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Mr. Allen C.

Jennings
124 E. Yates Avenue
Findlay, Ohio 45840
Dear Allen:
WayNESVILLE. OHIO 45068
June 13, 1984
Now that I have untangled the Jennings genealogy I feel that I am up for an even
bigger challenge. Maybe 1*11 tackle a Holy Grail hunt next and wouldn*t be at all
surprised to find it in a Quaker haystack owned by a Jennings...
To answer your first question, I went to the Jennings file and Beers 1882 History of
Warren County, Ohio :
John Jennings, son of Jacob and Mary Smith Jennings, was born February 5, 1765
at Haddonfield, N.J., came to Waynesville, Ohio in 1810. John bought the mill
property and mills of John Haines and then in 1825 built the brick grist mill in
1825. He sold the mill in 1832 to Stephen Cook and Jason Evans. There is no further
mention of John who at that time would've been 67 years old. He possibly retired
from business, moved to some other part of Ohio, returned to New Jersey or died here,
John Jennings, son of John and Sarah Hopkins Jennings, was born August 17, 1800
and died at Waynesville, Ohio May 11, 1845. I find no mention of him as far as
his profession or trade.
Note that I checked the burial records of the Miami Monthly Meeting of Religious
Society of Friends. I do not find either John, father or son, in these records
which we have cataloged from the originals. However; what burial records are
available are only the Hicksite records. Miami Meeting split in 1829 split during
the national separation of Friends Societies which divided Friends into Hicksites
(followers of Elias Hicks* doctrine-liberal and Orthodox-who followed the traditional
Friends doctrines and were apprently purists). The division caused such an uproar
among Friends at Waynesville that they actually dug up their dead relatives and
ancestors and reburied them in seperate sides of the cemetery which was first begun
about 1802. The Orthodox buried their dead on the East side next to the Orthodox
"Red Brick" Meeting Houise (built in 1836) and the Hicksites buried theirs on the
West side next to th'e Friends Schoolhouse. The Orthodox Friends Meeting was "laid
doira*^ about 1919 and the Meeting records were turned over to a member, Maria Elbon
who then gave them to Haryeysburg Friends Meeting (Orthodox) in Harveysburg, Ohio
which is just five miles East of Waynesville. Around'1960, the Harveysburg Friends
Meeting House was sold to. the Friendship Baptist Church of Waynesville. One of the
Friendship Baptist members, Henry McFarland who now lives in Ft, Myers, Fla., found
several Friends minute books in the attic. He told me about them and said that they
were dated 1805-1835. He took them to the Warren County Historical Society Museum
at Lebanon, Ohio, No one at the museum seems to know about them but if I can get
access to their vault I can find them. Orthodox burials were not listed consequently
in Hicksite records. Each Meeting kept own burial records although the cemetery was
all one. Some Orthodox burials.were removed to Miami Cemetery at Corwin after it
formed in 1867 from the Old Methodist Cemetery there.
0i(Alic
WayNESVILLE. OHIO 45068
Since neither John can be found in local Friends burial records, I figure both
converted to Orthodox branch. The Orthodox branch here was absorbed in 1919
mostly by the Methodist Church. ^
I can't explain why the "second marriage" children and those attributed to James
Jennings seem to be the same. I am enclosing copies of James Jennings family group
sheet and Bible records. This was researched by Joan Keefer whose husband, Les, is
a Jennings descendant. I feel that Joan's research is correct and possibly the one
written by the person who did the Haddonfield history might be partially incorrect.
Each generation seemed to repeat names such as Jacob, James, John etc. It is sometimes
very difficult to tell who is who unless you have a date to go by.
I see from family group sheet that James Jennings was the brother of John, Sr. He was
also the son of Jacob and Mary Smith Jennings. James was born October 22, 1774 in New
Jersey and died at Waynesyille where he was buried in the Hicksite-Orthodox Friends
Cemetery September 18, 1860 (No. 41-9th Row). He is listed in the Friends Hicksite
burial records. James bought a "house of public entertainment" at Waynesville prior
to 1806. It was what is known as The Hammel House (owned later by Hammel in 1841).
The log building which was the former log tavern of James Corey was replaced by Jennings
with a frame building which is still attached to the brick inn added by John Worrell in
1822. This building is now the Williamson apartments owned by Harold Williamson of
Dayton, Ohio. My maternal grandmother's sister and susband, Will and Ollie (Florence)
Gustin were the last to own this building and operate it as a hotel calling it The
Gustin House which closed after Great-aunt Ollie's death in 1912. The building is on
Aouth Main Street between the Chamber of Commerce office and the White House Antiques
Shop (built in 1899 as a home by my Great-Uncle Will Gustin).
It dosen't state anywhere in Beers history that James Jennings operated a tavern that
served liquor. It could have been a "temperance" house of public entertainment if he
was in good standing with local Friends. Of course I do know that early Friends were
allowed their daily ration of liquor and anything over it qualified them for title of
public drunkard and their memberships were withdrawn. However; I do know that John
Satterthwaite who was an early Quaker settler (1802), and who helped build the 1811 white
brick Friends Meeting House (Hicksite) also giving land for it etc. seemingly remained
in the good graces of Miami Meeting after he opened an inn in his home in 1827. He also
served liquor. His family and local Quakers didn't like it but they must have tolerated
it due to his contiributipns to Meeting. John Satterthwaite was also a Mason and did
much to establish the Masonic Lodge in Ohio (another taboo for Friends). John is never
the less buried in the Friends Cemetery and has a tombstone that is simple but etched
with Masonic emblem. So it is possible that James Jennings could've remained in good
standing with local Friends Meeting depending on the circumstances of his contributions.
Early Friends were shrewd businessmen and knew how to drive a bargain.
Now to clear up the mystery of John Jennings, Sr. standing with Miami Meeting. It is
most possible that John and Sarah Hopkins Jennings were disowned by Haddonfield Meeting
through Philadelphia Yearly Meeting action as shown in minutes you have copied from our
copies. Since fornication was stressed with a capital "F", and it went to a public
meeting at Haddonfield, this may be the reason he left and came to Waynesville in 1810.
I also notice that Mary, their first child, was born February 10, 1789 and the date of
the Haddonfield M.M. dealing with John and Sarah are dated March 9, 1789. Apparently
Sarah was pregnant with Mary at the time and the marriage was forced. It is possible that
the Meeting resolved the situation and their membership was kept entanct but John and
Sarah might've just joined Mia mi and kept the situation from the new Meeting. But if
they requested a letter of transfer if could be that the situation wasn't mentioned.
WAYNESVILLg, OHIO 45068
I dug out a handwritten scroll copy of the Heighway Genealogy done several years
ago by a local descendant of SAmuel Heighway, Sr. I forgot about having it when
you were here. It clears up themystery about Rebeccas Clark Jennings Harris, the
mother of I.H. Harris and "sister of Samuel Heighway*s wife".
Sarah Jennings, mother of Rebecca Clark Jennings Harris, was a sister to Mary Jennings
who married Samuel Heighway, Jr. in 1810 in Waynesville. Samuel, Jr. was born in
England in 1783 and was the first postmaster of Waynesville Post Office which opened
April 1, 1804. Rebeccas who was born in 1804 was simply 11 years younger than her
husband who was. the son of Samuel Heighway, Waynesville's founder. Samuel and Mary
Jennings Heighway*s branch went to Kosciusko County, Indiana.
i have enclosed Mark Jennings copy and some others from 1882 Beers. Have fun.
Most Sincerely,
mis E. Dalto
"Dhioana Room Coordiantor
-f-----' vs "vu.. ij Rucii a niCii^iiro -.1.. ' . I or nnf
dlTlT^f nio-pvilig.veRtrou^^th to Uk- pri.u-.plo. nf ^>'n\hr\n xhc
civit Jioenj'-our moral ciiilurc, our intel->ay ilmoet with ubunduiii Hiim-fia. fn: doing woll. comprisn. if I am
ectual #(lrscement, our romDion:iai' /.-int- "i _ . . . "ot mistaken, tiip omire list of tiaiic; f..i-! ectual adrsijcement, our rornnioreial; t,.,o . i- i nn^taken, (lie entire list of trades for!
growih-our internal energies and m.imnp- .ro^T v^ v there is any demand. All nrtielca:!" V"
menl-^ur happiness as a wopleour ex ! \ ork. tonnidcrft- of manuim lure that will beur Iniiwriortn-1
mpieof elf-gvernn,enl-thegloryof ourl by the shipload, but
nsrne the hoi>P nf it, r . tvi-^a i , I't would n-em that a country m which theif ,
Imund .,r, i,v T' ore nil 0-^Sce the cards of Dr Sinizer and "'orchant and th-,. laborer are bo well com-1 f"'
Pin Liiionthat the Geugrnpica! Gladden Jt M:lle!aml. ipencilled, imi.si i.e in u llourisliiiig comli- -
position of tJie StftleBthat our political' {tion nnd promih-ing to tiie euiijrrmit lint nj|
conditionthe hallowed blood of patriots! of McDonoarh^s lionse, Ac. : o" largo a# two Chiragn. s with as , " ,-
thovoice of the mighty deadUie voice! New Otit.KA!!, Friday. Nov. j ibusiness and net ivity ue New York!,
of the struggling livingthe voice of God! . Th house of McDonmigh, the miilmn. foumlaiion opon
himself in the improved fomiition o'man i lve- 1^: '
under . f*'""" i8"i^cd by live white men. The Pe<Trne .^benceLlii.s pros- .. .:
servaimn f iK it ^ the pre-: Kftya lliev took three parketa of gold "iind ' i r '
smaiion of lha Union, and in our heartsleilver. There was a.nackigw of notesSacrumentu and: ,'
we declare "TAefoicm mw/ and aliall &i,'nounling toglOO.OOO irf iftfsame room Valley. This prosperity (
prifsenjcd.'" | whidj it seems was not taken. Tjie ideaJ ^ '""tf " 'be yield of.
Rf.9oi.vn:_That the Union should be IIWugh'swill i now h-^bor of
etronirer in iovefthnn rrtu. .w , tt by i he New-Orfeans papers. .b''-indtvidnois, but will tjiis cotiiinue. It; f' . : ^onger mlov^han power, that our Uat A . ^ s the opinion of those who are experienc-^'"^'""'
oai8urnq;i of the people, a union cd that it will hold out not much lornrer: S.""
hsarts, a union of love a well 48 of States. For tie Miami visiwr. than a year at farthcfet. You must not
a unity of feeling, a unify of States based' The JeaBinfs Rstaie take the r^uaniitics taken home in lliei
s^Mione people, one oriffin one .mion I noticed a comtminication h,' Steamers vhal are bo blazoned about by
... . _ / na !si weot'o ,,orthe nnnfvr,. f,.r K.. .. 1 I. / that ren
stronirer in bwefthnn .u . 7, by the New-Orleans papera. ,y'<: jiiutviuuois, out will this cotiiinue. It; ^onger in lov^han power, that our Uat A . ^ s the opinion of those who are experienc-^'"^'""'
oni8urnq;i of the people, a union cd that it will hold out not much lori-rer: S.""
hsarts, a union of love a well 18 of States. For tie Miami visiwr. than a your at farthcfet. You must not
t unity of feeling, a unify of States based' The Jeflnijifs Rstaie take tbo r^uaniitics taken home in lliei
t^Mione people, one oriffhi one .mion m^A I noticed a comtminication h,' Steamers vhal are bo blazoned about by
lRe mandaretof^utLtidrr li 1i t 'be tf,
God haU. ioiued loJeihert r, ^ 'A'"""^thougheucli month,
>. ^ t*' te one :sens that tim legal heirs of the Eetato of;'^'bovv a Kligbt iucrenso you nniv soon ;f
sm* rfcrJMi. [William Jennings decVl; intc ofGrosver'or 1 bow dec.cpfivt: such ri'purtB arc,,
jSqiiore, London, and Acton Hal), England l" y" consider t|;i ibp^e millions af-
Cc!rA. C. Ford has been arreaed jn'docievH, end ilmi iliey aretbe divided Among twenty tlmusmid ^L
New York for passing connterfeit monov :'f-f''"dB"fs ofJoim Addis who died in Phi!-''""' be but n poor rccompeiiBC fur llie *"*
flevcn ihousfliid bills on theSit-' P November 1810. The writertlmy buvo to undergo in l"
of Mis.ouHe-io Mellr. State Bank on to say that John Addis was married !obtaining if. Well should li.e deiAilB
of San PVnci r I f "" ' JcniiingR Shea, tisUr of the Intes- ' bcromc exhausted next year, or the year : ,
of ban iTtnciaco, (.ahforttu. Seventeen "tot#', Wiliam, and hence derives the con-which there is astrpng probabili-l"
50 notes onthe same Bank were found on i^bision that "one sixth ofthis innnfnae Es- ''y' mly and ail theotheni would retro-1 ^
bia person. {^'c will fall to the heirs ofJohn .\ddi8, and''1'^''^''''^)' 8" ihey have advancodj >,
; lbai"ono of ifiese heirs reflideu in Union I"ml importance; to be eure I f
(f^Abetter feeling seems to exist to-county". Now as I hove : s")''h^Uhm^vvuuid on^ tcmpc,ra.| j.
. . r ^ a^a.Mwrv sr W41ii Qiri/as UtI linl J ' sijc \ KUitttiVH.iai ttU-j |
cotttjDuing to fikind iroopt tliere lo he iu nod my resuludifter very nalwraily {Pf^rnary of liio Piu jric^ but till ihe iriunc-'
readiness should there W any outbreaks p'om tbese arrivoil at by the "Star" corres-j'hate efTm t would bo the ruin of tbouBumls,' A
or demonstration# made. ' jpondent. J deem ib proper to state the; husinebs would be entirely proatrafed niMl i'f"r ,'
I o J understand it; that thus moy be j"^"^"hdence entirely annifiilnt- ,1 ^
. jefTccied a mutual interchange of ecnliment ttiiforluiiately, liie country has uc*' iJ "
IC^A couttterfeiter named Johnson, who among those who leel themaolves inlc/eu-'upnn, no agriculture, no. '
aas been watched and hunted for some- ^'d all possible information elicited. ;'"Bnnfacturcs; there is not oneacre in tenI
time paat, wts afew deys ago arrested near Jennings,of Birmlnghani Eng-' under cultiv-iiion; every pound of
MechaoistHirg. Appa,rtua of diflereiu *557, and had twelve iP'^^'sion being brot from foreigticountries i The brl MechaoistHirg. Apparatua of diflersitf *557, and had twelve iP'"^vifljon being brot from foreigticountries i The brl
kind# for carrying on the nernrimia W n*'five daughter*. ^advv|ch U]es, or Oregonto the U-
a^ r I I.' I f [Thefifth aofi was named Robert, and ho}"'^'" '' be n great agricultural fCost of A
^wew found oa bis premiaes. Late jbad but ONE child, viz: William, the In-^veryfoot of the soil will ed in the
t on Ky and fivason lodUaa arc suDpo-j testate. If thi# be true, then are the con-i rf'gation. This can be done, tin- moroing
ed to Lavs been circulated by-himself aod;*^"*'*^ o"' Us"'n vilago friend unfoiid-i'l"*'''^'"'''^;' vaMcys, by ouch a and the pr
kaod. {ed: and that this f ths true 8tBi of the ''^ndercd exlreraely fertile; {the owner
{ I have from inso who have cxar^ncd', "-'T fxpensive, end it is woilj No Mai
OirPork u Sit* k * J .L docHoiants in the City ofLanbon itfself, ">wn that the first seulorB in a new;
ri'ini ' hundred Km. m:and wbji veracity, and bcuhmbr are wealthy enough to en-1
^ocins^. With an upward leudeocy. ipeachable. Will .^ur llniow Vilage friend: ^*Pf"ive opersii ms forj H.
" >i>s kind enough to inform me throueh Ibej'^' ^'^rtiiixing uny of tlioir lands; their i AjKirtm
asid th*T win b cootestod "P"" wltat Butnoriry ileeifng ,ipyn the btmnty ofi ri
ss* bstwses two otthe clmmaBt aMbr#' thst Wiiliawdcnningahad* B]aip,V | providenrn. Rut jf u,e country have lui,.; Twenty-f-
. .a ^Alui niiAlJ wWlkdM" hA ilftst Aries Twvt^raw t 4'^\ if QT #OIJtC<t'4 of iKicrsP lA IKa krii
ii^vk VI kiic Avji Will in ijkc
require irrigation. Thiscan be done, tin- morning :
que&tionably, and th<.Hie vaMoya, by auch a and the pr
procesB. can be rendered tTxireniely fertile;; the owner
but it will be vm>- expensive, end it is well | No Mai
known tliat the first seulon. in a new!
country ore gcldom wealthy enough toen-1
ter into iriy very expensive opersii ms forj H.
liie fertiiixing uny of tlioir lands; theiri A jKirtm
" >i>s kind enough to inform me throueh lb,
asid th*T win b contested 'wl*t Butnority,
* bstwoea two o< the cUiim*r. .; beatatea thst ^ tih) denaifurahsd a ller' ss* bstwsss two otthe clmmaBt aMbr#' tLst Wiiliawrdcnningahad* B]aip,V | pfovidenre. Rut jf the country have lUh-; Twenty-f-
of G-oogresfi from ths CuflaWrfD,< d'.U'let wWthsr be lisd any brother' for if,wealth, there i# Biiffirieiu ar-; n ike brii
i'W htvd oeitbsT brothff, norolbei sisterthen' J ' population withoulj'*-
iWCHtld the dRoesiKiSdrrts yf John Addis, ec-l 'besc uihat advantsffos. |
kCaiaa.
[WCHtld tJie deo-eaiMiSttrrts yf John Aildis, ec-l 'besc uihtst advantsges. j
ituniiug (a hia versKvji' be the sole hsjirs of' "C have beard gr^'nt smries at h..)inel !-(
ib# whofo Estate and not of one iarli en;y. 1 o{ t'slifoniia, in useful Gixci:
aeherioff that ibw in a ronsri Iron. CuBeer Coal. &r. Bui ; The tro
,4 *"ns f.traie onu not 01 one i*rli on;v. "2 r-smcrnia, m useful
will I Jieheviag ih*i ibw in a ronecl sutmeuV, Cupper, Coal, 4.C. But au.ch 8''
': that eiy fscta are UirootrovTuble, 1; ' pfveume, have been origioated by '*
It Mjaro yeno cinvictfots. I, tf jl. i'SfrpOiely sriceiinc who h#ve '. At the a
oi</ ' WaysiasiLt*. No*. SI, 181H). [*''* fooking rtght uJamb thrcmirfi i t*" k
" njuml.
^TA ttftar oi" t^harlsaten ips-tad a;
Asa of LwoiBsUw ^( being lo infimMe withi
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THE JENNINGS ESTATE.
; 14610S4
tn compUsnce wiih previous notice,' g[ivn by me, lomany Jenwisgsss
uiid others desiring informalioo ia reference to the Investigation of their
eupposcd titieatotlie Crw/ Estdte. ot the Jate intestate ,WILLIA3!
JENXIXGS, of l79d, England/ I am permitted, after nlontr and eev^
afttiction in my family*, tootake'the follou ing very brief Reportr from
my correspondence, collected together within the laet- few monlha;
which, however, need not betaken as replete- and perfect, but, for the
moHt part, as o prelude, or beacon light, tomany in quest of tnch family
history. And. although it i'a impossible to throw intothissheetthe
traoing-i from overy letter rergivd. J. fmi the vsrieiy may tnnrh every
branch, ami serve all truly iat^3. to some good purpose. For, that
there are many defn^t? "'6i^UMPHREY JENNINGS,'now in
the United Rtatesi-foeiSie Vetends to deny; and, if so, that Ihev are
entitled to the.eeti^f^ieir deceasedrelotite, WILLIAM J.\MNGS,
Bnot alloget^.-^j&idiiematical; but most clearly demonstrable, by
.vper ebTt,-<nii}c}i is the more -strongly indicated by erety late
' elopement. - _
She common ancestor, . -
""WfifiJJSsrfSSNivINGS, of Binningham, was married in1657.'.:
tiled, ;MS ^
He B||CSSQ;^^ldreaCaccordiDgto seven communioKtioDs at bead,
butdiSeTTn^tirxterialiy from eacfi other, in some important partici:. re.
I cannot, therefore, guarantee the corfectnea? of either; but will rin^
give the names and dates of their births, from a Londonletter, dated 18th.
January, 1830: Ist. Ann. bom in IfiW; Sd. Justine, in )65; 3d.
Charles James, to 1063: 4Ui. Mar\% in 1864; dih. Elixal>etb, in 1665;
6th. John, in 1667;. 7th. Humplirey. in 1W8: 8th. Esther, in 1670;
12th. Felicia, in 16'.^. _
Seven of the above named, are eab! tu Imvc^dicd witliout issue. But
this statement is not accorded by another reporter, perhaps of eqoa)
merit. Not presuming to judge the cauiie of discrepan<7 between '
thMS reports, I deem it unnecessary here to follow out any detailed
statements of Humphrey's childrenV marriages, dtc., save merely to
remark that some of them are said to rank as peers in Eoglmid, and
enjoy the use of the property in question under teonre, subject to .
the proper heirs and next of kin. - -
Without further comment, I will proreod togive the lineageofseveral
branches of the Jcnniags family, as traced by different letters at hand,
regardless of the order in which they may herebhpresented, as there
can be no importance attached thereto.
1. Janes Harvzt, of Hebron, Ohio, gives the following statement of
the branch he represents, vlx:
They are the dcscendents of Samuel Jennings, who lived in Sussex
county. New Jersey. He has beendead aliout filler sixtyycaxa. I am
informed h' fi:-^ frinn K)t?land, \> cue or two i.ther brotUrrs, and left _
Other l^othcrt) in England, oneofVtiftm was tiamcd William The
iibove named Samuel, married Sophia Gamer, in New Jersey. They
had six children, vlx: Mary, William, Hannah, Samuel, Char-
lotley, and Elizabeth. These children he supposes to have all died
more thantwenty-live or thirty years past,, except William, who was
living in Orange county, New Ymk, eight years ago. Mary mamed
Samuel Haud, whose sou Samuel was father-in-law^ to the said James
Harvey. There was a Doctor Jennings, wlw mice lived in Fait
*!Mr. s'te4.<c ullndes lo the Uleirss aud death of hliatellievut lUtle eon.JV.
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county, Pennsylvania. I think his father was brother to Mary and -
ton of old Samuel. Tbia Dr. Jennings wa3,.aa I aa informed, the father
of the Rev. Obediah Jennings, of Nashville, Tennessee; Jonathan, of '
Indiana; David, of Bclmont county, Ohio; and Sophia and Reuben,
children of Mary, are still living, and believe they are of direct desccnL
Hannah, one of the six, married Elisha Walton some sixty years past.-.
There seems to have been some vague knowledge of this William
Jennings, of 1798, and his great wealth, and that they felt some inter-/
esl in it. But it is not now well known how or why.
2. JoHX Lapham, of West Farmington, New York, states that Benja
min, Jacob, and Zebulon Jenningo, three brethcri, came from England
in the Caledonia, landed, and remained on Long Island some years,
thence removed to the Scotch Plains, in Esse.v and Somerset counties,
New Jersey, where thcv spent their remaining dii3-sdying about 1779,
when many of their desccndontsdiepcrsed tothesouthern and western
Stales,
Mr. Ltphamproceeds to noticethe sons' namesof one of these three
hrothm, viz: Jacob, (they are aa given,) Dr. Samuel K. Jennings, form
erly of Baltimore; Jonathan, Governor at one time pf Iilidiana; David, ^
a former reorcsentativc inCongress from Ohio; and the Ite^. Obedio^^
D. D., of Nashville. f '. -
3. Dr. S. . Jexxixcs, ofTuscaloosa. Alabama, on the-ebOTt^J^ter
that he believes Benjamin, Jacob and Zebulon, referred to,
to his father; and that he had often beard bis father l^eek Scotch
Plains in aa interesting manner, from the cirtrnmstaft^-MlM thinks,
of relative associations hold in remembrance. He further oays: My
father was born in 1744. My paternal grand father must have been bom
abont the year 1712. My groat grand father, probablyabout 1687; and,
therefore, was about fourteen years older than William, who was bora
in 1701.. Jily grand father died in my father's house, and was buried in
the grave yard of the Bound Brook Presbyterian church, of wbieh be
vve>^lderfhirtv years. . And I think it.as^hle 'hat n-v Qada.
iSifieroiefl somiivnere^on lAingisTanu. TJly tauier never hatThbemne^
I wasbomJune6th, 1771. 1believe my father's cousins all left Jersey
for the west. Dr. Mitchell, who married my sister, writes to me that,
your good father namedto me in 1812, that an estate was pending in
Bnglaod, which might one day come to the connection, &c. Mr. For-
dyee, of Ohio, grandson of Zebulon Jennings, says that his grand mother
hadoften saidthat there wasan estatein England, which would oneday
come to the family in this country.
.4. Dr. D. G. MtTCBEtt, of Corydon, Indiana, states: I often heard
Dr. Jacob Jennings, my wife's father, speakof Benjamin Jennings aa
his fiithcr'i eoosin. But does not recollect the names of Jacob and Zeb-
aloD. But says further, that his Rev. father-in-lawalways claimed the
Rev. Dr. David Jennings, of England as his cousin, dtc.
6. Jaxzs Jzhsisqs, of Cape Vincent, New York, gives the follow
ing statement: Belonging to the estate in question, thete is some of the
best wheat land in England. I shall soon hear from my brother, liv
ing only twenty miles from Long Mblford. Extract from hit brother's
letter: I am afraid thev will not succeed, as they cannot get his (mean-
thg William's) priv^e Register, flkc., d^c.-too mucW and not ae-
eessary, however important, to Insert here.
6. Joxx Woods, New Providence, NewJersey, states that he traces
through Joshuato John of 1740to Johnof 1718, who, he thinks pro
bable, was the tun of Humphrey.
7, R. A. Hatcrtb, Esq., ofNcw Madrid. Missouri, traces fora party,
throughHeniy, of Essex, NewJersey, toJoshua or Joseph Jennings, from
j^ttgland, as supposed.
S. Hexit Jeaxisos, Waynesvtllc, Ohio, states: We trace back
from etff Cither, James Jennings, by a succession of wills and records,
toHenrv Jennicgs. our parent tjck, who came from F.r.gland to the
United States. And we find on the Emigraufs Regisier.Uic Ume of
landing, the vessel he came on, and the name of the master of the ves
sel, dtc. He came on the ship Rent, Mecslow, masier; Icndcd iGth
June.1677.
(This Henry has much reliable family history.)
9. M. J. Wicks, of Aberdeen, Mississippi, presents the afEdavil of an
oged relative. Nelson Jennings, in substance as follows: I was lom
llth September, 1765. My father, James Jennings, was raised in Han
over county, Virginia, lived inAmelia county sometime, then removed
to Lawrcnceburg county, Virginia, where he died. Thai his great
grand father (be thinks he has heard his father say) was named Hum
phrey Jennings, and from England. That his grand father, William,
bad five sons, viz: John, William, Robert, James, and Joseph; and
four daughters: Polly, Ann, Pe^gy, Betsey or Elizabeth. That my
father, James, had fovir sonstwo diedwithout issuetheother twoare
myself and James, late of Clark county, Georgia, who left many chil
dren. Threeof tke daughters, Elizabeth, Nancy and Polly, and myscli,
wereborn inAtoelia couuty, since Nottaway, Virginia, and now reside
Randolph MUhlv, Alabama. Further it is staled that, Joseph, the
youngest son of William, had twosons and seven daugbleni. One of
thejfpartied without issue. The other, viz: Langley B. Jennings, set-
t^^^yNottawav county, Virginia, where he raised a faipily, and theq
nMMiMo .Wiltdn coun^, Georgia, wherebe died.
10. L. Latham, of Canton, Miaaissippi, traces back through Col,
PhillipDixon, late of Natchez, who married Mary, daugbter of fienjftt
min Jennings, formerly of Virginia.
11. Robert Stbrhibs, of Yuoo city,Mississippi, w* thsMaof a
daughter of Daniel, who was theson of Daniel Jenningi, ibmerly of
Virgittie, who possessed considenble wealth, andinteUigenee;and often
Kceived y^jwents from Bnglaod. His relations or many of tbets aov
rviii)e I ' .uck^.
12. E li.D JasKiBoa, ot Shelby, NorthCarolina, stalesthat theee is
an old Prayer Book of the High Church of England, eome where inthis
country, aaong hit veUUoas, in which his great-great grand fa thei'a
same, itc., is recorded, andtbinkait might be ofgreat value as eviiUnee
if found. Itia desired that any oneknowing any thingof this book will
immediately give him, orothers interested, notice of thefact. There it
a large and respectable connection of this branch; but I__haTe not
their lineage traced,
13. David J. LarDi Troy, Indiana, traces for Edmund Jennings, of
thatplace, whose grand father came to Virginia about 17W, where ha
died. No particular tracing given.
14. WituA.* C. ThiMIKOx, of Adams, Jefcraoncounty, New York,
traces from Ephraim Jenninga, abotit eighty years of a^; says three
brothers of his grand father, Ephraim, came to^America indefinite, but
may be a clue.
15. Da. A. Hawlet, of Jefferson, Ohio, traces for Nathan Jenninge,
of Geneva, Ohio, seventy-three years of age; says that, Thoaaa
Jennings Isndcd st Boston in 170S: married Svth Bishop at MsmftelA
Cmineeticut. in 1711. He had tluto sona, Thomas, Ephraim, and
Nathan. Theiastnsmed* NatbantlivedanddiedlaWilmingtoa, about
1B08. Hisyoongestaon, Nathan, remained there until aboot thirty-fire
years old. and then removedl to Genera, Ohio, where he atlH Urea.
Tbomaa, the first son of the third, had six children, fire sons and ono
daughterher name not recollectedWho married a Turner. Theseas'
names were Daniel, Bcnjamtn, Jeremiah, David and Nathan. These
last named left chil^nnames not giren. Still the intimation may
be a clue for others.
16. B. G. Hexiox, of Zaneaville, Ohio, traeei* thrpugh Geo^,
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JetuiiD^f. (ciguTy-i.\ years old.) his v.-ije's fainrr, to Georjro- liis father,
of (/ruUbSeld, Englond, who had two brotiicrB there, Thomas and
WiBiam.
17. James W. Jknxincs, of Mount Pleasant, Tennessee, traces
through his father, Richard, to his {;rand father, Robert, who (had two
brotbcrSf Cain and William,) lived and'dicd in Prince Edward county,
Virginia-
18. N. O. Ross, of Peru, la., represents Lewis Jennings, near that
place, whose father wa.s Augustine Jennings, of Frederick countv,
Virginia, who had two brothers. Jt:hn ami Edward, who removed to Ten
nessee. Said Lewif had a liall-brotlicr, Nathan, of whom he has not
heard for many years.
19. John M. Long.stbetcji, of Burlington, Indiana, represents the
family of Amns Jennines. who was tin- son of Aiignsline. who w.if the
sonol William Augustine, of Virginia. - _ .
20. B- Have.vs, of New York eity, is a great gr.nnd son of Samuel
Jennings-not definitely traced.
21. K. 31. JE5M.VGS, of 31arictta, Oliio. son of Junia Jennings, has
not reported, hut appears sanguine, that his family will trace to
achantage. '
23. William H. JEEXiNcti, of St- Louis, Slissouri, states that his
grand father, Augustine, diedin Gulp, ppcr, Virginia, about 1778cr 1779;
but has not reported hi^family history. Yet entertains hut liltledetibt of.
his favorable title, witJi otherstracing.
23. CATitAEiXE . PiEECE, 23 Dodford street. Boston, is a descendant
of Samuel Jennings, \ybo, witii his brother Isaac, settled in Sandwich,
Massachusetts. Said Isaac was once in business with Williasn Jen
nings, of London, who was a very wealthy bachelor and cousin, and it"
wasthoughtthathlRpropcrty would fall to these relatives.
94..R0BEST Caelaxd JE.X.XIX1.S, of Halifax county, Virginia, traces
through his father. Cirments A., and grand father Robert G., wbo died
in Charlotte .ronntv. Virfripia. . His uni-leiu,. '-.'hn B fihy^ i" 3f:*s
Sarah S. Hoslc,)and Robert G., died in Charleston. SouthT^j^ina.
25. Eli Parsoxs, of South- Egruinont, Ma.ssachtisctts, representa
partiestracing buck to threebrotlicrs, John, JoshuaandSamuelJeBoings,
emigrants from England to Americabut not very definite.
26. David Jr..xxnrGs, of 3Ia9onto'D Pennsylvania, states' that his
Cither, Henry, was the son of Zebulon, who was the only child of Zebu-
Ion and Sarah Jennings, of Essex county. New Jersey, who is believed
to have been the sonof John, who made a will in 1718, Morris county,
New Jersey, where Benjamin, his son. liv^d and diedwhose brothers
wereJacoband Zebulon. Tiie latter (Zobulon) left a will, dated 1776,
his father a witness; who, also, left a will dated 1777leaving his pro
perty to his second wife, during her life-time, and then to his three sons, '
Henry, Jonathan, and Jacob Jennings. These intimations may bcuscfal
to many.
27. Hellexa V. Jexxixcs, of Frcdericksburg, Virginia, traces her
family to her grand father, John. who. she believes, was from England,
lie had several sons, viz; Presley, Elijah. Daniel L., William and Juhn.
The latter settled in Spotuylvanin. Virginia, who was her father. She
remembers to have beard him speak of receiving letters from his rich
relatives in England, anddesiring to visit them, expected to be greatly
benefited by them, &,c.
28. JoRX Batless Jexxixcs, of Fredonia, Kentucky, states that his
great grandfather came from England to Americaabout 1740not posi
tive as to his name, but thinks It was Edward or Augustuswho left four
fions, Edward, Augustus. John and James. John, i-t.o grand father, was
born in Virginia, was in the revolutionary war, nl'terwards moved to South
Carolina, thence to Tennessee, last settled in Kenlurky in 180U, where
he died in 1831, leaving twelve ehildrcD, his father, John, beinironcof
ti-.c-m. n}v. ai:out "ixty-.-ieven yrr:old. hving in ('aid*.NeU cwuii?y. K'-n-
litrky; onii wus l>orn ill Virgiiiin, 17e2uli'> an> nuim-ruu>iy coiuie^ed,
and triirruiilc. ' . - - ' '
2!h William Kelley, of Newport, Tennessee, states: He inarricil.-
Phebo. (nowseventy-three yeurs old.) daughter of Williaiii Jeiiiiings, of
Buckingham county, Virgiulii, who was partly niised in HiUiover, iiiurrieil
a 3Iiss Alien, had lour sous, John. Robert, and William. Her fa
ther, William, hadlour daughters ami one wui. Agnes, Fiiiuiv, Nancr,
Rhmla. Piiehc and Siiinuvl. Plielic. uiy wife, rceollccis to have heard,
licr griind lather, William, she thinks, call liis grand father Ilunndircv
Jennings. Hi-rgnuid father. Wiiliain. it is tuiiil, rniuu from KiiglanJ."
Robert had nine sons. Allen. Jolir, Williaui, Cuin, Clriii. David, Sam
uel. Richard and Doctor, all ol'wiioin, ssivi- .Allen, moved west and sunth-
wi'st with their tiiinilies. Wllliini,. oy wife's father, li-d in l.suu. He
had a cousin. 3Toody Ji-nnings, living in Ilutiovcr county, Virginia, who
was very weultliy, and had no children.
30. J. D. W. Jnxxjsu.s, of iHayslirk, Kentucky, says: Iwjwhornm
New Jersey, as was also my father. 31y grand father and great grand
father were born on the cast end of Lung I.<land. A nunibbr of the
family in roniieclicut trace tlieir tleseem Ifoin Jushnn JcnniiU'S, who
(lied in 1766. He was1%'"!'^^ 'll 'luinphrcy's father, whoso
name waa John. x4o!x094
81. Eluaii C. Jexxixos, oI' St.iie.siillc, Tonncssoc,says: My father,
William, wo-sson of Robert, of .Marylaiul, from whence tln-yremovedto
Virginia and North Candina. andllience tn Kentucky, tiiencc to Ten
nessee. Some of the connection are still living in VirginiH and Ken
tucky, andare believed to bedoscciiduuts of Williatu Jeiiiuiigs' family,
of England: and traceable.
32. David H. Clauk, of rittsylvariiu, Virginia, stales that William
Jennings, Ibruierly of Hanover, married 3Iary Pulli:im: nnntv(Hl to
Amelia, nowNuttaway cuimty, Virginia hadlive-Konsntidtiveduughtcrs,
of the daii^juters. married John Fowlktv. whose d.iughttT, Sally, iimrrMtl
thelate Col. John Clark, of JVIuce Edward; who was grand father of
Mrs. Martha M. Clark, wIki wasdaiiglitcr ofLiUlcberrr Clark, decU.&c.
Mrs. Elizabetli C. Clark is Uic only child of Jennings Fowlkfs, who was
. son of John Fowtkeswlw was the mm of Uic before named John
and Sally Jennings. Her aistcrs, Mrs. Imcinila M. Ricliardsuo,
Ann E. Jcflrcos, and tlir heirs of Agnes Pinick, dec'd, Mary
Jennings married Samuel Thom|>soii, wIkisu licirs live in this county.
Betsey married G. Walton- Nary married Juwepli Fowlkcs; their heirs
live in Prince Edward and Nottaway. And the remaining duughUtr,
Agnes Jennings, married a Dickcrson, andmoved to llulstou. Charles,
it is said, one of the FuppoH-d sons.of Itumphri^*, lived in Elizabeth
city; and his heirs claimthe hcir^^hip, drc. '
33. Theodore Jex-tixcs, Galei^burg, Illinois, soyshe is sonof Tlioia-
MS J., whowas son of Thomas Jennings, who dietl' in lANiisa
Virginiahas many coiisiiisscattered uvi-r the United Stuteu.
34. F. M. Jexxixcs, of Augusta, Georgia, says liiii grand fuiber,
Bciij^imln. c.-me Jrinn Somersel.hire. Kti'/lnnd. whenuliout twentv-onc
(H twenty-two years old, and setthtl in ('hnrlestown, Mussachusetts, in
1735; married in this country. His wiK died niter him. in 18|7. Ho
(Benjamin) bad a sister Elizahrtliin Kiigiaad. who married aMr. Edgar.
His grand motheroften received money from England. He knew not
from whumi and always said tohis childn'ti that mmuu of them would get
property some day Iruto England: but km-w ii'ii 1mw it was expected.
35. Frederick ArovsrixE Jcxkixcs, of 3!i)eshnrg, Pennsylvonia
was the sou ofRirhunl. who was the son of JefTn-y Jennings, iliis jui.
rent branch, it wouldseem, seuled in Ireland uliout tlie tini(> Willjim
Prince of Orange, conquered Ireland, as pertndititm; wliirhis suxuined
cuaoty.
-Ml
l>y p4ri of tbis urancii iivin}; Uicr^*. \\iiu caii f'-r a p2r:;rioaiionin
thi# iiivosiijfaiion; which of right may beproperJy regarded ly the
American ciaimanta._. _
36. Rer. R. Troixcs, Clorerport, Kentucky, represent* Mr*. Sarah
E. Jennings and her daughter Drucilla, not 6ho\ving their connection
with others. - -
3". J. JE.tstrrcs, of Hardinsburg," Kentucky, says his grand father,
James Jennings, he thinks, came from Englanddoes not trace hi*
lineage. . "
'33. Gabriel W. Jes^iscs, of Princeton. Kentucky, supposes he can
trace to William or Augustine, as his father's namewas William Augus
tine Jennings, and from Virginia,
3D. Harriet T. Williams, of Chilicothe, Ohio, claims to he a de
scendant of William or Augustine of Virginia. Not traced.
- 40. George William Jekrincs, of Great yarmouth, Norfolk, Eng
land, whose father died 5lh October. 1"798, aged si.xty years, (no name or
place given.) had a brother settled at .Anapolis, Slaiyland; had a son
Thomas, who. he thinks, was Attorney General. He (G. W. J.) ha*
been to the West Indies a long time; is nowabout seventy years old; ha*
notlieard of his relations fur fifty years; desire? the favorable considera
tion of parties investigating this claim, as he believes he is an heir.
41. Arot'STixE JEXxixGsdied 1T78, in Fauquier; who was the on of
William, of Richmond. Virginia; died 1733. Said Augustine married
Hannah, daughter of James Williams. Their- sons and daughters were
fifteen in number, viz:
1st. William: 2d. Au^stine; 3d. Elizabeth; 4th. Benjamin;5th. Bay
lor; 6th. Hannahi 7th. Lewis; 8th. George; 9tb. Jemima; 10th. Nancy;
llth. Frances or Fanny: 13th. Chloe; 13th. Mary; 14th. John; J5th.
rah Edrington, orEdington,
The 1st son, William, married Betsey, daughter of James Wither*. -
fid. Augustine married Pollyor Mary, daughter of Thomas Oxford. 3d.
iciaci VA. ^crpeN'm ,
of John Duff. &ih. Baylor married Susan, daughter of Alexander Brad-
fiwd. 6th. Hannah married Joseph Duncan. 7th. Lewb mOTed lacy,
daughter of Alexander Bradford. 8th. George died without issue, hth;
Jemima married John Hudnall. lOtb. Nancy married Kane Withe^
11th. Frances orPonnT. married Thomas Obanyan. 12th. Chloe married
James Witben. 13th. Mar}' died without issue. 14th. John, no iseue.
I5th. Sarah E. married Peter Lucas.
The families descending from Augustine, of Pauquier, 1778, are now.
widely scattered, and numerously aswell as farorably connected, com
prising several prominent and distinguished families not mentioned.
InclostBg up these brief, and, for the most part, very imperfect and
limited sketches oftheseveral family tables oflineage, I must regret the
great hurry inwhich necessity has compelled me tothrow them toge^er;
and moft, that time and space forbid an enlargement thereonentirely
leaving many, perhaps equally interested, out: as well as embracing
omc who moy not beinterested. But, as observed in theoutset, thb
may onlyserve s* a prelude. Time and further developmenis may reme
dyanyerrors, hereoccurring, as necessity, in pursuing this investigt-
tioB, may require. I cannot but hope, therefore, that this although
limited brief, may prove aceept^le and useful to many in theirfutW
tracings; would remark, the magnitude of the claim, the jostnees of
the cause, the opening and increasing developments before us, being
brought to lightsince commencing this investigationall conspire to
renew and encourage hopes of suceeM, toall oculy^nterestcdby propcr
uaited effort. **
As to the information late from London, Dublin, dtc., it is deemed
UBDCcesaaiy to bevery particular in detail. But, for the satisfaction of
nil imtreeted, it may be pn^ to eUte oar inCwmation from London np
mmm
lo the I?ih January, IsiO. is, thai bclh liic frcrhiiid ar.d perfcrai c"ia>c
of the late intestate William Jennings, of 1798, is still held subject lo .
tothe-proper legal heir and neatof kin; not, however, inthe hands ot'thc
British government, but in the possessionend enjoyment of certain parties.
But, fortunately forthe claimants, these parties are of undoubted wealth.
Seme of them have instituted suit for this property, but the effectual
progress of their suit was stayed on account of difficulties occurring in
their way. We ire not informed as to the nature of those difficulties,
but naturally infer they may be the expectation of other legal heirs.
For the descendant*of Humphrey, William's grand father, are presumed.
to be numeroua. - - '
This letter-writer desires that his name be not published; but says be'
wouldbe most happy to . co-operate with the parties investigating their
claims in America. The writer further says, in answer to my inquiry, .
Your schedule of property is correct a* set forth in your circular,
which was taken from the obituary, published in the Gentleman's
Magazine, in London, 1798.
A letter-writer of Dublin, (of date November or December, 1849,)
Baysit is seen in England from the newspapers, what is on foot in Amer
ica; and there seems to be a tenacity on their part, for that they may
dislike to let go such an amount, and particularly as it may have to be
bandedoverlo Americana. He says, further, that a certain dignitary in
England, is nowtenant of the Acton Hall p.'operty, part of the estate of
William, at 10,000 per annum. He also says,-that the butler and
hoose-keeperof the intestate VVilliam, are still living.
Another writer, living not far remote from London, says be fears tbe
daimaots maynot be able to es^Ush their title, * imfmrtantdocument*
koowntohave existed, cannot now be found, fitc. - -
There is nmcb saidin relation to the eondnet of persons occupying
' high poeitinns in England, (jf so) to have a beoring prejoHieial to claim
ants ^ the-estate in questirn.' Of ibese things I need not spesk, as I
know not OB what grotinds suchstatement*are mode. Bat oiustbope, in
iMnorot 4amiftipo*(ttoostfitMecnsmtersoceupy, tbtt eitittehibUiMV'''
Uona, oMt ft saydMtaroiiaas, tr groundless. These parties soalluded
to, I mderatond tbe cae, ore interested efib with the American
claimants. Therefore, it is coaeidered betterpolicy, in deference tooil
concerned, not tousenames or etstements a*given in those letters, here;
as tb^ will becarried up to tbe convention, there to be subject to the
inspectlMi of a cominittee to be seipcted, having cognitonce of such
mattm; which oourse, no doaU, will be cotsidered more pndont and
atisCietmy in tbe end.
Finally: astosuggestions on theplan of pursuing this investigation,
that, now, would only bea reiteration of on opinion expressed to many
in letters; that Is, that all feeling interested should uniteonsome most
.feasible plan of canytng out the inTestigatiouh(for thesimple reason
that aoisoloted or individual tffort bss, or is likely to tehiereany good.
Such experimenti in this cose have b^ already made.) To this end,
and for ^a purpose, each and every one feeling such interest and deter
mined toezooHae into his or her rights, if not convenient to attendthe
next (and perhaps last) convention, would do well to authorise some ona
goingto that eonvestiotf to act himor her there, a* fully in every
rtapsct OS be or she could or would havea right to do were they per
sonally present. By adopting this plan, in most instances the most
active and energetic, and those bestacquainted withthe history of this
case,will be meet likelyto appear at that convention sod to settle upon
the most feasible plan, not only of operation bet co-operotiaa. Abo, by
this plan much maybe eaved of travelling expenseo, [which maybe
hereafter needed for not ieai important purpoeee}. It ne^ not he neces
sary to say that each one so claiming representation, by hie- or her
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THE JENNIHG3 OF HADDONFIEU)
JAMES R. JENNINGS
cy
"Tis fin ungratoful goneratlon that
neglects the memorj' of Its fathers."
Anon
For
"The roots of the present llo deep
In the past; and nothing in the past
is dead to the man vho would learn
how tho present camo to bo what It is."
Prof. W. Stubbs
Hioonix, Arizona
May, 1967
m
i
1133872
acknowledgments
The material in this book could
been assembled except for the interest and
assistance so generously given by so many
"semrh people. To name everyone would
leave us no place to stop.
To all a sincere appreciation
Jamos 1^. JonnlnKn
Kaul \ i'ri vtt
HmmuiUi Arl
U-
i--"'
I

-M
l-i.
'mr
i'-
THE JENN1N}3 OP HADDONFIELD
Who vae my family? Where did they como from? What did they do?
vere they like?
What
The compilation of this report is a rooult of such Questions by mombors
of the immediate family. No claim is made for the completeness nor the
accuracy of tho contents. An ettompthns boon nrado to rcooarch records
and documents that have boon conveniently available. Quotationc from
various sources include books, nanuscripts, historical and genealogical
society records and files, and other media useful in an effort to trace
and record the history of the Jennings family, going back to the twolveth
and thirteenth centuries. Much of tho material submitted here is pre
sented as received from the various sourcoo, as stated above. If there
are spoiling and typing or printing mistalcos in tho manuscripts or quotas
they will carry on into the book. There is no pretense that the work is
professional.
But the tracing of family lineage is only a port. The irest intriguing
interest seems to be the character, habits, customs, social and moral
attitudes, occupations, and financial ingenuity, or lack of it, among
those fton whom wo are in doocont. To gain an insight into tholr acti
vities and lives Is the purpose and motivating force In this undertalcing.
Why, and in what way is it possible to trace a family history back
several hundred years? A number of things make this possible with a
measure of accuracy. Many of the laws of our country ond customs of our
peoplo have been greatly influenced by our English heritage. This seems
to hold true in the matter of family records and genealogy.
THE ANCIENT PARISH REGISTERS OF EfGUND AND WALES BY ARTHUR M, BURKE,
gives an insight into the keeping of records of births, deaths and
marrlageo. While not complete the records offer valuable assistance in
historical research. Because many irroplacoablo records were carelessly
kept, lost, burned, stolen, or even auctioned off, in 153? Henry tho VIII
appointed Lord Cromwell Vlcar-Oenerol, Cromwell reouirod every Parish in
England and Wales to keep a book and coffer, with two locks, and required
the parson of each Parish to enter records each Sunday in the presence of
church wardens.
In 15U7 (Edward VI) an injunction directed that fines for failure to keep
records go to tho poor-box of the I^rioh, And In 1559 (I Elizabeth) it
was enjoined tbat fines be divided equally between tho poor-box and tho
church repair fund.
In 1563 Parliament Intervened to require an office of "registership", but
tho move was defeated with help of the Clergy, A mandate ms issued in
tho first year of the reign of James Ist, providing that every parish
"Church and Chapel" In the Relm be provided one Parchment Book in charge
of the Parish. All entries were eventually taxed for revenue purposes.
Another answer to the WHY AND HOW question is tho inherent interest or
instinct found in some individuals, groups and organizations to research
thl Tonnln r C1 villmtlon, OF tllQ Orlpln of
vlolt tlio ^nnflvl liitorootlng exp^ijrience, for ornTTiplo, to
ra?tL ^^.nd Historical Society In nillndolrhia. n,o oobjoct
1 f ^^'0 tliousnnda of poop]9 viio come
Sy"? torrccuirbrr^ "r'
dlJ^cLrr a7?? found covering every Sir ffano In the telephone
hietorLTi ?ntLt!' locatione and numerous other items of
oeaboard appears to be favored with imany historical socle ties
tions 3uch'^ districts!"""'" """" P0Pl<' and loca- '
Kt^^rsov^S^an (donnings) has been found available in
aeUleS! "d'dd vest and
toe of the foremost contributing factors to tho availabiHtv of Tooo4
riU - ItrSriy"^"
JoX^Sed ritb"S
In Amorlca, and perhaps other countries, the Fanilv Riblo nrimtv,/^
and usually reliable source of lineage. FbriirroL^d boohs ^ro T!!o
fanur3:rt"e!'' agreement'on '
t!rianr"''?^o ly= hold true with roaoarchers, and his-
momho f jarlsnco is sometinoa quite confusing and disconcertinp
toe mombor of the Jennings family hao been nnsigned to three different
bach oo different historians. Tho researching of a family
nv 'r\hundrod years is a tremendous undortalring, fraught with
!uoL It ti,a'"Ht probably a tomptation for a researcher to
nroh^M conclusions may or may not bo oorroct. Tliis is
probably true when a complicated inheritance is Involved.
quotations from a number of books, manu-
scriris Md historical sketches will follow. Several versions ori e
at" nIt"! a including time and place of origin
Also liriod will bo tho earliest available records of those bcorlL the
riWrod"'" 1^ the roaderuulril'be
It'fft 1+ pronontod hero, not to oonfuso, but to point to the
PPddqnhqPOd by historians In finding occurato data. IJhich
If tilth" "Svl ^Odr elements of truth, Hosravcr, they do provide interesting speculation.
AHERICAN FAfffLT ANTIQUITY. WELLS
Pennsylvania Historical Society, F
Among the ancient families of Great Britain, the Jennings Fbmily shows a
*i ' .* '
:-*s5
remarkablo uniformity for a period of oevoral centuries. The first
historical account shovs then to have settled in Torkshire. Their
choroctor indlcat-eo that they tjorc of the Sa^con race, end settled prior
to tho Itoman Conquest. It is a family of peace and plenty, with no am
bition for glory of civil or othor kind of wars. Hjcy were Induntrious
and thriving agriculturalisto and mannfncturera. \^lle some families
sought powor and wealth as powerful warriors, and became the nobility of
England, the Jennings wero satisfied with dignity and nobility that at
tains to tho loyal, God fearing; wore religious but not fanatic, honest
and upright from principle.
There wore no English Titles in this family, but there wore instances of
female marriages into nobility.
This work by Wells, Vol. Ill, leads us through prominent members of the
family In ^gland from I6OO to 1875> and in Amorlca, It covers the family
In Connectlcutt from l6U^ to I88O. Jfost of tho report Is of a gonoalo-
glcal nature but Is Interspersed with comraont that tho family was one of
considerable prominence. (Notes by this compiler indicate that another
volume covers the family in New Jersey, but he has been unable to locate
it). The name has been found throughout English histories.
The Name and Family of Jennings
Compiled From
The Media Research Bureau
Washington, D. C.
The Name and Family of Jennings
The surname of Jennings is said to have been derived from tho Celtic
name MacEonln, mac meaning "son" and Eonln meaning "young Ownor John".
Tho name Is found in ancient British and oarly Anerlcan records in the
various spellings of Jennens, Jennins, Jonness, Jennlss, Jonnyng,
Jonnyno, Jennlng, Jenyngos and Jennings, of which tho last is tho form
most generally used in America today.
The family of Jennings, which is of ancient Welsh origin, was seated ot
an early date in Carnarvonshire, Wales. It later spread to Ireland and
to the Counties of Bedford, Chester, Shrops, Devon, York, lUddlosox,
Bucko, Whrwlck, Somerset, Surrey, Stafford, Hants, London and Suffolk.
It appears that tho farnlly were, for the most part, of the landed gen
try and yeomanry of Great Britain.
One Jennings of the Yorkshire branch of the family was lord Mayor of
London in 1^08, but the records of his descendants have not been found.
Of the Warwickshire branch, one John Jennens or Jonnins was succeeded in
the year 1575 by his eldest son William, who had issue by his wife, Joan
Elliott, of nine children. Their son John married twice and had, anrong
g;ri
Robert, "*^611013 and I*d.lHfl}n tv' Eliy-oboth, John, Ann, Enfcher
-rica .e ear.,
lHuatrlous llno3''of"the^Lldli^"o^eat^n "y
the name to America were descended the early emigrants of
Of them derive ft. acomm:n"are1^or\J\~L'trL'd!'^''
from the Count^of Zf/oll', EnglSr\fHa^rtf"'^ c" """ oo-'ie
X^lToTo^tht^-- ^r^helar^a Lr^amlS Jo^h^^;
aa ear^. as 1635, and at
and aeveral other children vhose ^mes a^e n!!t certain!"'''""
lloved!fN!o"bLn'^h^b!othero"Nlchrt^ I639. He Is be-
5:.^r.!.&rSa'^aV^^ha':n:hr:^ 3':ma\i!'--- ^
possibly ab^other^of NlcholarandJoh"'S'"'
Hary William, by whom he had Issue of Jo,-lf '""'"led In 161i7 to
Samuel, ihtthew, Isaac, Hary anrEufabath 'w "t<=tael, John,
at Falrfield, Conn., where he dlofab^'t'^fire
r6?l"!'V'~?ed"a 'r --time before
Hannah, He.eUah, !o^\^^Eltrth^7i:hl'L\[:tj 'nlcL^d?'
lnghamshlro!"Lgld^ and7hortly7ft0r'eml'^'^'^7d
chlldron wore 'llllara, Sarah Ann ^ w "^s
them made their homoa at '^'llade"l7hS!'"""'"' of
Heynolds, whom he marbled In l^f h!
-Richard and Elinor. ' ohlldren.- Samuel,
SeL?,C.''ry"we'riSrpa7:r7j''? 7."^""^" -t Hat.
Sarah, Benjamin, John, Jonathan, and L^ozer!'^'
his'rtfor^brgarot^SasL'^l* to Salora in 1677 with
H>lladelphla, and their chlldr:n, w7^7a"hfres^de'dllJ'Ho^w^rra^v
m
ij;
m
Stephen, Hannah, Martha and Sarah.
Othora of the name who omlgratod In the seventoontli century to Amorlca,
but left few records of themselvoa and tholr fanilloa, voro William of
Charlestown in I63O; Richard of Ipsvdch In I636; Samel and Ihonias of
Portsmouth, R. I. in 16??; and Jonathan of Norwich in I6OI1.
Thero is a family tradition to the offoot that sovon brothers came to
America about the beginning of tho eightoenth century and settled for the
moot part in Wow Jersey. These brothers are bollovod to havo boon Joseph,
Zabulon, Jacob, Benjamin, Jonathnn, John, and David. Records of tho
last three, however, are not available.
Joooph, first of the brothers, was tiio father of at loast two sons,
Isaac and Jonathan, and probably of others, although no further records
have been found. Their homo was at Elizabethtown.
Zabulon, second of the brothers, had issue by his first wife, Sarnh, of
a son Zebulon. There were no children by his later marriage to Rebecca
Squire.
Jacob, perhaps third of tho brothers (according to tho beliof of some
historians he was the doscondant of an oldor Now Fhgland branch) vns
the father by a wife, whoso namo is not know, of Jacob, Ann, and several
others.
Benjamin, fourth of the brothers, married Ilary Springer and hod issue by
her of Jacob, Ruth, Itennis and Abigail. By his second wifo. Miry Hosrer,
he was tho father of Benjamin, Hannah and Jeremiah, He had a third wifo,
Mary Tucker, but no further issue.
Tho William Jennings before mentioned, of the WorvTickshlro, England,
branch of tho family, came to Virginia about tho beginning of the eigh-
toonth contury. He married Mary Pulllam and had issue by hor of John,
William, Robert, Joseph, Elizabeth, Sarah, Agnes, Mary and Ann.
The descendants of these and other branches of the family in America
have spread to practically every State of the Union, and havo aided as
much in tho growth of the country as their ancestors did in its found
ing, Thoy havo boon noted for their ploty, industry, energy, ambition,
courage, moral and physical strength, amiability, power of will, and re
sourcefulness. Ifembers of the family have won especial prominence in tho
fields of science, education and business.
Among those of the name who fought as officers in the War of the Revolu
tion, wore Surgoion Hlchaol, of Pennsylvania; Lieutenant Simoon, of
Rhode Island; and Lieutenant William of Rhode Island.
John, Samuel, Richard, Stophon, Jonathan, William, Joseph, Thomas, Jacob
and Henry are some of the Christian names most highly favored by the
family for its mala progeny.
A few of the many members of the family who have distinguished themselves
in Amarica In more recent times are the following; ^
Charloa Godwin Jennings (b, 185?) of Now York, physician.
David Jonnings (b, 1882) of South Carolina, morchant and business
OXQCUtivO.
Herbert Sponcer Jennings (b. 1868) of Illinois, naturalist, educa
tor and author,
louis John Jennings (I836-I893) of London and New York, author,
journalist and politician.
Otto Emory Jonnings (b. 1877) of Ohio, botanist, educator and author,
Porcy Hall Jennings (b. I88I) of Now York, glass manufacturer and
business executive.
Stephen Richard Jennings (b. 187?) of Virginia, coal operator.
Walter Jonnings (b, 18?8) of California, business executive and
capitalist.
Walter Mlson Jennings (b, I887) of Illinois, economist, educator
and author,
William Beatty Jennings (b. 18?9) of South Carolina, Presbyterian
clergyman and author.
Probably the boat knoi^ of the many coats of arms of the Jonnings family
is that described as follows:(Burke, Encyclopedia of Heraldry, iSliU)
Arms: "ATiuro, a chevron or, between three berants of the same, on a
chief ermine, three cinque-foils gules."
Crest: "A jay proper" or "A redbreast sitting on a wreathed morion" or
"A griffin passant gules, holding a buckle or,"
BXELIOGRAHTf
Gentry. Family Nomas. I89?
Burke. Eiicyclopedia of Heraldry. iBhh
Savage. Genealogical Dictionary of Now England, i860
Heitman. Officers of the Continental Aru^y, 191li
W, H. Jonnii^s. Jonnings Family 1899
The Americana 193h
Jonnings Association. I863
Jennings Family Convention. 18?0
SHITH AND CURTS SEARCH
John Jonnens, (sometimes spelled Jonnings) iron imingor of Birmingham-
County Warwick, England, son of William and Johann was baptized in 1579 -
married first to his cousin Itary In I606 - second to Jolce Weaman in
1622. His will proved by his son Humphrey, Executor, in the Prerogative
Court of the Archbishop of Canterbury, on the lOtb day of Ilarch, 1653,
leaving vast states as per copy of vdll in possession of American Heirs
in the aforesaid County of Warwick, the major port of which was ontailod
to the following named four children as tenants In common & and at their
deaths to the oldest male heir.
1st Humphrey, born 16?9, died 1689, his heir was his grandson V/illlam of
Acton, Suffolk, Ehgland. (Son of Robert). William of Acton died Juno
19, 1798 a bachelor & Intestate. No male heirs surviving in England.
The next heir in line, Humphreys, son Henry who had emigrated to America
in 1777.
?nd Joseph, bom I63I - malo Issue failing.
3rd Sarah, bom 163b, diod aliiglo.
bth Edward, bom 16140 - malo issue failing.
At tho death of Joseph, Sarah & Edward their rights in their father's
estate passed also to their nephew, viniara of Acton,
UBRART OF OONGRESS CS71 J?li? 191?
The Jennings family is traced back in English and Wolsh history to the
time of the Crusades. Military oipeditions undertaken by the
Christians of Europe in tho 11th, l?th and 13th conturios for tho re
covery of Holy Lands from the Mohammedans. John Jennings connandod
a division of the English krnjy under Ouoen Elizabeth, which about A. D,
1560, rendered aid to tho Protestants of Franco. (First coat of arms).
Tho family originated In Carnarvonshire, VJhlos, from whence it spread
ovor England following tho 11th century; thence lator to Ireland, France,
Germany and in due time, into the colonies in America.
JENNINGS
COPE COLLECTION (Oen'l Society of Penna.) C-0 b?, P. 131.
Newspaper Excerpt dated 6-I9-I878.
John Jennings b. 1^79; will datod ?-?5-l65l> had two sons,
Joseph Jennings
Humphrey Jennings
Humphrey Jennings married Margaret Millwood 1697, by whom he had 12
children, among thom Robert, the father of William Jennings of fcton,
England.
Joseph Jennings, son of John Jennings, by his first wife, >313 tho father
of V^lllam v^io was the father of Henry who came to this country in I666.
Samuel Jennings was grandson to Joseph Jennings, cousin to Henry Jennings
lAio came over in that year. Isaac Jennings, son of Joseph Jennings and
uncle to Henry and Sarauol, father of Margarot Jennings, came over botvoen
1666 and 1669 (paper says I606 and I609), William Jennings, the fathor
of Henry Jennings ^0 >Jas bom 7-?l-l6i42 and mrrlod Margaret Bussoe of
York City, Eng. I-I8-I666, came to this country on 2-9-1667. Henrj'
Jennings was 36 years old when he came to America and 63 years old wiien
he died.
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Copied from Rev, Caleb E, Smith's Notes
Wenhan, Mass. I939
MANUSCRIPT BOOK ENTITLED:
'K}ENEAU)GXCAL DESCENT IHROUGH THE FAMILIES OF
JENHIW3S, CHEW, SMITH AND LEONARD
in SOUTH JEW JERSEY : Arranged from data
collected by,
Rov, Caleb Edward Smith
Paxton, JTass.
1930
M3TE: On inner side of cover is a picture of
"Samuel Jennings." An oil portrait
by Francis Coates. 17?6-1770. Size
30Courtesy of the Newman Galleries.
Gov, of N.J. from Burlington, of Burlington
Co. N.J, (See bottom of Rage 9)
Samuel's Dau. Mercy Mar. John Stevenson in 1706, Their Dau. Anne
Mar. teniel Doughty; and their Dau. Mary Doughty, Mar. William Lovett
Smith (Exceprts from the narrative of Mary Smith, I67li to 1739,
1$
(TITI PAGE)
Ooneology
of
Jennings^ Cbew, Smith and Loonard famllleo
in
'K)ld Qoucester County," Now Jersey
by
Rev. Caleb Edward Smith
(came to Wenham, ?la3s., in 1932. The 1st of July.)
Paxton, Ilaosachusetts
1930.
(In 1837 and l6bU "Old Gloucostor" was divided into the present three
counties of ATUNTIC, GLOUCESTER, and CAIWEN: and after the division,
strange as it may seem, Gloucester Towiship found itself in CAHDEN COUNTY.
EXCERPTS.
FROM the Narrative of Hary Smith, l67ii-1739.
At the ago of four years, she came idth her parents Robert and
Ann rUflin from Notingham, England. In later life she wrote a narrative
of their oxporiencesshe married Daniel Smitli.
(See page 37)
"Sometircos after it came into their minds to remove to West Jorsoy, ny
parents wont into Hull, Eng., and bought provisions for tho voyagn, such
as flour, butter, cheese, & ect. Then took passage in tho good ship
"Shields" of Stockton. And after about sixteen weeks sailing, arrived
at Burlington, in I678, Thoy all landed and made such dwellings as
they could for the present time, some in caves and some in palisado
houses secured. The Indians were very numsrous, but vni-y civil, Thoy
brought venison and com to the, English, yitio never complained of their
conrso way of living, such as pounding com-moal ono day for tho ne^Jt#
And I never hoard ono say "I would I had nover como." It soemod no
other than the hand of God, so to send thorn to prepare a pXaco for tho
future generations. I wish that they who como nftor, may consider
these things, and not bo like tho children of Israel after thoy wore
settled in tho land of Canaan, forgetting the God of thoir fathers and
following their own vanities, for if they do, great will bo thoir fall,"
--In Watson's Annals of Riila
early editions.
THE JENNINGS FAIilLr
William Jennings of Birmingham, England married Johanna Elliot. Hioir
nine children wore all baptised in St. Ilartin's. But only two of their
children this story springs from. They wore John, the iron-monger (and
William the 2nd).
John Jennings, baptised Apr. 6th, 1?79> Lord of Tarsau, He had exten
sive iron-works at Birmingham, His home was tho manor of "Nether Vlhit-
acre." His first wife was his cousin, Mary Jennings, dau. of his Uncle
James. Sucling (?), their son Ambrose, born I6IO, had a son John of
St. Albans, whose son (page 2) - (Wm. L's ancestor, of Mass.) Richard,
t
' ..
, hod throe noted daughters:- Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough; Barbara
Jennings and Francos, Lady Homilton, Through the lattor's influence
?|i with Queen Caroline, the ports of France were opened so Lord Nelson
I./' , could obtain food for his starving Anry, Tiio second marriage of John,
ft the iron-monger, or iron manufacturer, was with Joyce Woamans in 1622,
four of their children are named in his Will (mndo in 16?1 and probated
'}> March 1-1653.) as "tenants in common" of his vast estate, which included
ift. "Nether Whitacre," and some 3U other proportios, mostly In Warwickshire,
in and around Birmingham. His Will further stated that "at the death
of the last of the four, Uie oldest male heir of either of them should
Inherit all." These four wore:- Humphrey, Sarali, Joseph and Edward.
No hoir vras left by cither (page 3) Joseph or Edvmrd. Sarah loft a son
and daughter (see page 5)> but the estate passed to Humphrey's son
Robert, then on to his con, V/illism L. Jennings of Acton, vdio was born
in 1701. (Ref.-top of P. 250 in big book on V/m. L. Jermings.) He re
mained unmarried, and died in June 29th 1798, leaving only an unsigned
Will to dispose of his estate, which has been the cause of great con
tention. Cosins on his mother's side claimed his personal effects
Lord Beauchamp, the silver, and Lady Andover, the jewels, - so the
story goes. But they didn't take the two strOMi-'-^cucos of cold cash,
several million strong, which tradition tells us wore safe in ths keep
ing of some good Bank in England. This alluring tale has caused many a
good American dollar to slip from the hands of its credulous cnmor into
/ the pockets of fraudulent agents vrtio from time to time arise proclaiming
, thoy have "just found the documents that will locate the lost fortuno."
; Like the "pot of gold at the rainbov/'s end" it never yet has been found.
But "hope springs eternal in the human breat," so the older genorations
nurse their burnt fingers and tell the younger generation "the fortune
j ; won't come in my day, but it may come in yours." And so the bubble
V : floats on.
f ^
'' Real estate is no bubble, it can always be found, so all of that (money?)
left by William of Acton, The Courts of England gave to ons of the Cur-
j zon familyLord Howe, as next hoir in lino. He was an adopted son of a
i illegitimate son, Penn Cur zon of Robert's brother Cliarlos Jonnings of
Oopsal Hall, The "Jennings Association" in Amorica in 1053 brought suit
in the English ODurts to regain the estates from the Lord Curzon of that
day, but the Americans lost the suit and small wonder it is that thoy
did, for they had gotten their genealogy so mixed and tangled as to
think Henry (page 5) Jennings, born l6U2 was the son of Humphrey (see
!'' page 2) born 1629. These dates of themselves would be enough to throw
[ . the case out of court without adding the weight of the Salem, N.J. re-
cords which says "Henry was the son of William and Ifary," evidently
William the second & brothers of John (page 1) who married Mary Itossen-
gor are the ones referred to. The "Jarndyce vs Jarndyco case" in
! "Bleak House" by Charles Dickens, is said to be based on the Jennings
case.
Coming nearer to the truth of the matter is the tradition backed by a
few records, that indicate Sarah Jennings (page 2) born I63U man'ied
her cousin Henry. She died of the plague in Juno 20th, 1665> leaving
two children Isaac and Sarah, Henry's second wife was Margaret Busse,
whom he married in London in I666. Henry and Margaret left ES^g. and
came to Salem, N.J., on the good ship "Kent" in 1677. While living in
17
London he worked as a tailor, and ho did the a.ins kind of i-rork in
Ihiladelphla, Pa., aftor corning to Amortca. IIo vms a mombor of the
Socioty of Frionds. Ho owned (sorro little of) land in Salom, N.J,,
Hilladolphia, Pa., and noar Haddonfiold (Barrlngton), N.J. Hig vrill
proved In 1706 loft property to Isaac Jonnings of london, vjhoro ho was
ducQted) and some llttlo remembranco to Isonc's little daughter
Margaret whom Honry called by the nicknamo of "my cousin,") Henry's
wife. Margaret's Will proved in 1710, montions Sarah and Isaac
Jennings as children of her husband, 2nd wife had no children,
Isaac Jennings came to Amorica after tho doath of liis father and
settled on or near tho land Henry had owned around Haddonfiold (Parring-
ton), but votod in Gloucester Tovmship, in tho latter years of his life.
All records of him show him to have been a man of fine education such
as vras only given in those days to the sons of wealth. Henry's circum-
stancos would hardly have afforded it. So it seems as oafo a guess to
say that Sarah Jennings young children wore carefully raiood by some
one of their mother's people, on the money from hor rights in her
father's estate (See page 2)-and that may have been why Isaac and his
sister did not come to Ainorican when Henry and Margaret camo. Tradi
tion has always been Insistent that Isaac was tho rightful Jennings
hoir through his mother's rightsj but bccauoe SaraH^s had
dls^^sbd hor Tolko, hor son was not parmittod to come into his ovm.
No iurthor records are lound of Isaac's daughter Margaret.} He died
in 1750.
In New Jorsoy, Isaac Jennings married Judith Harden Bates, a young
widow witli one daughter Rebecca, who married Richard Price. The
children of loaao & Judith were Jacob, John, Ellis, Sarah and Ann.
(Isaac Jennings's children bom in New Jersey wore tho following named
fivo:-
1, Sarah Jennings daughter of Isaac, married George Flannigan (Or
Flanningham) in 1736 and had children named:- Isaac, Patrick, Saimjcl,
Ann (She married Jaggard, Perce and Fisher.) William, Deborah, Eliza
beth, Priscllla and Sarali.
2, Ann Jennings, daughter of Isaac married John Chow 3rd, son of
Rlobard Oiow, Jr. (Soo page 28).
3, Deborah Jennings, daughter of Isaac, married Isaac Burrough and had
issue:- Isaac, Priscilla and Hannah.
li. Elizabeth Jennings, daughter of Isaac, married Aaron lipplnoott in
17l;6. Hor children were Samuel and Judith.
5. Jacob Jennings, son of Isaac, married first vrifo. Miry Smith in
1761. Hie descendants of this marriage are not knovm to tho writer.
Jacob Jennings second marriage In 1783 was to Ann Hoplrf.na, widow of
Ebenezor and daughter of Joaiah and Ann Albertson. The children of
the second roirriage wore:- Ifark, Joseph, James, Isaac and Job and Jacob,
John and Judith. The last two may have been of tho first marriage.
Mirk Jennings bom 1706 married Mary Fleetwood. Of their children the
naiBoa of only two are known to the writer.
1. Jacob Ifark Jennings mrrlod Qnma Slcklor of Slcklervllln.
2. Ibry Jane Jennings bom 1833 >ras roarriod in 1851 or 1652, to John
B. Sutton. Their son Joseph F. Sutton married Ann Elizabeth Kane (or
Cain). (Cain's mil)
18
'^k
There is a record (a letter from him, dated 1810, to friends back homo)
" showing tboro was a John Jonnlnga of Gloucester County, N.J,, who ro-
^ Indiana prior to 1810. He evidently belongs somewiioro In this
lyy line of the fanrLly.
/f"' Sarah Jennings, sister of Isaac (see page 6) somo claim, married John
' Chew 2nd, son of Richard the 1st (see page lU) (see oaicorpts),
' t
Samuel Jennings, first Governor of New Jersey (in l60l) came from England
and settled In Burlington Co., N.J, His daughter Ilorcy married John
Stevenson In 1706. Their daughter. Anno Stevenson married Daniol Doughty,
and thoir daughter ihry Doughty, married v;illlnm lovott Smith (soe page
37). Gov. Jennings' two other daughters Sarah end Anno, both married
Stevcnsons, all tln^o brothers, Sarah having first marrJ.ed Edward Penn-
Ington, a half-brother of William Ponn's wife. Gov. Jennings was por-
haps doocondod from anothor son of Ist William (see page 1) as may also
Thomas Joniiings of Burlington County have been.
Sarah Jennings, dau. of Charlos Jennings, Mar. Comolius Dabncy in
April 1721. He died in 176!^, & she died in 179U. Sarah (or Ghas.)
Gmlgrated from Eng., to Albomarlo Co., Va. Chas. vma the son of Robert,
who was the son of Sir Humphrey Jennings. (Sunttod (?) from a slip of
uery 126ii from Oroenvillo, So, Carolina) (Hlles Jennings)?
Mrs. Jano Pierce Jennings Wilson. P.O. Box h$6 Richmond Va.)
Miss lucy Jennings cam from Eng. to Hanover Co., Va. Inter she went to
Polk Co., Ga., and Ifer. Samuel Hutchings, She was bom in 1797.
Mrs. E>Tnrta Doughit Stephens was her grand-daughterj Address is: 13 Stone
wall St. Cartorsville, Ga.)
Sarah Jennings was the Dau. of Isaac Jennings and her Dau, Ann, iiir,
George Flannlgan & Mar. Michael Fisher, Jr.)
Henry Jennings was bom in Clemond-dean, England, July 21, 16!42. Ho
married a cousin, Sarah Jennings, at Essex, England, Jan, 18, 1660. She
was bom at Eougqc Birmingham, England, May 18, 163U. She died York
shire, England, May 18, 1665. (With the plague)
Henry Jennings marries (2 0 Margaret Busse daughter of Paul,
By his first wife Henry Jennings had Isaac Jennings, bora Yorkshire Eiig-
land 1662, and Sarah, Jennings, born Eng. 16614/5.
Henry died at Ihlladelphla, 1705/6.
Isaac Jennings mrried Doc, 19, 1709, Judith Mordon (Bates) at Gloucester,
bom 1668 and died at Haddonfield, N.J. 1752. Isaac died Oct. 28, 1758.
The foregoing found in the Norfolk Virginia library by Mrs. Caldwoll.
Heniy and Ifergarot bad but one child and it was still bom, March 8, 1668.
Tliey were married at the Parish of St. Bartholemie, london.
W
;/
<;i'
Simpson^ Gloucooter Co. Historical Society^ NJ.
It oosma quito gonorally agrQed that Henry Jonnlrga v-ns th? fmmdation
stoclc of the Haddonfleld Jennings. Ho wag the oon of V.'lllinm and Ihry
Jennings and waa bom in Clenond-deano, Surrey, Sigland, July 21, 16U2.
Honry and his \jq Margaret Busalo Jenninga, camo to America on tho
ship Kent, landing in Salem, N.J., 23rd, 6 mo. 1677- Tlicy loft from
their hone in Kingston, on Thames, London, bringing with thorn tholr
servant 'Tbrtha borlrat", in ono report, and in nnot-hor tbo name wag
Martlia Bagsett. Such a dlfforonce seems not unusual in tho reports or
records of the "l^Vionds Ilontbly Msetingo". Hand writing, spoiling and
phraseology in original records of monthly irootings indicates frequent
changos in the scribe or reporting aocret-ary. V/ithin a two year period
in tba Salom Monthly Ifeotlnga tho name Honry Jennings is spoiled in tho
following nanner: honorio Jemomoo, honorie Jamonos, Henry Jenyngs,
Henry Jenlngs, and finally Henry Jennings.
Tliore is also a conflict in the narao of tho Master of tlxi Kent, tho
ship bringing thorn to the Now World. Our grandfathor, Henry Jennings,
bom in Waynosvillo, Oblo, Aug. 6th 1812, vrritlng to the Sect, of tho
Jennings Association, April 17th, iB^O, states: 'T^o trace back from
our father Jarws Jennings, by a auccossion of wills and records, to
Henry Jennings, our parent stock, who carto from Qiglard to tho United
States. And we find on the Emigrants Register, tho time of landing,
tho vessel ho came on, and tho name of tho rAstor of -Wio veasol, & c.
He coma on tho ship Kent, Mooslow, mastorj landed l6 Juno, 1677." All
othor records and documonts so far seen, refor to 'Gregory Itistor". A
question arises. Was tho first or last nama used in the records?
Could tho name have been Gregory Ileoslow, or Marlow. Fhrthor research
seems nocossary.
William Henry Jennings, Columbus, Ohio, 1899
One of ttio most comprchonsivo reports on the Jennings family was pixb-
llshed by tho above author in Vol. II entitled: The History of tho
Jenninga iVmlly in England and America. The volumno contains approrl-
mateTy 600 pages and is found in many libraries across tbo land. Ro-
feronco to this book may bo abbreviated in tliis report with the desig
nation WHJ 1899.
In this volumno we find that Honry and his wife Margaret oimcd land in
many parts of Kew Jersey. Some was purchased in aioucQstor County and
considerable near Cohansoy (now Greenwich). In l60l Henry purchased
200 acres from John Adams. In 1682, 200 acres woro purchased from two
Indians. In 1695, Henry Jonnlnga of Mouth Rivor somo acroago of
the latter to John Bacon of Coaarea River. In 1687 Salom records at
Trehton Indicate that Honry bought ... acres from Roger Milton.
1703, Basses' Book, TTonton, P. Ill and U70 Ub. 0.3
Henry Jennings, tailor of Salom, bought land in Oloucostor July 6th and
Aug. 6th of John Hugg k wife.
tf-
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c
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v.;
20
Liber A, FoUo 33, Trenton
Jo""i"gs sold 69 acres to John Dorniis and oome to Vm, V/arthman in
3 brother Isaac was father of Margaret Jennings. In his
will Hemy refers to his niece ao "cozon".
Henry o will vras "proved, approved and aUowed" at Burlington, N.J. ani
we quote Surrogate Theodore Revell: "Know yeo that at Burlington, yo
twenty third day of April Anno Dom, 1706, the last will and testament of
Homy Jennings was proved, approved and allowed."
IVIIJ 99
^ rfergaret Bussio Jennings, was hurried
in Haddonfiold 5j\ 1758. "In 1715 Isaac bought land of John Hugg, or'^cu-
*1 Largarots estate, at head of Timber Greek. Ho also oimed land
soutJi of Haddonfiold near Pliiladolphla and Atlantic Railroad. His gon
Jacob, in 17oU, bought the farm at Harrington recently sold by Burr
Haines, near his fathers tract".
field Judith wore members of the Friends Ifeeting in Haddon-
NEs; JERSEf ARCHIVES 1st SERIES, 21, CALEHDER H.J. RECORD 16614-1703.
On Sept, lith, 1677, a warrant was sent to Samuel Hedge, Surveyor General,
pr a survey of ton acres in Township of Fow Salen for Henry Jenynr^s,
tailor, the return to be nade to Fenwlck Adams. On July 20th, 1685
Homy Jennings leased to Roger Milton a yoke of oxen for a poriod of
Wo years. On August lOth, I68I, Henry leased a pair of oxen to Roger
Milton for two years.
1601, 20th day, 6th mo,, a memorandum notes that Homy Jenni-ngs received
a quasi ^dian Deed for about 300 acres. Hie two Indians were a Shochanam
and on Etthimt making the sale. Ihe land was next to Jacob Ycungs on
Uttlo Crook. In the 1681-2 poriod Henry also purchased 200 acres of
1500 acres surveyed from a 2000 acre piece of land. On Oct. 28ili I696
a deed was issued from Henry to Abel Nicholson for 100 acres. Numsrous
other items of barter were noted but time did not permit their rocoi-dlng.
GENEAIXX3ICAL Society of Pennsylvania Vol. I, Records of Salom N.J.
Monthly Meetings, I676-I7UO.
The first lionthly ^feoting In Salem N.J. of Friends was In I676. (note
dot over I in I676, Henry first appeared in a Quaker meeting "the third
day of the fourth month I676."
"It was appointed by the mooting That Edirard Bradway &honerie Jcmemos
should speak to James Noavell and know his reason vAiio heo doth absent
from the meeting and return bis answer to the next monthly meeting".
It ^11 be noted that the spelling varies a great deal from moating to
meeting. It appears that a different person was appointed or volunteered
to be clerk of the monthly meeting. Hence the variety in spelling and
phraseology. One researcher comments that he has found the name Jennings
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to bo spelled eleven different vnyo, Tlie name has been known to bo
spelled six different ways in one deed.
3rd day of 5th Ho. I678 he Is referred to an Jcmenes. On tho 3rd day
of the 7th Mo. I678, he is referred to on committoe aasignmont as Henry
Jenings. On this day Honry and Ilathan Smart Vere ordered by meeting to
go to Robert Zainos to know whether he is willing to leave the differ
ence that is between Thomas Smith & Hoe to ye matting".
There are ma.ny notations of mGrabors giving monoy to help defray exponacs
and other matters and Henry often topped the list of givers with ten or
fifteen shillings.
On tho 2nd day of ye 6th Ito. I68O, "Richard Robinson &Henry Jonings are
ordered by yo mons mooting to make Inquiry of John Doon and bis wife to
know kan Justify to marrye their dagthor to unbeliever."
By 1683 in minutes of monthly meeting the name is spoiled Honry Jennings.
At this date it also appears that a permanent clerk has boon appointed
to koop tho records, "shall record the families of Friends and tlmt he
shall have three pence each head for recording the same."
1683 is the last dato of record that Henry served at tho Salem meetings.
To bo called on assignment a member must be capable and responsible.
Honry was called frequently.
mi EraiAKD HISTORICAL AMD OENEALOQICAL SOCIETY, BOSTON Fonwicks Colony
History and Genealogy, Shoruds, IO76.
Henry Jennings was a prominent member of Salem N.J. Monthly Meetings,
soon after its organization. Ho was tho son of V^illiam and Itary Jennings,
born 2l3t day 7th Kc. 16U2, County of Surrey, liigland. Tho ship Kent
landed them in Salem N.J. 23rd, 6th Ho. 1677-
In 1082, John Adorns, son-in-law of John FonHlck sold Honry Jennings 200
acres of land. Adams was a woavor by trade. Not having aiiy children
Henry devised moot of his estate to his uncle, Isaac Jennings of London
and to ffergaret, daughter of Isaac, his cousin.
For the benefit of posterity it may bo of interest to note that this
penchant for dealing in land and other barter appears to have pasced on
and inherited by some of tho fourth and fifth groat grand sons of Henry.
Smiths History of Now Jersey, Second Edition UNJ UUp, page 93 refers to
Henry Jennings and others laying out and dividing land in Burlington, N.J.
It is interesting to note that, even though Margaret had no children of
her own, Henry was sufficiently affluent to provide her with a maid.
HISTORY OF BURLIN3T0N CO. N.J. - EVERETT & PECK I863
Samuel Jennings emigrated from Coles Hill, Buckinghamshire, England and
located in Burlington in I680, "FTlonds" of Pennsylvania and West New
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howl'l ! / ^3 home for many yoare. Ho was a roconimondod minister
England. Soon after his arrival ho vas appointed Pro
prietary ^voraor of Now Jersey and gorvcd until I683 when ho was appointed
Ml Jersey, and subsequently reappointed,
serving until 1692, when ho moved to fhiladolpliia. Ho was greatlv ad-
Ai'"histor!l'^^^^'""t'^""nQ^ him on serious problems of the day.
^th both^anl!!rri Jennings was vortJiy of memmory and endowed with both spiritual and temporal wisdom". Ho did more than any of his
contem^rarios ^ organizing civil government in West New Jersey. Ho
had three daughters and no son.
WHJ '99. West New Jersey Parailiee. Vol. 2, P 336-1*1
Za *''^1 have been factors in forniing both civic
and ocoLaistio policies in America, and whose namas have found an honored
and permanent place in the history they themselves eagerly made"
Samuel and Henry, if they are related, are no closer than cousins. TI*o
E^ffl'nnd'" relationship other than that they both came from
nf u ttlad in West New Jersey at about the same time; both wore
and /e" w, America, were men of honor, integrity
and ability. (One historian finds them to be cousins".) Ed.
rvlT'naMn?^''n w ^^uel is not known by the author, though lie was bom in
Coleshill, Bucldnghamshire, England, and coming to America in I68O. He
learning, influence and prominence. In 1677 he was minister
London Monthly Meetings. He made two return trips to
^land, one to settle a "schism" among the "Friends" and the other to
appeal to Queen Anne to remove Lord Cornbury as Qovemor. Both were
successiul.
In 1609 he removed to Hiiladelphia and the next year wag annointPd
"RECEIVER GENERAL OF FENNSyLVANIA". During 1690-3 he was ^STICE OF
QUORUM AND JUDGE OF GOUNrT COURT". JUSTICE OF
Burlington Co. Historical Society Vol. 2
Samuel Jennings (Governor) and a friend were quietly enjoying their pipes
In his office when their attention was directed to William Ponn approach
ing. Knowing his aversion to tobacco they immediately put their pipes
X entered and became aware of the aroma, he pleasantly re-
imirkGd that he was glad that thoy had sufficient sense of propriety to
be ashamed of the practice. Quick witted Samuel retorted that they were
not ashamsd but wanted to avoid hurting a weak brother,
WHJ '99. Henry Jennings, Clemmonddoan Surrey, England
His name is especially to be noted bocauso he was a koy in the "ISAAC
Slam of establishing prooVof'dLcoTfrom Villlara of Acton" and the "great estate". The author states that his
soorcb, though incomplete, falls to find any dependable proof that Henry
though he proceeds with the assumption that they
a^ related. While he treats them as father and son ho also presents
of Haddonfield, on April and Augst of
1099, find nothing to connect them that would stand up in court.
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During 172U-27, Iscnc wns "Justice of the county of GXoucester". N.J,
IbQ 17U0, $th Ho. llth, Haddonfield Ibotings Record quote: "At ye re
quest Isaac Jennings, FR'DS consent that he may set In our meetings of
Busirfflss and that Ephraim Tonainson is to acquaint hlia herowith".
In his will Henry leaves the farm he bought from Thomas Graves, to Isaac
Jennings, and the house in which he lived to "my cousin Itargaret Jennings,
dau. of Isaac Jennings of London,
On Doc. 2, 1679, tho rviends Record notos that Henry, along with thirty
others, was appointed to view the homo of Edward Bradway to see if it was
suitable for a "Meeting House."
Since World V^ar Two, Vhrzan and Haguerito Bates, searched the original
Parish Records of St. Clement Dalnes England, From the Baptismal re
cords are noted four sons of vailiam and Itary Jennings. They were:
Henry Jennings, Bap. Sept. 29, 16U2.
Robert Jennings, Bap. 30 Oct. I61t2.
John Jennings, Bap. 5 Oct. I6h5.
Isaac Jennings, Bap. llj Aug. 16U7.
The rocordts of births, deaths and marriagos of numerous othor Jennings
are also of rocoixi but the relationship is not indicated. At the time of
this search the church had been bombed out but the records hod boon
rescued and moved to other quarters for safe keeping.
The Bates search covers many other parishes with dates as late as 182?.
The records of St. Nicholas I^rish, Desford, London, collected at County
Hall, Tfest Minister, are of special interest because of tho occupations
among tho Jennings. The time was in tho late seventeen and early eigb-
toen hundreds, Tbore was a ships captain, Copper Plato maker, a Rigger,
a Sapyor and many Sailmakers.
Excerpts, BISTORT OF NEW JERSET JOHN BARBER IflliU
John Fonwick came to America from Sigland in 167?, on the ship Griffith,
landing in a spot he named Salom, soon to become knoim as Wost New Jorsoy.
He iimnediatoly began forming what later was called FENl-JXCK*S COIONY. This
was tho first ship from Ehgland to Land in tho area. It was followed in
loss than two years by tho ship Kent, among whose passongors was Honry
Jennings, of London. The passengers on both ships wore, for the rrost part.
Friends or Quakers. Negotiations were soon undor wny for tho purchase
of largo tracts of land. By circumstance, William Penn, among others,
was appointed trustee to handle large land holdings.
Aconstitution or government was soon agreed upon by the colonists and
was entitled:
"THE CONCESSIONS AND AGREEMENTS OF THE PROPRIETORS, FREEHOLDERS kW IN
HABITANTS OF THE HIOVINCE OF WEST NEW JERSET".
There wore one hundred and forty five signers of the document, among
whom were William Penn and Henry Jennings.
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Large tracta of land were also purchased from tlio Indians, Ajnonp the
considerations were the folloKing:
"30 matchcoats, 20 guns, 30 kottlos, and one great one, 30 pair of hose,
20 fatbnm of duffelds, 30 petticoats, 30 narrow hoes, 30 bars of load,
15 small barrels of powder, 70 knives, 30 Indian ajcos, 70 conbs, 60 pair
scissors, 60 tinshaw looking glasses, 120 awlblades,
120 fish hooks, 2 grasps of red paint, 120 needles, 60 tobacco boxes,
120 pipes, 200 bells, 100 Jews-harps, and 6 anchors of rum",
Ihey did not have sufficient Indian goods to complete the purchase and
wore obliged to agree with the Indians not to settle on the land until -
the remain-was paid.
(A Job Jennings was a passenger on the ship Griffith. The compiler has
no other infornQtion about him.)
W.H.J. 99
Henry Jennings was a prominent member of the Salem Tfonthly meeting of
Friends soon after its organizaUon in 1666. Ho was the son of villiams
and rtiry Jennings, bora the 2l3t of the 7th month, I6J42, in the County
of Surrey, England. Henry and his wife Margaret embarked for America
in tba ship Kent, Captain, Gregory, and landed at New Salem N.J. 23rd
of the 6th month, 1677,
Xn 1682, John Adams, son-in-law of John Fenv/ick, sold Henry Jennings
200 acres of land. Henry likexiise purchased a considerable tract of
land in Cohansey precinct, it being near the tovm of Cohansoy, (Now
Greenwich), Honry and his wife renioved from Salem and located in the
City of Riiladolpbla, about the year 1700, and at that place ended their
days. He was a tailor by trade and followed it in that city. He died
in 1706, and made his will the year previous. Not having any children
be devised most of his estate to his uncle, Isaac Jennings, of London
and to the daughter of Isaac, Ifergarot Jennings, his cousin.
(Shrouds Histoiy of fbmd.ck Colony, P. 119.)
WHJ '99 cent. There are many people in West New Jersey who are said to
to be doscendod from Henry Jennings. This seems to hb to be probable,
and I shall therefore present such references to him as have appeared in
official and historical records, (How could he have descendants if he
had no children? See above,) (Ed,) The following I am told by a former
Secretary of the "Jennens Association", was certified to by Richard M,
Acton, Custodian of Records of Salem Hanthly Meeting, 8th Mo. lli, I878.
Henry Jonninga, son of Vittlliam and Mary, was born 7th Ho. 21, I6ii2, in
the Parish of Clemonddeane, in the County of Surrey, England, married
1 No, 18,1666, in London, Ifergaret, daughter of Fanl Bussie, of York
City, Old England, They left Qigland for West New Jersey on the ship
Kent 2 No, 5, 1677, with their servant Martha, daughter of John Basse,
arriving in Salem 6 Mo. 23, 1677,
Judge Clement, in "First Settlers in Nawton Township" P, 287, further
states that Margaret Bussie was of the Parish of St. Bartholomew, London,
Henry Jennings was a Friend, and 30 far as we can learn, a strict member
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of the Society. I have collected a few memoranda of the mn while ho
was in Salem, N.J,, prior to his removal to the City of niiladolphia.
He and his wife Margaret, frequently appear as witnesses to marriages
in Salem Meetings.
1679 - 12th Mb. 2, Friends Rocords - Henry Jennings with others there
"were appointed to take a view of Edward Bradway's house for a meeting
house. *'
1661 - Ifer. 12th, Lib, 2. Vol. 1, Basse's Book, John and Elizabeth Adams
sold 200 acres to Henry and Margaret Jennings (his wife).
1682 - Two Indians sold 200 acres to Henry Jennings, Salom.
1695 - Jan. 16 - Henry Jennings of Ihin Mouth River of the County of
Salem, Taylor sold 90 aci"es of the above tract for 32L (pound) silver
money to John Bacon of Cesaria River. (Deed in possession of Miss lary
W, Bacon, IO98.)
1687 - Ilbor 3, fol. Salem Records at Trenton - Henry bought - acres
of Roger Milton.
1703 - Bassotts Book, Trenton, pp 111 and U70 of Lib. G,3.--Henry
Jennings, tailor of Salom, bought land in Gloucester (town) Gloucest
Co., N.J. 6th July and 6th Aug. of John H\igg and wife.
John IIuEg Sr. diod in 1?06. Ho had lived at the junction of "reat arf
Little Timber Greeks, very near the Doleware River. It is believed tbat
the site of Old Fort Nassau - tbe first point of settlement of Eijropeans
Q623) on the shore of the Deleware River, was on this land. John Ilugg
Jr. parried Priscilla Collins and it was to her that Henry Jennings
widow mrgaret left property and appointed John Hugg her executor,
liber A. fol. 33 - Trenton.
Henry Jonnlngs sold 69 acres to John Denis, Ho also sold
Waithman, 170U. John Bacon who had bought of Vfto, Waithman sold 3U^
acres to Jeremiah Bacon,
The following by courtesy of Ethel H, Jennings, laurel Springs, N.J,,
reference to Henry Jennings, source unknown:
"2 match coats, 2 mutches of powder, 2 bars lead, 2 knives, 6 fish hooks,
6 needles, 20 spoons of red lead. Rec. Nov. 20, 1602."
The following early records of FRIENDS lOOTHLT HEETIRSS are of poat
family interest, not only because of the customs of the times, but, also, ;
because of activities of family members as Quakers. Anunhor of early
family TOmbers were frequently appointed to committees to bring erran ^
FViends before Monthly Meetings for discipline, :ji
The accusations and stem discipline appear to have the flavor of the
Gatiiolic Inquisions of the 13th to 19th century and to tbat of the {
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Puritans of early Now Bhgland, Other religions are reported to have
acted with equal severity at early times.
tfeny Quakers of today are shocked at the lnflend.ble austerity of tlra
early record and have reason to question the validity of some accusa-
tions. One is led to wonder.
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