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Dr Priscilla Clarke 2011

RESOURCE
BOOKLET
Learning English as an Additional Language
in the Early Years (birth to six years)
RESOURCE
BOOKLET
Learning English as an Additional Language
in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Copyright
Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority 2011
ISBN: 978-1-921702-76-1
No part of this publication may be reproduced except as specied under the
Copyright Act 1968 or by permission from the VCAA. For more information
go to: www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/aboutus/policies/policy-copyright.html
The VCAA provides the only ofcial, up-to-date versions of VCAA
publications. Details of updates can be found on the VCAA website: www.
vcaa.vic.edu.au
This publication may contain copyright material belonging to a third-party.
Every effort has been made to contact all copyright owners. If you believe
that material in this publication is an infringement of your copyright please
email the Copyright Ofcer: vcaa.copyright@edumail.vic.gov.au
This Resource Booklet may be copied by early childhood professionals for
use within their service.
For all other purposes, permission must be obtained in writing from the VCAA.
This resource is available on the Internet at:
www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/earlyyears
iii
Foreword
I am thrilled and delighted to introduce the Learning
English as an Additional Language professional
learning resources.
In Australia at the present time there are many
children starting early childhood services for
whom English is not their first or home language.
Some early childhood settings have a diversity of
languages spoken, while others have only one or
two children who do not speak English.
This set of resources provides comprehensive
information to assist children from birth to six years
in learning English as an additional language and
practical suggestions to support early childhood
professionals in their work with children and
families from diverse communities.
These materials, which draw on both the research
of Dr Priscilla Clarke and the training and practice
expertise of the FKA Childrens Services, have
been developed in partnership with the Victorian
Curriculum and Assessment Authority.
These resources will support implementation of the
Victorian Early Years Learning and Development
Framework. The Framework acknowledges that
the families and communities in which children live
are diverse, that responsive relationships support
childrens learning and development and that
early childhood professionals respect childrens
languages, cultures and ways of knowing and
being.
I commend these accessible, clear and helpful
professional learning resources to early childhood
professionals. I also recognise the significant
contribution these resources make to bi/multilingual
early childhood education and to all childrens
learning.
Professor
Iram Siraj-Blatchford
Institute of Education
University of London
Professor Iram Siraj-Blatchford
has worked as an academic and
researcher for over 25 years,
holding positions at the University
of Warwick and the University of
London.
Professor Siraj-Blatchford's
research includes the impact of
early home learning, staff training,
pedagogy, curriculum and
assessment on young childrens
learning and development;
particularly those children
and families from vulnerable
backgrounds. Prior to this her
work was as an early years
teacher during the 1980s.
iv
Acknowledgements
Special thanks to Boroondara Kindergarten staff,
children and families for allowing us to photograph
in their welcoming and inclusive environment.
This resource has been written by Dr Priscilla
Clarke, OAM, Early Childhood Consultant (formerly
Executive Director of FKA Childrens Services
which includes the Multicultural Resource Centre).
Dr Clarke specialises in the Second Language
acquisition of young bilingual children birth to
eight years and has conducted professional
development for early years educators in Australia,
New Zealand, Thailand, England, Scotland,
Northern Ireland and Ireland. She is the author of
many publications including a book written jointly
by Professor Iram Siraj-Blatchford and published
by Open Press University.
In 2003, Dr Clarke was awarded
an Order of Australia medal for
her signicant contribution to the
bilingual preschool education of
immigrant and refugee children.
v
Contents
Introduction 1
Creating welcoming and culturally inclusive
environments for all children and families 3
Strategies to welcome and support all
families and children 3
Practical ideas to support children under
three years old 9
Relationships with families 9
Experiences for children under
three years of age 12
Practical ideas to support children three
to six years old 17
Beginning in an early years setting 17
Strategies to develop childrens English 18
Games and learning experiences 24
Cooking experiences 27
References 30
Resources 32


Resource Web Link Contact Experience

vi
Photo and image credits
This Resource makes use of a series of photos and images:
Cover image of From lullabies to literature: Stories in the lives
of infants and toddlers, Washington DC courtesy of NAEYC and
Pademelon Press.
Cover image of Inviting Play Photographs of imaginatively
constructed early childhood settings courtesy of FKA Childrens
Service Inc. and Dr Priscilla Clarke.
Cover image of Theres a Goat in my Coat, courtesy of Allen and
Unwin.
Images of childrens books courtesy of Global Books website.
Photographs taken at Boroondara Kindergarten.
Photographs courtesy of Dr Priscilla Clarke.
Selection of plant images courtesy of Ian Potter Foundation
Childrens Garden.
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
1
Introduction
This Resource Booklet has been developed by the Victorian Curriculum and
Assessment Authority (VCAA) with funding from the Victorian Department of
Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD) as part of implementation of
the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework, 2009.
This Resource Booklet complements a professional learning program that supports
early childhood professionals in their work with children, birth to six years from
culturally and linguistically diverse communities. The professional learning program
and materials include:
1. Supporting Children Learning English as a Second Language in the Early Years
(birth to six years) 2009 by Dr Priscilla Clarke OAM
2. Three professional learning modules:
Module 1 Learning English as an Additional Language children under three
Module 2 Learning English as an Additional Language in the preschool years
Module 3 Achieving outcomes in English as an Additional Language in the
preschool years
3. A Resource Booklet which is ordered into four sections: Creating welcoming and
culturally inclusive environments for all children and families, Practical ideas to
support children under three years old, Practical ideas to support children three
to six years old and References and Resources.
This Resource Booklet begins with a selection of ideas, experiences, resources and
websites for early childhood professionals. The focus is on supporting children in the
maintenance of their first language and in learning English as an additional language.
The materials provided promote cultural awareness for all children.
3
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
The Victorian
Framework
acknowledges
that the families
and communities
in which children
live are diverse, and
childrens learning
and development is
enhanced when early
childhood professionals
respect their cultures
and ways of knowing
and being.
(Victorian Early Years
Learning and Development
Framework for all Children
from Birth to Eight Years, p.7)
(VEYLDF)
Creating welcoming and culturally
inclusive environments for all
children and families
Understanding diverse cultural practices is an important
part of supporting parents and assisting children to
settle into services. The most effective way to learn
about the diverse cultural practices of families is through
ongoing discussions with families.
Discussions with families over time provides
information on:
what values are important to them
what cultural practices families wish to retain.
Strategies to welcome and support all
families and children
1. Refer to written information on diverse
cultures and cultural practices.

2. Provide translated
notices, brochures
and pamphlets
that help explain
the routines of
the early years
setting.
A current resource on diverse cultural practices is:
Child Rearing Backgrounds of Immigrant
Families in Australia (manual and/or CD)
Published by FKA Childrens Services

4
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
3. Create a space to display
community information and
provide bilingual information
whenever possible.
4. Acknowledge the traditional
custodians of the land:

5. Display a calendar of signicant cultural events
to share with all families.
6. Discuss with families
appropriate ways of
acknowledging and
celebrating these events
with children and families.
7. Display photos of children
engaged in learning.
Accompany photos
with explanations of the
childrens experiences using the languages spoken
by the children and written in the spoken language
and English.
8. Learn to pronounce childrens names.
9. Learn greetings in the children's languages.
Together the children and educators have created a
display to acknowledge the traditional custodians of the
land and pay respect to the elders both past and living.

5
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
10. Work collaboratively with interpreters or bilingual
early childhood professionals to welcome families.
These bilingual professionals can explain the early
years settling-in processes, routines and practices.
All services with State Government Funding contact:

Organisation:
All Graduates Interpreting and Translating Services
Telephone: 03 9605 3000
Telephone Translation Desk: 03 8602 0000
Email: General Enquiries admin@allgraduates.com.au
All services with Commonwealth Government
Funding contact:
Organisation:
Translating and Interpreting Services (TIS) National
Telephone: 131 450
Email: tispromo@immi.gov.au
11. Seek assistance from an interpreter or bilingual
educator wherever possible. If this is not possible,
and where appropriate, consider seeking assistance
from another parent at the early years setting who
speaks the same rst language and has appropriate
language skills.

6
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
12. Provide a welcoming physical environment that
reects diversity both indoors and outdoors, for
example:
display pictures and
puzzles of varying
families and lifestyles
display a variety of
books, ction and
non-ction in English
and other languages
select items for home corner that reect diversity
including kitchen utensils, materials and dolls
select musical instruments, songs, CDs and
rhymes that promote a variety of backgrounds
plant a variety of herbs and plants that reect a
rich cultural diversity, for example Vietnamese
mint, bamboo in pots, lemongrass, oregano,
Australian native plants.
B
amboo
B
anksia
V
ie
tn
amese M
in
t
7
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Notes
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
9
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Practical ideas to support children
under three years old
Relationships with families
Early childhood professionals play a vital role in the
maintenance of childrens rst languages when they:
1. Support families to understand the value of
maintaining their rst language. Make available up-
to-date information such as bilingual resources in
formats that are accessible for families.
2. Reassure families that children will learn English as
an additional language from English speakers at the
early years setting.
3. Work with bilingual early childhood professionals
whenever possible to support children to feel
secure in the early years setting and to assist
communication with families.
The maintenance
of rst or home
languages has a
signicant and
continuing role in
the construction of
identity.
(VEYLDF, p.18)
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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
4. Demonstrate a respect for diverse cultures and
languages by learning greetings, key function words
and the names of familiar objects in the childs rst
language. Develop a bank of resources such as:
5. Ask families to teach you key words and phrases
and help you to pronounce them correctly.
6. Show respect for the cultural backgrounds of families
by discussing their cultural practices and routines
such as:
the childs sleeping patterns
feeding, eating and toileting expectations
promoting independence and choice; for
example, about choosing toys or clothing, and
encouraging self-care
Publications of key phrases for
early years setting such as FKA
Children's Service publication.
How to say it:
some practical
phrases to use
with small children
Generate individual
sets of key words
using the
web translators at:
http://translate.google.com
http://babelsh.yahoo.com

Example
English pencil
Spanish el lpiz
Turkish kalem
Vietnamese bt ch

11
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
attitudes to play, for example use of toys and
resources (new shop bought, natural materials or
homemade materials)
purpose of different play settings, for example
playing on the oor, in the sandpit or with water,
small group play
behaviour guidance and beliefs about discipline.
Think about:
What information have we sought from
families about their cultural practices?
How exible are we in accommodating
the family practices into our routines?
12
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Experiences for children under
three years of age
Babies and toddlers need rich language experiences to
support the maintenance of their first language and the
learning of English as an additional language.
Strategies to support language development in English
and other languages
1. Create inviting spaces and safe environments
indoors and outdoors such as:
places to crawl in and
explore
treasures for toddlers
including boxes and
baskets
handmade and knitted
toys, dolls and balls
open spaces, areas
with cushions,
mats and rugs,
natural materials.
Further information is available in:
Inviting Play: Photographs of imaginatively
constructed early childhood settings
(Clarke, P)

13
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
2. Use language experiences, for example:
talk with children and engage in language play
engage children in shared conversations such as
peek-a-boo or waving goodbye
use interactive games such ipsy wispy spider
and round and round the garden
clap with babies and toddlers
sing action songs when playing in the sand
ask parents to teach simple
rhymes in childrens rst languages:

3. Use everyday routines to extend childrens language,
for example sing and talk to children when you
change nappies or when children are settling to
sleep.
4. Listen and respond to children, for example:
listen intently
respond with short sentences
pause to encourage response
sing and coo to babies.
Can you keep a secret?
I dont suppose you can
You mustnt laugh
you mustnt smile
But do the best you can.

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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
5. Read and tell stories everyday.
It is never too early to introduce babies and toddlers to
books. Reading a story to young children should involve
close physical contact. When you read to children:
point to the pictures and name objects, for example
this is a truck
use a single word to ask a question or point to
an object by repeating the words in the sentence
provide books with cardboard pages that are easy to
turn, or lift the flaps books
use books with large, simple and realistic illustrations.
6. Sing songs.
When you sing to children:
sing familiar nursery rhymes and simple songs to
babies and toddlers
sing to babies while you organise routine tasks
such as nappy changing and washing hands
learn short chants and rhymes in languages other
than English.
For further reading and more ideas for using books with
babies and toddlers:
From Lullabies to Literature: Stories in
the lives of infants and toddlers
(Birckmayer, J, Kennedy, A and Stonehouse, A)
Theres a Goat in my Coat (Milne, R and McLean A)

15
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Notes
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
17
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Practical ideas to support children
three to six years old
Beginning in an early years setting
When children first attend an early years setting,
they may not understand much English and may be
unfamiliar with the new environment. Early childhood
professionals can support children in the following
ways:
1. Greet children everyday using repetitive language
such as hello, how are you?, bags go here, you
can hang up your coat.
2. Help children become familiar with English by using
routine phrases every day such as come and sit on
the mat, is everyone listening?, would you like to
do a puzzle? you can wash your hands.
3. Use visual clues when speaking with children, for
example take photos of familiar routines such as
meal or snack times.
4. Encourage children to repeat the words said by
other children.
5. Use gestures to describe what is happening, for
example Marko said he wants to wipe the table, so I
gave him the cloth.

6. Acknowledge what children say, including single
words.
Children can
successfully learn
English as a second
language through
quality exposure
to English, explicit
modelling and
language teaching.
(VEYLDF, p.28)
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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Strategies to develop childrens English
1. Learning through play.
Set up the environment to
encourage children to
talk together.
Provide props to encourage
socio-dramatic play.
Provide interesting,
stimulating and open-
ended experiences.
Provide opportunities
for children to hear
everyday language and
introduce new
vocabulary in context.
Encourage
childrens attempts at
communication.
2. Plan a variety of group times every day.
Meet with children informally and
read a book together, play card
games, and sing songs.
Plan small groups to include children
who may be reluctant to join a bigger group.
Plan small groups for cooking, playing card
games and picture lotto.

19
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Illustrate stories using a felt board to provide
visual support and encourage children to retell
stories using visual aids.
Make your own illustrations: draw or
photocopy pictures, laminate and put Velcro
on the back to make them stick onto a felt board.
Use puppets to encourage children to
communicate and enter a world of imagination
and fun.
Ask parents and bilingual early childhood
professionals to read stories to children in their
own language.
3. Support children to learn English.
Use visual materials such as pictures, photos,
toys and puppets when talking with children.
Model and extend the language used by
the children.
Ask open-ended questions, rather than
questions that require a 'yes' or 'no' response.
Praise childrens attempts to
communicate.
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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
4. Listen and enjoy stories in English and other
languages.
Provide opportunities for children to share their
culture and language.
Use familiar stories to promote a strong sense of
identity and wellbeing.
Introduce children to the rhythms and sounds
of English.
Introduce new vocabulary
and model grammatical
structures.
Use puppets to help
children who are shy or
reluctant to talk by
providing a focus other
than on the learner.
Provide opportunities to
practise.
Some children may find it difficult to sit for long periods
of time. Choose books that can be told or read in
a short space of time. If the book is long, consider
shortening it at appropriate places.
5. Choose a range of different types of books.
Offer factual books, picture books, bilingual
books, books about different cultures, fantasy,
poetry, rhymes and nonsense, books with audio
tapes, homemade books.
Have books on display all the time.
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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
6. Read books more than once.
If children hear a story often they get more information
and begin to learn new vocabulary. If children are
familiar with the story they will be able to talk about
what is happening.
Guidelines for selecting books
Remember to select books and stories that reflect
diversity of culture, language, gender and ability.
Keep up to date with books for children. Look at
websites that specialise in childrens books, both
bilingual and in English.
7. Enjoy musical experiences with children every day.
Songs and singing games, lullabies and music for
listening, percussion and movement expose children
to diverse musical experiences.
Songs, raps and rhymes provide opportunities
for children to learn and practise language.
They can practise pronunciation and intonation
by learning nonsense rhymes and songs.
Singing introduces new vocabulary and concepts.
Refer to handout under References section:
Criteria for selecting childrens books
and materials

The Book Garden: www.thebookgarden.com.au


Global Books, specialists in a large range of bilingual books
and books reecting diversity: www.globallanguage.com.au
22
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Play singing games such as:
Hokey Pokey
Children play this game standing in a circle.
Sing the song and demonstrate the actions.
You put your right foot in,
You put your right foot out,
You put your right foot in and you shake it all about,
You do the hokey pokey and you turn around,
Thats what its all about.
There are many singing games in other languages.
These are often sung to familiar tunes.
Children can share their culture and language by singing
songs in other languages. Families can also provide
songs to learn in their childs first language.
Many songs share common tunes:
Frere Jacques (French)
Buttery song (Vietnamese)
One elephant balancing (also in French,
Italian, Spanish )
Twinkle, twinkle little star (also in Greek, French)
If youre happy and you know it (also Greek)
Old Macdonald had a farm (also Italian,
Mandarin, Cantonese)
My little hen (Spanish)
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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Use rhymes to provide opportunities for children to
work cooperatively together.
Fis Fis Kayici (Turkish)
Children sit in pairs on the floor with their legs
stretched out.
Ask the children to hold hands. Show the children how
to push and pull and move forwards and backwards in
time to the music.

Songs in languages other than English can also be found


at Mama Lisas World International Music and Culture
for Kids & Adults: www.mamalisa.com
Swish, swish boatman
Row your boat, boatman
Thump, thump his heart is beating
Borek for dinner, will be eating
24
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Games and learning experiences
Games and experiences can assist children learn
everyday language, practise socialisation skills and
develop new concepts.
What is your name?
Resources: A small rubber ball
Children sit on the floor in a circle
Roll the ball to one of the children.
Ask the child Whats your name?
The child catches the ball and says their name.
Ask the child to roll the ball to another child and repeat
the question.
Feely bag
Resources: A variety of tactile objects such as a wooden
block, peg, cloth ball, small toy car, animal, spoon,
woollen object, acorn and prickly seed pod.
Spread the objects out on the table.
Ask each child to feel an object.
Describe to the child a characteristic of an object soft/
hard, smooth/rough, big/small, heavy/light.
Ask each child to describe an object.
Put the objects in a bag large enough for the child to
put a hand in and feel the
object.
Ask the child to put their
hand into the bag and
guess what the object is
and describe it for others
to guess.
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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Sorting and matching
Resources: A selection of pictures of fruit and
vegetables, containers for sorting.
Spread the individual pictures out in front of two to
three children.
Place the containers for the children to sort the fruit
and vegetables into.
Ask the children to sort the pictures into different
categories such as:
things we like to eat
things we do not like
things that are sweet
things we can cook
things we can eat raw.
Hold cards up and children can name them and place
them in the containers.
Identifying objects
Resources: Cards with objects known to children (for
example, book, box, toy car, key, animals and clothing),
counters or tokens (large buttons could be used).
Give out six cards to each child.
Place the cards face up in front of each child.
Call out the name of an object.
Give a token (counter or button) to the child who
has the object.
The game concludes when all the cards are full.
The game can be made more difficult by describing
the objects rather than naming them. For example,
its round and bounces, it barks, you write with it,
or it unlocks doors.

Cut out and mount


pictures and photos
of fruit and vegetables
or download free resources
such as those at:
www.teachchildrenesl.com
26
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Talking about families
Resources: A felt board, a
selection of family figures
(fathers, mothers, grandmother,
grandfather, baby, young girl,
young boy, older girl, older
boy preferably a selection
of figures from different ethnic
backgrounds).
Make sure you have a good selection of family
members to represent extended families.
Pictures can be cut out of magazines with Velcro placed
on the back.
Lay out all the family figures on the floor or table in front
of a small group of two to three children.
Each child selects family figures to make their family.
Ask the child about their family.
How many people live at your place?
Tell me about your mum?
What colour hair has she got?
Where does your grandma live?
How many brothers have you got?
Who is big in your family?
What do you call your mummy?
Talk about the names children call their family members,
for example mama, papa, yia yia, pappou, mum, dad,
baba, granny.
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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Cooking experiences
Cooking and preparing food is a fun and enjoyable
learning experience and provides opportunities for
sharing the cultural backgrounds of children in the
service and learning English.
1. Making gingerbread biscuits
Begin by asking children to wash their hands.
Resources: Boards for cutting, sifter, measuring
cups, teaspoons, wooden spoons, bowls,
rolling pins and cutters arranged in front of you.
Place in coloured box
Early childhood professionals can:
Talk to the children as they help
sift flour, roll out dough, place
sultanas, and prepare for cooking.
Children can learn new words and
concepts such as stir, roll, and beat.
Explain the actions that you are
taking, children learn to follow
directions and instructions.
Use the cooking experience to
help children learn mathematical
concepts such as half full, full,
empty, time concepts,
measurement and counting.
Follow up the cooking experience
with the gingerbread biscuit. Use a
felt board and illustrations from the story
to re-tell the story.
Ask parents to assist by demonstrating cooking with
the children or teaching everyone the names of foods
and ingredients in their own languages.
Gingerbread Biscuits
Ingredients
125g chopped butter
cup brown sugar
cup golden syrup
1 egg
1 cups plain flour
2 teaspoons ginger
1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
Sultanas can be used for eyes
Method
Place butter chopped into small
squares in a bowl. Add brown sugar.
Cream butter and sugar until pale
and creamy.
Add golden syrup and egg yolk and
beat until well combined.
Add flour, ginger and bicarbonate of
soda. Beat until mixture starts to form
a ball.
Knead on floured surface until smooth.
Roll out until 5 mm thick. Give each
child a lump to roll out on small boards. Children can cut out the gingerbread
people with cutters and decorate with
sultanas.
Bake for 1015 minutes in 180 degree
preheated oven.

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Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Find out what foods are enjoyed at festival times and
provide opportunities for parents to share experiences.
Celebrate festivals that are important to families at the
service such as Mid-Autumn festival, Moon festival,
Orthodox Easter, Diwali, Bayram, Eid and Christmas.
2. Making recipe cards
Resources: Pictures of
food from magazines or
drawn by children.
Cardboard, paste and
scissors.Three or four
children can help draw
pictures of the
ingredients for a chosen
recipe or cut out pictures
from magazines. Photos of
the food can also be used.
Prepare the recipe cards detailing the quantities needed
and the instructions for preparation.
3. Visual displays
Resources: Display board, pictures for display.
Prepare a visual display about food. Laminate pictures
of different foods, talk to the children about how they
taste (sweet, sour, bitter, soft, crunchy etc.)
Ask children to tell you the names of food and
ingredients in their own language.

Useful websites:
www.nutritionaustralia.org

29
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
Notes
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
30
References
Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace
Relations for the Council of Australian Governments 2009, Belonging, Being
and Becoming, The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia, Australian
Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
for the Council of Australian Governments.
Birckmayer, J, Kennedy, A and Stonehouse, A 2008, From lullabies to
literature: Stories in the lives of infants and toddlers, National Association for
the Education of Young Children, Washington, USA.
Clarke, P 2011, Inviting Play: Photographs of imaginatively constructed early
childhood settings, revised edition, FKA Childrens Services, Richmond,
Australia.
Clarke, P 2009, Supporting Children Learning English as a Second Language
in the Early Years (birth to six years), www.vcaa,vic.edu.au/earlyyears
Department of Education and Early Childhood Development and Victorian
Curriculum and Assessment Authority 2009, Victorian Early Years
Learning and Development Framework, Department of Education and
Early Childhood Development and Victorian Curriculum and Assessment
Authority, Melbourne, Australia.
Global Books, www.globallanguage.com.au
Mama Lisas World International Music and Culture for Kids & Adults,
www.mamalisa.com
Milne, R and McLean A 2010, Theres a Goat in my Coat, Allen and Unwin,
Crows Nest, NSW, Australia.
The Book Garden, www.thebookgarden.com.au
The following publications are available from FKA Childrens Services at:
www.fka.com.au
FKA Childrens Services 1997, Criteria for selecting childrens books and
materials (hand out)
FKA Childrens Services in partnership with the Victorian Governments
Ofce for Children and Early Childhood Development 2009, Child Rearing
backgrounds of Immigrant Families in Australia (manual and/or CD) 3rd
(revised) edition
FKA Childrens Services 1989-1993, How to Say It: Some practical phrases to
use with small children (booklet and cassette)
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
31
Music
Hoermann, D 1978, A Developmental Music Programme Teachers Manual
and Childrens Book Stage l to Stage lll, A Dominie Publication, Brookvale,
Australia
Graham, C 1999, Holiday Jazz Chants, Oxford University Press,
New York, USA.
Hill, S 1990, Raps and Rhymes, Eleanor Curtain Publishers, South Yarra,
Australia.
Hill, S 1993, Jump for Joy: More Raps & Rhymes, Eleanor Curtain Publishers,
Armadale, Australia.
Harrop, B 2001, Okki-Tokka-Unga: Action Songs for Children, A & C Black
Publishers Ltd, London, England.
Colgin, M 1982, One potato, two potato, three potato, four: 165 Chants for
Children, Gryphon House, Maryland, USA.
Larkin, V and Suthers, L 1995, What Will We Play Today?, Volume 1,
Pademelon Press, Castle Hill, Australia.
Larkin, V and Suthers, L 1997, What Will We Play Today?, Volume 2,
Pademelon Press, Castle Hill, Australia.
Websites
Audio songs in other languages
Mama Lisas World International Music and Culture for Kids & Adults,
www.mamalisa.com
Food and Nutrition
Nutrition Australia, www.nutritionaustralia.org
Multicultural and English as an Additional Language Resources
FKA Childrens Services Inc.
www.fka.com.au
Gowrie Victoria, www.gowrievictoria.org.au
Puppets by Post, www.puppetsbypost.com
Teach Children ESL (ashcards), www.teachchildrenesl.com
World music
Putumayo World Music, www.putumayo.com
The Boite, www.boite.com.au
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
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Resources
Culture and creativity
In the early years there has been a long tradition of the use of natural materials
and recycling to support learning experiences for children. In the VEYLDF
Outcome 2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world describes
environmental sustainability as important for the development of learning
experiences, centred on a commitment to make the world a safe place for now
and future generations.
There is also increasing interest in the maintenance of skills and traditions in art,
design and craft as an important part of the cultural identity of communities. In
the twenty rst century this includes an increased focus on sustainable living.
Children become socially responsible and show respect for the environment
when they are supported to gain an appreciation of craft and traditional skills
that are fostered within learning environments.
Information and websites in this section describe connections to some resources
and materials that are hand crafted, environmentally sustainable and explore
diversity. These ideas support the planning of creative experiences with children
and families.
Early Childhood Australia (Victoria)
www.earlychildhoodvictoria.org.au
About Early Childhood Australia (Victoria)
ECA Victoria provides a comprehensive range of information, resources, latest
news items and research to promote the best interests of children.
ECA Victoria operates a sustainability special interest group which aims
to advocate for children, families and issues that relate to environmental
sustainability, increase awareness and knowledge, and increase discussion on
topics about sustainable education and development.
For more information visit:
ECA Victoria Environmental Sustainability Special Interest Group
For further information on the National body and branches of Early Childhood
Australia please see http://earlychildhood.org.au
Ian Potter Foundation Childrens Garden
www.rbg.vic.gov.au/rbg-melbourne/childrens-garden
About The Ian Potter Foundation Childrens Garden
The Ian Potter Foundation Children's Garden is a magical place to discover
the world of plants. Its a place where children can dig, build, imagine, create,
hide... come and explore!
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
33
Immigration Museum
www.museumvictoria.com.au/immigrationmuseum
About Immigration Museum
The Immigration Museum explores the stories of real people from all over the
world who have migrated to Victoria. Learners of all ages can join a journey of
discovery, exploring the themes of immigration, cultural diversity and
Australian identity.
Koorie Heritage Trust Inc.
www.koorieheritagetrust.com
About Koori Heritage Trust Inc.
The Koorie Heritage Trust Inc. aims to protect, preserve and promote the living
culture of Aboriginal people of south-eastern Australia. Through education
and promotion it raises awareness and appreciation of the cultural diversity of
Koorie culture in south-eastern Australia and work towards the broader goals of
reconciliation for all Australians.
Rainbow Serpent
www.rainbowserpent.com.au
About Rainbow Serpent
Production of art and craft is an important means for Aboriginal people to
communicate their stories, spirituality and relationship to the land. Handcrafts
are sourced from a range Aboriginal community art centres and range from
traditional forms such as boomerangs, didgeridoos, bark paintings, Tiwi
carvings and central desert canvases, through to contemporary ceramics, silk
painting and bush jewellery.
Creative experiences
Craft Victoria
www.craftvic.org.au
About Craft Victoria
Craft Victoria fosters creativity, experimentation and professionalism in
contemporary craft and design. The organisation enhances awareness of
Australian craft and design at state, national and international levels.
Knitting patterns
www.jeangreenhowe.com
www.sunspun.com.au/sunspun
Jean Greenhowe Designs
Publishers of easy to knit patterns for dolls and toys.
Sunspun
Stockists of knitting, tapestry and patchwork kits and patterns to explore colour
and creativity. Good selection of knitting pattern books for toys including toys
shown in this Resource Booklet.
Learning English as an Additional Language in the Early Years (birth to six years)
34
Spinners and Weavers Guild of Victoria Inc
http://home.vicnet.net.au/~handspin/
About Spinners and Weavers
The Guild aims to bring together those who practise, or wish to practise,
hand weaving, spinning and allied crafts. It encourages increased knowledge,
understanding and skills in these crafts through discussion, demonstration,
exhibition, teaching and the provision of resource materials.
Reverse Art Truck
www.reversearttruck.com.au/about-us
About Reverse Art Truck Inc. (formerly Reverse Garbage Truck Inc.)
Reverse Art Truck is a non prot organisation that collects seconds, rejects and
factory off cuts for distribution to schools, early learning centres, community
groups and individuals.
Reverse Art Truck provides materials to thousands of members of the
community. Its sole aim is to provide a large variety of affordable resource
materials and to educate on the benets of re-using to recycle and reduce.
The Friendship Tree
www.thefriendshiptree.com.au
About The Friendship Tree
With 30 years combined experience in the eld of early childhood, this range
is developed with the childs imagination and sensory appreciation in mind.
Through simple concepts, natural materials and a little fairytale magic, designs
are handcrafted to provide inspiration for play, nature/seasonal displays and
story telling.