Guide to Products

and Services
www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Guide to Products and Services
The Software Engineering Institute 1
Strategy 2
Areas of Work 3
Put The SEI to Work For You 4
How to Use This Guide 5
Acquisition 6
Architecture, Product Lines, and Predictable Assembly 10
Process Improvement and Performance Measurement 18
Security 25
Interoperability, Dependability, and Misson Success 31
Special Programs
Affliate Program 37
SEI Credentials Program 37
SEI Membership Program 37
SEI Offce in Europe 38
SEI Partner Network 38
Software and Systems Process
Improvement Network (SPIN) 38
Index 39
Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Initialisms and Index 44
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 1
Since 1984, the Carnegie Mellon
®
Software
Engineering Institute (SEI) has served the
nation as a federally funded research and
development center. The SEI staff has
advanced software engineering principles
and practices and has served as a national
resource in software engineering, computer
security, and process improvement. As part
of Carnegie Mellon University, which is
well known for its highly rated programs in
computer science and engineering, the SEI
operates at the leading edge of technical
innovation.
Today, software continues to grow in impor-
tance and signifcance in nearly all aspects
of our society, including defense systems,
transportation, fnance, medicine, manufac-
turing, and entertainment.
Software affects us all. More than ever, we
need software that is built with quality, is
developed on time and within budget, and is
usable, maintainable, and capable of evolv-
ing to meet evolving needs.
The Software Engineering lnstitute
The SEI works with defense
and government organizations, industry,
and academia to continually improve our
software-intensive systems.
To accomplish this, the SEI
• performs research to explore
promising solutions to software
engineering problems
• identifes and codifes technological and
methodological solutions
• tests and refnes the solutions through
pilot programs that help industry and
government solve their problems
• widely disseminates proven solutions
through training, licensing, and
publication of best practices
The SEI’s core purpose is to help
organizations such as yours to improve their
software engineering capabilities and to
develop or acquire the right software, defect
free, within budget and on time, every time.
The SEI’s core purpose is to help organizations such as yours improve their
software engineering capabilities and develop or acquire the right software,
defect free, within budget and on time, every time.
2 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Create
The SEI addresses signifcant and
pervasive problems in software engineering
and related disciplines by
• motivating and performing research
• developing innovative new technologies
• identifying and fostering the
development and improvement of emerg-
ing or underused technologies
• improving and adapting existing solutions
SEI tools and methods are suitable for all
organizations that commission, build, or use
systems that depend on software.
The SEI collaborates with innovators and
researchers to implement these activities.
Apply
Because application and validation are
required to prove effectiveness, applicabil-
ity, and transition potential, the SEI applies,
validates, refnes, and extends new and
improved technologies and solutions in real-
world government and commercial contexts.
Refning and extending technologies and
solutions is an intrinsic part of application.
Government and commercial organizations
directly beneft from these engagements.
In addition, the experience that SEI staff
members gain through these engagements
helps to identify
• real-world problems that warrant further
investigation in the Create phase
• needed transition artifacts and
strategies for encouraging and supporting
adoption in the Amplify phase
The SEI works with early adopters to apply
promising tools and methods.
Strategy
Amplify
The SEI works through the software
engineering community and organizations
that depend on software to encourage and
support the widespread adoption of new and
improved technologies and solutions through
• courses
• licenses for use and delivery
• authorizations and certifcations
• workshops and conferences
• leadership in professional organizations
• Web-based communication
• books and publications
• advocacy
Professionals throughout the world acceler-
ate the adoption and impact of software
engineering improvements through direct
interaction with the SEI and with SEI
Partners—organizations and individuals
licensed by the SEI to deliver SEI services.
The SEI achieves its goals through technology innovation and transition.
The SEI creates usable technologies, applies them to real problems, and
amplifes their impact by accelerating broad adoption.
Create Apply Amplify
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 3
Areas of Work
For nearly 25 years, the SEI has served
the nation as a federally funded research
and development center. The SEI staff has
advanced software engineering principles
and practices and has served as a national
and international resource in software
engineering, computer security, and process
improvement. As part of the world-renowned
Carnegie Mellon University—a global
research university of more than 10,000
students and more than 4,000 faculty and
staff—the SEI and its staff operate at the
leading edge of technical innovation.
The SEI’s technical focus areas together with
its outreach activities are aimed at meeting
the defned software engineering needs of
the U.S. Department of Defense. Within
these areas of work, the SEI collaborates
with defense, government, industry, and aca-
demic institutions to continuously improve
software-intensive systems.
The SEI technical program—created and carried out by world-recognized
leaders in software engineering, security, and process improvement—consists
of fve technical focus areas. The SEI also conducts new research into emerging
topics in software and systems engineering.
Acquisition
Support for the DoD, federal
agencies, and others in
institutionalizing and continuously
improving their ability to acquire,
deploy, and sustain systems
that meet cost, schedule, and
technical objectives
Architecture, Product Lines,
and Predictable Assembly
Practices and techniques for
predictably and effciently
designing, constructing,
and guiding the evolution of
software-intensive systems with
the qualities needed to meet
business and mission goals
Process Improvement and
Performance Measurement
Process-management practices
and performance-improvement
and measurement techniques for
software and related disciplines
in support of the management,
development, and acquisition of
software and systems
Security
Technologies, system-development
practices, and system-management
practices that can signifcantly
improve networked systems
security and survivability; includes
CERT, a center of Internet security
expertise
Interoperability, Dependability,
and Mission Success
Technology and practices to
achieve system-of-systems
interoperability and to predict and
improve the performance and
dependability characteristics of
embedded and large systems
4 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Put the SEl to Work for You
By working with the SEI, you beneft from more than two decades of government
investment and participation from your peers in advancing the practice of software
engineering.
Congress established the SEI because
software is vital to the national interest.
By working with the SEI, you beneft from
a government investment of more than
$800 million and more than two decades of
participation from your peers and competi-
tors in advancing the practice of software
engineering.
The SEI creates, tests, refnes, and dissemi-
nates a broad range of technologies and
management techniques. These techniques
enable organizations to improve the results
of software projects, the quality and behav-
ior of software systems, and the security and
survivability of networked systems.
As an applied research and development
center, the SEI brings immediate benefts to
its research partners and long-term benefts
to organizations that depend on software.
The tools and methods developed by the SEI
and its research partners are applied daily in
organizations throughout the world.
How the SEI Works with Government
SEI staff members help the U.S. Department
of Defense (DoD) and other government
agencies solve software engineering and
acquisition problems. SEI direct support is
funded through task orders for government
work. Engagements with the SEI are of
particular beneft to government program
managers, program executive offcers, and
senior acquisition executives, particularly
those with long-range programs that will
beneft from strategic improvements that the
SEI fosters.
The SEI has a well-established process for
contracting with government agencies and
will work with you to meet your needs. This
process is described in more detail at
www.sei.cmu.edu/collaborating
/contracting.html.
For more information, write to the SEI at
government-customers@sei.cmu.
How the SEI Works with Industry
The SEI works with commercial organiza-
tions that want to develop a strategic advan-
tage by rapidly applying improved software
engineering technology. The SEI also works
with organizations that want to combine
their expertise with the SEI’s expertise to
mature new technology for the beneft of the
entire software industry. The SEI also sup-
ports a select group of SEI Partners—orga-
nizations and individuals that are trained and
licensed by the SEI to deliver SEI products
and services.
For more information, write to the SEI at
industry-customers@sei.cmu.
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 5
TOOLS & METHODS
www.sei.cmu.edu/tools-methods
Many SEI solutions to the problems
associated with software-intensive systems
are available as tools and methods to help
developers and acquirers improve their
practices.
CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENTS
www.sei.cmu.edu/services
The SEI accepts a limited number of funded
engagements to help organizations apply
best practices.
EDUCATION & TRAINING
www.sei.cmu.edu/products/courses
SEI courses, available from the SEI and from
licensed SEI Partners, are based on matured,
validated, and documented solutions to
pervasive problems.
CONFERENCES
www.sei.cmu.edu/events
The SEI sponsors or cosponsors many
technical conferences, workshops, and
user-group meetings throughout the year.
PUBLICATIONS
www.sei.cmu.edu/publications
Addison-Wesley has published more than 30
books by SEI staff members and others in the
SEI Series in Software Engineering. SEI staff
members have also written books published
by other publishing companies. In addition,
the SEI Web site provides free downloads of
almost 1,000 SEI research reports.
How to Use This Guide
This Guide to Products and Services is organized by the SEI areas of work. It is intended to help
you and your organization determine how to put the SEI’s resources to work for you.
CREDENTIALS
www.sei.cmu.edu/credentials
Participants are guided through a series of
SEI courses that help them to develop exper-
tise in specifc technical areas. Participants
receive SEI certifcations or certifcates after
completing the courses.
RESEARCH
www.sei.cmu.edu/collaborating
By investing in technology development
with the SEI, organizations contribute to and
rapidly adopt the results of research before
those results are widely available.
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Acquisition
Acquiring systems that meet cost, schedule, and technical objectives
www.sei.cmu.edu/acquisition
Acquiring systems that deliver mission capa-
bilities on their promised date is a national
imperative. However, acquisition programs
frequently have diffculty meeting aggressive
cost, schedule, and technical objectives.
Acquisition program managers are chal-
lenged to grasp practical business concerns
and to understand topics as diverse as risk
management, use of commercial off-the-
shelf (COTS) components, use of processes
and their application, program management,
architecture, survivability, interoperability,
source selection, and contract monitoring.
The SEI has spent more than two decades
developing solutions in these areas.
Unfortunately, mastery of this information
and know-how can be daunting for an acqui-
sition program manager.
The SEI works directly with acquisition pro-
grams to help them achieve their objectives.
Teams of SEI experts work in acquisition
contexts in the Army, Navy, Air Force, and
intelligence agencies, as well as other DoD
and civil agencies, applying SEI products and
services.
The SEI vision is to facilitate the rapid forma-
tion of agile teams composed of acquirers,
developers, and operators using SEI tech-
nologies to provide high-quality, cutting-edge
capabilities.
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1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 7
TOOLS & METHODS
Solutions to the problems associated with
software-intensive systems that help develop-
ers and acquirers improve their practices
Acquisition Strategy Development Tool
The SEI Acquisition Strategy Development
Tool (ASDT) can be used to profle a pro-
gram’s software-acquisition characteristics,
identify key strategy drivers, identify specifc
strategic choices, and evaluate how those
choices mitigate the program’s software
risks. Program management offces can
use this Excel-based workbook to formulate
acquisition strategies for a new program or
to evaluate the appropriateness of strategies
being executed. In addition, an accompanying
technical report, Techniques for Developing
an Acquisition Strategy by Profling Software
Risks, provides ASDT users in-depth back-
ground information and instructions on how to
use the tool to achieve optimal results.
Capability Maturity Model Integration
(CMMI) Acquisition Module
One way to improve acquisition practices is to
ensure that the acquisition processes needed
for a technically sound project are defned,
implemented, measured, and maintained.
The Capability Maturity Model
®
Integration
(CMMI
®
) Acquisition Module is a condensed
form of the CMMI framework that defnes
effective and effcient acquisition practices,
directed both internally toward the acquisition
project and externally toward project monitor-
ing and control of the selected contractors and
suppliers. These practices provide a basis for
acquisition process discipline while balancing
the need for agility.
The CMMI Acquisition Module (CMMI-AM),
Version 1.1 and related materials are available
on the CMMI-AM Web page at
www.sei.cmu.edu/programs
/acquisition-support/cmmi-am.html.
CMMI for Acquisition (CMMI-ACQ)
For organizations that want to apply a com-
prehensive suite of CMMI principles to their
acquisition activities, CMMI for Acquisition
(CMMI-ACQ) provides a set of widely
accepted acquisition practices within a proven
improvement structure.
The initial framework grew out of a col-
laboration between General Motors and the
Software Engineering Institute. The CMMI-
ACQ constellation now refects the results of
extensive piloting with other government and
commercial acquirers.
CMMI for Acquisition and related materials are
available on the SEI Acquisition Web page at
www.sei.cmu.edu/acquisition.
CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENTS
Funded engagements to help organizations
meet their business and mission objectives
Direct Support
Acquisition Process Improvement
Whether you’re using Lean, Six Sigma, Theory
of Constraints, AFSO 21, CMMI, or other
process improvement methods, the SEI can
help. The SEI works directly with acquisition
programs and organizations to help defne a
set of measurable improvement objectives,
analyze for improvement, and implement
changes and control mechanisms for long-
term improvement.
Support for Software Acquisition and
Systems Engineering Activities
The SEI works directly with program managers
and their staffs to help them achieve their
objectives. Teams of SEI technical experts
work in acquisition environments in the Army,
Navy, and Air Force, as well as with other DoD
and civil agencies, applying SEI products and
services as well as other industry best prac-
tices. The SEI supports a wide range of activi-
ties that include identifying and mitigating risk,
benchmarking and improving acquisition pro-
cesses, implementing software and systems
engineering best practices, and more.
Strategic Planning
Acquisition Strategy Planning
Workshop
Developing an acquisition strategy is a
crucial component of acquisition planning.
Acquisition-improvement experts from the
SEI help workshop attendees gain a deeper
understanding of a program’s software-acqui-
sition characteristics and the drivers that affect
that program’s strategic choices. In addition,
participants learn how to use the Acquisition
Strategy Development Tool to either formulate
acquisition strategies for a new program or
evaluate the appropriateness of strategies that
a program is already executing.
IT Strategic Planning
A well-founded information technology (IT)
strategic plan communicates the mission,
vision, objectives, values, and critical success
factors for the organization’s enterprise archi-
tecture and future products and services.
The SEI helps organizations defne and articu-
late an effective IT strategy from a systems
perspective. SEI experts also consider the
mechanisms for governance and focus on
aligning the IT strategy with organizational
business objectives.
Pre- and Post-Contract Award
Workshops
SEI staff members help a program’s person-
nel prepare for the request-for-proposal (RFP)
process, reviewing and discussing potential
pitfalls and problems. After contract award,
the SEI can facilitate workshops between
the government and the selected contractor
team as they defne program-specifc pro-
cesses in areas that are key to the success of
the program, such as engineering practices,
program management, communications, and
risk and issue management.
Assessments, Reviews, and
Evaluations
Independent Technical Assessments
Independent technical assessments (ITAs)
uncover the root causes of problems affect-
ing software-intensive programs, and provide
recommendations that maximize a program’s
strengths and minimize and mitigate its
risks. ITAs are typically initiated by a system
program director, program executive offcer,
or other acquisition offcial. ITA teams
comprise SEI staff members and visiting
scientists with a mix of expertise who
conduct a series of interviews with program
stakeholders and deliver a briefng and
recommendations.
Software Risk Evaluations
A software risk evaluation provides program
managers with a mechanism to anticipate and
address program risks. This evaluation is used
to identify and categorize specifc program
risks emanating from products, processes,
management, resources, and constraints.
The program’s staff members participate in
the identifcation, analysis, and mitigation of
risks that could affect their development effort.
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Process Appraisals
A process appraisal is an objective review
of the processes used by a program team
(acquirers, contractors and subcontractors)
to execute a project. Reviews examine engi-
neering, acquisition, integrated product and
process development, project management,
and support processes. The SEI provides the
Standard CMMI Appraisal Method for Process
Improvement (SCAMPI
SM
) family of appraisal
methods to identify strengths, weaknesses,
and risks to assist government programs in
process improvement activities.
Additionally, the SEI offers the SEI Process in
Execution Review (PIER), a SCAMPI appraisal
that helps acquirers evaluate the process
capability of their contractor or contractor
team, and identify risks and ways to mitigate
them. A PIER can also look at the processes
employed by the acquirer, and at the intersec-
tion of processes between the contractor and
the acquirer.
Request for Proposal (RFP) Preparation
and Reviews
The language used in a formal request for
proposal (RFP) makes a critical difference in
the quality of the proposals received and ulti-
mately the success of an acquisition program.
The SEI is adept at developing RFP language,
including sample language for a variety of
specifc clauses relevant to software-inten-
sive acquisition. For example, some proposals
should specifcally address the importance
of software architecture, process improve-
ment, the software test and evaluation
approach, software measurement needs, and
requirements.
Additionally, the SEI works directly with acquir-
ers to improve RFP processes and capabili-
ties, conducting pre-award workshops to help
identify and mitigate risks by evolving the RFP
package. After the award, the SEI helps estab-
lish expectations and process interactions
between the acquirer and developers.
Source-Selection Reviews
The SEI supports the proposal-evaluation
phase of the source-selection process by pro-
viding technical reviews of the submissions,
with an emphasis on software-related issues.
Experienced SEI staff members help programs
prepare to evaluate proposals, judge them
against the criteria set forth in the solicitation,
assist with past performance and cost evalua-
tions, and more.
Measurement-Plan Evaluations
Effectively monitoring a contract requires that
a program have in place an effective, custom-
ized measurement system. When a program’s
measurement system includes consistent
collection of metrics and analysis for decision
making and fact-based planning, it can operate
as an effective early-warning system for
program problems. The SEI helps programs
create a system for recording metrics data so
that they can use reliable historical data as a
basis for more accurate program estimates.
System and Software Requirements
Architecture Reviews
The SEI works with project stakeholders to
ensure that customer requirements, product
and architecture requirements, and analysis
and validation processes refect the fun-
damental needs that drive programs, from
both mission and business perspectives. In
addition, the SEI advises programs on how
to manage requirements and architecture
changes, maintain traceability and change
history, and evaluate the impact of changes
from the viewpoint of the stakeholders.
Quality Assessments of System
Architectures and their Requirements
(QUASAR)
The SEI Quality Assessment of System
Architectures and their Requirements
(QUASAR) assessment method provides
a practical way to determine if a system’s
architecture, including its subsystems, meets
quality requirements. SEI technical staff
members help architects formulate claims,
build arguments, and gather evidence to
demonstrate to the program offce and other
stakeholders that their architectures possess
suffcient quality.
Testing-Approach Evaluation
The testing approach for a software-inten-
sive system has a signifcant impact on the
ultimate quality of the delivered system.
SEI experts help to ensure an appropriate
approach to software testing by reviewing
the system-test approach. Conducting an
evaluation ensures appropriate test coverage,
traceability to requirements, testing for COTS
products, visibility into contractor testing,
testing of both quality and functional require-
ments, and integration of software testing into
the overall test strategy.
Sustainment-Readiness Review
A sustainment-readiness review can help an
organization determine its overall software
maintenance plan, whether its software is
ready for sustainment, and whether suffcient
artifacts exist. Technical experts from the SEI
conduct sustainment-readiness reviews to
identify potential issues with a project entering
into sustainment and to recommend actions
for preparing a project for sustainment.
Document Reviews
The quality, completeness, and level of detail
of milestone document deliverables have a
substantial impact on a program’s ability to
execute software development. Experts in
many different areas of systems and software
expertise can provide or augment the techni-
cal review of documents produced by both
the program offce and the contractor. Types
of documents that can be reviewed include
those emanating from the acquisition strategy
as well as the transition and operations plans.
EDUCATION & TRAINING
Available from the SEI and licensed SEI
Partners, based on matured, validated, and
documented solutions to pervasive problems
Continuous Risk Management
This two-day course introduces project
managers, lead engineers, software engi-
neers, quality-assurance staff, hardware
engineers, and software engineering process
group members to the concepts and appli-
cation of continuous risk management. The
course provides participants with practical
experience, methods, and tools that help them
implement risk-management practices in their
organizations.
COTS-Based Systems for Program
Managers
This one-day course covers the major chal-
lenges and opportunities associated with the
use of COTS products in software-intensive
systems from the perspective of the program
manager. It covers practices based on real-
world case studies for establishing a COTS
business case, vendor and supplier rela-
tionships, architecture, license negotiation,
requirements, evaluation, risk management,
and more.
Acquisition, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 9
COTS Software Product Evaluation for
Practitioners
This two-day course covers fundamental def-
nitions, an overview of some of the basic prin-
ciples of COTS product evaluation, a process
framework for COTS software product evalua-
tion, and some useful techniques. Instructors
describe experiences and practices based
on real-world case studies for COTS product
evaluation.
Introduction to the CMMI Acquisition
Module
This one-day course is designed for program
managers and their staff members. It
presents the important role that process
and process improvement play in the acqui-
sition of software-intensive systems. This
course features comprehensive discussion
of the CMMI Acquisition Module, actionable
methods and tips for attendees, and ample
opportunity for questions.
Software Acquisition Survival Skills
This three-day course is designed for program
managers and their staff members and
provides a broad overview of the skills needed
in a program offce to manage software
acquisition. It presents a unique acquisition
perspective on key topics in software system
acquisition, including risk management,
requirements management, pre-award activi-
ties, systems engineering, software architec-
ture, technical evaluation, project metrics, and
process management.
Patterns of Failure in Software
Acquisition
This workshop, designed for acquisition prac-
titioners, is a facilitated exploration of recur-
ring patterns of counter-productive behavior in
software acquisition. Led by SEI experts with
experience observing common types of failure
in actual programs, the workshop employs key
concepts from systems thinking. Participants
will learn the warning signs and techniques to
recognize and prevent these failure modes.
PUBLICATIONS
SEI reports are available for free download at
www.sei.cmu.edu/publications.
CMMI Acquisition Module (CMMI-AM),
Version 1.1. 2005
Techniques for Developing an Acquisition
Strategy by Profling Software Risks. Mary
Catherine Ward, Joseph P. Elm, Susan
Kushner, 2006
Sustaining Software-Intensive Systems. Mary
Ann Lapham, Carol Woody (contributor), 2006
QUASAR: A Method for the QUality
Assessment of Software-Intensive System
ARchitectures handbook. Donald Firesmith,
2006
10 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Using proven practices for predictably and effciently designing, constructing,
and guiding the evolution of software-intensive systems with the qualities
needed to meet business and mission goals
www.sei.cmu.edu/programs/pls
The SEI works in the areas of software
architecture, software product lines, and
predictable assembly to effect widespread
product line practice, architecture-centric
development and evolution, and predictable
construction throughout the global software
community. The SEI is also studying how
to build and maintain the ultra-large-scale
systems of the future.
Architecture
Software architecture is the key for ensuring
that a system serves an organization’s busi-
ness and mission goals. The SEI can help you
• solve specifc architecture problems
• create leading-edge architecture tech-
niques and methods
• improve your organization’s architecture
capabilities
The SEI’s architecture products and services
serve as a starting point for establishing a
working relationship to help you answer the
following questions:
• Does your architecture meet your long-term
system-evolution needs?
• Do you have architecture development and
evolution strategies that will address long-
term uncertainty in your business climate,
mission goals, and technology?
• Is your system/software architecture tacti-
cally well positioned for the coming years?
• Do you have an approach for improving
architectural defciencies?
• Is there a seamless connection between
your system and software architecture
approaches?
• Do you know how to measure and improve
the architecture competence of your orga-
nization and its key individuals?
Product Lines
Software-intensive systems are often
acquired, developed, tested, and maintained
as separate products, even if they have a
signifcant amount of common functionality
and code. Such an approach wastes technical
resources, takes too long, and costs
more than necessary. A product line approach
to software can dramatically reduce devel-
opment cycles, improve return on software
investments, improve software system
integration, and give an organization more op-
tions in the future.
Making the move to product lines, however,
is a business and technical decision and
requires considerable changes in the way
organizations practice software engineering,
technical management, and organizational
management.
The SEI’s software product line products and
services serve as a starting point for estab-
lishing a working relationship to help you
answer the following questions:
• What is a systematic way to transition to
the use of software product lines?
• What are your organization’s strengths
and weaknesses with respect to software
product line development?
• Which products in your product line will
achieve the highest production savings?
• What is your business case for product line
development?
• How do you transition from a family of ex-
isting systems to a software product line?
• How can you improve your ongoing soft-
ware product line effort?
Predictable Assembly
Our confdence in software architectural
analysis can be only as high as our confdence
that the developed software implements the
architecture.

The SEI’s groundbreaking work in predictable
assembly combines the strengths of soft-
ware architecture and product lines so that
software implementations exhibit predictable
quality, by construction, for whole classes of
systems. This work enables organizations to
• defne design and implementation
standards that, when followed, result in
predictable runtime quality
• use automation to enforce these standards
• defne objective and predictive quality
standards and measures for software com-
ponents developed internally or provided by
third-party suppliers
Ultra-Large-Scale (ULS) Systems
Many systems of the future will be ultra-
large on one or many dimensions—number
of lines of code; number of people employing
the system; amount of data stored, accessed,
manipulated, and refned; number of connec-
tions and interdependencies among software
components; number of hardware elements
to which they interface. They will be ultra-
large-scale (ULS) systems.
The characteristics of ULS systems, already
evident in some of today’s largest systems,
imply changes in the fundamental assump-
tions that underlie today’s software engineer-
ing approaches. The SEI led a team of experts
in a study of ULS systems and continues to
nurture a community interested in exploring
the associated challenges and promising
research to address those challenges.
Architecture, Product Lines, and Predictable Assembly
10 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 11
TOOLS & METHODS
Solutions to the problems associated with
software-intensive systems that help develop-
ers and acquirers improve their practices
Architecture
Active Reviews for Intermediate
Designs (ARID)
The SEI Active Reviews for Intermediate
Designs (ARID) method is a low-cost, high-
beneft method for reviewing a preliminary
software design (such as for a component or
subsystem) for suitability in its intended usage
context and environment. The ARID method
relies on assembling the design’s stakehold-
ers to articulate what the important usage
scenarios are and then exercising the design
to make sure those scenarios are satisfed by
the design.
Architecture-Based System Evolution
SEI Architecture-Based System Evolution
methods are used to ensure that a system
continues to serve its business and mission
goals throughout its lifetime. These methods
are used for redesigning architectures to
improve defciencies relative to quality attri-
bute and business and mission goals and to
evaluate and design architecture evolution
strategies.
Architecture Competence Assessment
The SEI Architecture Competence
Assessment instrument is used to determine
an organization’s competence to perform
architecture-centric development and evolu-
tion. It determines whether an organization
possesses the ability to grow, use, and sustain
the necessary skills and knowledge to effec-
tively use architecture-based development
practices.
Architecture Expert (ArchE)
The SEI Architecture Expert (ArchE) is a rule-
based architecture design assistant that has
knowledge of quality attribute models, how
to analyze an architecture for its quality attri-
bute properties, and how to manage tradeoffs
among the quality attributes. ArchE makes this
knowledge accessible to every software archi-
tect to generate software architectures with
predictable quality attribute properties.
Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method
(ATAM) and the System ATAM
The SEI Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method
®

(ATAM
®
) evaluation process is used for evalu-
ating software architectures relative to quality
attribute goals. The ATAM exposes architectural
risks that potentially inhibit the achievement of
an organization’s business goals. The ATAM is
so named because it not only reveals quality-
attribute-specifc risks but also provides insight
into how those quality goals interact with, or
tradeoff against, each other. A variant of the
ATAM, known as the System ATAM, is used to
evaluate system architectures.
Attribute-Driven Design (ADD) Method
The SEI Attribute-Driven Design (ADD) method
is a systematic approach to designing a
software architecture. It is based on knowing
both the functional and quality requirements
of systems and knowing the architectural
approaches that have proven to be successful in
other systems.
Cost Beneft Analysis Method (CBAM)
The SEI Cost Beneft Analysis Method (CBAM)
is an architecture-centric method for analyzing
the cost beneft implications of architectural
decisions while managing uncertainty in future
business and mission goals. It provides a basis
for informed decision making about architectural
design and evolution. The CBAM builds on the
ATAM, though an ATAM evaluation is not an
absolute prerequisite.
Mission Thread Workshop
The SEI Mission Thread Workshop is used to
elicit quality attribute considerations associated
with the existing mission threads of a system
or system of systems (SoS). The resulting “aug-
mented” mission threads can then be used by
SoS and system architects during the develop-
ment and evaluation of the SoS, system, and
software architectures. This workshop is based
on the SEI Quality Attribute Workshop (QAW).
Quality Attribute Workshop (QAW)
The SEI Quality Attribute Workshop (QAW) is
used to elicit key quality attribute goals and
architecture-development plans. It can be con-
ducted prior to the development of a software
architecture.
Views and Beyond Approach to
Architecture Documentation
The SEI Views and Beyond approach to archi-
tecture documentation is based on the concept
of architectural views. This approach involves
selecting a set of relevant views based on the
architecture and its stakeholders, documenting
those views, and then documenting information
that applies across views. The approach covers
practical information such as how to choose the
set of views to document, how to document a
view, how to document the information beyond
views, how to judiciously combine views in the
documentation to increase understanding and
decrease the workload, and how to document
architectural constructs using popular notations
and languages, including the Unifed Modeling
Language (UML).
Product Lines
Framework for Software Product Line
Practice
The SEI Framework for Software Product Line
Practice
SM
Web-based reference model aids
organizations in software product line endeav-
ors. It provides comprehensive information
about essential activities and practices as
gleaned from studies of organizations that have
built product lines; from direct collaborations on
software product lines with customer organiza-
tions; and from leading practitioners in software
product lines. There is also an Acquisition
Companion to this framework that was devel-
oped to aid acquirers in the Department of
Defense. The framework is available at
www.sei.cmu.edu/productlines
/framework.html. The acquisition companion
is available at www.sei.cmu.edu
/productlines/companion.html.
Software Product Line Acquisition:
A Companion to a Framework for
Software Product Line Practice
This Web-based reference model complements
the SEI Framework for Software Product Line
Practice by adding acquisition-specifc informa-
tion. It is a description of the technical and man-
agement areas in which an organization must
be competent to successfully acquire and feld
a product line of software or software-intensive
systems. The acquisition companion is available at
www.sei.cmu.edu/productlines
/companion.html. The framework is available
at www.sei.cmu.edu/productlines
/framework.html.
Adoption Factory Pattern
As one of the SEI’s product line practice
patterns, the Adoption Factory pattern provides
a generic product line adoption roadmap to
guide an organization’s transition to a product
line approach. This roadmap is defned in
terms of phases, focus areas, and product line
practice areas.
Architecture, Product Lines, and Predictable Assembly
12 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Product Line Analysis
The SEI Product Line Analysis method is
requirements engineering for a product line;
it is the link between the recognition of a
business opportunity and the design of a
product line architecture. It incorporates the
views of multiple product line stakeholders in
a requirements model that includes the func-
tional features of products and the software
quality attributes (e.g., performance, modifabil-
ity) of both the product line and its products.
The requirements model created by Product
Line Analysis identifes common requirements
across the product line and their allowed
variants. It also serves as a fundamental com-
munications mechanism between developers
and other stakeholders of a product line.
Product Line Technical Probe (PLTP)
The SEI Product Line Technical Probe
SM

(PLTP
SM
) method is a comprehensive diag-
nostic method for examining an organization’s
readiness to adopt or ability to succeed with
a software product line approach. The PLTP
uses a series of structured interviews of small
peer groups within the organization followed
by data analysis and results reporting. The data
collection, analysis, and reporting are based on
the SEI Framework for Software Product Line
Practice.
Product Line Quick Look (PLQL)
The SEI Product Line Quick Look (PLQL)
method is used to gather initial information
about an organization’s readiness to adopt or
ability to succeed with a software product
line approach. The PLQL provides a high-level
framing of the organization and its product line
effort. The information gathered can then be
used to plan more specifc assistance from the
SEI or other activities needed to progress in
product line adoption. The PLQL can also serve
as the onsite portion of the preliminary phase
of the SEI Product Line Technical Probe.
Structured Intuitive Model for Product
Line Economics (SIMPLE)
The SEI Structured Intuitive Model for Product
Line Economics (SIMPLE) method is an
easy-to-use aid for calculating the costs and
benefts of various software product line alter-
natives. Different strategies and approaches
can be compared and the most advantageous
one chosen.
Options Analysis for Reengineering
(OAR)
The SEI Options Analysis for Reengineering
SM

(OAR
SM
) method is a systematic, architecture-
centric approach for identifying and mining
reusable software components within large,
complex software systems. OAR enables
users to screen candidate software compo-
nents; identify the best candidates for reuse;
analyze, isolate, and aggregate candidate com-
ponents; and estimate the level of diffculty,
cost, and effort required to mine and rehabili-
tate the software components selected.
Predictable Assembly
ComFoRT Model-Checking Reasoning
Framework
The SEI ComFoRT model-checking reasoning
framework can verify whether a system will
satisfy key behavioral invariants expressed as
claims. If a claim is not preserved, ComFoRT
displays the execution trace that violates the
claim. ComFoRT is based on Copper, a state-
of-the-art software model checker, and can be
applied to SEI Construction and Composition
Language (CCL) specifcations or suitably
restricted C-language code.
Lambda-star Performance Reasoning
Framework
The SEI Performance Reasoning Framework
(Lambda-star) can be used to predict the
timing behavior of assemblies in hard, frm,
and soft real-time settings. Performance
models draw on generalized rate monotonic
scheduling theory and queuing theory and are
constructed automatically from CCL specifca-
tions. Timing predictions have validated statis-
tical confdence intervals.
Pin Container Technology
Pin is a simple but robust container technol-
ogy designed for embedded and hard real-
time applications. It supports a strict form of
container-based component encapsulation,
deployment, and composition. Pin supports
a zero-coding, assembly-through-connection
style of development and is implemented
using nonproprietary real-time operating-
system services specifcally adapted to
support UML statechart semantics.
Construction and Composition
Language (CCL)
The SEI Construction and Composition
Language (CCL) is used to specify Pin compo-
nents and assemblies. It supports the syntac-
tic and behavioral specifcation of components
in an executable subset of UML statecharts,
generates complete component and assembly
implementations, and provides tool developers
with C, Java, and XML access to annotated
abstract syntax trees.
Predictable Assembly Starter Kit
The SEI Predictable Assembly Starter Kit is an
Eclipse-based interactive development environ-
ment that provides a user-friendly integration
of CCL, Pin, and reasoning frameworks. In
addition, the starter kit defnes plug-in interfaces
and conventions for the development and intro-
duction of new reasoning frameworks, code
generators, simulators, documentation genera-
tors, and other such tools. It provides users
with a functional prediction-enabled component
technology (PECT). The starter kit can be used
to learn about or teach predictable assembly, to
explore the feasibility of predictable assembly
in nontrivial application settings, or to serve as a
model for building a custom PECT.
CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENTS
Funded engagements to help
organizations apply best practices
Architecture
Architecture Reconstructions
SEI architecture experts use the ARMIN recon-
struction tool and a defned architecture-recon-
struction process to develop graphical illustra-
tions of architectural views from input source
code.
Architectural Assistance and Coaching
SEI architecture experts use the tools and
methods itemized above to provide technical
assistance and coaching in software architec-
ture requirements, design, documentation, evo-
lution, and cost/beneft analysis.
Software and System Architecture
Evaluations
SEI teams conduct software and system archi-
tecture evaluations using the ATAM. The SEI
team documents the results in a report provided
to the customer organization.
Product Lines
Product Line Executive Session
During the half-day Product Line Executive
Session, a product line expert from the SEI
provides an overview of software product lines
to a designated group of managers from the
organization. The SEI expert facilitates a dis-
cussion about software product lines and the
potential for the organization’s adoption of the
approach.
Architecture, Product Lines, and Predictable Assembly, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 13
Customized Product Line Solution
The SEI collaborates with organizations to
develop a customized product line solution,
tailoring existing methods and approaches as
necessary to ft specifc product or organiza-
tional needs.
Product Line Diagnosis Using the
PLQL or the PLTP
The SEI performs product line diagnostics
using either the Product Line Quick Look
(PLQL), which is a one-day high-level exami-
nation, or the more extensive Product Line
Technical Probe (PLTP), which takes a week.
The SEI team documents the results of
the diagnostics in a report provided to the
customer organization.
Product Line Adoption/Action
Planning Workshop
The Product Line Adoption/Action Planning
Workshop is a natural follow-up to the
Product Line Technical Probe (PLTP). The PLTP
produces a portrayal of the state of an orga-
nization’s product line practices. The planning
workshop helps translate that portrayal into
a plan of action. The workshop is a tailored,
facilitated work session in which an SEI team
works with a customer team, typically over
two days, to produce a product line adoption
plan or an action plan.
Tailored Management Assistance on
Product Line Efforts
The SEI provides tailored management
assistance to support developing a product
line adoption plan, business case, operating
concept, acquisition strategy, training plans,
and appropriate data collection, metrics, and
tracking mechanisms. The following services
are among those offered:
• Product Line Concept of Operations
Workshop: During this two-day working
session, SEI product line experts work with
product line managers to develop a product
line concept of operations (CONOPS).
• Product Line Business Case Workshop:
During this two-day working session, SEI
product line experts use the Structured
Intuitive Model for Product Line Economics
(SIMPLE) to help product line managers
develop a product line business case.
• Product Line Acquisition Support: SEI
experts work with an acquisition organization
to develop requests for proposals; an acqui-
sition strategy; statements of work; and
contractor planning, tracking, and monitoring
that are specifc to a product line effort.
• Product Line Measurement Workshop:
This three-day working session guides par-
ticipants in defning meaningful measures
aligned with their software product line goals
and developing an action plan for obtaining
these goals within the context of the pro-
cesses in their product line efforts.
Tailored Technical Support on Product
Line Efforts
The SEI provides tailored technical assistance
to support scoping and product line analysis,
architecture defnition, architecture evaluation,
mining assets, migration planning, component
development, and testing.
• Product Line Analysis and Scoping
Workshop: During this one-week working
session, SEI experts guide an organization
through a product line analysis that results in
a preliminary set of product line artifacts that
include a use case model, a feature model,
an object model, a domain- and organization-
specifc dictionary, and a preliminary scoping
document.
• Product Line Architecture Support: SEI
product line experts help an organization to
defne a product line architecture with appro-
priate variation mechanisms as well as to
document and evaluate the architecture.
• Product Line Variability Management
Workshop: During this two- to three-day
session, SEI product line experts guide an
organization in understanding the goal of
variability in a product line approach and
help the organization determine appropriate
variation points, variation mechanisms, and
variability-management strategies and tool
support.
• Product Line Production Planning Workshop:
During this two-day session, SEI product line
experts guide an organization through the
initial development of a product-production
strategy and provide tools and directions for
applying that strategy to the creation of a
production method and a production plan.
• Confguration Management Practice
Workshop: During this two-day session, SEI
product line experts lead a product line orga-
nization through the initial steps in develop-
ing or refning its confguration management
practices for its software product line effort.
Predictable Assembly
Quality by Construction Clinic
This clinic is a focused, two-day interac-
tive workshop for gathering initial informa-
tion about an organization’s readiness to
adopt methods and technology for predict-
able assembly. The goal of the clinic is to
help organizations identify the strengths and
weaknesses of their current methods and
technologies vis-à-vis predictable assembly
and to identify specifc opportunities to pilot
predictable assembly technology in a practical
setting.
Predictable Assembly Starter
Engagements
The SEI provides tailored technical assis-
tance to organizations interested in adopting
the methods and technology for predictable
assembly. Examples of the kinds of assistance
offered include
• upgrading legacy systems to enable predict-
able assembly: The SEI can help organiza-
tions evolve existing software systems and
product lines to support the predictable
runtime behavior of new (and possibly third-
party) system confgurations.
• defning standards for trust and certifca-
tion of third-party software: The SEI can
help organizations understand the value of
achieving a specifed level of confdence in
third-party software behavior and introduce
standards and technologies to achieve that
level of confdence.
• introducing software model checking to
obtain up-to-provable trust in software: The
SEI can help organizations introduce model
checking technology to analyze, validate, and
potentially certify the correctness of execut-
able design specifcations and source code.
• introducing state-of-the-art performance
analysis for a spectrum of real-time per-
formance requirements: The SEI can help
organizations introduce performance analysis
techniques to make systems predictable for
a range of soft to hard real-time performance
requirements.
• developing analysis models and construc-
tion rules to guarantee predictable runtime
quality: The SEI can help organizations intro-
duce comprehensive solutions for specifc
runtime quality attributes for high-criticality
systems. These solutions range from predic-
tive models to coding rules and their enforce-
ment mechanisms.
14 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
EDUCATION & TRAINING
Available from the SEI and licensed SEI
Partners, based on matured, validated, and
documented solutions to pervasive problems
Architecture
ATAM Evaluator Training
This two-day course prepares software archi-
tects to conduct a software architecture evalu-
ation using the Architecture Tradeoff Analysis
Method (ATAM), a proven, highly effective
method for systematically evaluating software
architectures for ftness of purpose.
ATAM Leader Training
This two-day course focuses on the social and
leadership skills needed to successfully lead
an architecture evaluation using the ATAM.
The course presents ATAM facilitation require-
ments and challenges and, to meet those
challenges, general facilitation and consulting
principles.
Documenting Software Architectures
This two-day course provides in-depth
coverage of effective practices for document-
ing software architecture that meet the needs
of the entire architecture stakeholder commu-
nity. It presents the information in the context
of prevailing prescriptive documentation
models.
Software Architecture Design and
Analysis
This two-day course provides in-depth
coverage of the concepts needed to design
and analyze a software architecture effectively.
The essential considerations for defning
any architecture are carefully examined and
then illustrated through application of the
Attribute-Driven Design method for software
architecture.
Software Architecture: Principles and
Practices
This two-day course emphasizes the impor-
tance of the business or mission context in
which systems are designed and introduces
participants to software architectures in a real-
world setting.
Product Lines
Software Product Lines
This two-day course introduces software
product lines and the basic concepts behind
them. It covers the essential technical and
management practices needed to succeed
with software product lines and provides
guidelines and patterns for applying product
line techniques. Case studies illustrate the
concepts.
Adopting Software Product Lines
This two-day course describes a practical,
phased, pattern-based approach to planning
and orchestrating software product line
adoption. The goal of the course is for partici-
pants to know what is involved in product line
adoption and how to plan for it.
Developing Software Product Lines
This two-day course provides participants
hands-on experience in understanding and
applying the practice areas needed for
software product line mastery. It provides
an in-depth treatment of the concepts and
essential ideas covered in the Software
Product Lines course, through the use of a
comprehensive software product line example
that includes a complete set of assets and
artifacts.
PLTP Team Training
This two-day course prepares participants to
be team members on a Product Line Technical
Probe (PLTP). The course involves hands-on
exercises so that participants learn the PLTP
process and practice the skills necessary to be
a contributing PLTP team member.
PLTP Leader Training
Leading a PLTP requires an in-depth under-
standing of product line technical and man-
agement practices, a thorough understanding
of the PLTP process, excellent organizational
skills, and superior facilitation skills. This two-
day course uses several hands-on exercises to
prepare participants to lead a PLTP.
Predictable Assembly
Principles of Predictable Assembly
This two-day course introduces participants
to the fundamental concepts of predictable
assembly. The course covers the relationships
between software architecture and software
component technology and between “predict-
ability by construction” and software product
lines. Course participants explore a practice
model for predictable assembly that spans
design, implementation, analysis, prediction,
and validation activities. Participants learn how
to impose “smart constraints” on developers
that guarantee that system runtime behavior
will be analyzable—and predictable—by
construction.
CONFERENCES
Events sponsored or cosponsored by the SEI
Software Architecture Technology
User Network (SATURN) Workshop
The SEI Software Architecture Technology
User Network (SATURN) Workshop is an
annual two-day conference that brings
together engineers, architects, technical
managers, and product managers who are
using the architecture-centric methods and
approaches developed and promulgated by
the SEI. Attendees exchange their experiences
and best practices and discuss ideas, issues,
and needs with regard to software architec-
ture practices.
Software Architecture Workshop
for Educators
The SEI Software Architecture Workshop
for Educators is a three-day gathering for
educators who teach college and university
computer science and software engineering
courses and who would like to teach and use
software architecture principles and prac-
tices. SEI instructors present the Software
Architecture: Principles and Practices course.
Attendees then jointly determine ways to
incorporate these concepts and methods into
academic courses.
Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method
(ATAM) Lead Evaluator Workshop
The annual SEI ATAM Lead Evaluator
Workshop provides an update on the ATAM
and its application. The workshop is mandatory
for all certifed SEI ATAM Lead Evaluators.
DoD Product Line Practice Workshop
This workshop is a forum for sharing
Department of Defense (DoD) product line
practices and experiences and for discussing
ways in which specifc product line practices
are accomplished within the DoD.
Software Product Line Conference
(SPLC)
The annual SEI Software Product Line
Conference (SPLC) features a rich and
varied program, with ample opportunities for
everyone from software product line novices
to experts. Recent conferences focused on
critical issues in product line engineering
such as architecture, quality assurance, and
business and economics. Tracks include dedi-
cated tutorials, workshops, panels, and paper
sessions. The conference also includes the
induction of organizations into the Software
Product Line Hall of Fame, as well as birds-of-
a-feather sessions.
Architecture, Product Lines, and Predictable Assembly, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 15
PUBLICATIONS
Books are available from Addison-Wesley
(www.awprofessional.com/seiseries) and
book retailers. SEI reports are available for free
download at www.sei.cmu.edu/publications.
Architecture
Books
Software Architecture in Practice, Second
Edition. Len Bass, Paul Clements, and Rick
Kazman, Addison-Wesley, 2003
Documenting Software Architectures: Views
and Beyond. Paul Clements, Felix Bachmann,
Len Bass, David Garlan, James Ivers, Reed
Little, Robert Nord, and Judith Stafford,
Addison-Wesley, 2002
Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods
and Case Studies. Paul Clements, Rick
Kazman, and Mark Klein, Addison-Wesley,
2001
Reports
Using the SEI Architecture Tradeoff Analysis
Method to Evaluate WIN-T: A Case Study. Paul
Clements, John Bergey, and Dave Mason,
2005
Attribute-Driven Design (ADD), Version 2.0.
Rob Wojcik, Felix Bachmann, Len Bass, Paul
Clements, Paulo Merson, Robert Nord, and Bill
Wood, 2006
System Architecture Evaluation Using the
ATAM. Mike Gagliardi and Bill Wood, 2007
Quality-Attribute-Based Economic Valuation
of Architectural Patterns. Ipek Ozkaya, Rick
Kazman, and Mark Klein, 2007
Evaluating and Improving Architecture
Competence. Len Bass, Paul Clements, Rick
Kazman, and Mark Klein, 2007
Progress Toward an Organic Software
Architecture Capability in the U.S. Army.
Stephen Blanchette Jr. and John Bergey, 2007
Making Architecture Design Decisions: An
Economic Approach. Rick Kazman, Jai Asundi,
and Mark Klein, 2002
ATAM: Method for Architecture Evaluation.
Rick Kazman, Mark Klein, and Paul Clements,
2000
Product Lines
Books
Software Product Lines: Practices and
Patterns. Paul Clements and Linda Northrop,
Addison-Wesley, 2001
Reports
Product Line Acquisition in a DoD
Organization: Guidance for Decision Makers.
John Bergey and Sholom Cohen, 2006
The Structured Intuitive Model for Product
Line Economics (SIMPLE). Paul C. Clements,
John D. McGregor, and Sholom G. Cohen,
2004
Software Product Line Adoption Roadmap.
Linda M. Northrop, 2004
Product Line Analysis for Practitioners. Gary
Chastek and Patrick Donohoe, 2003
Software Process Improvement and Product
Line Practice: CMMI and the Framework for
Software Product Line Practice. Lawrence G.
Jones and Albert L. Soule, 2001
Testing a Software Product Line. John D.
McGregor, 2001
A Case Study in Successful Product Line
Development. Lisa Brownsword and Paul
Clements, 1996
Preparing for Automated Derivation of
Products in a Software Product Line. John D.
McGregor, 2005
Guidelines for Developing a Product Line
Production Plan. Gary Chastek and John D.
McGregor, 2002
Predictable Assembly
Books
Building Systems from Commercial
Components. Kurt Wallnau, Scott Hissam, and
Robert Seacord, Addison-Wesley, 2001
Reports
Packaging Predictable Assembly with
Prediction-Enabled Component Technology.
Scott Hissam, Gabriel Moreno, Judith Stafford,
and Kurt Wallnau, 2001
Predictable Assembly of Substation Automa-
tion Systems: An Experiment Report. Scott
Hissam, John Hudak, James Ivers, Mark
Klein, Magnus Larsson, Gabriel Moreno, Linda
Northrop, Daniel Plakosh, Judith Stafford, Kurt
Wallnau, and William Wood, 2002
Software Component Certifcation: 10 Useful
Distinctions. Kurt Wallnau, 2004
Performance Property Theories for Predictable
Assembly from Certifable Components. Scott
Hissam, Mark Klein, John Lehoczky, Paulo
Merson, Gabriel Moreno, and Kurt Wallnau,
2004
Overview of ComFoRT: A Model Checking
Reasoning Framework. James Ivers and Nata-
sha Sharygina, 2004
Certifed Binaries for Software Components.
Sagar Chaki, James Ivers, Peter Lee, Kurt
Wallnau, and Noam Zeilberger, 2007
Ultra-Large-Scale Systems
Books
Ultra-Large-Scale Systems: The Software
Challenge of the Future. Linda Northrop, Peter
Feiler, Richard P. Gabriel, John Goodenough,
Rick Linger, Tom Longstaff, Rick Kazman, Mark
Klein, Douglas Schmidt, Kevin Sullivan, and
Kurt Wallnau, Software Engineering Institute,
2006
CREDENTIALS
SEI certifcates and certifcations awarded
on the completion of qualifcation criteria
established by the SEI
Software Architecture Certifcates
Software Architecture Professional
A software professional earns the SEI
Software Architecture Professional Certifcate
by completing the courses Software
Architecture: Principles and Practices,
Documenting Software Architectures,
Software Architecture Design and Analysis,
and Software Product Lines. This four-course
sequence provides both the needed breadth
and depth in software architecture concepts
and practices. Beginning with an introduction
to software architecture fundamentals, partici-
pants gain experience in effective architecture
documentation, design, and analysis tech-
niques and then learn how these techniques
can be used when adopting a product line
approach to software.
Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method
(ATAM) Evaluator
A software professional earns the SEI ATAM
Evaluator Certifcate by completing the
courses Software Architecture: Principles and
Practices and ATAM Evaluator Training. This
two-course sequence prepares a qualifed
software professional to perform SEI-autho-
rized ATAM architecture evaluations.
16 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
ATAM Lead Evaluator
A software professional becomes a certifed
SEI ATAM Lead Evaluator by completing the
courses Software Architecture: Principles
and Practices, Documenting Software
Architectures, Software Architecture Design
and Analysis, ATAM Evaluator Training, and
ATAM Leader Training and by successfully
leading an ATAM architecture evaluation
observed by an SEI ATAM expert. This fve-
course sequence and feld exercise provide
qualifed software professionals with the tech-
nical depth and social techniques needed to
lead an SEI-authorized ATAM evaluation of a
software architecture. SEI-authorized ATAM
Lead Evaluators must attend yearly ATAM
Update Workshops to maintain their skills and
status.
Software Product Line Certifcates
Software Product Line Professional
A software professional earns this certifcate
by completing the courses Software Product
Lines, Adopting Software Product Lines, and
Developing Software Product Lines. This three-
course sequence provides the needed breadth
and depth in software product line concepts
and practices to apply software product line
practices professionally.
Product Line Technical Probe (PLTP)
Team Member
A software professional earns this certifcate
by completing the courses Software Product
Lines, Adopting Software Product Lines,
Developing Software Product Lines, and
Product Line Technical Probe Team Training.
This four-course sequence prepares a qualifed
software professional to perform SEI-autho-
rized Product Line Technical Probes.
PLTP Leader
A software professional becomes a certifed
SEI PLTP Leader by completing all fve courses
in the SEI Product Line curriculum and by
successfully leading a PLTP observed by an
experienced PLTP Leader. This fve-course
sequence and feld exercise provide quali-
fed software professionals with the technical
depth and social techniques needed to effec-
tively lead SEI-authorized PLTPs.
RESEARCH
Engagements in technology
development with the SEI
Architecture
Architecture-Based System Evolution
SEI architecture-based system evolution
methods are based on understanding the
forces that drive system evolution, evaluat-
ing the “evolvability” of an architecture, and
managing the uncertainty associated with an
organization’s future business and mission
needs and technology capabilities. The SEI
architecture team is looking for industrial
collaborators to explore these areas, includ-
ing applying economic theories (such as the
theory of real options) and multi-attribute
analysis methods (such as conjoint analysis) to
understand architecture evolution from a cost/
beneft perspective.
Connection of Architecture-Centric
Methods with Other Software
Technologies and Paradigms
The SEI is now integrating its software archi-
tecture methods and connecting them with
other software development paradigms and
emerging technologies. The SEI architecture
team is looking for industrial collaborators to
pilot the integrated methods and to explore
the connections with existing software and
system development paradigms. The SEI is
also looking for collaborations exploring con-
nections with aspects, service-oriented archi-
tecture, open source, model-driven architec-
tures, J2EE, or .net.
Experiments with ArchE
The SEI is looking for collaborators interested
in using ArchE to architect small- to medium-
sized software systems. ArchE currently has
demonstrated its utility for small architectures.
The SEI team is eager to apply ArchE to larger
scale problems. The SEI is also looking for
collaborators who are interested in extending
ArchE with new reasoning frameworks.
Architecture Competence
The SEI is looking for collaborating organiza-
tions to investigate what it means for an orga-
nization to have architecture competence and
how this competence can be evaluated.
Quality Attribute Models
The SEI is looking for partners to develop
and use quality attribute models in reliability,
security, scalability, usability, and testability.
Also of interest is the exploration of the rela-
tionship between quality attribute models,
business goals, and architecture and design
patterns.
Architecture, Product Lines, and Predictable Assembly, continued
Product Lines
Product Line Adoption Strategies
The SEI seeks partners to explore effective
product line adoption strategies and to apply
SEI pattern-based adoption approaches. Also
of interest are adoption strategies that exploit
Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI),
architecture-centric, and Six Sigma initiatives.
Product Line Economic Models
The SEI is developing product line economic
models and looking for organizations that
would like to pilot or contribute to their
development.
Production Planning and Product
Derivation
Developing core assets is only part of the
product line equation. Products in a software
product line are developed from the core
assets according to the dictates of a produc-
tion plan. Product planning and product deri-
vation practices are often immature, even for
experienced product line organizations. The
SEI is seeking industrial partners engaged
in product line efforts to perfect production
planning and product derivation approaches.
Product Line Variability Mechanisms
and Automated Support for Variability
To accommodate the varying features and
quality attributes of the products in a software
product line, the core assets must have vari-
ability mechanisms. Choosing appropriate
variability mechanisms and tracing, and auto-
mating their use are among the most diffcult
technical challenges in a product line approach.
The SEI is seeking collaborators to conduct
applied research on real systems in the area of
variability mechanisms.
Connection of Software Product Lines
with Other Software Technologies and
Paradigms
Software product lines happen in the context
of other software development and business
paradigms. The SEI product line team is
looking for industrial collaborators to explore
and pilot software product lines in the context
of any of the following: open source, aspect-
oriented programming, model-driven develop-
ment, service-oriented architectures, global-
ization strategies, systems of systems, agile
development, and ultra-large-scale systems.
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 17
Predictable Assembly
Developing or Validating Automated
Methods for Predicting Software
Quality
Although the SEI develops novel theories for
software quality, its preferred approach is
to adapt (that is, restrict) existing theories to
new settings and, in this way, leverage domain
knowledge to achieve greater automation.
The SEI is interested in collaboration on com-
bining runtime verifcation (including binary
sandboxing) with static program analysis
and verifcation (including certifying model
checking) to obtain certifable trust that
software components satisfy safety, security,
and resource-consumption policies.
Developing PECTs
A prediction-enabled component technology
(PECT) is a software manufacturing infrastruc-
ture for enforcing quality standards that lead to
predictable software systems. The SEI is inter-
ested in developing and documenting practi-
cal techniques for incrementally building and
deploying PECTs.
Developing High-Integrity
Trust Mechanisms for Software
Components
How can software components be specifed,
packaged, and distributed in a way that yields
an objective basis for trust? The SEI is investi-
gating technologies such as certifying model
checking and practical variations of proof-
carrying code and seeks research collabora-
tions to develop and demonstrate these and
related technologies.
Developing Proofs of Feasibility of
Predictable Assembly
Predictable assembly seeks to achieve
predictable software quality by construction.
Achieving this goal will require signifcant
investment in tool infrastructure. The SEI is
interested in working with collaborators to
develop and demonstrate a staged rollout
of PECT.
Ultra-Large-Scale Systems
ULS System Research Areas
The SEI seeks partners to explore some of
the promising research areas and topics
related to ULS systems. The SEI is especially
interested in continuing its work in computa-
tional mechanism design, which uses game
theory and economic models; in understand-
ing the role of architecture in ULS systems;
and in exploring effective human involvement
in ULS systems.
ULS Systems Research Roadmap
The SEI seeks partners in completing a
roadmap that details the published ULS
system research agenda.
Process lmprovement and Performance Measurement
Enabling organizations to guide the development and acquisition of products and services through
quantitatively managed processes that are repeatable, predictable, and continuously improving in
terms of cost, schedule, process performance, and product and service quality
www.sei.cmu.edu/programs/sepm
Capability Maturity Model Integration
(CMMI)
When organizations want to improve the
way they do business, they often focus on
securing the best people, methods, and
tools. Processes are the means for coor-
dinating those resources. Improving an
organization’s processes provides an effec-
tive way to lower costs, improve quality, and
deliver products and services predictably on
budget and on time. Developed by a team
with members from industry, government,
and the SEI, the Capability Maturity Model
®

Integration (CMMI
®
) approach comprises
best practices that organizations can use
to improve their processes. CMMI for
Development (CMMI-DEV) is for organiza-
tions that develop products or services.
CMMI for Acquisition (CMMI-ACQ) is for
organizations that acquire products and ser-
vices. CMMI-DEV integrates disciplines such
as software and systems engineering and
can dovetail with the use of other process
improvement methods, such as the SEI Team
Software Process

(TSP) methodology, the
People CMM, ISO 9000, agile methods, and
Six Sigma. CMMI-ACQ integrates acquisition
best practices from industry and government
acquisition standards and experience.
People CMM
Today’s organizations must develop and man-
age their human capital in an environment of
rapid change and increased competition. The
People Capability Maturity Model (People
CMM) enables organizations to develop and
manage their workforces in a structured way
with clearly defned work commitments and
performance objectives. Organizations expe-
rience a smoother transition to CMMI when
they also use the People CMM because they
focus on improving the capability and com-
petencies of the organization, developing an
effective framework to support work groups or
teams, motivating improved performance, and
determining critical emerging competencies
needed to accomplish future business plans.
Team Software Process (TSP) and
Personal Software Process (PSP)
Improving organizational performance
requires a bottom-up as well as a top-down
focus. The SEI Team Software Process
SM

(TSP
SM
) methodology is transforming cost,
schedule, and performance quality for builders
of software and systems. Organizations meet
their critical business needs by delivering
essentially defect-free software on time and
with substantial increases in productivity. The
TSP also serves as a powerful accelerator for
the CMMI approach. Through the application
of TSP, organizations have advanced their
maturity in much less time than reported aver-
ages. The TSP couples with the SEI Personal
Software Process
SM
(PSP
SM
) methodology to
provide a strategy and operational proce-
dures for using disciplined software process
methods at team and individual levels. The
PSP brings substantive changes to the perfor-
mance of individual engineers. Their defect-
injection rates, for example, decline signif-
cantly as they progress through the process
levels. PSP-trained engineers plan their work
based on personal data, measure their work,
and use their results to continually improve.
Software Engineering Measurement
and Analysis
The SEI’s work in measurement and analysis
provides organizations with qualitative and
quantitative tools and techniques to measure
and analyze the results they are achieving at
the project, process, program, and enterprise
levels. Used in conjunction with other SEI
technologies, in particular CMMI and TSP, and
measurement best practices, performance
measurement enables organizations to char-
acterize their current state, how well projects
are performing, and the impact their improve-
ment efforts produce. Most software mea-
surement programs fail within the frst two
years of operation, usually from organizational
shortcomings: poor planning, lack of manage-
ment buy-in, and excessive data collection.
Measurement and analysis techniques help
organizations identify problems, track their
efforts to improve software processes, lower
costs, reduce defects, maintain schedule, and
gather return-on-investment information.
International Process Research
Consortium (IPRC)
The International Process Research
Consortium (IPRC) is a forum for members of
the software and systems process community
to jointly explore tomorrow’s challenges and
leverage their knowledge and resources to
develop solutions more quickly and effec-
tively. IPRC members come from around the
world to meet with experts from a variety
of infuencing disciplines. They explore the
process implications of emerging technologi-
cal, societal, environmental, political, eco-
nomic, and business trends. The IPRC’s three
strategic goals provide long-term guidance
for the consortium’s activities: (1) to provide
research leadership in response to emerging
trends, (2) to generate real-world impact, and
(3) to have international relevance. Currently,
IPRC members are developing cost-effective
methods for achieving process improvement
in small settings, where organizations often
lack resources and expertise. On the horizon
is the development of guidance for navigating
the multiple-standards environment, where
organizations must simultaneously conform to
multiple improvement standards and regula-
tions, such as ISO, Six Sigma, CMMI, and
Sarbanes-Oxley.
1S www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 19
TOOLS & METHODS
Solutions to the problems associated with
software-intensive systems that help develop-
ers and acquirers improve their practices
CMMI
CMMI Models
CMMI models comprise best practices that
organizations can use to improve their pro-
cesses. CMMI for Development (CMMI-DEV)
integrates disciplines such as software and
systems engineering and can dovetail with the
use of other improvement methods such as
the SEI’s Team Software Process (TSP) meth-
odology, the People CMM, ISO 9000, agile
practices, and Six Sigma techniques. CMMI
for Acquisition (CMMI-ACQ), which is sched-
uled to be published in November 2007, inte-
grates acquisition best practices from industry
and government acquisition standards and
experience. CMMI models can also enable
organizations to achieve benchmark ratings
that can be used to compare one organiza-
tion’s process capability with the capabilities
of its competitors.
CMMI Modules
CMMI modules build on relevant best prac-
tices extracted from CMMI and defne effec-
tive and effcient practices for an area of
interest in a specifc environment. The CMMI
Acquisition Module contains effective and
effcient acquisition practices specifcally
designed for government acquisition projects.
Unlike CMMI models, CMMI modules do not
contain information to help guide implementa-
tion of the best practices nor can they be used
to achieve benchmark ratings.
Standard CMMI Appraisal Method for
Process Improvement (SCAMPI)
SCAMPI Class A Method
The Standard CMMI Appraisal Method for
Process Improvement (SCAMPI
SM
) Class A
method is the CMMI appraisal method that
provides the most reliable and repeatable
rating results of the three SCAMPI methods.
SCAMPI Class A is the only class of SCAMPI
method that can produce ratings against the
goals of a CMMI model.
SCAMPI Class B and C Methods
SCAMPI Class B and C appraisal methods are
CMMI appraisal methods that provide informa-
tion about the strengths and weaknesses of
an organization. These methods require fewer
resources, smaller teams, and less evidence
than the SCAMPI Class A appraisal method.
The Class B and C methods can help an organi-
zation analyze its processes and plan a process
improvement approach. They do not produce a
rating against the goals of a CMMI model.
People CMM
People CMM
The People Capability Maturity Model (People
CMM) is a collection of best practices that
enables organizations to address success-
fully their critical people issues. Based on the
best current practices in felds such as human
resources, knowledge management, and
organizational development, the People CMM
comprises the practices that organizations can
use to improve their processes for managing
and developing their workforces.
Software Engineering Measurement
and Analysis
Goal-Question-Indicator-Measure
(GQIM) Method
The SEI Goal-Question-Indicator-Measure
(GQIM) method helps organizations defne
measures and indicators that are aligned with
the organization’s business processes and
support the measurement requirements of
the CMMI Measurement and Analysis process
area. GQIM also helps organizations produce
action plans for implementing the measure-
ment and analysis activities that will produce
the measures they need. The GQIM method
is used to determine success, progress, and
analysis indicators that show traceability from
an organization’s high-level business goals
down to the precise data collected, ensuring
relevance and traceability from goals to the
data collected.
Software Engineering Information
Repository (SEIR)
The Software Engineering Information
Repository (SEIR), available at
seir.sei.cmu.edu/seir, is a free, community-
based Web site that provides a forum
for its 38,000 members to access materials
on product development and acquisition
methods and technologies and to exchange
information concerning development and
acquisition improvement activities. Registered
members exchange questions and tips and
contribute experiences and examples to help
each other with their implementation efforts.
Measurement and Analysis
Infrastructure Diagnostic (MAID)
The SEI Measurement and Analysis
Infrastructure Diagnostic (MAID) tool can be
used by organizations to help improve the
quality of the data generated by their measure-
ment and analysis activities and increase its
value to the organization. Based on the CMMI
Measurement and Analysis process area, ISO
15939, and Six Sigma methodologies, MAID
characterizes the performance of a measure-
ment system and identifes opportunities to
improve measurement processes, data quality,
and stakeholder satisfaction.
CMMI Process Performance
Improvement Using Six Sigma DMAIC
This method uses various statistical methods
and tools from the Six Sigma improvement
method called Defne-Measure-Analyze-
Improve-Control (DMAIC) to enable dramatic
performance results. Basic DMAIC tools provide
a proven, measurement-oriented approach that
integrates well with other improvement para-
digms, including CMMI and TSP. This method
may be adopted during initial process improve-
ment planning or dynamically during product
development when process issues arise.
Process lmprovement and Performance Measurement
20 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
CMMI Process and Product
Development Using Six Sigma DMADV
This method implements a widespread col-
lection of Six Sigma process improvement
and product development tools used within a
popular Design for Six Sigma method known
as Defne-Measure-Analyze-Design-Verify
(DMADV). DMADV is integrated into various
product development approaches, including
some that focus on CMMI product develop-
ment-oriented process areas. Examples of
critical methods range from innovative voice-
of-the-customer techniques to optimal product
design solutions.
Team Software Process
Team Software Process (TSP)
Measurable improvement based on quanti-
fed data emerges when software developers
follow the SEI Team Software Process (TSP)
method. Organizations repeatedly see dramatic
decreases in schedule and effort deviation,
defects per line of code, and overall cost after
adopting TSP tools and practices. TSP is an agile
approach to software development that can also
be used to expedite CMMI implementation. It
has proven to be a practical, effective method
for achieving the benefts of high-maturity
process on a greatly accelerated schedule. The
process begins with a four-day launch, where
the team establishes goals, defnes roles,
assesses risks, and produces a comprehensive
project plan. The team then follows a precisely
defned framework for managing, measur-
ing, tracking, and reporting on work. Previous
training in the Personal Software Process
method is required for team members. The suc-
cessful TSP application to software development
is now being extended to security and systems
development.
Personal Software Process (PSP)
The skills and work habits of engineers largely
determine the outcome of a software develop-
ment project, as consistently demonstrated
when the SEI Personal Software Process (PSP)
method is applied. This series of defned prac-
tices enables software engineers to produce
high-quality products on time and within budget.
PSP provides the individual with an objective
basis for measuring progress against goals.
The foundation for PSP planning and tracking
methodologies is statistics; these provide an
objective means of analyzing and improving pro-
cesses so that productivity rises, while defects,
schedule slips, and costs decline. Specialized
skills, knowledge, and discipline set PSP prac-
titioners apart from other practitioners as they
engage in many aspects of creating software:
program development, requirements defnition,
document writing, systems test, or maintenance
and enhancement of large and small software
systems.
CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENTS
Funded engagements to help organizations
meet their business and mission objectives
Getting Started with CMMI-Based
Improvement
The SEI offers assistance to organizations that
wish to adopt CMMI but don’t know how to
get started.
CMMI Appraisals
The SEI offers SCAMPI Class A, B, and C
appraisals using a CMMI model as the refer-
ence model. These appraisals enable organiza-
tions to understand how their product develop-
ment and acquisition/outsourcing processes
compare to the best practices in a CMMI
model.
Getting Started with People CMM-
Based Improvement
The SEI offers assistance to organizations that
wish to adopt the People CMM but don’t know
how to get started.
People CMM Appraisals
The SEI offers SCAMPI appraisals using the
People CMM as the reference model. These
appraisals enable organizations to understand
how their workforce management processes
compare to the best practices in the People
CMM.
Performance Benchmarking
Consortium (PBC)
The Performance Benchmarking Consortium
(PBC) is a newly formed group of organizations
working together to improve how software
project performance data are collected
and used to drive process improvement.
Consortium members represent organizations
from the consulting, industry, standards, and
academic sectors. The near-term goals of the
consortium are to develop a software project
performance measurement specifcation and a
repository of measures that organizations can
use to set benchmarks for their projects. PBC
products and services include an annual per-
formance benchmark report, special reports,
guidebooks, training, and consultation support
provided by PBC service-provider members.
Assistance Applying Goal-Driven
Measurement, Six Sigma, and Other
Measurement and Analysis Techniques
The SEI provides assistance applying Goal-
Driven Measurement, Six Sigma, and other
measurement and analysis approaches as part
of improvement efforts for product develop-
ment and acquisition management. Support is
available in the form of data analysis, mentor-
ing, analytical methods development, model
development, and site-specifc workshops.
Introducing PSP and TSP Into an
Organization
To ensure a successful transition to the
Personal Software Process and Team Software
Process, organizations can receive support
from the SEI or an SEI Partner. Partners are
licensed and carefully monitored to deliver
specifc SEI products and services. When
introducing PSP and TSP, the SEI expert trains
all involved executives, managers, engineers,
and instructors. During TSP transition, the
expert also conducts a kickoff session and
assists in developing a schedule, conduct-
ing two to four pilot projects, and planning
and initiating rollout. These SEI services typi-
cally bring improved planning, higher product
quality, and reduced testing and overall cycle
time to organizations who engage them.
EDUCATION & TRAINING
Based on matured, validated, and documented
solutions to pervasive problems
CMMI
CMMI Process Improvement Overview
This one-day course introduces executives,
managers, and process improvement practi-
tioners to the fundamental concepts of using
CMMI as the basis for a process and perfor-
mance improvement program. It identifes
benefts realized by organizations implement-
ing CMMI-based process improvement and
describes how CMMI is used to determine an
organization’s process capability.
Introduction to CMMI, Version 1.2
This three-day course introduces managers
and practitioners, appraisal team members,
and engineering process group members
to fundamental CMMI concepts. This
course is available from the CMMI Partners
(www.sei.cmu.edu/partners). One day of
additional training is also available for those
using the CMMI for Acquisition model. This
training covers the acquisition-specifc prac-
tices in CMMI-ACQ.
CMMI Version 1.2 Upgrade Training
This online training provides to students who
have taken Introduction to CMMI Version 1.1
the opportunity to understand the changes
and improvements made in CMMI Version 1.2,
thereby helping them to successfully make
the transition to Version 1.2. This upgrade is
required for SCAMPI Version 1.2 appraisal
team members who previously attended the
Introduction to CMMI, Version 1.1 course.
Process Improvement and Performance Measurement, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 21
Intermediate Concepts of CMMI
This fve-day course introduces candidate
SCAMPI Lead Appraisers, B and C Team
Leaders, and CMMI instructors, software
and systems engineers, engineering process
group members, and others to advanced
CMMI concepts, including how CMMI model
components interrelate.
CMMI Instructor Training
This three-day course introduces those inter-
ested in becoming authorized Introduction to
CMMI course instructors to the details of the
CMMI models and the teaching strategies
used by CMMI instructors.
SCAMPI Lead Appraiser Training
This fve-day course provides training in the
SCAMPI methods to those interested in
becoming an authorized and certifed SCAMPI
Lead Appraiser
SM
for CMMI. The SCAMPI
methods are diagnostic tools that support,
enable, and encourage an organization’s
commitment to process and performance
improvement.
SCAMPI B and C Team Leader Training
This four-day course provides training in the
SCAMPI Class B and C methods to those
interested in becoming authorized SCAMPI B
and C Team Leaders. SCAMPI B and C are the
CMMI appraisal methods that provide infor-
mation about an organization but use fewer
resources, smaller teams, and less evidence
than the SCAMPI Class A method.
Understanding CMMI High Maturity
Practices
This three-and-a-half-day course provides
specifc information about CMMI levels 4 and
5—the highest levels of maturity and capability
in CMMI. The course covers the characteristics
of high maturity and capability and provides
details of the concepts and practices at levels
4 and 5. Examples are provided of how sta-
tistical methods and tools can be applied to
assist in the proper implementation of level 4
and 5 practices.
People CMM
Introduction to the People CMM
This three-day course introduces participants
to the fundamental concepts of the People
CMM, Version 2.0, a collection of best prac-
tices for attracting, motivating, and retaining a
talented technical staff.
Intermediate Concepts of the People
CMM
This fve-day course introduces individuals
(such as candidate SCAMPI with People CMM
Lead Appraisers, candidate People CMM
Instructors, managers, human capital/resource
individuals, and engineering process group
members) to advanced People CMM concepts,
including the relationships among People CMM
model components. This course is useful for
anyone who needs an in-depth understanding
of the People CMM.
People CMMI Instructor Training
This three-day course introduces those inter-
ested in becoming authorized Introduction to
the People CMM course instructors to details
of the People CMM model and the teaching
strategies used by People CMM instructors.
SCAMPI with People CMM Lead
Appraiser Training
This fve-day course introduces SCAMPI, a
diagnostic tool that supports, enables, and
encourages an organization’s commitment to
process improvement, to those interested in
becoming authorized SCAMPI A with People
CMM Lead Appraisers.
Team Software Process
Leading a Development Team
This three-day course provides the knowledge
and skills required for successful leadership
in the Team Software Process: forming and
maintaining a TSP team; establishing and main-
taining process discipline and high standards;
managing schedule and quality; and engaging
management. When leaders apply what they
learn, their project teams see signifcant, mea-
surable improvements in productivity and in
cost and schedule predictability. Basic manage-
ment training is a prerequisite.
TSP Executive Strategy Seminar
This two-day introductory course for software
executives and middle managers covers the
key concepts and principles of the TSP and PSP
from a management perspective. The purpose
of the course is to provide the foundation that
managers need to begin to introduce and apply
the TSP in their organizations.
TSP Launch Coach Training
This fve-day course prepares students to
launch and coach effective TSP teams. The
course covers the key concepts and principles
of the TSP from an operational and procedural
perspective. Students are guided through a
series of lectures and exercises that prepare
them to facilitate the use of the TSP on actual
software teams.
Introduction to Personal Process
This two-day course prepares students to
participate on TSP teams. The course covers
the key concepts and principles of the PSP at
a high level so that students understand the
terminology and the philosophy behind the
method. Students are guided through a series
of lectures and exercises that teach the PSP
and prepare them to plan and track their work
as part of a TSP project team.
PSP for Engineers I: Planning and PSP
for Engineers II: Quality
This two-week course, composed of the
courses PSP for Engineers I: Planning and PSP
for Engineers II: Quality, teaches software engi-
neers the principles, concepts, and benefts of
the PSP, a process-based approach for devel-
oping software. Students who complete the
course will be able to apply the PSP methods
to their own personal work processes and par-
ticipate on a TSP team. Students learn how to
measure and analyze their personal software
processes, use process data to improve
their personal performances, and apply PSP
methods to other structured tasks.
PSP Instructor Training
Upon completing this fve-day course, students
will be authorized to use the PSP course
suite to teach the courses PSP for Engineers,
Introduction to Personal Process, Managing
TSP Teams, and TSP Executive Strategy
Seminar to others in their organizations. The
PSP Instructor Training course focuses on how
to teach the PSP and put it into practice and
introduces the concepts of the Team Software
Process. Specifc course objectives include
understanding how to teach the PSP effectively
to others, how to grade student assignments
and analyze resulting data, and the role of a
change agent in introducing the PSP into an
organization.
Software Engineering Measurement
and Analysis
Analyzing Project Management
Indicators
This three-day course teaches project
managers how to use measures and derived
indicators as the foundation for making
informed decisions. Participants learn to
use indicators to plan, manage, and control
software projects. After completing this course,
participants will understand how the Project
Planning, Project Monitoring and Control, and
Measurement and Analysis process areas of
the CMMI models work together and how
these techniques establish a foundation for
implementing related higher maturity process
areas.
Process Improvement and Performance Measurement, continued
22 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Implementing Goal-Driven
Measurement
This two-and-a-half-day course teaches
managers and practitioners the 10-step Goal-
Question-Indicator-Measure (GQIM) method
based on the specifc practices of the CMMI
Measurement and Analysis process area. The
method identifes and defnes the measures
that directly support an organization’s
business, process improvement, and project
goals, ensuring relevance and traceability from
their goals to the data collected. With useful
examples, real-life experiences from the feld,
and a class notebook flled with helpful check-
lists, templates, and reference materials, par-
ticipants walk away with the tools necessary
to lead goal-driven software measurement
processes at their own organizations.
Implementing Goal-Driven
Measurement Instructor Training
This three-day course is for those interested
in becoming SEI-Certifed Instructors of the
Implementing Goal-Driven Measurement
course. It teaches instructors the skills and
knowledge needed to deliver the course as a
public and tailored on-site offering.
Improving Process Performance Using
Six Sigma
This fve-day course takes a hands-on, tactical
problem-solving approach to data analysis for
process improvement. It provides participants
with experience using a toolkit of analysis
methods based on Six Sigma and Goal-Driven
Measurement to investigate three case
studies. Participants gain experience using a
statistics package to analyze data and draw
conclusions.
Designing Products and Processes
Using Six Sigma
This fve-day course takes a hands-on, mea-
surement-oriented approach to product
development, in the context of a single case
study. It provides participants with a toolkit
of analysis methods including voice of the
customer, simulation, reliability growth
modeling, and logistic regression combined
via best practices, such as the Design-for-
Six-Sigma methodology of Defne, Measure,
Analyze, Design, Verify (DMADV) and CMMI
High Maturity, which students apply during a
case study focusing on the development of a
new laptop computer.
Other Process Improvement
Defning Software Processes
This three-and-a-half-day course introduces
those involved in defning processes in an orga-
nization to useful processes, methods, and
skills for understanding, modeling, and docu-
menting current processes, analyzing process
defciencies, and specifying needed process
improvements.
Mastering Process Improvement
This fve-day course introduces members of
process groups, people leading and facilitat-
ing process improvement activities, and those
preparing to adopt CMMI models to a series of
effective practices for process and performance
improvement.
CONFERENCES
Events sponsored or cosponsored by the SEI
SEPG North America Conference
The SEPG
SM
North America Conference, the
premiere annual conference for software and
systems process and performance manage-
ment, is the world’s leading conference and
exhibit showcase for process professionals.
The conference has an international atten-
dance that includes professionals from govern-
ments, industries, and academic institutions. It
provides a truly global perspective on process
improvement activities and performance results
within and across projects, divisions, organi-
zations, and enterprises. See www.sei.cmu.
edu/sepg.
CMMI Technology Conference and User
Group
This conference and user group provides an
opportunity for the users, adopters, and devel-
opers of capability maturity models and those
involved in internal process improvement to
exchange ideas, concepts, and lessons learned
concerning models, appraisal methods, and the
benefts of process improvement. This event
is presented under the auspices of the
National Defense Industrial Association with
technical support provided by the SEI.
See www.sei.cmu.edu/cmmi/events
/cmmi-techconf.
TSP Symposium
The Team Software Process enables
organizations to establish mature, disciplined
engineering practices that produce secure,
reliable software. To learn about the latest devel-
opments, TSP practitioners gather annually for
presentations and interactive learning sessions.
Trainers, developers and users of the TSP meth-
odology discuss new fndings, tools, lessons
learned, and strategies to optimize practice and
outcomes. Personal Software Process practitio-
ners also beneft from this exchange, as do
engineers and managers wanting to learn about
TSP successes and challenges. See
www.sei.cmu.edu/tsp/symposium.html.
SEPG Europe Conference
The SEPG Europe Conference is an annual
conference that focuses on the European
experience, but also draws attendees from
across the world. Keynotes, presenters,
exhibitors, and attendees come together to
address issues, trends, and solutions of
particular interest to the European community.
See www.sei.cmu.edu/sepg.
SEPG Australia Conference
The SEPG Australia Conference (SEPG-AU) is
an annual conference that focuses on Australian
experience, but also draws attendees from
across the world. Keynotes, presenters, exhibi-
tors, and attendees come together to address
issues, trends, and solutions of particular
interest to the Australian community. The con-
ference is sponsored by the SEI, the Software
Quality Institute, and Griffth University. See
www.sepgaust.com.au.
SEPG Latin America Conference
The SEPG Latin America Conference (SEPG-
LA) is an annual conference that focuses on
the Latin American experience, but also draws
attendees from across the world. Keynotes,
presenters, exhibitors, and attendees come
together to address issues, trends, and solu-
tions of particular interest to the Latin American
community. The conference is sponsored by the
SEI and the European Software Institute. See
www.esi.es/SEPGLA.
Process Improvement and Performance Measurement, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 23
PUBLICATIONS
Books are available from Addison-Wesley
(www.awprofessional.com/seiseries) and
book retailers. SEI reports are available for free
download at www.sei.cmu.edu/publications.
Books
Winning With Software: An Executive Strategy.
Watts Humphrey, Addison-Wesley, 2002
CMMI: Guidelines for Process Integration and
Product Improvement, Second Edition.
Mary Beth Chrissis, Mike Konrad, and Sandy
Shrum, Addison-Wesley, 2006
CMMI Survival Guide: Just Enough Process
Improvement. Suzanne Garcia and Richard
Turner, Addison-Wesley, 2006
CMMI SCAMPI Distilled: Appraisals for Process
Improvement. Dennis Ahern, Jim Armstrong,
Aaron Clouse, Jack Ferguson, Will Hayes, and
Kenneth Nidiffer, Addison-Wesley, 2005
CMMI for Outsourcing. Hubert F. Hofmann,
Deborah K. Yedlin, John W. Mishler, and Susan
Kushner, Addison-Wesley, 2007
The People Capability Maturity Model:
Guidelines for Improving the Workforce. Bill
Curtis, William Hefey, and Sally Miller, Addison-
Wesley, 2002
CMMI Assessments: Motivating Positive
Change. Marilyn Bush and Donna Dunaway,
Addison-Wesley, 2005
CMMI Distilled: A Practical Introduction to
Integrated Process Improvement, Second
Edition. Dennis Ahern, Aaron Clouse, and
Richard Turner, Addison-Wesley, 2004
A Discipline for Software Engineering:
The Complete PSP Book. Watts Humphrey,
Addison-Wesley, 1995
TSP: Leading a Development Team.
Watts Humphrey, Addison-Wesley, 2005
PSP: A Self-Improvement Process for Software
Engineers. Watts Humphrey, Addison-Wesley,
2005
Introduction to the Team Software Process.
Watts Humphrey, Addison-Wesley, 2000
Introduction to the Personal Software Process.
Watts Humphrey, Addison-Wesley, 1997
Coaching a Development Team. Watts
Humphrey, Addison-Wesley, 2006
Measuring the Software Process: Statistical
Process Control for Software Process
Improvement. William Florac and Anita
Carleton, Addison-Wesley, 1999
CMMI and Six Sigma. Lynn Penn, Jeannine
Siviy, and Robert Stoddard, Addison-Wesley,
2007
Reports
Performance Results of CMMI-Based Process
Improvement. Diane L. Gibson, Dennis R.
Goldenson, and Keith Kost, 2006
Understanding and Leveraging a Supplier’s
CMMI Efforts: A Guidebook for Acquirers.
CMMI Guidebook for Acquirers Team, 2007
Adapting CMMI for Acquisition Organizations:
A Preliminary Report. Kathryn M. Dodson,
Dr. Hubert F. Hofmann, Gowri S. Ramani, and
Deborah K. Yedlin, 2006
A Process Research Framework. Eileen
Forrester (editor), 2007
CREDENTIALS
SEI certifcations and certifcates awarded
on the completion of qualifcation criteria
established by the SEI
Certifcations
SEI-Certifed SCAMPI High Maturity
Lead Appraiser
This certifcation program enables SCAMPI
Lead Appraisers to upgrade their authoriza-
tions specifcally for conducting appraisals for
organizations seeking to achieve CMMI levels
4 or 5. An SEI-Certifed SCAMPI High Maturity
Lead Appraiser is responsible for applying
SCAMPI to determine if an organization has
demonstrated the capability to quantitatively
manage its projects to produce high-quality,
predictable results at CMMI levels 4 and 5.
SEI-Certifed PSP Developer
A PSP Developer is an individual who pos-
sesses the knowledge and skills required
to competently deliver quality software on
predictable schedules. Candidates should
be able to measure and track size, time, and
defect data; estimate and plan their work;
and manage the quality of the products they
produce using PSP methodologies. To earn
this certifcate, the SEI requires candidates to
pass an examination based on the PSP Body
of Knowledge. Candidates who pass the exam
become SEI-Certifed PSP Developers and
are required to meet ongoing professional-
development requirements to maintain their
certifcations.
SEI-Certifed Implementing Goal
Driven Measurement Instructor
An Instructor of the Implementing Goal-Driven
Measurement (IGDM) course introduces
standard practices and methods to increase
effciency in ways that directly support an
organization’s business goals. Instructors lead
course participants in learning to identify and
defne indicators and measures in the areas of
product development, process improvement,
and project management.
SEI-Certifed TSP Coach
A TSP coach is an individual who possesses
the knowledge, software skills, and team
facilitation abilities to lead software-based
product development teams. Leadership of
a development team requires dedication,
commitment, and energy to continually keep
the team motivated, management informed,
and tasking on track. TSP coaches work with
team leaders to monitor a team’s progress
using effective communication techniques.
The SEI-Certifed TSP Coach designation
requires that candidates complete a series
of qualifcation steps and meet ongoing
professional development requirements to
maintain their certifcations.
Certifcates
SEI Certifcate in CMMI
Using CMMI, organizations can improve
their ability to develop, maintain, and acquire
quality products and services. The SEI
Certifcate in CMMI program guides change
agents and managers through the funda-
mental concepts of CMMI, the relationships
among CMMI model components, and the
development of an effective process improve-
ment program that incorporates CMMI. Also
covered are the IDEAL
SM
model, a high-level
description of the phases of process improve-
ment. Those who complete this certifcate
program will need only two additional courses
to earn an SEI Certifcate in Personal Software
Process for CMMI.
SEI Certifcate in Personal Software
Process for CMMI
A high-performance software organization
requires high-performance teams, staffed
with high-performance software engineers.
The PSP can enable engineers and their
organizations to improve their performance.
While CMMI provides a powerful improve-
ment framework that helps organizations
Process Improvement and Performance Measurement, continued
24 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Process Improvement and Performance Measurement, continued
understand what they need to do to improve
their processes, it does not specify how they
should do it. This certifcate program helps
engineers learn how to implement CMMI
using the PSP.
SEI Certifcate in Software Engineering
Process Management
This certifcate program provides managers
with an overview of process improvement.
The courses in the program explore manage-
ment, metrics, and PSP and TSP approaches
to process improvement. Designed for
managers who need a variety of approaches
for managing and improving the software engi-
neering process, this certifcate program helps
managers develop the knowledge and skills
they need to establish a solid foundation in
process and performance improvement.
SEI Certifcate in Software Process
Improvement Implementation
This certifcate program for those leading
change efforts within their organizations
covers several different methods for imple-
menting change, including IDEAL, metrics,
TSP, and PSP. This program provides change
agents, such as members and leaders of
software engineering process groups, with the
information they need to implement quality ini-
tiatives such as CMMI in their organizations.
RESEARCH
Engagements in technology
development with the SEI
Studies of CMMI’s Effect on
Performance
The SEI works with CMMI user organizations
to collect information about how using CMMI
has affected them. The SEI advises these
organizations on how to best collect meaning-
ful performance data, which is then analyzed
to determine how to best implement CMMI
best practices.
CMMI Beyond Version 1.2
The National Defense Industrial Association
(NDIA), the industry sponsor of CMMI with
technical support from the SEI, is soliciting
and collecting input from experienced CMMI
users and practitioners around the world about
the direction for CMMI future development.
This effort is designed to gather input on ways
to simplify CMMI models and on alternative,
straightforward appraisal techniques, while
preserving the integrity of the CMMI Product
Suite.
Integrated Use of TSP and CMMI
The SEI has been working with organizations
that have adopted TSP and CMMI to gain their
input on mapping TSP and CMMI and identify-
ing how these two approaches complement
each other. The SEI is looking for organiza-
tions interested in discovering the benefts of
using both TSP and CMMI and reporting their
results.
TSP-Secure
The SEI is interested in collaborating with
partners on the development of TSP-Secure,
the Team Software Process for Secure
Software Development, which augments the
TSP with security practices throughout the
software development life cycle. The research
objectives of TSP-Secure are to reduce or elim-
inate software vulnerabilities that result from
software design and implementation defects
and to provide the capability to predict the
likelihood of latent vulnerabilities in delivered
software.
Integrated Use of Six Sigma and
CMMI
The SEI works with organizations that have
adopted CMMI and Six Sigma to identify effec-
tive ways to integrate these two approaches.
Mapping Other Standards with CMMI
CMMI, IEEE, and ISO standards share a
common purpose related to quality and
process management. The SEI and IEEE are
looking for partners to identify ways in which
CMMI, ISO, and other standards complement
one another.
Translating CMMI Into Other
Languages
The SEI is working with organizations to trans-
late the CMMI Product Suite into Japanese,
traditional Chinese, simplifed Chinese, and
German.
Improving Processes in Small Settings
Small businesses, organizational units, and
project teams pose unique challenges for
process improvement. Such environments
have their advantages, such as swift com-
munication through close social networks, a
short chain of command, and staff fexibility.
But small settings have inherent problems of
limited resources, prohibitive appraisal and
vendor costs, and a lack of specialized exper-
tise. Yet, early research shows that process
improvement is not only possible in small
settings but that simple process changes can
provide signifcant improvement if they are
started correctly and if the organization suc-
cessively builds upon early “wins.” To accel-
erate the introduction of best practices into
small settings, the SEI International Process
Research Consortium (IPRC) has launched the
Improving Processes in Small Settings (IPSS)
project to develop guidance to help organiza-
tions achieve the benefts of process improve-
ment while working with tight resource and
cost limitations.
Process Improvement in Multi-Model
Environments
Many organizations today use numerous
process standards and improvement method-
ologies, such as CMMI, ISO, Six Sigma, and
others. The SEI IPRC is seeking to initiate a
collaborative research effort to identify new,
effective methods to balance and integrate
multiple models and to help organizations
overcome challenges in multi-model environ-
ments, such as resolving conficts among
work groups dedicated to different improve-
ment programs; ensuring sustainability and
institutionalization of multiple improvement
efforts; and maintaining multiple systems of
audits, assessments, and benchmarks.
State-of-the-Practice Studies
State-of-the-practice studies are conducted to
show how the community is performing its
work and to allow the SEI to identify changes
and trends that may arise in response to the
introduction and adoption of SEI technolo-
gies. The SEI publishes the results of these
studies to allow organizations to compare their
improvement efforts with those of others in
the community.
Security
Helping organizations protect against, detect, and respond to
attacks on networked systems
www.cert.org
In a world in which the threat of cyber
attacks is contained but not eliminated and
in which threats from unknown sources are
dynamic and constantly changing, the SEI
identifes, develops, matures, and broadly
transitions new technologies, system
development practices, and system manage-
ment practices that enhance computer and
network security.
CERT Coordination Center (CERT/CC)
Founded in 1988, the CERT
®
Coordination
Center (CERT/CC) is the nation’s frst and
best-known computer security incident
response team. Staff members provide
technical advice and coordinate responses
to major Internet security events, identify
trends, work with others to identify security
solutions, advance the state of the art in ma-
licious code analysis, coordinate remediation
of vulnerabilities in software products, and
disseminate information to the Internet com-
munity. In 2003, the CERT/CC began a joint
effort with the U.S. Department of Homeland
Security to create US-CERT, a coordination
point in the United States for preventing,
protecting against, and responding to cyber
attacks across the Internet.
Survivable Systems Engineering
The SEI creates technologies for develop-
ing and analyzing networked systems with
respect to security and survivability. Because
defective software cannot be secure, the SEI
also conducts research and development on
computational approaches to next-generation
software and security engineering, aimed at
reducing errors and vulnerabilities in systems.
Network Situational Awareness
The SEI supports computer security incident
response teams (CSIRTs), watch-and-warning
centers, and analysis groups in measuring
normal and anomalous activity occurring on
large networks. It also helps them assess
threats based on information shared by
collaborators or gleaned from open or intel-
ligence sources. This support is achieved
through research, engineering, and relation-
ship building efforts to improve the sensor
technology that provides necessary data; to
facilitate the sharing of data across relevant
domains; and to derive novel approaches that
synthesize this data into actionable insight
for network operators based on a rigorously
empirical foundation.
Survivable Enterprise Management
Practices, Computer Security Incident
Response Team (CSIRT) Development,
and Training
The SEI works to enhance the transition
of information-assurance knowledge to
the Internet community and to increase
the number of qualifed practitioners. In
partnership with government and industry,
members of the staff build knowledge in
depth for defense in depth through a virtual
lab training environment with certifcation
for technical staff and teams. To increase
the number of system and network adminis-
trators educated in the feld of information
assurance, staff members are developing an
academic curriculum for community colleges
and minority-serving institutions. Members
of the technical staff also work with global
enterprises, government agencies, nations,
and regions to create and sustain the capa-
bility to manage computer security incidents
in order to improve international coordina-
tion and response to Internet attacks. The
SEI is also codifying principles and practices
for corporate security governance.
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 25
Process Improvement and Performance Measurement, continued
26 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
TOOLS & METHODS
Solutions to the problems associated with
software-intensive systems that help develop-
ers and acquirers improve their practices
CERT Knowledgebase
The CERT Knowledgebase (www.cert.org/kb
/index.html/) contains structured information
on vulnerabilities and malicious code. Parts of
the knowledgebase are publicly available to
help system and network administrators and
other technology professionals protect and
defend their systems from intruders. These
parts include the vulnerability catalog, which
includes descriptions of vulnerabilities, their
impacts, and remediation information. Users
can search or browse the database by vulner-
ability name or ID number, common vulner-
abilities and exposures (CVE) number, date
that the vulnerability became public, date that
the database was updated, or severity. Other
parts of the knowledgebase are available on a
restricted access basis to critical-infrastructure
operators, CSIRTs with national responsibility,
malicious-code analysts, and others.
e-RA
e-RA is a technique developed for the General
Services Administration’s Offce of Electronic
Government by an SEI team. It enables orga-
nizations to analyze their own authentication
risks and requirements for their Internet sites
without having to call in authentication experts.
It is used to elicit requirements for authentica-
tion of transaction-based systems based on
the risks to those systems and to users. The
purpose of e-RA is to guide the selection of
an appropriate level of authentication that will
enable the system to resist threats to data,
users, and organizations that could result from
unauthorized system transactions. The tech-
nique can be performed using a Microsoft
Access-based tool that is available online at
www.cio.gov/eauthentication/era.htm.
Security Quality Requirements
Engineering (SQUARE)
Security Quality Requirements Engineering
(SQUARE) is a nine-step method for eliciting,
categorizing, and prioritizing security require-
ments for information technology systems and
applications. It is performed by requirements
engineers with security expertise and project
stakeholders. SQUARE guides the use of
software requirements engineering practices
to specify security requirements and helps
ensure that security requirements are included
in system design and that security goals
support business goals.
Network Situational Awareness
(NetSA) Security Suite
The NetSA Security Suite is a collection of
open source tools that facilitate the security
analysis of large-scale networks using fow
data. The suite of tools includes a probe
(Yet Another Flow Sensor [YAF]) to generate
and aggregate the fows (NetSA Aggregated
Flow [NAF]); a storage and retrieval infra-
structure to house and analyze the fows
(System for Internet Level Knowledge [SiLK]);
and a number of additional analytical tools
(Retrospective Analysis and Visualization
Engine [RAVE]) to process the data and related
contextual data sources (IPA, IP Address
Association library). This suite supports the
network security analyst with incident inves-
tigation as well as trending. The approaches
are ideally suited for analyzing traffc on the
backbone or border of a large, distributed
enterprise or mid-sized Internet service
provider.
Survivable Systems Analysis (SSA)
Survivable Systems Analysis (SSA) is a practi-
cal engineering process that permits system-
atic assessment of the survivability properties
of proposed systems, existing systems, and
modifcations to existing systems. The analysis
is carried out at the architecture level as a
cooperative project by an SEI team working
with a team of system architects, develop-
ers, and stakeholders. The method proceeds
through a series of joint working sessions,
culminating in a briefng on fndings and
recommendations.
Vendor Risk Assessment and Threat
Evaluation (V-RATE)
Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components
are being integrated into critical systems
where failures can lead to severe conse-
quences. Yet with little access to the code or
its development process, the security and
survivability of these components is diffcult
to analyze. The CERT Vendor Risk Assessment
and Threat Evaluation (V-RATE) assesses
vendor capabilities as a strong indicator of
product quality. The process is based on tax-
onomies of vendor risks and the acquiring
organization’s risk-management skills.
Operationally Critical Threat, Asset,
and Vulnerability Evaluation (OCTAVE)
The SEI Operationally Critical Threat, Asset,
and Vulnerability Evaluation
SM
(OCTAVE
®
) and
OCTAVE Allegro methods are self-directed,
risk-based, strategic assessment and planning
techniques for security. In using OCTAVE, a
small team of people from the operational (or
business) units and the information technol-
ogy department work together to address the
security needs of an organization.
CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENTS
Funded engagements to help organizations
meet their business and mission objectives
Clustered-Computing Analysis
Platform (C-CAP)
The CERT Clustered-Computing Analysis
Platform (C-CAP) is a state-of-the-art foren-
sics analysis environment that allows for a
complete suite of tools for host-based and
network investigations. The environment
maximizes the application of specialized com-
puting resources to the forensic and incident
response missions. Analysts and investiga-
tors enjoy fexible, secure access to high-per-
formance systems, increasing productivity
and enabling distributed collaboration. C-CAP
combines scalable resources, a collaborative
environment, centralized management, and
augmented capabilities to address a variety of
needs.
Establishing an Incident Response
Capability
The SEI helps organizations establish CSIRTs
through a variety of training products, best
practices, and tools that can be used to
evaluate the effectiveness of the CSIRT.
Evaluating or Benchmarking Incident
Management Capabilities
The SEI uses the SEI Incident Management
Capability Evaluation (IMCE) to assist organiza-
tions in benchmarking their incident manage-
ment practices for protecting, detecting, and
responding to computer security incidents
and events. The SEI defnes incident manage-
ment as the end-to-end processes involved in
providing a set of services considered essen-
tial to protecting, defending, and sustaining
an organization’s computing environment,
as well as conducting appropriate response
actions. These incident management practices
or functions may be performed by a CSIRT, a
managed security service provider, or other
designated security groups or individuals
within the organization.
Implementing Tools and Methods for
Survivable Systems
The SEI helps organizations implement tools
and methods for improving the survivability
of networked systems, including OCTAVE,
V-RATE, Security Quality Requirements
Engineering (SQUARE), and fow-service
quality (FSQ).
Security, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 27
Virtual Network Audit
The CERT Virtual Network Audit (VNA) is a
scenario-based testbed for training person-
nel to perform information-assurance audits.
VNA simulates a functioning network offering
internal services and an external Internet
(Web, email) presence, and it includes a real-
istic scenario describing the purpose, location,
and topology of the network and profles of
administrative personnel. The network and
scenario contain a number of vulnerabilities
or failures. Auditors must discover weak-
nesses and risks and develop a plan to bring
the network into compliance with commonly
accepted best practices. VNA can be custom-
ized in a number of ways and can be tailored
to specifc scenarios.
Virtual Training Environment (VTE)
The CERT Virtual Training Environment (VTE)
(www.vte.cert.org) is a Web-based knowl-
edge library of best practices in information
assurance and computer forensics. VTE uses
a rich media interface that includes nearly
500 hours of recorded video of instructor-led
training, captured demonstrations, and hands-
on training labs on topics such as network-
access controls, intrusion detection, building
a forensic toolkit, and more. VTE is targeted
at system administrators and frst respond-
ers to computer security incidents. Basic VTE
content is available to the public. CERT also
offers distance learning courses through VTE.
Organizations interested in these services can
contact vte-support@cert.org to learn more.
Establishing and Improving
Information Security Management
Programs and Practices
CERT helps organizations improve their
information security programs through the
development and assessment of strategic
plans, program structure, measurements and
metrics, risk and security management prac-
tices, and standards adoption.
Evaluations, Assessments, and
Reviews
CERT develops, conducts, and transitions
information security assessment and evalu-
ation methods and techniques that provide
organizations with practical guidance for iden-
tifying, mitigating, and managing risks to their
organizations and networked systems.
Evaluating Environments for
Infrastructure Protection Preparedness
The SEI conducts reviews of developing and
operational information infrastructures, includ-
ing critical information infrastructures, to
identify signifcant threats and vulnerabilities
and ensure resiliency of operations under
stress, attack, and contingency scenarios.
CERT Resiliency Engineering
Framework (CERT REF) Assessment
The CERT Resiliency Engineering Framework
(CERT REF) Assessment evaluates an orga-
nization’s capability for managing operational
resiliency activities (security, business con-
tinuity, and IT operations). The assessment
results are useful for planning and prioritizing
resiliency improvement activities, optimiz-
ing investments in resiliency activities, and
validating organizational competencies. The
assessment is conducted in three segments,
during which a team of experts from CERT
(a) help the organization set and prioritize its
objectives for operational resiliency compe-
tencies, (b) evaluate the organization’s current
resiliency processes against the objectives in
the context of the framework, and (c) help the
organization develop and prioritize improve-
ment strategies based on the results of the
evaluation.
EDUCATION & TRAINING
Available from the SEI and licensed SEI
Partners, based on matured, validated, and
documented solutions to pervasive problems
Advanced Incident Handling for
Technical Staff
This fve-day course, designed for CSIRT
technical personnel with several months
of incident-handling experience, addresses
commonly used and emerging attacks that
are targeted against a variety of operating
systems and architectures.
Advanced Information Security for
Technical Staff
This fve-day course is designed to increase
the depth of knowledge and skills of technical
staff charged with administering and securing
information systems and networks. Developed
around a scenario in which a production
network has failed an information-security
audit, students implement numerous techni-
cal security solutions to bring the network into
compliance.
Computer Forensics for Technical Staff
This three-day course comprises three com-
ponents: lecture, student labs, and team sce-
narios. It is designed for technical staff who
administer and secure information systems
and networks. This course provides partici-
pants with a fundamental understanding of
the computer forensics process and develops
frst responders’ basic forensic practices.
Creating a Computer Security Incident
Response Team
This one-day course is designed for managers
and project leaders who have been tasked
with implementing a CSIRT. This course
provides a high-level overview of the key
issues and decisions that must be addressed
in establishing a CSIRT. As part of the course,
attendees develop an action plan that can be
used as a starting point in planning and imple-
menting their CSIRTs.
Fundamentals of Incident Handling
This fve-day course is for CSIRT technical
personnel with little or no incident-handling
experience. It provides a basic introduction to
the main incident-handling tasks and critical-
thinking skills that will help incident handlers
perform their jobs. This course is recom-
mended for those new to incident handling.
Information Security for Network
Managers
This two-day course is designed to give infor-
mation technology (IT) and network managers
the practical knowledge required to ensure
the security of their information assets. The
course begins by addressing the concepts
of information security, survivability, and risk
management, including the layered approach
to survivability and the elements of risk
analysis and assessment. The course also
focuses on the IT manager’s role in increas-
ing an organization’s security, from policy
defnition to business continuity and disaster-
recovery planning.
Information Security for Technical Staff
This fve-day course is designed to provide
participants with practical techniques for pro-
tecting the security of an organization’s infor-
mation assets and resources. Security issues,
technologies, and recommended practices are
addressed at increasing layers of complexity,
beginning with concepts and proceeding to
technical implementations.
Managing Computer Security Incident
Response Teams
This three-day course provides current and
future managers of CSIRTs with a pragmatic
view of the issues they will face in operating
an effective incident response team.
OCTAVE Training Workshop
This three-day workshop is designed to
help individuals and analysis teams lead and
perform information security risk evaluations
such as the OCTAVE and OCTAVE Allegro
methods.
2S www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Security, continued
CERT Resiliency Engineering Executive
Workshop
This half-day workshop introduces partici-
pants to the CERT Resiliency Engineering
Framework (REF), including key underlying
concepts, and guides participants in develop-
ing a high-level strategy for using the frame-
work to improve their organizations. Through
lectures, class exercises, and discussions, the
workshop covers current trends in security
and business continuity, the concept of opera-
tional resilience, key process improvement
principles, and the REF.
Foundation for Resiliency
This two-day course provides current and
future operational risk managers with founda-
tional skills and knowledge of how security,
business continuity, and IT operations con-
tribute to operational resiliency. It frames the
management of security and business conti-
nuity in the context of the business objectives
and organizational mission.
Survivability and Information
Assurance (SIA) Curriculum
Today’s organizations rely on networked
systems powered by fast-changing technology.
This reliance makes them more vulnerable
to attacks and forces system administrators
to seek new approaches to computer and
network security. To help them, CERT has
developed a downloadable, three-part, 46-
module curriculum with companion labs in
survivability and information assurance (SIA).
The curriculum offers a problem-solving meth-
odology built on key SIA principles that are
independent of specifc technologies. It is
available free of charge to the general public
and registered instructors. Qualifying regis-
tered instructors have access to the curricu-
lum’s companion instructor materials as well
as the student materials.
CONFERENCES
Events sponsored or cosponsored by the SEI
FloCon Analysis Workshop
The Flocon
®
Analysis Workshop is an open
conference that provides a forum for research-
ers, operational analysts, network operators,
and vendors interested in security-relevant
traffc analysis of fow data. Attendees submit
papers on topics related to the development
or provisioning of such infrastructures or the
analysis of their corresponding data sets.
Forum of Incident Response and
Security Teams (FIRST) Conference
This conference focuses on the feld of
computer security incident handling and
response. In recognition of the global spread
of computer networks and the common
problems of computer owners, service provid-
ers, networking communities, and companies,
the conference is held in different parts of the
world each year. Presentations include the
latest information about incident response and
prevention, vulnerability analysis, and related
aspects of computer security.
Collaboration Meeting for CSIRTs with
National Responsibility
The CERT Coordination Center hosts an
annual meeting of CSIRTs with national
responsibility. This meeting fosters collabora-
tion on joint projects and examines the chal-
lenges and projects unique to national CSIRTs.
International Workshop on
Requirements for High-Assurance
Systems (RHAS)
Held in conjunction with the IEEE International
Requirements Engineering Conference, this
workshop brings together researchers and
practitioners from the felds of secure comput-
ing and software requirements to exchange
ideas and experiences.
Software Engineering for High-
Assurance Systems (SEHAS)
Workshop
Held in conjunction with the International
Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE),
this workshop provides a forum for research-
ers and practitioners to exchange ideas and
experiences relevant to the development of
high-assurance software systems.
System-Dynamics Modeling for
Information Security Workshop
The objectives of this workshop are to develop
a preliminary system-dynamics model of
important aspects of the information security
problem from both insider and outsider per-
spectives using a group modeling approach;
to identify additional data on these aspects
that are unknown or unavailable, but are
needed for future progress on this problem;
and to investigate possible collaborations for
longer term work to propose to prospective
sponsors.
PUBLICATIONS
Books are available from Addison-Wesley
(www.awprofessional.com/seiseries) and
book retailers. SEI reports are available for free
download at www.sei.cmu.edu/publications.
Books
Secure Coding in C and C++. Robert Seacord,
Addison-Wesley, 2005
Internet Denial of Service: Attack and Defense
Mechanisms. Sven Dietrich with J. Mirkovic,
D. Dittrich, and P. Reiher, Prentice Hall, 2004
Managing Information Security Risks: The
OCTAVE Approach. Christopher Alberts and
Audrey Dorofee, Addison-Wesley, 2002
The CERT Guide to System and Network
Security Practices. Julia Allen, Addison-
Wesley, 2001
Reports
Comparing Insider IT Sabotage and Espionage:
A Model-Based Analysis. Stephen R. Band,
Dawn M. Cappelli, Lynn F. Fischer, Andrew P.
Moore, Eric D. Shaw, Randall F. Trzeciak, 2006
Introducing OCTAVE Allegro: Improving
the Information Security Risk Assessment
Process. Richard A. Caralli, James. F. Stevens,
Lisa R. Young, William R. Wilson, 2007
Introducing the CERT Resiliency Engineering
Framework: Improving the Security and
Sustainability Processes. Richard A. Caralli,
James. F. Stevens, Charles M. Wallen, David
W. White, William R. Wilson, Lisa R. Young,
2007
Botnets as a Vehicle for Online Crime. Nicholas
Ianelli, Ross Kinder, Christian Roylo, 2005
The Impact of Function Extraction Technology
on Next-Generation Software Engineering.
Alan R. Hevner, Richard C. Linger, Rosann W.
Collins, Mark G. Pleszkoch, Stacy J. Prowell,
Gwendolyn H. Walton, July 2005
Security Quality Requirements Engineering
(SQUARE) Methodology. Nancy R. Mead, Eric
D. Hough, Theodore R. Stehney II, 2005
Trustworthy Refnement Through Intrusion-
Aware Design. Robert J. Ellison, Andrew P.
Moore, 2003
Tracking and Tracing Cyber-Attacks: Technical
Challenges and Global Policy Issues. Howard F.
Lipson, 2002
Handbook for Computer Security Incident
Response Teams (CSIRTs). Moira J.
West-Brown, Don Stikvoort, Klaus-Peter
Kossakowski, Georgia Killcrece, Robin Ruefe,
Mark Zajicek, 2003
Incident Management Capability Metrics.
Audrey Dorofee, Georgia Killcrece, Robin
Ruefe, Mark Zajicek, 2007
State of the Practice of Computer Security
Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs). Georgia
Killcrece, Klaus-Peter Kossakowski, Robin
Ruefe, Mark Zajicek, 2003
Detecting Scans at the ISP Level.
Carrie Gates, Josh McNutt, Joseph B. Kadane,
Marc Kellner, 2006
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 29
CREDENTIALS
SEI certifcates and certifcations awarded
on the completion of qualifcation criteria
established by the SEI
Certifcations
CERT-Certifed Computer Security
Incident Handler Certifcation
Organizations need individuals who can
lead computer security incident response
teams (CSIRTs). In response to this demand,
CERT has introduced a program designed to
train and certify computer security incident
handlers. This program is designed for working
incident handlers, CSIRT managers, system
and network administrators with incident-
handling experience, incident handling
trainers, and those who have some techni-
cal training and intend to enter the incident-
handling feld.
Certifcates
SEI Certifcate in Information Security
This certifcate program is designed to provide
participants with practical techniques for pro-
tecting the security of an organization’s infor-
mation assets and resources and increasing
the depth of knowledge and skills of technical
staff charged with administering and securing
information systems and networks. Security
issues, technologies, and recommended prac-
tices are addressed at increasing layers of
complexity, beginning with concepts and pro-
ceeding to technical implementations.
SEI Certifcate in Incident Response
Process
This certifcate program is for CSIRT techni-
cal personnel. The frst course in the certif-
cate provides a basic introduction to the main
incident-handling tasks and critical-thinking
skills that will help incident handlers perform
their jobs. The second course addresses
commonly used and emerging attacks that
are targeted against a variety of operating
systems and architectures. Ultimately, this
certifcate is designed to provide insight into
the type and nature of work incident handlers
may perform. It will provide an overview of
the incident-handling arena, including CSIRT
services, intruder threats, the nature of
incident-response activities, and the steps
incident handlers can take in response to
system compromises at the privileged level.
RESEARCH
Engagements in technology development
with the SEI
Computational Security Attributes
(CSA)
Security analysis of software today is a
labor-intensive process requiring substantial
expertise that often results in subjective, one-
time evaluations of limited use in ongoing
system operation. The Computational Security
Attributes (CSA) project has developed theo-
retical foundations and automatable engineer-
ing methods for fast and precise computation
of security properties, such as authentication,
authorization, and non-repudiation, during
system development and operation. The
project defnes security properties in terms
of required functional behavior that can be
computed with function extraction technology.
Corporate Governance: Governing for
Enterprise Security
The SEI defnes governing for enterprise
security as “directing and controlling an orga-
nization to establish and sustain a culture of
security in the organization’s conduct (beliefs,
behaviors, capabilities, and actions).” This work
builds on and expands commonly described
forms of governance, including corporate gov-
ernance, enterprise governance, and informa-
tion technology governance. The SEI helps
senior executives and managers expand their
governance perspectives to include security,
incorporating enterprisewide security thinking
into their and their organizations’ day-to-day
governance actions. The SEI is building col-
laboration relationships with organizations
working in the governance domain (such as
the Institute of Internal Auditors) and seeks
partners who are addressing enterprise
security as part of their corporate governance
strategy.
Malicious Code Analysis Tools and
Techniques
As a thought leader in the feld of Internet
security, the CERT/CC not only provides
technical information to system and network
administrators and technology professionals to
help them better defend their networks, it also
develops tools and methods to better identify,
analyze, catalog, and manage vulnerability
information and malicious code. It transitions
these tools and methods to the DoD, intel-
ligence community, law enforcement, reverse
engineers, CSIRTs with national responsibil-
ity, and software vendors to help improve the
effectiveness of response teams and to help
vendors mitigate vulnerabilities in the software
they produce.
Flow-Service-Quality (FSQ)
Engineering
Flow-service-quality (FSQ) engineering
provides foundations for mastering complex-
ity and addressing survivability in analysis and
development of large-scale, network-centric
systems. The FSQ project is defning rigorous
engineering methods for complex network
systems characterized by shifting boundaries
and users, uncertain COTS software function
and quality, extensive asynchronous opera-
tions, unpredictable failures and compromises,
and lack of visibility and control.
Function Extraction (FX)
In today’s state of practice, programmers
lack practical means to determine the full
functional behavior of software in all circum-
stances of use. This longstanding gap in engi-
neering capabilities lies at the heart of many
problems in software security and quality.
CERT STAR*Lab is developing function extrac-
tion (FX) theory and engineering automation to
compute the behavior of software with math-
ematical precision to the maximum extent
possible. A frst FX system is under devel-
opment to compute behavior for programs
written in or compiled into Intel assembly
language. FX technology is a new approach to
human understanding of software, as well as
to malware detection and analysis, software
development and testing, correctness veri-
fcation, and component composition at the
system level.
Insider Threat Studies
The SEI has been conducting insider threat
research for several years based on analysis
of law-enforcement cases and supplemental
interviews for each case with the investiga-
tor, prosecutor, victim organization, and/or the
insider. Future analysis will focus on malicious
insider activity that was addressed internally
by the victim organization without the involve-
ment of law enforcement. The SEI is inter-
ested in working with organizations willing to
share data and experiences on insider threat
activity and to collaborate in the collection and
dissemination of guidance.
International Watch and Warning
Network
The CERT Coordination Center is collaborat-
ing with Asia-Pacifc Economic Cooperation
(APEC), the Organization of American States
(OAS), and many individual countries to build
a worldwide network of CSIRTs with national
responsibility to share information about inci-
dents, vulnerabilities, malicious code, and
threats.
30 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Security, continued
Levels of Anonymity and Traceability
(LEVANT)
The CERT research team is conducting
research to improve the current technical capa-
bility to track and trace sophisticated Internet-
based attacks through the CERT Levels of
Anonymity and Traceability (LEVANT) project.
Network Situational Awareness
CERT is looking for partners to pilot tools and
techniques to understand large-scale network
activity. The goal is to identify malicious
activity that is too subtle to detect with tradi-
tional intrusion-detection methods.
Security Quality Requirements
Engineering (SQUARE)
The SQUARE project team is installing
SQUARE at an industry location and is working
on further development of the SQUARE proto-
type tool. In addition, the team has developed
SQUARE educational and training materials
and is conducting a more detailed study of
the technical aspects of SQUARE. The team
is also performing industry case studies to
determine whether SQUARE-Lite, a stream-
lined version of SQUARE that can be used
to supplement an existing requirements
engineering process, is feasible.
The SEI is seeking organizations in govern-
ment, academia, and industry to participate in
pilots and reviews of SQUARE practices and
processes.
STAR*Lab: Security Technology
Automation and Research
CERT has established the STAR*Lab software
development laboratory, whose mission is to
develop theory-based automated solutions to
challenge problems in security engineering.
Challenge problems are intractable barriers
to progress whose solutions can have major
impact on engineering capabilities. STAR*Lab
applies three principles—theory frst, proof-
by-automation, and scale-up for practical appli-
cation—in developing engineering tools to
address security problems.
Resiliency Engineering Framework
Resiliency engineering is an emerging area of
applied research focused on helping organi-
zations integrate, improve, and mature their
security, business continuity, and IT operations
activities. The CERT Resiliency Engineering
Framework (REF) is the cornerstone artifact
of this research. REF codifes an integrated
approach to protecting and sustaining critical
business operations combined with a process
improvement approach to maturing enterprise
competency in resiliency engineering.
The framework provides guidelines for
managing security and business continuity
across the enterprise, in concert with and
in support of an organization’s mission and
strategy. Elevating these activities to an enter-
prise level and focusing on process enables
organizations to integrate, manage, bench-
mark, measure, and improve them over time.
The frst complete outline of the framework
was published in 2007 at www.cert.org
/archive/pdf/07tr009.pdf, and REF-based
assessments and training are now available.
Research continues to expand the framework
and to develop a suite of tools, techniques,
training, and methods to support organizations
in using the framework. Collaborating
organizations are sought to participate
in the research and assist in developing
the REF product suite. Please see
www.cert.org/resiliency_engineering
for more information about CERT REF.
Threat Analysis and Modeling
CERT has been conducting insider threat
research since 2001 based on analysis of law-
enforcement cases and supplemental inter-
views of each case with the investigator, pros-
ecutor, victim organization, and/or the insider.
Building on the insider threat studies, the SEI
is researching technical threat areas, including
insider IT sabotage, fraud, and theft of sensi-
tive or confdential information; espionage;
potential threats to our nation’s critical infra-
structure; and other electronic crimes.
Future activity will include the development
of models, reports, training, and tools to raise
awareness of the risk to an organization’s
critical assets and to assist the community
in understanding the factors infuencing an
insider’s decision to act, indicators and pre-
cursors of impending malicious actions, and
countermeasures for mitigation, with the goal
of improving the survivability and resiliency of
the enterprise. The SEI is interested in working
with organizations in the following areas:
developing and applying insider threat risk
diagnostics, piloting innovative threat preven-
tion and mitigation training materials, sharing
data and experiences on threat activities, and
collaborating in the collection and dissemina-
tion of guidance.
lnteroperability, Dependability, and Mission Success
Enabling organizations to achieve system-of-systems interoperability, to
predict embedded system performance, and to make large, networked
systems more dependable and successful
www.sei.cmu.edu/programs/ds
Today’s complex, geographically distributed
systems require the interoperation of multi-
ple systems. Such a system of systems must
evolve while it continues to deliver optimal
performance and dependability. This includes
systems in which timing is critical and heavy
load is the norm. At the same time, we can-
not lose sight of the engineering challenges
in developing embedded systems.
Interoperability
The SEI identifes, matures, and transitions
software engineering methods and tech-
niques that enable organizations to integrate
components, systems, and systems of
systems. The SEI investigates the software
implications of the vision of network-centric
operations, provides guidance on the selec-
tion and use of technologies and methods to
feld and sustain interoperable systems, and
seeks solutions to organizational interoper-
ability problems.
Performance and Dependability
The development of large, networked soft-
ware systems is complicated by inadequate
notations and tools for specifying, modeling,
and predicting system performance and
dependability. The SEI is creating, evaluat-
ing, and maturing technology to address
these engineering problems by helping to
ensure that software and systems engineers
routinely develop embedded and real-time
systems that predictably meet or exceed
their performance and dependability require-
ments. The SEI goal is to enable the use of
tool-supported analyses that detect common
but subtle performance and dependability
pitfalls, so that performance anomalies and
undesired operational behaviors rarely occur
during system integration, deployment,
operational use, and evolution.
Mission Success
In today’s business environment, multiple
organizations routinely combine resources
in pursuit of a single objective, resulting in
programmatic, process, and technological
complexity that can be diffcult to manage
effectively. Achieving mission success in
these complex settings poses a challenge for
most organizations. The SEI is developing a
suite of risk-based assessment and manage-
ment methods that help managers establish
and maintain confdence in mission success
throughout the life cycle and across the
supply chain. These methods are designed to
help managers evaluate success in relation
to a mission’s objectives and chart a course
for improvement.
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 31
32 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
TOOLS & METHODS
Solutions to the problems associated with
software-intensive systems that help develop-
ers and acquirers improve their practices
Interoperability
System-of-Systems Navigator
Product Suite
A system-of-systems (SoS) environment will
consist of many constituents and relation-
ships—some technical, some organizational.
The SEI SoS Navigator
SM
helps customers
understand the interoperation and cooperation
necessary in a system of systems and defne
the critical relationships between the constitu-
ents and their environment. The SoS Navigator
• analyzes the interoperability situation
• identifes the defciencies and risks to achiev-
ing the interoperability goals
• identifes and prioritizes mitigations
• plans the needed improvements based on
the mitigations
• guides the organizations involved in adopting
the planned improvements
For more information, see
www.sei.cmu.edu/isis/navigator.html.
Service Migration and Reuse
Technique (SMART)
The SEI Service Migration and Reuse
Technique (SMART) methodology helps
organizations analyze a legacy system to
determine whether its functionality can be
exposed as services as part of a service-
oriented architecture (SOA). During the
process, the SMART team establishes
the needs of the legacy system’s stakehold-
ers; describes the existing capability of
the system; describes the target SOA,
potential services, and how they will
interact; analyzes the gap between the
current and future states and the effort
and cost required to close the gap; and
develops a migration strategy, detailed
in a fnal presentation. For more information,
see www.sei.cmu.edu/publications
/documents/05.reports/05tn029.html.
Evolutionary Process for Integrating
COTS-Based Systems (EPIC)
The SEI Evolutionary Process for Integrating
COTS-Based Systems
SM
(EPIC
SM
) methodol-
ogy enables an organization simultaneously
to consider factors from the four spheres
that must be orchestrated to achieve a COTS-
based system solution: stakeholder needs and
business processes, the product marketplace,
system architecture and design, and program-
matic (budget and schedule) and risk consider-
ations. For more information, see
www.sei.cmu.edu/publications
/documents/02.reports/02tr005.html and
www.sei.cmu.edu/publications
/documents/02.reports/02tr009.html.
COTS Usage Risk Evaluation (CURE)
The SEI COTS Usage Risk Evaluation
SM

(CURE
SM
) method helps organizations avoid
common mistakes when acquiring systems
that employ COTS components. CURE is
ideally conducted during the early stages of
a program, when the major decisions relating
to use of COTS products have not yet been
made. CURE involves site visits and structured
question-and-answer sessions with personnel
from the program offce and the contractor
for COTS-based acquisitions. CURE materials
are now freely available through the SEI Web
site at www.sei.cmu.edu/cbs/cure
/cureprod.html.
COTS Product Evaluation Method
System developers are often challenged when
faced with making decisions about the incor-
poration of COTS products in their systems.
An important frst step is to systematically
evaluate candidate COTS products. The SEI
has developed the PECA method, which
stands for the leading letters of the main
steps:
• plan the evaluation
• establish the criteria
• collect the data
• analyze the data
This method is tailorable to ft with an organi-
zation's needs. More information is available
at www.sei.cmu.edu/publications
/documents/03.reports/03tr017.html.
Performance and Dependability
System Architecture Modeling and
Analysis
Model-based engineering (MBE) reduces risk
by predicting the runtime behaviors of the
customer’s system through early and repeated
analysis of the architecture at different refne-
ment levels. As a result, MBE cuts costs by
preventing many system integration problems
and simplifying life-cycle support. The SEI uses
MBE tools and methods to analyze a custom-
er’s system architecture for
• security, including intrusion, integrity, and
confdentiality analysis
• resource consumption, such as bandwidth,
CPU time, and power consumption
• real-time performance, including execu-
tion time/deadline, deadlock/starvation, and
latency
• availability and reliability, such as mean time
between failures (MTBF), failure modes and
effects analysis (FMEA), and hazard analysis
The SEI leads the technical development of
the Architecture Analysis & Design Language
(AADL), a Society of Automotive Engineers
(SAE) international industry standard. The
AADL is an architecture description language
that supports the model-based engineering of
embedded and real-time systems. It has been
used in domains such as avionics, aerospace,
automotive, and autonomous systems.
AADL models have a precise non-ambiguous
semantics, are machine processable, and facil-
itate objective human interpretation.
The SEI has developed an extensible tool
environment, OSATE (Open Source AADL Tool
Environment), featuring methods and tech-
niques that analyze AADL models. OSATE,
made available under an open source, no-fee
license agreement, is based on the Eclipse
environment. More information about the SEI
approach to MBE is available at
www.sei.cmu.edu/pcs/model.html and
www.sei.cmu.edu/pcs/aadl.html.
Interoperability, Dependability, and Mission Success, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 33
Mission Success
Mission Diagnostic
The SEI Mission Diagnostic provides a time-
effcient means of determining a mission’s
potential for success based on an evaluation
of current conditions. First, a set of key indi-
cators is evaluated to estimate a mission’s
current potential for success relative to a
predefned benchmark of success. Decision-
makers can then determine if the current
potential for success is acceptable or if actions
are required to improve the situation. The
Mission Diagnostic can be conducted at stra-
tegic points throughout a mission’s life cycle
and can be applied to programs, operational
processes, and technologies. More informa-
tion on the Mission Diagnostic and mission
success is available from the SEI Web site at
www.sei.cmu.edu/msce.
Mission Assurance Analysis Protocol
(MAAP)
The SEI Mission Assurance Analysis Protocol
(MAAP) is a comprehensive analysis protocol
that is used to examine in-depth the factors
affecting a mission’s potential for success
and create strategies to ensure that mission
priorities are successfully achieved. Upon
completion, an operational model, customized
analysis artifacts, a measure of the mission’s
potential for success, and strategies for
improvement are produced. MAAP can be
used to assess programs and operational pro-
cesses at strategic points in the mission life
cycle. More information on MAAP and mission
success is available from the SEI Web site at
www.sei.cmu.edu/msce/index.html.
CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENTS
Funded engagements to help organizations
meet their business and mission objectives
Interoperability
Basics of SOA
In this half-day working session, SEI experts
walk participants through the elements of SOA
and reveal some common misconceptions
about it.
SOA Strategy
Any successful SOA strategy has to be aligned
with business goals, such as reduced time-
to-market for applications, integration with
business partners, or improved customer
service. Each goal drives a different set of SOA
strategies. This workshop explores the linking
of business goals with SOA strategies and
identifes potential pilot projects. As a result of
this workshop, an organization develops a plan
for identifying its SOA priorities and imple-
menting a set of concrete tasks.
SOA Governance
SOA governance provides a set of policies,
rules, and enforcement mechanisms for
developing, using, and evolving SOA assets
and for analysis of their business value. In
this workshop, the SEI team facilitates a
session to help the customer organization
develop a set of appropriate SOA governance
policies, procedures, and practices. The SOA
Governance workshop is a natural comple-
ment to the session on SOA Strategy.
T-Check Technology Investigations
An SEI T-Check
SM
investigation provides a
sanity check on the claims made about a tech-
nology. A T-Check examination is ruthlessly
effcient and provides insight into technolo-
gies without requiring a large investment.
T-Check investigations are especially useful,
for example, to check the claims made about
technologies for an SOA environment, where
many of the technologies and standards are
still maturing.
Performance and Dependability
Analysis-Based Assurance
The application of assurance cases as a
means of demonstrating critical dependability
attributes is an emerging practice. Assurance
cases are reviewable artifacts showing why
increased confdence in the safety, security,
or reliability of a system is justifed. They typi-
cally integrate test-based results with various
analyses performed during the development
of a system.
The SEI helps organizations develop assur-
ance cases, assurance case management
plans, and relevant assurance case patterns.
The SEI institutes an assurance case approach
that is integrated across the system develop-
ment and operation life cycle. The end result
is an effcient assurance approach leading to
increased confdence in a system’s safety,
security, and dependability properties.
Model-Based Engineering and System
Architecture Analysis
The SEI uses model-based engineering to
provide technical assistance and guidance to
customers to support the analysis, evaluation,
and validation of architecture designs, including
• evaluating system architecture candidates,
validating system quality attributes, and iden-
tifying architectural inadequacies early in the
design phase
• facilitating system integration and validat-
ing the composition and the assumptions of
underlying subsystems
• conducting impact and tradeoff analysis
using architecture models to determine per-
formance and reliability effects given archi-
tectural changes
For predicting and validating non-functional
properties using MBE, the SEI supports
• evaluating fault-tolerance of architectures
(e.g., determining reliability and availability,
analyzing impact of fault propagation, and
identifying root causes of faults)
• adopting analytical resource models to
validate performance behavior (e.g., latency,
schedulability, timeliness), power consump-
tion, and network bandwidth usage
• deploying security models (e.g., Bell-
LaPadula, multi-level security [MLS]) and
security architectures (e.g., multiple indepen-
dent levels of security [MILS]) to ensure that
access to resources is not compromised
• conducting differential architecture analysis
to discover defects and guide localized archi-
tectural change
• validating data quality requirements such as
temporal correctness, accuracy/precision,
and confdence
EPIC Implementation
After delivering a two-day tutorial in the
EPIC methodology, the SEI helps organiza-
tions incorporate EPIC principles into current
COTS-based systems processes. The SEI also
provides coaching in the successful execution
of the COTS-based systems process using
EPIC.
COTS Software Product Evaluation
The SEI helps organizations apply its evalua-
tion process to the selection of one or more
COTS products for a specifc system.
CURE Transition
The SEI provides training and coaching to help
organizations master the CURE method and
become self-suffcient in its delivery.
Mission Success
Mission-Success Assessments
The SEI helps organizations apply the SEI’s
mission-success assessment methods. This
includes applying Mission Diagnostic and
MAAP as well as developing and applying
methods that are tailored for a customer.
34 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Interoperability, Dependability, and Mission Success, continued
EDUCATION & TRAINING
Available from the SEI and licensed SEI
Partners, based on matured, validated, and
documented solutions to pervasive problems
Interoperability
Migrating Legacy Components to
SOA Environments
At a time when systems based on SOA are
becoming increasingly popular, this two-day
course introduces managers, software engi-
neers, and decision makers to the basics of
SOA, common misconceptions about SOA,
and fundamentals for successfully implement-
ing SOA. It addresses SOA development
and challenges from the perspectives of the
service developer, the service consumer, and
the infrastructure developer. The course also
outlines the SMART methodology, which
helps organizations develop a realistic strategy
for the migration of legacy components to a
specifc SOA target environment.
Introduction to SOA
The Introduction to SOA course delves into
the basics of SOA, including its common mis-
conceptions and the four pillars of SOA-based
systems development (strategic alignment,
SOA governance, technology evaluation, and a
change in organizational mindset). This course
provides participants with a frm grounding in
the basics of this popular approach to achiev-
ing system interoperability.
Introduction to SMART
In this course, participants gain insight into
the challenges of reusing legacy systems as
services within an SOA environment. They
also learn about the SMART process that
helps organizations
• determine whether it makes sense to
migrate legacy systems to services
• decide which services it makes sense to
develop
• assess the changes needed in the legacy
system to accomplish the migration
• evaluate migration strategies
EPIC Tutorial
This two-day tutorial covers fundamental
COTS defnitions and provides an overview
of some of the major engineering, business,
acquisition, and contractual activities affected
by COTS-based systems. The presenter
describes practices, based on real-world case
studies, for COTS business-case, vendor, and
supplier relationships; architecture; license
negotiation; requirements; evaluation; and
risk management. The tutorial also covers
the basic concepts and structure of the EPIC
process, the implications for management and
the organization’s development processes, and
the detailed activities, tasks, and artifacts that
are used in the process.
COTS-Based Systems for
Program Managers
This fve-hour presentation, currently offered
only at customer sites, addresses the major
challenges and opportunities associated with
the use of COTS products in software-inten-
sive systems from the perspective of the
program manager.
COTS Software Product Evolution
for Practitioners
This two-day course covers the process and
techniques that can be employed in the evalu-
ation of COTS products for software-intensive
systems. It covers fundamental defnitions,
an overview of some of the basic principles
of COTS product evaluation, a process frame-
work for COTS software product evaluation,
and some useful techniques.
Open Systems for Executives
This half-day course is designed to introduce
executives to the basic concepts, principles,
and challenges of creating and sustaining open
systems.
Open Systems: The Promises and
the Pitfalls
This two-and-a-half-day course, currently
offered only at customer sites, provides par-
ticipants with basic knowledge about how
to successfully transition to using an open-
systems approach for systems acquisition.
Performance and Dependability
Model-Based Engineering with
SAE AADL
This two-day course provides an introduction
to MBE, AADL, and OSATE. MBE cuts costs
by preventing system integration problems
and simplifying life-cycle support. The AADL
provides a framework for the analysis of
system (and system-of-systems) designs prior
to development and supports an architecture-
based, model-driven development approach
throughout the system life cycle. OSATE is a
tool environment for the AADL.
CONFERENCES
Events sponsored or cosponsored by the SEI
International Conference on
Composition-Based Software
Systems (ICCBSS)
The International Conference on Composition-
Based Software Systems (ICCBSS) is the
frst conference series to focus on exchang-
ing ideas about current best practices and
promising research directions in creating and
maintaining systems that require the composi-
tion of components, including COTS software
products. Because of the explosion in growth
of new technologies and domains, along with
the complexity and number of systems and
systems of systems, ICCBSS addresses a
wider scope of challenges and approaches—
technological and organizational—for con-
structing, acquiring, deploying, and sustaining
software-intensive systems that require inter-
operation among a wide variety of systems
and components.
The ICCBSS provides a forum in which
researchers and practitioners from industry,
government, and universities can gather to
exchange ideas and results. The ICCBSS is
cosponsored by the Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and presented
in conjunction with the SEI, the National
Research Council Canada, and the European
Software Institute.
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 35
PUBLICATIONS
Books are available from Addison-Wesley
(www.awprofessional.com/seiseries) and
book retailers. SEI reports are available for free
download at www.sei.cmu.edu/publications.
Books
Managing Software Acquisition: Open
Systems and COTS Products. B. Craig Meyers
and Patricia Oberndorf, Addison-Wesley, 2001
Modernizing Legacy Systems: Software
Technologies, Engineering Processes, and
Business Practices. Robert Seacord, Daniel
Plakosh, and Grace Lewis, Addison-Wesley,
2003
CMMI Survival Guide: Just Enough Process
Improvement. Suzanne Garcia and Richard
Turner, Addison-Wesley, 2007
MBE Essentials: An Introduction to the SAE
Architecture Analysis and Design Language
(AADL). David Gluch and Peter Feiler, Addison-
Wesley, 2008
Reports
SMART: The Service-Oriented Migration and
Reuse Technique. Grace Lewis, Ed Morris,
Liam O’Brien, Dennis Smith, and Lutz Wrage.
2005
A Process for Context-Based Technology
Evaluation. Grace A. Lewis and Lutz Wrage.
2005
Model Problems for Technologies in
Interoperability: Web Services. Grace A. Lewis
and Lutz Wrage, 2006
Workshop on Model-Driven Architecture and
Program Generation. Grace A. Lewis, B. Craig
Meyers, and Kurt Wallnau, 2006
System-of-Systems Governance: New Patterns
of Thought. Ed Morris, Pat Place, and Dennis
Smith, 2006
Topics in Interoperability: Structural
Programmatics in Systems of Systems. James
D. Smith II, 2006
System-of-Systems Navigator, Version 2.
Suzanne Garcia, Ed Morris, Lisa Brownsword,
Phillip Boxer, Pat Kirwan, and Dennis Smith,
2007
Interoperable Acquisition for Systems of
Systems: The Challenges. James D. Smith II
and D. Mike Phillips, 2006
Risk Management Considerations for
Interoperable Acquisition. B. Craig Meyers,
2006
An Emergent Perspective on Interoperation in
Systems of Systems. David A. Fisher, 2006
Conditions for Achieving Network-Centric
Operations in Systems of Systems. David A.
Fisher, B. Craig Meyers, and Pat Place, 2007
The Architecture Analysis and Design
Language (AADL): An Introduction. Peter H.
Feiler, David P. Guch, and John J. Hudak, 2006
Modeling and Validating Security and
Confdentiality in System Architectures. Jörgen
Hansson and Aaron Greenhouse, 2007
Flow Latency Analysis with the Architecture
Analysis and Design Language (AADL). Peter
Feiler and Jörgen Hansson, 2007
Dependability Cases. Charles B. Weinstock,
John B. Goodenough, and John J. Hudak,
2004
Arguing Security—Creating Security
Assurance Cases. John Goodenough, Howard
Lipson, and Charles Weinstock, 2006
Mission Diagnostic Protocol, Version 1.0.
Christopher Alberts, Audrey Dorofee, and Lisa
Marino, 2007
Mission Assurance Analysis Protocol (MAAP),
Version 1.0. Christopher Alberts, Audrey
Dorofee, and Lisa Marino, 2008
Lessons Learned in Applying the Mission
Diagnostic. Christopher Alberts, Audrey
Dorofee, and Lisa Marino, 2008
Common Elements of Risk. Christopher
Alberts, 2006
Executive Overview of SEI MOSAIC:
Managing for Success Using a Risk-Based
Approach. Christopher Alberts, Audrey
Dorofee, and Lisa Marino, 2007
RESEARCH
Engagements in technology development
with the SEI
Interoperability
System-of-Systems Practices from an
Organizational Perspective
Organizational involvement in complex
systems of systems requires more emphasis
on effective collaboration across organizations
and response to dynamic customer demands.
The SEI is developing a set of principles,
practices, and tools that enable organizations
to adapt to this increasingly complex world.
Examples of tools we are exploring include
• scenario-based interoperability analysis
• alignment analyses
• supply and demand context modeling
We are looking for partners in the develop-
ment of those and other tools and practices.
The SEI is also interested in case studies and
lessons learned from organizations that have
successfully implemented system-of-systems
practices.
System-of-Systems Practices from an
Acquisition Perspective
The SEI is looking for collaborating organiza-
tions to pilot new approaches for acquiring
highly complex systems of systems. The suc-
cessful acquisition of systems of systems that
will be interoperable requires (1) the appli-
cation of practices that proactively address
legal issues, policies, procedures, and culture
governing or infuencing acquisition; (2) shared
knowledge about schedule, cost, risk, and
performance; and (3) use of effective tools
and models for specifcation, reasoning, and
execution of relevant acquisition practices. The
SEI is interested in partnering with organiza-
tions that are embarking on an interoperable
acquisition or that have successfully com-
pleted one to help refne our ideas and test
concepts and potential products.
System-of-Systems Practices from an
Engineering Perspective
The SEI is looking for collaborating organiza-
tions to explore practices that lead to suc-
cessful construction and execution of systems
of systems. The successful development of
complex systems of systems requires a new
set of concepts, a revised set of life-cycle
activities, attention to the role of emergence,
and the application of a different set of tech-
nologies and techniques. The SEI is seeking
partners who are developing or applying new
strategies embodied in practices for system-
of-systems engineering.
Cost Drivers and Risks of
Interoperability
The SEI seeks partners to develop and use
methods for modeling, tracking, and measur-
ing the costs and risks associated with the
acquisition and development of interoperable
systems of systems. The SEI is investigating
how interoperability risks vary in successful
and unsuccessful systems-of-systems efforts
and correlating those patterns of risk to perfor-
mance measures such as cost and schedule.
SOA Research Agenda
The SEI seeks collaborators to (1) evolve a
long-term research agenda for SOA that was
initially developed in 2007; (2) participate with
an international community of interest that is
carrying out parts of the research agenda; and
(3) carry out parts of the research agenda and
disseminate the results through the interna-
tional community of interest.
36 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Interoperability, Dependability, and Mission Success, continued
Network-Centric Operations
The SEI is investigating ways to develop and
acquire systems of systems that operate in
a network-centric way. The SEI is seeking
defense organizations tasked to develop
systems that feature a collaborative network-
ing infrastructure and that will be assembled
dynamically as dictated by evolving mission
needs. The SEI is also looking for industrial
collaborators desiring to be connected to all
entities that form its supply chain—from sup-
pliers of raw materials to consumers.
Performance and Dependability
Predictive Modeling
The SEI seeks collaborative research with
organizations applying predictive modeling
techniques to operational quality attributes
such as performance, security, reliability, and
safety criticality in real-time and embedded
systems. The techniques are part of a model-
based approach to software engineering
and include the use of models for predicting
system behavior and improving system perfor-
mance before code is written.
Assurance Cases for Systems
of Systems
Assuring the safety, security, or reliability of
a system of systems is quite diffcult. Test-
based assurance approaches are insuffcient
to demonstrate adequately that dependability
requirements have been met. Systems of
systems present special assurance diffculties
not only because of their size, complexity, and
continuing evolution but also because they can
exhibit undesired emergent behavior—that
is, unanticipated component interactions that
impair safety, security, or reliable operation.
The SEI seeks system-of-systems collabora-
tors to investigate new assurance approaches
for reaching sound conclusions about system
of systems safety, security, and reliability.
Fault Containment
The SEI seeks partners to pilot approaches
for discovering why system-level failures still
occur despite the use of fault tolerance tech-
niques and fault containment strategies. The
SEI has identifed system-wide design rules
that must be satisfed to limit propagation of
seemingly minor faults throughout a system.
The SEI has also developed a formalized
analysis framework for system fault contain-
ment and stability management.
Advanced Processor Performance
The SEI is developing engineering-based
solutions to make effcient use of advanced
processor hardware architectures without
sacrifcing predictable execution times. The
SEI model-based engineering team is seeking
organizations to pilot approaches to reducing
worst-case execution time and avoiding execu-
tion time variation due to cache/pipeline.
Data Management for Distributed
Systems
The SEI seeks collaborating organizations that
are dissatisfed with the task-centric method-
ologies for designing real-time systems to pilot
the use of a data-centric framework. The SEI
model-based engineering team advocates that
data needs must be explicitly modeled early in
the development process.
Mission Success
Mission Success Management
Framework
The SEI is developing a framework for
managing risk and opportunity within an enter-
prise and across multi-enterprise missions.
This framework extends the traditional view
of risk management and will be the basis for
mission success research and development
activities. This includes addressing gaps in tra-
ditional risk management approaches; devel-
oping a means of aligning risk management
activities within an enterprise; and developing
methods, tools, and techniques for managing
a mission’s potential for success across the
life cycle and supply chain. The SEI seeks
partners to assist in developing and testing the
framework.
Mission Success Management
Methods, Tools, and Techniques
The SEI seeks collaborators to co-develop risk-
based methods, tools, and techniques specifc
to organizational missions and consistent with
the principles of SEI MOSAIC. Organizations
will be able to evaluate and manage the poten-
tial for successful missions using innovative,
risk-based methods, tools, and techniques.
Such collaboration allows organizations to
gain early access to SEI research, create orga-
nization-specifc methods, and participate in
advancing the state of the practice for risk
management and mission success.
The SEI combines focused research in coop-
erating and consulting relationships with a
mandate to directly transition technology into
practice.
Special Programs
SEI Membership Program
www.sei.cmu.edu/membership
SEI Membership is a business and knowledge
network that connects the SEI with members of
government, industry, and academia throughout
the globe who stand at the forefront of software
and systems engineering. SEI Members include
CEOs, directors, and managers from Fortune
500 companies and prominent government
organizations, as well as front-line software
engineers, programmers, testers and devel-
opers from startup organizations. The SEI is
the only one of the 37 U.S. federally funded
research and development centers (FFRDCs)
that offers membership to the public.
SEI Membership is designed for software engi-
neering professionals who are interested in
priority access to SEI technologies and events
that support the transition of software engi-
neering standards and best practices. Benefts
include an annual member assembly and
luncheon, as well as other networking opportu-
nities year-round. Members receive discounts
on the annual SEPG Conference, several other
SEI-sponsored conferences and events, SEI
merchandise, and one SEI public course per
year. Members also have their own personalized
profle posted at the SEI Member Center Web
site, where they can fnd the latest SEI news
and network with other members through the
directory. Members also stay current with The
Bulletin, a weekly e-mail newsletter, and The
Monitor, a monthly, members-only publication
for and about SEI members.
Varying levels of membership include:
• Individual: Our individual members repre-
sent Fortune 500 companies and start-ups,
and include CEOs, programmers, project
managers, front-line software engineers,
testers and developers. All share a commit-
ment to professional development and improv-
ing their networking affliations.
• Partner: As employees of SEI Partner organiza-
tions, Partner members already have an estab-
lished connection to the SEI, but are looking
to increase their affliations with the software
community by taking part in SEI Membership.
• Honorary: These complimentary member-
ships are for active or retired employees of
the Department of Defense or the U.S. Armed
Forces, as well as SEI employees.
• Student: Student members are future leaders
in software engineering and represent univer-
sities and academic institutions worldwide.
To join or to receive more information
about SEI Membership, contact Customer
Relations at customer-relations@sei.cmu.edu
or visit the membership Web site at
www.sei.cmu.edu/membership.
Affliate Program
www.sei.cmu.edu/collaborating/affliates
Through the Affliate Program, sponsoring
organizations contribute their best technical
people to the SEI’s ongoing effort to defne
superior software engineering practices.
Affliates lend their technical knowledge and
experience to SEI teams investigating specifc
technology domains.
Affliates’ sponsoring organizations represent
industry, government, and academia. As team
members on SEI projects, affliates collaborate
with SEI staff to identify, develop, and demon-
strate improved practices.
Participation in the Affliate Program is
intended to immerse affliates in the inquiry
and exploration of new tools and methods
that promise increased productivity, predict-
able schedules, fewer defects, and decreased
costs. Affliates can infuence the SEI research
agenda by identifying real-world problems and
providing the SEI with opportunities to pilot
new tools and methods that can beneft
the affliates’ organizations for many years
to come.
See www.sei.cmu.edu/collaborating
/affliates or call 412-268-3980 for more infor-
mation about the Affliate Program, benefts to
the sponsoring organization and the affliate,
and current affliate opportunities.
SEI Credentials Program
www.sei.cmu.edu/credentials
The SEI Credentials Program helps organiza-
tions put in place the best practices for design-
ing high-quality software and protecting net-
worked systems. SEI Credentials offers certif-
cate and certifcation programs that guide par-
ticipants through a series of courses chosen to
help them develop expertise in specifc areas
of work, including computer security incident
handling, software engineering process man-
agement, and software architecture design.
The SEI has an unsurpassed reputation as a
leader in advancing the practice of software
engineering. By enrolling in one of our certif-
cation or certifcate programs, participants
• receive offcial recognition of their skills
and expertise
• learn how to lead and participate in efforts to
improve processes at their organizations
• network with others facing similar challenges
• learn from experienced instructors with
years of experience
SEI Certifcates
www.sei.cmu.edu/credentials
Certifcates are awarded upon completion of
a series of continuing education courses and
serve to recognize successful completion of
an educational process.
SEI Certifcations
www.sei.cmu.edu/certifcation
Certifcation is earned upon completion of a
series of courses and after the participant’s
knowledge is assessed against a set of
industry-relevant standards. Certifcations
include ongoing requirements that must be
met to keep the certifcation valid.
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 37
SEI Partner Network
www.sei.cmu.edu/partners
The SEI Partner Network is a group of organi-
zations and individuals trained and authorized
or certifed by the SEI to deliver offcial SEI
services worldwide. These services include
courses, consulting methods, and management
processes that aid in the implementation of
the SEI’s software engineering technologies.
Individuals who deliver SEI services on behalf
of SEI Partners are trained and evaluated by
the SEI to ensure that they have the necessary
knowledge and skills to deliver SEI services
successfully.
Services Offered by SEI Partners
Currently, SEI Partners provide training and
services in
• software process improvement, through
Capability Maturity Model Integration
(CMMI), People Capability Maturity Model
(People CMM), Personal Software Process
(PSP), and Team Software Process (TSP)
courses and methods of practice
• software architecture, through courses and
methods of practice
• software measurement and analysis,
through courses and methods of practice
• network security and survivability, through
the CERT suite of courses
If you are interested in becoming an SEI
Partner, or if you are a current SEI Partner
interested in providing additional SEI services,
please visit www.sei.cmu.edu/partners for
descriptions of the available opportunities and
to apply.
SEI Partner Network Ethics and
Compliance Program
Organizations and individuals who obtain
services from SEI Partners can have confdence
in the quality of the service and the integrity
of the provider. The SEI Partner Network Ethics
and Compliance Program ensures that SEI
Partners maintain a high standard of profes-
sional conduct—acting with honesty, integrity,
and fairness when they provide SEI services.
SEI Partner Network Ethics and Compliance
also develops programs and initiatives to
equip SEI Partners to deal with the ethics
and compliance issues they face on a daily
basis. Learn more about the SEI Partner
Network Ethics and Compliance Program at
www.sei.cmu.edu/partners/ethicscompliance.
SEI Offce in Europe
www.sei.cmu.edu/about/europe
Software development is a global activity
with organizations adopting SEI products and
services in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and
the Americas. In response to this globalization,
the SEI opened its frst international offce in
Europe in January 2003.
The SEI offce in Frankfurt, Germany, carries
out the SEI mission to help others improve
their software engineering and management
practices. The SEI European offce is fnancially
supported by European industry organizations.
The SEI brings expertise to Europe by
delivering training in Capability Maturity
Model Integration (CMMI), the Standard
CMMI Assessment Method for Process
Improvement (SCAMPI), and security incident
response. The SEI offers courses in its German
headquarters as well as in training centers
in Paris and London, and it provides on-site
course delivery on request.
The SEI has research partnerships with
leading European organizations such as
Bosch, Siemens, and ABB, to mature current
technologies and add new products to the
SEI portfolio.
With employees and consultants from
Germany, Switzerland, the Netherlands,
the United Kingdom, and Ireland, the SEI
European offce represents a cross section
of the new Europe. The SEI plans to add
employees and consultants in and from as
many European countries as possible to
ensure that it represents the European
industrial community.
This strategy is furthered by actively seeking
additional SEI Partners throughout Europe
as well as establishing research collabora-
tions with leading researchers. For example,
the SEI recently added the leading European
researchers in process improvement to the
International Process Research Consortium
(IPRC).
For more information about the SEI
European offce, please send email to
customer-relations@sei.cmu.edu.
Special Programs, continued
3S www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Software and Systems
Process Improvement
Network (SPIN)
www.sei.cmu.edu/go/spins
A Software and Systems Process
Improvement Network (SPIN) is an organiza-
tion of professionals in a given geographi-
cal area who are dedicated to software and
systems process improvement. SPIN chapters
offer a forum for the free and open exchange
of software and system process improvement
experiences, ideas, information and mutual
support. SPINs worldwide continue to foster
innovation in software engineering practice.
Joining a SPIN demonstrates a commit-
ment to improving the state of software and
systems engineering, and helps the member
make contact with a network of experts.
Each regional SPIN is different, based on the
vision of the founders and the needs of the
community.
SPINs comprise professionals from all
sectors —industry, government, and academia
(including students)—and include defense
contractors, professional organizations, and
independent consultants.
The SEI supports SPINs by facilitating com-
munication among SPIN founders and SPIN
groups maintaining a directory of SPINs and
the SPIN meeting calendar on the SEI Web
site assisting SPIN start-up providing SEI
experts to speak at SPIN meetings working
with SPIN members to peer review abstracts
for SEPG conferences, and helping to shape
the technical program hosting SPIN birds-of-a-
feather sessions at SEPG conferences
For more information visit
www.sei.cmu.edu/go/spins
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 39
lnde×
Conferences
Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method
(ATAM) Lead Evaluator Workshop ................ 14
CMMI Technology Conference and
User Group ...................................................22
Collaboration Meeting for CSIRTs with
National Responsibility .................................28
DoD Product Line Practice Workshop........... 14
FloCon Analysis Workshop ...........................28
Forum of Incident Response and Security
Teams (FIRST) Conference ...........................28
International Conference on Composition-
Based Software Systems (ICCBSS) ..............34
International Workshop on Requirements
for High-Assurance Systems (RHAS) ............28
SEPG Australia Conference ..........................22
SEPG Europe Conference.............................22
SEPG Latin America Conference ..................22
SEPG North America Conference .................22
Software Architecture Technology User
Network (SATURN) Workshop ...................... 14
Software Architecture Workshop for
Educators ...................................................... 14
Software Engineering for High-Assurance
Systems (SEHAS) Workshop ........................28
Software Product Line Conference (SPLC) ... 14
System-Dynamics Modeling for Information
Security Workshop........................................28
TSP Symposium ...........................................22
Credentials
Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method
(ATAM) Evaluator .......................................... 15
ATAM Lead Evaluator ................................... 16
CERT-Certifed Computer Security Incident
Handler Certifcation .....................................29
PLTP Leader .................................................. 16
Product Line Technical Probe (PLTP) Team
Member ........................................................ 16
SEI-Certifed Implementing Goal-Driven
Measurement Instructor ...............................23
SEI-Certifed PSP Developer .........................23
SEI-Certifed SCAMPI High Maturity Lead
Appraiser ......................................................23
SEI-Certifed ITSP Coach ..............................23
SEI Certifcate in CMMI ................................23
SEI Certifcate in Incident Response
Process .........................................................29
SEI Certifcate in Information Security ..........29
SEI Certifcate in Personal Software
Process for CMMI ........................................23
SEI Certifcate in Software Engineering
Process Management ..................................24
SEI Certifcate in Software Process
Improvement Implementation ......................24
Software Architecture Professional............... 15
Software Product Line Professional .............. 16
Customer Engagements
Acquisition Process Improvement ..................7
Acquisition Strategy Planning Workshop ........7
Analysis-Based Assurance ............................33
Architectural Assistance and Coaching ......... 12
Architecture Reconstructions ....................... 12
Assistance Applying Goal-Driven
Measurement, Six Sigma, and Other
Measurement and Analysis Techniques ........20
Basics of SOA ...............................................33
CERT Resiliency Engineering Framework
(CERT REF) Assessment ..............................27
Clustered-Computing Analysis Platform
(C-CAP) .........................................................26
CMMI Appraisals ..........................................20
COTS Software Product Evaluation ..............33
CURE Transition ............................................33
Customized Product Line Solution................ 13
Document Reviews ........................................8
EPIC Implementation ...................................33
Establishing and Improving Information
Security Management Programs
and Practices ................................................27
Establishing an Incident Response
Capability ......................................................26
Evaluating Environments for Infrastructure
Protection Preparedness ..............................27
Evaluating or Benchmarking Incident
Management Capabilities .............................26
Evaluations, Assessments, and Reviews .....27
Getting Started with CMMI-Based
Improvement ................................................20
Getting Started with People CMM-Based
Improvement ................................................20
Implementing Tools and Methods for
Survivable Systems ......................................26
Independent Technical Assessments ..............7
Introducing PSP and TSP Into an
Organization ..................................................20
IT Strategic Planning .......................................7
Measurement-Plan Evaluations ......................8
Mission-Success Assessments ....................33
Model-Based Engineering and System
Architecture Analysis ....................................33
People CMM Appraisals ...............................20
Performance Benchmarking Consortium
(PBC) .............................................................20
Pre- and Post-Contract Award Workshops ......7
Predictable Assembly Starter
Engagements ............................................... 13
Process Appraisals..........................................8
Product Line Adoption/Action Planning
Workshop ..................................................... 13
Product Line Diagnosis Using the PLQL
or the PLTP ................................................... 13
Product Line Executive Session ................... 12
Quality Assessments of System Architectures
and their Requirements (QUASAR).................8
Quality by Construction Clinic ....................... 13
Request for Proposal (RFP) Preparation and
Reviews ..........................................................8
SOA Governance ..........................................33
SOA Strategy ................................................33
Software and System Architecture
Evaluations ................................................... 12
Software Risk Evaluations ..............................7
Source-Selection Reviews ..............................8
Support for Software Acquisition and
Systems Engineering Activities ......................7
Sustainment-Readiness Review .....................8
System and Software Requirements
Architecture Reviews ......................................8
T-Check Technology Investigations ................33
Tailored Management Assistance on
Product Line Efforts ...................................... 13
Tailored Technical Support on Product Line
Efforts ........................................................... 13
Testing-Approach Evaluation ...........................8
Virtual Network Audit ....................................27
Virtual Training Environment (VTE) ................27
40 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Publications
A Case Study in Successful Product Line
Development ................................................ 15
Adapting CMMI for Acquisition
Organizations: A Preliminary Report .............23
A Discipline for Software Engineering:
The Complete PSP Book ..............................23
An Emergent Perspective on Interoperation in
Systems of Systems .....................................35
A Process for Context-Based Technology
Evaluation .....................................................35
A Process Research Framework ...................23
Arguing Security—Creating Security
Assurance Cases ..........................................35
ATAM: Method for Architecture Evaluation .. 15
Attribute-Driven Design (ADD), Version 2.0 .. 15
Botnets as a Vehicle for Online Crime ..........28
Building Systems from Commercial
Components ................................................. 15
Certifed Binaries for Software
Components ................................................. 15
CMMI: Guidelines for Process
Integration and Product Improvement,
Second Edition ..............................................23
CMMI Acquisition Module (CMMI-AM),
Version 1.1., 2005 ....................................... 7, 9
CMMI and Six Sigma ....................................23
CMMI Assessments: Motivating Positive
Change .........................................................23
CMMI Distilled: A Practical Introduction to
Integrated Process Improvement, Second
Edition ...........................................................23
CMMI for Outsourcing .................................23
CMMI SCAMPI Distilled: Appraisals for
Process Improvement ..................................23
CMMI Survival Guide: Just Enough
Process Improvement ............................23, 35
Coaching a Development Team.....................23
Common Elements of Risk ...........................35
Comparing Insider IT Sabotage and
Espionage: A Model-Based Analysis ............28
Conditions for Achieving Network-Centric
Operations in Systems of Systems ..............35
Dependability Cases .....................................35
Detecting Scans at the ISP Level .................28
Documenting Software Architectures:
Views and Beyond. ....................................... 15
Evaluating and Improving Architecture
Competence ................................................. 15
Evaluating Software Architectures: Methods
and Case Studies .......................................... 15
Executive Overview of SEI MOSAIC:
Managing for Success Using a Risk-Based
Approach.......................................................35
Flow Latency Analysis with the Architecture
Analysis and Design Language (AADL) ........35
Guidelines for Developing a Product Line
Production Plan ............................................. 15
Handbook for Computer Security Incident
Response Teams (CSIRTs) ............................28
Incident Management Capability Metrics .....28
Internet Denial of Service: Attack and
Defense Mechanisms ...................................28
Interoperable Acquisition for Systems of
Systems: The Challenges ..............................35
Introducing OCTAVE Allegro: Improving
the Information Security Risk Assessment
Process .........................................................28
Introducing the CERT Resiliency Engineering
Framework: Improving the Security and
Sustainability Processes ...............................28
Introduction to the Personal Software
Process .........................................................23
Introduction to the Team Software Process ..23
Lessons Learned in Applying the Mission
Diagnostic .....................................................35
Making Architecture Design Decisions:
An Economic Approach ................................ 15
Managing Information Security Risks: The
OCTAVE Approach ........................................28
Managing Software Acquisition: Open
Systems and COTS Products ........................35
MBE Essentials: An Introduction to
the SAE Architecture Analysis and Design
Language (AADL) ..........................................35
Measuring the Software Process: Statistical
Process Control for Software Process
Improvement ................................................23
Mission Assurance Analysis Protocol
(MAAP), Version 1.0 ......................................35
Mission Diagnostic Protocol, Version 1.0 ......35
Modeling and Validating Security and
Confdentiality in System Architectures ........35
Model Problems for Technologies in
Interoperability: Web Services ......................35
Modernizing Legacy Systems: Software
Technologies, Engineering Processes, and
Business Practices .......................................35
Overview of ComFoRT: A Model Checking
Reasoning Framework .................................. 15
Packaging Predictable Assembly with
Prediction-Enabled Component Technology .. 15
Performance Property Theories for Predictable
Assembly from Certifable Components ...... 15
Performance Results of CMMI-Based Process
Improvement ................................................23
Predictable Assembly of Substation
Automation Systems: An Experiment
Report ........................................................... 15
Preparing for Automated Derivation of
Products in a Software Product Line ............ 15
Product Line Acquisition in a DoD
Organization: Guidance for Decision
Makers .......................................................... 15
Product Line Analysis for Practitioners ......... 15
Progress Toward an Organic Software
Architecture Capability in the U.S. Army ....... 15
PSP: A Self-Improvement Process for
Software Engineers ......................................23
Quality-Attribute-Based Economic Valuation
of Architectural Patterns ............................... 15
QUASAR: A Method for the QUality
Assessment of Software-Intensive System
ARchitectures handbook .................................9
Risk Management Considerations for
Interoperable Acquisition ..............................35
Secure Coding in C and C++ ........................28
Security Quality Requirements Engineering
(SQUARE) Methodology ...............................28
SMART: The Service-Oriented Migration and
Reuse Technique ...........................................35
Software Architecture in Practice, Second
Edition ........................................................... 15
Software Component Certifcation:
10 Useful Distinctions ................................... 15
Software Process Improvement and Product
Line Practice: CMMI and the Framework for
Software Product Line Practice .................... 15
Software Product Line Adoption
Roadmap ...................................................... 15
Software Product Lines: Practices and
Patterns ........................................................ 15
State of the Practice of Computer Security
Incident Response Teams (CSIRTs) ..............28
Sustaining Software-Intensive Systems9
System-of-Systems Governance:
New Patterns of Thought ..............................35
System-of-Systems Navigator, Version 2 ......35
System Architecture Evaluation
Using the ATAM ............................................ 15
Index, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 41
Techniques for Developing an Acquisition
Strategy by Profling Software Risks...............9
Testing a Software Product Line ................... 15
The Architecture Analysis and Design
Language (AADL): An Introduction ...............35
The CERT Guide to System and Network
Security Practices .........................................28
The Impact of Function Extraction
Technology on Next-Generation Software
Engineering ...................................................28
The People Capability Maturity Model:
Guidelines for Improving the Workforce .......23
The Structured Intuitive Model for Product
Line Economics (SIMPLE) ............................ 15
Topics in Interoperability: Structural
Programmatics in Systems of Systems ........35
Tracking and Tracing Cyber-Attacks:
Technical Challenges and Global Policy
Issues ...........................................................28
Trustworthy Refnement Through
Intrusion-Aware Design ................................28
TSP: Leading a Development Team ..............23
Ultra-Large-Scale Systems: The Software
Challenge of the Future ................................ 15
Understanding and Leveraging a
Supplier’s CMMI Efforts: A Guidebook for
Acquirers ......................................................23
Using the SEI Architecture Tradeoff
Analysis Method to Evaluate WIN-T:
A Case Study ................................................ 15
Winning With Software: An Executive
Strategy ........................................................23
Workshop on Model-Driven Architecture
and Program Generation ...............................35
Research
Advanced Processor Performance ................36
Architecture-Based System Evolution ........... 16
Architecture Competence ............................. 16
Assurance Cases for Systems of Systems ...36
CMMI Beyond Version 1.2 ............................24
Computational Security Attributes (CSA) ......29
Connection of Architecture-Centric Methods
with Other Software Technologies and
Paradigms ..................................................... 16
Connection of Software Product Lines
with Other Software Technologies and
Paradigms ..................................................... 16
Corporate Governance: Governing for
Enterprise Security .......................................29
Cost Drivers and Risks of Interoperability ....35
Data Management for Distributed
Systems ........................................................36
Developing High-Integrity Trust
Mechanisms for Software Components ....... 17
Developing or Validating Automated
Methods for Predicting Software Quality ..... 17
Developing PECTs ........................................ 17
Developing Proofs of Feasibility of
Predictable Assembly ................................... 17
Experiments with ArchE ............................... 16
Fault Containment ........................................36
Flow-Service-Quality (FSQ) Engineering .......29
Function Extraction (FX) ................................29
Improving Processes in Small Settings.........24
Insider Threat Studies ...................................29
Integrated Use of Six Sigma and CMMI .......24
Integrated Use of TSP and CMMI .................24
International Watch and Warning Network ...29
Levels of Anonymity and Traceability
(LEVANT) ......................................................30
Malicious Code Analysis Tools and
Techniques ....................................................29
Mapping Other Standards with CMMI .........24
Mission Success Management
Framework ....................................................36
Mission Success Management Methods,
Tools, and Techniques ...................................36
Network-Centric Operations .........................36
Network Situational Awareness ....................30
Predictive Modeling ......................................36
Process Improvement in Multi-Model
Environments ...............................................24
Production Planning and Product
Derivation ..................................................... 16
Product Line Adoption Strategies ................. 16
Product Line Economic Models .................... 16
Product Line Variability Mechanisms and
Automated Support for Variability ................. 16
Quality Attribute Models ............................... 16
Resiliency Engineering Framework ...............30
Security Quality Requirements Engineering
(SQUARE) .....................................................30
SOA Research Agenda ..................................35
STAR*Lab: Security Technology Automation
and Research ................................................30
State-of-the-Practice Studies ........................24
Studies of CMMI’s Effect on Performance ...24
System-of-Systems Practices from an
Acquisition Perspective.................................35
System-of-Systems Practices from an
Engineering Perspective ...............................35
System-of-Systems Practices from an
Organizational Perspective ...........................35
Threat Analysis and Modeling .......................30
Translating CMMI Into Other Languages ......24
TSP-Secure ...................................................24
ULS System Research Areas ........................ 17
ULS Systems Research Roadmap ................ 17
42 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
Tools & Methods
Acquisition Strategy Development Tool ..........7
Active Reviews for Intermediate Designs
(ARID) ........................................................... 11
Adoption Factory Pattern .............................. 11
Architecture-Based System Evolution ........... 11
Architecture Competence Assessment ........ 11
Architecture Expert (ArchE) .......................... 11
Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method
(ATAM) and the System ATAM ..................... 11
Attribute-Driven Design (ADD) Method ........ 11
Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI)
Acquisition Module .........................................7
CERT Knowledgebase ..................................26
CMMI for Acquisition (CMMI-ACQ) ................7
CMMI Models .............................................. 19
CMMI Modules ............................................ 19
CMMI Process and Product Development
Using Six Sigma DMADV..............................20
CMMI Process Performance Improvement
Using Six Sigma DMAIC ............................... 19
ComFoRT Model Checking Reasoning
Framework .................................................... 12
Construction and Composition Language
(CCL) ............................................................. 12
Cost Beneft Analysis Method (CBAM) ........ 11
COTS Product Evaluation Method ................32
COTS Usage Risk Evaluation (CURE) ...........32
e-RA ..............................................................26
Evolutionary Process for Integrating
COTS-Based Systems (EPIC) ........................32
Framework for Software Product Line
Practice ......................................................... 11
Goal-Question-Indicator-Measure (GQIM)
Method ......................................................... 19
Lambda-star Performance Reasoning
Framework .................................................... 12
Measurement and Analysis Infrastructure
Diagnostic (MAID) ........................................ 19
Mission Assurance Analysis Protocol
(MAAP) .........................................................33
Mission Diagnostic .......................................33
Mission Thread Workshop ............................ 11
Network Situational Awareness (NetSA)
Security Suite ...............................................26
Operationally Critical Threat, Asset, and
Vulnerability Evaluation (OCTAVE) ................26
Options Analysis for Reengineering (OAR) ... 12
People CMM ................................................. 19
Personal Software Process (PSP) .................20
Pin Container Technology .............................. 12
Predictable Assembly Starter Kit .................. 12
Product Line Analysis ................................... 12
Product Line Quick Look (PLQL) ................... 12
Product Line Technical Probe
(PLTP) ........................................................... 12
Quality Attribute Workshop (QAW) ............... 11
SCAMPI Class A Method ............................. 19
SCAMPI Class B and C Methods ................. 19
Security Quality Requirements Engineering
(SQUARE) .....................................................26
Service Migration and Reuse Technique
(SMART) .......................................................32
Software Engineering Information
Repository (SEIR) ......................................... 19
Software Product Line Acquisition: A
Companion to a Framework for Software
Product Line Practice .................................... 11
Structured Intuitive Model for Product Line
Economics (SIMPLE) .................................... 12
Survivable Systems Analysis (SSA)...............26
System-of-Systems (SoS) Navigator
Product Suite ................................................32
System Architecture Modeling and
Analysis ........................................................32
Team Software Process (TSP) ......................20
Vendor Risk Assessment and Threat
Evaluation (V-RATE).......................................26
Views and Beyond Approach to Architecture
Documentation ............................................. 11
Education & Training
Adopting Software Product Lines ................. 14
Advanced Incident Handling for
Technical Staff ...............................................27
Advanced Information Security for
Technical Staff ...............................................27
Analyzing Project Management Indicators ...21
ATAM Evaluator Training ............................... 14
ATAM Leader Training ................................... 14
CERT Resiliency Engineering Executive
Workshop .....................................................28
CMMI Instructor Training ..............................21
CMMI Process Improvement Overview .......20
CMMI Version 1.2 Upgrade Training ..............20
Computer Forensics for Technical Staff.........27
Continuous Risk Management .......................8
COTS-Based Systems for Program
Managers ..................................................8, 34
COTS Software Product Evaluation for
Practitioners ....................................................9
COTS Software Product Evolution for
Practitioners ..................................................34
Creating a Computer Security Incident
Response Team ............................................27
Defning Software Processes .......................22
Designing Products and Processes
Using Six Sigma ............................................22
Developing Software Product Lines ............. 14
Documenting Software Architectures........... 14
EPIC Tutorial ..................................................34
Foundation for Resiliency .............................28
Fundamentals of Incident Handling ..............27
Implementing Goal-Driven Measurement ....22
Implementing Goal-Driven Measurement
Instructor Training .........................................22
Improving Process Performance
Using Six Sigma ............................................22
Information Security for Network
Managers ......................................................27
Information Security for Technical Staff ........27
Index, continued
1-888-201-4479 www.sei.cmu.edu 43
Intermediate Concepts of CMMI ..................21
Intermediate Concepts of the People CMM .21
Introduction to CMMI, Version 1.2 ................20
Introduction to Personal Process ..................21
Introduction to SMART .................................34
Introduction to SOA ......................................34
Introduction to the CMMI Acquisition
Module ...........................................................9
Introduction to the People CMM ..................21
Leading a Development Team .......................21
Managing Computer Security Incident
Response Teams ...........................................27
Mastering Process Improvement .................22
Migrating Legacy Components to SOA
Environments ...............................................34
Model-Based Engineering with SAE
AADL ............................................................34
OCTAVE Training Workshop ..........................27
Open Systems: The Promises and
the Pitfalls .....................................................34
Open Systems for Executives ......................34
Patterns of Failure in Software Acquisition .....9
People CMMI Instructor Training...................21
PLTP Leader Training ..................................... 14
PLTP Team Training ........................................ 14
Principles of Predictable Assembly ............... 14
PSP for Engineers I: Planning and PSP for
Engineers II: Quality .....................................21
PSP Instructor Training ..................................21
SCAMPI B and C Team Leader Training.........21
SCAMPI Lead Appraiser Training ..................21
SCAMPI with People CMM Lead Appraiser
Training .........................................................21
Software Acquisition Survival Skills ................9
Software Architecture: Principles and
Practices ....................................................... 14
Software Architecture Design and Analysis .. 14
Software Product Lines ................................ 14
Survivability and Information Assurance
(SIA) Curriculum ............................................29
TSP Executive Strategy Seminar ..................21
TSP Launch Coach Training ...........................21
Understanding CMMI High Maturity
Practices .......................................................21
44 www.sei.cmu.edu 1-888-201-4479
AADL Architecture Analysis & Design
Language
ADD Attribute-Driven Design
APEC Asia-Pacifc Economic Cooperation
ArchE Architecture Expert
ARID Active Reviews for Intermediate
Designs
ASDT Acquisition Strategy Development
Tool
ATAM Architecture Tradeoff Analysis
Method
C-CAP Clustered-Computing Analysis
Platform
CBAM Cost Beneft Analysis Method
CCL Construction and Composition
Language
CERT/CC CERT Coordination Center
CMM Capability Maturity Model
CMMI Capability Maturity Model
Integration
CMMI-ACQ CMMI for Acquisition
CMMI-AM CMMI Acquisition Module
CMMI-DEV CMMI for Development
CONOPS concept of operations
COTS commercial off-the-shelf
CSA Computational Security Attributes
CSIRT Computer Security Incident
Response Team
CURE COTS Usage Risk Evaluation
CVE common vulnerabilities and
exposures
DMADV defne-measure-analyze-design-
verify
DMAIC defne-measure-analyze-improve-
control
DoD Department of Defense
EPIC Evolutionary Process for
Integrating COTS-Based Systems
FIRST Forum of Incident Response and
Security Teams
FSQ fow-service-quality
FX function extraction
GQIM Goal-Question Indicator Metric
ICCBSS International Conference on COTS-
Based Software Systems
IEEE Institute of Electrical and
Electronics Engineers
IGDM Implementing Goal-Driven
Measurement
IMCE Incident Management Capability
Evaluation
IPRC International Process Research
Consortium
IPSS Improving Processes in Small
Settings
IT information technology
ITA independent technical assessment
LEVANT Levels of Anonymity and
Traceability
MAAP Mission Assurance Analysis
Protocol
MAID Measurement and Analysis
Infrastructure Diagnostic
MBE model-based engineering
MOSAIC Mission-Oriented Success
Analysis and Improvement Criteria
NDIA National Defense Industrial
Association
NetSA Network Situational Awareness
OAR Options Analysis for
Reengineering
OAS Organization of American States
OCTAVE Operationally Critical Threat, Asset,
and Vulnerability Evaluation
OSATE Open Source AADL Tool
Environment
PBC Performance Benchmarking
Consortium
PECT prediction-enabled component
technology
PIER Process in Execution Review
PLQL Product Line Quick Look
PLTP Product Line Technical Probe
PSP Personal Software Process
QUASAR Quality Assessments of Systems
Architecture Requirements
QAW Quality Attribute Workshop
REF Resiliency Engineering Framework
RFP request for proposal
RHAS Requirements for High-Assurance
Systems
SAE Society for Automotive Engineers
SATURN Software Architecture Technology
Users Network
SCAMPI Standard CMMI Assessment
Method for Process Improvement
SEHAS Software Engineering for High-
Assurance Systems
SEI Software Engineering Institute
SEIR Software Engineering Information
Repository
SEPG-AU SEPG Australia
SEPG-LA SEPG Latin America
SIA Survivability and Information
Assurance
SiLK System for Internet-Level
Knowledge
SIMPLE Structured Intuitive Model for
Product Line Economics
SMART Service-Oriented Migration and
Reuse Technique
SOA service-oriented architecture
SoS system of systems
SPIN Software Process Improvement
Network
SPLC Software Product Lines
Conference
STAR*Lab Security Technology Automation
and Research
SQUARE Security Quality Requirements
Engineering
SSA Survivable Systems Analysis
TSP Team Software Process
UML unifed modeling language
ULS ultra-large scale
VNA Virtual Network Audit
V-RATE Vendor Risk Assessment and
Threat Evaluation
VTE Virtual Training Environment
Abbreviations, Acronyms, and lnitialisms
Copyrights
Carnegie Mellon University SEI-authored documents are
sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense under Contract
FA8721-05-C-0003. Carnegie Mellon University retains
copyrights in all material produced under this contract. The
U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to
publish or reproduce these documents, or allow others to do
so, for U.S. Government purposes only pursuant to the
copyright license under the contract clause at 252-227-7013.
For information and guidelines regarding permission to use
specifc copyrighted materials owned by Carnegie Mellon
University (e.g., text and images) see Permissions at
www.sei.cmu.edu/about/legal-permissions.html. If you
do not fnd the copyright information you need, please consult
your legal counsel for advice.
Trademarks and Service Marks
Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (stylized),
Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute (and design),
and the stylized hexagon are trademarks of Carnegie Mellon
University.
® Architecture Tradeoff Analysis Method; ATAM, Capability
Maturity Model, Capability Maturity Modeling, Carnegie
Mellon, CERT, CERT Coordination Center, CMM, CMMI, and
OCTAVE are registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Offce
by Carnegie Mellon University.

SM
CMM Integration; COTS Usage Risk Evaluation; CURE; EPIC;
Evolutionary Process for Integrating COTS-Based Systems;
FloCon; Framework for Software Product Line Practice; IDEAL;
Interim Profle; OAR; Operationally Critical Threat, Asset, and
Vulnerability Evaluation; Options Analysis for Reengineering;
Personal Software Process; PLTP; Product Line Technical Probe;
PSP; SCAMPI; SCAMPI Lead Appraiser; SEPG; Team Software
Process; and TSP are service marks of Carnegie Mellon
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For information and guidelines regarding the proper referential
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at www.sei.cmu.edu/about/legal-trademarks.html.
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sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense and
operated by Carnegie Mellon University.

The SEI advances software engineering and related
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systems with predictable and improved cost, schedule,
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