields or clearings from
roads or access trails to locate current
travel paths. It is important to keep
out of the woods and scout from a
distance to keep pressure to a minimum. Secondly, I keep in mind when
I am in and out of the woods between
sits is to keep my eyes open searching the forest floor to locate acorns. I
try to locate them on my way in and
out of the stand to limit the pressure
being put on the deer. It is important
to note that all oak trees are not created equal as deer prefer acorns form
white oaks as they have a lower tannic
acid content, making them less bitter.
Although deer will turn to acorns
from red oaks as they remain edible
far longer than acorns from white
oaks, especially if they cannot find
white acorns. Finally, I think outside
the box. By this I mean, grunting from
time to time along with some soft
rattling as these behaviors are not that
uncommon in the month of October.
Also, I like to use estrous scent
during some sits in hopes of attracting
a buck looking for a doe early in the
season.
To be successful during the month
of October you will definitely be
facing adversity. Think outside the
box and be aware that with so many
changes happening at once you have
to be ready to change your hunting
rituals, allowing you to try new things.
Keep at it and sooner than later an
opportunity will present itself, leaving
you with a true reward.n

Woods-N-Water News Classified Section
MISC.

A TEMPUR-PEDIC MEMORY
FOAM MATTRESS SET.
Clean. Never used. As seen on TV.
Cost $1700. Sell for $695. 989-8322401. M-4-TFN
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AN
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LOG
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for $275. 989-923-1278.
M-4-TFN
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AMISH LOG BEDS, ANY
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$199. Good quality. Lowest prices in
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LOG BUNK BEDS. $495. Amish
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FOR SALE
MEAT GRINDER 1 ½ hp
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block and new/used butcher knives
(will separate) Best Offer 313-5700709. FS-11-1
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WANTED

FISHING

HUNTING

HUNTING

ANIMAL
TRAPS
WANTED: Mouse to bear, all
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trade related items. 989-7361155. W-9-4

SEASONAL
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5 day bow camp, 5 day rifle
camp, 5 day black powder
camp. 5 day lake house (with
family) $2000 for all 20 days.
Call for details 586-260-0719.
H-10-2

DEER HUNT. Saganing River Club. Bucks, 100 pt., private,
have cabin to stay in. Lots of
game. High success rate. Call
989-846-6228. H-8-4

WANTED - Winchesters pre 64,
Model 71s, 86s, 64s and Model 70s.
Call Don at 231-499-9891. W-11-3
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TIMBER: Buying all types of timber, 5 acres or more, top price paid.
Cash in advance. Improve wildlife
habitat. Patco Forest Products, 989539-7588 after 6 p.m. W-4-12-14
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CITY                                           STATE                      ZIP
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$30.25

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Enclosed is $                                               for
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FISHING CLASS OFFERS CLOSURE: Just
looking at that maze of tackle
you "sense" spontaneously,
virtually unerringly, how each
individual component affects
the fish audibly as well as visually, and defensively as well
as offensively. Capable now of
readily adapting to any situation, not only do you feel justified in having accumulated all
those tackle boxes full of stuff,
but even about adding more
stuff to them. No longer needing to travel miles on end to
experience top notch success
while targeting any specie we
choose, ultimately we wind up
fishing more, enjoying it more.
If you've sensed that this is how
angling could and should be,
should our instinctive approach
be followed to the letter, this is
how it can be. All species, all
baits, all presentations, all in
one session, all for as little as
$45 per person. For further details 810-395-4334 Mon.-Sat. 9
am – 7 pm. Instructor Larry R.
Walter, Sr. F-TFN

HUNTING
HUNT DEER ON A PRIVATE
RANCH-just east of Frankenmuth,
Michigan. Thinning out our herd of
Fallow and Sitka deer-too many to
feed! Call for cheap hunt pricing!
Cell-989-233-4890-please leave a
message, your call will be returned!
H-10-2
................................................

ADDRESS

(7)

SPEARING SUPPLIES - Ice
saws, pike & muskie spears, bunny
boots & Pike Busters, the battery
powered decoy system.
www.dream-outdoors.com
F-11-4
................................................

BOX MY CLASSIFIED - $5 Extra

HUNT THE U.P. THIS
FALL - for bear in the Newberry or Baraga BMU late season. Deer hunt September, October, November in Schoolcraft
County. Possible wolf hunt.
Don't miss out! 231-620-0398
Credit Card Accepted. H-10-2
NORTHERN
ONTARIO
BEAR HUNTS: Booking now for
fall of 2015. Includes comfortable
cabin, boat and motor, baited stands.
Very experienced guides. High success rate. References on request.
$960 U.S. 705-869-3272 or fax 705869-6537 www.texasandsons.com
H-10-12-14

TROPHY ELK HUNT. Private ranch. Elk management
area. Section 36 Bay Count.
Cabin. 70% success rate. Call
989-846-6228 nights. H-8-4

WHITETAIL
DEER
HUNTS: October & November trophy hunts and a few
management and doe
hunts are still available. Beautiful 560 acre
preserve with lodging, food
and license included! This is
a great hunt! Call to book now!
231-873-1688 H-10-2
DUCK HUNTING - Saginaw Bay,
Sebewaing, Michigan. All day blind
rental. Decoys set and picked. Shuttled to and from blinds, $80 per person. $240.00 minimum per blind.
Lodging available. Call Gary Zellar
989-673-5614. H-10-2
................................................
DEVILS CREEK YOOPER HUNTING LODGE,
U.P. Menominee County,
Michigan Upper Peninsula,
now leasing for 2014 Whitetail
hunting season. Semi-guided,
5-day hunts with accommodations. Beautiful 400 acre active
farm. Many, new cedar blinds
overlooking lush food plots.
Dozens of treestands. $1,000
per hunt. Please call Sandra
313-410-2204 H-11-1
ELK HUNT. Northern Michigan. We have 10 club permits.
Cows or bulls. Crop damage
area. Ranch phone 989-8466228. DNR inspects heads.
H-8-4

TROPHY
WHITETAIL
HUNTS AVAILABLE in
Southern Ohio. We have limited openings for a 7 day firearm
hunt for trophy class whitetails.
Your hunt will be semi-guided,
takes place on over 3500 private acres and offers high success rates to harvest a great
buck. This hunt takes place December 1 - December 7, 2014.
Please contact Anthony Best at
810-223-4587.
H-10-2

DEER HUNTS. Mackinac &
Chippewa Counties. $175 per person, per day. Gun or bow. Includes
food, lodging and baited spots.
Eastlakeoutfitters.com H-5-8
................................................

WHITETAIL
DEER
HUNTS - limited amount doe
hunt $250. Management buck
$450. Mid-range buck $800
to $1500. Trophy buck starting at $2500. 989-732-2978.
www.thegrandviewranch.com.
H-11-2
HUNT: Russian Hogs, Stoker
Hogs, Rams, Fallows, Sika
Bucks and Whitetail Bucks.
Trophy Ranch, 989-658-8634
or
www.trophyranch.com
H-11-2

ELK HUNT. Gibson Township, Bay County. Good success rate, 70% crop damage
area. We have 10 permits.
Control hunt cows or bulls. Call
989-846-6228, 9-11 at night.
H-8-4

RESORTS/RENT
FRIENDS OF GRATIOTSAGINAW STATE GAME
AREA Come check out Just
In Time Campground for your
place to stay during this year’s
Hunting Season. We are located just off of M57 on Ransom Rd and are surrounded
by State Land. We offer sites
with or without Electricity and
Hot Showers for those who
are looking for more convenient Deer Camp. The Bonus
is when you're not Hunting we
have a lake you can fish on so
you get the best of both worlds.
Call Now for your reservations
in October and November at
989-875-2865 or check out our
website at
Just-In-Time-Campground.com
R/R-10-2
LAKE FRONT CABIN ON
Grand Lake in Presque Isle County.
Two king beds, two baths, completely
furnished. Daily or weekly. 989-4644900. R/R-11-1
................................................
TRAILS END RESORT:
Big Manistique Lake, Curtis, MI
Hunting and fishing fall specials
- 2 bedroom cabins, 20% OFF
weekly rentals. 906-586-3515.
R/R-10-2
HOUSE FOR RENT in
Thumb area for hunting or fishing by the week, month or year.
Call 989-658-2292 or 989-5531116. R/R-11-1

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

MISC.

121

Woods-N-Water News Classified Section
RESORTS/RENT
LAKE LOUISE CAMP and
Retreat Center near Boyne Falls,
Michigan has two winterized lodges
available for rent. Close to snowmobile trails, geocache sites, North
Country Trail, and Boyne Mountain.
Each lodge sleeps 20 and contains
full bath facilities, refrigerator, microwave and spacious meeting room.
For more information
call 231-549-2728 or email
program@lakelouisecommunity.org
R/R-10-5
................................................
SEASONAL
ONLY
CAMPING! Private gated
paradise on Big Manistee
River. Offers large wooded
sites, full hookups, easy to
Lake Michigan beaches, Long
seasons, gorgeous newly built
sites! Coho Bend. 231-7237321.
www.cohobend.com.
R/R-3-10

HUNTING LEASE
NORTHERN MICHIGAN whitetail deer hunting ranch will be leasing
hunting land for the 2014 fall hunting
season. Limited leases available, call
for more information 989-732-2978.
www.thegrandviewranch.com HL-76
................................................
UP TO 135 ACRES Prime
deer, turkey and squirrel hunting land. Section 10, Almont
Township. $35 per acre. 517263-5579. L-11-1
5 - 80 ACRE PARCELS for
lease in Hale, MI. Excellent hunting,
abundant wildlife. Call Norm 231238-4178. HL-7-6
................................................

REAL ESTATE
HUNTERS, “JUST LAND
SALES” is Here to Help You Find
& Purchase Your Hunting Land Just
Land Sales 586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.justlandsales.com 11-1
................................................

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

160 ACRES - Mt. Forrest
Twp. Property is 1800 x 3840
+_ with 1800 frontage on Mt.
Forrest Rd. 12 Miles West of
Pinconning Michigan 100%
Virgin hunting property with all
Mineral Rights. The property
is Mixed trees and never harvested. Available immediately
at $280,000 Call 989-980-7560
or 989-659-3373. RE-9-3

122

123 ACRES – Wooded Deer
Camp, 4 miles of Groomed RV Trails,
& Bunk House, 95% Wooded,
1329x4043 Possible Split, Paris Twp.
Huron County, $330,000
Just Land Sales 586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

320 ACRES of choice hunting land 30 min. north of Escanaba. Nice 700 sq. ft. cabin.
Ten blinds, some with heat.
Five acres of planted food
plots. Timber sale potential.
Call Dave Siegers. 616-4142695. RE-10-3

40
SQUARE
WOODED
ACRES, 2 Rd. Frontages,
Excellent Hunting, and a Creek Too.
1320 x 1320 – 90% Wooded
Burnside Twp, Lapeer County
$119,000 Just Land Sales
586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................

ALCONA COUNTY Black River, 139 ft. frontage, 3
bedroom home, 2 car attached
garage., 1 1/4 baths, fireplace
with insert, Lake Huron access,
2 blocks away. Salmon, trout,
walleye. $99,500. 989-3487355. RE-10-3

FOR SALE: EATON RAPIDS
- $149,900 Wildlife Enthusiasts will
love this 1,618 sq. ft. home on 33.15
acres! 3 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, family room with stone fireplace, den, 1st
floor laundry, 1 1/2 car detached
garage, outbuildings and more.
Wooded land with wildlife galore. Call
Duane Ross at 663-4500. Ross &
Assoc. Realtors, L.L.C. RE-11-1
................................................
HARSENS ISLAND, 35 ACRES
- adjacent to stateland on one side
3000 ft of paved road frontage, good
deer hunting. $229,900. Advantage
Realty, Patrick Smith 586-598-1400.
RE-11-1
................................................

CLARE COUNTY – Majestic "Maple Island Log Home"
with fireplace, deck, covered
porch, guest cabin, huge pole
barn and 20 wooded acres
with pond. Spectacular views,
great hunting, diverse wildlife
with 98 species of song birds
documented on site! For photos and details contact Wayne
Terpening Coldwell Banker
MPR (989)772-0422 Ext. 231.
RE-11-1

115 ACRES, Three lakes, and
Gated Entry. 30% Wooded Trophy
Deer Live in the area Irregular
Shaped Lot Elba Twp. - Lapeer
County, $350,000 Just Land Sales
586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................
117 WOODED ACRES,
Tyre Rd., Ubly, Michigan, hunting cabin, well, septic, electric,
30'x40' shed, pond. www.
thumbhomes.com/362075.
Seller will split. Osentoski Realty Company, Bad Axe, Michigan 989-712-0050. RE-9-6
53 ACRES, Variety, Farmland,
Hard Woods, Meadow Grasses, &
River/Creek, 624 x 2615 irregular N.
Branch Twp., Lapeer County,
$145,000 Just Land Sales
586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................
MASON COUNTY: Beautiful log home on 110 acres with
stocked Trout pond, turkeys,
deer, snowmobile trails and
Pere Marquette river nearby.
Large pole barn with sleeping
quarters for hunters, workshop
area and room for storage.
Near Pentwater and Ludington.
231-898-4867. RE-10-2
44.44 ACRES – Unique Riverfront
Scenic Trails, with, Mill Creek’s edge
as, S/W Property Lines.530 x irregular Brockway Twp, St. Clair County,
$169,000 Just Land Sales
586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................
400 ACRES hunting land
adjacent to vacant farmland.
Upper Peninsula Delta County,
Bark River Township. One mile
off US2, easy access, near Island Casino. Small secluded
furnished cabin, generator - no
bath. Mixed lowland conifers,
cedar, hardwood. Excellent
deer, bear, turkey hunting. $750
per acre. Would consider 10
year land contract, 20% down,
8% interest. Contact Bill 989954-0101 or 989-496-2815.
RE-11-2
ONAWAY AREA: 160 acres
hunting property, mostly cedar $1200
per acre. Call Larry at 989-733-4152.
RE-11-1
................................................

GRAND
TRAVERSE
COUNTY - Paradise Township Great Hunting (deer,
turkey, small game) Indoor
deer camp w/room for your
toys 20/acre w/pole barn
14'Hx36'Wx94'L w/6" poured
concrete floor. Frontage on
Bancroft Creek - along Hwy
M 113. Power available - year
round access. 20 min from
Traverse City, 5 min from Fife
Lake. 1/2 open 1/2 wooded
Ground & elevated blinds
throughout. Close to snowmobile trails. Make this your 4 seasons Up North Getaway. Asking
$141,900 (231) 357-0757. Serious inquiries only. L/C terms
available. rweber5959@charter.net RE-7-5
BUYING OR SELLING?
Farms, vacant land or recreational
parcels throughout Michigan. Call
Doug Beasley at Faust Real Estate,
LLC 517-260-2939. RE-11-1
................................................
143 ACRES, Amazing Large
Piece. With a x-Large Pond for
Fishing 90% Wooded - Irregular
Shaped Kimball Twp. - St. Clair
County $278,000 Just Land Sales
586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................
150 ACRES Tuscola County.
4 bedroom farm house, 32 x
60 pole barn, out buildings, 2
ponds, river runs through property, food plots, blinds ready
to hunt, awesome deer and
turkey. $650 K, 586-634-5129.
RE-11-3
120
ACRE
FARM
IN
MONTMORENCY COUNTY in
northern Michigan. Previously used
as a cattle farm. Includes 4 bdrm., 3
bath, 2 story home that has had
many recent updates. Included
income from mobile home rental. 65
acres tillable. 38x100 hoop barn,
36x70 pole barn, 40x80 two story
barn,
equipment
negotiable.
Agricultural low, low Property taxes!!
$365,000 Call Diana at Faust Real
Estate, LLC 517-270-3646. F-462
RE-11-1
................................................
140 ACRES, Wooded, Rolling
Hills, Scenic Trails, Lake, Flowing
Creek, Pole Barn & Great Hunt
Camp 1990 x 2590 irregular,
Delaware Twp Sanilac County,
$449,000 Just Land Sales
586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1

32 ACRES West Branch, MI hunting cabin, pole barn, structure for
trailer electric, well, 4 enclosed hunting blinds, food plots, great hunting
property. $95,000. 248-394-0283.
RE-11-1
................................................
64 ACRES, Three Road Frontages
Nice Trails thru Most of property, &
Bridgehampton River, very Scenic
1750 x 1255 irregular, Forester Twp
Sanilac County, $192,000 Just Land
Sales 586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................
77 ACRES with very nice 3 bdrm.,
1.5 bath ranch home located in
Rogers City area of northeastern
Michigan. 16x24 building w/lean to.
Approx. 25 acres planted in hay.
Approx. 50 acres wooded. $220,000.
Call Diana at Faust Real Estate, LLC
517-270-3646. F-463 RE-11-1
................................................
MIO AREA - Log home on
75 acres. Hunting, pond and
swimming pool. Ready to move
in! North Country Realty Mio
- Jean Dilks Broker 239-2489091. RE-11-2
20 ACRES with woods located in
Hillsdale Cty. 2 BR home w/attchd
garage and outbuildings plus another
farmhouse needs some TLC. A great
price for $149,900. Immediate possession. Great Hunting. Call Nicki
Kennedy, ERA Reardon, 517-4149418 or 517-592-8326. RE-11-2
................................................
KALKASKA COUNTY: 20
wooded acres ideal hunting property,
mostly wetland. $19,900, $1,000
down, $370/mo 11% land contract,
www.northernlandco.com Northern
land Co. 231-258-5100. RE-11-1
................................................
35 ACRES – Huge Pines, Grassy
Areas, 2 Nice Ponds, Great Barn.
60% Wooded, 660 x 1320 Irregular
Wheatland Twp, Sanilac County
$129,000 Just Land Sales
586-419-6716
www.facebook.com/justlandsales
www.JustLandSales.com 11-1
................................................
GORGEOUS
160
ACRES of prime hunting
property 25 minutes north of
Midland, small cabin on site
with well, mostly wooded some
ponds. Call Tom Messinger
Ayre/Rhinehart in Midland, MI
989-631-7000 RE-10-2
4 - 80 ACRE wooded parcels.
Great deer, bear, & turkey hunting.
On Old State Rd. Hale, MI Call 989732-4049. RE-9-3

JORDAN
TOWNSHIP,
Antrim County, MI. 10 acres
hardwoods, 300 yards to the
Jordan River, trout fishing,
state land, deer hunting, rabbit, grouse, mushrooming
and snowmobile trails. Jordan
Valley, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
full partially finished walk-out
basement, screenroom overlooking pond and waterfalls
raised garden area detached, 2
car garage private road. Great
area for horses, pets, kids and
grandkids. East Jordan school
district. 231-536-7765. RE11-1
GRAYLING - 10 acres with two
living quarters. Backs to state land,
dog kennel, close to trails $67,900
248-933-8624.
Agent/Owner
RE-11-1
................................................
BUCK COUNTRY! 23.77 acres
wooded with trails surrounded by
crops. 15 different bucks have been
recorded on a trail camera this fall.
One was a 15 point. For sale east of
Mt Morris MI. $213,000.00 248-8912024. RE-11-4
................................................
DICKENSON COUNTY,
U.P. 85 beautiful acres of
farmed alfalfa fields with mixed
hardwoods with some high and
low hills which borders cedar
swamps. This also has modern
camp, indoor plumbing and loft.
Too much to list. $180,000
(negotiable)
1-586-9092317 RE-11-1
HUNTERS: 160 private acres, furnished log cabin built 1996, State
Land on three sides, Betzie River a
mile away and gated entrance. Land
Contract possible. Call Tom Taylor
(231) 499-9271 or Fred Weber (231)
631-1986. Exit Realty Paramount
803 Front St Traverse City. RE-111
................................................
RED OAK 120 ACRES- Ideal
camp for the serious deer hunters.
several food plots, stands, blinds.
Side by side cabins,, rustic cabin has
4 bdrs, wood stove, modern cabin
has 1 bd with full bth. Set up with
solar power and generator. Kubota
tractor and implements available.
$240,000. Call for photos. 989-3706317 RE-10-2

40 ACRES GOULD CITY Mi,
back 40 with bought-in easement.
Fully wooded with parking / camping
area, gated entrance with new driveway. Land is not swampy, adjoining
state land two miles from town. Great
hunting, bear, deer and birds.
Trimmed trails with blinds and feeders. Snowmobile trail head minutes
away. Asking $45,000.00 any more
questions call or e-mail Debbie
Severn. 1-989-624-4670 or ddsesuntan@aol.com RE-11-12-14
................................................
EATON COUNTY, Bellevue
Township, 82 acres hunting and fishing property. Excellent deer and turkey hunting. 3 acre pond, nice building spot for house or hunting camp.
$275,000 call 517-879-3554.
RE-10-3
................................................
ONAWAY AREA: Great deer and
bear. 80 acres, 2 bedroom cabin,
pond, electricity and well, secluded.
$150,000. Phone 989-798-1405.
RE-10-3
................................................
FOR SALE 10 ACRES hunting
land in Gladwin County with a trailer
and outhouse. In the trailer are 2
futon beds and a propane wall heater. Small stocked pond 15-20’ deep.
2-3 deer taken every year.
$39,900.00 obo. (313) 386-3882.
RE-10-2
................................................
CURRAN 160 ACRES- Fully
wooded camp with 1/2 mile on Wolf
Creek. 1985 camp has lots of charm,
over 2500 sq. ft. with 7 bds and 1.5
bths, knotty pine, wood cook stove
plus modern kitchen, vinyl siding,
steel roof. Has electric, well, septic.
Property has several blinds, equipment shed, pole barn and the old
original cabin. Call for photos. 989370-6317. $349,000. RE-10-2
................................................
49
ACRES
GLADWIN
COUNTY - Cedar River runs thru
it. Beautiful, well built cabin with
knotty pine interior. Call Ivie at Kehoe
Realty 989-426-0664. RE-10-2
................................................
FOR SALE 10 ACRES WELL
WOODED property 2 Miles from
Curtis, MI Upper Peninsula, within 2
miles of both Manistique Lake and
South Lake Manistique. Asking
$25,000 Call Randy at 989-2801126. RE-10-2
................................................
47+ ACRES NORTHEAST
PRESQUE ISLE CO. GATED
ENTRANCE TWO FOOD PLOTS
TWO GROUND BLINDS TWO TREE
STANDS DEER BEAR TURKEY
AND PARTRIDGE $45,000 989-7332114. RE-10-2

email: wnw@pageone-inc.com • website: www.woods-n-waternews.com

Woods-N-Water News Classified Section
REAL ESTATE

DOGS

DOGS

BENZIE COUNTY: 260 acres
with 2,500+ feet of Betsie River frontage. Fish, hunt , hike, swim, kayak,
and ride ATV’s on this exceptional
game rich recreational property. 75%
hardwoods, 5% cedar swamp, 20%
poplar new growth, ideal for a hunt
club $599,900. Call Bob Doriot at
Coldwell Banker Schmidt Realtors,
231-995-7446 or bobdoriot@juno.
com. RE-9-4
................................................

FDSB
REGISTERED
ENGLISH SETTER PUPS
FOR SALE. Whelped 5/28/14.
Started on Pheasant Wings. Contact
us for more info & pictures 248-2109683. D-11-1
................................................
RYMAN ENGLISH SETTER
MALE PUP, 12 wks old. Two
English pointers, male and female 14
months started. Out-right or co-ownership $350 - $650 Andy Johnson
269-279-7599 or boondocks1935@
hotmail.com
Kalamazoo area.
D-11-1
................................................
BIRD DOG TRAINING BY
HALL OF FAMER DAVID
GRUBB. Now training and hunting
dogs on wild birds. Any age – any
breed – best of care – best of food –
best of training. Only $450 per month
(everything included) 248-391-1446.
D-10-2
................................................
WE
LEAVE
IN
LATE
OCTOBER for two weeks training/
hunting in North Dakota expose your
dog/pup to hundreds of birds and
have many shot over him. Only $300
for two weeks of training with hall of
famer David Grubb. 248-391-1446.
D-10-2
................................................
SPRINGER SPANIELS: 100%
UK Championship bloodlines. Hunt,
trail or champion. OFA certified
health guaranteed. Ready 11-22-13.
$750 810-220-2708. D-11-13-13
................................................
AKC BEAGLE PUPPIES out of
champion blood line and hunting
stock. Black/Tan and Tri-Color,
$200.00 each. 989-550-3451 after 6
pm. D-10-2
................................................

BIRD DOG TRAINING IN
THE SOUTH. In late November
we leave for Selma, Alabama where
we have trained for 35 winters.
Thousands of acres to work on with
lots of wild birds. Birds shot daily.
Send your dog/pup with us for the
winter and have a dog to brag about
by spring. Discounted rates for this
trip. Call early and reserve a spot.
David Grubb 248-391-1446. D-10-3
................................................

40 ACRES hunting land. 6
miles north of Alpena off paved
road, several lakes within 5
miles. Asking $47,000. Call
810-793-7582 or 810-3584450. RE-11-1
90 ACRES WITH CABIN.
Great deer, bear, & turkey hunting.
On Old State Rd. Hale, MI
$199,900.00 Call 989-732-4049.
RE-9-3
................................................
290
ACRE
WOODED
LAKEFRONT SPORTSMEN'S
PARADISE! 2000 feet on 90 acre
clear lake. 6000 feet on great county
roads. One mile from US 23 and
Lake Huron. Three bedroom, two
baths, pole barn. Wildlife haven.
9628 Balch Road, Ocqueoc, Presque
Isle County. See it at
w w w. l a n d s o f a m e r i c a . c o m /
listing/1514845 $350,000.00 Call
Dan Davenport, Re/Max Platinum,
810-599-2141. RE-11-TFN
................................................

Classifieds Work!

DOGWOOD
KENNEL:
Complete training obedience and
field work. Working with dog and
owners to create a complete hunting
dog. If you want to hunt with your
dog, not for your dog, we can help
you. Training for AKC and F.D.S.B.
tests and trials. All hunting breeds
welcome. Brittany and Pointer pups
and started dogs available. 989-7610234 Merritt, MI.
www.dogwood-kennel.com
D-7-6
................................................

123-137

CANADIAN RECREATIONAL PROPERTY: 160
acres, 23 miles east of S.S.M. Finnebay Road at Echo
Bay. Deer & Moose. $54,400.
MANISTEE CO., MICHIGAN: 40 acres on Big 4
Road, 4 miles from Crystal Mtn. Ski Resort. Paved
road, electric. Deer, Turkey, Ruffed Grouse. $59,800.

HAROLD CASE, Associate Broker
231.620.8670 • harold@2cases.com

6919 Frankfort Hwy. Benzonia, MI 49616

Subscribe Today!
(810) 724-0254

Your Woods-N-Water News is

“Just a Click Away!”
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www.woods-n-waternews.com
It’s Easy . . .

VISIT TODAY!

360

Contact Maurer Real Estate
at (269) 673-3800
www.maurerrealestate.com

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

www.woods-n-waternews.com

(810) 724-0254

GERMAN SHORTHAIR
POINTER PUPS: Males
and females available. Excellent hunting dogs and superb
family pets. Close working dogs
with strong point and retrieve
instincts. Reasonably priced for
the sporting family. Money back
guarantee. Eulenhof Kennels,
Gladwin, MI.
http://www.eulenhof.com
989-426-4884 D-11-2




123

Stout Group Ltd
4330 17 Mile Road
Cedar Springs, Michigan

1-616-696-3300
www.stoutgroup.net

FOR SALE WHITE CLOUD, MI

VACANT LAND MORLEY, MI

Impressive 2 bedroom, 2
bath custom built log home
situated on 38 spacious
acres. This beautiful home
features hickory wood floors,
a full basement, quaint family room in the lower level , additional loft area that
overlooks the living room, lots of natural light, a cathedral ceiling in the living room, French doors to the rear
deck, very inviting open floor plan, a 2 car detached garage, a circular driveway, a seasonal pond

This is a total of 4 parcels totaling 198.81 Acres. There is approximately 90+ acres of tillable
ground between the 4 parcels.
This is a sportsman’s paradise!!!
Beautiful country setting with
plenty of mature woods and
open ground. There is frontage on the Little Muskegon River, Food plots to keep the wild life around, and
lots of room to stretch your legs!! This is a unique
piece of paradise that you must see to appreciate.

Priced at $295,000

N
EW

N
EW

BEAUTIFUL COUNTRY HOMES WITH ACREAGE

N
EW

$369k-10 Ac, Exquisite, Woods, Grn House

$259,900 - 2.5 Acres, Huge Pole Barn

$335,000 - 8 Ac, Pole Barn, Two Ponds

$299,900 - 2.5 Ac, Elegant Colonial

D
CE

DU
RE

40 ACRES
HURON COUNTY

$199,900 - Lake Lapeer Views & Access

$765,900 – 44 Ac Estate, Morton Barn

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME HERE!! GOLF & HUNTING LAND
Highlands of Metamora - 1 Ac..........$32,900
Steeplechase - 1 Ac...........................$55,000
MGCC-Masters Dr - 1 Ac...................$35,900
MGCC-Invitational Dr - 1 Ac..............$27,000
Sutton Rd - 2.5 Ac............................. $29,900
Rochester Rd - 3 Ac, Nat’l Gas.........$37,900

Priced $495,000

Peter’s Ln - 3 to 8 Ac.......$54,900 to $89,900
M-119 – 8 Ac. On Lake Michigan....$495,000
Casey Rd – 23 Ac., on Flint River...$179,000
German Rd – 40 Ac, Woods!..........$159,900
Genesee Rd – 44 Ac., Splits ..........$289,900
Sutton Rd – 90 Ac., Wooded...........$599,000

14 ACRE FARM WITH 26 ACRES
WOODED WITH CREEK ON PAVED ROAD,
5 MINUTES FROM LAKE HURON

178,800

$

CALL DANNY 248-310-3074

TARGET REAL ESTATE SPECIALIZES IN
WATERFRONT HOMES AND HUNTING PARCELS
“WE REPRESENT BUYERS AND SELLERS”
HOMES WITH ACREAGE
2464 SOUTH POORFARM,
GREENBUSH
$159,000
MLS # 1786902

Custom built Two bedroom home on 20 acres
+/-. The property is loaded with hardwood, Oak,
Maple and Aspen cover most of the land. Open
floor plan, on upper level, with walk-out below.
The lower level has a murphy bed and kitchenette
with a ¾ bath. Large pole building on property
with upper level storage. 12x12 screened in hot
tub area also!

6004 TURTLE RD.,
WHITTEMORE
$229,000

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

MLS # 1784963
Nice salt box home with three bedrooms,
central air, fireplace and 1.75 baths. Located on a 60 acre parcel bordering the AuGres River. The property features a stocked
pond, several elevated stands complete
with Sweeney solar powered feeders.

124

7981 NORTH ALVIN,
OSCODA
$695,000
MLS # 1787099
288 acres +/- with Custom built log sided home.
Two bedrooms on main floor with sleeping loft
above. Hardwood floors, Cherry wood cabinets
with split stone fireplace behind Vermont Castings
woodstove. Fabulous outbuildings. Land is diverse
with stream and Oak Ridges. QDMA practiced
here, food plots, Apple Tree’s and lots of wildlife.

2315 THAYER RD.,
LUPTON
$159,000
MLS # 1789909
115 acres of prime hunting land. Manufactured
home of little to no value on land. White and Red
Oak, Maple, Birch and Aspen cover the majority
of the property. Several water features are scattered throughout the property. There are openings for food plots! Nice barn on the property
also! Call today for details.

MORE PARCELS ARE AVAILABLE…
CALL TODAY FOR MORE DETAILS 989.362.4400

TARGET REAL
ESTATE COMPANY

701 W. Bay Street, East Tawas, MI 48730

Office (989)362-4400 • Cell (989)370-2152
info@TargetRealEstate.com
www.TargetRealEstate.com

231-652-7000
- or -

231-250-8200

WE NEED LISTINGS 40+ ACRES AND LARGER
LD

O

S

Alcona County, 40 Acres, Adjacent
to Public Land, Rustic Cabin
$55,000

Arenac County, 70 Acres 3,500+/- ft. Lake
Huron Frontage, Duck & Deer Hunters Dream
$280,000

Alpena County, 160 Acres Adjacent to State
Land, Beaver Pond, Excellent Hunting
SOLD - $179,000 - SOLD

Arenac County, 146 Acres Rifle River &
Saginaw Bay Access, Tri-Level House
$399,999

Arenac County, 349 Acres
2 Ponds, Blinds, Trails
$523,500

Calhoun County, 88 Acres
45 Tillable, Balance Wooded
$299,900

Calhoun County, 61 Acres. 3,000+/- ft. St.
Joseph River Frontage, Big Buck Country
$129,900

Calhoun County, 336 Acres Caretaker House,
Lodge, Pole Barn, River & Lake Front
$1,150,000

Chippewa County, 40 Acres 8,500 sq. ft. Log Home,
7 Bedrooms, 6 1/2 Baths, To Many Features to List
$690,000

Chippewa County, 80 Acres Log Cabin,
Pole Barn, Pond, 20 minutes to Soo
$260,000

Chippewa County, 1684 Acres 8,500 sq. ft. Log Lodge,
Guest House, Dock on St. Mary’s River, Private Lake
$2,490,000

Clare County, 136.76 Acres, Private Lake
5,000 ft. Muskegon River Frontage, Adjacent to National Forest
$350,000

NG

DI
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P

Clare County, 155 Acres
Rolling Hardwoods, Pond, Trails
$234,900

Gladwin County, 158 Acres 1/2 Mile Road
Frontage, Elevated Blinds, Heavy Cover
$292,300

Gratiot County, 40 Acres
Surrounded by Ag Land, Excellent Hunting
$105,000

Iosco County, 79 Acres, Nice Cabin,
Private Setting, Marketable Timber
$190,000

Jackson County, 51 Acres Rolling Terrain,
Big Buck Country, Mixed Hardwoods
$122,400

Jackson County, 52 Acres
15 Acres Tillable, Big Buck Area, QDM
$109,900

Jackson County, 162 Acres CRP Program, 6 Elevated
Blinds, 115 Ac. Tillable, Pond, Big Buck Country
$599,000

Kalkaska County, 60 Acres Heavy Cover,
Excellent Deer & Turkey Hunting
$71,600

Kalkaska County, 480 Acres
Great Trail, Nice Hardwoods
$995,000

Mecosta County, 1.6 Acres 100 ft. Muskegon
River Frontage, Paved Road, Utilities
$19,900

Missaukee County, 75 Acres Pond, Creek,
Guest Cabin & 2 Bedroom House
$199,000

NG

I
ND
E
P

Jackson County, 60 Acres Custom Log
Home, Pole Barn, Too Much To List
$379,000

LD
O

Missaukee County, 200 Acres
Cabin, Pond, 8 Enclosed Blinds
$329,000

Montcalm County, 30 Acres 2,500 sq ft
Log Home, 120x70 Outbuilding
$349,000

Montcalm County, 40 Acres Church Creek
Frontage, Rustic Cabin, Excellent Hunting
$129,900

Newaygo County, 40 Acres Surrounded by
National Forest, Trails, Elevated Blinds
$85,000

Newaygo County, 140 Acres, Pond
Trout Stream, 40 Ac. Tillable, Food Plots
SOLD - $325,000 - SOLD

Ogemaw County, 40 Acres House, Pond,
Abundant Wildlife, Great Hunting
$139,000

Osceola County, 112 Acres,
Small Creek, Trail System
$128,800

Otsego County, 160 Acres
Private 15 Ac Lake, 6,000 sq. ft. House
$1,749,000

Otsego County, 200 Acres
Rolling Terrain, Food Plots, Cabin
$399,000

Presque Isle County, 395 Acres
Remote Location, QDM, Travel Trailer
$276,500

Shiawassee County, 23 Acres Nice Mix of
Wildlife Habitat, Surveyed, Excellent Hunting
$66,000

Schoolcraft County, 2282 Acres
Fox River Frontage
$499,000

WildLifeRealty.com

www.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

S

125

Offices Serving Lower &
Upper Michigan

CABIN & 280 ACRES U.P. LAND

Bringing people and places together since 1945

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TODAY!

statewiderealestate.net
• Houghton
Marquette

Curtis
Manistique •

Escanaba

• Powers
Menominee •
Marinette

Excellent Hunting, Deer, Bear, Grouse, Even Moose To See.
Walking Distance To Several Lakes And Escanaba River

Newberry

Fife Lake

$250,000 • CALL 906-360-4576 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Onaway
• • Hawks
Hillman
Alpena


• Atlanta
• Harrisville
Mio •
• Oscoda


Skidway Lake

Clare •

• Almont
Linden •

Howell •

Contact Your Nearest State Wide Real
Estate Office To Buy or Sell In Michigan
ALPENA
1100 W. Chisholm, 49707
email: alpswre@speednetllc.com
989-356-2142 • Fax: 989-356-2144

HAWKS
8383 Hwy. 451, 49743
email: rita8383@yahoo.com
989-734-4846

ALMONT
844 Van Dyke Road
lafrancesharon@yahoo.com
810-798-8591 • Fax: 810-798-8079

HILLMAN
14938 State Street, P.O. Box 98, 49746
email: statewidehillman@yahoo.com
989-742-4523 • 800-228-7856
Fax: 989-742-3931

CLARE
308 E. 5th Street, 48617
email: statewideclare@voyager.net
989-386-3396 • Fax: 989-386-3800

HOUGHTON
500 Shelden Ave., 49931
email: dick@statewideofhoughton.com
906-482-6955 • 800-676-6323
Fax: 906-482-7699

CURTIS/NEWBERRY
Main Street, P.O. Box 305, 49820
email: swcurtis@sbcglobal.net
906-586-9606 • Fax: 906-586-9607

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

ESCANABA
2209 Ludington Street, 49829
email: escanaba@statewiderealestate.net
906-786-1308 • 800-900-0777
Fax: 906-786-1388

126

FIFE LAKE
127 State Street, P.O. Box 190, 49633
email: swfife@charterinternet.com
231-879-4471 • Fax: 231-879-4362
HARRISVILLE
430 S. US-23, 48740
email: sold@anjstatewide.com
989-724-5711 • 800-655-5735
Fax: 989-724-6833

HOWELL/LINDEN
204 W. Grand River, Suite 100, 48843
email: statewid@earthlink.net
517-546-9060 • 800-531-4449
Fax: 517-546-9148
IRON MOUNTAIN - KINGSFORD
112 S. Carpenter Ave., Kingsford, 49802
906-828-9079
MANISTIQUE
10 N. State Highway M-149
Cooks, MI 49817
906-644-2304
email: dekeysermary@yahoo.com
MARINETTE, WISCONSIN
1460 Marinette Ave., 54143
email: statewidemarinette@yahoo.com
715-735-9964 • Fax: 715-732-1107
MARQUETTE
856 W. Washington, 49855
email: sw@statewiderealestate.org
906-228-9312 • Fax: 906-228-8069

8 Elevated Blinds, Plus
Tree Stands, Food Plot

MENOMINEE
3631 10th Street, 49858
email: statewideone@newbc.rr.com
906-863-9905
Fax: 906-863-7935
MIO
102 West 8th St., P.O. Box 395, 48647
email: info@statewidemio.com
989-826-3292
Fax: 989-826-2108
ONAWAY
M-33 & M-68,
P.O. Box 478, 49765
email: bigdan@frontier.com
989-733-6522
Fax: 989-733-2427
OSCODA
335 South State St., 48750
email: lakehuronsw@chartermi.net
989-739-2050
Fax: 989-739-2280
POWERS
W3776 US2 & 41, 49874
906-497-4190
Fax: 906-497-5328
holly@statewiderealestate.net
SKIDWAY LAKE
2228 Greenwood Rd.,
Prescott, 48756
email: atlas@m33access.com
989-873-3601
Fax: 989-873-6914

PRIME REAL ESTATE AUCTION
LOCATED:

8601 Baseline Road, Battle Creek, Michigan

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29TH • 5:30 pm
PARCEL#1: Selling this beautiful 12+/- acre vacant tract of land that has everything one could hope for when looking for huntable, fishable & buildable parcel. Rolling hills, mature and new growth trees, seclusion and approximately 1240 feet of frontage
on the Wanadoga Creek that is home to small & largemouth bass, northern pike and bluegill. If you are looking for a place hunt,
fish or to build a new home, you would be hard pressed to find one more scenic than this 12 acres. Come take a look, you will
like what you see!!!
PARCEL #2: This executive sandstone ranch was built with pride and quality craftsmanship. Constructed in the 1950’s from
Douglas Fir, this three bedroom home features hardwood floors in the bedrooms with the master bedroom featuring a 1/2 bath.
There is a large living room and family room with gas log fireplace, a kitchen/dining area, three seasons room, drive thru two car
attached garage with drain, full basement with fireplace and more!!.
Many updates include a brand new septic system, new natural gas water
heater, some new plumbing, eves trough approximately 5 years ago, new
roof approximately 10 years ago, 10” blown insulation added last year, new
bladder tank and living room carpet approximately 6 years ago.

For terms and conditions, maps, pictures
and a listing of personal property to be sold, go to

www.BelcherMcPherson.com or call 269.781.7100

Land and Lakes Real Estate Co.
"Serving the NorthCentral Upper Peninsula"

Phone: (906) 387-5100
www.landandlakesrealestate.com
14571 33rd Rd (CoRd 442), Wetmore, MI 49895. WH-209 /
PRIVATE LAKE Property. This 3-BD, 2-BA home was built in 2001 with comfort & ease
of maintenance in mind. It is located on 200’ of frontage on picture-perfect Billy Good
Lake with a dock & swim raft. Centrally located in the Hiawatha National Forest, fishing
is excellent here with pan fish, pike, walleye & bass. The large two car garage has a
heated workshop attached. Generator, riding mower/snow blower power tools, outdoor
furniture, etc. are negotiable...Life is truly GOOD here! Priced at $189,900.
E6438 Doe Lake Road, Munising, MI 49862. RH-278←/1083557
This cozy cabin is located on 2 acres on a year round road with utilities. Great hunting & fishing are a short hop out the front door to USA lands & there are trails to ride
& explore that go for miles & miles! These owners live here in the WINTER, so the
cabin is well insulated & easily heated. Maintenance is minimal with new windows &
vinyl siding. Why rent a vacation cabin when you can buy and own your own so
reasonably? Priced at $68,000
TBD Old Plank Road, Wetmore, MI 49895. RC-161/1082026
This comfortable, remote hunting cabin in Southern Alger County is located in a good hunting area
with a high success rate for deer, bear, grouse, turkey & waterfowl. Included are several elevated
hunting blinds, food plots & a pond There is good access to this 70 acres which is close to Hiawatha
National Forestlands. Priced at $119,900
551W Cold Creek Dr, Seney, MI 49883. RC-160/1081485
This unconventional collection of buildings on 120 acres all fit together to form an
effective, efficient living complex capable of supporting year round living. Located
on a hillside overlooking an old bog, the site is beautiful with white birch, poplar,
maples & pines. There is a generator in the shed to provide the power, a 5hp B&S
pump in another shed to provide water, a woodshed (for the wood, of course!), a
storage garage, an outhouse & a snowmobile garage. The hunting for all types of
game is great here with migration trails through & logging to encourage wildlife to
stay. All 3 40s are high & nicely timbered - with possible timber value, especially on
the north 40. Snowmobile Trail 431 is close, with unending trails & logging roads that you could ride on forever. (Ask me!) This is the untamed
Upper Peninsula at its best - with State of MI lands surrounding. Priced at $145,900
N259 Forest Highway 13, Wetmore, MI 49895. RH-252 / 1080547
Private & Quiet, easily Accessible Home/Cabin in the heart of the Hiawatha National Forest.
This comfortable home is in turn key condition and overlooks Blue Lake, a lovely bog pond
filled with birds & wildlife. It features a roomy kitchen, 2 full size baths, 2 bedrooms & space
for expansion in the full basement. It has central air, a covered porch, & a back-up generator
hook-up to the cabin in case the power goes out. The 2-car garage has a workshop in the &
the yard is nicely landscaped to encourage outdoor living. .Additional household items, furnishings & outdoor equipment are negotiable. Price REDUCED to $ 159,900

HHHHH Five Star Rating for Customer Service
The Land Experts You Can Trust
877-843-0910

www.TrophyClassRealEstate.com

Participating broker of

60+ Acres on Grand River
Ottawa County
Perfect for the hunting and fishing enthusiast
Listed by Ian Volchoff, Broker/Owner (231) 233-1437

ASKING $329,000

1,400 sf Home on 152 Acres
Osceola County

Rustic Hunting Cabin
Lake County

Dense woodland, mature timber
Ian Volchoff (231) 233-1437

Property includes trails, hunting
blinds, and pole barn
Rick Rybicki (231) 690-7792

39 acres of hardwoods and conifers
Tom Clarke (231) 220-3089

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Muskegon River Frontage
Newaygo County

Pristine Hunting Land
with Lake Views
Grand Traverse County

Log Cabin with Views
of Muskegon River
Mecosta County

Amazing custom luxury log home
Dave Pawlak (231) 206-2326

107 acres near Green Lake
Derrick Volchoff (231) 233-3575

3,200 sf log cabin with 30 delightful
acres of great hunting land
Tim Dykstra (616) 566-3770

ASKING 129,900

ASKING $649,900

ASKING $444,000

ASKING $189,900

ASKING $86,500

ASKING $344,500

Three ConvenienT offiCe LoCaTions
Grand haven
219 north 7th street, suite 2
Grand haven, Mi 49417

Traverse CiTy
4249 Us 31
south Traverse City, Mi 49685

aTLanTa
12412 Main street
atlanta, Mi 49709

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

38 Acres South of
Grand Rapids
Barry County

127

560 ACRES – OGEMAW COUNTY

HUNTER, FISHER, NATURE LOVER,
or WATERSPORTS ENTHUSIAST?

Here’s your own piece of country living. Hilltop views
of your own private lake, surrounded by woods full
of deer, turkey and other wildlife. Modern two-story
Cape Cod home (3,645 sq ft) with a lodge-like feel
has 5 BR and 4.5 BA, spacious great room, plenty of
windows for lake views. Kitchen has Stainless Steel
appliances and hardwood floors. Indoor entertainment awaits in the Media room and Rec room, with
a finished basement. A 40x80 heated pole barn with
workshop has plenty of room for storage.

CONTACT CRAIG KIVI
Close to I-75 – Well-stocked Forest – Excellent Wildlife Habitat – Waiting for the right
group to take over this well-managed hunting ground. $850,000. For more information
contact Huron Consulting, Tom Jacques 989-329-8079 or Ben Kendra 989-820-6420

Direct (734) 478-5730

6928 Springville Highway
Onsted, Michigan

112+ ACRES

JimLowry

8520 100TH Ave.

Canadian Lakes, MI 49346

360 ACRE HUNT CLUB
SEARS, MICHIGAN
$950,000

231 972-8300 office
231 202-1014 cell

6 Bedroom Lodge
2 Bedroom Guest House
30 x 40 Pole Barn
Heated Blinds
Food Plots
Stocked Fish Pond
2 Tracks to all blinds
Security Alarm
EXCELLENT HUNTING CAMP

#QWW-21114403

$55,000

MUSKEGON RIVER FRONTAGE

#QWW-21114251

$19,000 each

101 ACRES W/CABIN

#QWW-21114059

$240,000

RECREATIONAL OR BUILDING SITE!

#QWW-21112762

$22,500

LAKEFRONT LOTS

#QWW-21112665&21112666

$19,900 each

WOODED ACREAGE

#QWW-21112471

$17,600-$39,900

UP NORTH CAMPING LOT!

#QWW-21109998

$2,500

HOME ON PINE RIVER

#QWW-21113987

$75,000

158 ACRE HOME

#JMWW-21113190

$549,000

40 ACRE FARM

#JMWW-21113643

$289,000

120 ACRES OF LAND

MMWW-21113399 $180,000

WOODED 80 ACRE PARCEL

MMWW-21113604

$119,000

330 ACRES WITH A RUSTIC CABIN (HUNT CLUB?)

#LSWW-21115031

$519,900

Beautiful 40 acre corner lot just east of Luther with hardwoods, pines, apple & pear trees. Older mobile home located on the property.
3 parcels on Muskegon River. 300x250, black top road. Osceola County.

61 acres of thick mixed woods, some low & some high and dry areas that border the 40 acres of farm ground. Cabin features 2 bedrooms & a loft. One of the best hunting parcels in Missaukee County!
Beautiful 10 acres with the perfect spot for a new home & walk out basement. Spot already cleared! Also a great recreational area
being only 2 miles from Pere Marquette Forest & 2 miles the other direction to state land. Luther area.
Beautifully wooded lake front lots on Lake Gitchegume. Private, peaceful lake with no public access. Wexford County. GREAT PRICE
FOR LAKEFRONTAGE!
Wooded property only 4 miles from Cadillac, Offered on land contract terms, Good for hunting or building your new home. Land contract terms! 8 acres-$17,600, 11.04 acres-$22,500, 12 acres-$23,900, 20 acres-$39,900.
1 acre, Mesick area, Great spot to build getaway cabin or spend some Up North time for snowmobiling, hunting, or fishing. Additional
lot available, call for details.

3-4BR, 1.5BA, 2,645±sf Home
with 2-story Garage on 1.38± Acres
2772 Skidmore Road, Brethren, MI • Manistee County

Terrific Hunting Land!

Up North Hideaway with excellent access to Tippy Dam, Big and Little Manistee Rivers,
Bear Creek, and Trout Creek. Surrounded by Federal Land!
Ideal for Hunting and Fishing Lodge. Don’t miss out on this one of a kind secluded Cabin!

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Red & White Arkansas Oak flooring in family room. Home Remodeled within the last year.
Sprinkler system in front and back yards. New roof added last year with partial torched down roof.
Central air & propane furnace, wood burner on front porch. Detached 2-story garage with cement floor and generator.

128

ONLINE ONLY AUCTION
Thursday, October 30th
ONLINE BIDDING ENDS AT 1PM

Beautiful 2 bed, 2 bath home. Sits on 9 acres. 2 car garage AND 28x40 pole barn for amazing price! Previous listing shows Pine River
access. Great recreational place or full time. Osceola County.
4500 sq ft. home on 158 acres with 3 ponds, 8 deer blinds and a creek. 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms.

Custom made home with full walk-out basement. 40x64 pole barn with 220, wood burner. 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms.

Perfect for hunting with a mixture of open, wooded, thick woods and semi-open land. Years of careful management can be to your
benefit with food plots, watering holes, tree blinds and the “Great Shack” positioned in the hub of “wagon wheel spoke” shooting lanes.
Seller is sad to sell but wants someone else to enjoy the thrill of hunting as he has for many years. Survey and maps are available.
Adjoins state land on 2 sides. Location is excellent for hunting and recreation. Close to Long Lake open ORV trails. Less than 1 mile
from "Blue Ribbon" Clam River trout stream. Easy access to shopping and conveniences of town. About 2 miles off paved roads and
a quick commute from US 131 Highway. If you are searching for hunting land, a great place to snowmobile and enjoy the splendor of
Northern Michigan, then come and get it!
A hunting and outdoorsman's dream come true! Abundant wildlife including deer, turkey, & grouse. This diverse acreage has lots of
woods and open areas. Approximately 60-70% wooded. The headwaters of the Little Manistee River run through this property supplying water to the wildlife. A well maintained series of trails runs throughout the property. Numerous hunting blinds can be found with
food plot areas and shooting lanes. Always wanted a HUNT CLUB? Now is your chance. The west side of the property borders state land.

124 S. Mitchell Street • Cadillac, MI 49601

Open Houses:
Wed, October 22nd & 29th (5-6pm)
For more information, call or text
Troy Crowe (989) 666-6339
troy@sheridanauctionservice.com

(517) 676-9800

SheridanAuctionService.com

Central

phone 231.775.1205
fax 231.775.4223
www.HomesInCadillac.com

WEST BRANCH
WEST BRANCH
LOOP OFFICE M-33/M-55 OFFICE

HALE
OFFICE

3160 North M-65
Hale, MI 48739

“Gateway to Huron National Forest”

1953 S. M-33
West Branch, MI 48661

Local: 989-728-2540
Toll Free: 800-495-2540

10 miles north of I-75 exit 202

2575 S. I-75 Business Loop,
West Branch, MI 48661

Local: 989-345-2662
Toll Free: 800-535-6520

1 mile north of I-75 Exit 212

Local: 989-345-0315
Toll Free: 866-345-0315

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

WWW.CAHANES.COM
15.8 AC, spac 3-brm Cape Code, 2 garages, workshop, wood floors, family rm, FP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $250,000 H783741B
3 ACRES, 3-br, FP, full basement, family room, lots of updates, oversized garage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$84,900 M783672R
5 ACRES, move-in ready! 2-br, garage w/wood stove, beautiful pond, rear deck, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $52,900 M783267B
1+ ACRE, spac 3-br, walk-in pantry, appliances, country setting, deck, garage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M783242B
2.5 ACRES, sharp 3-br Saltbox, heated garage, deck, porch, custom blinds, applian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 M783223D
5.4 ACRES, EXCELLENT LOCATION, 3-br chalet, pole barn, newer well, porch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M782912B
HUNT CAMP OR YEAR ROUND! 2-br mob, appliances, newer furnace, 10 ACRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,500 M782831R
HUNTING & FISHING GETAWAY! Near River, across from St land, 2-br, updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M782432L
ACROSS FROM FED’L LAND! 13+ AC, 3-br, garage, 2 stoves, knotty pine, trails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $148,900 M781903B
1.47 ACRES, 2-br, updated, mostly furnished, porch, firepit, walking path to creek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,500 M780004R
20 ACRES, 2-br log home, pond, open floor plan, great hunting, privacy, porch, gar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $130,000 H782274B
ACROSS FROM ST LAND! ONE ACRE, full log 3-br home, newer roof & more! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$27,900 M779757B
2 ACRES, cute 2 –br, gas FP, family room, garage, barn, nice views, deck, wooded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $38,000 M779384B
3.65 AC, BEAUTIFUL 3-br, deck, 30x32 pole bldg, secluded, garage, open fl plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $135,000 W779153J
2+ ACRES, 3-br ranch, attached garage, deck, open floor plan, knotty pine kitchen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99,900 M775973L
104+ AC, custom blt 3-br, garage, 2 pole barns, St land on East, trails thru-out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $370,000 M775842C
102 AC, ST LAND 2 SIDES! 2-br, gar, trails, food plots, 13 blinds, guest house, deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $299,000 M775663B
2.76 AC, spac 3-br, nice country setting, FP, AC, garage, formal dining, great views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,000 L749835A
91.26 ACRES! HUNTER’S DREAM! 1394’ when finished, wood stove, applia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $189,900 M790081B
2.5 ACRES, beautiful country setting, part bsmt, near town, some updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,000 M747242C
5 ACRES! 3-br, 2 ba, landscaping, garage, coverd porch, beautiful views, AC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $92,000 M747080C
1.7 ACRES, updated 2/3-br, heated gar, lean to, knotty pine, loft area, all appliances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $82,000 M746227B
6.5 AC, 4-br, two garages, 60x100 barn, beautiful country setting, workshop area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,900 H744403B
8.87 ACRES, beautiful custom built, wrap-around porch, garage, AC, loft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,000 M758327R
1.06 ACRES, 3-br, lrg family room, nice views, spacious backyard, fresh paint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M752475B
6 ACRES, lrg 4-br, pond w/fish, 50x70 deck, inground pool, pole barn w/stalls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 M757423L

10 AC, 229’ ON MORRIS LK, 30X40 POLE BLDG, stoves, ¾ ba, kitc, bedrms, blinds . . . . . . . . . . . $134,900 M790263L
1.37 AC & 50’ WATER FRONTAGE!! All sports 172 acre Hardwood Lk, great views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M789290B
POPULAR SAGE LAKE! Wooded lot on canal to 785 acre all sports lk, poss bldg site . . . . . . . . . . . .$20,000 L789247A
S DEASE LK! 60’on canal to all sports lake, potential bldg site, boat dock, wooded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45,000 H788489B
LK OGEMAW! 1.1 ACRES, 32X64 POLE BARN, septic, well, electric, dock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $209,000 M782685C
FOREST LAKE! All sports private lake, 600’ frnt, potential bldg. site, nice subd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $46,000 M780595B
LAKE OGEMAW! Over ½ ACRE, wooded, all sports lk, nice views, poss bldg. site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $96,900 M790612R

10 AC, 229’ ON MORRIS LK, 30X40 POLE BLDG, stoves, ¾ ba, kitc, bedrms, blinds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $134,900 M790263L
24X24 GARAGE & 7+ WOODED ACRES! Paved rd, corner, some low & open areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,900 M790214R
10+ ACRES, near Huron Nat’l Forest, beautiful views, mostly wooded, mature trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,900 M790106R
53+ AC, ST LAND ON 3 SIDES, “shack”, outhouse, shed, sugar beet bin, blinds, wded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $94,000 M789618B
30 ACRES & POLE BLDG! 200 AC ST LAND across rd, great hunting or raise horses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $85,000 M789151J
40+ ACRES & CABIN! 1300’ on Johnson Crk, wooded, shed, wood stove, blind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $98,500 M788865G
60 ACRES! Wooded, elec at road, 24x24 pole bldg w/cement floor, great hunting area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 M788919R
12X20 BLDG, 30+ ACRES, BORDERS NAT’L FOREST! Paved road, wooded, hunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $109,900 M788548R
BUNKHOUSE W/ 6.88 ACRES, 2 blinds, well, septic, AMMOND CRK frnt, wooded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M788221B
11 ACRES, great hunting, heavily wooded, near state lands, electric at road, wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,900 M787819B
100.77 ACRES, ADJOINS ST LAND! Great hunting, lrg pond, small cabin, gated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,000 M787752B
2.61 AC, LIKE-NEW, 3-br chalet, deck, gazebo, heated gar w/2 brms & ba, FP, air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $129,900 M787691L
10 ACRES!! Mostly wooded, small clearing, great hunting, add’l 10 acres available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,000 M787378C
SURROUNDED BY ST LAND! 5 ACRES, wooded, alum shed, hunting, near trails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,500 M787317D
ADJACENT TO ST LAND!! 18 AC, 2-br cabin, nestled in woods, great hunt camp! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,900 M786738R
11.83 ACRES, great hunting, heavily wooded, 12x24 insulated bldg w/furn, firepit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,900 M786561D
5+ AC, 200’ from St Land! 2-br, gazebo & pole bldg w/elec, deck, patio, trails, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $79,900 M786457C
10+ AC, WALK TO ST LAND! Well, septic, elec, shed w/hot water & tub, 8x20 deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,900 M786070B
40 ACRES, gated, partly wooded, great hunting, lots of wildlife, great area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $79,900 M785451D
10 ACRES!! Mostly wooded, small clearing, great hunting, add’l 10 acres available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,000 M787383C
80 ACRES, SMALL CABIN, excellent hunt camp, power & gas at road, wooded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,900 M785097B
8.8 ACRES, on private road for privacy, cleared, lots of possibilities, near town . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,900 M784931R
10 ACRES! Rolling, secluded & wooded, great hunting, great recreational area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,900 M783220R

LK OGEMAW! 4-br Saltbox, stamped patio, dock, 77’ frnt, ¾ acre, great deck, gar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $199,000 M783506C
RIFLE RVR!! 10 AC, full log, 3-br, 4 ba, amenities galore, decks, porches, balcony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $595,000 M782802R
RIVER FRNT & ACRES!!! Spac 3-br, sunroom, several outbldgs, gorgeous views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $129,900 M782443R
3.5 AC ON LEWIS LK! 3-br, 2 ba, deck, 32x40 pole barn, 295’ on small lake, wooded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $122,900 M782163R
LITTLE LONG LK! 4-br, extensive decking, gorg views, stone FP, 2 sheds, 60’ frnt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $159,900 H781901B
RIFLE RIVER! Cute getaway on River, nicely wooded prop, great fishing/canoeing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 M781019R
LITTLE LONG LK! Cozy 2-br, 2 garages, encl porch, covered porch, 64’ frontage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $119,900 M780107R
HARDWOOD LK! 1.31 ACRES, 3-br, garage, AC, newer steel roof, deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $149,000 M780038B
SKIDWAY LK! 2-br log home, lakeside sunroom, garage, FP, fenced yrd, full bsmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $87,500 M776963B
RIFLE RIVER! 3-br, garage, wrkshp, updated, open floor plan, views, deck, sunrm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $168,000 M776647R
80 AC & 1400’ on RIFLE RVR! 2-br, pond, apple trees, secluded, trails, blind, fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $259,900 M776325R
CRANBERRY LK! Cozy getaway, boat dock, some furnishings, lakeside patio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $81,900 M749638C
AFFORDABLE LAKEFRONT! FP, patio, encl porch, views, garage, PONTOON! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $54,900 M749664B
WATERFRONT LOT across rd! 2-br, lk views, garage, 2 sheds, covered patio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,900 M749221L
EVERETT LK! 240’ frnt and 5 ACRES, 4-br Cape Cod, deck, covered porch, dock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $109,000 M745690B
20 AC & FRNT ON SAGE & LITTLE SAGE LKS! 3-br, secluded, wooded, deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $299,000 L759898A
RIFLE LK! 95’ frnt, 2-br verti log home, garage, FP, sunroom, steel seawall, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $154,900 M758147R

LITTLE LONG LK! 66’ water frnt, partly wooded, nice views, potential bldg site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $42,000 H763152B
15 ACES & FRNT ON STYLUS LAKE! Great hunting parcel, heavily wooded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,000 L755186A
NORWAY LK ACCESS & 4+ ACRES, county paved road, wooded, bldg site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,000 H784032B
SHARED WATERFRONT, 7 lots, potential bldg site, mostly wooded, paved road . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,000 H784326B
WATER ACCESS W/24 X 32 GARAGE, North Dease Lake, potential bldg site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $36,000 M786155B
LAKE ACCESS!! Private access to all sports Lk Ogemaw, 30x40 pole bldg, 2 lots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,900 M790121R

60 ACRES, food plots, 20 BLINDS, partly wooded, prime hunting, lrg bucks taken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $199,900 M780713L
3 ACRES, some cleared for building, county maintained road, electric available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,500 M780319C
60 ACRES! Wooded, elec at road, 24x24 pole bldg w/cement floor, great hunting area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 M780006R
5 ACRES, mostly open, on paved road, nice views, potential bldg site, near Nat’l Forest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900 M779693R
101 AC – ST LAND ON 3 SIDES!! Ultimate hunting parc, older bldg w/heat & lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $224,900 M779538B
5.96 ACRES! On maintained road, potential bldg site, elec at road, countryside views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,000 H778743B
120 ACRES! Trails-thru-out, excellent huning, lots of wildlife, secluded, gated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,500 M776912B
10.06 ACRES, wooded, driveway, elec at road, near State lands, camping trailer incl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $28,900 M778297B
WALK TO HOUGHTON CREEK, 2.1 ACRES, elec at road, nice views, bldg site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,900 M776054B
15 AC & FRNT ON STYLUS LK!! Great hunting parcel, lots of wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,000 L775186A
ST HELEN! 10 AC! Heavily wooded, excellent hunting, SECLUDED, easy access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 M748824L
87.52 AC, ACROSS FROM ST LAND, trails, food plots, blinds, rustic bldg/cabin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $174,000 M747501B
10+ ACRES, insulated 2-car GARAGE, W/heat & kitchen, outhouse storage shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $57,900 M745040B
40 ACRES! Nice mix of trees, near 2 allsports lks, great hunting, lots of wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $80,000 H743334B
72 ACRES & LKFRONT! Beautiful, rolling, lots of wildlife, gated, maintained rd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $145,000 M763946R
10 ACRES, great hunt camp, elec at road for poten bldg site, mostly wooded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,900 M762277B
TWO PARCELS, acre+ each, slopes to Perry Creek, nice bldg site, each . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,000 M761380-81R
2.5 ACRS ON PAVED RD & on Campbell Creek for your new home! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 M761714B
1.37 ACRS for your new home on paved rd not far from West Branch! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,000 M761715B
20.14 ACRES, rolling, wooded, BORDERS ST LAND, great hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $63,900 M763333R
HUNTER’S PARADISE! 40 Ac borders St land, tons of wildlife, poss bldg site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $74,950 M763481R
20 ACRES, rolling, wooded, open area for plots, trails, deer blind, excellent hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $31,500 M776729R

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WATERFRONT HOMES/COTTAGES

WATERFRONT LOTS & ACREAGE

FAWN LK! Nice 3-br, garage, large deck, nice views, all appli, move in ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,900 M755449L
HENDERSON LK! 2-br, newer roof & flooring, decks, boat dock, 95’ frnt, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,900 M789599B
W LONDO LK! Spacious 4-br, upper/lower decks, views, fruit trees, landscaped . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,000 L787658A
HARDWOOD LK! 156+ sandy frnt, 2-br, walkout bsmt, 14’ boat, dock, 3 sheds, view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $165,000 M786820B
S DEASE LK! 3-br, 1728 sq ft, 2 decks, garage w/stove, furnishings, lawn equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,000 M786169B
LAKE ELNI! 100’ frnt, 3-br, FP, wrap-around deck, views, full bsmt, dock, turn-key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $165,000 M786081B
HARDWOOD LK! 3-br, beautiful views, most furnishings, garage, 2 sheds, wood flrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,500 L785732A
“NO WAKE” BIG WMS LAKE! 2/3-br, nice views, 64’ water frntg, log cabin, shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $109,900 M785706D
LK OGEMAW, COMPLETE ‘02 REMODEL, 3-br, Trex 3tier deck, patio wgril /sink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $264,900 M785430C
NO WAKE LK! Move-in ready 3-br, sunrm, dock, views, near all sports CLEAR LK! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $125,000 W785156J
LK OGEMAW! 77’ frnt, beauti views, 2-br, loft, garage, walkout bsmt, covered decks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $154,900 M784998C
CHAIN LK!! Over 3000 sq ft, 4-br, 2.5 ba, full bsmt, deck, gorg views, 140’ frontage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 L784955A
LAKE OGEMAW! 1800 sq ft, 3-br, walkout bsmt, deck/patio, 65’ frnt, sandy, dock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $162,900 M784779C
RIFLE LAKE!! Sandy beach, seawall, gentle slope, all sports, 2-br, storage shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $134,900 M784612R
BUSH LK! AFFORDABLE 2-br, garage, appliances, some furnishings, covered porch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,900 M784589B
21 ACRES/PRIOR CREEK!! 5-br, 3 ba, in-law suite, blind, trails, rear deck, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $184,900 M784501C
LK GEORGE! 2-br, tons of great updates, patio, views, garage, aluminum dock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $159,900 M783771R
ISLAND LK, 2-br, gar w/loft, ¾ bath & bdrm, lakeside patio, great views, no wake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $209,900 M783692R

HOMES/CABINS ON ACREAGE HUNTING LANDS & ACREAGE
2.1 AC, NESTER CREEK, 3-br, garage, AC, FP, covered porch, rear deck, fenced yd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 M790635B
2.41 ACRES, spac 3-br, needs work, full bsmt, garage, lrge barn, FP, wood floors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $54,000 M790417B
10+ ACRES, beautiful custom built, 2 garages, jet tub, rear deck, FP, move-in ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $149,900 M789899R
15 AC, 3-br, covered porch, garage, pole barn, lrg shed/lean to, AC, updated 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$140,000 H789770B
5 AC, 3-bedroom, sits back off road, 2 FP, newer flooring, deck, gar & pole bldg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 M789713B
2.5 ACRES, 2 bedroom, on corner, 2 car garage, year round, nice country setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $29,900 L789452A
4.92 AC, 1204 sq foot, 2-brm, full basement, garage, newer plumbing, pump, shingles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,900 L788451A
STUNNING PARK-LIKE SETTING, 4-br, walkout bsmt, pond, garage, 62+ AC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $249,900 M787816R
UPDATED FARMHOUSE, 1.17 AC, 4-br, full bsmt, deck, wood floors, gar, barn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60,000 L787736A
16 AC – PARK-LIKE SETTING! 3500 sq ft, 4-br, 2 FP, fami rm, den, deck, sunroom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $239,000 M787699C
ACROSS FROM ST LAND!! 1.25 AC, 3-br, immaculate, garage, furniture, HH items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $54,900 W787496J
GOLFERS & PET LOVERS!! 1.77 ACRES, fenced, borders Golf Course, 2-br, TLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M787467L
FARM HOUSE!! 80 ACRES, 5-br, garage w/loft, outbldg, guest house, pond, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $229,900 M787448R
REMODELED 2-BR, 2 AC, lrg garage, fenced yard, 16x16 shed, nr lks, golf course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $54,900 M787375R
LARGE HOME, 11.6 AC, 4-br, needs some work, near Fed’l land & Au Gres River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,900 L787127A
ADJACENT TO ST LAND!! 18 AC, 2-br cabin, nestled in woods, great hunt camp! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,900 M786738R
POSS 5 BDRMS!! VIEWS, 3 ACRES, creek, pond, fruit trees, 2 FP, family rm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $194,900 M786279L
1.5 ACRES, 2-br mobile, needs TLC, garage, newer well & septic, trails on property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,500 M786212B
5 ACRES BACKING UP TO ST LAND!! 3-br, garage, appliances, wood stove, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $89,900 M786126B
BACKS TO STATE LAND!! 3 ACRES, 2-br yr round or hunt cabin, FP, deck, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M785814R
4.91 ACRES, 2882 SQ FT, 4-br, 2 full ba, porch, deck, indoor pool & hot tub, views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $109,900 W785593J
OVER AN ACRE! Super clean, painted, 3-br, 2 full ba, garage w/breez & wrkshp, AC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $82,900 M785477B
1.08 ACRES 3-br, needs some work, garage, fenced yard for pets/gardening, yr round . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,000 M785455C
4.7 AC, beautiful custom blt, 2 garages, Trex deck, 3-br, 3 ba, hot tub, walkout bsmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $199,500 M785441C
ONE ACRE NEXT TO NAT’L FOREST!! 2-br, garage, family rm, sunroom, 2 decks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $56,000 H785070B
10 ACRES, 3-br, wooded, great hunting, garage, carport & 14/20 outbldg, secluded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,900 M784322R

ALL SPORTS LK OGEMAW ACROSS RD! , 4-br, full bsmt, priced for quick sale! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,900 M784418L
INTEREST IN LKFRONT LOT! Views of lk, 3-br, garage, shed, lrg deck, 2 lrg lots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $76,500 M784247D
VIEW OF SAGE LK! Totally updated, 2/3 bedroom, newer applia include, shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,995 M783945B
ALL SPORTS FOREST LK 2-br, covered porch, newer roof 2012, fireplace, getaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,900 M783538R
BUSH LK & BOAT LAUNCH just across road! 2-br, furnishings, deck, garage, FP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $54,900 M781909B
BEAUTIFUL LK VIEWS! Lrg 4-br, extensive decking, 2 garages, amenities galore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $169,000 M780746B
TITTABAWASSEE RIVER across rd, cute getaway cabin, storage shed, great fishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,500 M778565C
PEACH LAKE VIEWS, 3-br, gar, heated wrksp, 2 sheds, AC, deck, walkout bsmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $89,900 M777391L
BEAUTIFUL LK VIEWS & steps to access, 2 br, large family rm, FP, part bsmt, deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,500 M777233B
RIFLE RIVER! Cute 2-br, private River access, 2-story garage, covered porch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $54,900 M748071B
GEORGE LK! 3-br, view of lake, deck, 2 outbldgs, wood floors, FP, updated, 6 lots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,000 M747414R
WALK TO POPULAR CLEAR LK! Newly remodeled 2-br, steel roof, family rm, FP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M784601L
SAGE LK! 2-br, lakeside sunroom & patio, wood floors, knotty pine, walk to access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,500 M782759R

WATER ACCESS HOMES & COTTAGES
GEOR & RIFLE LKS! Updated 3-br, deck, garage, blktop dr, walk to lk, nr hunting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $77,500 M790790B
WALK TO LK ELNI/NEAR CLEAR LK!! 2-br, shed, knotty pine, FP, pond, 1.1 AC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M790741B
FOREST LK! Beautiful 3-br, garage, pole bldg, full basement, 1.23 wooded acres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,000 M789509B
WALK TO ELBOW LAKE! 2/3-brm, garage, knotty pine, appliances, patio, FP, shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,900 M788194B
PRIVATE BOAT DOCK! Access to allsports S Dease Lk! 2-br, family room, FP, shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $44,800 H788081B
AFFORDABLE GETAWAY! LK OGEMAW access, 2-br, 2 sheds, shade trees, firepit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $22,500 M787257D
JOHNSON LK ACCESS, 2-br, sunroom, wood stove, appli, furnishings, needs work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,500 M787148D
WALK TO POPULAR CLEAR LK! 3-br, gar w/rec room, lrg pole barn, newer roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99,900 M786999L
LK GEORGE ACCESS, 2/3 bdroom, needs work, covered porch, garage, FP, getaway . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M786481C
WALK TO BEAUTIFUL RIFLE LK! 3-br, knotty pine, deck, 3 lots, landscaping, shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $56,000 M786270C
3.75 AC & HENDERSON LK ACCESS!! 3-br, 2 garages, sunroom, workshop, deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $123,900 M785925R
BETWEEN 2 ALL SPORTS LAKES!! Rustin UP North 2-br cabin, garage, encl porch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,900 M785008R
SAGE LK! 2-br, lakeside sunroom & patio, wood floors, knotty pine, walk to access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,500 M782759R
FAWN LK! Private lk access, nice 3-br, walkout bsmt, deck, over 2300 sq feet, garage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,900 M784971R

DOUBLE LOT, full log 3-br home, garage, near lakes, st land, River, LC terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M784124B
NEAR TOWN, MOVE-IN READY! Nice 2-bedroom, garage, shed, nice lots w/trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M784050C
TWO LOTS, great rec area, 2-br, 1.5 bath, garage, front deck, encl seasonal porch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M783504C
3/ 4 ACRE! 3-bedroom, garage w/heated wrkshp, 2 sheds w/elec, deck, fenced yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,900 M781209R
OLDER VICTORIAN HOME! 6-br, garage w/loft, screened porch, 2000 sq ft! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $48,000 M778577C
2 CORNER LOTS, 1.5 story 2-br, year round, wood stove, encl sunroom, garage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,900 M776995R
CITY LIVING! 2-br, garage, lrg covered deck, all applia, newer 2010 roof, updated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $72,900 M749144R
NEAT & CLEAN! 2-br, mostly furnished, affordable, nr lakes & river, getaway! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,900 M748585L
APPROX ½ AC! 4-br Chalet, extensive decking, nice views, wrkshp and an addition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $94,900 M747265G
MOVE-IN READY! Updated 3-br, newer flooring, AC, deck, garage, landscaping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 L745941A
NR ACRES OF ST LAND! Cute 2-br, garage, 12x20 bonus room, mostly furnished . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,000 M745810R
COMPLETELY UPDATED, 3-br, wd floors, full bsmt, guest cabin, nr boat launch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M754301R
ACROSS FROM ST LAND! 1416 Sq ft, 3-br, garage, FP, family rm, near lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,900 M753184R

HOMES/CABINS ON LOTS

VICTORIAN W BRANCH! Tons of updates, 3-br 2 ba, deck, AC, gar, appli, paved dr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,900 M790664L
NICE 2 BDRM, at end of road, nr acres of St Land & Clear Lk, garage, knotty pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,500 M790413B
PRICED TO SELL! Large 4-br, needs some TLC, some updates, garage, bsmt, porch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $39,900 M790150L
GREAT GETAWAY! Nr St lands & Clear Lake, 2-br, mostly furnished, stor shed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $27,900 M789081L
CITY LIVING! 3-br ranch-style, appli, fenced yard, AC, garage, wood stove, patio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,900 M788298C
NICE 3-BR MANU, 3 lots, all appliances, mostly furnished, 30x30 garage, lrg deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,900 M787757B
3 LOTS, Near all sports Long Lk, town & Huron Nat’l Forest, needs work, encl porch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $19,900 L787410A
LARGE 4 BDRM, garage, fruit trees, raspberry bushes, wood & tile floors, bsmt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $89,900 M787138L
ACROSS FROM NAT’L FOREST! 3-br, needs TLC, deep lot, almost an acre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,000 L786801A
A PROJECT FOR YOU! 4-br, 1300 sq ft, needs work, applia, front deck, great area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24,000 M786718D
OVER HALF ACRE, cute 2/3 bungalow, patio, garage, near lakes, River, St land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32,500 M786132R
UPDATES & GORG FINISH WORK!! 3-br, part bsmt, family rm, encl sunrm, gar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $139,900 M785803R
WEST BRANCH! Upated, move-in ready 2-br, garage, rear deck, near Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,000 M784463C

129

B

VACANT LAND:

WALKERVILLE, MI Very nice recreational property with stocked fish pond and small creek. Also
great for that avid hunter!! Mostly wooded but
has some clearings for camping and R V use.
Privacy and room to camp just half mile off main
road. Has well and electric and travel trailer included if desired. $79,900 MLS# 14033967

Coldwell Banker Woodland Schmidt-Hart
BRAD CLARK

2332 Comfort Dr. • Hart, MI 49420

Direct Line 231-873-6640
Cell 231-923-6824
email clarkfarms@casair.net

2.99
Get it while it lasts...

%
*

IG RIVER

PROPERTIES

HOME ON 10 ACRES – 10156 HAWK TRAIL – IRONS - Very nice year round
home or “Up North get-a-way” offers 3 bedrooms and one bath on 10 wooded
acres very close to the trail system and across from hundreds of acres of State
Land! Home offers one bedroom on the main level, nice open kitchen with large
eating bar and fireplace in the living room. Newer 24x32 pole barn with drive
thru doors. Nice fire-pit area and deck on the back of the home. $139,900 (GIL)
HOME ON 30+/- ACRES – 10087 N PEACOCK TRAIL – IRONS – This nicely
wooded 30 Acre Parcel of land adjoins Federal land on three sides and is just
down the road from the snowmobile trails! 2+ bedrooms, 1 bath, cabin is all
newly redone in knotty pine and log siding interior. New hickory cabinets, insulated windows and door wall onto small deck overlooking a cleared area with
fire pit. Very secluded! $139,000 ( BRE)
MOBILE ON 10 ACRES W/BARNS – 8672 BASS LAKE ROAD – IRONS –
This 3 bedroom 1 ½ bath mobile is a northern Michigan dream! 36x52 Pole
Barn w/3 overhead doors and cement floors. Bonus Bunkhouse/Party Barn is
24x24 with a 10x24 covered porch with stamped concrete approach and fire-pit
area. Bunkhouse has a woodstove and is insulated and dry-walled. $114,900
(BLA)
20 ACRES – 2132 W. 8 MILE ROAD – IRONS – Home located on 20 acres of
land, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths. The home was updated in the past year and is
ready to move into. Very secluded setting with a large barn. Additional acreage
available! $89,900 (VEL)
CABIN ON 10 ACRES – 88 W 4 MILE ROAD – LUTHER – Enjoy this fully
furnished barn converted 1,100 sq. ft. two bedroom, one bath cabin with a living
room with double sliders out to the back, wood burning stove to keep you cozy,
kitchen with farm house sink, knotty pine and wood detail throughout, just awaiting your minor finishing touches. Set upon just over ten acres, with a large yard
surrounded by the rest of your heavily wooded property. $62,500 (KLO)
CAMPER ON 4.39 ACRES WITH UTILITIES – 8678 N M-37 – IRONS – Very
nicely wooded 4.39 acre parcel that fronts on a county maintained paved road.
Property offers a 39’ Wildwood Travel Trailer with steel cover structure.
Property has a 2 inch well, drywell and 200 amp electric with 4 separate
camper hook-ups. 12x12 Storage barn has electric, great fire-pit area and
direct access to the ORV and snowmobile trail system. Adjoins State Land to
the East. $34,900 (JON)
GREAT HUNT CAMP – 9333 TIMBER DRIVE – IRONS – Nicely wooded with
a mixture of mature trees this 10 acre parcel would be a great spot to set up
camp. There are a couple of out buildings on the property that need a little TLC
and a stab well. The parcel is clearly marked at all four corners and almost
square in size. Make this you’re next base camp for riding ATV’s , Fishing the
Little and Big Manistee Rivers or Hunting. At the time of listing the adjoining
parcel to the North is also for sale. $24,900 (KNA93)
20 ACRES – V/L LAVERNE ROAD – WELLSTON – This 20 acre parcel is
located off the power line just South of Stronach Dam Road in the middle of the
Manistee National Forest. This property is great hunting property with limited
access and no power available. Have a camp nearby this would be the perfect
getaway for hunting!! $22,900 (STA)

“Hunters Call for our Acreage Parcels”
5963 W. 10-1/2 Mile Rd. • Irons, Michigan
231-266-8288 • 877-88-NORTH

www.BigRiverVentures.com • Info@BigRiverVentures.com

DYNAMICS, INC.
14 North Morse Street, Sandusky, MI 48471
Mike 810-404-5647 • Rick 810-404-4991

SANILAC COUNTY
HUNTING PROPERTIES
Argyle — Approximately 1/8 mile to one
entrance of the Minden City State Game
area. Completely remodeled home on 1.5
acres. Ideal Home for a hunters lodge.
Priced at $49,900 # 12766

MORE THAN LENDING–
This is the deal you have been waiting for!
Now through Dec. 31, GreenStone Farm
Credit Services is offering incredible rates
as low as 2.99% up to five years, on real
estate financing.

Melvin Area, 28 acres on unimproved
county road. Wooded 10 acres, Framland
18 acres currently rented. Has been excellent deer and turkey hunting. # 12769
Melvin area, 21 acres on Brockway Road,
Currently farmed. Has been tiled. #12770

Experience the benefits of GreenStone and
take advantage of this special offer today.
Contact your local branch to get started.

Hemans Area, 78 acres prime hunting
land. Two road frontages excellent wildlife
habitat. Excellent deer, turkey and possible grouse hunting. Land Contract to qualified buyer. #12774

800-444-3276

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Sandusky only minutes from town is where
you will find this 2 story home on 20 acres.
Woods wildlife pond and fields make this
the perfect place for the outdoors men
and ladies. #12753

130

Applegate/Sandusky 13.5 acres of hunting land that backs up to Elk Creek. 90%
wooded. With the sale of the 13.5 acres
there is the exclusive right to hunt on an
additional 160 acres. #12738
Lake Property/Iosco County Chain Lake,
50 ft. x 140 ft. #12713
*Excludes refinancing of existing GreenStone loan products,
pending credit approval, offer ends Dec. 31, 2014. NMLS# 440787

www.greenstonefcs.com

GIVE US A CALL
We Have New Listings Weekly
Office 1-800-968-3701

THOUSANDS OF ACRES AVAILABLE FROM $6,900 TO $1,200,000 See all of our listings at swreescanaba.com

swreescanaba.com • dandylandhomes.com

(800) 900-0777
VISIT OUR WEB SITE FOR ALL OUR PROPERTIES:

swreescanaba.com or dandylandhomes.com
VISIT US ON FACEBOOK AT: www.facebook.com/statewideescanaba

2209 Ludington Street
Escanaba, Michigan 49829

(906) 786-1308
FAX: (906) 786-1388
email:

escanaba@statewiderealestate.net

POWERS OFFICE:
W3776 US 2 & 41,
Powers, MI 49874

(906) 497-4190
FAX: (906) 497-5328

1 bdrm, 1 bth camp in Menominee Co
on 60 acres. Well, septic, generator, & borders State land on 2 sides. Cedar River

$89,500 1077994

3 Bdrm, 3 bth log home on hardwood
inpound. Finished walkout bsmt. Central
air. Beautifully maintained. Foster City

$329,000 1078761

862 Acres. Central Menominee Co. Rolling wooded terrain. Established roadways.
Preserved for 3 generations. Carney.

2 Bdrm, 1 bth cottage. Indian Lk.
26x36 Garage, sheds, dock, appliances.
Year around. Manistique.

1 Bdrm, 1 bth ranch cottage on
Green Bay Shores. Fishing, swimming,
or relax. Cedar River.

2 Bdrm, 1 bth farm. 80 Acres.
Outbuildings. Hunting. Something
for everyone. Stonington.

$1,260,000 1077509

$119,000 1075421

$149,900 1078972

$164,900 1081032

2 Bdrm, 1 bth ranch.
325 Ft Escanaba River frtg.Cozy
fireplace and deck. Gladstone.

2 Bdrms, 1 bth home. 500' on
Rapid River. 5 Ac. 36x38 gar.
Fireplace. Rapid River.

2 Bdrm, 1 bth home or camp.
48 Acres, everything included. Borders
state land. Nicely wooded. Rock.

2 Bdrm 1 bth Camp, 60 acres,
Well, Septic, Electric. Great
Hunting Parcel. Perkins.

$117,000 1081908

$65,000 1059214

$68,800 1070425

$142,500 1078442

Attention Hunters! Camp on 200 acres.
Drilled well. Sauna. Pole Bldg. Northland.

2 bdrm 1 bath camp on 280 acres,
food plots, pole bldg, & more. Perkins

Round Lake Lots. 100 Ft and 120 Ft.
$85,000 and $109,900. Sand beach!

120 Acres with Rustic Camp.
Hardwood and Cedar Forest. Good
Roads Throughout. Rock-Osier.

$175,000 1074964

$425,000 1075830

$109,900 1076691

$179,000 1079705

2 Bdrm, 1bth cottage. Year around.
Escanaba River. Great fishing.
New gar and breezeway. Cornell.

3 Bdrm, 2 bth home. 10 Acres. 140 ft
frtg on Jug Lk. Pole barn. Wetmore.

3 Bdrm, 1 bth home. 80 Acres. 1/2 open, 1/2 wooded.
Pond. Completely redone. All new. Carney

3 Bdrm, 1 bth cottage.
Quaint Cottage. 110 Ft on Big Bay
De Noc. Beautiful sunrises. Nahma

$115,000 1080077

$159,995 1080446

$329,000 1080794

$65,000 1080044

3 Bdrm, 1 bth home. Bsmt,
lrg pole bldg, guest house,
2 garages. Stephenson.

4 Bdrm, 3 bth 160 acre homestead. Separate
rental cabins. Mature forest. 10 Mile Creek
frtg. 48x124 Equip. bldg. Perronville.

4 Bdrm, 3 bth waterfront home.
3200 sq. ft. log home. Awesome. Spotless.
Motivated seller! Stonington.

2 Bdrm, 1 bth camp. 40 Acres. Mobile, well,
septic, elec. Outbldgs. Year around access.
Perronville.

$155,000 1083236

$399,000 1081742

$239,000 1081090

$84,500 1083207

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

ESCANABA OFFICE:

131

CADILLAC AREA:

128 Acres M/L - For
Cash Sale - 3 Parcels

SQUIRREL,
TURKEY,
DEER!
Almont Twp. Sec 10,
Lapeer Co., MI

SKOW TRUST SEEKS BIDS. SELLER RESERVES
RIGHT TO ACCEPT OR REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS.
PARCEL 1 - 46.356 acres m/l 15.5 tillable m/l balance prime wildlife
habitat/young forest. Lying West and South of access at end of unimproved dead end Farley Road.
PARCEL 2 - 60.746 acres m/l with pond mostly tillable. Some trees
around pond and fence rows. Lying East and South of access at end
of unimproved dead end Farley Road.
PARCEL 3 - 21.415 acres m/l mature hardwood with 20 foot access
owned to Kidder Road.
PARCEL 4 - All of above as one parcel. Entire parcel Squirrel, Turkey
and Deer abound! All boundaries marked with visible cement markers
set pursuant to order of Lapeer County Circuit Court Order.

JUST IN TIME FOR
HUNTING SEASON
78.33 acres with a pond on it. Has a deer
blind set up already with great hunting. Has
a nice mix of woods and field. $142,000

80 Acre Hunting Parcel!!!!
Find your next buck on this
beautiful secluded wooded parcel!
Enjoy a nearly 2500 sqft, 4 bdrm,
2.75 ba home w/ a 2 car attached
garage, 24x48 pole barn w/ heated
workshop & a large pond!! Make
this your next hunting camp or home
today! Price Reduced $269,000.
MLS# 1787308

61 wooded acres with older 3 bedroom
1.5 bath mobile home. Great hunting cabin. Trails throughout property and not much
traffic. $149,900

MLS: 1781191: 7143 W 48TH ROAD, FORMER HOXEYVILLE
INN, CADILLAC, 48+ ACRES, HARDWOODS, RIDGES, RAVINES,
MEADOWS, 4 BEDROOM 3+ BATHS, 3800 SQ/FT, POLEBARN
AND 2 CAR DETACHED GARAGE,AND HORSEBARN, FORMER
BED AND BREAKFAST,FORCED AIR HEAT AND ALT WOOD
HEAT, POND, $395,000. CLICK HERE TO SEE ADDITIONAL
PHOTOS OF THIS BEAUTIFUL HOME WWW.MPR.NET

Melissa Castillo
Kehoe Realty

COLDWELL BANKER MT PLEASANT REALTY
Deb Morris - Sales Associate
304 E Broadway
Mount Pleasant MI 48858
cell 989-621-8912
office 989-773-5972
debmorris@mpr.net

(989)965-3170 Cell
(989)426-2583 Home

MelissaCastillo1@yahoo.com

901 N. M-18 • Gladwin, MI 48624

Tracy L. Collins

216.09 Acres of Prime Hunting
Enjoy hunting this nearly 80%
wooded parcel. Several blinds,
shooting lanes & trails are already
on the property. There is also a
cabin w/ running water &
electricity. $454,000. MLS#1790814

GREAT LAKES
MORTGAGE
FUNDING
NMLS# 137017

586-481-5577

www.HomeLoansByTracy.com

A LOAN MADE JUST FOR YOU
Because mortgage loans are uniquely individual, we offer a wide
range of loan programs tailored to your specific needs including:

Bid/info: Mark A. Jackson, Attorney/Broker for Trust

(517) 265-8138

Written Bids due no later than 4:00 pm December 29, 2014.

Rural Development Loans • FHA And VA Loans
Conventional Fixed Rate Loans • Debt Consolidation
First Time Homebuyers • Non-Owner Loans
PURCHASES AND REFINANCES

989-820-7564

ESCAPE & OWN YOUR OWN HUNTING LODGE

MOVE IN READY HOME

Ask for . . . JERRY

FORSBERG
Office: 989-386-2631

308 E. 5th Street • Clare, MI 48617

OF CLARE

HUNTERS SEE US!

Harrison-62 A parcel w/6000’ river frontage on Muskegon River. Hunt, camp and canoe. You can do some
great things on this beautiful piece of property. L/C terms
available. Great Price - $149,900!
Farwell-79 A wooded and open hunting property w/
clean, well maintained 2 BR cabin & pole barn. Located
on paved road. Great recreation area $185,000.

COME SEE THE POSSIBILITIES
Land Contract Option Available!

Lake-PRICE REDUCED To $565,000! 255 acres, prime
piece of recreational/agricultural property. Includes 2
homes and many barns/outbuildings. Doc & Tom Creek

runs through the property. Also has a fishing pond. Many
possible uses. Call office for details.
Osceola Co., Orient Township. 295 acres for deer,
ducks, partridge and woodcocks. Good road frontage.
New survey. Several blinds included. $1278/Acre.
Harrison area: Clare County. 40 acre hunt club with cabin. Quality deer mgt; trails throughout. Only $119,900!
Many smaller, affordable Up North getaway parcels;
We have several hunting properties that would work well
for multiple ownership. See us for land.

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

HUNTING PROPERTY in the U.P.

132

Cape Cod 1 ½ story home offers the scenic outdoors year round. Immediate
possession of home with 5 acres for $137,000 or purchase entire 83 acre parcel for the avid hunter and outdoor enthusiast at $386,000. Home and land
is centrally located in Tuscola County on a paved county road. This single
family home has been recently updated with new carpet, tile, windows, all
electric & plumbing fixtures. Most furniture included. The land offers a pole
barn, multiple deer blinds for bow & gun season, and ATV trails.

MLS #: 214078692 on Realtor.com

Contact: Chris Krystek • chrisk@idealtech.us

90+- acres of land in the
Watson area, Marquette
Co. 2- bedroom log home
with newer 2- car garage.
100’s of acres of State
Land next to property.

$275,000
#1081582

CALL BOB AT

906-280-4815

31.95 acres of land in
Escanaba Township.
Property has a large
building on property,
electric on property.
Formerly a horse barn.

37+- acres with a large
camp and 2 outbuildings.
Close to State Land and
Lake Michigan for
hunting and fishing.
NEW PRICE

98+- acres of nicely
wooded property. 80 of
the 98 acres are in CFA.
12x65 garage. Great
hunting area. Public road.
NEW PRICE

#1079034

#1077947

$175,000
#1076600

$79,999

PINE TREE REALTY

1002 Delta Ave • Gladstone, Michigan 49837

$99,000

OFFICES:
906-428-1256
or 906-466-2600

pinetree@pinetreerealty.net

FEATURED PROPERTIES
2000+ Frontage on Woodruff Lake
Isabella County

EDMORE - Ideal for entertaining.
Underground Sprinkling System w/
dedicated well, 36X48 Partially Insulated Pole Barn, Two Ponds and Over
2000 Feet of Paved Driveway, attached
3 car garage, Central Air, Oak Kitchen
Cabinets, Stainless Steel Appliances,
and custom made elevator.
MLS #14036318
$309,000

SIX LAKES - Just under 200’ of
peaceful and private waterfront on
Horseshoe Lake. Owner has taken special care of interior and exterior, while
adding a bunk house attached to a 2 car
garage. Horseshoe Lake is an all sports
lake w/great fishing. Home is situated
on 3 extra deep waterfront lots. Unbelievable views from 4 season porch.
MLS #14050076
$179,900

BLANCHARD - 120 Acre Hobby
Farm in Isabella County with 4+
Bdrms/ 2 Full Baths & 3000 sq ft of
living space. Attached 2 Car Garage
and a 42X60 Partially Heated Pole Barn
w/ Workshop.

REMUS: Abundance of Wildlife, Oak
Trees and peace and quiet are just a few
ways to describe this Waterfront Property.
Over 2000 Feet of Private Frontage on
Woodruff Lake (no wake, no public access). Property had a former 12-site rustic
campground with electric. Private boat
launch to the lake. Excellent bird, deer
and small game hunting. Home is a 1981
Fairmount that has been updated inside
and out and is heated primarily w/an outdoor wood burner and LP for back up.
Newer Roof and 4” Well. Three Elevated
Heated Blinds and two mature food plots.
MLS#14056098

MLS #14014643

$450,000

CRYSTAL - Peaceful, Quiet and Secluded describes this home on 85 +/Heavily Wooded Acres. Open floor
plan w/plenty of go to places. 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Full Walkout Basement
with a 28X32 Pole Barn.

BANK OWNED

$499,900

MLS #14049921

$219,900

Waterfront Land/Cottages/Homes
Barryton - 120’ of Chippewa River Frontage.

This 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Home is very clean and cozy. Panoramic Views of the River from most of

the rooms. Owner has taken special care to maintain this home.

MLS #14031137 - $39,900



Riverdale - Well-kept executive ranch home w/5 bedrooms, 3 full baths on 10 acres among mature trees overlooking the Pine River. 330’ of
river frontage. Ultimate peaceful and serene setting with wildlife galore. MLS #13046685 - $214,900



Six Lakes - Situated on 3 lots w/additional Waterfront Lot, you will have plenty of room for those Summer BBQ's. 2 Car Pole Barn has plenty of
room to park your water toys. MLS #13049251 - $124,900



Barryton - A cottage w/amazing river views!

4 acres across 400’+ of Chippewa River frontage, plenty of room to explore your own wooded

hills overlooking the river or relax and fish from your riverfront deck. Being sold furnished.

MLS #14039421 - $59,000



Barryton - Private Channel Frontage to Martiny Chain of Lakes Waterfront Home. Special care w/home inside and out.
Kitchen have wonderful panoramic views of the water. This is a must see home! MLS #14031132 - $125,900



Houghton Lake - Buildable Lot w/100’ Channel Frontage to Houghton Lake. MLS #13062257 - $80,000

Family Room and

www.eaglerealtymi.com
120 E. Main, Edmore MI 48829

888-967-4140

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS



133

Antler Bay

G

RE

A
M TT
o I
sE TIv ME
L L A To
ER TE B
! D uY
,

Woodland Luxury in
Michigan’s Eastern
Upper
Peninsula

ANTLER BAY DEER RANCH, BARBEAu, MI n Estate-style 1684-acre ranch with 300 ft. of frontage with a dock on St. Mary’s River — allowing
access to anywhere in the world by water! n Located in the eastern Upper Peninsula, this property includes three private lakes where fish
abound. n Historic Sault Ste. Marie — and its attractions and casino — are just 15 min away. n Though tucked quietly into the woods, it’s only
20 min. to Chippewa International Airport. n The main lodge is a grand 8,500-sq. ft.-log home with 7 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, gourmet kitchen,
indoor pool/spa, fitness area, billiard room, attached 3-car garage, and stunning views from floor-to-ceiling windows and wrap-around porches.
n In addition, there is a quaint 1,500 sq.ft. Hunters Cabin, on 600-acre DNR-licensed deer ranch enclosed by 10 ft. high game fence – no limits,
season or additional hunting license required. n Outbuildings include clubhouse, multi-purpose room, pole barns and more.
Great for hunting, fishing, hiking and snowmobiling; with income potential.
n Estate: $2,490,000 MLS# 14-407
n Main Lodge (8,500 sq. ft) 40 acres, dock on St. Mary’s River: $690,000
n Hunters Cabin (2 bedroom, 1,500 sq. ft.) 80 acres with 4800 sg. ft. pole barns: $260,000

906-484-5555

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

DianePatrick@lighthouse.net | www.landnseasales.com
101 W. M-134 | Cedarville, MI 49719

134

Call Us
For Details
866-402-3620

306 total acres
275 acres of private park
and recreation area
Private gated community
Estate sized 1 acre wooded lots
Lots starting at $75,000
All residents will receive
5 all-inclusive days and
have the opportunity to hunt
at the Muy Grande Ranch
and Resort for 10 years
5 day stay at our
luxury lake house
TRULY UNIQUE PROPERTY
Beautiful Wooded Acreage
Presque Isle County
Secluded location with rolling
lands
26 acre private Lake Ann
250 acre all sports Lake Nettie
45 minutes from
historic Mackinac Island

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

For Sale
By Owner

LIMITED
LAKE FRONT
LOTS
AVAILABLE

135

COLDWELL BANKER
SCHMIDT REALTORS

101 W. M-134 • Cedarville, MI 49719

Diane Patrick • 906-484-5555
dianepatrick@lighthouse.net

U.P. HUNTER’S PARADISE – ALL A SHORT
DISTANCE FROM SAULT STE. MARIE

128 ACRES W. 8 ACRE POND SECLUDED 672 SQ. FT CABIN
Hardwoods, Rolling
Terrain, 2000 Sq. Ft. “Up
North” Feeling Home,
Spacious Garage Plus A
Bunk House. Dafter

$

269,000
80 ACRE PARCEL

with a charming 1450 sg. ft. log
home suited for year round or
seasonal living, two ponds, and a
large pole barn with a 1,000 sq ft
“Gathering Room” plus the 3800
sq. ft. garage/workshop. Barbeau

on the Munuscong
River, great fishing,
deep protected water,
electric & well.
$

79,000
ANTLER BAY WHITETAIL
DEER RANCH

$

260,000
40 ACRE PARCEL

with an 8500 sq. ft. elegant log
home with 7 bedrooms, 6 baths,
gourmet kitchen, indoor pool/
spa to name just a few amenities.
Includes waterfront lot on the
St. Mary’s River with a dock.
Barbeau

$

690,000

1684 acre ranch, partially fenced, three private
lakes, 1500 Sq. ft. log home, secluded 800 sg. ft. hidden
cabin, spacious pole barn/garage/workshop/office, 300’
waterfront lot with dock on the St. Mary’s River PLUS
the elegant 8500 sq. ft log home w. 7 bedrooms,6 baths,
gourmet kitchen, fully furnished! Motivated Seller!
A great time to buy the whole package. Barbeau
20 minutes to Chippewa International Airport.

Reduced to $2,490,000

Bringing Together Buyers And Sellers Of Quality Hunting And Farmland

Chad Thelen

cell 517 819 6344

cthelen8@hotmail.com • www.stoneycreekoutdoors.com
CIRCLE J DEER RANCH IN
PORTLAND, IONIA COUNTY

MLS: 58663. Fantastic and well
kept! 37 acres, 3 bedroom ranch
home, rental home, several outbuildings. Approx. 35 acres
behind a high fence home to
approx. 100 deer. Quite a bit of
water on property holding ducks
and geese. Trophy room/museum on property, that can be
purchased for an additional
price. $375,000

CLINTON COUNTY

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

RARE IONIA COUNTY
GRAND RIVER FRONTAGE

136

CLINTON COUNTY
VACANT LAND

MLS: 59395. 47 Total Acres,
Approx. 15 acres of woods and
12 acres of tillable, the balance
in wooded fence rows and
swamp land. Approx. 20x24
polebarn with cement floor.
Additional “sugar shanty”
building that needs work. A well
also sits next to polebarn. Lots of
deer and turkeys on property.
$249,000

2040 Yallup Rd. St. Johns-Log home on 10 acres
Here is a great chance to be my neighbor! This log home was built in an awesome setting on 10 acres. From
my home across the road, I watch the wildlife pour out of this property........deer, turkey, pheasants, etc. The
home and outbuildings sit on approx. 2 acres, the other 8 acres is comprised of woods, brush, swamp, and some
tillable land that produces a small income. The surrounding land is 60 acres of open tillable farmland to the
west, everything to the north, east, and south is a great mix of woods, swamp, small tillable fields and CRP.
The log home is very well kept and updated, being built in 1991. There are 2 outbuildings, of which one has a
small liveable apartment built in. The buildings are also used for woodworking, housing animals like chickens
and the occasional steer.

MLS: 59590. Approx. 83 acres
of hunting, fishing and farming heaven on property.
Approx. 50 acres of tillable
and that is high and dry with
the balance of acres in swails
and nature timber that leads
down to the Grand River.
Buildable lot has a recent perk
with tillable farmland, buildable locations test on file that would overlook
and hunting and fishing opportunities the river.

EATON COUNTY FARM! 152 ACRES
112 TILLABLE, 40 WOODS AND WETLANDS

Here is your chance to own a large tract of land
to start a small farming operation, build a family retreat, or purchase for an investment
between Charlotte and Eaton Rapids. There are
several gravel mining operations in the vicinity
and this property has subsurface gravel on it.
With 112 out of 152 acres being tillable, the
property brings in a substantial income from
renting out the farmland. The current owner
also leases out the hunting rights for more
income. Owner states that a few years back,
one of the fields held approx. 50 deer with
approx. 20 of them being bucks! $830,600

We offer wildlife habitat consulting, CRP and WRP
planting and maintenance, road/trail building, food plots, ponds, etc.
Stoney Creek
Outdoor Properties, LLC 
St. Johns, MI 48879 
Cell: (517) 819-6344

Brokered By:

WEICHERT, REALTORS®
Property Mart Southgate Plaza
800 S. BR 127
St. Johns, Michigan 48879-1649

Contact us to see how you can get financial assistance to turn your property into a Wildlife Paradise!

MANISTEE RIVER. 400+ ft of prime trout stream, 1,100 sq ft log sided home. 2 bdrm
+ loft, stone fireplace, screen porch, hot tub, sauna. Build 1996. Thousand acres
state land nearby. See details at www.cbgreatlakes.com/1790168. $229,900.
BOB MERCHANT • 231-633-0867
BEAUTIFUL SECLUDED WOODED WATERFRONT
7.7+/- acres, 970+ sq ft frontage on Smith Lake,
located between Traverse City & Kalkaska,
state land on three sides, ideal log home site.
$169,900. www.cbgreatlakes.com/1790168.
FRED BRIGHT • 231-409-6143

VACANT LAND

80 ACRES OLD FARM. State land nearby. www.cbgreatlakes.com/1776762. $140,000.
BOB MERCHANT • 231-633-0867
80 ACRES HUNTING. U.P. Property near Bevort Lake. www.cbgreatlakes.com/1790575.
$65,000. JAMES TEAHEN • 231-631-5588

402 E. Front Street, Traverse City, MI 49686

CBGreatLakes. com

SCHMIDT REALTORS

Kathleen Schepke

Banner Realty

989-464-6031 • kschepke@ymail.com

SERVING ALPENA, ALCONA, PRESQUE ISLE & MONTMORENCY COUNTIES

NEW CONSTRUCTION: 20 acres included, but up to
200 excellent hunting acres (negotiable) with stunning,
quality designed, custom ranch with 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, and 2- car attached garage. Private location that
is easily accessible just off US 23. Prosperous hunting
year-round and adjoins hundreds of acres of state land.
$200,000 MLS #292878
WITH 150' ON GREAT
LAKE HURON and 23
acres of hunting property,
this 2004 ranch has incredible views, cathedral
ceilings, gas fIreplace, and hot tub lakeside. Includes
heated, attached 2-car garage and detached pole bam,
underground power, and close to hundreds of acres of
nature conservancy. $289,000 MLS #286212

HORSE RANCH: 20
acres, 2004 3 bedroom, 2
bath ranch with over 1700
sq. ft. includes a master
suite, separate dining,
20x13 living room, 30x40
attached garage leading
to indoor arena and stables, and detached 32x48
pole building. Board your horses at home and enjoy
panoramic country views! $199,000 MLS #292709

4-WHEELING: Yearround family home on 3
acres with sand beach
access to Lake Huron,
endless state trails nearby for cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, or off­
roading. Well kept 3-4 bedroom home has a wood
fireplace, 15x20 kitchen, a full, finished basement
and 2 car attached garage. $119,000 MLS #292773

RETREAT: 10 acres and
pond includes Presque
Isle Association membership
(presqueisleharbor.org).The 31x33
pole barn improved with
2 bedrooms, a full bath,
well and septic. Power run to workshop, covered
RV parking, fish cleaning station and Gem Camper.
Snowmobiles negotiable. $79,000 MLS #292624

LAKE HURON: 300' of
natural frontage on Michigan's Great Lake. Majestic wildlife views! 10
acres to build your dream
home in this private, gated community near the
village of Presque Isle. A 53x36 pole building with
14' doors has improvements including well, septic
and underground power. $189,000 MLS #289802

ALL-SPORT: 108' on
recreational Long Lake
beach frontage. Prime
for fishing, swimming,
boating, water and jet
skiing, and more! This
lot is lake level and
ready to build with sand foundation and gravel
drive already in. Vacant parcels like this and at
this price are hard to find. $109,000 MLS #291464

MUST SELL!

10 % DISCOUNT IF DEAL FINALIZED
BY NOVEMBER 30, 2014
(on all properties except LIGHTHOUSE POINT,EXCLUSIVE
LAKE HURON WATERFRONT & WATERVIEW ESTATE LOTS)!

CANADIAN RECREATIONAL HUNTING
PROPERTY CLOSE TO SAULT STE.
MARIE, MICHIGAN BORDER

*LAND CONTRACTS AVAILABLE O.A.C.*
OTHER PROPERTIES AVAILABLE,
CONTACT US FOR DETAILS!
MOOSE HUNTING SEASON
OPENS OCTOBER 11TH
WHITETAIL HUNTING SEASON
OPENS NOVEMBER 3RD

ALL PROPERTIES ARE IN TROPHY DEER
& BEAR AREA WITH GREAT FISHING!!!
NO GUIDE OR OUTFITTER REQUIRED
IF YOU BUY PROPERTY IN ONTARIO!

LAJAMBE
ENTERPRISES
INC.
120 Huron Street

(across Street from Canadian Customs)

Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 1P8
TELEPHONE:

(705) 541-9663
FAX:

(705) 541-9664

After 5 p.m. and weekends
(705) 248-9663
Frank Lajambe
flajambe@lajambe.com
WEBSITE: www.lajambe.com
CONTACT:

EMAIL:

WATERFALLS PROPERTY: 160 acre parcel 45 min from International
Bridge. Waterfalls & river running across property. Rugged, well treed, hunting, and recreational property with government land on 3 sides. Only 1.5
miles off a year round maintained road. This won't be on the market for long
so act now. Don’t delay, asking $69,900.00 as is or make an offer.
REILLY NORTH PROPERTY: 80 acre parcel with beaver pond, hardwood and softwood mixed forestland 30 minutes from International Bridge.
Priced to sell at $26,900.00.
MACDONALD PROPERTY: Reduced for quick sale - Private hunting lodge
with 759 acres of rugged forestland. Property comes with five (5) deeds
therefore; six (6) bear and six (6) moose tags are available. The lodge is 24
X 36. There is also a twenty +- acre lake and a beaver pond on this recreational WONDERLAND. This property is being sacrificed for $299,000.00.
Don’t be shy, make an offer.
EXECUTIVE WATER FRONT HOME FOR SALE: This four bedroom home
is situated less than 30 miles from the US/Canadian border in a private
country setting, in a quiet bay. The lot is 200x750. Lots on either side also
available. This property has unequaled sunsets facing southwest with deep
water for pleasure craft boating on Lake Huron in the North Channel.
$899,900.00.
TWO 10 ACRE SAND BEACH LOTS (these lots have it all): 60 miles east
of Sault Ste. Marie each lot has 300’ frontage on Bright Lake near highway 17
East (lake area approx. 24 square miles), year round access with power to
property. This inland lake has perch, bass, walleye and northern pike. Priced
to sell at $124,900.00 (lot #2) and $139,900.00 (lot #3).
REILLY SOUTH PROPERTY: 80 acre parcel with beaver pond, hardwood and softwood mixed forestland 30 minutes from International Bridge.
Priced to sell at $21,900.00.
PRINCE PROPERTY: 287 acres of hardwood and softwood forest with a
creek flowing through the property. Year round access. This property comes
with a wind mill that generates approximately $5,500.00 dollars per year.
There are deer, bear, as well as small game on the property and it is located
30 minutes from the International Bridge. Asking price is $94,900.00 OBO.
FINN'S BAY PROPERTY: Two Waterfront Lots on Lake Huron's North
Channel 141' X 600' $129,900.00 and 150' X 600' $134,900.00, year
round access, deep water for boating and fishing, 25 minutes east of Sault
Ste. Marie, Ontario. Financing available. (705) 248-2002
EXCLUSIVE LAKE HURON WATERFRONT & WATER-VIEW ESTATE
LOTS LOCATED IN THESSALON, ONTARIO 50 MILES EAST OF SAULT
STE. MARIE, ONTARIO ON HIGHWAY 17 EAST: Lighthouse Point serviced
with hydro, telephone, sewer, water, gas, cable on paved street. Airport,
marina and hospital in area. No time limit for building. Waterfront lots 100’–
478’ frontage, waterview lots 80’ frontage. Prices from $25,000.00 and
up.

Other Properties Available Upon Request.
Don't Be Shy, Make An Offer.
All Properties Must Be Sold!

LAND CLEARANCE SALES • LOOKING FOR OFFERS • LAND CLEARANCE SALES • LOOKING FOR OFFERS •

LOOKING FOR OFFERS • LAND CLEARANCE SALES • LOOKING FOR OFFERS • LAND CLEARANCE SALES •

FEATURED PROPERTIES IN CHEBOYGAN AND PRESQUE ISLE COUNTIES

LOOKING FOR OFFERS • LAND CLEARANCE SALES • LOOKING FOR OFFERS •

$149,900

WALSH ROAD
CHEBOYGAN, MI 49721
MLS # 292463

Prime Hunting acreage located between Mullett
Lake and Black Lake. 111.45 acres nicely wooded less than 3 miles from hundreds of acres of
State Land and near the Black Mountain and
ORV trails.

$62,000

1617 SILERY ROAD 8.49 ACRES
INDIAN RIVER, MI 49749
MLS # 293530

Immaculate Pole Barn on a total of 8.49 acres, close to hundreds of acres of state
land, ATV and snowmobile trails and Mullett Lake. Close to the Landings Marina
for easy in and out boat access. A great location for your up north get away and
plenty of storage for those seasonal toys. Electric at the road for easy access
to power. A great location and well maintained property. Pole Barn is 30x40ft.

$39,000

192 TRILLIUM TRAIL
PARCEL 43
WOLVERINE, MI 49799
MLS # 291475

Great hunting compound. 10 acres very
near 1,000's acres of Pigeon River State
Forest. A walk away to an abundance of
recreation. 2 bedroom mobile home with
snow roof.

$84,900

1709 CHIPPEWA BEACH ROAD
INDIAN RIVER, MI 49749
MLS # 293518
Fantastic 3 bedroom and 1 newly renovated bathroom in a great location close to Indian River and
Burt Lake. In addition to a great location, this property includes a 24x36 pole building with wood stove
and man cave on just over an acre, a great package
for a new home buyer or an up north getaway.

$249,000

8244 SWAN ROAD
ONAWAY, MI 49765
MLS # 292126
Tucked away with 160 acres and turnkey cabin has it all.
There are trails and hunting blinds through out the property
with open ground for farming or planting. The cabin is a perfect up north getaway with easy access off maintained county road, forced air heat, wood stove inside and all the luxuries
of home with full functioning kitchen, laundry, and bathroom.

$35,500

ISLAND DRIVE PARCEL 2
WOLVERINE, MI 49799 MLS
# 291503

120' of Wildwood Lake frontage. Beautiful vacant waterfront site, close to the Pigeon River
Forest. Recreation is at your fingertips, biking,
kayaking, hunting, fishing, snowmobiling or motor biking are just a few of the sports. Easy access to I-75

3412 S. Straits Hwy
Indian River, MI 49749

231-238-7400

• LAND CLEARANCE SALES • LOOKING FOR OFFERS • LAND CLEARANCE SALES

Smarter, Bolder, Faster

524 ACRE RANCH IN
NORTHERN MICHIGANS
OTSEGO COUNTY

That’s Century 21 White House Realty
Let One Of Our Experts Provide You With A
FREE MARKETING ANALYSIS On The Value Of Your Property.

White House Realty

TOM GARNER 231-629-6006
60 ACRES, 2 MILE RD
REED CITY, MI

20+ ACRES, 70TH
AVE, EVART MI

Log home surrounded by hardwoods,
meadows & ponds is perfect for outdoor
adventures, wildlife & hunting!

3BR home, rolling/wooded,
stocked pond, pole barn,
natural gas.

$

389,900

$

164,000

80 ACRES, PARTRIDGE 40 ACRES, 4 MILE RD, 40 ACRES, 1 MILE RD,
AVE, LAKE MI
MORLEY MI
WHITE CLOUD MI

2 Miles from US 10,
walk to Eight Point Lake, well,
private pond 2 out buildings

$

109,900

100% wooded, great
hunting, small stream, paved
frontage, easy access.

$

89,900

Great hunting and recreation opportunities. Easy access
off US 131/M-37

$

79,000

MLS 14032945

MLS 14024093

MLS 14046080

MLS 14054607

MLS 14044179

23 ACRES, 11 MILE RD,
STANWOOD MI

21+ ACRES, 18 MILE
RD, RODNEY MI

26+ ACRES, 55TH AVE,
REMUS MI

40 ACRES,TAFT RD,
REMUS MI

3.87 ACRES, 20 AVE,
REMUS MI

Situated in the Northern tip of Michigan's
Lower Peninsula you will find this spectacular parcel of land. Property offers variety of
terrain from tillable food plot areas to rolling
hills to level woodland areas plus a small
tributary meanders through the Western
portion of the property and flows into the
Sturgeon River. Buildings consist of a main
lodge, cabin, pole buildings, storage building with cooler and utility buildings as well
as 9 hunting blinds and deer feeders. The
property is presently high fenced and supports a quality/managed deer herd. The opportunities are endless for what this property
has to offer and awaits a buyer that appreciates how special it truly is. The property has
remained in the same family since 1929 and
is now being made available to you. Please
take the opportunity to arrange your private
tour by contacting Tom Garner at 231-6296006 or email at tgarner.c21@gmail.com Serious and qualified
inquires only.

$

2,500,000

MLS# 14042750
Wooded, paved road,
building sites, great hunting,
2 ponds, L/C available

$

51,900
MLS 14007009

Hunt-Fish-Play on
Martiny Chain of Lakes.
Building sites, pond

$

79,900
MLS 14020078

Wooded land, great
history of good deer herd.
Easy access off M-20/M-66

$

49,900
MLS 14026013

100% wooded,
fantastic hunting and trails,
easy access off M-66

$

89,900
MLS 13063636

Wooded, waterfront parcel,
pole barn wired and prepped for
plumbing. Elec hookup avail.

$

79,900
MLS 14012866

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

10060 Buchanan Road • Canadian Lakes
tgarner.c21@gmail.com
www.Century21WhiteHouse.com

137

DAN DAN

LOG CABIN
FURNITURE

THEMATTRESSMAN.COM

WHOLESALE TO THE PUBLIC

Queen Log Bed $19999

Queen Size Log Headboard

CHECK
US OUT
ON THE
WEB!

7500

$

5 Drawer Chest Only
$

199

4 Drawer Chest
$

189

2 Drawer Night Stand
$

149

Finished Cedar Log Bed

ONLY

29999

$

BUNK BEDS Solid Wood Complete with Mattresses $29999
Rocker Recliners
From

19999

$

NOVEMBER 2014 - WNW NEWS

Rustic End Tables

138

from

14999

$

Log
Futons

39999

$

MORE SIZES,
SOLID WOOD,
AMERICAN MADE!

Mini
Cabins
starting at

1999

$

99

N
A
CALL
ANYTIME
(989)-832-1866
D
N
DA
Mattress
Not Included

THEMATTRESSMAN.COM 802 ASHMAN ST., MIDLAND

SeaArk 1652

Alweld 1552

Polarkraft 1654

$9,995

$16,995

Evinrude 50/35 Jet, Trailer

Yamaha 40/30 Jet, Trailer

Alumacraft MV 1544

Polarkraft 1860

$4,995

$12,995

$6,495

Alweld 1644

$8,995

G3 1652

Evinrude 60 Etec tiller,Trailer

Honda 15, Trailer

Backwater 27 hp, Trailer

Yamaha 70/50 Jet, Trailer

Side Console Yamaha 50hp 4 stroke Trailer

$10,995

Alweld 1648

Mud Buddy 35, Trailer, Shaggy Blind

$13,995

War Eagle 542

Backwater 23 hp, Trailer "Shiawasee Special"

$9,495

*plus tax, title & freight

CLEARANCE
SALE ON ALL
YAMAHA
OUTBOARD
MOTORS FOR
A LIMITED
TIME ONLY!!

Visit us at www.freeway-sports.com for a complete listing of boats!

FULL SERVICE PARTS & ACCESSORIES
Service Department • Indoor & Outdoor Storage

(810) 629-2291

Exit 84 on US-23

FLINT
EXIT 84
59

FREEWAY
SPORTS CENTER

FENTON

23

3241 Thompson Rd.
Fenton, MI 48430

Hours:
Mon.-Fri. 9am - 6pm
Sat. 9am - 5pm
Closed Sunday's

PONTIAC

96
ANN ARBOR

DETROIT

SPORTS
CENTER
w w w. f r e e w a y - s p o r t s . c o m
sales@freeway-sports.com

Ithaca Gun Company Model 37-Deer Slayer II

BLOW OUT SALE!

Many deer hunters spend their time stalking their quarry through the woods and waiting patiently in a
deer stand. The Deerslayer II is equipped with fiber optic (Marble Arms ®) rifle sights for shots through
the leaves and briars but is also drilled and tapped for the Weaver #62 rail so that you can mount the
scope of your choice. The barrel is fully rifled, which is optimal for a wide variety of ammunition. The
gun is available in 12 gauge and 20 gauge.

•A receiver that is machined from a solid block of steel
•Solderless Barrel System (patent pending)
•The strongest, truest barrel of any slug gun
•Robust extraction for today's high power ammunition

Retail $1,100

Hurry! Limited Supply!
31516 Harper Avenue
St. Clair Shores, MI 48082

Phone (586) 296-2360
Fax (586) 264-8307

STORE HOURS:
Mon. - Fri: 10am-7pm;
Sat: 10am-4pm; Closed Sunday

•Crisp, rifle-like 4-6lb. trigger pull
•Drop tine deer head engraving
•Fancy black walnut stock and forend

Slug Hunter Special:
BLOW OUT SALE PRICE OF

$

749

99

Michi-GUN
Available at:

Layaways Welcome

www.michigunandtackle.com