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BSR 64000 CMTS

Configuration and
Management Guide
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
Release 6.4.0
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Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
Release 6.4.0
Published: 11/12
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Contents
Contents
Preface
Scope .......................................................................................................................................... xxv
Audience.................................................................................................................................... xxvi
Documentation Set .................................................................................................................... xxvi
Conventions.............................................................................................................................xxviii
Notes, Cautions, Warnings ........................................................................................................ xxix
If You Need Help........................................................................................................................ xxx
1 Configuring the Cable Interface
Introduction .................................................................................................................................1-1
Setting the IP DHCP Relay Functions .......................................................................................1-2
Configuring the Cable Helper and IP Helper Addresses ............................................................1-5
Configuring Multiple ISPs .........................................................................................................1-7
Enabling a VCI on a Cable Interface ...............................................................................1-7
DHCP Option 60 ...............................................................................................1-8
Selecting a Specific ISP ...................................................................................................1-9
Enabling Host Authorization for All Cable Modems................................................................ 1-11
Disabling Host Authorization for All Cable Modems....................................................1-12
Creating a Static Host Authorization Entry for a Specific Cable Modem ...............................1-12
Deleting a Static Host Authorization Entry for a Specific Cable Modem .....................1-13
Enabling Host Authorization for an IP Range of CPEs ...........................................................1-13
Removing Host Authorization for an IP Range of CPEs ...............................................1-14
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Displaying Host Authorization Information ............................................................................1-14
Using DHCP Lease Query Function to Secure the Cable Network .........................................1-15
Setting ARP Parameters ...........................................................................................................1-18
Defining MAC Domains on the 2:8 Primary CMTS Resource Module ..................................1-19
Default MAC Domain Definition...................................................................................1-20
Redefining a MAC Domain............................................................................................1-20
Configuring AntiVirus/AntiWorm Protection ..........................................................................1-23
Configuring the Cable Channel Utilization Interval .................................................................1-24
Bundling Cable Interfaces into a Single IP Subnet ..................................................................1-24
Creating a Cable Bundle on a Cable Interface ...............................................................1-25
Adding a Static ARP Entry to a Cable Bundle Interface ................................1-28
Creating a Cable Bundle on a Loopback Interface ........................................................1-28
Subnetting DHCP Clients on the Cable Interface ....................................................................1-32
Forcing the Primary Cable Address for DHCP Requests...............................................1-33
Clearing Cable Interface Counters ............................................................................................1-33
Configuring Cable Intercepts ...................................................................................................1-34
Cable Intercept Security .................................................................................................1-34
Configuring the Cable Intercept Feature Through TACACS Authorization .................1-35
Group Configuration........................................................................................1-35
TACACS Settings ............................................................................................1-35
Shell Command Authorization Settings...........................................................1-36
Logging in as securityuser .............................................................................................1-36
Changing the securityuser Password..............................................................................1-37
Enabling a Cable Intercept ............................................................................................1-38
Enabling a Bridging Cable Intercept .............................................................................1-40
Disabling a Cable Intercept ...........................................................................................1-41
Disabling a Bridging Cable Intercept ............................................................................1-42
Displaying Cable Intercept Information ........................................................................1-42
Configuring Cable Security Authorized ...................................................................................1-46
Enabling Cable Security Authorized..............................................................................1-46
Configuring Cable Security Failure................................................................................1-46
Configuring User-defined Channel IDs ...................................................................................1-46
Default Channel IDs.......................................................................................................1-47
Configuring User-defined Channel IDs..........................................................................1-47
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2 Configuring a Downstream Channel
Introduction .................................................................................................................................2-1
Initial Downstream Configuration Tasks ....................................................................................2-1
Configuring the Downstream Frequency and Modulation Rate ......................................2-2
Enforcing the Downstream Rate Limit ............................................................................2-3
Enabling the Downstream Port ........................................................................................2-4
Entering a Description of the Downstream Port ..............................................................2-4
Managing the Downstream Channel ...........................................................................................2-5
Configuring the Downstream Interleave Depth ..............................................................2-5
Adjusting the Downstream Power Level .........................................................................2-6
Resetting a Downstream Port ..........................................................................................2-7
Reserving Downstream Bandwidth..................................................................................2-7
Unreserving Downstream Bandwidth ..............................................................................2-8
Cable Modem Downstream Frequency Override During Ranging .................................2-8
Testing RF Carrier Modulation ........................................................................................2-9
Specifying Downstream Queue Thresholds ....................................................................2-9
Limiting Downstream Multicast Traffic ........................................................................2-10
Configuring Multicast Downstream Replication Control (MDRC) .............................. 2-11
Enabling MDRC on a MAC Domain............................................................... 2-11
Configuring a Multicast Capable Downstream Channel .................................2-12
Displaying Cable Interface Parameters ..........................................................................2-13
Displaying Downstream Parameters ..............................................................................2-14
Viewing Downstream Port Information...........................................................2-14
3 DOCSIS 3.0 Features
Partial Services ...........................................................................................................................3-2
Dynamic Bonding Change .........................................................................................................3-3
Expanded Downstream Bonding Groups....................................................................................3-3
Upstream Fiber Node Configuration ..........................................................................................3-4
MD-CM-SG Ambiguity Resolution ...........................................................................................3-5
Source-Specific Multicast ..........................................................................................................3-5
Multicast QoS .............................................................................................................................3-6
Cable Modem Control (CM-CTRL) ..........................................................................................3-6
Cable Modem Status (CM-STATUS) .........................................................................................3-7
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Channel Specific Events ....................................................................................3-7
Non-Channel Specific Events ............................................................................3-7
Service Flow Attribute Based Downstream Assignment ...........................................................3-8
Downstream Channel Bonding with Multiple Receive Channels....................................3-8
Type 4 DOCSIS 3.0 Logical Upstream Channels ......................................................................3-9
4 Configuring Downstream Channel Bonding
Introduction .................................................................................................................................4-1
Configuring a Bonding Domain .................................................................................................4-2
Configuring a Bonding Group ....................................................................................................4-2
Clearing Channel Bonding Statistics...........................................................................................4-4
Disabling Downstream Channel Bonding...................................................................................4-4
Configuring the DOCSIS 3.0 MAC Domain Descriptor Message Interval ...............................4-5
Configuring Multiple Receive Modules .....................................................................................4-6
Entering RCC Template Configuration Mode .................................................................4-6
Entering a Description of the RCC Template...................................................................4-7
Assigning an RCP ID to an RCC Template......................................................................4-7
Adding a Receive Channel to an RCC Template .............................................................4-7
Adding a Receive Module to an RCC Template ..............................................................4-8
Assigning RCP Priority ...................................................................................................4-8
Assigning an RCC Template to a Cable Interface............................................................4-9
5 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Introduction .................................................................................................................................5-1
About Upstream Channel Commands..............................................................................5-2
Initial Upstream Configuration Tasks .........................................................................................5-3
Setting the Upstream Frequency .....................................................................................5-4
Setting the Upstream Power Level ..................................................................................5-5
Setting the Upstream Power Level in Absolute Mode.......................................5-6
Setting the Upstream Power Level in Relative Mode........................................5-7
Enforcing the Upstream Cable Modem Rate Limit .........................................................5-8
Enabling an Upstream Port ..............................................................................................5-9
Entering a Description of the Upstream Port .................................................................5-10
Modulation Profiles .................................................................................................................. 5-11
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The Modulation Profile Numbering Scheme .................................................................5-12
Displaying Configured Modulation Profiles ..................................................................5-12
Determining the Modulation Profile Applied to an Upstream Port ...............................5-13
Modulation Profile Configuration Mode .......................................................................5-15
Entering Modulation Profile Configuration Mode...........................................5-15
Configuring a Modulation Profile .................................................................................5-16
Configuring a Modulation Profile with the iuc Command ..............................5-17
Configuring a Modulation Profile Through an IUC Submode .......................5-20
Applying a Modulation Profile ......................................................................................5-22
Copying a Modulation Profile .......................................................................................5-23
Restoring a Default Modulation Profile Configuration .................................................5-24
Deleting a Modulation Profile or IUC ...........................................................................5-24
Managing the Upstream Channel .............................................................................................5-25
Configuring Upstream Cable Modem Registration Parameters ....................................5-25
Moving a Cable Modem or MTA to a Different Upstream Channel .............................5-30
Adjusting for Physical Delay between the Cable Interface and Cable Modems ...........5-30
Enabling Pre-equalization .............................................................................................5-33
Forcing the Fragmentation of Large Upstream Packets ................................................5-33
Disabling an Upstream Port ...........................................................................................5-34
Configuring the Upstream Channel Descriptor .............................................................5-35
Limiting the Number of Voice Calls on an Upstream Channel .....................................5-35
Enabling/Disabling CMTS Concatenation Capabilities ................................................5-36
Enabling/Disabling Concatenation for DOCSIS 1.0 Cable Modems.............................5-37
Displaying Upstream Parameters .............................................................................................5-38
Viewing Upstream Port Information ..............................................................................5-38
6 Configuring Upstream Channel Bonding
Introduction .................................................................................................................................6-1
Multiple Transmit Channel Operation .......................................................................................6-3
Enabling MTC Mode .......................................................................................................6-4
Configuring the T4 Timeout Multiplier ...........................................................................6-5
Configuring Upstream Bonding Group SID Clusters .....................................................6-6
Maximum Outstanding Bytes per SID Cluster ..................................................6-7
Maximum Requests per SID Cluster .................................................................6-8
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Maximum Time in the SID Cluster....................................................................6-8
Maximum Total Bytes Requested per SID Cluster ............................................6-9
Configuring an Upstream Channel Bonding Group .................................................................6-10
Clearing Upstream Channel Bonding Statistics ....................................................................... 6-11
Resetting Cable Modems in Partial Service ............................................................................. 6-11
Displaying Upstream Channel Bonding Information................................................................ 6-11
show cable modem detail ................................................................................. 6-11
show cable modem upstream bonding.............................................................6-12
show cable modem upstream non-bonding......................................................6-12
show cable modem upstream partial-service ...................................................6-12
show cable sid-cluster ......................................................................................6-12
show cable upstream bonding-groups..............................................................6-13
show cable upstream bonding-groups minrr-multipliers .................................6-13
Other Related show Commands .....................................................................................6-13
7 Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0 Upstream Logical Channel
Introduction .................................................................................................................................7-1
About DOCSIS 2.0 .....................................................................................................................7-1
Logical Channels ........................................................................................................................7-2
Channel Types ............................................................................................................................7-2
DOCSIS 2.0 Only Channel Types ...................................................................................7-3
Other Channel Types ........................................................................................................7-3
Logical Channel Operation ..............................................................................................7-3
Obtaining Detailed DOCSIS 2.0 Information ..................................................................7-4
DOCSIS 2.0 and the BSR 64000 ...............................................................................................7-4
BSR 64000 Hardware Support for DOCSIS 2.0 .............................................................7-5
BSR 64000 Software Support for DOCSIS 2.0 ...............................................................7-6
DOCSIS 2.0 Logical Channel Configuration Task Summary ....................................................7-7
About Upstream Channel Commands..............................................................................7-7
Determining the 2:8 CMTS Module Type .................................................................................7-9
Determining the DOCSIS Version of a Slot .............................................................................7-10
Configuring the Channel Type ................................................................................................. 7-11
Configuring Spectrum Power Density Maintenance for a Logical Channel ............................7-14
Additional S-CDMA Logical Channel Configurations ............................................................7-14
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Configuring S-CDMA Active Codes ............................................................................7-15
Configuring S-CDMA Codes Per Minislot ...................................................................7-16
Configuring the S-CDMA Hopping Seed .....................................................................7-16
Configuring the S-CDMA Spreading Interval ..............................................................7-16
Displaying the Upstream Logical Channel Configuration .......................................................7-17
8 Using RF Sentry
Introduction .................................................................................................................................8-1
Power Level Measurement .........................................................................................................8-2
Configuring FFT...............................................................................................................8-2
Configuring the FFT Processor .......................................................................................8-3
Displaying the FFT Processor Configuration ..................................................................8-3
Starting FFT Power Level Measurement ........................................................................8-3
Storing FFT Power Level Measurement Data ..................................................8-4
Displaying FFT Power Level Measurement Data ...........................................................8-4
Retrieving FFT Data from an Operational CMTS Module ...............................8-5
Retrieving FFT Data from a File System ..........................................................8-5
Signal to Noise Ratio Measurement ...........................................................................................8-6
Configuring SNR Measurement .......................................................................................8-6
Configuring an Automatically Repeated SNR Test ..........................................8-8
Displaying the SNR Configuration .................................................................................8-9
Starting SNR Measurement ..............................................................................................8-9
Storing SNR Measurement Data ...................................................................................8-10
Displaying SNR Measurement Data .............................................................................8-10
Retrieving SNR Data from an Operational CMTS Module............................. 8-11
Retrieving SNR Data from a File System........................................................ 8-11
Configuring an SNR Offset ...........................................................................................8-12
9 Managing Cable Modems
Introduction .................................................................................................................................9-1
Configuring Network Parameters for Cable Modems ................................................................9-2
Enabling the Cable Modem Aging Timer .......................................................................9-2
Removing Cable Modems from the Offline List .............................................................9-2
Setting the Insertion Interval for Cable Modems ............................................................9-3
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Setting the Synchronization Interval ...............................................................................9-4
Setting Cable Modem Authentication Parameters ..........................................................9-5
Restoring Previously Defined Authentication Parameters.................................9-7
Denying Access to a Cable Modem ................................................................................9-7
Setting the Maximum Number of Hosts ..........................................................................9-7
Configuring Baseline Privacy ....................................................................................................9-9
Setting TEK Privacy ......................................................................................................9-10
Setting Authorization Key Values .................................................................................9-12
Managing Multicast Traffic ...........................................................................................9-13
Configuring Cable Privacy Mandatory .........................................................................9-14
Using Flap Lists .......................................................................................................................9-15
Setting Flap List Parameters...........................................................................................9-15
Using Flap Lists to Troubleshoot Cable Modem Problems ..........................................9-18
Viewing Flap List Statistics to Identify Network Health.................................9-18
Interpreting Flap List Statistics ........................................................................9-19
Tips for Administering Flap Lists .................................................................................9-24
Pinging a Cable Modem at the MAC Layer .............................................................................9-25
Resetting the Cable Modem .....................................................................................................9-26
Clearing Cable Modem Counters .............................................................................................9-27
Viewing Cable Modem Information ........................................................................................9-27
Multiple IP Addresses Per MAC Address ......................................................9-32
Viewing the Timing Adjustments for Cable Modems ....................................9-33
Configuring Remote Query ......................................................................................................9-35
Enabling Remote Query ................................................................................................9-36
Configuring the SNMP Response Timeout ...................................................................9-37
Enabling SNMP Remote Query Traps ..........................................................................9-37
Displaying Remote Query Information..........................................................................9-38
Using Cable Modem Steering ..................................................................................................9-38
Service Type Identifiers .................................................................................................9-39
Cable Modem Steering Procedural Overview ...............................................................9-40
Other Functional Considerations ....................................................................9-41
Cable Modem Steering Caveats .......................................................................9-42
Configuring Cable Modem Steering .............................................................................9-42
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Configuring a Service Type Identifier on a Restricted Load Balancing Group......
9-43
Configuring a Service Type Identifier on a MAC Domain..............................9-44
Displaying Service Type Identifiers.................................................................9-44
10 Configuring Service Classes
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................10-1
Service Classes ..............................................................................................................10-1
Maximum Assigned Bandwidth ....................................................................................10-2
Overbooking ..................................................................................................................10-2
Scheduling Priority ........................................................................................................10-2
Admission Control .........................................................................................................10-3
Downstream Flow Classifier Support ............................................................................10-3
Service Class Name Expansion .....................................................................................10-3
Service Flow and Classifier Allocation .........................................................................10-4
Default Service Classes ............................................................................................................10-5
Default Parameter Settings.............................................................................................10-5
Sharing Bandwidth Between Service Classes ..........................................................................10-7
DQoS Emergency Call Service Classes ...................................................................................10-8
Configuring the DQoS Emergency Call Service Classes...............................................10-8
Displaying DQoS Emergency Call Information.............................................................10-9
High Priority Pre-emption for 911 Calls ................................................................................10-10
Defining DQoS Voice Calls for Pre-emption ...............................................................10-10
Enabling DQoS Emergency Pre-emption..................................................................... 10-11
Creating Service Classes ........................................................................................................10-12
Calculating Maximum Assigned Bandwidth Percentages .....................................................10-15
Maximum Assigned Bandwidth Override ...................................................................10-16
Modifying Service Class Parameters .....................................................................................10-17
Viewing Service Class Information ........................................................................................10-25
Displaying Service Class Statistics ..............................................................................10-25
Displaying Service Flow Parameters ...........................................................................10-25
Displaying Service Class Information..........................................................................10-25
Displaying Service Flow Statistics ..............................................................................10-26
Voice Call Statistics ................................................................................................................10-27
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Configuring a Voice Call Statistics Sample..................................................................10-27
Viewing Active Voice Call Statistics............................................................................10-28
Clearing Active Voice Call Statistics............................................................................10-29
Disabling Active Voice Call Statistics..........................................................................10-29
11 Setting QoS Parameters
Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 11-1
Creating or Modifying a QoS Profile ....................................................................................... 11-2
Resetting the Default Values ......................................................................................... 11-4
Deleting a QoS Profile ............................................................................................................. 11-4
Viewing a QoS Profile .............................................................................................................. 11-5
Initiating a DSA ....................................................................................................................... 11-6
Initiating a DSC ........................................................................................................................ 11-7
Initiating a DSD ....................................................................................................................... 11-9
Configuring an Active Timeout for Dynamic Service Flows ................................................ 11-10
Viewing QoS Information ...................................................................................................... 11-11
Displaying the Packet Classifier .................................................................................. 11-11
Displaying SFID and QoS Information ....................................................................... 11-12
Displaying Service Flow Statistics .............................................................................. 11-12
Displaying Upstream Service Flow Statistics .............................................................. 11-13
Displaying Payload Header Suppression Entries ........................................................ 11-13
Displaying QoS Profiles .............................................................................................. 11-14
Notes About Viewing Class of Service (Qos) Profiles .................................. 11-14
Configuring the BSR 64000 for DOCSIS 1.0+ Interoperability ............................................ 11-15
Verifying that DOCSIS 1.0+ Devices Successfully Register ....................................... 11-18
Troubleshooting DOCSIS 1.0+ Interoperability .......................................................... 11-19
12 Configuring Spectrum Management
Introduction ...............................................................................................................................12-1
Configuring a Spectrum Group ................................................................................................12-2
Creating a Spectrum Group ...........................................................................................12-3
Scheduling the Availability of a Spectrum Group Band ...............................................12-5
Deleting an Existing Availability Time for a Band..........................................12-6
Scheduling the Removal of a Spectrum Group Band.....................................................12-7
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Deleting an Existing Removal Time for a Band ..............................................12-8
Configuring Spectrum Data Collection .........................................................................12-9
Configuring Spectrum Hopping Rules ........................................................................12-10
Configuring the Spectrum Hopping Error Threshold...................................................12-14
Configuring the Spectrum Hopping Flap Threshold ...................................................12-14
Enabling and Disabling Spectrum Roll-back ..............................................................12-15
Configuring the Guard Band .......................................................................................12-15
Reviewing the New Spectrum Group Configuration ..................................................12-16
Viewing Your Spectrum Group Configuration.............................................................12-17
Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Port .................................................................12-17
Evaluating Spectrum Management Performance ...................................................................12-19
Displaying Spectrum Data............................................................................................12-19
Viewing Spectrum Management Configuration Changes ............................................12-20
Determining the Upstream Signal to Noise Ratio .......................................................12-21
Determining the MIB Index ID Number of an Upstream Port ....................................12-21
Viewing Spectrum Management Activity ...................................................................12-22
Viewing Spectrum Management Hopping Actions......................................................12-23
Viewing the Spectrum Management Roll-back Function ...........................................12-26
13 Configuring Advanced Spectrum Management
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................13-1
Terminology .............................................................................................................................13-2
Frequency Agility ..........................................................................................................13-3
Frequency Rollback .......................................................................................................13-4
Modulation Profile Agility ............................................................................................13-4
Modulation Profile Rollback .........................................................................................13-5
Prerequisites ..............................................................................................................................13-5
Advanced Spectrum Management Operational Rules .............................................................13-6
Legacy Spectrum Management CLI Commands ......................................................................13-6
Advanced Spectrum Management CLI Commands .................................................................13-7
Configuring Frequency Agility ................................................................................................13-9
Specifying Hop Action Band Start and End Frequencies ..............................................13-9
Specifying a Hop Action Center Frequency.................................................................13-10
Specifying the Active Channel Hop Sampling Period ................................................. 13-11
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Specifying the Spare Channel Hop Sampling Period................................................... 13-11
Specifying SNR Hysteresis .........................................................................................13-12
Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver ................................................13-13
Configuring Frequency Rollback ...........................................................................................13-14
Enabling Frequency Rollback .................................................................................................13-15
Configuring Modulation Profile Agility ................................................................................13-15
Specifying a Modulation Profile ..................................................................................13-15
Configuring Modulation Type SNR Thresholds .........................................................13-16
Specifying SNR Hysteresis .........................................................................................13-18
Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver ................................................13-19
Enabling Modulation Profile Rollback ..................................................................................13-20
Excluding Reference Cable Modems .....................................................................................13-21
Customizing SNR Hopping Criteria .......................................................................................13-22
Displaying the Reference Modem List....................................................................................13-22
14 Configuring Load Balancing
Introduction ...............................................................................................................................14-1
Configuring Static Upstream Load Balancing .........................................................................14-2
Enabling Static Upstream Load Balancing.....................................................................14-3
Load Balancing Across All Upstream Channels ............................................................14-5
Moving a Cable Modem to a Specified Upstream Channel ..........................................14-5
Displaying Load Balancing Statistics for a Spectrum Group ........................................14-6
Displaying UCC Statistics .............................................................................................14-7
Configuring Static Count-Based Load Balancing ....................................................................14-7
Configuring Dynamic Load Balancing ....................................................................................14-8
Load Balancing Groups .................................................................................................14-8
Configuring a Load Balancing Rule ..............................................................................14-9
Configuring a Load Balancing Policy .........................................................................14-12
Configuring the Load Balancing Group.........................................................14-12
Configuring a Restricted Load Balancing Group ........................................................14-13
Restricting an Entire Load Balancing Group.................................................14-13
Restricting Selected Cable Modems in a Load Balancing Group..................14-14
Assigning Downstream and Upstream Channels to a Load Balancing Group.............14-15
Enabling/Disabling Dynamic Load Balancing ............................................................14-16
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Enabling/Disabling Dynamic Load Balancing on all CMTS Modules..........14-16
Enabling/Disabling Dynamic Load Balancing for a Load Balancing Group 14-17
Displaying Dynamic Load Balancing Information .....................................................14-17
Manually Moving a Cable Modem ........................................................................................14-19
Manually Moving a DOCSIS 1.0 or 1.1 Cable Modem with UCC .............................14-19
Manually Moving a DOCSIS 1.1 or 2.0 Cable Modem with DCC .............................14-20
Displaying UCC/DCC Statistics ............................................................................................14-21
Clearing UCC or DCC Statistics .................................................................................14-21
Redistributing CMTS Traffic Among HSIMs ........................................................................14-22
Displaying CMTS to HSIM Bindings ..........................................................................14-23
15 Configuring PacketCable
Overview ..................................................................................................................................15-1
PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Components ..............................................15-1
Configuration Task Summary ...................................................................................................15-3
Common Network Configuration Tasks.........................................................................15-4
PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Configuration Tasks ..................................15-4
Related Tasks..................................................................................................................15-5
Entering PacketCable Configuration Mode .............................................................................15-5
Configuring Common Parameters.............................................................................................15-6
Specifying the Protocol IP Address ...............................................................................15-6
Configuring COPS Parameters ......................................................................................15-6
Restricting COPS Connections ........................................................................15-7
Specifying the Policy Enforcement Point .......................................................15-7
Configuring the COPS Client Timer ...............................................................15-7
Configuring Access Control Lists for COPS Connections .............................15-8
Displaying COPS Connections ........................................................................15-8
Verifying the COPS Configuration ..................................................................15-9
Configuring Event Messages..........................................................................................15-9
Enabling the Event Message System ..............................................................15-9
Configuring Event Message Parameters .......................................................15-10
Disabling Event Messages ............................................................................15-14
Displaying Event Message Statistics .............................................................15-14
Configuring IP Security ...............................................................................................15-15
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Configuring a Security Policy Using IPSec and IKE ...................................15-15
Configuring IPSec and IKE Parameters ........................................................15-19
Enabling IPSec and IKE ...............................................................................15-21
Deleting Security Policy Database Policy Entries .........................................15-22
Displaying the IPSec Configuration ..............................................................15-22
Configuring Electronic Surveillance ...........................................................................15-23
Displaying Electronic Surveillance Information............................................15-24
Configuring PacketCable Specific Parameters .......................................................................15-25
Enabling DQoS ............................................................................................................15-25
Configuring DQoS Parameters ....................................................................................15-26
Configuring DQoS Gate T0 and T1 Timers ..................................................15-26
Displaying Gates ............................................................................................15-27
Displaying Gate Statistics ..............................................................................15-28
Configuring PacketCable Multimedia Specific Parameters ...................................................15-29
Enabling PacketCable Multimedia ..............................................................................15-29
Configuring the Multimedia Gate Timer T1 ................................................................15-29
PacketCable DSCP .................................................................................................................15-30
Configuring Related PacketCable Tasks .................................................................................15-30
Clearing All COPS Connections .................................................................................15-31
Enabling the COPS Status SNMP Trap .......................................................................15-31
Enabling the Emergency Call SNMP Trap ..................................................................15-31
Enabling the Resource Request SNMP Trap ...............................................................15-32
Clearing Gates .............................................................................................................15-32
Clearing PacketCable Statistics....................................................................................15-33
Clearing PacketCable Configuration ...........................................................................15-34
16 Configuring DSG
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................16-1
Prerequisites ..............................................................................................................................16-3
DSG Configuration Tasks ........................................................................................................16-4
Entering DSG Configuration Mode .........................................................................................16-4
Initial DSG Configurations ......................................................................................................16-5
Configuring a Channel List ...........................................................................................16-5
Configuring a Classifier ................................................................................................16-6
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Configuring a Timer ......................................................................................................16-7
Configuring a Vendor Parameter ...................................................................................16-8
Configuring a DSG Client ........................................................................................................16-8
Configuring a DSG Tunnel ....................................................................................................16-10
Specifying Tunnel Parameters .....................................................................................16-10
Configuring a Tunnel Group ....................................................................................... 16-11
Configuring a DSG Downstream Channel ............................................................................. 16-11
DCD Messages ............................................................................................................16-12
Associating Tunnel Groups to a Downstream Channel ...............................................16-12
Additional Configuration .............................................................................................16-14
Displaying DSG Information .................................................................................................16-15
17 Configuring VLAN Tagging
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................17-1
VLAN Tagging Packet Formats ...............................................................................................17-4
Enabling VLAN Tagging .........................................................................................................17-5
Enabling VLAN Tagging on Multiple Ports .................................................................17-6
Configuring VLAN Tagged Bridging ......................................................................................17-6
Specifying a Bridging Cable Modem through a Bridge Mode TLV .............................17-7
Specifying a Bridging Cable Modem through the CLI .................................................17-8
Configuring VLAN Stacking on a Bridging Cable Modem ..........................................17-9
Enabling VLAN Stacking through an Enhanced Bridge Mode TLV ............17-10
Enabling VLAN Stacking through the CLI ...................................................17-10
Configuring VLAN Tagged Routing ...................................................................................... 17-11
Configuring the External L2/L3 Switch .................................................................................17-12
Configuring Cable Privacy Mandatory ..................................................................................17-13
Bridging Packet Sizes .............................................................................................................17-13
Displaying VLAN Tagging Statistics .....................................................................................17-14
Clearing VLAN Tagging Statistics..........................................................................................17-15
18 Configuring Tagged Sub-Interfaces
Introduction ...............................................................................................................................18-1
TSI Feature Description ...........................................................................................................18-2
Adding and Removing a Sub-Interface ....................................................................................18-2
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Associating an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN ID with a Sub-Interface .................................................18-3
Configuring the Physical Interface to Include Optional 802.1P and 802.1Q Tags ..................18-4
19 Subscriber Management
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................19-1
Creating Filters to Manage Subscribers ...................................................................................19-1
Creating a Packet Filter Group ......................................................................................19-2
Configuring the Source IP Address and Mask.................................................19-2
Configuring the Destination IP Address and Mask .........................................19-3
Configuring the Upper Level Protocol ............................................................19-3
Configure the TOS Value and Mask ................................................................19-4
Configure the Filter Match Action...................................................................19-4
Enabling a Packet Filter ...................................................................................19-4
Displaying the Packet Filter Configuration .....................................................19-5
Deleting a Packet Filter....................................................................................19-5
Configuring Filters for TCP or UDP Packet Headers ...................................................19-6
Configuring the TCP/UDP Source Port ...........................................................19-6
Configuring the TCP/UDP Destination Port....................................................19-6
Configuring the TCP Flag Value and Mask.....................................................19-7
Enabling the TCP/UDP Packet Filter...............................................................19-7
Displaying the TCP/UDP Packet Filter Configuration....................................19-8
Deleting a TCP/UDP Packet Filter ..................................................................19-8
Configuring Default Packet Filter Group for CMs and CPEs .......................................19-8
Configuring Default Filter Group for a CPE ...................................................19-9
Configuring Default Filter Group for a CM.....................................................19-9
Configuring the Default Maximum CPEs........................................................19-9
Configuring the Active Default for CPEs ......................................................19-10
Configuring the Learnable Default for CPEs.................................................19-10
Displaying the Default Filter Groups and CPE Control Defaults..................19-10
20 Configuring a Distributed MAC Domain
Introduction ..............................................................................................................................20-1
Downstream Configuration Commands ........................................................................20-4
MAC Domain Layer 3 Configuration ......................................................................................20-5
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Creating a Cable Bundle on a Loopback Interface ........................................................20-5
Fiber Node Configuration ........................................................................................................20-8
Entering Fiber Node Configuration Mode .....................................................................20-9
Entering a Description of the Fiber Node.......................................................................20-9
MAC Domain Configuration .................................................................................................20-10
Initial Configuration.....................................................................................................20-10
Entering Cable Interface Configuration Mode for the 2:8 CMTS Module....20-10
Entering a Description of the Distributed MAC Domain ..............................20-10
Associating the Cable Bundle ....................................................................... 20-11
Binding the Downstream Channels ............................................................... 20-11
Configuring a Bonding Group .....................................................................................20-12
2:8 CMTS Downstream Channel Configuration .........................................................20-14
Entering a Description of the Downstream Channel .....................................20-15
Enabling the Downstream Rate Limit ...........................................................20-15
Configuring the Downstream Modulation Rate ............................................20-16
Adjusting the Downstream Power Level ......................................................20-16
Configuring the Downstream Frequency ......................................................20-17
Associating the Fiber Nodes to the Downstream Channel ...........................20-17
Enabling the Downstream Channel................................................................20-17
2:8 CMTS Upstream Port Configuration ....................................................................20-18
Binding the Upstream Ports ...........................................................................20-18
Entering a Description of the Upstream Port .................................................20-19
Setting the Upstream Frequency ...................................................................20-20
Enabling the Upstream Port ...........................................................................20-20
TX32 Downstream Port Configuration ..................................................................................20-21
Entering TX32 Downstream Port Configuration Mode ...............................................20-21
Entering a Description of the TX32 Downstream Port ................................................20-22
Configuring the TX32 Channel Mode .........................................................................20-22
Adjusting the TX32 Downstream Port Power Level ...................................................20-23
Configuring the TX32 Downstream Channel Frequency ............................................20-24
Associating the Fiber Nodes to the TX32 Downstream Port ......................................20-24
Entering a Description of the TX32 Downstream Channel..........................................20-25
Enabling a TX32 Downstream Channel.......................................................................20-25
Enabling a TX32 Downstream Port .............................................................................20-26
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Verifying the TX32 Downstream Port Configuration ..................................................20-26
Additional TX32 Downstream Port Configurations.....................................................20-26
Additional TX32 Downstream Channel Configurations..............................................20-27
21 Cable Traffic Management
Theory of Operations ...............................................................................................................21-2
Cable Traffic Policies ....................................................................................................21-4
Traffic Token Bucket .....................................................................................................21-5
Traffic Token Bucket Monitoring Algorithms .................................................21-6
Traffic Enforcement Algorithms......................................................................21-7
Cable Sample Interval ...................................................................................................21-7
Offline Cable Modems ..................................................................................................21-8
Other Cable Traffic Management Operational Features ...........................................................21-9
Configuring a Cable Traffic Policy ..........................................................................................21-9
Applying Cable Traffic Policies to Subscriber Service Tiers ........................................21-9
Cable Traffic Policy Configuration Tasks ....................................................................21-10
Entering Cable Traffic Policy Configuration Mode....................................... 21-11
Configuring Maximum Rate Matching .........................................................21-12
Configuring the Credit Maximum .................................................................21-13
Configuring the Enforce Rate .......................................................................21-13
Configuring the Peak Time ...........................................................................21-14
Configuring the Penalty Period .....................................................................21-15
Configuring Bidirectional Enforcement ........................................................21-16
Enabling a Cable Traffic Policy.....................................................................21-16
Configuring the Cable Sample Interval .......................................................................21-17
Displaying Cable Traffic Management Information ....................................................21-18
show cable subscriber-usage..........................................................................21-18
show cable subscriber-usage summary ..........................................................21-19
show cable traffic policy ................................................................................21-19
Clearing Cable Traffic Management Statistics.............................................................21-20
clear cable traffic enforcement.......................................................................21-20
clear cable traffic history................................................................................21-20
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22 Configuring an Integrated CMTS
Introduction ...............................................................................................................................22-1
Integrated CMTS Overview......................................................................................................22-2
Configuration Overview............................................................................................................22-4
RX48 Distributed MAC Domains ............................................................................................22-6
MAC Domain Binding Guidelines ................................................................................22-7
Number of MAC Domains...............................................................................22-7
Binding RX48 Upstream Channels ...............................................................................22-7
Binding TX32 Downstream Channels ...........................................................................22-9
Configuring RX48 MAC Domain Binding and Unbinding ...................................................22-10
Adding Upstream Channels to an RX48 MAC Domain .............................................. 22-11
Incrementally Adding New Upstream Channels ........................................... 22-11
Incorrectly Using the cable bind upstream Command................................... 22-11
Removing Upstream Channels from an RX48 MAC Domain..................................... 22-11
Incrementally Removing Upstream Channels ...............................................22-12
Removing All Upstream Channels ................................................................22-12
Incorrectly Using the no cable bind upstream Command..............................22-12
TX32/RX48 Plant Topology ..................................................................................................22-12
The RX48 and Fiber Nodes .........................................................................................22-13
Frequency Isolation .....................................................................................................22-14
Typical Plant Topologies ..............................................................................................22-15
RX48/TX32 MAC Domain with Dual Fiber Node........................................22-15
RX48/TX32 MAC Domain with Eight Bonded Downstreams .....................22-16
Multiple MAC Domains per Fiber Node ......................................................22-17
The BSR and DOCSIS Service Groups .......................................................................22-18
MAC Domain Service Groups.......................................................................22-19
Displaying Fiber Node and Service Group Configuration.............................22-22
MAC Domain Channel Assignment and Topology .....................................................22-24
Load Balancing Groups and DOCSIS Service Groups..................................22-24
Bonded Cable Modems and DOCSIS Service Groups ..................................22-24
Cable Modem MAC Domain Service Group Determination.........................22-25
RX48 Load Balancing .................................................................................................22-25
General Load Balancing Groups....................................................................22-26
Load Balancing Policy...................................................................................22-27
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Channel Bonding Topology and Fiber Nodes .............................................................22-27
Multicast Replication and Downstream Channel Set ....................................22-28
Legacy 2:8 CMTS Upstream Ports and Fiber Nodes ..................................................22-28
Configuring an RX48 Port .....................................................................................................22-28
Entering RX48 Port Configuration Mode ....................................................................22-29
RX48 Port Administration............................................................................................22-29
Enabling an RX48 Port ..................................................................................22-29
Entering a Description of the RX48 Port .......................................................22-30
Adjusting for Physical Delay between the Cable Interface and Cable Modems .........22-31
Configuring an Automatic Physical Delay ....................................................22-31
Configuring a Fixed Physical Delay ..............................................................22-31
Fiber Node Configuration ............................................................................................22-33
Entering Fiber Node Configuration Mode.....................................................22-34
Entering a Description of the Fiber Node ......................................................22-34
Associating the Fiber Nodes to the RX48 Upstream Port .............................22-35
Configuring an RX48 RF Channel .........................................................................................22-35
Entering RX48 RF Channel Configuration Mode........................................................22-35
Upstream RF Channel Administration ........................................................................22-36
Entering a Description of the Upstream RF Channel ....................................22-37
Configuring the Upstream RF Channel Frequency .......................................22-37
Configuring Upstream RF Channel Width ...................................................22-38
Enabling an Upstream RF Channel................................................................22-38
Configuring the RF Channel Power Level ..................................................................22-39
Setting the Upstream Power Level in Relative Mode....................................22-40
Setting the Upstream Power Level in Absolute Mode...................................22-41
Associating a Spectrum Group to an Upstream RF Channel ......................................22-41
Configuring Upstream RF Channel Concatenation or Fragmentation Capabilities ....22-43
Configuring BCM 3142 Ingress Noise Cancellation ...................................................22-44
Configuring Upstream Scheduler Controls .................................................................22-44
Configuring the Upstream Bandwidth Allocation Map Interval ..................22-45
Configuring the Invited Ranging Interval for Cable Modems ......................22-45
Configuring the Cable Modem Ranging Delay ............................................22-46
Configuring the Cable Modem Rate Limit ...................................................22-46
Upstream RF Channel State Notifications .....................................................22-48
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Configuring an RX48 Logical Channel .................................................................................22-49
Types of Logical Upstream Channels...........................................................................22-49
Entering RX48 Logical Channel Configuration Mode ................................................22-50
Logical Channel Administration ..................................................................................22-51
Configuring a Logical Channel ID.................................................................22-52
Configuring the Logical Channel Type .........................................................22-53
Enabling a Logical Channel ...........................................................................22-55
RX48 Logical Channel Bandwidth Management ........................................................22-56
Configuring the Logical Channel Minislot Size ............................................22-56
Forcing the Fragmentation of Large Upstream Packets ................................22-57
Specifying the IUC 11 Grant Size..................................................................22-58
Configuring Cable Modem Upstream Logical Channel Transmission Management ..22-58
Assigning a Modulation Profile ....................................................................22-58
Configuring the Data Backoff Value .............................................................22-60
Configuring the Range Backoff Value ..........................................................22-61
Pre-equalization and Release 6.0.0 ...............................................................22-62
Configuring Spectrum Power Density Maintenance ....................................22-63
Cable Modem Data Load Balancing .............................................................22-63
BCM 3142 Equalizer Magnitude Scaling ......................................................22-64
S-CDMA Logical Channel Configurations .................................................................22-64
Configuring S-CDMA Active Codes ............................................................22-66
Configuring S-CDMA Codes Per Minislot ...................................................22-66
Configuring the S-CDMA Hopping Seed .....................................................22-66
Configuring the S-CDMA Spreading Interval ..............................................22-67
S-CDMA Transmit Range Power Level Restrictions ..................................................22-67
DOCSIS 2.0 ..................................................................................................22-67
DOCSIS 3.0 ..................................................................................................22-67
Logical Channel State Notifications ............................................................................22-70
A Pre-Defined Modulation Profiles
Introduction ............................................................................................................................... A-1
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B Understanding and Modifying Modulation Profiles
Introduction ................................................................................................................................ B-1
TDMA, A-TDMA and MTDMA............................................................................................... B-2
Modulation (Modulation Type) ....................................................................................... B-2
FEC (FEC ERR CRC, FEC CW Len) ............................................................................. B-3
Preamble (Preamble Len) ................................................................................................ B-4
Post-Equalization .............................................................................................. B-5
Pre-Equalization................................................................................................ B-5
Mix of DOCSIS 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 Cable Modems ............................................ B-6
Interleaving (Intlv Depth)................................................................................................ B-8
S-CDMA.................................................................................................................................... B-8
Modulation (Modulation Type) ....................................................................................... B-8
FEC (FEC ERR CRC, FEC CW Len) ........................................................................... B-10
Preamble (Preamble Len) .............................................................................................. B-10
Interleaving (Intlv Stp Sz) ............................................................................................. B-10
Index
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Preface
Scope
This document describes how to configure and manage the cable network modem
termination system (CMTS) component of the Motorola Broadband Services
Router 64000 (BSR 64000). The following tasks and procedures are described in this
document:
n Configuring the Cable Interface
n Configuring a Downstream Channel
n DOCSIS 3.0 Features
n Configuring Downstream Channel Bonding
n Configuring an Upstream Channel
n Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0 Upstream Logical Channel
n Using RF Sentry
n Managing Cable Modems
n Configuring Service Classes
n Setting QoS Parameters
n Configuring Spectrum Management
n Configuring Advanced Spectrum Management
n Configuring Load Balancing
n Configuring PacketCable
n Configuring DSG
n Configuring VLAN Tagging
n Configuring Tagged Sub-Interfaces
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n Subscriber Management
n Configuring a Distributed MAC Domain
n Cable Traffic Management
n Configuring an Integrated CMTS
The following additional information is also provided:
n Pre-Defined Modulation Profiles
n Understanding and Modifying Modulation Profiles
Audience
This document is for use by those persons who will install and configure the
BSR 64000 product. Only trained service personnel should install, maintain, or
replace the BSR 64000.
Documentation Set
The following documents comprise the BSR 64000 documentation set:
n BSR 64000 Quick Start Guide
The quick start guide provides a "roadmap" to the tasks involved in physically
installing the BSR 64000 product, physically connecting it to your network/HFC
infrastructure, and performing configuration tasks to enable the BSR 64000 to
operate in your networking environment.
n BSR 64000 Chassis Installation Guide
This guide provides detailed instructions for physically installing the BSR 64000
product including: procedures for rack mounting, making physical network cable
connections, connecting DC power, and for determining the status of the BSR
64000 after applying power to it. This document also provides a description of the
BSR 64000 chassis, its hardware components and modules.
n BSR 64000 Module Installation Guide
This guide contains procedures for installing additional and replacement
Resource and I/O Modules in a BSR 64000 chassis and for making physical cable
connections to the modules.
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n BSR 64000 Command Line Interface Users Guide
For users, this guide describes the structure of the BSR 64000 Command Line
Interface (CLI) and its various command modes. It also provides rules and
guidelines for navigating through the CLI.
n BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide
This guide contains individual descriptions of the entire set of commands that
comprise the BSR 64000 Command Line Interface (CLI). These commands are
used to interface with, configure, manage, and maintain the BSR 64000.
n BSR 64000 System Administration Guide
For system administrators, this guide provides detailed procedures for performing
initial configuration tasks including setting up: user accounts and passwords;
telnet and console access; system logging; and associated servers such as DHCP,
DNS, etc.
n BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide
This guide provides the instructions and procedures for configuring and
managing BSR 64000 CMTS operation.
n BSR 64000 Routing Configuration and Management Guide
This guide contains the instructions and procedures for configuring and managing
BSR 64000 routing operation, including RIP, OSPF, and BGP.
n BSR 64000 SNMP Configuration and Management Guide
This guide provides the instructions and procedures for configuring and
managing BSR 64000 Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) operation.
It also describes SNMP MIBs; provides information that describes standard and
proprietary MIB support; describes how to walk MIBs; and how to compile and
load SNMP MIBs.
n BSR 64000 BGP/MPLS VPN Configuration Guide
This guide provides the instructions and procedures for configuring and
managing the BSR 64000 to support and implement Border Gateway Protocol/
MultiProtocol Label Switching Virtual Private Networks (BGP/MPLS VPNs).
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n BSR 64000 Troubleshooting Guide
This guide contains instructions and procedures for troubleshooting typical
configuration problems that might be encountered using the BSR 64000. It also
offers suggestions for information to record, and have available should the need
arise to call Motorola support for assistance with BSR 64000 operational
problems.
n BSR 64000 Release Notes
These documents are specific to each release of the BSR 64000 product (software
and hardware). Release notes provide information about features not documented
or incorrectly documented in the main documentation set; known problems and
anomalies; product limitations; and problem resolutions.
Conventions
This document uses the conventions in the following table:
Convention Example Explanation
angle brackets < > ping <ip-address>
ping 54.89.145.71
Arguments in italic and enclosed by angle
brackets must be replaced by the text the
argument represents. In the example,
54.89.145.71 replaces <ip-address>. When
entering the argument, do not type the angle
brackets.
bar brackets [ ] disable [level] Bar brackets enclose optional arguments. The
example indicates you can use the disable
command with or without specifying a level.
Some commands accept more than one
optional argument. When entering the
argument, do not type the bar brackets.
bold text cable relay-agent-option Boldface text must be typed exactly as it
appears.
brace brackets {} page {on | off} Brace brackets enclose required text. The
example indicates you must enter either on or
off after page. The system accepts the
command with only one of the parameters.
When entering the text, do not type the brace
brackets.
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Notes, Cautions, Warnings
The following icons and associated text may appear in this document.
italic text boot system <filename> Italic type indicates variables for which you
supply values in command syntax descriptions.
It also indicates file names, directory names,
document titles, or emphasized text.
screen display Wed May 6 17:01:03
2000
This font indicates system output.
vertical bar | page {on | off} A vertical bar separates the choices when a
parameter is required. The example indicates
you can enter either command:
page on or page off
When entering the parameter, do not type the
vertical bar or the brace brackets.
Note: A note contains tips, suggestions, and other helpful information, such
as references to material not contained in the document, that can help you
complete a task or understand the subject matter.
Caution: The exclamation point, within an equilateral triangle, is intended to
alert the user to the presence of important installation, servicing, and
operating instructions in the documents accompanying the equipment.
Warning: This symbol indicates that dangerous voltage levels are present
within the equipment. These voltages are not insulated and may be of
sufficient strength to cause serious bodily injury when touched. The symbol
may also appear on schematics.
Convention Example Explanation
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If You Need Help
Support for your BSR 64000 hardware and software is available via telephone and the
Internet.
Telephone Support
If you need assistance while working with the BSR 64000, contact the Motorola
Technical Response Center (TRC):
The Motorola TRC is on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
When calling for technical support, please have the following information available:
n Your customer information, including location, main contact, and telephone
number
n BSR product and modules
n Detailed description of the issue
n Specific information to assist with resolving the problem, including:
BSR hostname
BSR error messages and logs
Output of BSR show tech command
Cable modem information
n List of troubleshooting steps you have performed before calling the TRC.
n Current state of your BSR 64000 product
n Severity of the issue you are reporting
When calling for repair or Advanced Component Exchange (ACE) replacement,
please provide the following additional information:
n Output of BSR show version command, with part numbers and serial numbers of
BSR components
n Shipping information for the replacement, including contact name, company
name, address, phone number, and email address
U.S. 1-888-944-HELP (1-888-944-4357)
International +215-323-0044
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Online Support
Motorola BSR Customer Website
The BSR customer website, http://bsr.motorola.com, is available for BSR customers
with active service contracts to access the latest product information, software
updates, troubleshooting information, and technical publications for the BSR 64000,
BSR 2000, and BSR 1000 product line.
You may request access to the site by emailing the BSR product support team at
bsrsupportonline@motorola.com with the following information:
n Company name
n Contact name, phone number, and email address
n Motorola Support contact
n BSR product under service contract
The BSR product support team will email an invitation to you with further
instructions on how to set up an account on the BSR customer information website.
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1
Configuring the Cable
Interface
Introduction
This chapter discusses required configuration tasks that must be performed to make
the cable interface on the CMTS module operational. It also discusses additional
optional cable interface configuration tasks.
You must perform the following mandatory initial cable interface configuration tasks:
n Setting the IP DHCP Relay Functions
n Configuring the Cable Helper and IP Helper Addresses
n Configuring Multiple ISPs
n Enabling Host Authorization for All Cable Modems
n Creating a Static Host Authorization Entry for a Specific Cable Modem
n Enabling Host Authorization for an IP Range of CPEs
n Displaying Host Authorization Information
n Using DHCP Lease Query Function to Secure the Cable Network
n Setting ARP Parameters
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Additionally, you can also perform the following optional cable interface
configuration tasks:
n Defining MAC Domains on the 2:8 Primary CMTS Resource Module
n Configuring AntiVirus/AntiWorm Protection
n Configuring the Cable Channel Utilization Interval
n Bundling Cable Interfaces into a Single IP Subnet
n Subnetting DHCP Clients on the Cable Interface
n Clearing Cable Interface Counters
n Configuring Cable Intercepts
n Configuring Cable Security Authorized
n Configuring User-defined Channel IDs
Setting the IP DHCP Relay Functions
The IP DHCP relay function is used to forward DHCP messages between clients and
servers. The IP DHCP relay agent function gathers broadcast DHCP discovery
packets from a Multimedia Terminal Adapter (MTA) device, cable modem, or
Customer Premises Equipment (CPE), and forwards the packets to their
corresponding DHCP server. The DHCP relay function enables an MTA, cable
modem, or CPE to obtain an IP address from a DHCP server through the DHCP relay
agent, which is the router (SRM) between the cable interface and the DHCP server.
Note: Ensure that an IP address and subnetwork mask has been configured
for the cable interface before performing any of the tasks described in this
chapter.
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The ip dhcp relay information command enables the BSR's DHCP relay agent to
insert the Spectrum Group Name that DHCP client belongs to and/or inserts the MAC
address of the DHCP client and the DOCSIS Device Class Identifier into outbound
requests to the DHCP server. The DOCSIS Device Class Indenter is only supported
for 1.1 cable modems. Support for DHCP Option 82, sub-option 2 (Agent Remote ID)
and sub-option 4 (DOCSIS Device Class Identifier) is enabled by the ip dhcp relay
information option command. Support for DHCP Option 82, sub-option 85
(Spectrum Group Name) is enabled by the ip dhcp relay information
spectrum-group-name. The no ip dhcp relay agent information command disables
the insertion of DHCP Option 82, sub-options.
The following steps outline the IP DHCP relay process:
1. An MTA device, cable modem, or CPE sends broadcast DHCP discover packets
to the DHCP relay agent containing a request for an IP address.
2. The DHCP relay agent inserts the MTA, cable modem, or CPE option into the
DHCP discover packets. This option contains either the spectrum group name and
associated MAC address or a MAC address.
3. The DHCP relay agent inserts any configured options into the DHCP discover
packets. This can be a spectrum group name, a MAC address and a DOCSIS
Device Class Identifier or both the spectrum group name and the MAC address
and DOCSIS Device Class Identifier.
4. The DHCP server assigns an IP address to each MTA, cable modem, or CPE that
requested an IP address by placing the IP address in the (Your IP Address) yiaddr
field in the DHCP packet header. The yiaddr is the IP address to be used by the
MTA, cable modem, or CPE.
5. The DHCP relay agent removes the MTA, cable modem, or CPE option and
forwards the DHCP server reply, containing the IP address to the MTA, cable
modem, or CPE.
Follow these steps to configure the DHCP relay option on the BSR:
1. Use the show running-config command in Privileged EXEC mode determine the
DHCP relay function is enabled for the desired cable interface:
MOT:7A#show running-config
2. If you need to change or enable the DHCP relay function for a cable interface,
enter the desired cable interface from Global Configuration mode.
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3. Use the ip dhcp relay information option command in Interface Configuration
mode to enable the DHCP relay agent to insert a MAC address (Agent Remote
ID) only into a clients DHCP packet:
MOT:7A(config-if)#ip dhcp relay information option
4. Optionally use the ip dhcp relay information spectrum-group-name command
in Interface Configuration mode to enable the DHCP relay agent to insert the
spectrum group name (Circuit ID) into all of the DHCP packets:
MOT:7A(config-if)#ip dhcp information spectrum-group-name
Note: The ip dhcp relay information option command must be entered to
enable the DHCP relay information option function. If the DHCP relay
information option function is not enabled, cable modems cannot register and
go on-line.
If you are configuring two MAC domains on the 2x8 CMTS module, the ip
dhcp relay information option command must be entered for each MAC
domain. If this command is not entered in for each domain, cable modems
cannot register in that domain.
Note: If a DHCP client on a particular subnet is using an upstream frequency
that is not configured as a member of a spectrum group, the spectrum group
name is not inserted by the DHCP relay agent into the DHCP discover
packet.
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Configuring the Cable Helper and IP Helper
Addresses
The cable helper IP address function disassembles a cable modem DHCP broadcast
packet, and reassembles it into a unicast packet so that the packet can traverse the
router and communicate with the DHCP server.
The cable helper address function is used in conjunction with the DHCP relay
function. If the ip dhcp relay information option command is not set, all requests
are sent to the IP address defined by the ip helper-address command. When ip dhcp
relay information option is enabled, the BSR can distinguish between requests from
cable modems, secondary hosts and secondary MTAs, and forwards the DHCP
requests to the cable helper IP address specifically defined for the requesting device.
Follow the steps in this section to configure the cable helper and IP helper address:
1. Use the cable helper-address command in Interface Configuration mode to
configure the helper IP address for the cable interface to forward only DHCP
broadcasts:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable helper-address <A.B.C.D> cable-modem
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the destination DHCP server.
2. Optionally use the cable helper-address command in Interface Configuration
mode to configure a secondary helper IP address for the CPE to forward only
UDP broadcasts:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable helper-address <A.B.C.D> host
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the destination DHCP server.
3. Optionally use the cable helper-address command in Interface Configuration
mode to configure a secondary helper IP address for the Multimedia Terminal
Adapter (MTA) device to forward only UDP broadcasts:
Note: Multiple cable-helper addresses can be configured for cable modems,
hosts, and MTAs. If you want both cable modem and host DHCP requests to
be sent to the same DHCP server, configure the same cable helper IP
address for hosts and cable modems.
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MOT:7A(config-if)#cable helper-address <A.B.C.D> mta
where:
A.B.C.D is the destination DHCP server IP address.
4. The IP helper address necessary for the BSR to forward packets to the DHCP
server. Use the ip helper-address command in Interface Configuration mode to
forward default UDP broadcasts including IP configuration requests to the DHCP
server:
MOT:7A(config-if)#ip helper-address <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D is the destination DHCP server IP address.
5. Use the show ip dhcp stats command in Interface Configuration mode to display
information about DHCP upstream and downstream port statistics:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show ip dhcp stats [<0-15>]
where:
0-15 is the module slot number.
Note: The IP helper address must be entered for the DHCP Lease Query
function to work regardless of whether the relay agent option is used.
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Configuring Multiple ISPs
The DHCP-relay agent, which is the router (SRM) between the cable interface and
DHCP server, monitors DHCP CPE host requests for the presence of the Vendor Class
Identifier (VCI) also known as DHCP Relay Option 60. Vendors define a VCI to
optionally identify the DHCP client vendor type and configuration information. For
example, if a VCI identifies a DHCP client as a Multimedia Terminal Adapter (MTA)
device, the DHCP server can put all MTA devices that are on a cable interface into the
same subnet.
The host and mta VCI options are used to configure a CPE host or MTA gateway IP
address (giaddr) for the cable interface. During the DHCP process, the DHCP relay
agent requests an IP address in a particular subnet by inserting the cable interface
giaddr into the DHCP requests from cable modems, hosts, and MTAs. The primary IP
address is always inserted in cable modem DHCP requests. The ip dhcp relay
information option command must be enabled to allow the BSR to determine what
type of device originated the DHCP request. The primary IP address for the cable
interface is inserted into DHCP requests by default.
Enabling a VCI on a Cable Interface
Follow these steps to enable a VCI on the cable interface:
1. Use the ip address command in Interface Configuration mode for the cable
interface to define the Gateway IP address (giaddr) for CPE host DHCP requests
or MTA DHCP requests that creates individual subnets for host CPEs, and MTAs:
MOT:7A(config-if)# ip address {<A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D>} secondary [host |
mta]
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address.
A.B.C.D is the subnetwork IP address mask.
secondary specifies that the secondary IP address is a secondary IP address
for cable modem DHCP requests.
Note: The ip dhcp relay information option command must be enabled to
allow the BSR to determine what type of device originated the DHCP request.
The primary IP address for the cable interface is inserted into DHCP requests
by default.
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host optionally defines this secondary IP CPE host address as the giaddr to
be inserted into CPE host DHCP requests.
mta optionally defines this secondary IP MTA address as the giaddr to be
inserted into MTA DHCP requests.
DHCP Option 60
The DHCP Vendor Class Identifier Relaying feature enhancement allows the BSR to
relay DHCP traffic based on the contents of the vendor class identifier (VCI) field.
This allows DHCP traffic sourced from specific devices, such as set-top boxes, to be
relayed to specific DHCP servers based on the contents of the VCI field (option 60).
There are no requirements for devices to include the VCI field, however, the intention
of this feature enhancement is to allow the VCI field to be used as a way to identify
certain devices. Set-top boxes, for example, can be designed to include a specific VCI
string that allows the BSR 64000 to relay their DHCP traffic to specific DHCP servers
with this feature enhancement.
The following commands are used for this feature:
n cable helper-address host vendor-class-identifiers
n vendor-class-identifier
Note: The BSR supports 256 secondary IP subnets per CMTS module.The
maximum number of secondary IP subnets that can be configured on the
entire BSR chassis is 1024.
If you are running a BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS module as two
1:4 configurations, the limit is still 256 secondary IP subnets for the entire 2:8
CMTS module. The total number of secondary IP subnets between MAC
Domain 0 and MAC Domain 1 can only equal 256. Also, if you apply the
same cable bundle to each MAC domain even though the secondary IP
subnets are the same they must be counted twice.
For example, if you have 256 secondary IP subnets in a cable bundle and
you apply that cable bundle to two MAC domains, the total number of
secondary IP subnets would be 512 which exceeds the limit for the DOCSIS
2.0 CMTS module. In this example, there can be no more than 128
secondary IP subnets on the cable bundle.
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Selecting a Specific ISP
The multiple ISP feature requires significant coordination between the operator's
provisioning system and the BSR. The following is a high level walkthrough of the
use of this feature:
1. The operator configures the BSR and their provisioning system correctly.
2. The customer powers up the cable modem.
3. The cable modem sends a DHCP request to the cable helper-address defined for
cable-modems. The giaddr value is set to that of the primary interface on the
cable interface.
4. The DHCP server assigns an IP address to the cable modem using the giaddr
value.
5. The customer's CPE sends a DHCP discover to cable helper-address defined for
hosts. The giaddr value is set to that of the first secondary ip address defined for
the interface.
6. The DHCP server assigns an IP address for the CPE using the giaddr value.
7. The CPE traffic is now directed to a configuration server which allows the
customer to select the ISP provider.
8. The configuration server saves the information related to the customer's ISP
selection.
9. The cable modem and CPE must now be power cycled to force both devices to
initiate the DHCP process again.
10. The cable modem sends a DHCP request to the cable helper-address defined for
cable-modems. The giaddr value is set to that of the primary interface on the
cable interface. Since the provisioning server now knows the ISP that the
customer selected, it assigns the cable modem an IP address on a sub network that
is associated with the ISP provider.
11. The CPE sends a DHCP request to the cable helper-address that has been defined
for all CPEs that are connected to a cable modem with IP address assignment in
the isp-bind sub network. The giaddr is set to the giaddr of the secondary IP
address that has been defined for all CPEs that are connected to a cable modem
with an IP address in the isp-bind network.
12. The DHCP server now responds with an IP address in a subnet that is owned by
the ISP provider.
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13. All subsequent CPEs that perform DHCP that are connected to the same cable
modem will be automatically assumed to have selected the same ISP.
The BSR supports an "isp-bind" option for the CLI commands ip address and cable
helper-address.
n The isp-bind option for the ip address command allows the BSR to bind a
secondary IP address subnet, to another secondary IP address subnet.
n The isp-bind option for the cable helper-address command allows the BSR to
bind the cable helper address with a secondary IP address subnet.
A CPE that is connected to a cable modem that has an IP address in the A.B.C.D
subnet of the isp-bind <A.B.C.D> option will have the giaddr field of its DHCP
requests set to the ip address A.B.C.D value and will have its DHCP requests
forwarded to the cable helper-address defined for isp-bind A.B.C.D.
An operator can bind a secondary IP address range that was defined for CPEs with the
giaddr of the secondary IP address range that was defined for cable modems of a
particular ISP provider using the ip address and cable helper address commands.
The operator creates an internal mapping of a cable modem subnet, giaddr value and
cable helper address. There can be up to 128 subnets configured on each CMTS
module. Since binding a secondary IP subnet to another secondary IP subnet requires
the use of two subnets and one subnet for the primary, up to 64 ISPs can be configured
for each CMTS.
After a CPE has selected an ISP, all subsequent DHCP requests will have the IP
address of the cable modem inserted by the CMTS module before forwarding the
request to the relay agent on the SRM. The SRM sets the giaddr field and the IP
address of the DHCP server using the cable modems IP address to determine what
the value should be.
MOT:7A(config-if)#ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D> [ secondary [ host |
mta ] [isp-bind <A.B.C.D>]]]
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address.
A.B.C.D is the subnetwork IP address mask.
secondary specifies that the secondary IP address is a secondary IP address for
cable modem DHCP requests.
isp-bind A.B.C.D specifies the secondary IP subnet that this
secondary IP address is bound to.
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MOT:7A(config-if)#cable helper-address <A.B.C.D> {cable-modem | host
[isp-bind <A.B.C.D>] | mta [isp-bind <A.B.C.D>]}
where:
A.B.C.D indicates the IP address of the destination DHCP server.
cable-modem specifies that only cable modem UDP broadcasts are forwarded.
host specifies that only CPE UDP broadcasts are forwarded.
mta specifies that only CPE MTA broadcasts are forwarded
isp-bind A.B.C.D specifies the secondary IP subnet to which the
secondary IP address is bound.
Enabling Host Authorization for All Cable Modems
The host authorization feature is used for security purposes on the cable network.
When enabled, host authorization denies access to any hacker who tries to take or
spoof an IP address from any legitimate user on the same cable network. A hacker
takes the IP address from this user to steal their data service. The hacker accomplishes
this by changing the IP address on their PC to the IP address that the DHCP server
assigned to a legitimate users CPE.
Note: The isp-bind option is only available after selecting the host or mta
options. It is not available for the cable modem option.
Note: The cable helper-address command allows operators to support
multiple cable modem subnets bound to a single cable helper-address. Any
DHCP requests from clients that are attached to cable modems that are part
of the Multiple ISP configuration will have their requests relayed to any
defined ip helper-addresses.
Note: The host authorization feature is turned off by default.
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Follow these steps to enable the host authorization feature:
1. Enter the cable interface on which host authorization is enabled.
2. Use the host authorization on command in Interface Configuration mode to
enforce the bind of the cable modem and CPE MAC addresses to the IP address
assigned to them (statically or through DHCP):
MOT:7A(config-if)#host authorization on
Disabling Host Authorization for All Cable Modems
Use the no host authorization on command to disable host authorization on the cable
interface.
Creating a Static Host Authorization Entry for a
Specific Cable Modem
Cable operators can create static entries to deny hackers from stealing service from
users. Through static entries, cable operators can manually bind the Customer
Premises Equipment (CPE) MAC (hardware) and IP address or Customer Premises
Router (CPR) MAC (hardware) and IP address to a particular cable modem. This
command may be used in circumstances when DHCP is not used to assign the CPE IP
addresses.
Follow these steps to configure and verify a static host authorization:
1. Use the cable interface command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
desired cable interface.
2. Use the host authorization command in Interface Configuration mode to create a
static entry for a specific cable modem and CPE, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#host authorization <mac> cpe <mac> <prefix>
where:
mac is the MAC address of the cable modem.
mac is the MAC address of the CPE.
prefix is the IP address of the CPE.
3. Use the host authorization command in Interface Configuration mode to create a
static entry for a specific cable modem and CPR, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#host authorization <mac> cpr <mac> <prefix>
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where:
mac is the MAC address of the cable modem.
mac is the MAC address of the CPR.
prefix is the IP address of the CPR.
4. Use the show host authorization cpe static command to display the static entries
and DHCP lease query information for CPEs only:
MOT:7A#show host authorization cpe static
Deleting a Static Host Authorization Entry for a Specific
Cable Modem
Use the no host authorization command in Interface Configuration mode to delete a
host authorization entry, as follows:
MOT:7A#no host authorization <mac> cpe <mac> <prefix>
where:
mac is the MAC address of the cable modem.
mac is the MAC address of the customer premises equipment (CPE).
prefix is the IP address of the CPE.
Enabling Host Authorization for an IP Range of
CPEs
Instead of adding individual static CPEs on a specific cable interface using the cable
host authorization cpe command, CPEs can be added automatically to the network
by specifying a start and end range of IP addresses. This function allows you to
specify a partial subnet by allowing CPEs on different cable interfaces to
automatically connect to a network.
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Use the cable host authorization range command in Global Configuration mode to
define a range of CPE IP addresses that are allowed to be added to the host
authorization table (static IP table). Any CPE IP address within the specified start and
end IP address range is added to the host authorization table when a CPE joins the
network.
MOT:7A(config)#cable host authorization range {<prefix> <prefix>}
where:
prefix is the start of the IP address range.
prefix is the end of the IP address range.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable host authorization range 150.42.19.100
150.42.19.109
Removing Host Authorization for an IP Range of CPEs
Use the no cable host authorization range command to remove the start and end IP
range of CPE addresses so that new CPEs trying to join the network (having an IP
address within the specified range) cannot be added to the host authorization table:
MOT:7A(config)#no cable host authorization range {<prefix> <prefix>}
A CPE with an IP address that is within the start and end range defined by the host
authorization range command that is currently connected remains in the host
authorization table until it is individually removed by the no host authorization
command, or if the BSR is reset.
Displaying Host Authorization Information
Use the following show command options to view host authorization information in
all modes except UserEXEC mode:
n If you want to view a summary of ARP authorization table information, issue the
show host authorization cpe leased command:
MOT:7A#show host authorization summary
Note: Up to 32 CPE IP address ranges can be defined for the BSR.
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n If you want to view the type, host IP address and host MAC address of dynamic
entries in the ARP authorization table, issue the show host authorization cpe
leased command:
MOT:7A#show host authorization cpe leased
n If you want to view the type, host IP address and host MAC address of static
entries and DHCP lease query information for CPEs only, issue the show host
authorization cpe static command:
MOT:7A#show host authorization cpe static
n If you want to view all entries or the entries for a specified CMTS module in the
ARP authorization table on the BSR, issue the show host authorization
command:
MOT:7A#show host authorization [<0-15>]
where:
0-15 is the BSR module slot number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output and
field descriptions for the show host authorization and show host authorization
summary commands.
Using DHCP Lease Query Function to Secure the
Cable Network
The DHCP lease query feature provides additional security on the cable network by
preventing hackers from stealing service from customers. Hackers steal service from
other subscribers by spoofing their connection information contained in ARP
broadcasts. Preventing hackers from spoofing the cable network also prevents
undesirable ARP broadcasts from disrupting service on the cable network.
The DHCP lease query feature is used in conjunction with the host authorization
feature on the BSR to query the location of a hackers cable modem and its connected
Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) when a packet either arrives from or is destined
to a subscribers cable modem and its CPE, and has no location information in the
DHCP Lease table.
If the DHCP lease query attempt fails, packets associated with the cable modem and
its CPE are discarded. The BSR sends DHCPLEASEQUERY messages to the
specified DHCP server and accepts DHCPACTIVE, DHCPKNOWN and
DHCPUNKNOWN replies from the DHCP server.
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The DHCP lease query function requires that the DHCP Server is configured with the
following values for the different DHCP message types:
n DHCPDISCOVER (1)
n DHCPOFFER (2)
n DHCPREQUEST (3)
n DHCPDECLINE (4)
n DHCPACK (5)
n DHCPNAK (6)
n DHCPRELEASE (7)
n DHCPINFORM (8)
n DHCPLEASEQUERY (10)
n DHCPLEASEUNASSIGNED (11)
n DHCPLEASEUNKNOWN (12)
n DHCPLEASEACTIVE (13)
The following steps demonstrate how the BSR uses the DHCP lease query feature:
1. Cable Subscriber requests and gets an IP address from DHCP server.
2. Cable Subscriber starts to pass traffic through the cable interface.
3. The BSR inspects the cable network traffic to ensure source IP addresses are valid
by doing the following:
Verify DHCP server acknowledgement messages to learn if IP packets are
forwarded only once for an IP address.
Query the DHCP server to verify if an IP address was legally assigned by
verifying DHCP lease information table. If it is confirmed that static IP
address was assigned by a hacker for a cable modem, packets are not
forwarded beyond the cable interface.
Disallow ARP broadcasts
Query the DHCP server to verify that one IP address to MAC address
binding appears for a cable modem. If there is more than one IP address to
MAC address combination, one IP was assigned by DHCP and the other IP
address is statically (manually) set by a hacker. In this instance, only packets
sent from the legal source learned through DHCP are forwarded.
The DHCP lease query feature can also determine:
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n If the BSR is replaced or inadvertently rebooted.
n When a cable modem re-registers and acquires a new lease.
n When a cable modem or CPE maintains its lease because it has not expired.
n When the cable interface learns about the DHCP lease through a
DHCPLEASEQUERY exchange.
n When the cable modem or CPE can continue passing data.
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Follow these steps to enable the DHCP lease query feature:
1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
desired cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the dhcpleasequery authorization on command in Interface Configuration
mode to enable DHCP lease query messages to be exchanged between the cable
interface and DHCP server:
MOT:7A(config-if)#dhcpleasequery authorization on
3. Use the show ip traffic command to monitor DHCP lease query statistics, which
include the number of active, known, unknown, and unimplemented DHCP
packet transmissions.
Setting ARP Parameters
The Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) is used to build a correlation between the
cable network and the connected cable modems and customer premises equipment
(CPE) by translating the cable modem and CPEs MAC address to a logical IP
address. The collected information is dynamically stored in a table called the ARP
cache.
Follow these steps to set ARP parameters on a cable interface.
1. Enter the cable interface on which ARP is enabled.
Note: The IP helper address must be entered for the DHCP Lease Query
function to function properly. Refer to Configuring the Cable Helper and IP
Helper Addresses for more information on setting the IP helper address on
the cable interface.
For the DHCP Lease Query feature to function properly, host authorization
must also be enabled with the host authorization command. Host
authorization is used for security purposes on a cable network. Refer to
Enabling Host Authorization for All Cable Modems.
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2. Use the arp command in Interface configuration mode to specify the type of ARP
packet that is used on the BSR 64000:
MOT:7A(config-if)#arp [arpa | snap]
where:
arpa is entered for the standard ARP protocol.
snap is entered for the IEEE 802.3 usage of ARP.
The ARP timeout feature is used to prevent unnecessary flooding of traffic over the
cable network. ARP resolution requests are terminated after a defined interval when
attempts to resolve addressing information, for a device entry in the ARP cache table.
3. The ARP cache table expiration value is disabled by default. Use the arp timeout
command in Interface Configuration mode to set the ARP cache table expiration
value:
MOT:7A(config-if)#arp timeout <1-6000>
where:
1-6000 is the expiration value in minutes.
If you want to return to the default ARP timeout condition, use the no arp timeout
command in Interface Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no arp timeout
Defining MAC Domains on the 2:8 Primary CMTS
Resource Module
A 2:8 Primary CMTS Resource Module supports up to two MAC Domains. A MAC
Domain must have at least one downstream and one upstream channel associated with
it (i.e, bound to it). In effect, a MAC Domain is somewhat analogous to the concept of
an interface.
When the 2:8 CMTS Resource Module is installed into an operating chassis, it sets up
MAC Domains based on the default MAC Domain definition in the startup
configuration file. After the module boots you can modify the MAC Domain
definition through the BSR Command Line Interface (CLI).
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Each MAC Domain must have at least one downstream and one upstream channel
associated (bound) to it. A user associates (binds) either one or both of the two
downstream channels and a specific group of the eight upstream channels on the
module to either of the two MAC Domains available on the module. When installed in
an operating BSR chassis, the 2:8 Primary CMTS Resource Module sets up MAC
Domains based on the default definition in the startup configuration file.
Default MAC Domain Definition
A MAC Domain definition is defined for each resource module slot in which a 2:8
Primary CMTS Module can be installed (slots 0-5, 9-15) in the BSR startup
configuration file. Slot 6 is reserved for the Standby CMTS, slot 7 is reserved for the
SRM, and slot 8 is reserved for the Standby SRM. When a 2:8 Primary CMTS
Resource Module is installed into an operating BSR chassis, the module, after
booting, has one MAC Domain (0). MAC Domain 0 comprises downstream port 0
and upstream ports 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7.
Redefining a MAC Domain
The 2:8 Primary CMTS Resource Modules supports two MAC Domains that can be
configured through the BSR CLI. Configuration flexibility allows operators to
associate (bind) one of the modules two downstream ports with any combination of
upstream ports to define a MAC Domain. Follow this procedure to redefine the MAC
Domains on a single 2:8 Primary CMTS Module. As an example, this procedure
describes rebinding upstream and downstream ports from MAC Domain 1 to MAC
Domain 0.
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1. On the installed 2:8 Primary CMTS Module, navigate to Interface Configuration
mode for MAC Domain 1, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the chassis slot number of an installed 2:8 Primary CMTS Module
Y is the number of the MAC Domain (e.g. MAC Domain 1)
2. Use the cable downstream shutdown and cable upstream shutdown command
to disable the upstream and downstream ports on MAC Domain 1 that you want
to bind to MAC Domain 0, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)cable downstream <NUM> shutdown
where
NUM is the number of the downstream port.
MOT:7A(config-if)cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} shutdown
where:
NUM is the number of the upstream port (channel).
X/Y is the upstream port number and logical channel number (0-3)
3. Use the show cable modem registered and show cable modem unregistered
commands to view the deregistration of all cable modems associated with the
channels you disabled in Step 2. Wait until all modems associated with the port
deregister before proceeding to Step 4.
4. Shutdown the cable interface associated with the MAC Domain 1, as follows:
Note: When using the cable upstream shutdown command, only the NUM
option displays for a BCM 3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules. Both the NUM
and X/Y arguments display for BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS. The
cable upstream shutdown command is applicable to both an upstream port
or upstream port and logical channel.
To determine which 2:8 CMTS module is installed in the BSR 64000, use the
show chassis status command. For BCM 3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules,
the command display reads 2:8 CMTS, and for the BCM 3140-based
DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS, the display reads, 2:8 CMTS (DOCSIS 2.0)
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MOT:7A(config-if)shutdown
5. Navigate to Interface Configuration mode for MAC Domain 0, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the chassis slot number of an installed 2:8 Primary CMTS Module
Y is the number of the MAC Domain (e.g. MAC Domain 0)
6. Use the cable bind downstream command to bind a downstream port to MAC
Domain 0, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)cable bind downstream <NUM>
where:
NUM is the number of a single downstream port or both downstream port
numbers on the module separated by a comma (0,1).
7. Use the cable bind upstream command to bind an upstream port to MAC
Domain 0, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)cable bind upstream <NUM>
where:
NUM specifies a single upstream port number, a subset of upstream port
numbers (separated by commas), or all upstream port numbers on the module
separated by commas (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7).
8. Use the no cable downstream shutdown and no cable upstream shutdown
commands to enable the individual ports now associated (rebound) to MAC
Domain 0, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)no cable downstream <NUM> shutdown
MOT:7A(config-if)no cable upstream <NUM> shutdown
where:
NUM is the number of the downstream or upstream channel
9. Use the show cable modem registered and show cable unregistered commands
to view the reregistration of all cable modems associated with the channels you
enabled in Step 8.
10. Navigate to Interface Configuration mode for MAC Domain 1, as follows:
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MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the chassis slot number of an installed 2:8 Primary CMTS Module
Y is the number of the MAC Domain (e.g. MAC Domain 1)
11. Enable the cable interface associated with the MAC Domain 1, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)no shutdown
12. Use the copy running-config startup-config command in Privileged EXEC
mode to copy (save) the running configuration to the startup configuration, as
follows:
MOT:7A#copy running-config startup-config
Configuring AntiVirus/AntiWorm Protection
The BSR supports a configurable antivirus/antiworm feature that enables operators to
filter (drop) worm/virus packets on both the upstream and downstream cable
interfaces.
Using the cable deny ip CLI command, operators specify the IP protocol used by the
virus or worm and its packet length (in bytes) to enable a filter for a particular threat.
For example, to handle the Nachi worm the CMTS must be able to filter 92-byte
ICMP packets both upstream and downstream.
This feature is disabled by default and must be explicitly enabled by the operator. The
ACCPKT event system keeps track of the number of dropped packets in the upstream
and downstream directions using the ACCPKT.33 and ACCPKT.68 events.
Use the cable deny ip command to create and implement a filter that will filter (drop)
the virus or worm from the cable network.
Before creating a filter you must know the following:
n Number of the IP protocol used by the threat (virus or worm)
n The size (in bytes) of the virus or worm
Note: Repeat the above procedure, as required, to redefine MAC Domains
on additional 2:8 Primary CMTS Resource Modules.
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Use the cable deny ip command from Cable Interface Configuration Mode to create a
filter for a specific threat, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)# cable deny ip <0-255> <20-65535>
where:
0-255 is a numeric value indicating which IP protocol number to drop.
20-65535 is the length in bytes indicating the size of the IP packet to drop.
Use the no form of this command, no cable deny ip, to delete a filter you created, as
follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)# no cable deny ip <0-255> <20-65535>
Configuring the Cable Channel Utilization Interval
The cable utilization-interval command is used to estimate the amount of bandwidth
used on each BSR CMTS module for their downstream and upstream channels for a
specified interval. Use the cable utilization-interval command in Global
Configuration mode to specify the upstream and downstream channel utilization
calculation interval. The no cable utilization-interval returns the channel utilization
calculation interval to the default value of "0" (disabled).
MOT:7A(config)#cable utilization-interval <0-86400>
where:
0-86400 is the channel utilization interval in seconds, 0 is disabled.
Bundling Cable Interfaces into a Single IP Subnet
Cable bundling allows you to group multiple cable interfaces into a single IP subnet.
Cable bundling simplifies network management and conserves IP addresses.
Each BSR 64000 DOCSIS module provides one cable interface. A cable bundle
comprises two or more cable interfaces: one cable interface is configured as the
master, while the remaining interfaces are configured as slaves to the master. If one
DOCSIS module is configured as the master, the other DOCSIS modules can become
slaves. The master cable interface is assigned IP addresses and the slaves share the
same IP addresses with the master. Therefore, the bundling feature eliminates the
need for an IP subnet for each cable interface.
The cable bundle feature provides the following benefits:
n You can add new DOCSIS modules without having to assign an IP address to
each new DOCSIS module or to cable modems on each interface.
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n You can move a cable modem that has a static IP address to any cable interface on
the same bundle without assigning the cable modem a new IP address.
n You can bundle all cable interfaces into a single bundle to share a single IP
subnet.
The cable bundling feature requires that the following conditions are observed:
n Cable interface bundling is only supported on cable interfaces.
n One cable interface must be configured as the master interface for the bundle. The
other cable interfaces are configured as slave interfaces.
n An IP address is only assigned to master cable interface.
n DHCP relay is only enabled on the master cable interface.
n ARP authorization is enabled on both the master cable interface and the slave
cable interfaces.
n Cable upstream and downstream parameters remain unique for each individual
cable interface.
n Cable interface bundles are configured using CLI commands only.
Creating a Cable Bundle on a Cable Interface
Follow these steps to configure a cable bundle on the BSR 64000:
1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
cable interface that you want to designate as the master cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
For example:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable 4/0
2. Use the show running-config command in Privileged EXEC mode to make sure
that DHCP relay is enabled on the master cable interface. Check the command
output to see if the IP helper address or cable helper address is assigned to the
master cable interface.
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3. If the IP helper address or cable helper address is not assigned to the master cable
interface, use the ip helper-address or cable helper-address command in
Interface configuration mode to enable DHCP relay. The ip helper-address or
cable helper address specifies the DHCP server.
4. Use the show interfaces cable command in Global Configuration mode to
determine if an ip address is assigned to the master cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#show interfaces cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
5. If the master cable interface does not have IP address, use the ip address
command in Interface Configuration mode to specify the master cable interface
IP address.
6. Use the cable bundle master command in Interface Configuration mode to
assign the cable interface as the master cable interface and assign the bundle a
number:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle <0-255> [master]
where:
0-255 is the number of the cable bundle identifier.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle 1 master
7. Use the end command in Interface Configuration mode to exit the master cable
interface.
8. Use the show interfaces cable command in Global Configuration mode to make
sure that the slave cable interface does not have an IP address assigned to it:
MOT:7A(config)#show interfaces cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
9. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to assign
another cable interface as the slave interface:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
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where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
For example:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable 5/0
10. Use the cable bundle command in Interface Configuration mode to assign this
cable interface as the slave cable interface and assign the bundle the same number
as the master cable interface:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle <0-255>
where:
0-255 is the number of the cable bundle identifier.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle 1
11. Use the show running-config command in Privileged EXEC mode to verify your
cable bundle configuration for each cable interface.
The examples in this section show that the DOCSIS module master cable interface is
in slot 4 and the DOCSIS module slave cable interface is in slot 5. Both modules are
in the same IP subnet that is described as cable bundle 1.
Here is the entire example configuration discussed in this section:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable 4/0
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle 1 master
MOT:7A(config-if)#end
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable 5/0
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle 1
MOT:7A(config-if)#end
Note: In the case of virtual cable bundling, the BSR will support the
association of CMs in a single IP subnet with sub-interfaces across the MAC
domains (as slaves) of the same CMTS 2:8 module. This will also be
supported across the MAC domains of two different CMTS 2:8 modules.
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Adding a Static ARP Entry to a Cable Bundle Interface
Use the arp cablebundle cable command in Global Configuration mode to optionally
add a static arp entry to the cable bundle interface:
MOT:7A(config)#arp <A.B.C.D> <H.H.H> [arpa | snap] cablebundle cable <X/
Y>
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the ARP entry.
H.H.H is the 48-bit MAC address of the ARP entry.
The following example shows how to add a static arp entry that has an IP address of
10.1.1.10 and MAC address of 0000.0000.0010 MAC in arpa format on cable bundle
interface cable 3/0:
MOT:7A(config)#arp 10.1.1.10 0000.0000.0010 arpa cablebundle cable 3/0
Creating a Cable Bundle on a Loopback Interface
Configuring a loopback interface as a cable bundle master provides a mechanism for
configuring the IP parameters of a cable bundle in a virtual interface which is
independent of physical cable interfaces. The advantage of configuring a virtual
interface as the cable bundle master is that IP configuration information will be
always available regardless of the state of the CMTS hardware. The slave cable
interfaces of a bundle whose master is a virtual interface will not lose their IP
information when the hardware module for one of the cable interfaces has either
failed or been removed.
Follow these steps to configure a cable bundle on a loopback interface on the BSR
64000:
1. Use the interface loopback command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
loopback interface that you want to designate as the master cable bundle:
MOT:7A(config)#interface loopback <1-255>
where:
1-255 is the loopback interface number for the master cable bundle.
For example:
MOT:7A(config)#interface loopback 4
2. Use the ip address command in Interface Configuration mode to define an IP
address for the loopback interface:
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MOT:7A(config-if)#ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the BSR interface designated for the loopback
interface.
A.B.C.D is the subnetwork mask of the IP network, on which the interface is
associated.
3. Use the ip address secondary command in Interface Configuration mode to
optionally configure a secondary IP address for the loopback interface:
MOT:7A(config-if)#ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D> secondary
where:
A.B.C.D is the secondary IP address of the BSR interface.
A.B.C.D is the subnetwork mask of the IP network, on which the interface is
associated.
Note: A 32-bit mask (255.255.255.255) is permitted for a loopback IP
address.
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secondary optionally designates the IP address as a secondary IP address.
Include the keyword secondary after the IP address and subnet mask to
specify additional secondary IP addresses.
4. Use the show running-config command in Privileged EXEC mode to make sure
that DHCP relay is enabled on the master cable loopback interface. Check the
command output to see if the IP helper address or cable helper address is assigned
to the master cable loopback interface.
5. If the IP helper address or cable helper address is not assigned to the master cable
loopback address, use the ip helper-address or cable helper-address command
in Interface configuration mode to enable DHCP relay. The ip helper-address or
cable helper address specifies the DHCP server.
6. Use the show interfaces loopback command in Interface Configuration mode to
determine if an IP address is assigned to the master cable loopback interface:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show interfaces loopback <1-255>
where:
1-255 is the loopback interface number.
Note: The BSR supports 512 secondary IP subnets per CMTS module.The
maximum number of secondary IP subnets that can be configured on the
entire BSR chassis is 1024.
If you are running a BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS module as two
1:4 configurations, the limit is still 512 secondary IP subnets for the entire 2:8
CMTS module. The total number of secondary IP subnets between MAC
Domain 0 and MAC Domain 1 can only equal 512. Also, if you apply the
same cable bundle to each MAC domain even though the secondary IP
subnets are the same they must be counted twice.
For example, if you have 512 secondary IP subnets in a cable bundle and
you apply that cable bundle to two MAC domains, the total number of
secondary IP subnets would be 1024 which exceeds the limit for the DOCSIS
2.0 CMTS module. In this example, there can be no more than 256
secondary IP subnets on the cable bundle.
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7. If the master cable loopback interface does not have IP address, use the ip
address command in Interface Configuration mode to specify the master cable
loopback interface IP address.
8. Use the cable bundle master command in Interface Configuration mode to
assign the loopback interface as the master cable interface and assign the bundle a
number:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle <0-255> [master]
where:
0-255 is the number of the cable bundle identifier.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle 1 master
9. Use the end command in Interface Configuration mode to exit the master cable
interface.
10. Use the show interfaces cable command in Global Configuration mode to make
sure that the slave cable interface does not have an IP address assigned to it:
MOT:7A(config)#show interfaces cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
11. Use the show running-config command in Privileged EXEC mode to verify your
cable bundle configuration for each loopback interface.
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Subnetting DHCP Clients on the Cable Interface
The DHCP-relay agent, which is the router (SRM) between the cable interface and
DHCP server, monitors DHCP CPE host requests for the presence of the Vendor Class
Identifier (VCI) also known as DHCP Relay Option 60. Vendors define a VCI to
optionally identify the DHCP client vendor type and configuration information. For
example, if a VCI identifies a DHCP client as a Multimedia Terminal Adapter (MTA)
device, the DHCP server can put all MTA devices that are on a cable interface into the
same subnet.
The host and mta VCI options are used to configure a CPE host or MTA gateway IP
address (giaddr) for the cable interface. During the DHCP process, the DHCP relay
agent requests an IP address in a particular subnet by inserting the cable interface
giaddr into the DHCP requests from CMs, hosts, and MTAs. The primary IP address
is always inserted in CM DHCP requests. The ip dhcp relay information option
command must be enabled to allow the BSR to determine what type of device
originated the DHCP request if one or more secondary giaddr IP addresses are defined
for a secondary CM host or MTA device. The primary IP address for the cable
interface is inserted into DHCP requests by default.
Follow these steps to enable a VCI on the cable interface:
1. Enter the desired cable interface.
2. Use the ip address secondary command to define the Gateway IP address
(giaddr) for CPE host DHCP requests or MTA DHCP requests that creates
individual subnets for host CPEs, and MTAs:
MOT:7A(config-if)# ip address {<A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D>} secondary [host |
mta]
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address.
A.B.C.D is the subnetwork IP address mask.
secondary specifies that the secondary IP address is a secondary IP address
for CM DHCP requests.
Note: The primary IP address for the cable interface is used for CM DHCP
requests.
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host optionally defines this secondary IP CPE host address as the giaddr to
be inserted into CPE host DHCP requests.
mta optionally defines this secondary IP MTA address as the giaddr to be
inserted into MTA DHCP requests.
Forcing the Primary Cable Address for DHCP Requests
If you need to force the BSR to always set the gateway IP address (giaddr) to use the
primary IP address only for DHCP requests, which is the IP address of the cable
interface, optionally issue the cable dhcp-giaddr primary command in Interface
Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable dhcp-giaddr primary
Clearing Cable Interface Counters
Use the clear counters cable command in any mode to clear the counters for a cable
interface:
MOT:7A#clear counters cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
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Configuring Cable Intercepts
Cable intercept provides a means of monitoring and intercepting data originating from
a cable network. The Cable Intercept feature provides MSOs with Lawful Intercept
capabilities required by the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act
(CALEA) for electronic surveillance. Lawful Intercept capabilities are used by law
enforcement agencies to conduct electronic surveillance of circuit and data
communications.
When a cable intercept is initiated, copies of the data transmissions from and to a
specified Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) MAC address (such as a PC) are sent
to an intercept collector, which is a server at a specified IP address and UDP port
number.
On the 2:8 CMTS module, each MAC domain supports a maximum of 16 cable
intercept entries in the startup configuration and running configuration files for a total
of 32 cable intercept entries for a 2:8 CMTS module. Only one MAC address per CPE
device, such as a PC can be intercepted and only packets from these CPEs are
intercepted.
Cable Intercept Security
Only authorized personnel should be able to configure and monitor current intercepts.
Access to cable intercept functionality is password protected. A user with the
appropriate privilege level is able to enable, disable, and view cable intercepts. Users
without the appropriate privilege level cannot access any cable intercept CLI
commands for configuring or viewing cable intercepts.
A new CLI user group called security, which is similar to the existing sysadmin user
group, is now supported by the BSR. There is a single username, called securityuser,
within this user group which effectively has superuser privileges and is the only
username with access to all cable intercept related commands. All other users will be
excluded from any CLI commands relating to cable intercepts.
Warning: Lawful Intercept capabilities to intercept customer traffic are
authorized by either a judicial means to support local laws or through an
administrative order governed by service level agreements (SLAs). The
proper legal or administrative persons must be contacted first before
customer traffic is intercepted and examined.
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For auditing and traceability purposes, it is necessary to log securityuser logins,
logouts, and all cable intercept related commands. This logging information is
available to a user logged in as securityuser with the show log security command.
The following commands are only available to a user logged in as securityuser:
n cable intercept
n no cable intercept
n bridge cable intercept
n no bridge cable intercept
n clear packet-cable statistics es identifier
n clear packet-cable statistics em
n show interfaces cable intercept
n show log security
n show packet-cable statistics es identifier
n show packet-cable statistics em
n show packet-cable gate identifier
n show running-config security
n show startup-config security
Configuring the Cable Intercept Feature Through TACACS
Authorization
The following TACACS server configuration is needed to successfully login and
configure the cable intercept feature through TACACS authorization:
Group Configuration
Enable Options -> Max Privilege for any AAA Client
Set to Level 14
TACACS Settings
Check - Shell (Exec)
Check - Privilege Level then input 14 into the box
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Shell Command Authorization Settings
Per Group Command Authorization -> Unmatched Cisco IOS Commands
Check - Permit
Logging in as securityuser
To login as securityuser, do the following:
1. Use the login command, in User EXEC mode, as follows:
MOT:7A> login securityuser
2. Press the Enter key.
The Password: prompt displays.
3. Enter the default password of securityuser.
4. Press the Enter key to login as securityuser and access Privileged EXEC mode.
The MOT:7A# prompt displays.
Note: When the cable intercept feature is enabled, the TACACS
authorization servers must be configured to include a securityuser user with a
privilege level set to 14.
Note: Motorola recommends changing the securityuser password from the
default password of securityuser as described in the following section.
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Changing the securityuser Password
The securityuser password is encrypted by default. Use one of the forms of the
username password command, in Global Configuration mode, to define a new
encrypted password for the securityuser user account, as shown below.
1. MOT:7A(config)#username securityuser password <WORD>
2. MOT:7A(config)#username securityuser password 0 <WORD>
3. MOT:7A(config)#username securityuser password 7 <WORD>
(ENCRYPTED)
where:
0 specifies that a plain text password follows.
7 specifies that an encrypted password follows.
WORD defines the password for the securityuser login account and is entered in
plain text.
WORD (ENCRYPTED) defines the encrypted password for the securityuser login
account and is entered as an encrypted password.
The password is always displayed in the encrypted form in any show command
output. For example, the following is an example of typical username output from the
show running-config command:
MOT:7A#show running-config | inc username
Note: Although three forms of the username password command are
available, Motorola recommends using forms 1 and 2 from the description
below for specifying a password for securityuser.
username securityuser user-group security
username securityuser password 7 79676a222571d69cd5496dc5c019046d946fe259
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Enabling a Cable Intercept
Follow these steps to intercept data for a particular CPE:
1. Use the interface command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the cable
interface on which you want to enable a cable intercept:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module:
2. Use the cable intercept command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to
create a cable intercept to respond to CALEA requests from law enforcement for
traffic regarding a specific user:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable intercept <mac> <prefix> <0-65535>
where:
mac is the intercept source, which is the MAC address from which traffic is
intercepted. Packets with a source or destination MAC address that matches
this address are copied and forwarded to the data collection server. Most
often, this MAC address is the user's CPE device, and not the MAC address
of the user's CM.
prefix specifies the destination IP address for the data collection server that
receives copies of the forwarded traffic.
0-65535 is the destination User Datagram Port (UDP) port number, which is
used exclusively by the data collection server. A default UDP port number is
not provided.
3. Use the show running-config security command to display configured cable
intercept entries in the running configuration file. Refer to Displaying Cable
Intercept Information for an example of typical configured cable intercept entries
from the show running-config security command screen output.
4. Use the copy running-config startup-configuration command to save the
configuration changes made in the running configuration to the startup
configuration so that these changes are guaranteed to persist across a reboot of the
BSR:
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MOT:7A(config-if)#copy running-config startup-configuration
5. Use the show interfaces cable intercept command to view intercept information
for each intercepted CPE MAC address. Each destination IP address and UDP
port for the data collection server are displayed and the total number of packets
and bytes that are intercepted from this CPE are also displayed:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show interfaces cable <X/Y> intercept
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module.
Note: When the BSR is rebooted without a startup configuration file, all
configured cable intercepts will be automatically removed. If the BSR is
rebooted without a startup configuration file, the securityuser password is
reset to the default of securityuser. A non-authorized individual will potentially
be able to login as securityuser and identify any ongoing intercepts. This
scenario should be avoided.
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Enabling a Bridging Cable Intercept
The bridge cable intercept command creates a cable intercept on a specified bridging
cable modem as a response to a CALEA request from law enforcement for traffic
regarding a specific user. Follow these steps to intercept data for a particular bridging
cable modem:
1. Use the bridge cable intercept command, in Global Configuration mode, to
create a bridging cable modem intercept to respond to CALEA requests from law
enforcement for traffic regarding a specific user:
MOT:7A(config)#bridge cable intercept <mac> modem <mac> <A.B.C.D>
<0-65535>
where:
mac is the intercept source, which is the MAC address from which traffic is
intercepted. Packets with a source or destination MAC address that matches
this address are copied and forwarded to the data collection server. Most
often, this MAC address is the user's CPE device, and not the MAC address
of the user's CM.
A.B.C.D specifies the destination IP address for the data collection server that
receives copies of the forwarded traffic.
modem mac is the MAC address of the user's cable modem.
0-65535 is the destination User Datagram Port (UDP) port number, which is
used exclusively by the data collection server. A default UDP port number is
not provided.
2. Use the show running-config security command to display configured cable
intercept entries in the running configuration file. Refer to Displaying Cable
Intercept Information for an example of typical configured cable intercept entries
from the show running-config security command screen output.
3. Use the copy running-config startup-configuration command to save the
configuration changes made in the running configuration to the startup
configuration so that these changes are guaranteed to persist across a reboot of the
BSR.
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Disabling a Cable Intercept
Follow these steps to disable a cable intercept for a particular CPE:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
cable interface on which cable intercepts are configured:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module.
2. Use the no cable intercept command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to
delete a cable intercept on the cable interface:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable intercept <mac> <prefix> <0-65535>
where:
mac is the intercept source, which is the MAC address from which traffic is
intercepted. Packets with a source or destination MAC address that matches
this address are copied and forwarded to the data collection server. Most
often, this MAC address is the user's CPE device, and not the MAC address
of the user's CM.
prefix specifies the destination IP address for the data collection server that
receives copies of the forwarded traffic.
0-65535 is the destination User Datagram Port (UDP) port number, which is
used exclusively by the data collection server. A default UDP port number is
not provided.
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Disabling a Bridging Cable Intercept
Follow these steps to disable a bridging cable modem intercept for a particular
bridging cable modem:
Use the no bridge cable intercept command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode,
to delete a cable intercept on the cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#no bridge cable intercept <mac> modem <mac> <A.B.C.D>
<0-65535>
where:
mac is the intercept source, which is the MAC address from which traffic is
intercepted. Packets with a source or destination MAC address that matches this
address are copied and forwarded to the data collection server. Most often, this
MAC address is the user's CPE device, and not the MAC address of the user's
CM.
A.B.C.D specifies the destination IP address for the data collection server that
receives copies of the forwarded traffic.
modem mac is the MAC address of the user's cable modem.
0-65535 is the destination User Datagram Port (UDP) port number, which is used
exclusively by the data collection server. A default UDP port number is not
provided.
Displaying Cable Intercept Information
n Use the show running-config security or show startup-config security
commands to display configured cable intercept or bridging cable intercept
entries in the respective running configuration or startup configuration files. The
following displays an example of typical configured cable intercept entries from
the show running-config security or show startup-config security command
screen output.
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n Use the show users command to display the group access level for the
securityuser user account. The following displays an example of typical screen
output from the show users command.
n For auditing and traceability purposes, it is necessary to log login, logout, and all
cable intercept related commands. This logging information is available to a user
logged in as securityuser with the show log security command. Use the show log
security command to display logged cable intercept information. The following
displays an example of typical screen output from the show log security
command. The newest logged entries appear first in the output.
cable intercept 0000.0001.0201 10.14.38.52 1900
cable intercept 0000.0001.0301 10.14.38.52 1900
cable intercept 0000.0001.0401 10.14.38.52 1900
CPE MAC
Address
Data Collection
Server IP
UDP
Port
bridge cable intercept 0000.0000.0004 modem 0017.ee85.b148 150.31.159.77 99
CPE MAC
Address
Cable Modem
IP Address
Cable Modem
MAC Address
UDP
Port
Address

Active connections
user group/privilege origin session
------------------------------------------------------------------
console sysadmin/rw console 0
securityuser security/rw 10.14.37.103 1*
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[12/13-13:45:20.43- 07:tRDNts0004]-N-session 01 disconnected
[12/13-13:45:20.43- 07:tRDNts0004]-N-user securityuser logged out.
[12/13-13:17:46.58- 02:tNetTask]arptnew failed on 961f9f08
[12/13-13:17:33.58- 06:tNetTask]arptnew failed on 961f9f08
[12/13-13:17:18.58- 04:tNetTask]arptnew failed on 961f9f08
[12/13-13:16:49.58- 10:tNetTask]arptnew failed on 961f9f08
[12/13-13:04:10.09- 07:telnet01]-N-user securityuser authenticated
[12/13-13:03:49.68- 07:telnet01]-N-connection made from 10.14.37.103 on session
01
[12/13-13:03:41.51- 07:tRDNts0003]-N-session 01 disconnected
[12/13-13:03:19.24- 07:telnet01]-N-user enabled-user authenticated
[12/13-13:03:15.84- 07:telnet01]-N-connection made from 10.14.37.103 on session
01
[12/13-13:03:06.51- 07:tRDNts0002]-N-session 01 disconnected
[12/13-13:01:36.48- 07:telnet01]-N-user enabled-user authenticated
[12/13-13:01:21.71- 07:telnet01]-N-connection made from 10.14.37.103 on session
01
[12/13-13:01:11.11- 07:tRDNts0001]-N-session 01 disconnected
[12/13-13:01:11.11- 07:tRDNts0001]-N-user securityuser logged out.
[12/13-12:59:17.84- 07:telnet01]-repeat 2:-E-Invalid GateID: 0
[12/13-12:59:17.84- 07:telnet01]-E-Invalid GateID: 0
[12/13-12:57:11.81- 07:telnet01]-N-user securityuser authenticated
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n Use the show interfaces cable intercept command to view statistical information
for each intercepted Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) MAC address.
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> intercept
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module:
The show interfaces cable intercept command displays the following CPE
information:
The following is an example of typical screen output from the show interfaces
cable intercept command:
MAC Address MAC (hardware) address of a CPE, such as a
customers PC or VoIP phone.
Destination IP Address IP address of the data collection server.
Destination UDP Port UDP Port number that is used exclusively by the data
collection server.
Packets The total number of packets that have been
intercepted from each specified CPE on this CMTS
interface.
Bytes The total number of bytes that have been intercepted
from each specified CPE on this CMTS interface.
Type: R - Layer 3 Intercept, B - Layer 2 (Bridged) Intercept
Destination Destination
MAC Address IP Address UDP Port Type Packets Bytes
00c0.4f5e.e476 150.31.98.100 10000 R 0 0
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Configuring Cable Security Authorized
The Cable Security Authorized feature prevents theft of service by hacked cable
modems. Hacked cable modems will request configuration files unauthorized for their
MAC address or playback an earlier Registration Request transmitted to a different
CM to gain unauthorized service. The Cable Security Authorized feature significantly
reduces the number of unauthorized registrations from hacked cable modems.
Enabling Cable Security Authorized
Use the cable security authorized command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode,
to enable cable security authorization for a MAC domain, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable security authorized
Configuring Cable Security Failure
When an initializing CM fails a cable security option check, it is said to have a cable
security failure. In order to account for present and future initializing CMs that may
change their behavior between initialization attempts, the BSR permits an initializing
CM to have one cable security failure before it applies a configured cable security
failure action after the second failure.
Use the cable security failure command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode,
configure how the BSR handles an initializing cable modem after the CMs second
consecutive security failure, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable security failure {mark | reject}
where:
mark allows the CM to register, but the CM is marked as having failed a
security option.
reject means that the BSR continues to reject the CMs registration and resets the
consecutive failure count to zero.
Configuring User-defined Channel IDs
A user can specify downstream or upstream channel IDs instead of using the default
pre-defined channel IDs that are automatically assigned to the upstream and
downstream ports by the BSR CMTS.
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User-defined channel IDs can simplify the configuration of features such as Dynamic
Load Balancing (DLB) because user-defined channel IDs can be more meaningful to
an user than the default channel IDs.
The BSR 64000 now supports the following CableLabs channel ID ECNs:
n OSSI V 2.0-N-04.0201-3
n RFI V 2.0-R-04.0200-1
Default Channel IDs
The BSR maintains the default downstream and upstream channel ID tables for each
CMTS module in the BSR chassis. The BSR reads each table to determine if any new
channel ID that has been configured by a user conflicts with a channel ID from the
table that is already in use. If an attempt is made to configure a channel ID that is
equal to the default channel ID value of any other downstream or upstream port on the
BSR, an error message will be generated.
The default upstream channel IDs are determined based on the upstream port number
and the upstream port number and optional logical channel number and are unique
within a CMTS module.
The BSR will save and retain an user-defined channel ID during a reboot/reload of the
BSR chassis if the running configuration file has been copied to the startup
configuration file.
Configuring User-defined Channel IDs
Follow these steps to configure a new downstream or upstream channel ID on a
CMTS module:
Note: A downstream or upstream channel ID may not be assigned a value
that is equal to the default channel ID value of any other downstream or
upstream port on the BSR.
If an attempt is made to configure a channel ID that is equal to the default
channel ID value of any other downstream or upstream port on the BSR, the
following error message(s) will be generated:
DS channel ID - <X> (a default value) is restricted from
slot <X>, port <Y>
US channel ID - <X> (a default value) is restricted from
slot <X>, port <Y>
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1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
desired cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the cable downstream channel-id command to specify a channel ID number
for a downstream port.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> channel-id <0-255>
where:
NUM the downstream port number (0-1).
0-255 is the downstream channel ID number.
3. Optionally, repeat Step 2 if a channel ID number for another downstream port
needs to be specified.
4. Use the show controllers cable downstream command to verify the configured
downstream channel ID.
MOT:7A(config-if)#show controllers cable <X/Y> downstream <NUM>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the downstream port number.
5. Use the cable upstream channel-id command to specify a channel ID number
for an upstream port and optional logical channel.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} channel-id
<1-255>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number
X/Y the upstream port number and optional logical channel number (0-3).
1-255 is the upstream channel ID number.
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6. Optionally, repeat Step 5, if a channel ID number for another upstream port needs
to be specified.
7. Use the show controller cable upstream command to verify the configured
upstream channel ID.
MOT:7A(config-if)#show controller cable <X/Y> upstream <NUM>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number.
Note: When using this command, only the NUM option displays for BCM
3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules. Both the NUM and X/Y arguments display
for BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS.
To determine which 2:8 CMTS module is installed in the BSR 64000, use the
show chassis status command. For BCM 3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules,
the command display reads 2:8 CMTS, and for the BCM 3140-based
DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS, the display reads, 2:8 CMTS (DOCSIS 2.0).
Note: For a user-defined downstream or upstream channel ID to be retained
after a reboot/reload of the of the BSR chassis, use the copy running-config
startup-config command to save the running configuration file as the new
startup configuration file.
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 2-1
2
Configuring a Downstream
Channel
Introduction
A downstream channel is configured to control the data flow from the cable interface
to the users cable modem. This section is divided into two parts. The downstream
parameters that must be configured for the minimal operation of the downstream port
are discussed in the Initial Downstream Configuration Tasks section. The downstream
parameters that are configured to manage the downstream channel operation are
discussed in the Managing the Downstream Channel section.
Initial Downstream Configuration Tasks
This section discusses the following initial downstream configuration tasks:
n Configuring the Downstream Frequency and Modulation Rate
n Enforcing the Downstream Rate Limit
n Enabling the Downstream Port
n Entering a Description of the Downstream Port
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Configuring the Downstream Frequency and Modulation
Rate
Follow the steps in this section to configure the downstream center frequency and
modulation rate:
1. Use the cable downstream frequency command in Interface Configuration
mode to enter the fixed center frequency for the downstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> frequency {<91000000
- 857000000>}
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
91000000 - 857000000 is the downstream frequency in Hertz.
2. Use the cable downstream modulation command in Interface Configuration
mode to set the downstream digital to analog signal modulation rate:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> modulation [64 | 256]
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
64 is 6 bits per downstream symbol Quadrature Amplitude Modulation
(QAM). This is the default downstream digital to analog signal modulation
rate.
256 is 8 bits per downstream symbol Quadrature Amplitude Modulation
(QAM).
Use the no cable downstream modulation command in Interface Configuration
mode to restore the default (64 QAM):
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> modulation [64 | 256]
Note: The digital carrier frequency cannot be the same as the video carrier
frequency.
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Enforcing the Downstream Rate Limit
Use the cable downstream rate-limit command to enable the downstream data
transmission rate-limit to cable modems on the HFC network. Once the downstream
data transmission rate-limit function is enabled, data sent from the cable interface to
the cable modems is rate-limited according to each cable modem configuration.
Packets are buffered by the CMTS, when the data exceeds the permitted bandwidth of
the cable modem, and queued for transmission once downstream bandwidth for the
cable modem becomes available.
Follow the steps in this section to enable the downstream rate-limit for cable modems:
1. Edit the cable modem configuration file to set the downstream data rate limit.
2. Use the cable downstream rate-limit command in Interface Configuration mode
to enable the rate-limiting function:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> rate-limit
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
Use the no cable downstream rate-limit command to disable the downstream
rate-limiting function.
3. Use the show running-config command in Privileged EXEC mode to verify that
downstream rate-limiting is enabled or disabled on the cable interface:
MOT:7A#show running-config
4. Use the show cable qos svc-flow statistics command to display the service flow
statistics for all service flow ID (SFID), a specific cable interface, or a specific
service flow:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow statistics [<X/Y>] [<1-4292967295>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the SFID number.
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Enabling the Downstream Port
The downstream port is in an administrative shut-down state by default and must be
enabled to function.
Follow these steps to enable the downstream port:
1. Use the no cable downstream shutdown command in Interface Configuration
mode to enable the downstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream shutdown
2. Use the show interfaces cable command in Interface Configuration mode to
verify that the downstream port is enabled:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show interfaces cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Entering a Description of the Downstream Port
Optionally use the cable downstream description command in Interface
Configuration mode to specify descriptive information for a downstream port. This
information is limited to 80 characters and spaces cannot be used.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> description <LINE>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
LINE is the text that describes the downstream port.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream 0 description charlestown_1D
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration file,
and in the display output of various show commands such as the show ip
interface command.
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Managing the Downstream Channel
The tasks in this section involve some parameters that you may choose to change. If a
parameter default is satisfactory, you can ignore its associated task.
The tasks in this section are used to manage the operation of the downstream channel:
n Configuring the Downstream Interleave Depth
n Adjusting the Downstream Power Level
n Resetting a Downstream Port
n Reserving Downstream Bandwidth
n Unreserving Downstream Bandwidth
n Cable Modem Downstream Frequency Override During Ranging
n Testing RF Carrier Modulation
n Specifying Downstream Queue Thresholds
n Limiting Downstream Multicast Traffic
Configuring the Downstream Interleave Depth
The cable operator can protect the downstream path from excess noise or decrease
latency on the downstream path by setting the interleave depth. A higher interleave
depth provides more protection from noise on the HFC network, but increases
downstream latency. A lower interleave depth decreases downstream latency, but
provides less protection from noise on the HFC network.
1. Review Table 2-1 to determine the appropriate interleave-depth.
Table 2-1 Interleave Depth Criteria
Depth # of Taps Increments
8 8 16
16 16 8
32 32 4
64 64 2
128 128 1
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2. Use the cable downstream interleave-depth command, in Interface
Configuration mode, to set the downstream port interleave depth:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> interleave-depth [8 | 16 |
32 | 64 | 128]
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
Use the no cable downstream interleave-depth command in Interface
Configuration mode to restore the default (8 for the North American standard):
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> interleave-depth [8 |
16 | 32 | 64 | 128]
Adjusting the Downstream Power Level
The default downstream power level is 55 decibels per millivolt (550 dBmV). If you
need to adjust the downstream power level, use the cable downstream power-level
command, in Interface Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> power-level <450-630>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
450-630 is the downstream power level expressed in one tenth of a dB.
Use the no cable downstream power-level command in Interface Configuration
mode to restore the default power-level setting (550 dBmV):
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> power-level <450-630>
Note: The Euro DOCSIS standard requires an interleave depth of 12, 12
Taps, and 17 increments.
Note: A higher interleave depth provides more protection from bursts of noise
on the HFC network; however, it increases downstream latency.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring a Downstream Channel
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Resetting a Downstream Port
Follow these steps to optionally reset a downstream port:
1. Use the cable downstream shutdown command, in Interface Configuration
mode, to optionally disable a downstream port if it must be reset:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> shutdown
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
2. Use the no cable downstream shutdown command, in Interface Configuration
mode, to enable the downstream port again:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> shutdown
3. Use the show interfaces cable command to verify that the downstream port is
activated:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> downstream <NUM>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the downstream port number.
Reserving Downstream Bandwidth
Use the cable downstream reserve-bandwidth command, in Interface Configuration
mode, to reserve a specified amount of downstream bandwidth for cable modems:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> reserve-bandwidth
<1-38469736>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
1-38469736 is the amount of downstream bandwidth in bits per second.
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Unreserving Downstream Bandwidth
Use the cable downstream unreserve-bandwidth command to unreserve a specified
amount of downstream bandwidth for cable modems, in Interface Configuration
mode:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> unreserve-bandwidth
<1-38469736>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
1-38469736 is the amount of downstream bandwidth in bits per second.
Cable Modem Downstream Frequency Override During
Ranging
The Cable Modem Downstream Frequency Override helps the BSR to accelerate
ranging in an RF environment where all downstream signals are seen by all cable
modems but upstream signals are wired discretely. This is accomplished by sending
an RNG-RSP message with a downstream frequency override that tells a specific
cable modem to move to a specific downstream channel. By default, this feature is
disabled.
The Cable Modem Downstream Frequency Override feature is useful if the network is
configured as follows:
n there are multiple downstream channels tied together on the same RF pipe
n all upstream channels must be physically separated
n the same upstream parameters (frequency, modulation, etc.) must be set for all
physical upstream channels
Use the following commands, in Global Configuration Mode, to enable or disable the
Cable Modem Downstream Frequency Override feature:
MOT:7A(config)#cable multi-ds-override
MOT:7A(config)#no cable multi-ds-override
Note: Depending on cable modem software and hardware revisions, this
feature will not be effective if a cable modem does not support the
downstream frequency override in the RNG-RSP message.
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Testing RF Carrier Modulation
The downstream carrier-only function is disabled by default and is used for testing
purposes only to control downstream output. Use the cable downstream carrier-only
command in Interface Configuration mode to optionally enable this test function.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> carrier-only
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
Use the no cable downstream carrier-only command to disable the downstream
carrier-only function.
Specifying Downstream Queue Thresholds
If the BSR is running both a time critical application (such as Voice Over IP) and best
effort service, the cable downstream threshold command guarantees that the
downstream scheduler can only release bandwidth within a certain specified range to
the downstream channel. When a higher priority VOIP packet arrives, the VOIP
packet will move ahead of the previously queued downstream non-VOIP data. This
command allows an operator to configure "back pressure" parameters for various
applications. Use the cable downstream threshold command, in Interface
Configuration mode, to specify downstream channel upper and lower queue
thresholds, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> threshold {bytes
<500-65535> [<500-65535> ] | pdu <16-256> <16-256>}
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
bytes uses the byte count as a threshold unit.
500-65535 specifies the upper byte threshold.
500-65535 specifies the optional lower byte threshold.
pdu uses the PDU count as a threshold unit.
16-256 specifies the upper PDU threshold.
16-256 specifies the lower PDU threshold.
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The command defaults are listed below.
upper byte threshold = 1000 bytes
lower byte threshold = 500 bytes
upper pdu threshold = 32 PDUs
lower pdu threshold = 16 PDUs
Limiting Downstream Multicast Traffic
The BSR can be configured to limit the amount of multicast traffic (including
DVMRP or PIM) on a downstream channel. Limiting the amount of multicast traffic
allows an MSO to balance the bandwidth requirements of IP-based video streaming
services with other bandwidth critical services such as voice traffic or high-priority
business traffic. Multicast traffic rate limiting is achieved by creating a static
multicast downstream service flow and assigning the service flow to a service class.
Use the cable multicast command, in Global Configuration mode, to create a static
multicast downstream service flow and assign the service flow to a service class, as
follows:
MOT:7A(config)#cable multicast <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D> [<WORD>]
where:
A.B.C.D is the destination IP multicast address.
A.B.C.D is the destination IP multicast address mask.
WORD is the optional service class name. If the service class is not specified, the
downstream service flow defaults to the DefMCDown service class.
Note: When using the byte count parameter as the threshold unit, you must
specify a value for the lower byte threshold. If the lower byte threshold is not
specified, the BSR will automatically use one half of the upper byte threshold
value as the lower byte threshold value.
Note: The BSR supports the configuration of 256 downstream multicast
service flows specified by unique combinations of a destination IP multicast
address and destination IP multicast address mask {ipAddr, ipMask}. The
BSR supports the mapping of different downstream multicast service flows to
a specific user defined service class for a maximum of 256 mappings.
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For specific information on service classes and service class configuration, refer to
Chapter 9, Configuring Service Classes.
Configuring Multicast Downstream Replication Control
(MDRC)
The Multicast Downstream Replication Control (MDRC) feature controls the
replication of multicast packets on downstream channels. The MDRC feature allows a
user/operator to specify whether replicated multicast traffic, belonging to any
multicast session, should be transmitted on a specific downstream channel. This
functionality is available per downstream channel (not per downstream port) of the
TX32 module and per downstream port of the CMTS 2:8 module. During replication,
the downstream IXP will only replicate a multicast packet on a downstream channel/
port that has been enabled to forward multicast traffic. This will not affect local-scope
multicast, routed broadcast or bridging traffic. This functionality will only affect
routed non-local-scope multicast traffic. If the MDRC feature is enabled on a MAC
domain but no downstream channels are configured as "multicast capable", IGMP
messages will not be reflected on any of the downstream channels of that MAC
domain.
This chapter describes the following MDRC tasks and related commands:
n Enabling MDRC on a MAC Domain
n Configuring a Multicast Capable Downstream Channel
Enabling MDRC on a MAC Domain
Use the mdrc enable command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to enable
Multicast Downstream Replication Control on a MAC Domain, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#mdrc enable
Note: IGMP joins will still be listened for devices using a multicast disabled
downstream. If a device requests a join to a multicast session, the associated
cable modem will be moved to a multicast enabled downstream.
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Configuring a Multicast Capable Downstream Channel
The cable downstream multicast enable command allows a user to configure a
downstream channel as multicast capable. This enables the replication of
downstream multicast packets on the specified channel/port.
Use the cable downstream multicast enable command, in TX32 Downstream Port
Configuration mode, to configure a TX32 downstream channel as multicast
capable, as show below:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream <0-3> multicast enable
where:
0-3 is the TX32 downstream channel number.
Use the cable downstream multicast enable command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to configure a CMTS 2:8 downstream channel as multicast
capable, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> multicast enable
where:
NUM is the CMTS 2:8 downstream port number.
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Displaying Cable Interface Parameters
Select from the following options to display downstream cable interface parameters:
n Use the show interfaces cable configuration command in all modes except User
EXEC mode to view the downstream and upstream configuration for the
specified interface:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> configuration
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
n Use the show interfaces cable downstream command in all modes except User
EXEC mode to view a specified downstream ports statistics for a cable interface.
This command describes whether the downstream port is up or down, the number
of packets and bytes transmitted on the downstream port, how many packets are
discarded, the number of active cable modems, and the associated upstream
Spectrum Group names.
MOT:7A#show interfaces <X/Y> cable downstream <NUM>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the downstream port number.
n Use the show stats cmts command in all modes except User EXEC mode to view
cable interface statistics, which includes both downstream and upstream port
statistics and QOS service flow dynamic statistics:
MOT:7A#show stats <NUM> cmts
where:
NUM is the CMTS slot number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show interfaces cable configuration, show interfaces cable downstream, and
show stats cmts commands.
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Displaying Downstream Parameters
Use the show cable downstream command in Interface Configuration mode to show
the configured parameters for the downstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable downstream <NUM>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable downstream command.
Viewing Downstream Port Information
Use the show interfaces cable downstream command in all modes except User
EXEC mode to view downstream port statistics:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> downstream <NUM>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the downstream port number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show interfaces cable downstream command.
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3
DOCSIS 3.0 Features
This chapter provides descriptions of DOCSIS 3.0 features that are included in the
Motorola Broadband Services Router 64000 (BSR 64000) Release 6.0.0 and later
software. The following features are described:
n Partial Services
n Dynamic Bonding Change
n Expanded Downstream Bonding Groups
n Upstream Fiber Node Configuration
n MD-CM-SG Ambiguity Resolution
n Source-Specific Multicast
n Multicast QoS
n Cable Modem Control (CM-CTRL)
n Cable Modem Status (CM-STATUS)
n Service Flow Attribute Based Downstream Assignment
n Type 4 DOCSIS 3.0 Logical Upstream Channels
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Partial Services
Partial Services is a DOCSIS 3.0 concept that was introduced to maintain services
upon the loss of one or more channels in a transmit or receive channel set. Cable
modems operating with a reduced channel set is said to be operating in partial
service mode.
A channel can be declared unusable when the cable modem is unable to acquire it
during registration and/or a Dynamic Bonding Change (DBC) transaction or the cable
modem loses an upstream and/or downstream channel during normal operation.
Partial Service is a temporary mode of operation where service is not be operating
optimally and the loss can be resolved. The cable modem signals that it is operating in
a partial service mode and the CMTS will try and resolve a cable modems partial
service state.
By definition a cable modem is in a partial service mode of operation any time the
cable modem is operating with a subset of the channels in the receive channel set and/
or transmit channel set because a channel has become unusable either due to an
inability to acquire a channel during registration, a DBC transaction taking place, or
because communication on a channel was lost during normal operation. Partial
service mode is intended to be a temporary mode of operation where services may not
operate normally and which can be resolved.
The BSR Partial Service feature protects services that may be interrupted by an
impaired downstream channel(s) in a DBG by allowing cable modems to continue to
operate in partial service mode and by automatically restoring full downstream
operation once the impaired channel(s) are restored. This is achieved through the
implementation of additional registration confirmation codes, the DOCSIS 3.0
specified CM-STATUS message, and the Dynamic Bonding Change (DBC) protocol.
With the introduction of the DBC protocol to move DOCSIS 3.0 bonded cable
modems between channels and around receive channels sets, the DCC protocol has
been re-defined. DCC can now only move DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems across MAC
domains leaving channel movement within MAC Domains to be performed with
DBC. The functionality enforces DBC for DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems operating in a
DOCSIS 3.0 mode and DCC for non-DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems.
The following commands are provided with the Partial Services feature:
n cable partial-service
n show cable modem downstream partial-service
n show cable modem downstream partial-service
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Dynamic Bonding Change
Dynamic Bonding Change (DBC) is a DOCSIS 3.0 mechanism that allows a CMTS
and a cable modem to communicate in order to change bonding parameters. At any
time after registration, the CMTS uses DBC to change the receive channel set,
DSID(s) or DSID association attributes.
The DBC change can only occur within a MAC domain. The CMTS uses a DCC
message to move cable modems between MAC domains. The CMTS can add
channels, delete channels, or change channels within the receive and transmit channel
set(s) of a cable modem by sending a new receive channel and/or transmit channel
through a DBC-REQ message. The CMTS can also add channels, delete channels, or
change channels within the downstream re-sequencing channel list by replacing a
cable modems downstream re-sequencing channel list with a new list.
When communicating a new transmit channel configuration to the cable modem, the
CMTS also includes an updated assignment of SID(s) or SID cluster.
Expanded Downstream Bonding Groups
Release 5.3.0 increased the maximum number of DOCSIS 3.0 Downstream Bonding
Groups per MAC Domain from 4 to 8 and the maximum number of downstream
channels that can be assigned to a Downstream Bonding Group from 4 to 8.
Note: During a DCC, the CMTS modifies the SID, SFID and SAID assignments for
the primary channel. During a DBC, the SID will be changed but SFID and SAID
assignments remain the same.
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Upstream Fiber Node Configuration
Upstream fiber node configuration is the ability for the BSR to associate upstream
ports to fiber nodes. Upstream fiber node configuration is an addition to the previous
implementation, introduced in Release 5.2.0, which only supported downstream fiber
node associations. This feature allows the BSR to be configured with a more complete
picture of a cable plants physical topology. An operator configures the list of fiber
nodes in the plant and configures which fiber nodes are reached by each downstream
and upstream channel. Based on this information, along with channel binding and
administrative state, the BSR can automatically determine channel groups reachable
by cable modems on the plant. These channel groups are called
n MD-DS-SG-ID (MacDomain-DownStream-ServingGroup)
n MD-US-SG-ID (MacDomain-UpStream-ServingGroup)
n MD-CM-SG-ID (MacDomain-CableModem-ServingGroup)
As the BSR processes the configuration of channel binding to a MAC Domain and
their associations to fiber nodes, the channels are grouped into respective MD-DS-SG,
MD-US-SG and MD-CM-SGs. They are formed on a per MAC Domain based on the
set of active channels reaching a particular fiber node. The MD-DS-SG, MD-US-SG
and MD-CM-SGs are unique to each MAC Domain. A cable modem is expected to
have access to particular channel groups based on the MAC domain and fiber node
the cable modem is reached by. If multiple fiber nodes reach the same exact set of
channels (upstream, downstream or both), they will share an MD-DS-SG, MD-US-SG
and MD-CM-SG.
The following commands are provided with the upstream fiber node configuration
feature:
n cable upstream fiber-node
n show cable fiber-node
n show cable md-cm-sg
n show cable md-us-sg
n show interfaces cable downstream
n show interfaces cable upstream
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MD-CM-SG Ambiguity Resolution
With the introduction of channel bonding in the DOCSIS 3.0 specification, upstream
and downstream channels can be shared across HFC fiber nodes.The BSR must be
aware of the cable modems serving group (MD-CM-SG) for the purpose of channel
set assignment, load balancing, partial service resolution, and other applications.
Determining the cable modems serving group allows the BSR to assign and move
cable modems between reachable upstream and downstream channels.
The BSR may be able to associate a cable modem with a unique MD-CM-SG based
solely upon receiving a ranging message. This can be achieved if the Downstream
Channel ID (DCID), the Upstream Channel ID (UCID) and the MAC Domain
Downstream Service Group ID (MD-DS-SG-ID) are associated with one and only
one MD-CM-SG.
If the UCID, DCID and MD-DS-SG-ID found in the ranging message, do not point to
a uniquely defined MD-CM-SG, the BSR performs a sequence of steps to resolve the
cable modems MD-CM-SG. Once the MD-DS-SG is identified, the BSR determines
if the MD-US-SG is unique based on the upstream channel from which the ranging
message was received. If the upstream channel is not associated with a unique
MD-CM-SG, the BSR will send a RNG-RSP with an Upstream Channel Adjustment
TLV containing another upstream channel that can reduce the set of possible
MD-CM-SGs.
The following command is provided with the MD-CM-SG Ambiguity Resolution
feature:
n cable cm-sg-resolution
Source-Specific Multicast
DOCSIS 3.0 supports delivery of source-specific IP multicast streams to CPEs.
Rather than extend the IP multicast protocol awareness of cable modems to support
enhanced multicast control protocols, DOCSIS 3.0 takes a different approach. All
awareness of IP multicast is moved to the CMTS, and a new DOCSIS-specific Layer
2 multicast control protocol between the CM and CMTS is defined, which works in
harmony with downstream channel bonding and allows efficient and extensible
support for future multicast applications.
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Multicast QoS
DOCSIS 3.0 defines a standard mechanism for configuring the quality of service
(QoS) for IP multicast sessions. It introduces the concept of a group service flow for
multicast traffic that references a service class name to define the QoS parameters for
the service flow. The RX48 and 2:8 CMTS modules support Multicast QoS.
Cable Modem Control (CM-CTRL)
The BSR supports the CM-CTRL-REQ management message as defined in the
DOCSIS 3.0 MULPI specification. CM-CTRL-REQ is sent to a specified cable
modem to enforce a specific action. It is a replacement for the DOCSIS 2.0 UP-DIS
management message. The CM-CTRL-REQ management message will only be sent
to DOCSIS 3.0 capable cable modems and is used to perform the following actions:
n Mute or un-mute an upstream channel. A mute interval must be specified for
mute action, i.e. an amount of time to mute the upstream channel (in
milliseconds).
n Reinitialize a cable modem MAC.
n Enable or disable the forwarding of PDUs in the upstream and downstream
direction for a specified cable modem.
n Override a downstream status event enable bitmask.
n Override upstream status event enable bitmask.
n Override non-channel specific CM-STATUS event enable bitmask.
CM-CTRL_RSP is a new MAC message specified by DOCSIS 3.0 that is sent from a
cable modem to a CMTS indicating how a recently sent CM-CTRL-REQ message
was handled. The following command is provided with the cable mode control
feature:
n cable modem control
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Cable Modem Status (CM-STATUS)
CM-STATUS messages are used by a cable modem to report an event condition such
as an MDD timeout or QAM/FEC lock failure. The event condition can be for a
particular downstream channel, a particular upstream channel, or non-channel
specific. Event reporting is enabled by the presence of the appropriate Event Control
TLV 11 and the appropriate bit in the CM-STATUS Event Enable Bit Mask TLV 1.5,
7.2, or 15 in the MDD message.
Channel Specific Events
n If an override for the CM-STATUS event enable bitmask for a channel is
specified via a unicast CM-CTRL-REQ message, then the cable modem enables
or disables event reporting for the event type on the channel according to the
bitmask specified in the CM-CTRL-REQ message.
n If an override for the CM-STATUS event enable bitmask is not specified via a
unicast CM-CTRL-REQ message, then the cable modem enables or disables
event reporting for the event type on the channel according to the upstream or
downstream CM-STATUS event enable bitmask provided in the MDD message.
Non-Channel Specific Events
n If an override for the CM-STATUS event enable bitmask for a non-channel
specific event is specified via a unicast CM-CTRL-REQ message, then the cable
modem enables or disables the event reporting for the event type according to the
bitmask specified in the CM-CTRL-REQ message.
n If an override for the CM-STATUS event enable bitmask for a non-channel
specific event is not specified via a unicast CM-CTRL-REQ message, then the
cable modem enables or disables event reporting for the event type according to
the CM-STATUS event enable bitmask for a non-channel specific event provided
in the MDD message.
The following commands are provided with the cable modem status feature:
n cable cm-status-event
n cable non-chan-specific cm-status-eventt
n cable downstream cm-status-event
n cable upstream cm-status-event
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Service Flow Attribute Based Downstream
Assignment
DOCSIS 3.0 adds the concept of assigning service flows to channels or bonding
groups based on binary attributes. The BSR will allow for Provisioned Service Flow
Attributes to be configured for downstream channels and downstream bonding
groups. Within the cable modem configuration file and within the TLVs of a cable
modems registration request, service flow encodings now include both required and
forbidden attributes. The BSR attempts to assign channels or bonding groups whose
attributes match the requirements of the service flow (i.e. making a downstream
assignment that has provisioned attributes including all of the cable modems service
flows required attributes and none of the forbidden attributes).
In order to support the service flow attribute feature, the BSR has moved away from a
per cable modem downstream assignment and towards a per service flow downstream
assignment. This allows that multiple downstream assignments to be made in order to
satisfy multiple service flows, each with a unique set of requested attributes.
The following commands are provided with the service flow attribute based
downstream assignment feature:
n cable downstream service-flow-attribute
n cable downstream bonding-group service-flow-attribute
n show cable downstream bonding-groups
n show cable qos svc-flow param-set
Downstream Channel Bonding with Multiple Receive
Channels
DOCSIS 3.0 introduces the concept of a cable modem that receives simultaneously on
multiple receive channels. Downstream channel bonding refers to the ability (at the
MAC layer) to schedule packets for a single service flow across those multiple
channels. Downstream channel bonding offers significant increase in the peak
downstream data rate that can be provided to a single cable modem.
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Type 4 DOCSIS 3.0 Logical Upstream Channels
DOCSIS 3.0 introduces four new logical upstream channel types. As a result, all valid
logical upstream channels fall into one of the following eight types:
n Type 1: DOCSIS 1.x upstreams that support no DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA/S-CDMA
features
n Type 2: Mixed upstreams that support DOCSIS 1.x and DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA/
S-CDMA burst
n Type 3A: DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA upstreams, which cannot support DOCSIS 1.x
modems
n Type 3S: DOCSIS 2.0 S-CDMA upstreams, which cannot support DOCSIS 1.x
modems
n Type 4A: TDMA upstreams that support DOCSIS 2.0 modems on IUC 9, 10, and
11 (UCD type 29) and DOCSIS 3.0 modems on IUC 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11 (UCD
type 35)
n Type 4S: S-CDMA upstreams that support DOCSIS 2.0 modems on IUC 9,10,
and 11 (UCD type 29) and DOCSIS 3.0 modems on IUC 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11 (UCD
type 35)
n Type 4AR: TDMA upstreams that support only DOCSIS 3.0 modems on IUC 5,
6, 9, 10, and 11 (UCD type 35)
n Type 4SR: S-CDMA upstreams that support only DOCSIS 3.0 modems on IUC
5, 6, 9 10, and 11 (UCD type 35)
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4
Configuring Downstream
Channel Bonding
Introduction
The Downstream Channel Bonding feature allows the combination of multiple
downstream channels on the BSR 64000 to provide up to 100 Mbps of downstream
throughput for a single cable modem.
In a Downstream Channel Bonding configuration, packets received by the BSR 64000
Network Interface Module (NIM) are forwarded to a 2:8 CMTS module. The CMTS
distributes the packets over multiple downstream channels (referred to as a bonding
group) to a cable modem. The cable modem collects packets received on the
downstream channels, resequences them to the order in which they were transmitted,
and then forwards them to the subscribers Customer Premises Equipment (CPE).
This chapter describes the functionality supported for DOCSIS 3.0 standard
downstream channel bonding. Configuring Downstream Channel Bonding involves
the following procedures:
n Configuring a Bonding Domain
n Configuring a Bonding Group
n Clearing Channel Bonding Statistics
n Disabling Downstream Channel Bonding
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n Configuring the DOCSIS 3.0 MAC Domain Descriptor Message Interval
n Configuring Multiple Receive Modules
Configuring a Bonding Domain
The cable downstream bonding-domain command configures a bonding domain
that will be used for binding more than one MAC Domain to a bonding group. The no
cable downstream bonding-domain removes a bonding domain from the BSRs
configuration.
All bonding groups configured in a bonding domain must be deleted before removing
that bonding domain from the BSRs configuration. The BSR will not allow the
configuration of bonding domains whose slots are currently configured in an existing
bonding domain.
For example, if a bonding domain is currently configured to include slots 1 and 2 and
the user wants to remove slot 2 from that bonding domain, the bonding domain
consisting of slots 1 and 2 must first be removed and then a new bonding domain must
be created that only includes slot 1.
Use the cable downstream bonding-domain command, in Global Configuration
mode, to configure a bonding domain.
MOT:7A(config)#cable downstream bonding-domain <NUM> [<NUM>]
where:
NUM is the 2:8 CMTS module slot number.
Configuring a Bonding Group
A bonding group is a set of two or more downstream channels that offer multiple
channel through-put to individual bonding cable modems. The channels comprising a
bonding group must be within the same bonding domain. For release 4.4 a bonding
group is limited to two, three, or four downstream channels. Bonding groups are
defined within the context of a MAC domain. However, the downstream channels
comprising a bonding group may span multiple MAC domains. Hence, the
relationship between a bonding group and a MAC domain is fairly loose. This is a
known violation of the Media Access Control and Upper Layer Protocols Interface
Specification (MULPI) definition for a bonding group, where a bonding group is
associated with a single MAC Domain.
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Bonding modems ranging and registering on a downstream and upstream channel pair
will be considered to be registered in the MAC domain that contains that downstream
and upstream channel pair. Those modems will also belong to the bonding group
configured in that MAC domain. From a forwarding perspective downstream packets
sent to a bonding modem will be forwarded to the MAC domain/interface that the
bonding modem is registered in despite the fact that some of the packets may transit
downstream channels belonging to other MAC domains.
To configure a downstream channel bonding group, do the following:
1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
desired cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the 2:8 CMTS module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable downstream bonding-group command to configure a downstream
channel bonding group.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream bonding-group <NUM> <X/Y>
<X/Y> [...<X/Y>]
where:
NUM is the downstream channel bonding group number, which must be 1.
X/Y is a downstream channel associated with this channel bonding group: X
is the 2:8 CMTS module slot number and Y is the MAC domain.
3. Use the show cable downstream bonding-groups command to verify that the
channel bonding group and its downstream channels are enabled and configured
correctly.
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable downstream bonding-groups
Note: For information on the additional parameters provided with this
command, refer to cable downstream bonding-group in the BSR 64000
Command Reference Guide.
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Clearing Channel Bonding Statistics
Use the clear cable downstream bonding-group statistics command, in any mode
except User EXEC, to clear the channel bonding statistical counters for a cable
interface:
MOT:7A#clear counters cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the 2:8 CMTS module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
Disabling Downstream Channel Bonding
To disable channel bonding for a downstream channel, do the following:
1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
desired cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the 2:8 CMTS module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain
2. Use the cable downstream bonding disable command to disable downstream
channel bonding.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream bonding disable
Note: Channel Bonding is enabled by default.
Disabling downstream channel bonding during run-time will result in the
deregistration of all bonding cable modems associated with this MAC
domain.
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Configuring the DOCSIS 3.0 MAC Domain
Descriptor Message Interval
In order to communicate topology and IP layer service initialization parameters to a
DOCSIS 3.0 Cable Modem, the BSR transmits an MAC Domain Descriptor (MDD)
message periodically on every downstream channel in the MAC Domain. The MDD
message is configured with the cable mdd-interval command. A separate MDD
message is sent for each downstream channel associated with the bonding domain
where a DOCSIS 3.0 bonding group is configured. This message is used by the cable
modem during initialization. The information provided to the cable modem in the
MDD message allows the cable modem to identify the downstream fiber node it is
connected to and which downstream channels reach it. The downstream fiber node is
identified by the MAC Domain Downstream Service Group (MD-DS-SG). MDD
messages will coexist on the same downstream channel with Motorola Proprietary
BDM messages if a Motorola Proprietary bonding group and a DOCSIS 3.0 bonding
group share the same channel.
To configure the MAC Domain Descriptor message transmission interval, do the
following:
1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
desired cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the 2:8 CMTS module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable mdd-interval command to configure the bonding descriptor
message transmission interval.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable mdd-interval <0-2000>
where:
0-2000 is the MAC Domain Descriptor message interval in milliseconds.
Entries will be rounded to nearest 50 milliseconds. For example, an entry of
151 milliseconds would be rounded to 200 milliseconds. The default bonding
descriptor message transmission interval is 2000 milliseconds (2 seconds). A
value of "0" disables sending MDD messages on this MAC Domain.
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Configuring Multiple Receive Modules
DOCSIS 3.0 downstream channel bonding requires that a CMTS assign a set of
downstream channels to a registering cable modem. This assigned set of downstream
channels is referred to as the receive channel set (RCS). In order for the cable modem
to register as bonded, the CMTS must assign an RCS that the cable modem can
support. During registration, the cable modem communicates this ability to the CMTS
using a receive channel profile (RCP) which describes the cable modem hardwares
ability to handle receive channels. The cable modem can provide one or more RCPs in
its request.
The main elements within an RCP are receive channels (RC) and receive modules
(RM). An RC represents a channel that can be assigned to the cable modem. An RM
represents a physical component within the cable modem that is shared by multiple
RCs. When the RCP indicates that RCs are connected to one or more RMs, limitations
on RC assignments result. For example, an RM could be a tuner with a number of
RCs connected to it and this tuner might only be able to tune to certain frequencies or
handle channels that are adjacent. The CMTS must consider RM parameters when
assigning an RCS to the cable modem. In prior releases, the BSR supported only
RCPs with less than two RMs.
The BSR supports 255 RCC templates per chassis. A valid RCC template consists of a
configured RCP ID, and at minimum, one receive channel (RC) entry.
Entering RCC Template Configuration Mode
RCC Template Configuration mode allows a user to configure one or more receive
channel configuration (RCC) templates. An RCC template configures the physical
layer components described by an RCP, including receive modules and receive
channels to specific downstream frequencies. The template also specifies the
interconnections among receive modules, or between a receive module and a receive
channel.
1. Use the cable rcc-template command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter
RCC Template Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)# cable rcc-template <1-255>
where:
1-255 specifies an RCC template index.
The command line prompt changes to:
MOT:7A(config-rcc-template:<index number>)#
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2. Use the end or exit commands to return to Global Configuration mode.
Entering a Description of the RCC Template
Use the description command, in RCC Template Configuration mode, to enter a
description of the RCC Template:
MOT:7A(config-rcc-template:<index number>)# description
<string>
where:
string is the RCP description. A maximum 15 characters can be entered. The
description must be enclosed within double quotes if the description contains
spaces. The description can include any printable ASCII character ( # , \ ! &
etc).
Assigning an RCP ID to an RCC Template
The rcp-id command assigns a receive channel profile (RCP) ID to a receive channel
configuration (RCC) template.
MOT:7A(config-rcc-template:<index number>)#rcp-id
<hex-dump-string>
where:
hex-dump-string specifies an RCP ID for the RCC template. The valid range is
from 00 00 00 00 00 to FF FF FF FF FF.
Adding a Receive Channel to an RCC Template
A cable modem reports its ability to receive multiple channels with one or more RCP
encodings in a REG-REQ or REG-REQ-MP message. Each receive channel profile
describes a logical representation of the cable modem's downstream physical layer in
terms of receive channels (RCs) and receive modules (RMs). The CMTS initially
configures the cable modem's receive channels and receive modules with an RCC
encoding in the registration response.
Note: Multiple RCCs can be configured with the same RCP ID.
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MOT:7A(config-rcc-template:<index number>)# receive-channel
<1-8> center-frequency <91000000-999000000> [connected-receive-module
<1-8> [primary] | primary]
where:
1-8 specifies the index value for the receive channel.
center-frequency 91000000-999000000 specifies the center frequency for the
receive channel in Hz.
connected-receive-module 1-8 specifies a connected receive module in the RCC
template. Generally, only one receive module is configured for an RCC template.
primary indicates a cable modem primary receive channel.
Adding a Receive Module to an RCC Template
To add a receive module (RC) to a receive channel configuration (RCC) template, use
the receive-module command in RCC template configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config-rcc-template:<index number>)# receive-module
<1-8> first-channel-center-frequency <91000000-999000000>
[connected-receive-module <1-8>
where:
1-8 specifies the index value for the receive module.
center-frequency 91000000-999000000 specifies the center frequency in Hz of
the first channel of the receive module channel block.
connected-receive-module 1-8 specifies a nested receive module in the RCC
template.
Assigning RCP Priority
The BSR selects a manually configured RCC with the highest priority for assignment
to a registering cable modem.The highest priority RCC under consideration for
assignment must also meet all other requirements, such as being in the MAC domain
and containing the cable modems primary downstream channel.
The BSR decides between manually configured RCC with the same priority value for
assignment to a registering cable modem based upon the following selection criteria:
1. The RCC that provides most number of assigned service flows.
2. The RCC that supports the largest bonding group.
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3. The RCC containing the most channels.
Use the priority command, in RCC Template Configuration mode, to specify a
priority value for an RCP.
MOT:7A(config-rcc-template:<index number>)# priority <1-255>
where:
1-255 is the RCP priority value. "1" is the highest priority.
Assigning an RCC Template to a Cable Interface
To assign an RCC template to a cable interface, do the following
1. Enter the cable interface to which you want to assign the RCC Template.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable X/Y
where:
X/Y is the cable interface slot and MAC domain number.
2. Use the cable rcc-template command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to
assign the RCC template:
MOT:7A(config-if)# cable rcc-template <1,2,3,...,255>
where:
1,2,3,...,255 specifies an RCC template index.
A list of RCC template indexes can be entered separated by commas (,). This list
of indexes is not an incremental configuration. Any entered list replaces the
previous list. The no cable rcc-template command removes the entire list.
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-1
5
Configuring an Upstream
Channel
Introduction
An upstream channel is configured to control the data flow from a cable modem to the
cable interface. This section is divided into two parts. The initial upstream parameters
that must be configured for the minimal operation of the upstream port are discussed
in the Initial Upstream Configuration Tasks section. Modulation profiles are discussed
in the Modulation Profiles section. The upstream parameters that are configured to
manage the upstream channel operation and performance are discussed in the
Managing the Upstream Channel section. In addition, refer to the section About
Upstream Channel Commands before configuring an upstream channel.
Note: The cable interface will not operate until a fixed upstream frequency is
set.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
5-2 Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
About Upstream Channel Commands
When using the following cable upstream and related show commands, only the
NUM option displays for BCM 3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules. Both the NUM and
X/Y arguments display for BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS modules. These
commands are applicable to both an upstream port or upstream port and logical
channel.
When using the following cable upstream commands, both the NUM and X/Y
arguments display for a BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS module. These
commands are only applicable for an upstream port and logical channel and will only
be available through the X/Y argument.
When using the following cable upstream commands, only the NUM option displays
for BCM 3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules. Both the NUM and X/Y arguments display
for a BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS modules. These commands are only
applicable for an upstream port will only be available through the NUM argument.
channel-type modulation-profile
data-backoff range-backoff
force-frag show cable upstream
map-interval show interfaces cable upstream
max-calls trap-enable-cmts
minislot-size trap-enable-if
shutdown trap-enable-rdn
active-codes iuc11-grant-size
codes-minislot maintain-power-density
hopping-seed spread-interval
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-3
Initial Upstream Configuration Tasks
Follow these tasks for the initial configuration of the upstream channel:
n Setting the Upstream Frequency
n Setting the Upstream Power Level
n Enforcing the Upstream Cable Modem Rate Limit
n Enabling an Upstream Port
n Entering a Description of the Upstream Port
channel-width physical-delay
concatenation power-level
description pre-equalization
frequency range-forced-continue
ingress-canceller range-power-override
invited-range-interval rate-limit
loadbalance-group snr-offset
modem-ranging-delay spectrum-group
Note: To determine which 2:8 CMTS module is installed in the BSR 64000,
refer to Determining the 2:8 CMTS Module Type.
For additional information on any of the above commands, refer to Chapter
13 of the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
5-4 Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
Setting the Upstream Frequency
The upstream cable interface on a CMTS module does not operate until a fixed
upstream frequency is set. The RF upstream frequency must be compatible with your
regional upstream plant configuration.
1. Use the cable upstream frequency command in 2:8 CMTS Interface
Configuration mode or RX48 RF Channel Configuration mode to set the
upstream frequency for an upstream port/channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> frequency
<5000000-85000000>
where:
NUM is the upstream port or channel number.
5000000-85000000 is the upstream frequency value in Hertz (Hz) for
DOCSIS.
Upstream frequency ranges are different depending on your regional
implementation of DOCSIS, Euro-DOCSIS or J-DOCSIS. The frequency
ranges that appear in the CLI help are related to your implementation of
DOCSIS:
Note: Make sure that the upstream frequency selected does not interfere
with the frequencies used for any other upstream applications running in the
cable plant.
DOCSIS Version Frequency Range
North American standard 5,000,000 to 42,000,000 Hz
Euro-DOCSIS 5,000,000 to 65,000,000 Hz
J-DOCSIS 5,000,000 to 55,000,000 Hz
North American RX48 DOCSIS
3.0 frequency option
5,000,000 to 85,000,000 Hz
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-5
Setting the Upstream Power Level
The cable interface controls cable modem output power levels to meet the desired
upstream port input power level. Input power level adjustments to an upstream port
compensate for cable interface signal degradation between the cable modem and the
upstream RF port. You can configure the upstream input power level in either
absolute or relative (power-per-hertz) mode. Most configurations use absolute mode.
n If the upstream input power level is set to the absolute mode, the input power
level does not change when the upstream channel width is changed. Defining the
input power level in absolute mode could possibly cause upstream return lasers to
clip on a heavily populated upstream channel.
n If the upstream input power level is set in relative mode, the input power level
changes when the upstream channel width is changed. For example, if the input
power level is -3 dBmV for a 3.2 MHz DOCSIS 3.0 upstream channel bandwidth
setting in relative mode and the bandwidth is changed to 1.6 MHz, the default
receive power is -6 dBmV. The default power levels for the 3.2 MHz and 1.6
MHz channels are equal relative to their respective channel bandwidth settings.
Table 5-1 describes how the upstream channel bandwidth corresponds to the input
power-level range and default power-level setting for a specific upstream channel. As
a general rule, a value +4 dBc from the bottom of the power-level range is used for the
DOCSIS 2.0 Default Power-level Setting, and a value +7 dBc from the bottom of the
range is used for the DOCSIS 3.0 Default Power-level Setting.
Caution: If the power level is not explicitly set on the upstream interfaces,
they default to 0 dBmV in absolute mode with a 3.2 MHz, 2560 kilosymbols
per second rate. Ensure that the correct power level is set on each upstream
channel.
Table 5-1 Upstream Input Power Level Range Parameters
Upstream Channel
Bandwidth
Default Power-level
Setting
Power-level
Range
DOCSIS 2.0 (2:8 CMTS module)
200 KHz -12 dBmV -16 to +14 dBmV
400 KHz -9 dBmV -13 to +17 dBmV
800 KHz -6 dBmV -10 to +20 dBmV
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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Setting the Upstream Power Level in Absolute Mode
Use the cable upstream power-level command in RX48 RF Channel Configuration
mode or 2:8 CMTS Interface Configuration mode to set the upstream input power
level in absolute mode:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> power-level <power>
where:
X is the upstream channel number.
power is the input power level, expressed in tenths of a dB.
Example
Use the cable upstream power-level command in RX48 RF Channel Configuration
mode to set the upstream input power level to -3 dBmV in absolute mode, which
keeps the input power level at -3 dBmV regardless of the upstream channel bandwidth
setting:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream 0 power-level -30
1.6 MHz -3 dBmV -7 to +23 dBmV
3.2 MHz +0 dBmV -4 to +26 dBmV
6.4 MHz +3 dBmV -1 to +29 dBmV
DOCSIS 3.0 (RX48 module)
1.6 MHz -6 dBmV -13 to +17 dBmV
3.2 MHz -3 dBmV -10 to +20 dBmV
6.4 MHz +0 dBmV -7 to +23 dBmV
Caution: Use caution when increasing the input power level in absolute
mode. The cable modems on the HFC network increase their transmit power
level by 3 dB for every incremental upstream channel bandwidth change,
causing an increase in the total power on the upstream channel. This may
exceed the upstream return laser design parameters
Table 5-1 Upstream Input Power Level Range Parameters
Upstream Channel
Bandwidth
Default Power-level
Setting
Power-level
Range
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
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Setting the Upstream Power Level in Relative Mode
Use the cable upstream power-level default command in 2:8 CMTS Interface
Configuration mode or RX48 RF Channel Configuration mode to set the upstream
input power level in relative mode:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> power-level default <offset>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
offset is the number expressed in tenths of a dB above or below the default input
power level.
Example:
Use the cable upstream power-level default command in 2:8 CMTS Interface
Configuration mode to set the input power level for a 1.6 MHz DOCSIS 2.0 channel
in relative mode from -3 dBmV to -9 dBmV:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream 0 power-level default -60
The default input power level is reduced by 6 dBmV. The power level is now
-9 dBmV.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
5-8 Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
Enforcing the Upstream Cable Modem Rate Limit
Use the cable upstream rate-limit command to enable the upstream data
transmission rate-limit. This limits the traffic rate for data sent from the cable modems
to the cable interface. Packets are buffered by the CMTS, when the data exceeds the
permitted bandwidth of the cable modem, and queued for transmission once upstream
bandwidth for the cable modem becomes available.
Follow these steps to enable the upstream rate-limit for cable modems.
1. Edit the cable modem configuration file to set the upstream data rate limit.
2. Use the cable upstream rate-limit command in Interface Configuration mode to
enable the rate-limiting function:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> rate-limit
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
If you need to disable the upstream rate-limiting function, use the no cable
upstream rate-limit command.
3. Use the show running-config command in Privileged EXEC mode to verify that
upstream rate-limiting is enabled or disabled on the cable interface:
MOT:7A#show running-config
4. Use the show cable qos svc-flow statistics command in Privileged EXEC mode
to determine the number of packets dropped due to upstream rate-limiting for a
particular service flow:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow statistics <X/Y> [<1-4292967295>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the Service Flow Identifier (SFID).
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
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Enabling an Upstream Port
The upstream ports are in an administrative shut down state by default.
Follow these steps to enable the upstream ports:
1. Use the show interfaces cable command to determine if an upstream port is
activated or deactivated:
MOT:7A(config)#show interfaces cable <X/Y> upstream {<NUM> |
<X/Y>}
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
upstream NUM is the upstream port number.
upstream X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
2. Navigate to Cable Interface Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#interfaces cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
3. The upstream ports are in a shutdown state by default. Use the no cable
upstream shutdown command in Interface Configuration mode to enable the
upstream ports:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} shutdown
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
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Entering a Description of the Upstream Port
Optionally issue the cable upstream description command in Interface
Configuration mode to specify descriptive information for the upstream port that you
are configuring. This information is limited to 80 characters and spaces cannot be
used.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> description <LINE>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
LINE is the text that describes the upstream port.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream 3 description charlestown_1U3
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration, and
in the command output of show commands such as the show ip interface
command.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-11
Modulation Profiles
A modulation profile is a collection of up to eight burst profiles that are sent out in an
Upstream Channel Descriptor (UCD) message to configure cable modem
transmission parameters for upstream traffic. Each upstream transmission burst type
is given a number called the Interval Usage Code (IUC). IUC codes are used to
allocate upstream time slots. The following IUC codes are supported:
n IUC 1 Request Burst - opportunity for cable modems to transmit bandwidth
requests
n IUC 3 Initial Maintenance - opportunity for cable modems to join the network by
sending an initial ranging request
n IUC 4 Station Maintenance -cable modem periodic ranging
n IUC 5 Short Grant Burst - short data burst
n IUC 6 Long Grant Burst - long data burst
n IUC 9 Advanced PHY Short Data Grant - advanced short data burst
n IUC 10 Advanced PHY Long Data Grant - advanced long data burst
n IUC 11 Unsolicited Grant Service - advanced unsolicited grant service
DOCSIS 1.0 and 1.1 cable modems use IUCs 5 and 6 for data transmission while
DOCSIS 2.0 cable modems use IUCs 9, 10, and 11 for data transmission. IUCs 9, 10,
and 11 may use higher modulation orders not supported by DOCSIS 1.0 and 1.1. IUC
11 was added for unsolicited grant service (UGS) flows.
Warning: Motorola does not recommend modification of modulation profile
parameters without a thorough understanding of modulation changes and
DOCSIS interface specifications. Modulation profile parameters will affect the
physical layer and may cause disruption or degradation of services.
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The Modulation Profile Numbering Scheme
The number of modulation profiles supported by the BSR has been increased to 1000.
The number of pre-defined modulation profiles supported has also been increased,
and a user is allowed to modify a pre-defined modulation profile. There are
approximately 95 default modulation profiles assigned to the TDMA, M-TDMA,
A-TDMA, and S-CDMA channel types. The numbering ranges for pre-defined
modulation profiles for each channel type are as follows:
n 1-100 = TDMA
n 101-200 = M-TDMA
n 201-300 = A-TDMA
n 301-400 = S-CDMA
n 601-700 = TDMA
n 701-800 = M-TDMA
n 801-900 = A-TDMA
n 901-1000 = S-CDMA
The total number of defined modulation profiles can be determined with the show
cable modulation-profile brief command.
Displaying Configured Modulation Profiles
1. Use the show cable modulation-profile command to view all existing
modulation profiles, as shown below:
MOT:7A#show cable modulation-profile
2. Use the show cable modulation-profile command to view a specific modulation
profile, as shown below:
MOT:7A#show cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
1-1000 is the modulation profile number.
Note: For a complete list and configuration of all pre-defined modulation
profiles, refer to Appendix A.
For guidelines on modifying modulation profile parameters, refer to
Appendix B.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
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3. Use the show cable modulation-profile brief command to view cursory
information about all configured modulation profiles, as shown below:
MOT:7A#show cable modulation-profile brief
The show cable modulation-profile brief command displays which modulation
profiles are pre-defined, pre-defined but modified by the user, or user configured
as shown in the sample command output below:
Determining the Modulation Profile Applied to an Upstream
Port
Follow these steps to determine which modulation profile is applied to a specific
upstream channel:
1. Navigate to Cable Interface Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the show cable upstream command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode,
to determine which modulation profile is applied to an upstream port, as shown
below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>}
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port number and logical channel number (0-3).
Profile Chan-type Config-status In-use
1 tdma pre-defined yes
2 to 4 tdma pre-defined
5 tdma user-configured
6 tdma user-configured
101 mtdma pre-defined, changed
102 to 116 mtdma pre-defined
201 to 205 A-TDMA pre-defined
301 to 310 S-CDMA pre-defined
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ifIndex: 46989444
description:
centerFreq: 13200000
rng_back_st: 0
rng_back_en: 4
data_back_st: 2
data_back_en: 8
channelWidth: 3200000
powerLevel: 0 (10th of dB)
slotSize: 0
force-frag: 0
map-interval: 4000 (usec)
pre-equalization: 0
invited-range-interval: 10000 (msec)
range-forced-continue: 0
range-power-override: false
concatenation: true
physical-delay: Mode 0, Min 400, Max 1600
rate-limit: 0
modulation-profile: 301
max-calls: 0
Spectrum Group:
Channel type: S-CDMA
S-CDMA active codes: 126
S-CDMA codes per slot: 2
S-CDMA spreading intrvl: 16
S-CDMA hopping seed: 0
Ingress canceller state: enabled
Ingress canceller idle interval: 320 (symbols)
Ingress canceller idle frequency: 5
Maintain power spectrum density: off
Modem ranging delay: 250 (usec)
IUC 11 grant size: 0
Modulation Profile
Number
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-15
Modulation Profile Configuration Mode
Modulation Profile Configuration Mode allows you to configure or modify a
modulation profile. DOCSIS 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 modulation profiles can be configured
through this mode.
Entering Modulation Profile Configuration Mode
To enter Modulation Profile Configuration Mode, use the cable modulation-profile
command, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
1-1000 is the modulation profile number.
The prompt changes to config-modprof followed by the specified modulation
profile number and IUC submode (Figure 5-1).
Figure 5-1 The Modulation Profile Configuration Mode Prompt
There are 8 IUC submodes (a-long, a-short, a-ugs, initial, long, request, short, and
station). The default IUC submode is request. There are two ways to enter a different
IUC submode:
Note: Modulation profiles 1-4, 101-116, 201-205, 301-310, 601-604,
701-726, 801-840, and 901-906 are pre-configured modulation profiles.
Motorola recommends that user-created modulation profiles use the
numbering range of 401-600 to ensure better future portability.
MOT:7A(config-modprof:5:request)#
Modulation
Profile
Number
IUC
Submode
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n A different IUC submode can be specified when entering Modulation Profile
Configuration Mode. For example:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modulation-profile 5 a-long
n A different IUC submode can be specified when in Modulation Profile
Configuration Mode with the iuc command. For example:
MOT:7A(config-modprof:5:request)#iuc a-long
Configuring a Modulation Profile
There are two methods of configuring a modulation profile in Modulation Profile
Configuration Mode:
n The iuc command can be used to completely configure a modulation profile
without having to enter individual IUC submodes.
n A modulation profile can be configured on an IUC submode by submode basis.
Note: The modulation profile parameters that need to be configured are
dependant on the DOCSIS channel type.
Note: Modulation profiles 1-4, 101-116, 201-205, 301-310, 601-604,
701-726, 801-840, and 901-906 are pre-configured modulation profiles.
Motorola recommends that user-created modulation profiles use the
numbering range of 401-600 to ensure better future portability.
For a complete list and configuration of all pre-defined modulation profiles,
refer to Appendix A.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-17
Configuring a Modulation Profile with the iuc Command
Follow these steps to configure a modulation profile using the iuc command:
1. Use the cable modulation-profile command in Global Configuration mode to
enter Modulation Profile Configuration Mode for the modulation profile that you
want to configure or modify, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
1-1000 is a modulation profile number.
2. Use the iuc command in Modulation Profile Configuration Mode to configure a
new modulation profile, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-modprof:<modulation profile number>:<IUC Submode>)#
iuc {a-long | a-short | a-ugs | initial | long | request | short | station} [A-TDMA
| mtdma | S-CDMA | tdma] {128qam | 16qam | 256qam | 32qam | 64qam |
8qam | qpsk} {<0-16>} {<16-253>} {fixed | short} {<0-255>} {off | on}
{<0x0-0x7fff>} {off | on} {none | qpsk0 | qpsk1} {<0-1536>} {<0-2048>}
{<0-2048>} {<0-32>} {off | on} {<0-128>} {off | on}
Table 5-2 provides a description of each parameter listed in the iuc command
syntax above.
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Table 5-2 iuc Command Modulation Profile Parameters and Descriptions
Parameter Description
a-long
a-short
a-ugs
initial
long
request
short
station
The Interval Usage Code:
Advanced PHY long data grant
Advanced PHY short data grant
Unsolicited Grant Service
Initial Ranging Burst
Long Grant Burst
Request Burst
Short Grant Burst
Station Ranging Burst
128qam
16qam
256qam
32qam
64qam
8qam
qpsk
The modulation type:
128qam is used for DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA or S-CDMA channel
types only - creates a default 128 -QAM modulation type where
all bursts are sent using 128-QAM.
256qam is used for DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA or S-CDMA channel
types only - creates a default 256 -QAM modulation type where
all bursts are sent using 256-QAM.
16qam creates a default 16-QAM modulation type where all
bursts are sent using 16-QAM.
32qam is used for DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA or S-CDMA channel
types only - creates a default 32-QAM modulation type where all
bursts are sent using 32-QAM.
64qam used for DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA or S-CDMA channel
types only - creates a default 64-QAM modulation type where all
bursts are sent using 64-QAM.
8qam is used for DOCSIS 2.0 A-TDMA or S-CDMA channel
types only - creates a default 8-QAM modulation type where all
bursts are sent using 8-QAM.
qpsk creates a default QPSK modulation type where all bursts
are sent using QPSK.
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3. Use the show cable modulation-profile command in Privileged EXEC mode to
view the modulation profile parameters and verify the configuration, as shown
below:
0-16 the number of bytes that can be corrected per FEC code word
16-253 the FEC code word length
fixed
short
fixed handling of FEC for last code word
shortened handling of FEC for last code word
0-255 the maximum burst length in minislots
off | on disable/enable scrambler
0x0-0x7fff the scrambler seed in hexadecimal format
off | on
disable/enable differential encoding
Note: If a modulation profile is in use, differential encoding
cannot be enabled or disabled for any of the burst types. To
enable or disable differential encoding for a burst type, an
operator must copy the modulation profile to a new modulation
profile number, enable or disable differential encoding for the
new modulation profile, and assign the new modulation profile to
the desired upstream channel. Attempting to enable or disable
differential encoding for a modulation profile that is in use will
generate the following error message:
[10/07-10:26:06.59- 07:CRMTASK]-E-mod profile
in use, cannot change diff encoding
none
qpsk0
qpsk1
the preamble type
low power QPSK preamble
high power QPSK preamble
0-1536 the preamble length in bits
0-2048 the interleaver depth value
0-2048 the interleaver block size value
0-32 the interleaver step size
off | on turn spreader off/on (S-CDMA only)
0-128 the codes subframe value (S-CDMA only)
off | on turn TCM encoding off/on - indicates whether trellis code
modulation (TCM) is enabled for (S-CDMA only)
Parameter Description
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
5-20 Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
MOT:7A#show cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
1-1000 is a modulation profile number.
Configuring a Modulation Profile Through an IUC Submode
Follow these steps to configure modulation profile on an IUC submode by submode
basis:
1. Use the cable modulation-profile command in Global Configuration mode to
enter Modulation Profile Configuration Mode for the modulation profile that you
want to configure or modify, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
1-1000 is a modulation profile number.
2. Use the commands shown below to configure a modulation profile on an IUC
submode by submode basis.
IUC Submode Commands
Command Description
channel-type Specifies the channel type for a modulation profile.
codes-subframe Specifies the sub-frame size. (S-CDMA only)
differential-encoding on Disables or enables differential encoding.
Note: If a modulation profile is in use, differential encoding
cannot be enabled or disabled for any of the burst types. To
enable or disable differential encoding for a burst type, an
operator must copy the modulation profile to a new modulation
profile number, enable or disable differential encoding for the
new modulation profile, and assign the new modulation profile
to the desired upstream channel. Attempting to enable or
disable differential encoding for a modulation profile that is in
use will generate the following error message:
[10/07-10:26:06.59- 07:CRMTASK]-E-mod profile
in use, cannot change diff encoding
fec-codeword Specifies the Forward Error Correction (FEC) code word
length.
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3. Use the show cable modulation-profile command in Privileged EXEC mode to
view the modulation profile parameters and verify the configuration, as shown
below:
MOT:7A#show cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
1-1000 is a modulation profile number.
fec-correction Specifies the number of bytes that can be corrected per FEC
code word.
interleaver-block-size Specifies the interleaver block size value.
interleaver-depth Specifies the interleaver depth value.
interleaver-step-size Specifies the interleaver step size value.
last-codeword-length Specifies the handling of FEC for the last code word.
max-burst Specifies the maximum burst length in minislots.
modulation-type Specifies the modulation profile modulation type.
preamble-length Specifies the preamble length in bits.
preamble-type Specifies the preamble type.
scrambler-mode Disables or enables the scrambler.
scrambler-seed Specifies the scrambler seed in hexadecimal format.
spreader on Disables or enables the spreader. (S-CDMA only)
tcm-encoding on Disables or enables the TCM Encoding. (S-CDMA only)
Command Description
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Applying a Modulation Profile
Modulation profiles 1-4 or user configured modulation profiles 5-16 can be applied to
an upstream channel for a cable interface. Follow these steps to apply a modulation
profile to an upstream channel:
1. Use the show cable modulation-profile command to view a specific modulation
profile, as shown below:
MOT:7A#show cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
1-1000 is a modulation profile number.
2. Use the cable upstream modulation-profile command in Interface
Configuration mode to apply an upstream modulation profile to an upstream port,
as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>}
modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream portnumber and logical channel number (0-3).
1-1000 is the modulation profile number.
Use the no cable upstream modulation profile command to restore the default,
as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>}
modulation-profile <1-1000>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port number and logical channel number (0-3).
1-1000 is the modulation profile number.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-23
Copying a Modulation Profile
Use the cable modulation-profile copy command, in Global Configuration mode, to
copy an existing modulation profile from a source modulation profile number to a
destination modulation profile number, as show below. The destination modulation
profile number is overwritten by the source modulation profile number.
MOT:7A(config)#cable modulation-profile copy {<1-1000>} {<1-1000>}
where:
1-1000 is the source modulation profile number.
1-1000 is the destination modulation profile number.
Note: When a modulation profile is assigned to an upstream channel, the
assignment will be rejected if any of the following rules are violated:
Differential encoding can only be enabled for TDMA, M-TDMA, and
A-TDMA channel types not the S-CDMA channel type.
Differential encoding can only be enabled for bursts using the QPSK and
16QAM modulation types.
For the TDMA and M-TDMA channel types, the differential encoding
setting (enabled or disabled) must be the same for IUC's 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6.
For the A-TDMA channel type, the differential encoding setting (enabled
or disabled) must be the same for IUC's 1, 3, and 4.
For the M-TDMA and A-TDMA channel types, the differential encoding
setting (enabled or disabled) must be the same for IUC's 9, 10, and (if
defined) IUC 11.
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Restoring a Default Modulation Profile Configuration
Use the cable modulation-profile reset command to reset a modified, pre-defined
modulation profile back to the system default. There are approximately 95 default
modulation profiles assigned to the TDMA, M-TDMA, A-TDMA, and S-CDMA
channel types.
MOT:7A(config)#cable modulation-profile reset {<1-4> | <101-116> |
<201-205> | <301-310>}
where:
1-4, 101-116, 201-205, 301-310 is the pre-defined modulation profile number.
Deleting a Modulation Profile or IUC
Follow these steps to delete a modulation profile or an IUC from a modulation profile:
1. Use the no cable modulation-profile command, in Global Configuration mode,
to delete a configured modulation profile, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#no cable modulation-profile <1-1000>
where 1-1000 is a modulation profile number to be deleted.
2. Use the no cable modulation-profile command, in Global Configuration mode,
to delete an IUC from a configured modulation profile, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#no cable modulation-profile <1-1000> [a-long | a-short |
a-ugs | initial | long | request | short | station]
where:
1-1000 is a modulation profile number.
a-long deletes the Advanced PHY long data grant IUC.
a-short deletes the Advanced PHY short data grant IUC.
a-ugs deletes the Unsolicited Grant Service IUC.
initial deletes the Initial Ranging Burst IUC.
long deletes the Long Grant Burst IUC.
request deletes the Request Burst IUC.
short deletes the Short Grant Burst IUC.
station deletes the Station Ranging Burst IUC.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Upstream Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-25
Managing the Upstream Channel
The following upstream tasks in this sections are used to manage or improve the
performance of the upstream channel:
n Configuring Upstream Cable Modem Registration Parameters
n Moving a Cable Modem or MTA to a Different Upstream Channel
n Adjusting for Physical Delay between the Cable Interface and Cable Modems
n Enabling Pre-equalization
n Forcing the Fragmentation of Large Upstream Packets
n Disabling an Upstream Port
n Configuring the Upstream Channel Descriptor
n Limiting the Number of Voice Calls on an Upstream Channel
n Enabling/Disabling CMTS Concatenation Capabilities
n Enabling/Disabling Concatenation for DOCSIS 1.0 Cable Modems
Configuring Upstream Cable Modem Registration
Parameters
Configuring upstream cable modem registration parameters includes the following
options:
n Setting the Upstream Minislot Size
n Setting the Upstream Channel Width
n Setting the Upstream Range-backoff
n Forcing a Range-response
n Forcing a Range Power Override
n Setting the Upstream Data-backoff
n Configuring the Invited Ranging Interval
n Configuring the Map Interval
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Follow these options to configure upstream cable modem registration parameters:
n Use the cable upstream minislot-size command in Interface Configuration mode
to set the upstream minislot size:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> minislot-size [2 | 4 | 8 | 16 |
32 | 64 | 128]
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
Use the no cable upstream minislot-size command in Interface Configuration
mode to reset the upstream minislot size:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream <NUM> minislot-size [2 | 4 | 8 |
16 | 32 | 64 | 128]
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
n Use the cable upstream channel-width command in Interface Configuration
mode to set the upstream channel width in Hertz (Hz):
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> channel-width [200000 |
400000 | 800000 | 1600000 | 3200000]
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
Note: For any cable modem TFTP configuration files using the Upstream
Channel ID configuration Setting (TLV type 2), you must edit the configuration
file to update the channel ID TLV. Taking this action ensures that cable
modems implementing upstream channel override will interoperate properly
with the upstream channel numbering convention. If your modems implement
upstream channel override, failure to update the cable modems TFTP
configuration file to accommodate the BSR upstream channel numbering
convention will result in the cable modems being unable to complete
registration.
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Use the no cable upstream channel-width command in Interface Configuration
mode to reset the default:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream <NUM> channel-width [200000 |
400000 | 800000 | 1600000 | 3200000]
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
n Use the cable upstream range-power-override command in Interface
Configuration mode to enable cable modem power adjustment:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> range-power-override
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
Use the no cable upstream range-power-override command in Interface
Configuration mode to disable the power adjustment:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream <NUM> range-power-override
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
n Use the cable upstream data-backoff command in Interface Configuration
mode to set the upstream data-backoff start and end values. If you choose
automatic, the system selects the upstream data-backoff start and end values.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} data-backoff
[automatic | <0-15> | <0-15>]
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
0-15 is the start value.
0-15 is the end value.
Use the no cable upstream data-backoff command in Interface Configuration
mode to restore the upstream data-backoff default:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} data-backoff
[automatic | <0-15> | <0-15>]
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where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3)
0-15 is the start value.
0-15 is the end value.
n The default time value allowed by the cable interface between ranging requests
transmitted by the cable modem is 10000 milliseconds. If you need to adjust the
time value allowed between ranging requests, use the cable upstream
invited-range-interval command in Interface Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> invited-range-interval
<0-30000>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
0-30000 is the number of milliseconds allowed between ranging requests.
n Use the cable upstream map-interval command in Interface Configuration
mode to determine the time interval in microseconds for bandwidth maps
messages (MAP) to be used by the cable modem to allocate upstream time slots,
as shown in the following command example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} map-interval
<2000-16000>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
2000-16000 is the time interval in microseconds. The default is 4000
microseconds.
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n The initial ranging start and end backoff values are a part of the Upstream
Bandwidth Allocation Map (MAP) that cable modems use to register with the
CMTS. If a cable modem initial ranging request collides with requests from other
cable modems during the initial ranging process, the cable modem initial ranging
request is lost. The CMTS does not directly detect the collision. The cable
modem determines that a collision (or other reception failure) occurred when the
next MAP fails to include acknowledgement of the request. The cable modem
must then perform a back-off algorithm and retry its initial ranging request
causing prolonged cable modem downtime.
The initial ranging backoff start and end number of backoffs (wait times) can be
adjusted to randomize when initial ranging is initiated by cable modems that are
colliding during initial ranging. This adjustment lowers the odds for cable
modems colliding again, reducing the amount of time that a cable modem is
down.
Use the cable upstream range-backoff command in Interface Configuration
mode to set the initial ranging backoff start and end time. If the automatic
argument is used, the CMTS automatically sets the upstream data-backoff start
and end values:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} range-backoff
[automatic | <0-15> | <0-15>]
where:
automatic prompts the ranging backoff to start and end automatically.
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
0-15 is the start ranging backoff number of requests.
0-15 is the end ranging backoff number of requests.
Use the no cable upstream range-backoff command in Interface Configuration
mode to return the range-backoff function to the default:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} range-backoff
[automatic | <0-15> | <0-15>]
where:
automatic prompts the ranging backoff to start and end automatically.
NUM is the upstream port number.
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X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
0-15 is the start ranging backoff number of requests.
0-15 is the end ranging backoff number of requests.
Moving a Cable Modem or MTA to a Different Upstream
Channel
Use the cable modem ucc command in Privileged EXEC mode to move a cable
modem or MTA to a different upstream channel
A cable modem or MTA can be moved to a different upstream channel within the
same spectrum group and the same MAC domain after registration to balance the
number of cable modem or MTAs evenly among the receivers of the CMTS module to
utilize the entire upstream bandwidths more efficiently.
MOT:7A#cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} ucc <0-7>
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address in the form of xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
prefix is the cable modem IP address.
0-7 is the channel number.
Adjusting for Physical Delay between the Cable Interface
and Cable Modems
The physical delay function is used to adjust the round-trip propagation delay
threshold between the cable interface and cable modems. The cable interface adjusts
the physical delay function automatically by default.
You can use the following options to adjust the physical delay function:
n A single fixed time can be set for physical delay.
n Physical delay parameters can be configured so that they are adjusted
automatically by the BSR when you use the automatic option with a specified
minimum and maximum range in microseconds.
n If you do not want to specify a range for the automatic option, select the
automatic option only.
Use the cable upstream physical-delay automatic command in Interface
Configuration mode to set the automatic physical delay value for an upstream
channel:
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Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-31
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> physical-delay automatic
[<10-1600> | <10-1600>]
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
10-1600 is the minimum upstream physical delay in microseconds. The default
value is 200 microseconds.
10-1600 is the maximum upstream physical delay in microseconds. The default
value is 1600 microseconds.
-or-
Use the cable upstream physical-delay command in Interface Configuration mode to
set the fixed value for an upstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> physical-delay <10-1600>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
10-1600 is the fixed upstream physical delay value in microseconds. The default
is 800 microseconds.
The 800 microsecond default setting is an optimal setting for HFC networks with a
radius of not more than 50 miles (i.e., distance to the farthest cable modem).
However, when the default setting of 800 microseconds is in force on HFC plants
with a radius larger than 50 miles, cable modems may not be able to register or pass
data reliably since the round-trip propagation delay exceeds the configured value for
the physical delay (i.e, cable modems are not given enough time to register).
Note: Setting a physical delay value larger than required is allowed, although
data passing performance will not be optimized. However, do not set a
physical delay value smaller than required since this might cause some cable
modems to become inoperable.
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Should you need to change the default value for the physical delay, refer to the
guidelines in the table that follows or calculate a setting value using the formulas that
follow the table.
To calculate a setting value for your HFC plant, follow these steps using one of the
formulas provided in Step 2:
1. Determine the distance from the BSR 64000 (i.e, CMTS) to the most distant cable
modem measured in miles (or kilometers) of HFC (i.e, physical cable length).
2. Calculate the value for the physical delay using one of the following formulas:
For HFC measured in miles:
16 x L = PD
where
L is the value determined in Step 1.
PD is the value to specify for the command cable upstream physical-delay
For HFC measured in kilometers:
9.95 x L = PD
Transit Delay
(microsecs)
BSR
Physical
Delay
Setting
(microsecs)
One-way
distance
(miles)
One-Way
Distance
(kilometers)
Round trip
distance
(miles)
Round trip
distance
(kilometers)
800 1,600 100.0 160.9 200.0 321.9
700 1,400 87.5 140.8 175.0 281.6
600 1,200 75.0 120.7 150.0 241.4
500 1,000 62.5 100.6 125.0 201.2
400 800 50.0 80.5 100.0 160.9
300 600 37.5 60.4 75.0 120.7
200 400 25.0 40.2 50.0 80.5
100 200 12.5 20.1 25.0 40.2
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where
L is the value determined in Step 1.
PD is the value to specify for the command cable upstream physical-delay
Enabling Pre-equalization
Use the cable upstream pre-equalization command to enable the pre-equalization
adjustment function on the upstream port, which includes sending pre-equalization
coefficients in a ranging response to a cable modem to compensate for impairment
over the transmission line in Interface Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> pre-equalization
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
If you need to disable the pre-equalization adjustment, use the no cable upstream
pre-equalization command.
Forcing the Fragmentation of Large Upstream Packets
The cable upstream force-frag command is used as a traffic shaping tool. When a
cable modem sends a request to the cable interface for a large data grant that exceeds
the configured minislot threshold, the cable interface grants the cable modem the
configured minislot threshold, which forces the cable modem to make another data
grant request for the remaining data, thereby causing the data packets to be
fragmented by the cable modem.
Use the cable upstream force-frag command to force cable modems to fragment
large upstream packets in Interface Configuration mode:
Note: The physical delay cannot be configured to a value less than 10
microseconds.
Note: Not all cable modems support the pre-equalization adjustment. If you
enable the pre-equalization adjustment for an upstream port and the cable
modem does not support this adjustment, the cable interface may not receive
valid upstream data from the cable modem.
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MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} force-frag <0-255>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
0-255 is the threshold number of minislots without fragmentation for large data
grants.
Disabling an Upstream Port
Follow these steps to administratively shut down an upstream port:
1. Use the show interfaces cable command in Privileged EXEC mode to determine
if an upstream port is activated or deactivated:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> upstream {<NUM> |
<X/Y>}
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
upstream NUM is the upstream port number.
upstream X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
2. Navigate to Cable Interface Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#interfaces cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
3. Use the cable upstream shutdown command in Interface Configuration mode to
disable an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} shutdown
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
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Configuring the Upstream Channel Descriptor
Follow the steps in this section to configure the upstream channel descriptor (UCD).
1. Use the cable upstream shutdown command in Interface Configuration mode to
disable the upstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} shutdown
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
2. The default UCD message transmission interval is 1000 milliseconds. If you want
to adjust this parameter, use the cable ucd-interval command in Interface
Configuration mode to set the UCD message transmission interval:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable ucd-interval <0-2000>
where:
0-2000 is the UCD message transmission interval in milliseconds.
3. Use the show cable ucd-interval command in Interface Configuration mode to
display the configured ucd interval value:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable ucd-interval
4. Use the no cable upstream shutdown command in Interface Configuration
mode to re-enable the upstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>}shutdown
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
Limiting the Number of Voice Calls on an Upstream Channel
The Maximum Assigned Bandwidth (MAB) feature is used on the cable interface to
regulate the number of Voice-over-IP (VOIP) calls that are available on a particular
upstream channel for Unsolicited Grant Service (UGS) and Unsolicited Grant Service
with Activity Detection UGS-AD constant bit rate (CBR) data flows. A definitive
limit on the number of voice calls ensures that bandwidth resources are not overused
on an upstream channel.
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n The maximum number of calls is set to zero by default, which means that the
BSR accepts an unlimited number of voice calls. Use the cable upstream
max-calls command in Interface Configuration mode to configure the maximum
number of voice calls for an upstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} max-calls
<0-255>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
0-255 is the number of voice calls permitted on the upstream channel.
n Use the no cable upstream max-calls command in Interface Configuration mode
to return the maximum number of voice calls to the default value, which is zero.
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} max-calls
<0-255>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
0-255 is the number of voice calls permitted on the upstream channel.
Enabling/Disabling CMTS Concatenation Capabilities
The CMTS concatenation feature on the BSR allows an MSO to globally enable or
disable concatenation for DOCSIS 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 cable modems. Enabling the
concatenation feature allows the CMTS to do concatenation with participating cable
modems. This increases per-cable modem upstream throughput by combining
multiple MAC frames into one packet request. Cable modems request only one
DOCSIS timeslot on the upstream channel for multiple small packets, as opposed to
having to request an individual timeslot for each MAC frame.
CMTS concatenation also allows an MSO to disable CMTS concatenation. Disabling
CMTS concatenation would be useful in preventing potential concatenation-related
problems from occurring.
Use the cable upstream concatenation command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to globally enable or disable CMTS concatenation capabilities, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> concatenation
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Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 5-37
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream <NUM> concatenation
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
Enabling/Disabling Concatenation for DOCSIS 1.0 Cable
Modems
Concatenation can be enabled or disabled specifically for DOCSIS 1.0 cable modems.
Use the cable concatenation command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to
enable or disable concatenation for DOCSIS 1.0 cable modems, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable concatenation { docsis-1.0 }
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable concatenation { docsis-1.0 }
where:
docsis-1.0 enables/disables concatenation for DOCSIS 1.0 cable modems only.
.
Note: Concatenation must be enabled globally with the cable upstream
concatenation command before any setting specified with the cable
concatenation command is valid. Once concatenation is enabled globally,
the cable concatenation command will enable or disable concatenation for
DOCSIS 1.0 cable modems only and concatenation will always be enabled
for DOCSIS 1.1 and DOCSIS 2.0 cable modems regardless of any setting
specified with this command.
Displaying Upstream Parameters
Use the show cable upstream command in Interface Configuration mode to show the
configured upstream parameters:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>}
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3)
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable upstream command.
Viewing Upstream Port Information
Use the show interfaces cable upstream command in all modes except User EXEC
mode to view upstream port statistics:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> upstream [stats | signal-quality | spectrum
<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
upstream <NUM> is the upstream port number.
upstream <X/Y> is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
stats provides upstream information in a statistical format.
signal-quality displays upstream port RF signal quality information.
spectrum displays upstream port spectrum information for power levels
comparing the upstream frequency to the number of microvolts and dBmV.
5000000-42000000 is the upstream start of the frequency range in Hertz (Hz).
5000000-42000000 is the upstream end of the frequency range in Hertz (Hz).
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show interfaces cable upstream command.
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 6-1
6
Configuring Upstream
Channel Bonding
Introduction
Upstream channel bonding is part of the DOCSIS 3.0 specification. It allows a single
cable modem to transmit data simultaneously on multiple upstream channels.
Upstream channel bonding provides for increased upstream throughput of 100 Mbps
or greater for individual modems. Additionally, upstream channel bonding provides
for real time load balancing across bonded channels and more efficient utilization of
upstream bandwidth.
Upstream channel bonding requires that all the upstream channels of a bonding group
be within the same upstream service group (MD-US-SG). Upstream service groups
are defined by the fiber node topology of the HFC plant. The channels of an upstream
bonding group must share one or more fiber nodes.
The figure below depicts an example network plant topology. In this figure, there are
two MAC domains. Both MAC domains have four upstream channels bound to them.
MAC domain 1 has the four channels split across two fiber nodes, FN-A and FN-B.
MAC domain 1 can support two upstream channel bonding groups: UBG1 and
UBG2. The four channels in MAC domain 2 all share the same fiber node. MAC
domain 2 supports a single four channel upstream bonding group: UBG3. MAC
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domain 2 could also be configured with an upstream bonding group of two or three
channels.
Figure 6-1 RX48/TX32 MAC Domain Fiber Node Plant Topology
In Release 6.3.1, upstream bonding groups must be on the same RX48 physical RF
port. This restriction eliminates any issues associated with the mapping of RF ports to
BCM3216 MAC chips. All the channels of an upstream bonding group must be
serviced by a single BCM3216 chip.
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
TX32 Port 1
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
TX32 Port 0
FN-A
MAC Domain 1
MAC Domain 2
FN-C
DBG 3
FN-B
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
TX32 Port 1
U
0
U
1
RX48 US Port 0
U
0
U
1
RX48 US Port 1
UBG 1
UBG 2
DBG 1
DBG 2
U
0
U
1
U
2
U
3
UBG 3
RX48 US Port 2
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In future releases, when eight channel upstream bonding groups are supported, the
restriction of limiting upstream channels of a bonding group to the same RF port will
be removed and the mapping of RF ports to MAC chips will be to taken into
consideration.
Multiple Transmit Channel Operation
The foundation for upstream channel bonding is a set of enhancements to the
DOCSIS upstream bandwidth request and grant procedures referred to as Multiple
Transmit Channel mode (MTC). MTC mode includes the following mechanisms:
n Continuous Concatenation and Fragmentation (CCF), with segment headers. A
protocol that treats the upstream data transmission for a given service flow as a
stream of data regardless of what channel it is transmitted on and regardless of
packet boundaries.
n Queue-depth based bandwidth requests. Pre-DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems and
DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems operating with MTC mode disabled use the legacy
bandwidth request mechanism. USing this mechanism, the cable modem requests
bandwidth in mini-slots and must take PHY layer overhead into account when
calculating the number of mini-slots to request. The queue-depth based frame
format is similar to the legacy request frame format except that the length of the
request field has been increased to two bytes. Overall, the queue-depth based
request mechanism allows a modem in MTC mode to request more bandwidth in
a single request.
n Multiple outstanding requests.
n Service ID (SID) clusters.
n T4 timeout multiplier.
n Use of assigned burst profile corresponding to IUC in the grant.
n One-fill of FEC code words, as opposed to zero-fill.
n New request/transmission rules.
Note: MTC mode enhancements can be applied to single channel service
flows as well as bonded service flows.
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Enabling MTC Mode
The cable mtc-mode command is a cable interface CLI configuration command to
enable or disable Multiple Transmit Channel (MTC) operation for all cable modems
on a MAC domain.
MTC mode will not be enabled for a cable modem under the following conditions:
n Cable modems whose registration request contains a cable modem upstream
forbidden attribute mask, TLV 43.9.4, with the bonded bit, bit 0, set to "1"
regardless of the configuration setting for MTC mode on the MAC domain.
n DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems that do not advertise multiple receive channel
support.
n DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems that do advertise multiple receive channel support but
for which the CMTS has disabled multiple receive channel operation in the
registration response message.
n DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem that include a DOCSIS 1.0 class of service TLV in
their registration request.
Unless otherwise prohibited by MTC mode configuration, cable modem attribute
mask TLV settings, or previously stated restrictions, the BSR will enable MTC mode
on all DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems that advertise MTC support in their cable modem
capabilities TLV, regardless of whether that cable modems service flows are bonded
or non-bonded.
The BSR will ignore the cable load-balancing tcc and dcc-mrc-mode configuration
settings for any cable modem that is operating in MTC mode.
When MTC mode is enabled for all cable modems on a MAC domain, the BSR forces
the deregistration of all cable modems that are MTC mode capable but not currently
operating in MTC mode. When MTC mode is disabled on a MAC domain the BSR
forces the deregistration of all modems operating in MTC mode.
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
RX48 cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
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2. Use the cable mtc-mode command to enable multiple transmit channel (MTC)
operation for all cable modems on a MAC domain.To allow any cable modem
that is capable of MTC mode to operate in upstream bonding mode, use the cable
mtc-mode command without the required-attribute argument.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable mtc-mode [required-attribute]
where:
required-attribute is an optional argument that permits only cable modems
whose registration request message contains a cable modem upstream
required attribute mask, TLV 43.9.3, with the bonded bit (bit 0) set to "1", to
operate in MTC mode. The default behavior for the BSR is to allow any cable
modem that is capable of MTC mode to operate in MTC mode.
Configuring the T4 Timeout Multiplier
The value of the T4 timeout multiplier for any cable modem is equal to the number of
channels in the cable modems transmit channel set when the T4 timeout multipliers
configured value is set to the default (0). The BSR sets the T4 timeout multiplier in
range response messages to DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems operating in MTC mode to be
equal to the number of channels in the cable modems transmit channel set. If the T4
timeout multiplier is set to the non-default DOCSIS value of "1," the BSR sets this T4
timeout multiplier value accordingly in every range response message to DOCSIS 3.0
cable modems operating in MTC mode.
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
RX48 cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
Note: The no cable mtc-mode command that includes the
required-attribute argument will have the same effect as the no cable
mtc-mode command without the required-attribute argument. It will disable
MTC mode for all cable modems on the MAC domain.
Note: The purpose of providing a T4 timeout multiplier is to reduce the CMTS
overhead associated with station maintenance. The BSR reduces the
frequency of station maintenance opportunities with DOCSIS 3.0 cable
modems operating in MTC mode by a factor equal to the T4 timeout
multiplier.
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where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable t4-multiplier command to configure the T4 timeout multiplier to
be used for DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems operating in MTC mode.
MOT:7A(config-if)# cable t4-multiplier <1-10>
where:
1-10 is the T4 multiplier value in seconds.
Configuring Upstream Bonding Group SID Clusters
A SID cluster is a group of SIDs assigned to a service flow that contains a unique SID
for each upstream channel associated with the service flow. The SID cluster allows
the CMTS to allocate bandwidth to specific upstream channels associated with the
service flow. When a cable modem transmits a bandwidth request, it must use the SID
from the cluster assigned to the channel on which the request is being transmitted.
The CMTS may issue grants and respond to requests on some or all of the upstream
channels associated with the service flow regardless of the channel on which the
request was received. When the CMTS issues a data grant for some or all of the
requested bandwidth, the grant must specify the SID from the service flows SID
cluster that corresponds to the channel on which the cable modem is to transmit data.
Whenever a CMTS cannot completely fulfill a bandwidth request, it must send a
pending data grant on at least one of the upstream channels associated with the service
flow.
A service flow can have more than one SID cluster associated with it. SID cluster
parameters assigned to a service flow are derived from the service flows assigned
bonding group. The set of SID clusters for a service flow is called a SID cluster group.
The reason for allowing multiple SID clusters is that requests and grants are not
tightly locked when utilizing MTC mode mechanisms, and therefore it is possible for
the cable modem and CMTS to become temporarily out of sync because of lost
upstream requests or downstream MAPs. This condition can result in an additive
delay build-up at the cable modem, although the system will eventually recover. In
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order to get the CMTS and the cable modem back in sync during the recovery process,
the cable modem will switch SID clusters.
Maximum Outstanding Bytes per SID Cluster
You can configure the maximum size, in bytes, for which there can be outstanding
requests using the SID cluster. Requests for previously unrequested bandwidth
increase the outstanding byte count by the total request size but re-requests increase
the count by only the number of newly requested bytes. Grants received for the SID
cluster decrease the count.
This maximum is a soft limit, which means that the last request may push the count
over the limit, but once the limit has been exceeded, no more requests can be made on
this SID cluster until the SID cluster has been cleared (all outstanding requested bytes
have been granted, or outstanding requests have timed out) and operation has
switched back to this SID cluster. To configure the maximum outstanding bytes per
SID cluster:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
RX48 cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable upstream bonding-group max-out-bytes-sid-cluster command
to configure the maximum outstanding bytes per SID cluster.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream bonding-group <1-65535>
max-out-bytes-sid-cluster <1-4294967295>
Note: For cable modems operating in MTC mode, the BSR supports two SID
clusters per upstream service flow for all service flows except UGS and
UGS-AD. UGS and UGS-AD service flows require only a single SID cluster
because they are not bonded. Only bonded service flows require multiple SID
clusters.
The BSR supports a maximum of 32 SID clusters per cable modem. (16
service flows per cable modem x 2 SID clusters per service flow = 32 SID
clusters per cable modem).
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where:
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
1-4294967295 is the maximum outstanding bytes per SID cluster.
Maximum Requests per SID Cluster
You can configure the maximum number of requests that can be made using the SID
cluster. Both new requests and re-requests, even for the same bandwidth, increment
the count of the number of requests made. To configure the maximum requests per
SID cluster:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
RX48 cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable upstream bonding-group max-reqs-sid-cluster command to
configure the maximum requests per SID cluster.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream bonding-group <1-65535>
max-reqs-sid-cluster <1-255>
where:
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
1-255 is the maximum number of requests that can be made using the SID
cluster.
Maximum Time in the SID Cluster
You can configure the maximum time, in milliseconds, that a service flow can
continue to use the SID cluster for requests. The start time is initialized to 0 at the
time of the first request and is checked before each subsequent request. It should be
noted that the final request may actually occur later than this deadline because of the
delay between when the limit is checked and when the request is actually made. Once
this deadline is reached, no more requests can be made using the SID cluster. To
configure the maximum time per SID cluster:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
RX48 cable interface.
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MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable upstream bonding-group max-time-sid-cluster command to
configure the maximum requests per SID cluster.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream bonding-group <1-65535>
max-time-sid-cluster <1-65535>
where:
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
1-65535 is the total time, in milliseconds, that a service flow may continue to
use the SID cluster for requests.
Maximum Total Bytes Requested per SID Cluster
You can configure the maximum number of bytes that can be requested using the SID
cluster. Requests for previously unrequested bandwidth increase the total byte count
by the entire request size, but re-requests increase the count by only the number of
newly requested bytes.
This maximum is a soft limit, which means that the last request can push the count
over the limit, but once the limit has been exceeded, no more requests may be made
on this SID cluster until the SID cluster has been cleared (all outstanding requested
bytes have been granted, or outstanding requests have timed out) and operation has
switched back to this SID cluster.
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
RX48 cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable upstream bonding-group max-tot-bytes-sid-cluster command to
configure the maximum requests per SID cluster.
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MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream bonding-group <1-65535>
max-tot-bytes-sid-cluster <1-4294967295>
where:
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
1-4294967295 is the total number of bytes that can be requested using the
SID cluster.
Configuring an Upstream Channel Bonding Group
An upstream channel bonding group is a set of two or more upstream channels that
offer multiple channel through-put to individual bonding cable modems. The channels
comprising a bonding group must be within the same MAC domain. For Release
6.3.1, a bonding group is limited to two, three, or four upstream channels. Bonding
groups are defined within the context of a MAC domain.
To configure an upstream channel bonding group, do the following:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
RX48 cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
2. Use the cable upstream bonding-group command to configure an upstream
channel bonding group.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream bonding-group <1-65535> {<X/Y/Z>
{<X/Y/Z> [<X/Y/Z>...]}}
where:
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
X/Y/Z is an upstream channel associated with this channel bonding group: X
is the port (0-7), Y is the upstream RF channel (0-5), and Z is the logical
channel (0-3) of the RX48 module.
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3. Use the show cable upstream bonding-groups command to verify that the
channel bonding group and its upstream channels are enabled and configured
correctly.
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream bonding-groups
Clearing Upstream Channel Bonding Statistics
Use the clear cable upstream bonding-groups statistics command, in any mode
except User EXEC, to clear the upstream channel bonding statistical counters for an
RX48 channel:
MOT:7A#clear cable upstream bonding-groups statistics [<X/Y>]
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
Resetting Cable Modems in Partial Service
Use the clear cable modem upstream partial-service reset command, in Privileged
EXEC mode, to reset all cable modems that are in partial service on a BSR upstream
channel:
MOT:7A clear cable modem <X/Y> upstream partial-service reset
where:
X is the RX48 module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
Displaying Upstream Channel Bonding
Information
show cable modem detail
The show cable modem detail command displays information for a service identifier
(SID) assigned to a cable modem on a specific RX48 or a specific cable modem
connected to a specific RX48.
MOT:7A# show cable modem detail {<MAC>} {<X/Y> {<NUM>}}
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where:
MAC is the MAC address of the cable modem.
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
NUM is the service identifier assigned to a cable modem.
show cable modem upstream bonding
The show cable modem upstream bonding command provides configuration
information for channel bonded cable modems.
MOT:7A# show cable modem upstream bonding [<X/Y> [<1-65535>]]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
show cable modem upstream non-bonding
The show cable modem upstream non-bonding command provides configuration
information for channel-bonding capable cable modems that are registered as
non-bonding.
MOT:7A# show cable modem upstream non-bonding <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the RX48 module.
show cable modem upstream partial-service
The show cable modem upstream partial-service command displays a list of cable
modems that are in upstream partial service.
MOT:7A# show cable modem upstream partial-service[<X/Y>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
show cable sid-cluster
The show cable sid-cluster command displays the SIDs associated with a SID
cluster.
MOT:7A# show cable sid-cluster {<X/Y> {<1-4294967295>}}
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where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
1-4294967295 is the upstream bonded service flow identifier (SFID).
show cable upstream bonding-groups
The show cable upstream bonding-groups command displays upstream channel
bonding group information:
MOT:7A# show cable upstream bonding-groups [statistics | <X/Y> [<1-65535>]]
where:
statistics displays upstream bonding group statistics.
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the RX48 module.
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
show cable upstream bonding-groups minrr-multipliers
The show cable upstream bonding-groups minrr-multipliers command displays
the minimum reserved rate multipliers for a cable bonding group.
MOT:7A# show cable upstream bonding-groups minrr-multipliers [<X/Y>
[<1-65535>]]
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
1-65535 is the upstream channel bonding group number.
Other Related show Commands
The following show commands have been modified in Release 6.3.1 as a result of the
upstream channel bonding feature:
show cable modem
show cable modem cpe
show cable modem detail
show cable modem downstream bonding
show cable modem downstream non-bonding
show cable modem downstream partial-service
show cable modem hosts
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show cable modem loadbalance-group
show cable modem mac
show cable modem mac30
show cable modem maintenance
show cable modem max-rate
show cable modem mta/ps/stb
show cable modem offline
show cable modem offline-previous
show cable modem phy
show cable modem registered
show cable modem remote-query
show cable modem stats
show cable modem summary
show cable modem summary percentage
show cable modem throughput
show cable modem time-registered
show cable modem timing-offset
show cable modem unregistered
show cable modem vendor
show cable modem verbose
show cable qos svc-flow param-set
show cable qos svc-flow statistics
show cable qos svc-flow summary
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7
Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0
Upstream Logical Channel
Introduction
DOCSIS 2.0 increases physical upstream channel performance. It increases upstream
channel capacity and increases overall system tolerance to noise. The benefit of this is
improved spectral efficiency for the HFC network.
About DOCSIS 2.0
DOCSIS 2.0 capabilities include:
n Advanced-Time Division Multiple Access (A-TDMA) encoding
n Synchronous Code Division Multiple Access (S-CDMA) encoding
n Higher symbol rates (5.12 MSym/sec - 6.4 MHz wide channel)
n Higher order modulations
In addition to the QPSK and 16 QAM modulations available in DOCSIS 1.0 and
1.1, DOCSIS 2.0 adds: 8QAM, 32Qam and 64QAM.
n Additional Forward Error Correction (FEC) (16 correctable bytes per codeword)
n Additional burst protection through byte interleaving
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n Additional multipath protection (24 tap equalizer)
Logical Channels
For DOCSIS 1.0 and 1.1, a single channel was associated with each single physical
port on a BSR 64000 CMTS module. DOCSIS 2.0 introduces the ability to have
logical upstream channels on each single physical port. Logical channels allow
accommodation of DOCSIS 1.0 and 1.1 (legacy) cable modems in a DOCSIS 2.0
environment.
Channel Types
DOCSIS 2.0 allows operators to assign a channel type to each logical channel
associated with a physical port. A channel type allows (or restricts) the kind of cable
modem (DOCSIS 2.0, 1.1, or 1.0 compliant) that can operate over the logical channel
to which the channel type is assigned. Available channel types are listed in Table 7-1:
Table 7-1 Channel Types Supported by DOCSIS 2.0
Channel Type DOCSIS Specification Type Comment
TDMA (Time Division Multiple
Access)
Type 1 DOCSIS 1.0 and 1.1 only channel
type
MTDMA (Mixed TDMA and
A-TDMA)
Type 2 DOCSIS 2.0, DOCSIS 1.1 and 1.0
channel type
A-TDMA (Advanced TDMA) Type 3A DOCSIS 2.0 only channel type
S-CDMA (Synchronous Code
Division Multiple Access)
Type 3S DOCSIS 2.0 only channel type
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DOCSIS 2.0 Only Channel Types
The DOCSIS 2.0 only channel types, A-TDMA and S-CDMA, greatly enhance
upstream channel capacity, as shown in Table 7-2:
Other Channel Types
To accommodate DOCSIS 1.0 and 1.1 cable modems in a DOCSIS 2.0 environment,
DOCSIS 2.0 also supports, in addition to A-TDMA and S-CDMA, two other logical
channel types:
n TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access)
n MTDMA (Mixed TDMA and A-TDMA)
Logical Channel Operation
For more than one logical channel to co-exist on the same physical CMTS port and
use the single frequency configured for that port, each logical channel type is assigned
a unique set of non-overlapping timeslots in which to communicate.
Table 7-2 Features of DOCSIS 2.0 Logical Channel Types
DOCSIS 2.0 Channel Type Features
A-TDMA A-TDMA features include:
Increased pre-equalization and equalization from 8 to 24 taps
Increased Forward Error Correction capabilities from 10 to 16
bytes.
Increased channel width from 3.2 to 6.4 MHz
Expanded upstream channel bandwidth capacity from 10Mb to
30Mb
Increased modulation orders (QPSK, 8,16,32,64 QAM)
Byte interleaving
S-CDMA S-CDMA supports all the features of A-TDMA with the addition of:
CDMA spreading
Trellis Coded Modulation (TCM)
128 QAM with TCM
128 codes
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For example, the bandwidth scheduler that resides in the CMTS module allocates
S-CDMA bursts to S-CDMA timeslots, while allocating DOCSIS 1.x or A-TDMA
bursts to TDMA timeslots.
The allocation of timeslots to each logical channel is interleaved and assigned based
on usage. TDMA-based cable modems transmit data during TDMA assigned
timeslots while S-CDMA based cable modems transmit data during their own
timeslots. In addition, multiple S-CDMA cable modems may transmit on the same
upstream channel at the same time, up to the total capacity of the channel. TDMA
requires that each cable modem on a particular upstream channel be allocated
different intervals of transmission time.
Obtaining Detailed DOCSIS 2.0 Information
For detailed information, refer to the CableLabs DOCSIS 2.0 specification. This
specification is available at the CableLabs website: http://www.cablemodem.com/
downloads/specs/CM-SP-RFIv2.0-I07-041210.pdf
DOCSIS 2.0 and the BSR 64000
The ability to configure the BSR 64000 successfully for operation in a DOCSIS 2.0
environment is dependent upon the BSR 64000 hardware configuration, your
awareness of limitations imposed by the DOCSIS 2.0 specification itself, and the
software characteristics of the Motorola implementation of DOCSIS 2.0.
Refer to the following sections for more information:
n BSR 64000 Hardware Support for DOCSIS 2.0
n BSR 64000 Software Support for DOCSIS 2.0
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BSR 64000 Hardware Support for DOCSIS 2.0
BSR 64000 CMTS module support for DOCSIS 2.0 is described in following table:
For a DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS Module, four logical channels are available on each
physical upstream port. The kinds of channel types that can be assigned to each
logical channel on a single upstream physical port of a 2:8 DOCSIS 2.0 CMTS
Module are listed in Table 7-4.
Table 7-3 BSR 64000 CMTS Module Support for DOCSIS 2.0
Module
DOCSIS 2.0
Support
Logical Channel
Support
Channel Type
Support
2:8 Primary CMTS
(DOCSIS 2.0 2:8)
(DOCSIS 2.0, Euro-DOCSIS 2.0)
(Broadcom 3140)
Yes Yes S-CDMA, A-TDMA,
MTDMA, TDMA
2:8 Primary CMTS
(DOCSIS 2:8)
(DOCSIS and Euro-DOCSIS)
(Broadcom 3138)
Yes No A-TDMA, MTDMA,
TDMA
2:8 Standby CMTS
(DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 Standby)
(DOCSIS 2.0 and Euro-DOCSIS
2.0)
Yes Yes S-CDMA, A-TDMA,
MTDMA, TDMA
2:8 Standby CMTS
(DOCSIS 2:8 Standby)
(DOCSIS and Euro-DOCSIS)
(Broadcom 3138)
Yes No A-TDMA, MTDMA,
TDMA
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BSR 64000 Software Support for DOCSIS 2.0
DOCSIS 2.0 is supported by BSR 64000 Release 4.1.0 and later as follows:
n The default channel type for all Primary (or Standby) DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS
Module logical channels is TDMA.
n The default channel type for all CMTS modules other than the Primary and
Standby DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS Module is TDMA.
n The S-CDMA DOCSIS 2.0 channel type can be assigned only to logical channels
0 and 1.
n TDMA and S-CDMA channel types can co-exist in the same MAC domain on a
2:8 DOCSIS 2.0 CMTS Module.
n A 6.4 Mhz channel width can only be used with A-TDMA and S-CDMA channel
types.
n The Motorola implementation of DOCSIS 2.0 offers 128QAM and 256QAM in
addition to those specified in the CableLabs DOCSIS 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0
specifications.
Table 7-4 Channel Types that can be Assigned to Logical Channels
Physical
Upstream
Port
Logical Channel Number Supported Channel Types
0 S-CDMA, A-TDMA, MTDMA,
TDMA
1 S-CDMA, A-TDMA, MTDMA,
TDMA
2 A-TDMA, MTDMA, TDMA
3 A-TDMA, MTDMA, TDMA
Note: Only the Primary (and Standby) 2:8 DOCSIS 2.0 CMTS Module
supports the configuration of logical channels.
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DOCSIS 2.0 Logical Channel Configuration Task
Summary
A summary of tasks for configuring DOCSIS 2.0 is listed in below:
About Upstream Channel Commands
When using the following cable upstream and related show commands, only the
NUM option displays for BCM 3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules. Both the NUM and
X/Y arguments display for BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS modules. These
commands are applicable to both an upstream port or upstream port and logical
channel.
Table 7-5 DOCSIS 2.0 Configuration Task Summary
Task Refer to...
1. Confirm that your BSR 64000 hardware
configuration supports DOCSIS 2.0
Determining the 2:8 CMTS Module
Type
Determining the DOCSIS Version
of a Slot
2. Enable Spectrum Power Density
Maintenance
Configuring Spectrum Power
Density Maintenance for a Logical
Channel
3. Assign a channel type to a logical channel Configuring the Channel Type
4. For logical channels assigned an
S-CDMA channel type, configure
additional S-CDMA related parameters
Additional S-CDMA Logical
Channel Configurations
5. Review the configuration Displaying the Upstream Logical
Channel Configuration
channel-type modulation-profile
data-backoff range-backoff
force-frag show cable upstream
map-interval show interfaces cable upstream
max-calls trap-enable-cmts
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When using the following cable upstream commands, both the NUM and X/Y
arguments display for a BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS modules. These
commands are only applicable for an upstream port and logical channel and will only
be available through the X/Y argument.
When using the following cable upstream commands, only the NUM option displays
for BCM 3138-based 2:8 CMTS modules. Both the NUM and X/Y arguments display
for a BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS modules. These commands are only
applicable for an upstream port will only be available through the NUM argument.
minislot-size trap-enable-if
shutdown trap-enable-rdn
active-codes iuc11-grant-size
codes-minislot maintain-power-density
hopping-seed spread-interval
channel-width physical-delay
concatenation power-level
description pre-equalization
frequency range-forced-continue
ingress-canceller range-power-override
invited-range-interval rate-limit
loadbalance-group snr-offset
modem-ranging-delay spectrum-group
Release 6.4.0 Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0 Upstream Logical Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 7-9
Determining the 2:8 CMTS Module Type
Use the show chassis status command, in all modes except User EXEC, to determine
the type of 2:8 CMTS module that is installed in the BSR 64000 chassis. An installed
2:8 DOCSIS CMTS module will return a type and subtype of 2x8 and an installed
2:8 DOCSIS 2.0 CMTS module will return a type and subtype of 2x8 (2.0). The
following is typical screen output from the show chassis status command displaying
the two 2:8 CMTS module type:
Note: To determine which 2:8 CMTS module is installed in the BSR 64000,
refer to Determining the 2:8 CMTS Module Type.
For additional information on any of the above commands, refer to Chapter
13 of the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
7-10 Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
Determining the DOCSIS Version of a Slot
Use the show docsis-version command, in all modes except User EXEC, to
determine the supported DOCSIS version of a slot in the BSR 64000 chassis, as show
below:
MOT:7A#show docsis-version <0-15>
where:
0-15 is the chassis slot number.
Returned values are DOCSIS 1.X (DOCSIS 1.0 or DOCSIS 1.1) and DOCSIS 2.0.
The DOCSIS version information allows you to determine the channel type that a
BSR chassis slot supports and the subsequent configuration procedures.
Slot Type Sub Red State RM IO UpTime LastUpTime Success Failure
0 CMTS 2X8 - RUN x x 19:38:20 1 1
1 - - - - 0 0
2 - - - x 0 0
3 CMTS 2x8(2.0) 6 RUN x x 19:38:27 1 1
4 - - - - 0 0
5 - - - - 0 0
6 CMTS 2x8(2.0) - stby x x 19:38:28 0 1
7 SRM 8 RUN x x 19:49:11 0 0
8 SRM - stby x - 19:46:50 1 1
9 - - - - 0 0
10 CMTS 2x8 - RUN x - 19:39:58 1 1
11 - - - - 0 0
12 - - - - 0 0
13 - - - - 0 0
14 CMTS 2X8 - RUN x - 19:37:56 1 1
15 HSIM ETH8 - RUN x x 19:47:03 1 1
2:8 DOCSIS CMTS module 2:8 DOCSIS 2.0 CMTS module
Release 6.4.0 Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0 Upstream Logical Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 7-11
Configuring the Channel Type
The cable upstream channel-type command allows you to specify the channel type
for the default upstream channel (0) or specify the channel type for up to four logical
channels (0-3).
Follow this procedure to configure the channel type for an upstream channel:
1. Navigate to Cable Interface Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the cable upstream channel-type command in Cable Interface
Configuration mode to configure an upstream channel type, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>} channel-type
{tdma | A-TDMA | mtdma | S-CDMA}
where:
NUM is the upstream port number and default channel number 0.
X/Y the upstream port number and logical channel number (0-3).
tdma is a DOCSIS 1.1 channel type.
A-TDMA is a DOCSIS 2.0 channel type.
mtdma is a DOCSIS 1.1 or DOCSIS 2.0 TDMA channel type.
S-CDMA is a DOCSIS 2.0 channel type only used for logical channel
configurations.
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3. Use the show interfaces cable configuration command, in all modes except
User EXEC, or show cable upstream command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to view the channel type configuration, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show interfaces cable <X/Y> configuration
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
\MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>}
where:
NUM is the upstream port number and default channel number 0.
X/Y the upstream port number and logical channel number (0-3).
The following is screen output from the show interfaces cable configuration
command which displays the channel type configuration. In this example, four
logical channels with an MTDMA channel type have been configured on
upstream port 4.
Note: The channel-type command is applicable to the 2:8 and 2:8
(2.0)CMTS modules only. To determine which CMTS modules are installed in
the BSR 64000, use the show chassis status command.
It is unnecessary to configure and enable multiple logical channels with the
same channel types. The total capacity of the physical channel will not be
enhanced by enabling multiple logical channels. However, it is reasonable to
assign unique modulation profile to multiple logical channels of the same type
for RF impairment investigation.
Note: If you are configuring an S-CDMA logical channel, refer to Additional
S-CDMA Logical Channel Configurations.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0 Upstream Logical Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 7-13
Invited Ranging Attempts: 16
--US PORT 4--
Max Tx Timing Offset: 0
Forced Continue Ranging: 0
Ranging Interval: 10000(ms)
Power Offset Threshold: 24
Power Desired: 16384(linear)
--CHAN 0--
Channel Type: mtdma
Rx Pwr Lvl Config: 0(10th of dB)
Max Power Adj: 8
AdjCtrlFlag: 8
--CHAN 1--
Channel Type: mtdma
Rx Pwr Lvl Config: 0(10th of dB)
Max Power Adj: 8
AdjCtrlFlag: 8
--CHAN 2--
Channel Type: mtdma
Rx Pwr Lvl Config: 0(10th of dB)
Max Power Adj: 8
AdjCtrlFlag: 8
--CHAN 3--
Channel Type: mtdma
Rx Pwr Lvl Config: 0(10th of dB)
Max Power Adj: 8
AdjCtrlFlag: 8
Upstream Port Number
Upstream Logical
Channel Number
and Channel Type
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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Configuring Spectrum Power Density Maintenance
for a Logical Channel
The Maintain Power Spectral Density feature can be enabled for each logical channel.
If Maintain Power Spectral Density is enabled and the modulation rate is different
from the previous UCD, the cable modem must change its transmit power level to
keep the power spectral density as close as possible to what it was prior to the
modulation rate change. If Maintain Power Spectral Density is disabled, the cable
modem maintains the same power level that it was using prior to the modulation rate
change.
Use the cable upstream maintain-power-density on command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to enable the Maintain Power Spectral Density feature, as shown
below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <X/Y> maintain-power-density on
where:
X/Y the upstream port number and logical channel number (0-3).
Additional S-CDMA Logical Channel
Configurations
The S-CDMA logical channel type introduces additional complexities in the timing
and synchronization of upstream scheduling. The upstream channel is still scheduled
using intervals described in terms of minislots.
In S-CDMA channel types, determining the minislot size in time ticks is no longer
used. S-CDMA groups data and codes into S-CDMA frames. A minislot in S-CMDA
is defined as an interval of time and a code (or combination of codes). Mini-slots are
mapped to frames. S-CDMA uses the concepts of spreading intervals, the number of
allowed active codes, and the number of active codes per mini-slot to determine
scheduling intervals per S-CDMA frame. A spreading interval is the time it takes to
send one symbol per code across all 128 possible codes in an S-CDMA frame. The
time duration of an S-CDMA frame is determined by a configurable number of
spreading intervals and the signaling rate. The number of codes per mini-slot is also
configurable as is the number of codes used.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0 Upstream Logical Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 7-15
The S-CDMA channel type allows multiple modems to transmit on the same
upstream channel at the same time. S-CDMA spreads the signals transmitted based on
the particular code used so that messages will not interfere with each other. The
coding has the effect of creating channels within the same spectrum. With S-CDMA,
more than one mini-slot can occupy the same place in time in the upstream bandwidth
allocation. Mini-slots are separated by the code(s) used.
The existing time stamp mechanism is not sufficient for synchronizing these new
frames so an additional level of synchronization is added called a timestamp snapshot.
This information contains the frame number, mini-slot number, and time stamp.
Timestamp snapshot information is conveyed in the SYNC and UCD messages.
The following additional configuration procedures are required for an S-CDMA
logical channel:
n Configuring S-CDMA Active Codes
n Configuring S-CDMA Codes Per Minislot
n Configuring the S-CDMA Hopping Seed
n Configuring the S-CDMA Spreading Interval
Configuring S-CDMA Active Codes
S-CDMA channels support the configuration of the number of active codes allowed
for an S-CDMA channel type. The active codes value must be a non prime number.
Increasing the number of allowed active codes provides more transmission channel
capacity. Reducing the number of active codes takes advantage of the S-CDMA
spreader processing gain at the expense of channel capacity.
Use the cable upstream active codes command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to specify the number of active codes allowed for an S-CDMA channel type, as
shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <X/Y> active codes <64-128>
where:
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
64-128 the total number of allowed active codes.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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Configuring S-CDMA Codes Per Minislot
S-CDMA channels support the configuration of the number of active codes allowed
for each minislot. The number active codes allowed for each minislot determines the
minislot capacity and sets the granularity of the upstream grants.
Use the cable upstream codes-minislot command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode for the S-CDMA channel, to specify the number of active codes per minislot, as
shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <X/Y> codes-minislot <2-32>
where:
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
2-32 is the number of codes allowed per minislot.
Configuring the S-CDMA Hopping Seed
Use the cable upstream hopping-seed command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to specify the 15 bit S-CDMA hopping seed value used for the code hopping
sequence initialization, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <X/Y> hopping-seed <0-32767>
where:
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
0-32767 is the hopping seed value (0 disables code hopping)
Configuring the S-CDMA Spreading Interval
S-CDMA channels support the configuration of spreading interval. A spreading
interval is the time that it takes to transmit one symbol per code across all 128 codes
in an S-CDMA frame. The time duration of an S-CDMA frame is determined by a
configurable number of spreading intervals and the signaling rate.
Use the cable upstream spread-interval command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to specify the spreading interval for an S-CDMA frame, as shown below:
Note: The logical channel must be disabled to specify a new hopping seed
value.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring a DOCSIS 2.0 Upstream Logical Channel
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 7-17
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <X/Y> spread-interval <1-32>
where:
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-3).
1-32 is the spreading interval value.
Displaying the Upstream Logical Channel
Configuration
Use the show cable upstream command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to
display the complete configuration of an upstream logical channel, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream {<NUM> | <X/Y>}
where:
NUM is the upstream port number and default channel number 0.
X/Y the upstream port number and logical channel number (0-3).
The following is screen output from the show cable upstream command which
displays a complete channel configuration. Configuration parameters introduced with
DOCSIS 2.0 highlighted.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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ifIndex: 118161
description:
centerFreq: 22800000
rng_back_st: 0
rng_back_en: 4
data_back_st: 2
data_back_en: 8
channelWidth: 3200000
powerLevel: 0 (10th of dB)
slotSize: 4
force-frag: 0
map-interval: 4000 (usec)
pre-equalization: 0
invited-range-interval: 10000 (msec)
range-forced-continue: 0
range-power-override: false
concatenation: true
physical-delay: Mode 0, Min 400, Max 1600
rate-limit: 0
modulation-profile: 1
max-calls: 0
Spectrum Group:
Channel type: tdma
S-CDMA active codes: 0
S-CDMA codes per slot: 0
S-CDMA spreading intrvl: 0
S-CDMA hopping seed: 0
Ingress canceller state: disabled
Ingress canceller idle interval: 320 (symbols)
Ingress canceller idle frequency: 5
Maintain power spectrum density: off
Modem ranging delay: 250 (usec)
IUC 11 grant size: 0
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 8-1
8
Using RF Sentry
Introduction
The BSR 64000 CMTS modules provide an RF Sentry upstream Spectrum analysis
tool. The RF Sentry tool is used to measure either power levels or signal to noise
ratios of each of the upstream ports. The RF Sentry works by means of the Fast
Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm for power level measurement or Signal to Noise
Ratio (SNR) measurement. RF Sentry using SNR is only available on the 2:8 CMTS
module.
n Power level measurement is done by means of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)
algorithm. FFT transforms a discrete signal in a time domain to a power level in a
frequency domain. Power level measurement is done through a built-in FFT
processor.
n SNR measurement is done by exchanging data between a reference modem and
the CMTS. A reference modem is a registered cable modem that is selected to
send an upstream traffic/burst used to measure the SNR on that upstream.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
8-2 Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5
The RF Sentry has its own RF path which can be switched between the RF paths of
the upstream ports. The RF Sentry uses a tap-in mode to access the RF path. Both
power level and Signal to Noise Ratio measurement is done within the DOCSIS burst
receiver on the CMTS module.
Power Level Measurement
The FFT processor measures the power levels of a signal in one of the upstream
receiver ports that spans a range of frequencies. Power level measurement provides an
informational big picture of the signal in a particular upstream port. The power
level measurement data can then be displayed to determine power level estimates at
different frequencies across the Spectrum over time. This information can then be
used for upstream Spectrum trend analysis.
This section describes the following tasks:
n Configuring FFT
n Configuring the FFT Processor
n Displaying the FFT Processor Configuration
n Starting FFT Power Level Measurement
n Storing FFT Power Level Measurement Data
n Displaying FFT Power Level Measurement Data
Configuring FFT
The fft setup command can be used to configure the FFT processor on the DOCSIS
burst receiver or to display the current FFT processor configuration.
Note: In a DOCSIS 2.0 environment, RF Sentry power level or SNR
measurement is only supported on logical channel 0. S-CDMA mode is also
not supported.
Note: Running any FFT commands can impact voice performance.
Release 6.4.0 Using RF Sentry
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 8-3
Configuring the FFT Processor
Use the fft setup command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to configure the FFT
processor, as follows:
MOT:7A#fft setup <Slot/Port> [sample {<256-4096>} mode {tap-in | intrusive |
hardware | idle-sid} window {blackman | blackman-harris | hamming | hanning |
rectangular}]
where:
Slot/Port is the operational CMTS slot number and a valid upstream port number.
sample 256-4096 is the number of samples of the power level measurement. The
maximum for 2:8 modules is 2048.
mode is the RF Sentrys operational mode:
tap-in (2:8 CMTS only) taps into the RF signal using the 9th receiver.
intrusive (2:8 CMTS only) is not used.
hardware (RX48 only) is random.
idle-sid (RX48 only) uses the IDLE SID trigger.
window is the window coefficient to shape the output of the power level
measurement (rectangular, hamming, hanning, blackman, or
blackman-harris). The default is rectangular.
Displaying the FFT Processor Configuration
Use the fft setup <Slot/Port> command, without any additional arguments, to display
the current FFT processor configuration for a particular port on a particular CMTS
module, as follows:.
MOT:7A#fft setup <Slot/Port>
where:
Slot/Port is the operational CMTS slot number and a valid upstream port number.
Starting FFT Power Level Measurement
Use the fft start command to initiate power level measurement using the FFT
algorithm via the RF Sentry.
MOT:7A#fft start <Slot/Port> [sample {<256-4096>}] [mode {Tap-in}] [window
{rectangular | hamming | hanning | blackman | blackman-harris}]
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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where:
Slot/Port is the operational CMTS slot number and a valid upstream port number.
sample 256-4096 is the number of samples of the power level measurement. The
maximum for 2:8 modules is 2048.
mode is the RF Sentrys operational mode.
window is the window coefficient to shape the output of the power level
measurement (rectangular, hamming, hanning, blackman, or
blackman-harris). The default is rectangular.
Storing FFT Power Level Measurement Data
The fft store command saves the latest FFT power level measurement data for a
CMTS module to a file system. The user specifies a particular slot and port, the file
system (NVRAM or Flash), and a file name without any extension to be used to store
the FFT power level measurement data. An extension of ".fft" will be automatically
added to the file name.
Use the fft store command to save the FFT power level measurement data, as follows:
MOT:7A#fft store <Slot/Port> {nvram: <WORD> | flash: <WORD>}
where:
Slot/Port is the operational CMTS slot number and valid upstream port number.
nvram: stores the power level measurement data to the NVRAM file system.
flash: stores the power level measurement data to the flash file system.
WORD is the power level measurement data filename with a limit of 20
characters excluding the ".fft" filename extension.
Displaying FFT Power Level Measurement Data
The fft display command is used to display FFT power level measurement data. The
command provides the following FFT data retrieval options:
n Retrieving FFT Data from an Operational CMTS Module
Note: The sample, mode, and window arguments are optional with the fft
start command but can be used to override the current FFT processor
configuration specified with the fft setup command and initiate power level
measurement with a new FFT processor configuration.
Release 6.4.0 Using RF Sentry
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 8-5
n Retrieving FFT Data from a File System
The FFT data can be processed into a table or graph format and then displayed to a
console or telnet session.
Retrieving FFT Data from an Operational CMTS Module
Power level measurement data can be directly retrieved from an operational CMTS
module. Use the fft display command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to retrieve FFT
data from a CMTS module, as follows:
MOT:7A#fft display {<Slot/Port>} startfreq {<0-102400000>} endfreq
{<0-102400000>} {table | graph}
where:
Slot/Port is the operational CMTS slot number and valid upstream port number.
startfreq 0-102400000 is the start of the frequency range (0 Hz - 81.92 MHz for
2:8 CMTS modules; 0 Hz - 102.4 MHz for RX48 modules).
endfreq 0-102400000 is the end of the frequency range (0 Hz - 81.92 MHz for
2:8 CMTS modules; 0 Hz - 102.4 MHz for RX48 modules).
table | graph specifies a table or graph display format.
Retrieving FFT Data from a File System
Power level measurement data can be retrieved from a file system if a user has saved
the latest FFT power level measurement data to a file system with the fft store
command. See Storing FFT Power Level Measurement Data.
Use the fft display command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to retrieve FFT power level
measurement data from a file system, as follows:
MOT:7A# fft display {nvram: <WORD> | flash: <WORD>} startfreq
{<0-102400000>} endfreq {<0-102400000>} {table | graph}
where:
nvram: retrieves the power level measurement data from the NVRAM file
system.
flash: retrieves the power level measurement data from the Flash file system.
WORD is the power level measurement data filename - limit of 20 characters
excluding the ".fft" filename extension.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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startfreq 0-102400000 is the start of the frequency range (0 Hz - 81.92 MHz for
2:8 CMTS modules; 0 Hz - 102.4 MHz for RX48 modules).
endfreq 0-102400000 is the end of the frequency range (0 Hz - 81.92 MHz for
2:8 CMTS modules; 0 Hz - 102.4 MHz for RX48 modules).
table | graph specifies a table or graph display format.
Signal to Noise Ratio Measurement
Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) measurements using the RF Sentry are performed on a
specified idle Spectrum. The acquired SNR data can be displayed or stored in a file
for on demand diagnostic purposes.
This section describes the following tasks:
n Configuring SNR Measurement
n Displaying the SNR Configuration
n Starting SNR Measurement
n Storing SNR Measurement Data
n Displaying SNR Measurement Data
n Configuring an SNR Offset
Configuring SNR Measurement
The snr setup command can be used to configure the SNR measurement on the
DOCSIS burst receiver. Use the snr setup command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to
configure SNR measurement, as follows:
MOT:7A#snr setup {<NUM>{<NUM>}} {<5000000-42000000> |
<5000000-65000000> | <5000000-55000000>} {<5000000-42000000> |
<5000000-65000000> | <5000000-55000000>} {1600000 | 200000 | 3200000 |
400000 | 6400000 | 800000} [equalization {auto | off | on}| ingress-cancel {auto |
off | on} | modulation-type {16qam | auto | qpsk}]
where:
Note: SNR measurements using the RF Sentry are not available on the
RX48 module.
Release 6.4.0 Using RF Sentry
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 8-7
NUM is the operational 2:8 CMTS slot number.
NUM is a valid upstream port number.
5000000-42000000 is the North America standard start frequency in Hz.
5000000-42000000 is the North America standard end frequency in Hz.
5000000-65000000 is the EURODOCSIS standard start frequency in Hz.
5000000-65000000 is the EURODOCSIS standard start frequency in Hz.
5000000-55000000 is the J-DOCSIS standard start frequency in Hz.
5000000-55000000 is the J-DOCSIS standard end frequency in Hz.
1600000 is the channel width 1600 kHz.
200000 is the channel width in 200 kHz.
3200000 is the channel width in 3200 kHz.
400000 is the channel width in 400 kHz.
6400000 is the channel width 6400 kHz.
800000 is the channel width in 800 kHz.
equalization auto evaluates the SNR with and without equalization.
equalization off evaluates the SNR without equalization.
equalization on evaluates the SNR with equalization.
ingress-cancel auto evaluates the SNR with and without ingress cancellation.
Note: Depending on the configuration of the installed 2:8 CMTS Resource
Module, the start and end frequencies will reflect the North American
DOCSIS, EURODOCSIS, or J-DOCSIS standards
Note: Equalization settings on the snr setup command is for POST
equalization.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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ingress-cancel off evaluates the SNR without ingress cancellation.
ingress-cancel on evaluates the SNR with ingress cancellation.
modulation-type 16qam evaluates the SNR for 16qam mode.
modulation-type auto evaluates the SNR for both QPSK and 16QAM modes.
modulation-type qpsk evaluates the SNR for QPSK mode.
Configuring an Automatically Repeated SNR Test
SNR measurement tests to perform SNR measurements for a specified number of
times on one particular frequency. Configuring a automatically repeated SNR
measurement test involves specifying a loop count and a center frequency. This type
of SNR measurement test is used for diagnostic purposes.
Use the snr loop command to configure an automatically repeated SNR measurement
test, as shown below:
MOT:7A#snr loop {<NUM>} {<NUM>}{<NUM>}{<NUM>}{<frequency>}
{1600000 | 200000 | 3200000 | 400000 | 6400000 | 800000} [<mac> | equalization
{off | on} | ingress-cancel {off | on} | modulation-type {16qam | qpsk}]
where:
NUM is the slot number of an operational 2:8 CMTS module (0-5, 9-15).
NUM is a valid upstream port number (0-7).
NUM is the number SNR measurement repetitions (1-100).
NUM is a ranging pattern number used to look up a certain pattern to be used for
SNR measurement.
frequency is the particular frequency to perform SNR measurements on.
1600000 is the channel width 1600 kHz.
200000 is the channel width in 200 kHz.
3200000 is the channel width in 3200 kHz.
400000 is the channel width in 400 kHz.
6400000 is the channel width 6400 kHz.
800000 is the channel width in 800 kHz.
mac is he MAC address, in the form of xxxx.xxxx.xxxx, of a device to perform
SNR measurements on.
Release 6.4.0 Using RF Sentry
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 8-9
equalization auto evaluates the SNR with and without equalization.
equalization off evaluates the SNR without equalization.
equalization on evaluates the SNR with equalization.
ingress-cancel auto evaluates the SNR with and without ingress cancellation.
ingress-cancel off evaluates the SNR without ingress cancellation.
ingress-cancel on evaluates the SNR with ingress cancellation.
modulation-type 16qam evaluates the SNR for 16qam mode.
modulation-type auto evaluates the SNR for both QPSK and 16QAM modes.
modulation-type qpsk evaluates the SNR for QPSK mode.
Displaying the SNR Configuration
Use the snr setup-get command, without any additional arguments, to display the
current SNR measurement configuration for a particular port or all ports on a
particular CMTS module, as follows:
MOT:7A#snr setup-get [<NUM> [<NUM>]]
where:
NUM is the slot number of the 2:8 CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number.
Starting SNR Measurement
Use the snr start command to initiate SNR via the RF Sentry.
MOT:7A#snr start {<NUM>{<NUM>}} [<mac>]
where:
NUM is the slot number of the 2x8 CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number.
Note: Equalization settings on the snr loop command is for POST
equalization.
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mac the MAC address of the reference modem in the form of
xxxx.xxxx.xxxx
Storing SNR Measurement Data
The snr store command saves the latest SNR measurement data for a CMTS module
to a file system. The user specifies a particular slot and port, the file system (NVRAM
or Flash), and a file name without any extension to be used to store the SNR
measurement data. An extension of ".snr" will be automatically added to the file
name.
Use the snr store command to save the SNR measurement data, as follows:
MOT:7A#snr store {<NUM>{<NUM>}} {flash:<filename> <WORD>|
nvram:<filename> <WORD>}
where:
NUM is the slot number of the 2:8 CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number.
flash:<filename> stores the SNR measurement data to the Flash file system.
nvram:<filename> stores the SNR measurement data to the NVRAM file
system.
WORD is the SNR measurement data filename with a limit of 20 characters
excluding the ".snr" filename extension.
Displaying SNR Measurement Data
The snr display command is used to display SNR measurement data. The command
provides the following SNR data retrieval options:
n Retrieving SNR Data from an Operational CMTS Module
n Retrieving SNR Data from a File System
The SNR data can be displayed to a console or telnet session.
Note: The snr start command must first be used to initiate SNR
measurement before the snr store command can be used to store SNR
measurement data.
Release 6.4.0 Using RF Sentry
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 8-11
Retrieving SNR Data from an Operational CMTS Module
SNR measurement data can be directly retrieved from an operational CMTS module.
Use the snr display command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to retrieve SNR data from
a CMTS module, as follows:
MOT:7A#snr display {<NUM>{<NUM>}
where:
NUM is the slot number of the 2:8 CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number.
Retrieving SNR Data from a File System
SNR measurement data can be retrieved from a file system if a user has saved the
latest SNR measurement data to a file system with the snr store command. See
Storing SNR Measurement Data.
Use the snr display command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to retrieve SNR
measurement data from a file system, as follows:
MOT:7A#snr display {flash:<filename> <WORD> | nvram:<filename>
<WORD>}
where:
nvram:<filename> retrieves the SNR measurement data from the NVRAM file
system.
flash:<filename> retrieves the SNR measurement data from the Flash file
system.
WORD is the SNR measurement data filename - limit of 20 characters excluding
the ".snr" filename extension.
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Configuring an SNR Offset
The cable upstream snr-offset command configures the display of an SNR value
with an offset. The offset can be configured for each upstream port up to a value of
100 (10 dB) in 10 (1 dB) increments. The offset value will be added to the SNR value
when it is displayed with the show controllers and show interfaces cable upstream
signal-quality CLI commands and through SNMP. The offset value will not be added
to the actual SNR reading that is used by critical tasks such as Spectrum Management.
Use the cable upstream snr-offset command, in Interface Configuration mode, to
configure an SNR offset, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> snr-offset [10 | 20 | 30 | 40 | 50 |
60 | 70 | 80 | 90 | 100]
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
10 | 20 | 30 | 40 | 50 | 60 | 70 | 80 | 90 | 100 is the offset value in increments of 10
(1 dB).
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9
Managing Cable Modems
Introduction
This chapter describes managing cable modems and includes the following
procedures and tasks:
n Configuring Network Parameters for Cable Modems
n Configuring Baseline Privacy
n Using Flap Lists
n Pinging a Cable Modem at the MAC Layer
n Resetting the Cable Modem
n Clearing Cable Modem Counters
n Viewing Cable Modem Information
n Configuring Remote Query
n Using Cable Modem Steering
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Configuring Network Parameters for Cable
Modems
Configuring cable modem network parameters involves the following tasks:
n Enabling the Cable Modem Aging Timer
n Removing Cable Modems from the Offline List
n Setting the Insertion Interval for Cable Modems
n Setting the Synchronization Interval
n Setting Cable Modem Authentication Parameters
n Denying Access to a Cable Modem
n Setting the Maximum Number of Hosts
Enabling the Cable Modem Aging Timer
The cable modem aging timer feature is used to automatically remove off-line cable
modems from the network after a configured time period. The cable modem aging
timer is disabled by default.
Use the cable modem-aging-timer command in Global Configuration mode to set
and enable the cable modem aging timer:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modem-aging-timer <10-30240>
where:
10-30240 is the cable modem Aging Timer number in minutes (10 minutes to 21
days).
Use the cable modem-aging-timer off command to disable the aging timer.
Removing Cable Modems from the Offline List
The cable modem aging timer function causes cable modems to be removed after a
configurable timeout period. However, the clear cable modem offline command is
useful for removing cable modem(s) before its configured aging timeout period or if
the cable modem aging timer function is not used. Refer to Enabling the Cable
Modem Aging Timer for more information on enabling the cable modem aging timer
feature.
Use the following options to remove cable modems from the offline list:
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n Use the clear cable modem offline command to remove all offline cable modems
from the offline list:
MOT:7A:7A#clear cable modem offline
n Use the clear cable modem offline command to remove a specific offline cable
modem from the offline list or all cable modems from a specific CMTS slot and
port:
MOT:7A:7A#clear cable modem offline {<mac> | <X/Y>}
where:
mac is the MAC address of the cable modem.
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
n Use the clear cable modem offline slot command to remove all offline cable
modems in a single CMTS from the offline list:
MOT:7A:7A#clear cable modem offline slot <NUM>]
where:
NUM is the slot number of a CMTS module from 0-5 and 9-14.
Setting the Insertion Interval for Cable Modems
The insertion interval is the fixed time period available for cable modem initial
channel request. The default insertion interval is 20.
1. Use the cable insert-interval command in Interface Configuration mode to set
the insertion interval for cable modem initial channel request:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable insert-interval {<0-200>}
where:
0-200 is the insertion interval in hundredths of a second.
Note: Ensure that the upstream port is down before setting the insertion
interval.
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2. Use the no cable insertion-interval command in Interface Configuration mode
to return the default insertion interval:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable insert-interval {<0-200>}
where:
0-200 is the insertion interval in hundredths of a second.
3. Use the show cable insert-interval command in Interface Configuration mode to
view the insertion interval:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable insert-interval
Setting the Synchronization Interval
The synchronization message interval is the interval between successive
synchronization message transmissions from the cable interface to the cable modems.
Follow the steps in this section to set and verify the synchronization interval:
1. Use the cable sync-interval command in Interface Configuration mode to set the
synchronization message interval value:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable sync-interval {0-200}
where:
0-200 is the synchronization interval set in milliseconds (msecs).
2. Use the show running-config command to verify the synchronization message
interval setting. Until an interval is set, the no sync interval entry appears in the
display.
Use the no cable sync-interval command in Interface Configuration mode if you
need to reset the default synchronization message interval:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable sync-interval
3. Use the show cable sync-interval command in Interface Configuration mode to
display the synchronization message interval:
Note: Ensure that the interface is down before setting the synchronization
message interval.
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MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable sync-interval
Use the no cable sync-interval command in Interface Configuration mode to
reset the default synchronization message interval:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable sync-interval <1-200>
Setting Cable Modem Authentication Parameters
The default authentication parameters are enabled, but have a null value by default.
Use the information in the following sections to set authentication parameters on the
cable interface and the cable modems to ensure security on the HFC network.
1. Use one the following two options to configure cable modem authentication
parameters so that all cable modems return a known text string to register with the
cable interface for network access:
If you want to activate cable modem authentication so that all cable modems
return an unencrypted text string to register with the cable interface for
network access, issue the cable shared-secret 0 command in Global
Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#cable shared-secret 0 < string>
where:
0 specifies that an unencrypted authentication text string follows.
string is an alphanumeric text authentication string. The authentication string
must enclosed with double quotes if the string contains spaces. The "%" and
"!" characters must not be used.
Note: The unencrypted "authentication string" on the BSR can be up to 246
characters. The encrypted "authentication string" on the BSR can be up to
508 characters.
Caution: Ensure that the authentication string or hexadecimal key in the
cable modem configuration file matches the authentication string or
hexadecimal key configured on the cable interface. Cable modems cannot
register with the cable interface if the authentication parameters do not
match.
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Automatic encryption on the BSR is disabled by default. If you want to
activate cable modem authentication so that all cable modems return an
encrypted key and register with the cable interface for network access, the
service password-encryption command must be configured.
2. Use the show running-config command in Global Configuration mode to
determine if the automatic encryption function is enabled on the BSR and if cable
modem authentication is activated or deactivated on a cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#show running-config interface cable <X/Y>
where:
interface displays running configuration information on all interfaces or a
specific interface.
cable X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
The configuration parameters that you have set should appear in the show
running-config command output.
Note: The show running-config command output identifies the system
password with the number 0 if it is unencrypted. If the system password is
encrypted, it is identified with the number 7. If cable modem authentication is
active, cable modem authentication information does not appear in the
display
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Restoring Previously Defined Authentication Parameters
Use the no cable shared-secret command in Interface Configuration mode to restore
the previously defined authentication parameters:
MOT:7A(config)#no cable shared-secret [< string> | <key>]
where:
string is an alphanumeric text string.
key is the shared secret key, expressed in hexadecimal notation, for example,
0x434F5453.
Denying Access to a Cable Modem
Use the cable modem deny command, in Global Configuration mode, to remove a
specified cable modem from the network and deny it future entry:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modem deny <mac>
where:
mac is the MAC address of the cable modem.
Use the no cable modem deny command to remove the restriction from the specified
cable modem:
MOT:7A(config)#no cable modem deny <mac>
where:
mac is the MAC address of the cable modem.
Setting the Maximum Number of Hosts
Use the cable modem max-hosts command to set the number of CPE hosts that can
connect to a cable modem on the HFC subnetwork.
1. Use the cable modem max-hosts command. in Privileged EXEC Mode. to
specify the maximum number of CPE hosts that can attach to a particular cable
modem:
MOT:7A#cable modem [<mac> | <prefix>] max-hosts <0-32>
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
prefix is the cable modem IP address.
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0-32 is the maximum number of hosts.
2. Use the cable modem max-hosts-all command, in Global Configuration Mod.e
to specify the maximum number of CPE hosts that can attach to a all cable
modems:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modem max-hosts-all <0-32>
where:
0-32 is the maximum number of hosts.
3. Use the show cable modem hosts command to verify the maximum number of
hosts setting:
MOT:7A#show cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} hosts
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
prefix is the cable modem IP address.
The screen displays the current number of hosts connected to the cable modem,
the maximum number of hosts allowed for the cable modem, and the host CPE IP
addresses behind the cable modem.
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Configuring Baseline Privacy
This section contains the tasks to configure Baseline Privacy (BPI). You must
configure BPI to encrypt upstream and downstream data on an HFC network. BPI is
activated by default and, in most cases, the BPI parameter default values are
satisfactory. The optional tasks described in this section involve some parameters you
may choose to change. If a parameter default is satisfactory, you can ignore its
associated task.
You can set the Traffic Encryption Key (TEK) and Authorization Key (AK) for BPI.
The encryption is based on 40-bit or 56-bit Data Encryption Standard (DES)
algorithms.
You can set the TEK to expire based on a grace-time value or a lifetime value. A
grace-time key assigns a temporary key to a cable modem to access the network. A
lifetime key assigns a more permanent key to a cable modem. Each cable modem that
has an assigned lifetime key requests a new lifetime key from the cable interface
before the current key expires.
Configuring BPI involves the following tasks:
n Setting TEK Privacy
n Setting Authorization Key Values
n Using Flap Lists
The following table describes the BPI parameters.
Note: The configuration and activation of BPI depend on the cable operator
physical plant.
Table 9-1 BPI Parameters
Parameter Identification Default Value
AK grace-time Temporary AK assigned to the
cable modem
600 seconds 300 to 1,800
seconds
AK lifetime More permanent AK assigned to
the cable modem after grace-time
AK expires
604,800
seconds
1 to 6,048,000
seconds
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Setting TEK Privacy
The TEK is assigned to a cable modem when its Key Encryption Key is established
during the cable modem registration process. The TEK encrypts data traffic between
the cable modem and the cable interface. The cable interface assigns a temporary
grace-time TEK to a cable modem so the cable modem can access the network. When
the grace-time TEK expires, the cable modem must renew its grace-time TEK with a
lifetime TEK. The cable interface assigns a more permanent lifetime TEK to a cable
modem when the grace-time TEK expires.
1. Use the interface cable command to enter Cable Interface Configuration mode
from Global Configuration mode to configure the cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the cable privacy tek life-time command in Cable Interface Configuration
mode to configure the global TEK lifetime value:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy tek life-time <30-604800>
where:
30-604800 is the TEK life-time value in seconds (the maximum value is 7
days).
Use the no cable privacy tek life-time command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, if you need to restore the default:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable privacy tek life-time <30-604800>
TEK grace-time Temporary traffic key assigned to
cable modem
600 seconds 300 to 1,800
seconds
TEK lifetime More permanent TEK assigned to
cable modem after grace-time
TEK expires
43,200 seconds 1,800 to
6,048,000
seconds
Table 9-1 BPI Parameters
Parameter Identification Default Value
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Use the cable privacy cm-tek grace-time command in Cable Interface
Configuration mode to set an individual cable modem grace-time TEK value for
Baseline Privacy.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy cm-tek grace-time <1-8192>
<300-302399>
where:
1-8192 is the Service Identifier (SID).
300-302399 is the grace-time value, expressed in seconds (5 minutes to 3.5
days).
Use the no cable privacy cm-tek grace-time command if you need to reset the
default.
3. If a new grace-time value is set for one or more cable modems, use the cable
privacy cm-tek reset command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to reset
the grace-time cable modem TEK value:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy cm-tek reset [<1-16383>]
where:
1-16383 is the primary Service Identifier (SID) of the cable modem.
4. The default lifetime TEK is 43,200 seconds. Use the cable privacy cm-tek
life-time command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to set a lifetime TEK
for an individual cable modem:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy cm-tek life-time <0-16383>
<1800-604800>
where:
0-16383 is the cable modems primary SID.
1800-604800 is the TEK lifetime value, expressed in seconds.
5. Use the show cable privacy tek command to display current TEK lifetime and
grace-time information:
MOT:7A#show cable privacy tek
6. Use the show cable privacy cm-tek command to display TEK information for
an individual cable modem using its MAC address:
MOT:7A(config)#show cable privacy cm-tek [<1-8192>]
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where:
1-8192 is the Service Identifier (SID).
Setting Authorization Key Values
An Authorization Key (AK) has a limited lifetime and must be periodically refreshed.
A cable modem refreshes its AK by re-issuing an Authorization Request to the cable
interface. Follow the steps in this section to configure the AK values.
1. Use the cable privacy cm-auth life-time command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to set the AK lifetime value:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy cm-auth life-time {<mac>}
[<300-6048000> ]
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
300-6048000 is the AK lifetime value, expressed in seconds.
2. Use the cable privacy cm-auth grace-time command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to set an individual grace-time AK value:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy cm-auth grace-time <mac>
<300-3024000>
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
300-3024000 is the individual grace-time AK, expressed in seconds (5
minutes to 35 days).
3. Use the cable privacy cm-auth reset command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to reset the individual cable modem life-time or grace-time value once a
new AK life-time or grace-time value is configured:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy cm-auth reset <mac>
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
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Managing Multicast Traffic
Follow this procedure to manage multicast traffic on the BSR:
n Use the cable privacy mcast command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode.
to enable the encryption of multicast traffic, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy mcast <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D>
[<8192-16381>]
where:
A.B.C.D is the multicast IP address.
A.B.C.D is the multicast subnet mask.
8192-16381 is the multicast SAID number.
n Use the cable privacy mcast access command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to configure a multicast address access list:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable privacy mcast access <H.H.H> <A.B.C.D>
[<8192-16381>]
where:
H.H.H is the cable modem MAC address.
A.B.C.D is the multicast IP address.
8192-16381 is the multicast SAID number.
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Configuring Cable Privacy Mandatory
The cable privacy mandatory feature allows a cable operator to enable the encryption
of all routed broadcasts and routed unmapped multicast traffic. Cable privacy
mandatory encrypts otherwise unencrypted downstream routed non-unicasts and only
gives the key to decrypt these messages to routing cable modems. Bridging cable
modems will discard all downstream routed broadcasts or routed multicasts.
Use the cable privacy mandatory command, in Global Configuration or Cable
Interface Configuration Mode, to allow the encryption of all routed broadcasts and
routed unmapped multicast traffic, as follows:
MOT(config)#cable privacy mandatory
The cable privacy enforce-bpi-plus command mandates that a cable modem
provisioned in DOCSIS 1.1 or higher must register with DOCSIS Baseline Privacy
Interface Plus (BPI+) and not use the earlier version of DOCSIS BPI.
MOT(config)#cable privacy enforce-bpi-plus
Note: The cable privacy mandatory feature requires that all cable modems
have BPI enabled in order to register. If a cable modem does not have BPI
enabled and cable privacy mandatory is turned on, the cable modem will not
be able to register.
With cable privacy mandatory enabled, routed broadcasts are not received by
VLAN Tagging CM's. Therefore, VLAN tagging cable modems will not be able
to respond to broadcast pings.
Warning: After enabling the cable privacy mandatory feature, the cable
operator must issue the clear cable modem all reset command to
re-register all cable modems and allow non-unicast traffic (including ARPs) to
function correctly.
Note: CMs provisioned with DOCSIS 1.0 are permitted to register without
BPI+.
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Using Flap Lists
Flap lists are used to collect statistics for determining cable modem problems on the
network. The cable modem flap list keeps track of the cable modem MAC address, up
and down transitions, registration events, missed periodic ranging packets, upstream
power adjustments on the BSR.
The following sections describe how Flap lists are used:
n Setting Flap List Parameters
n Using Flap Lists to Troubleshoot Cable Modem Problems
n Tips for Administering Flap Lists
Setting Flap List Parameters
Flap list parameters are configured to define a criteria for the proper functioning of
your cable network.
When a cable modem makes an insertion request more frequently than the defined
insertion time (the time allowed for cable modems to complete registration), the cable
modem is placed in the flap list for recording. When the cable modem power
adjustment meets or exceeds its predefined threshold, the cable modem is placed in
the flap list. You can specify the power adjustment threshold to a value that will cause
a flap-list event to be recorded. A miss rate is the number of times a cable modem
does not acknowledge a MAC layer keepalive message from a CMTS. You can
specify the number of seconds to record and retain flapping activity for the cable
modems connected to the CMTS. The number of cable modems that can be recorded
in the flap list is 8192 cable modems.
Use the following options to set flap list parameters:
1. Use the cable flap-list aging command, in Global Configuration mode, to specify
flap list aging, the number of minutes a cable modem is kept in the flap list.
MOT:7A(config)#cable flap-list aging <1-860400>
where:
1-860400 is the flap list aging value, expressed in minutes. The default flap
list aging value is 1440.
2. Use the cable flap-list insertion-time command, in Global Configuration mode,
to specify the flap list insertion time:
MOT:7A(config)#cable flap-list insertion-time <1-86400>
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where:
1-86400 is the flap list insertion time, expressed in seconds. The default flap
list insertion time is 60.
3. Use the cable flap-list percentage-threshold command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to specify the cable modem miss percentage:
MOT(config-if)#cable flap-list percentage-threshold <1-100>
where:
1-100 is the cable modem miss percentage.
Use the cable flap-list trap-enable command to control whether a flapListTrap
will be sent to the CMTS by the SNMP agent if the cable modem miss percentage
exceeds the flapListPercentageThreshold specified with the cable flap-list
percentage threshold command.
4. Use the cable flap-list power-adjust threshold command, in Global
Configuration mode, to specify the power adjustment threshold value between 0
to 2 dBmV. The power adjustment threshold causes a flap-list event to be
recorded when the threshold is exceeded:
MOT:7A(config)#cable flap-list power-adjust threshold <1-10>
where:
1-10 is the power adjustment threshold value, expressed in dB.
Note: Motorola recommends that you do not change the power adjustment
threshold from the default value, which is 2 dbmV. Ensure that you evaluate
the need to enable this function before applying it to your network. A power
adjustment threshold of less than 1 dBmV may cause excessive flap list
event recording.
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5. The default miss threshold for MAC-layer keepalive messages is 6. If you want to
change the threshold number of MAC-layer keepalive message misses that will
result in the cable modems being recorded in the flap list, use the cable flap-list
miss-threshold command, in Global Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#cable flap-list miss-threshold <1-12>
where:
1-12 is the keepalive misses threshold value.
6. Use the cable flap-list size command, in Global Configuration mode, to specify
the maximum number of cable modems that can be recorded in the flap list:
MOT:7A(config)#cable flap-list size <1-8191>
where:
1-8191 is a number that defines the maximum number of cable modems.
7. Use the clear cable flap-list command, in Global Configuration mode to remove
a cable modem from the flap list.
MOT:7A(config)#clear cable flap-list [<mac>] | all
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
8. Use the show cable flap-list command to display the cable modem flap lists and
verify cable flap list information. Refer to Using Flap Lists to Troubleshoot Cable
Modem Problems for using the various show cable flap-list command options.
MOT:7A#show cable flap-list
You can also use the show running-configuration command to display the cable
modem flap lists and verify flap list information:
Note: A high miss rate can indicate intermittent upstream problems, fiber
laser clipping, or common-path distortion.
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MOT:7A#show running-configuration | include flap
Using Flap Lists to Troubleshoot Cable Modem Problems
The BSR maintains a database of flapping cable modems to assist in locating cable
plant problems. The flap list feature tracks the upstream and downstream performance
of all cable modems on the network, without impacting throughput and performance
between the cable modem and BSR, or creating additional packet overhead on the
HFC network.
The following tasks are used to troubleshoot cable modem Problems:
n Viewing Flap List Statistics to Identify Network Health
n Interpreting Flap List Statistics
Viewing Flap List Statistics to Identify Network Health
This section describes the different show cable flap list sorting options and describes
the command output fields. Cable modems appear in the flap list when any of the
following conditions are detected:
n The cable modem re-registers more frequently than the configured insertion time.
n Intermittent keepalive messages are detected between the BSR and the cable
modem.
n The cable modem upstream transmit power changes beyond the configured power
adjust threshold.
Follow these steps to view flap list statistics by using different sorting options:
1. Use the show cable flap list command to view all flap list statistics for cable
modems:
MOT:7A#show cable flap-list
2. Use the show cable flap-list sort-flap command to sort the flap list statistics by
the cable modem flap:
MOT:7A#show cable flap-list sort-flap
Note: If a value is set to the default, the default value does not display after a
show running-configuration command.
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3. Use the show cable flap-list sort-time command to sort the flap list statistics by
the time at which the cable modem flap occurred:
MOT:7A#show cable flap-list sort-time
4. Use the show cable flap-list sort-interface command to sort the flap list
statistics by the cable upstream interface on which the cable modem flap
occurred:
MOT:7A#show cable flap-list sort-interface
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output and
field descriptions for the show cable flap-list command.
Interpreting Flap List Statistics
This section describes how to interpret flap list statistics in order to troubleshoot the
cable network
Cable modem activity follows the sequence below.
n Power-on
n Initial maintenance
n Station maintenance
n Power-off
The initial link insertion is followed by a keepalive loop between the BSR and cable
modem and is called station maintenance. When the link is broken, initial
maintenance is repeated to re-establish the link.
Initial maintenance @ Time T1
Station maintenance
Init maintenance @ Time T2
The Ins and Flap counters in the flap list are incremented whenever T2 T1 < N
where N is the insertion-time parameter configured using the cable flap-list
insertion-time command. The default value for this parameter is TBD seconds.
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Use the following cause or symptom observations (Table 9-2) to interpret flap list
activity and solve cable modem problems:
Note: Cable modems go offline faster than the frequency hop period and can
cause the frequency to stay fixed while cable modems go offline. Reduce the
hop period to 10 seconds to adjust to the hop frequency period.
Table 9-2 Troubleshooting Cable Modem Problems
Cause or Symptom Problem
Subscriber cable modem shows a lot of
flap list activity
Cable modem is having communication
problems with the BSR.
Subscriber cable modem shows little or
no flap list activity.
The cable modem is communicating with the
BSR effectively, however there is still a
problem. The problem can be isolated to the
subscribers CPE computer equipment or the
cable modem connection.
Ten percent of the cable modems in the
flap list show a lot of activity.
These cable modems are most likely having
difficulties communicating with the BSR.
Cable modems have a lot of power
adjustment (P-Adj) errors.
Cable modems have problems with their
physical upstream paths or in-home wiring
problems.
Use corresponding cable modems on the
same physical upstream port interface with
similar flap list statistics to quickly resolve
problems outside the cable plant to a
particular node or geographic location.
All cable modems are incrementing the
insertion at the same time.
There is a provisioning server failure.
A cable modem has more than 50 power
adjustments per day.
The cable modem has a suspect upstream
path.
Corresponding cable modems on the same
physical upstream port interface with similar
flap list statistics can be used to quickly
resolve problems outside the cable plant to a
particular node or geographic location.
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A cable modem has roughly the same
number of hits and misses and contain a
lot of insertions.
There is a problematic downstream path. For
example, the downstream power level to the
cable modem may have a power level that is
too low.
A high flap list insertion (Ins) time
number.
Intermittent downstream synchronization loss.
DHCP or cable modem registration problems.
Low miss/hit ratio, low insertion, low
P-adj, low flap counter and old
timestamp.
Indicates an optimal network situation.
High ratio of misses over hits (> 10%) Hit/miss analysis should be done after the
"Ins" count stops incrementing. In general, if
the hit and miss counts are about the same
order of magnitude, then the upstream may
be experiencing noise. If the miss count is
greater, then the cable modem is probably
dropping out frequently and not completing
registration. The upstream or downstream is
perhaps not stable enough for reliable link
establishment. Very low hits and miss
counters and high insertion counters indicate
provisioning problems.
High power adjustment counter. Indicates the power adjustment threshold is
probably set at default value of 2 dB
adjustment. The cable modem transmitter
step size is 1.5 dB, whereas the headend may
command 0.25 dB step sizes. Tuning the
power threshold to 6 dB is recommended to
decrease irrelevant entries in the flap list. The
power adjustment threshold may be set using
<cable flap power threshold <0-10 dB> from
Global Configuration mode. A properly
operating HFC network with short amplifier
cascades can use a 2-3 dB threshold.
Table 9-2 Troubleshooting Cable Modem Problems
Cause or Symptom Problem
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High P-Adj (power adjustment) This condition can indicate that the fiber node
is clipping the upstream return laser. Evaluate
the cable modems with the highest number of
correcteds and uncorrecteds first. If the cable
modems are not going offline (Ins = 0), this
will not be noticed by the subscriber.
However, they could receive slower service
due to dropped IP packets in the upstream.
This condition will also result in input errors on
the cable interface.
High insertion rate. If link re-establishment happens too
frequently, then the cable modem is usually
having a registration problem.This is indicated
by a high Ins counter which tracks the Flap
counter.
Table 9-2 Troubleshooting Cable Modem Problems
Cause or Symptom Problem
Release 6.4.0 Managing Cable Modems
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Table 9-3 describes how to interpret flap list statistics:
Table 9-3 Flap List Statistic Interpretations
Field Description
Hit and Miss The HIT and MISS columns are keepalive polling statistics between the
BSR and the cable modem. The station maintenance process occurs for
every cable modem approximately every 10 seconds. When the BSR
receives a response from the cable modem, the event is counted as a Hit.
If the BSR does not receive a response from the cable modem, the event
is counted as a Miss. A cable modem will fail to respond either because of
noise or if it is down. Cable modems which only log Misses and zero Hits
are assumed to be powered off.
Misses are not desirable since this is usually an indication of a return path
problem; however, having a small number of misses is normal. The flap
count is incremented if there are M consecutive misses where M is
configured in the cable flap miss-threshold parameter. The parameter
value ranges from 1-12 with a default of 6.
Ideally, the HIT count should be much greater than the Miss counts. If a
cable modem has a HIT count much less than its MISS count, then
registration is failing. Noisy links cause the MISS/HIT ratio to deviate from
a nominal 1% or less. High Miss counts can indicate:
Intermittent upstream possibly due to noise
Laser clipping
Common-path distortion
Ingress or interference
Too much or too little upstream attenuation
P-Adj The station maintenance poll in the BSR constantly adjusts the cable
modem transmit power, frequency, and timing. The Power Adjustments
(P-Adj) column indicates the number of times the cable modems power
adjustment exceeded the threshold value. The power adjustment
threshold may be set using the <cable flap power threshold > parameter
with a value range of 0-10 dB and a default value of 2 dB. Tuning this
threshold is recommended to decrease irrelevant entries in the flap list.
Power Adjustment values of 2 dB and below will continuously increment
the P-Adj counter. The cable modem transmitter step size is 1.5 dB,
whereas the cable interface may command 0.25 dB step sizes. Power
adjustment flap strongly suggests upstream plant problems such as:
Amplifier degradation
Poor connections
Thermal sensitivity
Attenuation problem
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Tips for Administering Flap Lists
Follow these suggestions for administrating flap lists:
n Write script(s) to periodically poll the flap list.
n Analyze and identify cable modem trends from the flap list data.
n Query the billing and administrative database for cable modem MAC
address-to-street address translation and generate reports. These reports can then
be given to the Customer Service Department or the cable plants Operations and
Maintenance Department. Maintenance personnel use the reports to see patterns
of flapping cable modems, street addresses, and flap statistics that indicate which
amplifier or feeder lines are faulty. The reports also help troubleshoot problems in
the downstream and/or upstream path, and determine if a problem is related to
ingress noise or equipment.
Flap The Flap counter indicates the number of times the cable modem has
flapped. This counter is incremented when one of the following events is
detected:
Unusual cable modem insertion or re-registration attempts. The Flap and
the Ins counters are incremented when the cable modem tries to
re-establish the RF link with the BSR within a period of time that is less
than the user-configured insertion interval value.
Abnormal Miss/Hit ratio The Flap counter is incremented when N
consecutive Misses are detected after a Hit where N can be
user-configured with a default value of 6.
Unusual power adjustment The Flap and P-adj counters are incremented
when the cable modems upstream power is adjusted beyond a
user-configured power level.
Time Time is the timestamp indicating the last time the cable modem flapped.
The value is based on the clock configured on the local BSR. If no time is
configured, this value is based on the current uptime of the BSR. When a
cable modem meets one of the three flap list criteria, the Flap counter is
incremented and Time is set to the current time.
Table 9-3 Flap List Statistic Interpretations
Field Description
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n Save the flap list statistics to a database server at least once a day to keep a record
of flap list statistics which includes upstream performance and quality control
data. These statistics can be used again at a later time to evaluate trends and solve
intermittent problems on the HFC networks. Once the flap list statistics are
backed up daily on the database server, the flap list statistics can be cleared.
Pinging a Cable Modem at the MAC Layer
The ping docsis command is used to ping or find a cable modem on the network at
the MAC layer by entering the cable modems MAC or IP address.
When a DOCSIS ping is initiated, the BSR sends a test packet downstream towards
the cable modem to test its connection. In most instances, this command is used to
determine if a particular cable modem is able to communicate at the MAC address
layer when a cable modem has connectivity problems at the network layer. For
example, if a cable modem is unable to register and obtain an IP address, the ping
DOCSIS command can help you determine if there are provisioning problems
associated with the cable modem.
Follow these steps to use the ping DOCSIS function:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
Cable Interface Configuration
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the ping docsis command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to
determine if a cable modem is online:
MOT:7A(config-if)#ping docsis {<mac> | <prefix>} <1-100>
where:
mac is the MAC address of the cable modem.
prefix is the IP address of the cable modem.
1-100 is the number of ping test packets to be sent to the cable modem.
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Resetting the Cable Modem
Use the following options to reset cable modems on the network:
n Use the clear cable modem reset command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to reset a
single cable modem by using its MAC address:
MOT:7A#clear cable modem <mac> reset
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
n Use the clear cable modem reset command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to reset
specific group of cable modems:
MOT:7A#clear cable modem <mac> [<mac>] reset
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
mac a MAC address mask that specifies a group of cable modems.
n Use the clear cable modem reset command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to reset a
single cable modem by using its IP address:
MOT:7A#clear cable modem <prefix> reset
where:
prefix is the cable modem IP address.
n Use the clear cable modem all reset command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to
reset all cable modems:
MOT:7A#clear cable modem all reset
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Clearing Cable Modem Counters
Use one of the following options to clear cable modem counters:
n Use the clear cable modem counters command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to
clear and reset a specific cable modems traffic counters from the station
maintenance list by using its MAC address:
MOT:7A#clear cable modem <mac> [<mac>] counters
where:
mac resets counters for a specified cable modems MAC address.
mac optionally specifies a set of cable modem MAC addresses to reset
counters by masking a portion of the MAC address.
n Use the clear cable modem counters command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to
clear and reset a specific cable modems traffic counters from the station
maintenance list by using its IP address:
MOT:7A#clear cable modem <prefix> counters
where:
prefix resets counters for a specified cable modems IP address.
n Use the clear cable modem all counters command, in Privileged EXEC mode,
to clear and reset all cable modems traffic counters on the BSR:
MOT:7A#clear cable modem all counters
Viewing Cable Modem Information
The show cable modem command allows you to view statistical information about
cable modems connected to the BSR. The information helps you to evaluate network
performance, troubleshoot registration problems, and determine registration status
and learn ranging information.
Use the following options to view cable modem information:
n Use the show cable modem command to display information for all cable
modems on connected to the BSR:
MOT:7A#show cable modem
n Use the show cable modem command to display information for a specific cable
modem connected to the BSR:
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MOT:7A#show cable modem [<mac> | <prefix>]
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
prefix is the cable modem IP address.
n Use the following options to view Customer Premises Equipment (CPE)
information:
If you want to display CPE information for all cable interfaces, use the show
cable modem cpe command as shown bellow:
MOT:7A#show cable modem cpe
If you want to display information for a CPE IP or MAC address, use the
show cable modem cpe command:
MOT:7A#show cable modem cpe [<mac> | <prefix>]
where:
mac is the CPE MAC address.
prefix is the CPE IP address.
If you want to display CPE information for a particular upstream port, use the
show cable modem cpe upstream command:
MOT:7A#show cable modem cpe <X/Y> upstream <NUM>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number.
Use the show cable modem detail command in Privileged Exec mode to
display information for a SID assigned to a cable modem on a specific
DOCSIS interface:
MOT:7A#show cable modem detail <X/Y> <NUM>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the Service Identifier assigned to a cable modems.
Use the show cable modem detail command in Privileged Exec mode to
display information for a specific modem connected to a specific interface:
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MOT:7A#show cable modem detail <MAC>
where:
MAC is the cable modem MAC address.
n The show cable modem summary command displays information for the total
number of cable modems, registered cable modems, and unregistered cable
modems:
Registered modems are modems which have reached the Online(d), Online
(pk), Online(pt) or Online(un) states.
Active modems are those modems in any Init, DHCP or Reject state or
substate. All other modems are assumed to be powered off.
Unregistered modems are those modems in any Init, DHCP or Reject state or
substate. Offline modems are any cable modems which have no state, are not
communicating, but are remembered because they previously were
provisioned. These modems are assumed to be powered off.
Use the following options to view cable modem summary information:
Use the show cable modem summary command to display the total number
of registered, unregistered and offline cable modems for cable interfaces on
the BSR 64000:
MOT:7A#show cable modem summary
Use the show cable modem summary total command to display the total
number of registered, unregistered and offline cable modems for a specific
cable module:
MOT:7A#show cable modem summary [<X/Y> | total]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
n Use the show cable modem svc-flow-id command in Privileged Exec mode to
view the service flow ID for a cable modem connected to a slot and cable
interface on the BSR:
MOT:7A#show cable modem <mac> svc-flow-id
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
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n Use the show cable modem hosts command in Privileged EXEC mode to display
the number of Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) hosts connected to a specific
cable modem:
MOT:7A#show cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} hosts
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
prefix is the cable modem IP address.
n Use the show cable modem offline command to display offline cable modems
only:
MOT:7A#show cable modem offline [<mac> | <0-15>]
where:
mac is the MAC hardware address of the cable modem.
0-15 is the slot number of the CMTS module to which cable modems are
associated.
n Use the show cable modem registered command to display registered cable
modems only:
MOT:7A#show cable modem registered
n Use the show cable modem unregistered command to display unregistered
cable modems only by filtering online and reject states:
MOT:7A#show cable modem registered
where:
The following online and reject states are filtered:
init(o),init(t), init(r1), init(r2), init(rc), dhcp(d), dhcp(req), dhcp(ack), offline
n Use the show cable modem time-registered command to display the Spectrum
Group for the cable modem and how long the cable modem has been registered:
Note: The show cable modem offline command output is updated if the
aging timer interval expires for an offline cable modem. Also, the cable
modem offline table can contain 6100 entries. If this total number is reached
and a new cable modem goes offline, the oldest entry in the table is deleted.
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MOT:7A#show cable modem time-registered [<mac> | <slot> |
spectrum-group <WORD>]
where:
mac is the MAC hardware address of the cable modem.
slot is the slot number of the cable module to which cable modems are
associated.
spectrum-group is used to identify a spectrum group.
WORD is the spectrum group name to which the cable modem belongs.
n The show cable modem mac command displays MAC layer (layer 2)
information for cable modems.
Use the following options to view cable modem MAC layer information:
Use the show cable modem mac command to view MAC layer information
for cable modems on a specific cable module:
MOT:7A#show cable modem mac <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Use the show cable modem mac command to view MAC layer information
for a specific cable modem:
MOT:7A#show cable modem <mac> mac
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
n The show cable modem phy command displays physical hardware information
for cable modems.
Use the following options to view cable modem physical layer information:
Use the show cable modem phy command to view physical layer
information for cable modems on a specific CMTS module:
MOT:7A#show cable modem phy <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module
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Use the show cable modem phy command to view physical layer
information for a specific cable modem:
MOT:7A#show cable modem <mac> phy
where:
mac is the cable modem MAC address.
n The show cable modem maintenance command is used to view station
maintenance statistics, which includes station maintenance retries, station
maintenance failures, and recent event timestamps.
Cable modem station maintenance ranging, which occurs during the cable
modem registration process, uses periodic time intervals to send a unicast
message containing a registered SID between the cable modem and the CMTS.
Use the following options to display station maintenance statistics:
Use the show cable modem maintenance command to view all station
maintenance statistics:
MOT:7A#show cable modem maintenance
Use the show cable modem maintenance command to view station
maintenance statistics for cable modems on a particular cable interface:
MOT:7A#show cable modem <X/Y> maintenance
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Use the show cable modem maintenance command to view station
maintenance statistics for a particular cable modem:
MOT:7A#show cable modem <mac> maintenance
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output, field
descriptions, and an explanation of connectivity states for the show cable modem
commands.
Multiple IP Addresses Per MAC Address
The BSR supports host authorization for multiple IP addresses using the same MAC
address. The maximum number of static IP addresses that can be configured behind a
single MAC address is 252. The output of several CLI commands has been modified
to accommodate the existence of multiple IP addresses per MAC address. The
commands affected are as follows:
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n show cable modem <mac> hosts
n show cable modem <mac> cpe
n show cable modem cpe
n show cable host <mac>
The following is an example of typical screen output displaying multiple IP addresses
per MAC address:
Viewing the Timing Adjustments for Cable Modems
Each cable modem manufacturer uses a different initial timing offset value. The BSR
stores the initial timing values based on the cable modem manufacturer. The true
timing offset that each cable modem uses is read by the cable modem using SNMP.
The cable modem with the highest recorded timing offset is the furthest cable modem
away from the BSR that is functioning correctly.
Interface Prim Connect Timing Rec Ip Address Mac Address
Sid State Offset Power
Cable 5/0/U1 7 online 1230 3 7.1.1.22 0090.8336.cdf1
Number of Hosts = 0
Interface Prim Connect Timing Rec Ip Address Mac Address
Sid State Offset Power
Cable 5/0/U1 6 online 1226 -2 7.1.1.23 0090.8336.d2fd
Number of Hosts = 0
Interface Prim Connect Timing Rec Ip Address Mac Address
Sid State Offset Power
Cable 5/0/U2 4 online 1239 0 7.1.1.24 0090.833d.8f82
Number of Hosts = 0
Interface Prim Connect Timing Rec Ip Address Mac Address
Sid State Offset Power
Cable 5/0/U2 3 online 1233 0 7.1.1.17 0090.833d.8f88
Number of Hosts = 0
7.1.1.18
7.1.1.19
7.1.1.20
7.1.1.21
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The timing offset stored in the cable modem is the collection of all the timing
adjustments sent to the cable modem. The BSR cannot determine the timing offset at
which a particular cable modem starts. The cable modem starts at an initial timing
offset based on its internal delays. The values stored and displayed by the BSR are the
summary of the cable modem initial timing offset adjustments.
The show cable modem timing-offset command allows the user to select which
cable modems are displayed based on their timing offset value.
n Use the show cable modem timing-offset below command in Privileged EXEC
mode to identify all cable modems with a timing offset below the entered number:
MOT:7A#show cable modem timing-offset below <0-500000> [<X/Y>]
where:
0-500000 is the timing offset value that displays all cable modems below this
timing offset value.
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
n Use the show cable modem timing-offset above command in Privileged EXEC
mode to identify all cable modems with a timing offset above the entered number:
MOT:7A#show cable modem timing-offset above <0-500000> [<X/Y>]
where:
0-500000 is the timing offset value that displays all cable modems above this
timing offset value.
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output, field
descriptions, and an explanation of connectivity states for the show cable modem
commands.
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Configuring Remote Query
The Remote Query feature allows the BSR to act as an SNMP Manager and query its
registered cable modems via SNMP to obtain particular RF parameters. Providing the
BSR with the ability to remotely query cable modems results in a significant
performance improvement over a central SNMP manager querying each individual
modem.
The Remote Query feature enables an SNMP Remote Query task to the SRM that
periodically polls every registered cable modem on the BSR to obtain five particular
RF parameters critical for the management of an MSOs HFC plant. The cable modem
RF parameters are:
n downstream signal to noise ratio (docsIfSigQSignalNoise)
n upstream transmit power level (docsIfCmStatusTxPower)
n received downstream power level (docsIfDownChannelPower)
n current round trip time obtained from the ranging offset
(docsIfUpChannelTxTimingOffset)
n the total microreflections including in-channel responses perceived on the
downstream interface (docsIfSigQMicroreflections)
The Remote Query feature executes the following operational sequence:
1. An SNMPv1 Get-Request is sent to each cable modem attached to the BSR. The
Remote Query task is implemented on the SRM, and it sends only one SNMP
request at a time.
2. The results of these SNMP requests are stored in an "Rquery CM Table" with an
entry for each cable modem.
3. The MSOs Network Operation Center (NOC) reads the Rquery CM Table by
performing an SNMPv2 "GetBulk" operation. Each GetBulk response from the
BSR to the NOC will contain the data for up to eight CMs.
Remotely polling cable modems at each CMTS and having a central SNMP
application perform SNMPv2 GetBulk walks to obtain the RFstatistics for all cable
modems attached to the CMTS provides a distinct technical advantage. A central
polling application typically polls one cable modem at a time while an SNMPv2
GetBulk packet can obtain the RF parameters for eight cable modems at a time.
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Configuring the Remote Query feature involves the following tasks:
n Enabling Remote Query
n Configuring the SNMP Response Timeout
n Enabling SNMP Remote Query Traps
Enabling Remote Query
Use the cable modem remote-query command, in Global Configuration mode, to
enable the Remote Query polling operation, configure the polling interval to use when
querying each cable modem, and specify the SNMP community name to use when to
reading a cable modems RF parameters, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modem remote-query <1-86400>
<snmp-community-name>
where:
1-86400 configures the interval, in seconds, that the Remote Query task waits
after completing one full polling cycle of all cable modems and then starting the
next polling cycle.
snmp-community-name is the SNMPv1 community name that the Remote Query
task uses to read a cable modems RF parameters.
Note: The Remote Query feature polls cable modems using SNMPv1 only.
The MSO must configure CMs to accept the SNMPv1 community string
specified with the cable modem remote-query command.
An operator can force the immediate execution of a Remote Query polling
cycle by entering the following sequence of commands:
1) cable modem remote-query <1-86400> <snmp-community-name>
2) no cable modem remote-query
3) show cable modem remote-query (check the status of the polling cycle)
The frequency of Remote Query polling should be selected with care so as
not to introduce excessive overhead that would degrade performance.
The cable modem remote-query command is the only command required to
enable the Remote Query feature. No additional SNMP commands are
required.
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Configuring the SNMP Response Timeout
Use the snmp-server manager response-timeout command to specify the number of
milliseconds that the SNMP manager running on the BSR waits for an SNMP
response from a cable modem polled by the Remote Query feature, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server manager response-timeout <10-60000>
where:
10-60000 is the number of milliseconds
Enabling SNMP Remote Query Traps
The BSR acts as an SNMP management station to query its registered cable modems
when the Remote Query feature is enabled. For the BSR to send remote query traps,
the following must also be configured:
n At least one SNMP trap destination host must be configured with the
snmp-server host command.
n Remote query traps must be enabled with the snmp-server enable traps
remote-query command.
The snmp-server enable traps remote-query command enables a new SNMP trap
group named "remote-query" to control sending of traps defined for the Remote
Query feature. This allows the BSR to send an unsolicited notification to one or more
pre-configured management stations that are identified to receive traps with the
snmp-server host command.
To enable the BSR to send SNMP Remote Query traps, do the following:
1. Use the snmp-server host command, in Global Configuration mode, to specify a
destination SNMP trap host to receive SNMP trap information, as shown below.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server host <A.B.C.D> traps <WORD>
remote-query
Note: Increasing the response-timeout value increases the probability of
receiving a cable modem remote query response under high upstream load
conditions, but also increases the overall polling cycle time when cable
modems completely fail to respond.
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where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the host machine to receive remote query SNMP
trap information
WORD is the SNMPv1/v2c community string or SNMPv3 user name
2. Use the snmp-server enable traps command, in Global Configuration mode, to
enable SNMP traps, as shown below. This command configures the BSR to send
SNMP traps to the host(s) specified with the snmp-server host command.
MOT:7A(config)#snmp-server enable traps remote-query
Displaying Remote Query Information
The show cable modem remote-query command displays the polled RF parameters
for each cable modem that has registered on the BSR.
MOT:7A# show cable modem remote-query
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output and
field descriptions for the show cable modem remote-query command.
Using Cable Modem Steering
It is a common practice for MSOs to have services divided among separate groups of
channels. MSOs want to steer cable modems to channels that are the best match for
a cable modems capabilities. For example:
n Steering a cable modem to/from different networks (i.e. DOCSIS 3.0 or legacy).
n Steering a DOCSIS 2.0/DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem off of a TDMA channel and
onto an ATDMA or S-CDMA channel.
n Steering DSG devices to non-preferred, low frequency, S-CDMA upstream
channels.
MSOs also require a mechanism to move cable modems to adjacent downstream or
upstream channels on the same fiber node.
The Cable Modem Steering feature uses the DOCSIS defined TLV 43.11, service type
identifier, to allow MSOs the ability to specify which Restricted Load Balance Group
or MAC domains a cable modem should steer towards for registration. The feature is
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supported on the 2:8 CMTS and RX48 modules and supports all versions of DOCSIS
(1.0, 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0).
Service Type Identifiers
TLV 43.11 service type identifiers are CLI-configurable for MAC domains and
Restricted Load Balancing Groups. They can not be configured on a per channel
basis. Service type identifiers do not have to be unique to a MAC domain or
Restricted Load Balancing Group. The same service type identifier can be used on
multiple MAC domains and Restricted Load Balancing Groups across the entire
chassis.
A cable modem is assigned a service type identifier via TLV 43.11 during registration.
The BSR then matches this service type identifier with a service type identifier
assigned to a Restricted Load Balancing Group (RLBG) or MAC domain and decides
which channel is the best match. The cable modem then registers on that channel.
A cable modem with TLV43.11 configured with a service type identifier that is not
configured on any reachable Restricted Load Balancing Group or MAC domain will
still be able to register. The cable modem will register and be assigned to a Restricted
Load Balancing Group and/or MAC domain as if TLV43.11 was not configured for
the cable modem.
When a Restricted Load Balancing Group or MAC domains service type identifier is
configured as restricted, the Restricted Load Balancing Group or MAC domain is
said to be required by the service type identifier. Cable modems with the indicated
service type are steered to the Restricted Load Balancing Group or MAC domain to
which they are required and are not permitted to fall back to other Restricted Load
Balancing Groups or MAC domains. There is no maximum retry count after which
the cable modem is placed in a no-move list. The BSR indefinitely continues its
attempts to steer the cable modem to the Restricted Load Balancing Group or MAC
domain. The cable modem will not be put in a no-move list.
Note: For the initial deployment of Cable Modem Steering in Release 6.2,
cable modems are only steered to Restricted Load Balancing Groups
(RLBGs) or MAC domains within the same module (RX48 or 2:8 CMTS).
Cable Modem Steering between the RX48 and 2:8 CMTS modules is not
supported.
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Cable Modem Steering Procedural Overview
The following is a high-level overview of the Cable Modem Steering process for a
registering cable modem. The Cable Modem Steering feature is supported for both
bonded and non-bonded cable modems.
1. The BSR allows each MAC domain and each Restricted Load Balance Group to
be identified by a service type identifier string.
2. When a cable modem registers, the cable modems service type identifier (TLV
43.11) will be compared to its registering upstream and downstream channels
associated RLBG service type identifier or MAC domain service type identifier.
If the BSR finds that the cable modem is already on an upstream and downstream
channel that is associated with a Restricted Load Balance Group or MAC domain
that has a matching service type identifier, then the cable modem may register.
3. If no initial match is found, the BSR searches the currently locked upstream and
downstream channels associated configured fiber node for a Restricted Load
Balance Group or MAC domain service type identifier match. If no match is
found, then the cable modem may continue to register on its currently locked
upstream and downstream channels.
4. If the BSR finds a match and the cable modem must change its upstream channel
and/or downstream channel, the BSR performs a Downstream Frequency Range
Override to the new channel(s).
Note: The cable modems MD-CM-SG will not be searched as it is not
supported by pre-DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems
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Other Functional Considerations
n The service type identifier search will span all Restricted Load Balance Groups
associated to a fiber node and across all MAC domains associated to that fiber
node.
n Fiber node configuration must be made so that the BSR knows which Restricted
Load Balance Groups and/or MAC domains should be searched for Cable
Modem Steering.
n Service type identifier matching will have the following priorities when
searching:
1. A Restricted Load Balance Group associated to the same MAC domain or fiber
node.
2. A Restricted Load Balance Group associated to the same fiber node but in a
different MAC domain.
3. A MAC domain associated to the same fiber node.
n Downstream Frequency Override is preferred because it allows the cable modem
to also change upstream channels or move across MAC domains.
n For bonded cable modems, when the cable modem locks onto the new
downstream channel, it will receive a new RCS list.
n After failing to be steered 3 times, a cable modem will be placed in the no-move
list.
Note: Cable Modem Steering will not process a cable modem under the
following conditions:
A cable modem is configured for MTA protection. The MTA protection feature has
higher precedence
A cable modem is in a no move list. The no move list has higher precedence.
The service type identifier will not be saved for the cable modem.
A cable modem is CLI-configured to be assigned to a Restricted Load Balancing
Group. The CLI configuration takes has higher precedence. The service type
identifier will not be saved for this cable modem.
A cable modem is re-registering due to a DCC init-tech 0 channel move.
A cable modem registers with TLV 1, 2, or 41 which specify a specific channel or
channel set that the cable modem should register on.
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Cable Modem Steering Caveats
There are some caveats with how Cable Modem Steering determines which channels
to match service type identifiers with and feature capabilities.
n When cable modems are moved to matching service type channels, the BSR will
move the cable modem to the first matching channel it finds.
No count-based cable modem balancing is performed across the matching
channels.
It is recommended that registration-based load balancing be enabled with the
load-balancing static command so that after the initial Cable Modem
Steering channel moves, load balancing policies can be applied as usual.
After cable modems are moved into the correct service type area, cable
modem count based balancing is performed to ensure proper distribution of
cable modems across the downstream and upstream set of channels.
n Cable Modem Steering between different fiber nodes is not supported.
n Only Cable Modem Steering on upstream logical channel 0 will be supported.
Currently, load balancing is only supported on upstream logical channel 0.
Configuring Cable Modem Steering
The Cable Modem Steering feature only requires configuration of service type
identifiers on Restricted Load Balancing Groups or MAC domains. Once the service
type identifiers are configured, cable modems will be steered towards the channels
under these Restricted Load Balancing Groups or MAC domains. No other
configuration is required for the Cable Modem Steering feature.
This section describes:
n Configuring a Service Type Identifier on a Restricted Load Balancing Group
n Configuring a Service Type Identifier on a MAC Domain
n Displaying Service Type Identifiers
Note: If the service type identifier for the Restricted Load Balancing Group or
MAC domain to which the cable modem is being steered has the restricted
option configured, the BSR indefinitely continues its attempts to steer the
cable modem to that Restricted Load Balancing Group or MAC domain. The
cable modem will not be put in a no-move list.
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Configuring a Service Type Identifier on a Restricted Load
Balancing Group
To configure a service type identifier on a Restricted Load Balancing Group, follow
these steps:
1. Use the cable loadbalance-group command, in Global Configuration Mode, to
access Load Balancing Group Configuration Mode for the Restricted Load
Balancing Group:
MOT:7A(config)#cable loadbalance-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the name of the Restricted Load Balancing Group.
2. Use the load-balancing service-type command, in Load Balancing Group
Configuration Mode, to configure a service type identifier for the Restricted Load
Balancing Group.
MOT:7A(config-lbgrp:<load balancing group name>)#
load-balancing service-type <WORD> [restricted]
where:
WORD is the service type identifier. The maximum number of characters is
16.
restricted marks the Restricted Load Balancing Group's service type as
restricted. If the service type identifier for a Restricted Load Balancing
Group to which the cable modem is being steered has the restricted option
Note: For a Restricted Load Balancing Group to be assigned a service type,
one of the following options must be configured for the Restricted Load
Balancing Group:
load-balancing restricted true-override
loadbalancing restricted true
There is no such restriction for MAC domain assignments.
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configured, the BSR indefinitely continues its attempts to steer the cable
modem to that Restricted Load Balancing Group. The cable modem will not
be placed in a no-move list.
Configuring a Service Type Identifier on a MAC Domain
To configure a service type identifier on a MAC domain, follow these steps:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration Mode, to access
Cable Interface Configuration Mode for the MAC domain:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the cable service-type command, in Cable Interface Configuration Mode to
configure a service type identifier on a MAC domain.
MOT:7A(config-if)# cable service-type <WORD> [restricted]
where:
WORD is the service type identifier. The maximum number of characters is
16.
restricted marks the MAC domains service type as restricted. If the service
type identifier for the MAC domain to which the cable modem is being
steered has the restricted option configured, the BSR indefinitely continues
its attempts to steer the cable modem to the MAC domain. The cable modem
will not be placed in a no-move list.
Displaying Service Type Identifiers
Service type identifiers can be displayed using various CLI show commands. These
commands will display the RLBG name or MAC domain along with the
corresponding service type identifier if one is configured.
show cable service-type interfaces
The show cable service-type interfaces command displays service type identifiers
for all MAC domains or a specific MAC domain.
MOT:7A# show cable service-type interfaces [<X/Y>]
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where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of a CMTS module. Use this optional
slot and MAC domain parameter to display information for a specific MAC
domain.
show cable service-type loadbalance-groups
The show cable service-type loadbalance-groups command displays service type
identifiers for Restricted Load balancing Groups on all MAC domains or on a specific
MAC domain
MOT:7A# show cable service-type loadbalance-groups [<X/Y]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of a CMTS module. Use this optional
slot and MAC domain parameter to display information for Restricted Load
Balancing Groups on a specific MAC domain.
show cable modem detail
The show cable modem detail command displays the service type identifier for a
cable modem.
MOT:7A# show cable modem detail {<X/Y> <NUM>} {<MAC>}
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the service identifier (SID) assigned to the cable modem.
MAC is the cable modems MAC address.
show cable modem service-type
The show cable modem service-type command displays a list of cable modems that
have configured service type identifiers or displays which cable modems have a
specific service type identifier configured.
MOT:7A# show cable modem service-type [<WORD> | <X/Y>]
where:
WORD is the service type identifier.
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the CMTS module.
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10
Configuring Service Classes
Introduction
The Service Levels Classes with Maximum Assigned Bandwidth (MAB) feature
allows customers to configure service classes and control the amount of bandwidth
allocated to each class. This permits customers to provide support for communication
applications with varying Quality of Service (QoS) requirements such as voice, video,
and data and to effectively manage the bandwidth allocated to these applications.
Additionally, this feature allows customers to provide differentiated levels of service
to their end users.
Service Classes
The concept of service classes implies assigning service flows to a service class and
providing all flows belonging to that class with a defined quality of service. DOCSIS
has defined a set of QoS parameters, including maximum sustained and minimum
reserved traffic rates, and a way for associating specific QoS parameter values to
service flows. DOCSIS has further incorporated the concept of a service class name
so that service flows, when being created, may be assigned their QoS parameters by
referencing a service class name. The Service Level Classes with Maximum Assigned
Bandwidth feature has extended the DOCSIS definition of a service class by
introducing additional service class parameters for maximum assigned bandwidth,
over-booking, and class-based scheduling priority. Service classes are supported for
both downstream and upstream directions.
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Maximum Assigned Bandwidth
Maximum Assigned Bandwidth (MAB) specifies the amount of bandwidth a service
class is permitted to consume on an interface. It is expressed as a percent of the total
interface bandwidth capacity. The MAB of a service class is applied during admission
control to determine whether to admit a new service flow and again by the scheduling
algorithms to provide a class-based weighting to the scheduler. Any unused portion of
a class bandwidth may be used on demand by other classes which have a traffic
load in excess of their own MAB.
Overbooking
Since not all service flows are active simultaneously the service level classes feature
permits customers to overbook service classes. Overbooking means admitting service
flows to a service class such that the sum of their guaranteed minimum reserved rates
are in excess of the configured MAB for the service class. A configurable
overbooking factor is provided by the service levels classes feature to control the
amount of overbooking. This parameter is called the Configured Active Percent
(CAP). The CAP is an estimate of how many service flows, expressed in percent, are
likely to be active simultaneously. For example, if the CAP for a service class is set to
20 percent then it is estimated that only 20 percent of the service flows belonging to
that class will be active simultaneously. Therefore, 5x (1 / 0.2) overbooking would be
allowed. A CAP of 100 percent means that no overbooking will be allowed. A CAP of
zero percent means that unlimited overbooking is allowed.
Scheduling Priority
The scheduling priority of a service class determines the order in which service flows
are serviced by the packet scheduling algorithm. All service flows belonging to a
service class with a higher scheduling priority will be serviced before service flows
belonging to service classes with a lower scheduling priority. Class scheduling
priority is distinct from the DOCSIS QoS parameter, traffic priority, which is
specified to differentiate priority for service flows with other-wise identical QoS
parameter sets.
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Admission Control
Admission control is a process wherein the bandwidth requirements of a service flow
are checked to verify that admission of the service flow to a service class does not
exceed the class MAB after accounting for the allowed level of overbooking. Service
flows are created during modem registration or through dynamic service messaging.
A CM registering with primary service flows will be permitted to register regardless
of whether the admission of its service flows would exceed its service class MAB. In
this case the service flow will be admitted in a Restricted state meaning that the
service flow will not be provided any guaranteed minimum reserved rate. Service
flows created via dynamic service messaging will be rejected if admission of the
service flow would cause its service class to exceed its MAB.
Downstream Flow Classifier Support
The BSR 64000 supports classification of downstream VLAN traffic into service
flows with guaranteed bandwidth, minimum rate settings, and priority settings. This
enhancement adds full support for L2VPN QoS classification for downstream traffic.
Service Class Name Expansion
The Service Class Name (SCN) Expansion enhancement is implemented with the
introduction of the Template Service Class feature for the BSR 64000. The Template
Service Class (TSC) feature increases the number of available service class names
from 64 to 1023, and each Template Service Class name has a QoS parameter set
assigned to it that defines a subscriber service tier. The TSC feature also significantly
increases the number of subscriber service tiers that can be identified in IPDR records
from 64 to 1023.
Each service class name is configured as either a Scheduling Service Class or a
Template Service Class. A Scheduling Service Class configures Motorola-specific
parameters that control admission control and packet scheduling, and corresponds to
service class names defined before the introduction of the Template Service Class
feature. The maximum number of Scheduling Service Classes remains at 32 in each
direction.
All remaining service class names must be a Template Service Class. A Template
Service Class is configured to "schedule-with" a Scheduling Service Class. Multiple
Template Service Classes may be configured to schedule with the same Scheduling
Service Class. The group of all service flows assigned to the Scheduling Service Class
and the Template Service Classes scheduling with it are treated as a single aggregate
group for admission control and scheduling purposes.
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Service Flow and Classifier Allocation
This release supports up to 32 service flows and classifiers per modem in each
direction, to support a T1 Primary Rate Interface (PRI) over DOCSIS solution. For
example, a cable modem that supports 32 Unsolicited Grant Service (UGS) flows will
be capable of providing up to 32 lines of voice over a single modem. The total number
of service flows and classifiers per module has not changed; the allocation of these
resources is now dynamic rather than static.
With the large amount of grant servicing being done on a single modem, the Packet
Cable Multimedia (PCMM) provisioning configuration must be set to optimally
guarantee a quality of service for all service flows for the modem. Specifically, there
must be an acceptable packet latency that will not translate to voice jitter.
A recommended configuration is shown in the table below. The recommended
PCMM configuration for a packetization interval of 20 milliseconds mandates an
Unsolicited Grant Size of 240 bytes.
To keep up with the rate of grants being offered, the upstream map-interval
configured on the BSR 64000 should not be set higher than 5000 microseconds. The
recommended value is 4000, which is the default.
The Nominal Grant Interval should not be set to align with the packetization interval
of 20 milliseconds (20000 microseconds). If a modem were to miss a grant in such a
configuration, it would have to wait for an entire grant interval before being able to
send out a packet. This would result in close to a 20000 microsecond latency, which
would translate to voice jitter and possible backlog of subsequent packets. Set the
Nominal Grant Interval to a value that lets packets utilize a subsequent grant in time if
the original grant was missed. The recommended value for this configuration is 9000
microseconds.
Recommended PCMM Configuration
Assumed packetization interval 20ms
Unsolicited Grant Size 240 bytes
Grants Per Interval 1
Nominal Grant Interval (microseconds) 9000
Tolerated Grant Jitter (microseconds) 2000
Recommended BSR 64000 Configuration
Upstream map-interval (microseconds) 4000
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Default Service Classes
All service flows must be assigned to a service class. If a service class name is not
present in a Registration Request message generated by a CM, then the CM service
flows are assigned to a default service class based on the direction, scheduling service
type, and the specified minimum reserved rate for the service flows.
The table describes the eight default service classes on the BSR:
Default Parameter Settings
The default settings for all parameters are based solely on the schedule type of the
service class.
Note: The parameters of the default service classes may be modified but the
default service classes cannot be deleted. Refer to Modifying Service Class
Parameters for more information on changing service class parameters.
Default Service
Class Description
DefBE-Down Default downstream service class, no minimum rate.
DefRRDown Default downstream service class, non-zero minimum rate.
DefBEUp Default upstream best-effort service class, no minimum rate.
DefRRUp Default upstream best-effort service class, non-zero minimum rate.
DefUGS Default upstream UGS service class.
DefUGSAD Default upstream UGS-AD service class.
DefRTPS Default upstream real-time polling service class.
DefNRTPS Default upstream non-real-time polling service class.
DefEMUp Default upstream emergency call service class.
DefEMDown Default downstream emergency call service class.
DefMCDown Default downstream mulitcast service class.
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The following table describes all of the default service class parameters on the BSR:
Parameter Downstream Best-effort UGS UGS-AD RTPS Non-RTPS
MAB 10 10 25 5 5 5
CAP 0 0 100 80 5 5
Scheduling Priority 1 1 1 1 1 1
Admitted BW Threshold 0 0 0 0 0 0
Traffic Priority 0 0 N/A N/A N/A 0
Maximum Sustained Traffic
Rate
0 0 N/A N/A 0 0
Maximum Traffic Burst 3044 3044 N/A N/A 3044 3044
Minimum Reserved Traffic
Rate
0 0 N/A N/A 0 0
Assumed Minimum Rate
Packet Size
128 128 128 128 128 128
Maximum Concatenated
Burst
N/A 1522 N/A N/A 1522 1522
Nominal Polling Interval N/A N/A N/A 10000 50000 50000
Tolerated Poll Jitter N/A N/A N/A 5000 25000 N/A
Unsolicited Grant Size N/A N/A 152 152 N/A N/A
Nominal Grant Interval N/A N/A 10000 10000 N/A N/A
Tolerated Grant Jitter N/A N/A 2000 2000 N/A N/A
Grants Per Interval N/A N/A 1 1 N/A N/A
Maximum Latency 0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
Activity Timeout 0 0 0 0 0 0
Admitted Parameter
Timeout
200 200 200 200 200 200
Tos And Mask N/A 0xff 0xff 0xff 0xff 0xff
Tos Or Mask N/A 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00 0x00
Request/transmission
Policy
N/A 0x000 0x07f 0x07f 0x01f 0x000
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Sharing Bandwidth Between Service Classes
The BSRs CMTS provides two service class admission control policies; one for
normal voice communications and one for emergency communications. These two
policies have configurable parameters that specify:
n a maximum amount of bandwidth that may be allocated non-exclusively to
normal voice and emergency communications sessions. This may be 100% of the
bandwidth capacity.
n the amount of bandwidth that may be allocated exclusively to normal voice and
emergency communications sessions. This may be 0% of the capacity.
The BSR provides the ability to share bandwidth between different service level
classes. Enabling bandwidth sharing, allows the bandwidth of a service level class to
be used as a bandwidth pool that can be shared by multiple service level classes.
Use the allow-share command, in Service Class Configuration mode, to enable
bandwidth sharing:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#allow-share <WORD> <0-1>
where:
WORD is the name of the service class.
0 disables bandwidth sharing.
1 enables bandwidth sharing.
Note: For scheduling purposes, each service class gets its bandwidth based
on its MAB fraction relative to other classes, not based on the absolute value
of the MAB. For example, if there are only two active service classes and
both have the same MAB, each service class would get 50% of the
bandwidth. The absolute value of the MAB is only used for admission control
not scheduling.
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DQoS Emergency Call Service Classes
The DQoS Emergency Call feature supports differentiated resource reservation for
high priority calls. High priority calls refer to emergency voice calls such as "911".
Since HFC upstream/downstream bandwidth is limited, an emergency call may be
blocked during high traffic hours due to insufficient bandwidth. In order to guarantee
the bandwidth for the emergency calls, the DQoS Emergency Call feature introduces
two new emergency service level classes whose bandwidth is reserved for emergency
voice calls only.
All other normal voice calls will not be allowed to use the bandwidth reserved for the
emergency class. However, emergency calls are allowed to use the bandwidth for
other service classes if the bandwidth of the emergency service class is full. Also,
bandwidth reserved for the emergency service class can be used for other applications
if the bandwidth is not already being used for emergency voice calls. If there is no
bandwidth available in the DefUGS, DefUGSAD, DefEMUp, or DefEMDown
service classes, the emergency call will be dropped.
Configuring the DQoS Emergency Call Service Classes
Configuring the DQoS Emergency Call feature involves setting the maximum
assigned bandwidth (MAB) for the default emergency call service classes and
enabling the emergency call trap. The default emergency call service classes are:
n DefEMUp - the upstream emergency call service class
n DefEMDown - the downstream emergency call service class
Use the mab command in Service Class Configuration mode to configure the
maximum assigned bandwidth for each emergency call service class:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#mab DefEMUp <1-100>
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#mab DefEMDown <1-100>
Note: For emergency calls to use the bandwidth for other service classes,
bandwidth sharing must be enabled for those service classes. Refer to
Sharing Bandwidth Between Service Classes and the allow-share
command.
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where:
1-100 the percentage of bandwidth the service class is permitted to use on an
interface.
Use the dqos emergency-trap-enable command in Packet Cable Configuration mode
to enable the trap for Emergency Calls:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#dqos emergency-trap-enable
Displaying DQoS Emergency Call Information
Use the show packet-cable gate command to view the gate ID in hexadecimal
notation, CM MAC address, subscriber IP address, CMTS slot number, upstream and
downstream SFID, status and committed time gate summary information for the
emergency service classes:
MOT:7A#show packet-cable gate
Note: The configure active percent (cap) for both the DefEMUp and
DefEMDown service classes is always 100 percent and cannot be changed.
The default maximum assigned bandwidth (mab) for both the DefEMUp and
DefEMDown service classes is 1 percent.
Note: The emergency call trap can also be enabled with the
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyTrapEnable MIB object (rdn-pktcable-mib).
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High Priority Pre-emption for 911 Calls
The High Priority (e.g. 911 Emergency Call) Pre-emption feature, which is disabled
by default, can be configured so that additional normal voice bandwidth is admitted
for high-priority 911 calls. For example, when 911 calls occur and exceed their
bandwidth, they can then use normal voice bandwidth, regardless of the normal calls
in progress.
Defining DQoS Voice Calls for Pre-emption
The operator must enable certain upstream and downstream service class flags so that
DQoS calls can either share additional bandwidth or be pre-empted when high
priority calls occur. The applicable upstream and downstream service class flags are
disabled (0) by default.
Follow these steps to configure DQoS Calls for the High Priority Pre-emption feature:
1. Use the cable service-class command in Global Configuration mode to enter
Service Class Configuration mode.
2. Choose the sharing option that best corresponds to the DQoS call type that is
being used:
a. Use the allow-share DefUGS 1 command in Service Class Configuration
mode to allow the Upstream Emergency Call Service Class (DefEMUp)
to share bandwidth with the Default Upstream Unsolicited Grant Services
(UGS) Service Class (DefUGS).
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#allow-share DefUGS 1
b. Use the allow-share DefUGSAD 1 command in Service Class
Configuration mode to allow the Upstream Emergency Call Service Class
(DefEMUp) to share bandwidth with the Default Upstream Unsolicited
Grant Services with Activity Detection Service Class (DefUGS-AD).
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#allow-share DefUGSAD 1
Note: PacketCable Multimedia calls are not considered DQoS calls.
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3. Use the allow-share DefRRDown 1 command in Service Class Configuration
mode to allow the Downstream Emergency Call Service Class (DefEMDown) to
share bandwidth with the Default Downstream Service Class, non-zero minimum
rate (DefRRDown).
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#allow-share DefRRDown 1
4. Use the show cable service-class command in Global Configuration mode to
view the allowShared output field to determine if the upstream and downstream
service class flags are configured for DQoS calls.
Enabling DQoS Emergency Pre-emption
Follow these steps to configure additional bandwidth for 911 calls:
1. Use the packet-cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter
PacketCable Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#packetcable
2. Use the dqos emergency-preempt command in PacketCable Configuration
mode to select all or one of three DQoS emergency pre-emption options:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#dqos emergency-preempt [most-recent |
oldest | random]
where:
most-recent admits bandwidth from the most recent active normal voice
calls.
oldest admits bandwidth from the oldest active normal voice calls.
random admits bandwidth from random normal voice calls.
3. Use the show packet-cable configuration dqos command to verify that the 911
emergency pre-emption option is enabled.
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Creating Service Classes
In order to define and use service classes, a service class must first be created. The
service class name must then be added to the cable modem configuration file. The
service class name TLV is part of the service flow encoding, Type [24/25].4. CM
service flows are then added to the service class name referenced in the CM request
message. If no other QoS parameters are included in the Registration Request
message, then the parameters configured for the service class in the CMTS are applied
to the service flows. Please refer to Modifying Service Class Parameters for more
information on how to set service class parameters for the service class that you
create. If you do not set the service class parameters, then the default parameters are
used based on the scheduling type that you selected for your service class. QoS
parameters included in the CM Registration Request message override those
configured in the CMTS.
Follow these steps to define a new service class:
1. Use the cable service-class command in Global Configuration mode to enter
Cable Service Class mode and define a new service class or modify a default
service class:
MOT:7A(config)#cable service-class <WORD>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
Note: A total of 32 service classes, including the 11 default service classes,
are supported.
Note: Default service classes can be changed, but cannot be deleted.
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2. Use the name schedule-type command in Cable Service Class mode to create a
service class that specifies the scheduling service type on an upstream service
flow:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#name <WORD> schedule-type [BE-DOWN |
BE-UP | UGS | UGS-AD | RTPS | NON-RTPS]
where:
WORD is the service class name, which can be between 1 and 15 characters.
BE-DOWN is for best effort service on the downstream port.
BE-UP is for best effort service on the upstream ports.
NON-RTPS is for non-real-time polling.
RTPS is for real-time polling.
UGS is for unsolicited grant service.
UGS-AD is for unsolicited grant service with activity detection.
3. Use the mab command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the bandwidth
that a service class is permitted to consume on an interface.
Note: The upstream or downstream direction is inferred from the scheduling
service type.
Note: The default MAB for any user-defined service class is set to 1
regardless of the scheduling type.
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The service class MAB is applied during admission control to determine whether
to admit a new service flow and again by the packet schedulers to provide a
class-based weighting to the scheduler.
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#mab <WORD> <1-100>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
1-100 is the percent of the total interface bandwidth capacity.
Note: When configuring the Maximum Assigned Bandwidth (MAB) for service
classes, it is not permitted to configure MABs such that the sum of the MABs
for all service classes for each direction (upstream and downstream) exceeds
100 percent. Refer to Calculating Maximum Assigned Bandwidth
Percentages.
Note: For scheduling purposes, each service class gets its bandwidth based
on its MAB fraction relative to other classes, not based on the absolute value
of the MAB. For example, if there are only two active service classes and
both have the same MAB, each service class would get 50% of the
bandwidth. The absolute value of the MAB is only used for admission control
not scheduling.
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Calculating Maximum Assigned Bandwidth
Percentages
The total percentage of combined MABs for all upstream or all downstream service
classes can not exceed 100%. If a user attempts to exceed this threshold, the BSR will
adjust the desired MAB percentage accordingly so it does not exceed 100%. For
example, the total combined upstream MABs is 70% as displayed in the following
output from the show cable service-class command.
Upstream Service Classes
Service Class mab cap priority
-------------------------------------------------
DefBEUp 10 0 1
DefRRUp 10 0 1
DefUGS 10 100 1
DefUGSAD 10 80 1
DefRTPS 10 5 1
DefNRTPS 10 5 1
DefEMUp 10 100 1
Total assigned bandwidth (mab sum): 70%
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The remaining MAB available is 30%. The DefEMUp service class has a MAB of
10%. If a user attempts to change the MAB percentage for the DefEMUp service class
to 50%, the following output would be displayed with the show cable service-class
command reflecting that the additional 10% MAB requested for the DefEMUp
service class was not allowed by the BSR and the MAB for the DefEMUp service
class was adjusted downward to 40%.
Maximum Assigned Bandwidth Override
The cable upstream max-calls command now overrides the service class Maximum
Assigned Bandwidth (MAB) parameter for Voice-over-IP (VoIP) admission.
Prior to this release, the Default Unsolicited Grant Service (DefUGS) service class
Maximum Assigned Bandwidth (MAB) parameter had to always be assigned to
reserve sufficient bandwidth to admit Voice-over-IP (VoIP) flows. Because you can
only configure service class MAB parameters globally, installations with different
capacity upstream channels were forced to set the DefUGS MAB to a percentage
based on the lowest-capacity channel. This reserved an unnecessarily high DefUGS
MAB percentage on the high-capacity channels, permitting inappropriate
over-admission of VoIP and preventing sufficient granularity of MAB assignment to
other service classes. If the cable interface mode configuration command cable
upstream <port> max-calls <n> was configured, both the DefUGS MAB and the
cable upstream max-calls conditions must have been satisfied in order to admit the
VoIP call.
With this release, if cable upstream max-calls is configured, it overrides the VoIP
admission control check for the DefUGS (or DefUGSAD) MAB on that channel.
Installations which configure cable upstream max-calls on all upstream channels
Upstream Service Classes
Service Class mab cap priority
-------------------------------------------------
DefBEUp 10 0 1
DefRRUp 10 0 1
DefUGS 10 100 1
DefUGSAD 10 80 1
DefRTPS 10 5 1
DefNRTPS 10 5 1
DefEMUp 40 100 1
Total assigned bandwidth (mab sum): 100%
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should set the DefUGS (and DefUGSAD) MAB to its minimum value of one percent,
since the MAB setting for those service classes will be ignored for purposes of
admission control.
Modifying Service Class Parameters
Follow these options to make adjustments to service class parameters for either a
default service class or a created service class:
n Configured Active Percent (CAP) is used to estimate the percent of service flows
which are likely to be simultaneously active since all service flows are not active
simultaneously. Use the cap command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
amount of over-booking for a service class:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#cap <WORD> <0-100>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-100 is the percent of service flows belonging to this service class that can
be simultaneously active on an interface.
For example, if the CAP for a service class is set to 20 percent then 5 X (1 / 0.2)
overbooking would be allowed. If set to 100 percent then no overbooking would
be permitted. If set to 0 then unlimited overbooking would be permitted.
n Scheduling priority determines the order in which service classes are serviced.
All service flows belonging to a service class with a higher scheduling priority
are serviced before service flows belonging to service classes with a lower
Note: Once admitted, UGS and UGSAD scheduling type upstream flows are
always granted bandwidth with higher priority than best-effort scheduling type
flows.
Note: CAP can be specified for a service class that has a minimum reserved
traffic rate. Overbooking for UGS classes is not permitted. The CAP
parameter is fixed at 100 percent. The CAP parameter for UGS-AD classes
may not be set to less than 80 percent (25 percent overbooking).
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scheduling priority. Use the schedpriority command in Cable Service Class
mode to assign a scheduling priority to the service class that you are configuring:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#schedpriority <WORD> <1-32>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
1-32 is the priority of this service class.
n The admitted bandwidth threshold is used to generate an event trap for a service
class on a per-interface basis when the admitted bandwidth falls below the
threshold. Use the admitted-bw-threshold command in Cable Service Class
mode to configure the admitted bandwidth threshold value for this service class:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#admitted-bw-threshold <WORD> <0-100>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-100 is the threshold expressed as percent of the admitted bandwidth.
n Use the trafpriority command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
relative priority of service flows with identical QoS parameters:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#trafpriority <WORD> <1-7>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
1-7 is the traffic priority of the service flows used by this service class.
Note: The scheduling priority is different from the traffic priority DOCSIS QoS
parameter that is specified to characterize a priority for service flows that
have identical QoS parameter sets.
Note: The larger the priority number is, the higher the priority it has.
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n Use the max-rate command in Cable Service Class mode to control the
maximum sustained traffic rate of a service flows in a service class:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#max-rate <WORD> <0-4294967295>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-4294967295 is the maximum rate number in bits per second.
n Use the max-burst command in Cable Service Class mode to control the
maximum traffic burst size at the transmission line rate of a service flows in a
service class:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#max-burst <WORD> <1522-65535>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
1522-65535 is the maximum burst size at the transmission line rate of a
service flow in bytes or the value of the maximum concatenated burst size
QoS parameter.
n Use the min-rate command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
guaranteed or reserved traffic rate of a service flows in a service class:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#min-rate <WORD> <0-4294967295>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-4294967295 is the guaranteed or reserved minimum number of bits per
second.
n Use the min-pkt-size command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
minimum packet size for a service flows in a service class with a reserved traffic
rate:
Note: Packets sent on the service flow which are smaller than the assumed
minimum packet size are considered to be the assumed minimum packet
size.
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MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#min-pkt-size <WORD> <64-1522>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
64-1522 is the assumed minimum packet size in bytes.
n Use the max-concat-burst command in Service Class configuration mode to
specify the maximum size, in bytes, of a concatenated upstream burst from CMs:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#max-concat-burst <WORD> <0-65535>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-65535 is the maximum upstream burst size.
n Use the activity-timeout command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
amount of time that an active service flow can be unused if there is no activity on
the service flow within the time-out interval:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#activity-timeout <WORD> <0-65535>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-65535 is the timeout in seconds.
n Use the admission-timeout command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
amount of time that reserved resources are allowed to exceed the active time-out
of the service flow. Reserved service flow resources are released when a Dynamic
Service Change (DSC) message is received by the CMTS from a CM after the
admission time-out interval expires.
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#admission-timeout <WORD> <0-65535>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-65535 is the time-out in seconds.
n Use the req-trans-policy command in Cable Service Class mode to specify
which Interval Usage Code (IUC) opportunities a CM may use for upstream
requests and packet transmissions, whether requests for bandwidth can be
piggy-backed with packet transmissions, and if data transmissions are
concatenated, fragmented or payload header suppression (PHS) is allowed:
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MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#req-trans-policy <WORD> <0x0-0x7fff>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0x0-0x7fff is the policy bit mask.
n Use the poll-interval command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
nominal interval between unicast request opportunities. The nominal polling
interval is relevant for service flows using UGS-AD scheduling, real-time, and
non-real time polling scheduling.
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#poll-interval <WORD> <0-4294967295>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-4294967295 is the polling interval in micro-seconds.
n Use the poll-jitter command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the interval
in which unicast requests may be delayed from nominal polling, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#poll-jitter <WORD> <0-4294967295>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-4294967295 is the interval in micro-seconds.
n Use the grant-size command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the size of
the unsolicited grant
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#grant-size <WORD> <0-65535>
Note: The tolerated poll jitter feature is relevant only for service flows using
UGS-AD and real-time polling scheduling.
Note: The unsolicited grant size function is relevant only for service flows
using UGS or UGS-AD scheduling.
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where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-65535 is the number of bytes.
n Use the grant-interval command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
apparent or nominal time between grants:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#grant-interval <WORD> <0-4294967295>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-4294967295 is the number of microseconds permitted between grants.
n Use the grant-jitter command in Cable Service Class mode to specify the
amount of time that a grant may be delayed past the nominal grant interval:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#grant-jitter <WORD> <0-4294967295>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-4294967295 is the number of microseconds permitted past the nominal
grant interval.
Note: The nominal grant interval function is relevant only for service flows
using UGS or UGS-AD scheduling.
Note: The grant-jitter command is relevant only for service flows using UGS
or UGS-AD scheduling.
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n Use the grants-per-interval command in Cable Service Class mode to specify
the number of data grants per grant interval:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#grants-per-interval <WORD> <0-127>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-127 is the number of grants permitted past the nominal grant interval.
n Use the tos-overwrite command in Cable Service Class mode to provide an
AND and OR mask that the CMTS uses to overwrite the type of service (TOS)
field on all upstream IP packets on a service flow
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#tos-overwrite <WORD> <0x0-0xff>
<0x0-0xff>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0x0-0xff is the TOS defined in hexadecimal format.
0x0-0xff is the optional numerical mask in hexadecimal format for the TOS.
Note: The grants-per-interval command is relevant only for service flows
using UGS or UGS-AD scheduling.
Note: If the TOS and mask is omitted, then the TOS field on upstream IP
packets are not modified by the CMTS.
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n Use the max-latency command in Cable Service Class mode to specify a
maximum delay between when a packet is received on a network interface and
transmitted on a cable downstream interface:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#max-latency <WORD> <0-4294967295>
where:
WORD is the service class name.
0-4294967295 is the delay in microseconds.
n Use the over-max-rate command in Cable Service Class mode to increase the
maximum sustained rate for voice calls on a cable downstream interface:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#over-max-rate <0-100>
where:
0-100 is the amount of increase, specified as a percent of the configured max
rate. The default is 100%.
Note: This max-latency applies only to downstream service flows.
Note: The over-max-rate command only applies to downstream service
flows.
A setting of 100% (the default) will have the effect of disabling rate limiting for
voice calls.
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Viewing Service Class Information
Use the following sections to display service flow and service class information:
Displaying Service Class Statistics
If you want to view statistics for a service class on the BSR, issue the show cable
srvclass-stats command in Service Class Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#show cable srvclass-stats {<X/Y>} {<NUM>}
{<WORD>}
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the port number on the specified MAC Domain.
WORD is the service class name.
Displaying Service Flow Parameters
Use the show cable qos svc-flow param-set command to display the service flow
parameter set for all service flows, a specific cable interface, or a specific service
flow:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow param-set [<X/Y>] [<1-4292967295>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the SFID number.
Displaying Service Class Information
Use the show cable service-class command, in all modes except User EXEC, to
display a configuration summary for all service classes, including all default service
classes, that are active on the BSR:
Note: The complete configuration of an individual service class can also be
displayed.
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MOT:7A#show cable service-class [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is a user-defined service class created with the name command or one of
the default service classes.
Use the show interfaces cable service-class command, in all modes except User
EXEC, to display interface level service class information for all downstream and
upstream service classes, downstream service classes, or upstream service classes that
are active on the BSR:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> service-class [all | downstream | upstream]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
all displays both upstream and downstream service class information
downstream displays downstream service class information only
upstream display upstream service class information only
Displaying Service Flow Statistics
Follow these steps to find an SFID and display service flow statistics for the desired
SFID:
1. Use the show cable modem svc-flow-id command in Privileged EXEC mode to
display the Service Flow ID (SFID) of all the service flows used by a specific
CM, which includes the upstream or downstream channel direction and the
maximum sustained flow rate for the SFID in bits-per second:
MOT:7A#show cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} svc-flow-id
where:
mac is the CM MAC address.
prefix is the CM IP address.
Note: "no restriction" indicates that there is no traffic rate limit for this service.
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Figure 10-1 displays typical show cable modem svc-flow-id command output for a
specific CM:
Figure 10-1 show cable modem svc-flow-id Command Output
2. Use the show cable qos svc-flow statistics command to display the service flow
statistics for all service flows, a specific cable interface, or a specific service
flow:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow statistics [<X/Y>] [<1-4292967295>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the SFID number.
Voice Call Statistics
The following sections provide information for configuring, viewing, clearing and
disabling voice calls:
n Configuring a Voice Call Statistics Sample
n Viewing Active Voice Call Statistics
n Clearing Active Voice Call Statistics
n Disabling Active Voice Call Statistics
Configuring a Voice Call Statistics Sample
The default voice call statistics sample is 60 minutes. Follow these steps to configure
a voice call statistics sample:
1. Use the cable service-class command in Global Configuration mode to enter
Service Class Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#cable service-class
Service flow id Interface Flow Direction Flow Max Rate
51 cable 5/0 Upstream no restriction
52 cable 5/0 Downstream no restriction
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2. Use the ugs-stats-window command in Service Class Configuration mode to
configure the UGS Flow Voice Call statistics sample period.
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#ugs-stats-window {<0> | <5-120>}
where:
0 disables UGS Flow Statistics sampling
5-120 is UGS Flow Statistics sampling time interval in minutes
Viewing Active Voice Call Statistics
Use the show cable ugs-stats command in all modes except User EXEC mode to
determine how many calls are active on a given BSR upstream port at a specific time.
MOT:7A#show cable ugs-stats <0-15> <0-7>
where:
0-15 is the DOCSIS module number.
0-7 is the upstream port number
Figure 10-2 displays the active voice calls on a specified upstream port after 1 minute.
Figure 10-2 Active Voice Calls on a Specified Upstream Port
Figure 10-3 displays the active voice calls on a specified upstream port after 10
minutes.
US Interface slot/port: 4/1
Current flow count: 3
Flow count Max (last 5 min window): <Valid in 5 minute(s)>
Flow count Min (last 5 min window): <Valid in 5 minute(s)>
Flow count Ave (last 5 min window): <Valid in 5 minute(s)>
Flow count Max (last 10 min window): <Valid in 10 minute(s)>
Flow count Min (last 10 min window): <Valid in 10 minute(s)>
Flow count Ave (last 10 min window): <Valid in 10 minute(s)>
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Figure 10-3 Active Voice Calls on a Specified Upstream Port
The Current Flow Count output field is updated every time statistics are displayed.
The Maximum, Minimum and Average UGS flow counts for voice calls are updated
once every minute to display their status within the configured sample period. Once
enough samples are collected, these statistics become valid.
Clearing Active Voice Call Statistics
Use the clear cable ugs-stats command in all modes except User EXEC mode to
clear active voice call statistics for all CMTS modules, a specified CMTS module, or
a specified upstream port on a CMTS module.
MOT:7A#clear cable ugs-stats [<0-15> [<0-7>]]
where:
0-15 is the DOCSIS (CMTS) module slot number.
0-7 is the upstream port number.
Disabling Active Voice Call Statistics
Follow these steps to disable active voice call statistics:
1. Use the cable service-class command in Global Configuration mode to enter
Service Class Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable service-class
2. Use the ugs-stats-window 0 command in Service Class mode to disable active
voice call (UGS Flow) statistics.
MOT:7A(config-srvclass)#ugs-stats-window 0
US Interface slot/port: 4/1
Current flow count: 3
Flow count Max (last 5 min window): 3
Flow count Min (last 5 min window): 3
Flow count Ave (last 5 min window): 3
Flow count Max (last 10 min window): 3
Flow count Min (last 10 min window): 3
Flow count Ave (last 10 min window): 3
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11
Setting QoS Parameters
Introduction
This chapter describes how to configure Quality of Service (QoS) using service flows.
Use the commands in this section to create, change, or delete service flows with
Dynamic Service Addition (DSA), Dynamic Service Change (DSC), and Dynamic
Service Deletion (DSD) MAC management messages. Configuring QoS involves the
following tasks:
n Creating or Modifying a QoS Profile
n Deleting a QoS Profile
n Viewing a QoS Profile
n Initiating a DSA
n Initiating a DSC
n Initiating a DSD
n Configuring an Active Timeout for Dynamic Service Flows
n Viewing QoS Information
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Creating or Modifying a QoS Profile
A QoS Profile is used for authentication and bandwidth management of DOCSIS1.0
and DOCSIS1.0+ cable modems. QoS Profiles are either learned from the cable
modem during registration or a new QoS Profile can be created through the CLI. The
parameters of a QoS Profile can also be modified through the CLI.
To create a new QoS Profile or modify an existing QoS profile, do the following:
1. Use the cable qos-profile command to enter QoS Profile Configuration mode, as
follows:
MOT:7A(config)#cable qos-profile <prof-num>
where:
prof-num is the QoS Profile identifying number.
The command line prompt changes to the following:
MOT:7A(config-qosprof:<prof-num>)#
2. Use the following commands to create or modify the QoS Profile.
baseline-privacy
guaran-us-bandwidth
max-ds-bandwidth
max-us-bandwidth
max-us-burst
priority
tos-mask
tos-value
grant-interval
grant-size
name
Note: Only QoS Profile numbers 1-16 are user configurable.
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For example:
To configure the grant-interval and grant-size, you would do the following:
MOT:7A(config-qosprof:prof-num>)# grant-interval 20
MOT:7A(config-qosprof:prof-num>)# grant-size 229
The QoS Profile parameters are described in detail in Table 11-1. To verify a QoS
Profile configuration refer to Viewing a QoS Profile.
Table 11-1 QoS Profile Parameters
QoS Profile Description Default
baseline-privacy <0-1> "0" indicates that Baseline Privacy is not
enabled for this QoS profile
"1" indicates that Baseline Privacy is enabled
for this QoS profile -
0
guaran-us-bandwidth
<0-10000000>
The guaranteed minimum upstream rate in
bits per second. "0" indicates no minimum
upstream rate.
0
max-ds-bandwidth
<0-10000000>
The maximum downstream data rate in bits
per second that a modem using this QoS
profile will receive. "0" indicates no
downstream rate limit.
0
max-us-bandwidth
<0-10000000>
The maximum upstream data rate in bits per
second that a modem using this QoS profile
will receive. 0" indicates no upstream rate
limit.
0
max-us-burst
<0-10000000>
The maximum upstream transmit burst size in
bits per second that the modem can send for
any single transmit burst. "0" indicates no
burst size limit.
0
priority <1-7> The relative priority number assigned to
upstream traffic by this QoS profile with 7
being the highest priority.
1
tos-mask <0-255> Overwrites the Type of Service (TOS) field in
IP datagrams received on the upstream
before forwarding them downstream if the
value is not "0". This parameter sets the
hexadecimal mask bits to a hexadecimal
value to help the CMTS identify QoS
datagrams for QoS on the IP backbone.
0
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Resetting the Default Values
Use the no qualifier for each of the QoS Profile parameters described in Table 11-1 to
reset the parameters default value.
For example:
The following would reset the maximum downstream rate limit to "0" (no
downstream rate limit):
MOT:7A(config-qosprof:<prof-num>)#no max-ds-bandwidth
Deleting a QoS Profile
Use the no cable qos-profile command, in Global Configuration mode, to delete a
QoS Profile as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#no cable qos-profile <prof-num>
where:
prof-num is the QoS Profile identifying number from 1-16.
tos-value <0-255> The overwrite value substituted for the
received TOS value.
0
grant-interval <0-65535> The grant interval in milliseconds. The grant
interval specifies the nominal time between
grants.
0
grant-size <0-65535> The grant size in bytes.The grant size
specifies the unsolicited grant size. Grant size
includes the entire MAC frame data PDU from
the Frame Control byte to end of the MAC
frame.
0
name WORD The ASCII string identifier for the QoS Profile
to a maximum of 30 characters.
NULL string
Note: Only QoS Profile numbers 1-16 can be deleted with the no cable
qos-profile command.
Table 11-1 QoS Profile Parameters
QoS Profile Description Default
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Viewing a QoS Profile
The show running-config and show cable qos profile commands can be used to
view QoS Profile configurations.
n Use the show running-config command to view all QoS Profiles, as follows:
MOT:7A#show running-config | begin cable qos
n Use the show running-config command to view a specific QoS Profile, as
follows:
MOT:7A#show running-config | begin cable qos profile<<prof-num>
n Use the show cable qos profile command, to view all QoS Profiles, as follows:
MOT:7A#show cable qos profile
n Use the show cable qos profile NUM command, to view learned and configured
(in use) QoS Profiles for a particular CMTS, as follows:
MOT:7A#show cable qos profile NUM
where:
NUM is a CMTS slot number on the BSR.
n Use the show cable qos profile [NUM [<1-32>]] command, to view a specific
QoS Profile for the specified Profile Index of the specified CMTS, as follows:
MOT:7A#show cable qos profile [NUM [<1-32>]]
where:
NUM is a CMTS slot number on the BSR 64000.
1-32 is the Qos Profile index (identifying number).
Note: The show cable qos profile command without any arguments
displays all user-configured QoS profiles on the BSR regardless of whether
they are in use. The show cable qos profile command without arguments
does not display any QoS profiles that have been learned via modem
registration.
The show cable qos profile command with the <NUM> argument displays
all active Qos Profiles either user-configured or learned via modem
registration for the specified CMTS slot.
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n Use the show cable qos profile mac command, to add the MAC addresses of
cable modems to the display output for the specified profile (with active flows) of
the specified CMTS, as follows:
MOT:7A#show cable qos profile [<NUM> [<1-32> [mac]]]
where:
NUM is a CMTS slot number on the BSR 64000.
1-32 is the Qos Profile identifying number.
mac causes the MAC Address for each modem
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable qos profile commands.
Initiating a DSA
The cable modem qos dsa command triggers the CMTS to send a Dynamic Service
Change (DSC) message to create a new service flow for a specified cable modem
(CM). The Dynamic Service Addition (DSA) is defined in the CM configuration file.
The current implementation has only the change of service based on service-flow (not
the flow classifier, nor the payload-header-suppression).
Follow these steps to cause the CMTS to initiate DSA messages on an existing service
flow for a CM:
Note: The "Prof Idx" field in the show cable qos profile command output
indicates a user configured QoS Profiles unique identifying number in the
range of 1-16. All QoS Profile identifying numbers in the range of 17-32
indicate a QoS Profile that was learned from cable modem registrations.
Note: Before you begin, ensure that the correct DSA definition is entered in
the CM configuration file, which is saved in the TFTP "boot" directory on a
TFTP server with a known IP address.
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1. Use the cable modem qos dsa command in Privileged EXEC mode to create a
new service flow:
MOT:7A#cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} qos dsa {<prefix> <string>}
where:
mac is the CM MAC address.
prefix is the CM IP address.
prefix is the TFTP server IP address.
string is the CM configuration file name.
2. Use the show cable qos svc-flow dynamic-stat command to display statistics for
dynamic service additions, deletions, and changes for both upstream and
downstream service flows:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow dynamic-stat
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show cable qos svc-flow dynamic-stat command.
Initiating a DSC
Follow these steps to cause the CMTS to initiate DSC messages on an existing service
flow for a CM.
Warning: This command should be used with extreme caution as the
dynamic service definition in the CM configuration file is overwritten.
Note: Before you begin, ensure that the correct DSA definition is entered in
the CM configuration file. Also ensure that the DSC definition applies to each
SFID. The CM configuration file must contain the correct SFID for the service
flow you change.
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1. Use the show cable modem svc-flow-id command in Privileged EXEC mode to
display the Service Flow ID (SFID) of all the service flows used by a specific
CM, which includes the upstream or downstream channel direction and the
maximum sustained flow rate for the SFID in bits-per second:
MOT:7A#show cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} svc-flow-id
where:
mac is the CM MAC address.
prefix is the CM IP address.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show cable modem svc-flow-id command.
2. Use the cable modem qos dsc command in Privileged EXEC mode to change an
existing service flow:
MOT:7A#cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} qos dsc {<prefix> <string>}
where:
mac is the CM MAC address.
prefix is the CM IP address.
prefix is the TFTP server IP address.
string is the CM configuration file name.
Note: "no restriction" indicates that there is no traffic rate limit for this service.
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3. Use the show cable qos svc-flow statistics command in Privileged EXEC mode
to display service flow statistics:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow statistics [<X/Y> [<1-4292967295>]]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the Service Flow Identifier (SFID) number.
4. Use the show cable qos svc-flow dynamic stat command in Privileged EXEC
mode to display statistics for both upstream and downstream DSC messages:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow dynamic stat
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable qos svc-flow commands.
Initiating a DSD
Follow these steps to cause the CMTS to initiate DSD messages to delete an existing
service flow for a CM:
1. Use the show cable modem svc-flow-id command in Privileged EXEC mode to
display the SFID of all the service flows used by a specific CM:
MOT:7A#show cable modem [<mac> | <prefix>] svc-flow-id
where:
mac is the CM MAC address.
prefix is the CM IP address.
2. Use the cable modem qos dsd command in Privileged EXEC mode to initiate the
DSD of a specific SFID:
MOT:7A#cable modem qos dsd {<X/Y> <1-262143>}
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Note: Before you begin, ensure that the correct CM SFID is selected.
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1-262143 is the Service Flow Identifier (SFID).
3. Use the show cable qos svc-flow log command in Privileged EXEC mode to
display the deleted service flow log:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow log
4. Use the show cable qos svc-flow dynamic stat command in Privileged EXEC
mode to display statistics for both upstream and downstream DSD messages:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow dynamic stat
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable qos svc-flow commands.
Configuring an Active Timeout for Dynamic
Service Flows
CMs dynamically request resources to CMTS such as service flow identifiers (SFIDs)
and bandwidth by using a Dynamic Service Addition (DSA) transaction. If the CM
fails to issue a Dynamic Service Deletion Request (DSD-REQ) to the CMTS or the
DSD-REQ is being dropped for any reasons (e.g. due to noise), these resources could
be held by the CMTS indefinitely. For this reason, an active timeout interval could be
configured on the cable interface so that the CMTS can remove the dynamic service
flows by issuing the DSD-REQs to the CM when the timer expires. The default for the
active timeout interval is zero, which is disabled.
Follow these steps to set the active timeout for dynamic service flows:
1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
appropriate cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the cable dynamic-service active-timeout command in Interface
Configuration mode to set the active timeout for CMs to release unused dynamic
service flow resources:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable dynamic-service active-timeout <0-65535>
where:
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0-65535 is the active timeout value in seconds - "0" disables the active timer.
Viewing QoS Information
Use the following sections to obtain QoS information:
n Displaying the Packet Classifier
n Displaying SFID and QoS Information
n Displaying Service Flow Statistics
n Displaying Upstream Service Flow Statistics
n Displaying Payload Header Suppression Entries
n Displaying QoS Profiles
Displaying the Packet Classifier
A service flow classifier matches a packet to a service flow using a service flow
reference. The service flow reference associates a packet classifier encoding with a
service flow encoding to establish a SFID. Classifiers have the following features:
n Classifiers are loosely ordered by priority.
n Several classifiers can refer to the same service flow.
n More than one classifier may have the same priority.
n The cable interface uses a downstream classifier to assign packets to downstream
service flows.
n The CM uses an upstream classifier to assign packets to upstream service flows.
Use the show cable qos svc-flow classifier command to display the packet classifiers
of a service flow configured on the cable interface:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow classifier [<X/Y> [<1-4292967295>]
[<1-65535>]]]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Note: If the CM requests an active timeout for that dynamic service flow in
the Dynamic Service Addition Request (DSA-REQ), this active timer starts
using the timeout value specified in the DSA-REQ.
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1-4292967295 is the Service Flow Identifier (SFID).
1-65535 is the classifier identifier..
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable qos svc-flow classifier command.
Displaying SFID and QoS Information
Use the show cable qos svc-flow summary command to display service flow
identifier (SFID) and QoS parameter information:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow summary [<X/Y> [<1-4292967295>]]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the Service Flow Identifier (SFID).
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable qos svc-flow summary command.
Displaying Service Flow Statistics
Use the show cable qos svc-flow statistics command to display service flow
statistics:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow statistics [<X/Y> [<1-4292967295>]]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the Service Flow Identifier (SFID).
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable qos svc-flow statistics command.
Note: If the Classifier ID is not given, all the classifiers with the given SFID
are listed.
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Displaying Upstream Service Flow Statistics
Use the show cable qos svc-flow upstream-stat command to view upstream service
flow statistics, which includes the number of fragmented packets, incomplete
fragmented packets, and the number of concatenated bursts:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow upstream-stat [<X/Y> [<1-65535>]]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-65535 is the Service Identifier (SID).
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable qos svc-flow upstream-stat command.
Displaying Payload Header Suppression Entries
Use the show cable qos svc-flow phs command to display the Payload Header
Suppression (PHS) entries for a service flow:
MOT:7A#show cable qos svc-flow phs [<X/Y> [<1-4292967295> [<1-65535>]]]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
1-4292967295 is the Service Flow Identifier (SFID).
1-65535 is the classifier identifier.
Note: If the Classifier ID is not given, all the classifiers with the given SFID
are listed.
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Displaying QoS Profiles
Use the show cable qos profile command to display the priority, bandwidth
allocation, and baseline privacy information for all QoS profiles or a selected QoS
profile which applies to DOCSIS 1.0, DOCSIS 1.0+, and Euro-DOCSIS 1.0 cable
modems, as follows:
MOT:7A#show cable qos profile [<NUM> [<1-32> [mac]]]
where:
NUM is the CMTS slot number.
1-32 is the Qos Profile index (identifying number).
mac adds the MAC addresses of the cable modems to the display.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
and output descriptions for the show cable qos profile commands
Notes About Viewing Class of Service (Qos) Profiles
When using the show cable qos profile command to view the class of service
configuration for DOCSIS 1.0 and Euro-DOCSIS 1.0 modems, you will obtain
inconsistent results under the following conditions.
Note: The "Prof Idx" field output indicates a user configured QoS Profiles
unique identifying number in the range of 1-16. All QoS Profile identifying
numbers in the range of 17-32 indicate a QoS Profile that was learned from
cable modem registrations.
Note: The show cable qos profile command without any arguments
displays all user-configured QoS profiles on the BSR regardless of whether
they are in use. The show cable qos profile command without arguments
does not display any QoS profiles that have been learned via modem
registration.
The show cable qos profile command with the <NUM> argument displays
all active Qos Profiles either user-configured or learned via modem
registration for the specified CMTS slot.
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n When you have not given each class of service (QoS Profile) a unique classID (in
the range 1 through 16) in the CM configuration file.
n When you modify a CMs configuration file and specify parameter values that are
already in use by other registered modems and fail to change the class of service
ID to a unique value.
However, all registered CMs are using the class of service (QoS) parameters as
defined in their respective configuration files, only the displayed output of the show
cable qos profile command that is inconsistent.
Once all DOCSIS 1.0, DOCSIS 1.0+, and Euro-DOCSIS 1.0 classes of service have
unique classIDs, the display of the show cable qos profile command is accurate.
Configuring the BSR 64000 for DOCSIS 1.0+
Interoperability
In order for the BSR 64000 to register DOCSIS 1.0+ cable modems successfully, the
BSR 64000 must be configured to accept and process DSA-REQs from DOCSIS 1.0+
devices.
Follow these steps to configure the BSR 64000 for interoperability with DOCSIS 1.0+
cable modems.
1. Use the configure command to enter Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A#configure
The prompt changes to MOT:7A(config)# indicating that the CLI is accepting
commands in Global Configuration mode.
2. Use the interface cable command to select the cable interface from Global
Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
3. Use the cable dynamic-service authorization-mode unauthorize command
from Interface Configuration mode to allow the cable interface to accept
DSA-REQs from DOCSIS 1.0+ cable modems.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable dynamic-service authorization-mode unauthorize
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After issuing the command, a message similar to the following is displayed on the
console.
MOT:7A(config-if)#[05/14-15:22:31.31-
07:console]-N-configuration change by [console]: cable
dynamic-service authorization-mode unauthorize
4. Use the show running-config command with the following parameters to verify
that the cable dynamic-service authorization-mode unauthorize command was
accepted by the BSR.
MOT:7A#show run | begin interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
The command will display output similar to the following. Find the line cable
dynamic-service authorization-mode unauthorize to confirm that the command
issued in Step 3 was accepted by the BSR.
interface cable 10/1
cable bundle 2
no ip address
no shutdown
cable bind downstream 1
cable downstream 1 frequency 567000000
cable downstream 1 fiber-node FN-DS-CMTS
cable downstream 1 interleave-depth 8
no cable downstream 1 shutdown
cable bind upstream 4,5
no cable upstream 4 shutdown
no cable upstream 4/0 shutdown
cable upstream 4/1 shutdown
cable upstream 4/2 shutdown
cable upstream 4/3 shutdown
no cable upstream 5 shutdown
no cable upstream 5/0 shutdown
cable upstream 5/1 shutdown
cable upstream 5/2 shutdown
cable upstream 5/3 shutdown
cable ip prov-mode dpm
cable load-balancing tcc enable
cable dynamic-service authorization-mode unauthorize
cable security authorized
cable security failure mark
ip dhcp relay information option
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5. Define the following five QoS Profiles in the BSR 64000 running configuration
file. Refer to the section, Creating or Modifying a QoS Profile, earlier in this
chapter.
cable qos profile 12 guaranteed-upstream 221
cable qos profile 12 max-upstream 221
cable qos profile 12 grant-size 149
cable qos profile 12 grant-interval 5
cable qos profile 12 name CALLS_4_AT_10MSEC
cable qos profile 11 guaranteed-upstream 221
cable qos profile 11 max-upstream 221
cable qos profile 11 grant-size 229
cable qos profile 11 grant-interval 10
cable qos profile 11 name CALLS_4_AT_20MSEC
cable qos profile 13 guaranteed-upstream 221
cable qos profile 13 max-upstream 221
cable qos profile 13 grant-size 229
cable qos profile 13 grant-interval 5
cable qos profile 13 name CALLS_8_AT_20MSEC
cable qos profile 14 guaranteed-upstream 221
cable qos profile 14 max-upstream 221
cable qos profile 14 grant-size 229
cable qos profile 14 grant-interval 20
cable qos profile 14 name CALLS_2_AT_20MSEC
cable qos profile 15 guaranteed-upstream 221
cable qos profile 15 max-upstream 221
cable qos profile 15 grant-size 149
cable qos profile 15 grant-interval 10
cable qos profile 15 name CALLS_2_AT_10MSEC_2FLOWS
6. Save your current running configuration as your startup configuration using the
copy running-config startup-config command in Privileged EXEC mode:
MOT:7A#copy running-config startup-config
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Verifying that DOCSIS 1.0+ Devices Successfully Register
There are two ways to verify that DOCSIS 1.0+ devices successfully register and that
the BSR 64000 recognizes them.
n Review the EVT messages displayed on the console. The following information
EVT should be displayed on the console if a cable modem has successfully
registered as DOCSIS 1.0+:
[05/14-15:28:58.09- 11:REG]-I- REG.15 DOCSIS 1.0+ enabled
for CM, for MAC add r: 0008.0e16.fafe
n Use the show cable modem mac command. The output of the command
indicates DOCSIS version for each cable modem as shown below.
Caution: If you do not save your current running configuration to your startup
configuration, your running configuration will be lost when the BSR is
rebooted.
MAC Address MAC Prim DOC Qos Frag Con PHS Priv DCC DS US Dev
State SID Ver Prov Saids Sids
0011.805f.fd30 online 2 2.0 1.1 yes yes yes BPI+ yes 15 16 eCM
0011.8061.3f0e online 1 2.0 1.1 yes yes yes BPI+ yes 15 16 eCM
000b.0643.33fc online 195 1.0+ 1.0 no yes no BPI no 0 0 CM
000b.0643.3718 online 203 1.0+ 1.0 no yes no BPI no 0 0 CM
0020.409a.24c8 online 194 1.1 1.0 no no no BPI no 0 0 CM
00e0.0c60.2854 online 213 1.0 1.0 no no no BPI no 0 0 CM
0011.1ac9.2094 offline 0 1.0 1.0 no no no BPI no 0 0 CM
0011.1aca.1394 online 1 2.0 1.1 yes yes yes BPI+ yes 15 16 eCM
0011.1aca.13a6 online 2 2.0 1.1 yes yes yes BPI+ yes 15 16 eC
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Troubleshooting DOCSIS 1.0+ Interoperability
If a phone call cannot be established enable the following EVT from Global
Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#logging evt set c 11:RESSF 1-10
Verify that there are no indications that the grant-interval and grant-size are not
being matched.
If EVT "RESSF.1" is reported, verify that the running configuration file has a QOS
profile configured with the grant-interval and grant-size specified in this EVT.
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12
Configuring Spectrum
Management
Introduction
The spectrum management system monitors the upstream signal integrity, and collects
upstream spectrum information. When signal integrity degrades due to noise, the
spectrum management system automatically configures the upstream channel
parameters to maintain low packet loss by changing the upstream frequency,
modulation profile, channel-width and/or power level to ensure that upstream
performance stays at acceptable levels.
The following tasks are used to implement frequency agility on the BSR:
n Configuring a Spectrum Group
n Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Port
n Evaluating Spectrum Management Performance
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Configuring a Spectrum Group
Each spectrum group contains spectrum data, a spectrum map, and channel
assignment:
n The spectrum data is where the collected spectrum noise information is kept. It
contains the starting frequency, resolution, number of data points, time of the last
measurement, and a pointer to an array where the noise level is kept.
n The spectrum map describes the way the upstream spectrum is used for a
particular band. It contains the start and stop frequency, and the current status.
n The channel assignment defines the frequency allocation of the upstream channel.
Each spectrum group also contains the following management information:
n Spectrum signal quality information is collected through the spectrum monitoring
process. This information contains the periodic error rate that is computed and
compared with the Forward Error Correction (FEC) error threshold to determine
if spectrum hopping is necessary, and the periodic combination of in-band power
and spectrum data collection to compute signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the
upstream channel.
n The spectrum schedule contains information on the availability of a certain
frequency band. The band can be made available statically, or available only at
certain time period(s). The actual available spectrum is the super set of all the
bands that are available at the time.
n Spectrum hopping rules determine the action taken when the spectrum manager
decides to change the parameters of an upstream channel to combat noise.
Operators can improve upstream channel conditions to combat ingress noise by
specifying hopping rules for upstream frequency changes, upstream frequency
band changes, modulation profile changes, channel-width reduction (until
channel conditions improve), and power adjustments (if it is necessary).
Note: The term "upstream channel" is synonymous to the term "upstream
port".
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Defining a spectrum group requires performing the following tasks:
n Creating a Spectrum Group
n Scheduling the Availability of a Spectrum Group Band
n Scheduling the Removal of a Spectrum Group Band
n Configuring Spectrum Data Collection
n Configuring Spectrum Hopping Rules
n Configuring the Spectrum Hopping Error Threshold
n Configuring the Spectrum Hopping Flap Threshold
n Enabling and Disabling Spectrum Roll-back
n Configuring the Guard Band
n Reviewing the New Spectrum Group Configuration
Creating a Spectrum Group
Follow these steps to create a cable spectrum group:
1. Use the cable spectrum command, in Global Configuration mode, to create a
cable spectrum group and enter Cable Spectrum Group mode in which to
configure your new cable spectrum group:
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum <WORD>
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
The Cable Spectrum Group mode prompt displays. From this new prompt, all
cable spectrum parameters are configured. For example, if you defined your
group name as spectrum1 the prompt would display as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#
If you need to delete a spectrum group, use the no cable spectrum
command, in Global Configuration or Cable Spectrum Group mode as shown
below:
Note: No spaces are allowed for the spectrum group name.
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MOT:7A(config)#no cable spectrum <WORD>
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#no cable spectrum <WORD>
If you need to change to another spectrum group or want to create a new
spectrum group, use the cable spectrum command in Cable Spectrum Group
mode as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#cable spectrum <WORD>
where:
WORD is the name of a new spectrum group or another spectrum group.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#cable spectrum2
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum2)#
2. Use the band command, in Cable Spectrum Group mode, to define the start and
end frequency band for the spectrum group:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#band {<5000000-42000000>
<5000000-42000000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name that you defined.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency in Hertz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency in Hertz.
For example, if you defined your spectrum1 group to have a start frequency of 8
MHz and an end frequency of 12 MHz your command syntax would look as
shown below:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#band 8000000 12000000
If you need to add another start and end frequency band to the spectrum
group, repeat this step.
If you need to delete a start and end frequency band from a spectrum group,
use the no band command as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#no band {<5000000-42000000>
<5000000-42000000>}
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Scheduling the Availability of a Spectrum Group Band
The time band command is used to schedule when a spectrum group band is
available. The spectrum group band can be made available on either a daily or weekly
schedule.
Follow these steps to schedule the availability of a spectrum group band:
1. Use the cable spectrum command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter Cable
Spectrum Group mode:
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum <WORD>
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
The Cable Spectrum Group mode displays for the spectrum group.
2. If you want to schedule the time for when the spectrum group band becomes
available on a daily basis, use the time band command in Cable Spectrum Group
mode:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#time <hh:mm:ss> band
{<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
hh:mm:ss is the time of the day, which includes the hour, minute, and second
when the band becomes available.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency in Hertz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency in Hertz.
For example:
The following example defines the 25 MHz to 35 MHz upstream frequency band
as being available daily at 4:00 PM for spectrum group spectrum1:
Note: If a new availability time for a band is entered for a spectrum group, the
existing availability time for a band must be deleted first.
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MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#time 16:00:00 band 25000000
35000000
3. To schedule the time for when the spectrum group band becomes available on a
weekly basis, use the time band command in Cable Spectrum Group mode:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#time {<day> <hh:mm:ss>} band
{<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
day is the three letter abbreviation for day of the week.
hh:mm:ss is the time during the day when the band becomes available.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency in Hertz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency in Hertz.
The following example defines the 21 MHz to 29 MHz upstream frequency band
as being available every Thursday morning at 10:00 AM for spectrum group
spectrum1:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#time Thu 10:00:00 band
21000000 29000000
Deleting an Existing Availability Time for a Band
To delete the existing availability time for a band, use the no time band command in
Cable Spectrum Group mode:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#no time {<day> | <hh:mm:ss>} band
{<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
day is the three letter abbreviation for day of the week
hh:mm:ss is the time during the day when the band is removed.
Note: When deleting the time for a band, ensure that the exact day,
hh:mm:ss, and start and end upstream frequencies are used.
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5000000-42000000 is the start upstream in Hertz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency in Hertz.
Scheduling the Removal of a Spectrum Group Band
Follow these steps to schedule the removal of a spectrum group band:
1. To schedule the time when the spectrum group band is removed on a daily basis,
use the time delete band command in Cable Spectrum Group mode:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#time <hh:mm:ss> delete band
{<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
hh:mm:ss is the time during the day when the band is removed.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency in Hertz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency in Hertz.
The following example determines that the band from 25 MHz to 35 MHz,
belonging to spectrum group spectrum1, is removed every day at 20:00 PM:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#time 20:00:00 delete band
25000000 35000000
The following example determines that the band from 21 MHz to 29 MHz,
belonging to spectrum group spectrum1, is removed every Thursday morning at
11:00 AM:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#time Thu 11:00:00 delete band
21000000 29000000
2. To schedule the time when the spectrum group band is removed on a weekly
basis, use the time delete band command in Cable Spectrum Group mode:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#time {<day> <hh:mm:ss>} delete
band {<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>}
Note: If a new removal time for a band is entered for a spectrum group, the
existing removal time for a band must be deleted first.
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where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
day is the three letter abbreviation for day of the week
hh:mm:ss is the time during the day when the band is removed.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency in Hertz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency in Hertz.
For example, the following syntax is used to express that the band from 21 MHz
to 29 MHz, belonging to spectrum group spectrum1, is removed every Thursday
morning at 11:00 AM:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#time Thursday 11:00:00 delete
band 21000000 29000000
Deleting an Existing Removal Time for a Band
To delete the existing removal time for a band, use the no time delete band command
in Cable Spectrum Group mode:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#no time {<day> <hh:mm:ss>} delete
band {<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
day is the three letter abbreviation for day of the week.
hh:mm:ss is the time during the day when the band is removed.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency in Hertz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency in Hertz.
Note: Ensure that the exact parameters for the removal of a time band are
entered in order for the change to occur.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring Spectrum Management
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 12-9
Configuring Spectrum Data Collection
The spectrum data collection feature can be used to take a 'snapshot' or view of all or
a portion of the upstream spectrum between 5 and 42 MHz to help determine the best
places on the upstream spectrum to configure the hop action frequency and band
values. The spectrum data collection feature is also used to analyze and troubleshoot
the upstream channel when a user does not have access to a spectrum analyzer to view
noise level and signal information. The spectrum data collection feature is disabled by
default and does not need to be enabled in order for spectrum management to work.
The spectrum data collection task is split between the spectrum manager and the
spectrum agent. The spectrum manager schedules the data collection with the
spectrum agent, and provides data storage for the collected data, while the spectrum
agent performs the actual data collection and sends the collected data to the spectrum
manager.
Follow these options to change the default spectrum data collection parameters used
by the spectrum manager:
n The default resolution is 200000 Hertz (Hz). Use the collect resolution command
in Cable Spectrum Group mode to change the frequency resolution rate that the
spectrum manager performs:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#collect resolution
<200000-4000000>
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
200000-4000000 is the resolution in Hz.
n The default collection interval is 0, which indicates that no collection interval is
defined. Use the collect interval command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to
configure the interval rate at which data collection is performed by the spectrum
manager while it scans the entire spectrum map from 5 MHz to 42 MHz:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#collect interval <60-65535>
Note: Spectrum data is not collected for an upstream channel until the correct
collection interval is configured for the spectrum group, and the spectrum
group is applied to the upstream port.
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where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
60-65535 is the time interval expressed in seconds.
For example, the following syntax shows that the spectrum managers data
collection interval rate for scanning the spectrum map occurs once every hour:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#collect interval 3600
n Since the spectrum collection feature uses resources on the upstream channel that
may affect throughput for CMs associated with the upstream port, the spectrum
data collection feature should be turned off when it is no longer in use to conserve
network resources.
Use the no collect interval command to disable the collection interval.
Use the no collect resolution command to disable the frequency resolution.
Configuring Spectrum Hopping Rules
Rules for spectrum hopping must be defined before the spectrum hopping function is
used. Spectrum hopping rules are searched before spectrum hopping occurs on an
upstream port when the spectrum group is triggered. Spectrum hopping rules are used
by the spectrum manager to find the best way to defeat noise problems on an upstream
port.
The following spectrum hopping rules apply:
n No actions are taken if spectrum hopping rules are not defined. The rules include
the preferred frequency, modulation profile, channel-width parameters, and
power adjustment.
n Multiple hopping rules with same type of action are allowed.
n Each hopping rule can be assigned with different priorities.
n Hopping rules are applied by priority and hopping rules with same priority are
applied in the order in which they are entered.
n If each individual rule fails to apply, the spectrum manager attempts to apply
different combinations of the individual rules.
Follow these steps to configure spectrum hopping rules:
1. The default hop period is 300 seconds. Use the hop period command in Cable
Spectrum Group mode to prevent excessive frequency hops on an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop period <30-3600>
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where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
30-3600 is the rate at which the frequency hop takes place, expressed in
seconds.
2. Use the hop action frequency command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to
determine the frequency hop for discrete center frequencies during the frequency
hop action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action frequency
<5000000-42000000> [priority <1-255>]
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
5000000-42000000 is the upstream frequency from 5000000 to 42000000 Hz
1-255 is the priority number of the upstream frequency hop action. When no
priority is assigned, the default priority is 128. The lower number takes
precedence.
For example, the following syntax determines that 28 MHz replaces the existing
upstream frequency when a hop action is triggered and defines the priority level
of the hop:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#hop action frequency 28000000
priority 30
3. Use the hop action modulation-profile command in Cable Spectrum Group
mode to change the modulation profile setting for a hop action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action modulation-profile
<1-16> [priority {<1-255>}]
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
1-16 is the modulation profile number. The default modulation profiles are 1
and 2.
1-255 is the priority number of the upstream modulation profile hop action.
When no priority is assigned, the default priority is 128.
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For example, the following syntax determines that modulation profile 2 replaces
the existing modulation profile when the hop action is triggered and defines the
priority level of the hop:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#hop action modulation-profile 2
priority 50
4. Use the hop action channel-width command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to
change the upstream channel-width setting in Hertz (Hz) for a hop action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action channel-width [1600000 |
200000 | 3200000 | 400000 | 800000] [priority <1-255>]
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
1-255 is the priority number of the upstream channel width setting. When no
priority is assigned, the default priority is 128.
For example, the following syntax determines that the upstream channel width of
1.6 MHz replaces the existing upstream channel width when the hop action is
triggered and defines the priority level of the hop:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#hop action channel-width 1600000
priority 100
5. Use the hop action band command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to determine
the hop for each frequency band during the frequency hop action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action band
{<5000000-42000000> <5000000-42000000>} [priority <1-255>]
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency band in Hz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency band in Hz.
Note: Refer to Configuring Upstream Cable Modem Registration Parameters
for more information on setting the upstream channel width.
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1-255 is the priority number of the upstream band hop action. When no
priority is assigned, the default priority is 128.
For example, the following syntax determines that the upstream frequency band
of 20 MHz to 30 MHz replaces the existing upstream frequency band when the
hop action is triggered and defines the priority level of the hop:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#hop action band 20000000
30000000 priority 110
6. Use the hop action power-level command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to
change the power-level setting for a hop action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action power-level {<200-3200>
| default < -150 - +150>} [priority <1-255>]
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
200-3200 is the input power level, expressed in dB.
default -150 - +150> is the number of dB above or below the default input
power level.
1-255 is the priority number of the upstream power level hop action. When
no priority is assigned, the default priority is 128.
The following table describes the input power level parameters expressed in dB:
Note: Refer to the Setting the Upstream Power Level for more information on
setting the upstream power level parameters for relative and absolute mode.
Power Range Upstream Channel Width
-160 to +140 dB 200 kHz
-130 to +170 dB 400 kHz
-100 to +200 dB 800 kHz
-70 to +230 dB 1600 kHz
-40 to +260 dB 3200 kHz
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Configuring the Spectrum Hopping Error Threshold
A frequency hopping error threshold is configured as a criteria to apply the hopping
rules in instances when an unacceptable error rate occurs, which is caused possibly by
the poor signal quality of channel.
The hopping threshold error rate is determined by the Forward Error Correction
(FEC) error-rate threshold value. If the error-rate threshold is configured, the
spectrum manager periodically polls the signal quality table of the member channels
to compute the error rate during the polling interval. If the error rate exceeds the
threshold, it triggers spectrum hopping for the affected channel. The error rate is a
fraction of 1000.
The default hopping threshold error rate is 10 or 1 percent. Use the hop threshold
error command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to adjust the acceptable hopping
threshold error rate:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop threshold error {<1-1000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
1-1000 is the error rate as a fraction of 1000.
For example, an error rate of 1 implies 0.1 percent or an error rate of 1000 implies 100
percent.
Configuring the Spectrum Hopping Flap Threshold
A frequency hopping flap threshold is configured as a criteria to apply the hopping
rules in instances when one or a minimal number of cable modems (CMs) lose their
connection with the BSR (flap).
The frequency hopping flap threshold is determined by the percentage of CMs that
lose their connectivity. If the flap threshold is configured, the spectrum manager
periodically scans the flap-list table of the member channels to compute the flap rate
during the scan interval. If the flap rate exceeds the threshold, it triggers spectrum
hopping for the affected channel.
This frequency hopping threshold is activated with a value of 0 percent by default to
prevent the unnecessary triggering of a hopping action. For example, if the
downstream cable is disconnected or the downstream frequency is changed, these
actions would cause all CMs on the network to flap.
Use the hop threshold flap command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to set a value
that triggers when a greater than a set percentage of CMs lose their connectivity:
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MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop threshold flap {<1-100>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
1-100 is the percentage of CMs from 1 to 100 that lose connectivity on the
network.
If an existing percentage other than zero is set, and you need to take some action that
causes CMs to flap (such as changing the downstream frequency), issue the no hop
threshold flap command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to deactivate the frequency
hopping threshold before taking the action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#no hop threshold flap <1-100>
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
1-100 is the set percentage of CMs that lose their connectivity on the network.
Enabling and Disabling Spectrum Roll-back
The spectrum roll-back function is disabled by default and is used to return the
upstream channel width or modulation profile setting, that was adjusted during a hop
action, to the original configuration when upstream channel conditions improve.
Use the hop action rollback command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to enable the
spectrum roll-back function:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action rollback
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
Use the no hop action rollback command to disable the spectrum roll-back function.
Configuring the Guard Band
Use the guard-band command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to set the minimum
spectrum separation or spacing between upstream channels in the same spectrum
group.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#guard-band {<0-37000000> |
<0-60000000>}
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
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0-37000000 is the guard band separation size expressed in Hertz (Hz) for
DOCSIS. The default guard band is 0 Hz.
0-60000000 is the guard band separation size expressed in Hertz (Hz) for
Euro-DOCSIS. The default guard band is 0 Hz.
Reviewing the New Spectrum Group Configuration
Use the show cable spectrum-group command to review the configuration of the
newly created spectrum group:
MOT:7A(config)#show cable spectrum-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
Use the show cable spectrum-group map command to view the spectrum allocation
map for the spectrum group that you created:
MOT:7A(config)#show cable spectrum-group <WORD> map
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
Use the show cable spectrum-group schedule command in Global Configuration
mode to view the spectrum schedule for the spectrum group that you created:
MOT:7A(config)#show cable spectrum-group <WORD> schedule
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable spectrum-group commands.
Note: In the show cable spectrum-group map command output, the
SPEC_OCCUPIED message that appears in the Map status column
indicates that this section of the upstream spectrum is occupied by the
upstream channel of the spectrum group. The SPEC_AVAILABLE message
indicates that the section of the upstream spectrum is free to use, and no
upstream channel is currently using this section of the upstream spectrum.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring Spectrum Management
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Viewing Your Spectrum Group Configuration
The show running config command does not show the configured parameters if the
spectrum manager makes changes the upstream frequency, channel width, modulation
or power level by hopping action. However, you can issue the show running-config
command in Privileged EXEC mode to view the configuration of a spectrum group
that you created:
MOT:7A#show running-config
For example, the following show running-config command output shows the
configured spectrum group information:
cable spectrum-group spectrum1
time 16:00:00 band 25000000 35000000
time 20:00:00 delete band 25000000 35000000
time Thus 10:00:00 band 21000000 29000000
time Thus 11:00:00 delete band 21000000 29000000
band 17000000 22000000
band 26000000 30000000
collect interval 3600
hop action frequency 28000000 priority 30
hop action modulation-profile 2 priority 50
hop action channel-width 1600000 priority 100
hop action band 20000000 30000000 priority 110
hop action roll-back
Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Port
When a spectrum group is applied to an upstream port, the upstream port belongs to
the spectrum group.
Follow these steps to assign a spectrum group to an upstream port on a cable
interface:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
Cable Interface Configuration Mode:
Note: The spectrum manager is unaware of the physical topology of your
cable plant, and it is only aware of the spectrum group. Ensure that you apply
the same spectrum group to all upstream ports that share the same upstream
frequency assignment on the same physical cable plant. Also ensure that the
frequency configurations of different spectrum groups do not overlap if they
share the same physical plant.
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MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the cable upstream spectrum-group command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to apply a spectrum group to an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
WORD is the exact spectrum group name applied to the upstream port.
3. Use the show cable spectrum-group command to verify if the spectrum group
that you assigned is activated for the upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable spectrum-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the exact group name applied to the upstream port.
4. If you want to see what spectrum group is applied to each upstream port, issue the
show running config command in Privileged EXEC mode:
MOT:7A#show running-config
Note: All upstream ports sharing the same return path must be configured to
the same spectrum group.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring Spectrum Management
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 12-19
Evaluating Spectrum Management Performance
Use the information and examples contained in the following sections to evaluate
your spectrum management configuration and performance:
n Displaying Spectrum Data
n Viewing Spectrum Management Configuration Changes
n Determining the Upstream Signal to Noise Ratio
n Determining the MIB Index ID Number of an Upstream Port
n Viewing Spectrum Management Activity
n Viewing Spectrum Management Hopping Actions
n Viewing the Spectrum Management Roll-back Function
Displaying Spectrum Data
Use the show interfaces cable upstream spectrum command to view the noise
power level for the whole spectrum:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> upstream <NUM> spectrum
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show interfaces cable upstream spectrum command.
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Viewing Spectrum Management Configuration Changes
Follow these steps to view upstream information when the spectrum manager makes
changes to an upstream port:
1. Use the interface cable command to enter Cable Interface Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the show cable upstream command in Cable Interface Configuration mode
to display the current frequency, channel width, modulation or power level for the
upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream <NUM>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output and
field descriptions for the show cable upstream command.
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Determining the Upstream Signal to Noise Ratio
Use the show interfaces cable upstream signal-quality command in Privileged
EXEC mode to determine the signal power to noise ratio, and error signal quality
information as shown below:
MOT:7A#show interfaces cable <X/Y> upstream <NUM> signal-quality
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the upstream port number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show interfaces cable upstream signal-quality command.
Determining the MIB Index ID Number of an Upstream Port
It is important to learn the MIB Index ID number that is associated to a specific
upstream port on a DOCSIS module because the debug specmgr and logging console
notifications command log output only displays the MIB Index ID number.
Follow these steps to determine the MIB Index ID number of an upstream port:
1. Use the interface cable command to enter Cable Interface Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
2. Use the show cable upstream command to discover what MIB Index ID number
is associated with a upstream port on a particular module as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream <NUM>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
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The following example shows that upstream port 1 on module 0 has a MIB Index ID
number (ifIndex) of 5. This number is used to determine the slot and upstream port
number that is displayed in the debug specmgr and console logging output.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable 0/0
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable upstream 1
ifIndex: 5
centerFreq: 13200000
rng_back_st: 0
rng_back_en: 4
data_back_st: 2
data_back_en: 8
channelWidth: 3200000
powerLevel: 100
slotSize: 4
force-frag: 0
map-interval: 4000
pre-equalization: 0
invited-range-interval: 10000
range-forced-continue: 0
range-power-override: 0
physical-delay: Mode 0, Min 1600, Max 1600
rate-limit: 0
modulation-profile: 2
Spectrum Group: spectrum_1
Viewing Spectrum Management Activity
The logging console notifications command can be used to monitor spectrum
management activity whenever the frequency, channel width, modulation profile,
power level changed manually or changed by the Spectrum Manager, the notification
message is displayed.
Use the logging console notifications command in Global Configuration mode to
turn on console logging and view manual changes or changes made by the spectrum
manager:
MOT:7A(config)#logging console notifications
For example, if the upstream frequency was changed to 20000000 Hertz, the
following notification output appears:
[07/23-10:57:17:SPECMGR]-N-Set to new frequency 20000000 for
channel ifIndex = 4 .
[07/23-10:57:17:console]-N-configuration change by
[enabled-user]: cable upstream 0 frequency 20000000
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Viewing Spectrum Management Hopping Actions
The debug specmgr command is used to monitor all active upstream ports. The
debug specmgr command output in this section describes what can happen when
spectrum management hopping actions occur.
The following debug specmgr command output example displays no ingress noise
problems on the active upstream port. The command output displays a time stamp, the
error rate, the number of word errors, total word count, and the upstream noise power
level in one-tenth of a dBmV.
Use the debug specmgr command in Privileged EXEC mode to monitor one or more
active upstream ports:
MOT:7A#debug specmgr
MOT:7A#[07/23-11:00:08:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:00:08:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 2901
[07/23-11:00:08:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv):
-197.
Note: Ensure that the logging console notifications command is activated so
that you can view spectrum management changes.
Note: Ensure that you review the criteria for the hop action rules that you
have configured when reviewing the debug specmgr and console logging
output to clearly understand what is happening in the debug specmgr
command output and console logging output.
Note: In the following example, the IfIndex = 7 entry in the debug output
represents a single upstream port on a DOCSIS module.
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The following command output example displays what happens when the ingress
noise power increases causing the error rate to exceed the error threshold on an
upstream port:
[07/23-11:01:58:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 3723
[07/23-11:01:58:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-152.
[07/23-11:02:08:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:02:18:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:02:18:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 25.8228 %, ErrorWord :
816, TotalWord : 3160
[07/23-11:02:18:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-84.
[07/23-11:02:20:SPECMGR]-D-Updating specTimers
The following command output example displays what happens when the spectrum
manager initiates the first hop action (the hop action rule is 1 with a priority of 30):
[07/23-11:02:38:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:02:38:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 1.3425 %, ErrorWord : 41,
TotalWord : 3054
[07/23-11:02:38:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-68.
The following command output example shows that the first hop action succeeded to
set a new frequency, and the desired noise power level is restored.
[07/23-11:03:07:SPECMGR]-N-Set to new frequency 28000000 for
channel ifIndex = 7 .
[07/23-11:03:08:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:03:08:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 3781
[07/23-11:03:08:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-198.
If the noise power increases at the new frequency, the next hop action rule is to change
modulation profile (in this example, the hop action rule is 2 with a priority of 50).
Notice that the noise power level continues to increase:
[07/23-11:04:58:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
Note: Notice that the noise power level increases.
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[07/23-11:04:58:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 3054
[07/23-11:04:58:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-172.
[07/23-11:05:18:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:05:18:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 4044
[07/23-11:05:18:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-102.
[07/23-11:05:28:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:05:28:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0799 %, ErrorWord : 3,
TotalWord : 3754
[07/23-11:05:28:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-102.
Ingress noise causes the error rate to exceed the threshold and the second hop action
occurs:
[07/23-11:05:58:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:05:58:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 1.1573 %, ErrorWord : 37,
TotalWord : 3197
[07/23-11:05:58:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-76.
The following output shows that the second hop action to change modulation profile 2
is successful. The noise power level does not change, however, since the modulation
type is different in modulation profile 2, than in modulation profile 1, the acceptable
noise power threshold is different.
[07/23-11:05:58:SPECMGR]-N-Set to new mode profile 2 for channel
ifIndex = 7 .
[07/23-11:06:08:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:06:08:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.1759 %, ErrorWord : 5,
TotalWord : 2842
[07/23-11:06:08:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-76.
[07/23-11:07:28:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:07:28:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 3805
[07/23-11:07:28:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-32.
In the following output example, ingress noise causes the error rate to exceed the error
threshold, and the next hop action changes the upstream channel width:
[07/23-11:08:58:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:08:58:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 4.5083 %, ErrorWord :
182, TotalWord : 4037
[07/23-11:08:58:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) : 16.
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The following output displays that the hop action succeeded and that a new channel
width has been assigned to the upstream port by the spectrum manager:
[07/23-11:08:59:SPECMGR]-N-Set to new width 1600000, miniSlot 8
for channel ifIndex = 7 .
[07/23-11:09:08:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:09:08:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.5769 %, ErrorWord : 17,
TotalWord : 2947
[07/23-11:09:08:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) : 16.
The following output displays that the noise power level is restored:
[07/23-11:09:18:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:09:18:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 3040
[07/23-11:09:18:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-183.
Viewing the Spectrum Management Roll-back Function
When the spectrum roll-back function is enabled, the spectrum manager returns the
upstream channel width or modulation profile setting, that was adjusted during a hop
action, to the original configuration when upstream channel conditions improve.
In the following output example, the roll-back function starts when the ingress noise
is removed:
[07/23-11:09:28:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:09:28:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 2809
[07/23-11:09:28:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-184.
[07/23-11:09:38:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:09:38:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 2143
[07/23-11:09:38:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-185.
The following output shows the existing upstream channel width reverting to its
original upstream channel width setting:
[07/23-11:09:39:SPECMGR]-N-Revert to width 3200000, miniSlot 4
succeed for channel ifIndex = 7 .
[07/23-11:09:48:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:09:48:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 1927
[07/23-11:09:48:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-182.
[07/23-11:09:58:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
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Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 12-27
[07/23-11:09:58:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 2108
[07/23-11:09:58:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-197.
[07/23-11:10:08:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:10:08:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 1926
[07/23-11:10:08:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-196.
[07/23-11:10:18:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:10:18:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 2434
[07/23-11:10:18:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-197.
The following output shows the existing upstream modulation profile reverting to its
original upstream modulation profile setting:
[07/23-11:10:19:SPECMGR]-N-Revert to mode profile 1 succeed for
channel ifIndex = 7 .
[07/23-11:10:28:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:10:28:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.1513 %, ErrorWord : 2,
TotalWord : 1322
[07/23-11:10:28:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-197.
[07/23-11:10:38:SPECMGR]-D-Monitor Channel IfIndex = 7 :
[07/23-11:10:38:SPECMGR]-D-Error Rate: 0.0000 %, ErrorWord : 0,
TotalWord : 395
[07/23-11:10:38:SPECMGR]-D-Channel Noise Power (1/10 dbmv) :
-197.
Compass ID: 402284713 Version 5 13-1
13
Configuring Advanced
Spectrum Management
Introduction
This chapter discusses the functionality and configuration procedures for the
Advanced Spectrum Management features on the BSR. Advanced Spectrum
Management includes Frequency Agility, Frequency Rollback, Modulation Profile
Agility and Modulation Profile Rollback.
The purpose of the Frequency Agility, Frequency Rollback, Modulation Profile
Agility and Modulation Profile Rollback features is to monitor the upstream signal
quality and automatically change the frequency and modulation profile (per operators
configuration), to operate the receiver at the optimum throughput by adapting to the
quality of the upstream spectrum. When the signal quality on the primary channel
improves, the upstream port is reverted back to the original configuration. The signal
quality is measured using MER (Mean Error Ratio). RF Sentry on the 2:8 CMTS
modules is used to assess the quality of the spare channels without affecting the data
or voice passing on the active channel.
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Configuring Advanced Spectrum Management on the BSR could involve the
following tasks:
n Configuring Frequency Agility
Specifying Hop Action Band Start and End Frequencies
Specifying a Hop Action Center Frequency
Specifying the Active Channel Hop Sampling Period
Specifying the Spare Channel Hop Sampling Period
Specifying SNR Hysteresis
Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver
n Configuring Frequency Rollback
n Configuring Modulation Profile Agility
Specifying a Modulation Profile
Configuring Modulation Type SNR Thresholds
Specifying SNR Hysteresis
Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver
n Enabling Modulation Profile Rollback
n Excluding Reference Cable Modems
n Customizing SNR Hopping Criteria
Terminology
RFSentry and 9th Receiver are synonymous.
MER (Mean Error Ratio) and SNR(Signal-To-Noise Ratio) are synonymous and
both represent coherent channel signal quality measurements across the spectrum.
Active Channel indicates the configured channel or the spare channel whichever is
active at the time.
NON-OPTIMAL the channel is not operating at the highest configured modulation
profile mode.
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Channel State indicates the operational state of the channel tuned to a receiver (as per
signal quality) and can be one of the following:
NORMAL is the operational status of the channel tuned to the receiver. If there
are registered modems on the receiver, continue to operate in this state or set the
channel quality to IMPAIRED based on the SNR measurements. If there are no
registered cable modems on the receiver, the channel quality state is changed to
PENDING.
IMPAIRED is the operational status of a channel that is operating below the
signal quality threshold. If there are registered cable modems on the receiver, the
channel can continue to operate in this state or the channel quality can be reset to
NORMAL based on the improved SNR measurements. If no registered cable
modems are on the receiver, the channel quality is changed to PENDING. If the
receiver is retuned to a different center frequency, the channel state is changed to
PENDING until SNR measurements can be performed.
PENDING is the operational status of the channel pending SNR signal quality
assessment. If there are registered modems on the receiver, set the channel quality
to either NORMAL or IMPAIRED based on the SNR measurements
Frequency Agility
Frequency Agility provides the capability of periodically monitoring the quality of the
active upstream channel. If the plant conditions degrade, i.e. noise detected on the
tuned center frequency, the spare spectrum that is configured for the Spectrum Group
is assessed using the RF Sentry 9th receiver. If a spare channel of acceptable quality is
available in that Spectrum Group, the receiver with the degrading channel is retuned
to the channel of acceptable quality.
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The quality assessment for a spare channel is performed whenever the active channel
of a receiver in the Spectrum Group is in the "IMPAIRED" state provided a spare
channel for the Spectrum Group is available. If all spare channels are searched and no
acceptable replacement channel is found, a configurable hold down delay will elapse
before the retesting of the spare channels is resumed. When impairment is detected for
an active channel, before retuning the receiver with a spare channel, the spare
channels are assessed for suitable channel quality. The impaired channel is swapped
only if the spare channel meets the quality threshold. In the event that an impaired
channel could not be swapped with another channel due to poor quality of the spare
channels, the receiver with the impaired channel continues to operate on the
"IMPAIRED" channel. However, the spare channels are periodically assessed using
the RF Sentry 9th receiver until the receiver is operating on a channel that is not
impaired.
Frequency Rollback
Frequency Rollback provides the ability to switch the active channel which is running
on a spare frequency back to the primary channel. If the primary channel becomes
noise free, the receiver is switched back (rolled back) to its primary channel and the
spare channel becomes available for use by any of the receivers in the Spectrum
Group, in the event that there is impairment on their respective configured channels.
Modulation Profile Agility
Modulation Profile Agility provides the capability of periodically monitoring the
quality of the upstream channel that is in use and to provide dynamic selection of a
configured modulation profile based on the signal quality. When an impairment on the
active channel exceeds the SNR threshold for the modulation profile currently in use,
the channel is reconfigured to use another modulation profile provided for the
Spectrum Group.
Note: The ASPM Frequency Rollback feature is only supported where the
configured frequencies are configured specifically for each upstream port and
the spare channel is used to replace the configured channel when there is
noise on the configured channel.
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Modulation Profile Rollback
Modulation Profile Rollback provides the ability for a receiver to use a secondary
modulation profile until the receiver can again operate effectively using another
modulation profile. When there is impairment on the primary or spare channel, the
modulation profile for the channel is changed to use another lower modulation profile.
When the signal quality of the channel improves and if Modulation Profile Rollback
is configured, the channel will use another higher modulation profile.
Prerequisites
n Frequency agility is used first in the Advanced Spectrum Management feature if
the quality of the active upstream channel degrades. If a spare channel of
acceptable quality is not available, Modulation Profile Agility will then be used to
improve signal quality.
n The Advanced Spectrum Management features described in this chapter are only
supported by the BCM 3138-based and BCM 3140-based 2:8 CMTS modules
that provide valid SNR channel quality measurements for upstream ports. These
modules provide a 9th receiver in order to provide channel quality measurements
on unused upstream channels.
n The BCM 3137-based 1:4 and 1:8 CMTS modules will continue to support the
existing Spectrum Management features that are based on RSSI and packet error
metrics. SNR based Spectrum Management functionality is not supported on the
1:4 and 1:8 CMTS modules.
n BCM 3140-based 2:8 CMTS modules for the BSR 64000 Release 4.2 or higher
only support the Modulation Profile Agility and Modulation Rollback features on
logical channel 0. This applies to both ASPM for Release 4.4 and the existing
Spectrum Management feature.
n No Advanced Spectrum Management features will be supported for S-CDMA
channel types.
n A minimum a five (5) registered cable modems are required for the ASPM
feature to work.
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Advanced Spectrum Management Operational
Rules
n If a another (secondary) modulation profile or profiles are configured for an
active channel, then in the event that the active channel becomes impaired and
can not be swapped with a spare channel, the modulation profile of the active
channel is changed to another modulation profile while the spare channels are
being assessed as replacements using the modulation profile used by the active
channel before it became impaired. If noise persists after the modulation profile
of the active channel is changed to another modulation profile, the active channel
will be operating in an "IMPAIRED" or "NON-OPTIMAL" state while the spare
channels are being assessed.
n If rollback is configured and the receiver is operating on a spare channel, the
originally configured channel for the receiver is periodically measured with RF
Sentry. Once the SNR on the originally configured channel is greater than the
threshold, the receiver is switched back to the originally configured channel.
n If rollback is configured, and the receiver is operating on a another modulation
profile, the modulation profile will be rolled back to a previously used
modulation profile before the active channel became impaired as that channels
quality improves.
n If no hopping rules are configured for a Spectrum Group or if a receiver is not a
member of any Spectrum Group, in the event of channel degradation the receiver
will continue to operate on the configured channel using the configured
modulation profile in an "IMPAIRED" or "NON-OPTIMAL" state.
Legacy Spectrum Management CLI Commands
This section identifies the existing Spectrum Group commands that are not applicable
to the Advanced Spectrum Management feature for 2:8 CMTS modules. These
commands will continue to be applicable for 1:4 and 1:8 CMTS modules and their
associated Spectrum Groups.
Note: The CLI help text will indicate which Spectrum Management
commands are only valid for Spectrum Groups associated with a 2:8 CMTS
modules upstream ports. The BSR will ignore the legacy CLI commands
listed below for a Spectrum Group associated with a 2:8 CMTS module.
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The following legacy Spectrum Management CLI commands are not supported by the
Advanced Spectrum Management feature:
Advanced Spectrum Management CLI Commands
The following legacy Spectrum Management CLI commands are supported by the
Advanced Spectrum Management feature:
cable upstream spectrum-group
hop action frequency
hop action band
hop action modulation-profile
hop action roll-back
band configures the start and end frequency band for a
Spectrum Group
guard band configures the guard band
hop action channel-width configures the hopping rule for channel width
hop action power-level configures the hopping rule for power-level
hop period prevents excessive frequency hops on an upstream
port
hop threshold error configures the spectrum hopping error threshold
hop threshold flap configures the spectrum hopping flap threshold
time band schedules the availability of the spectrum group
band
time delete band schedules the removal of the spectrum group band
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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The following new Advanced Spectrum Management CLI commands have been
introduced with the Advanced Spectrum Management feature to allow the operator to
have more control over ASPM:
clear interfaces cable upstream channel-agility-stats
cons-imp-measurements
hop snr hysteresis
hop sampling-period active-channel
hop sampling-period rollback-channel
hop sampling-period spare-channel
hop threshold snr modulation-type
reference-modem-exclusion
show cable spectrum-group modem-exclusion-list
show cable spectrum-group reference-modem
show cable spectrum-group snr-thresholds
show interfaces cable upstream channel-agility-stats
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Configuring Frequency Agility
Configuring the BSR for Frequency Agility may require the following procedures:
n Specifying Hop Action Band Start and End Frequencies
n Specifying a Hop Action Center Frequency
n Specifying the Active Channel Hop Sampling Period
n Specifying the Spare Channel Hop Sampling Period
n Specifying SNR Hysteresis
n Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver
Specifying Hop Action Band Start and End Frequencies
Use the hop action band command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to determine the
hop for each frequency band during the frequency hop action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action band {<5000000-42000000>
<5000000-42000000>} [priority <1-255>]
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
5000000-42000000 is the start upstream frequency band in Hz.
5000000-42000000 is the end upstream frequency band in Hz.
1-255 is the priority number of the upstream band hop action. When no priority is
assigned, the default priority is 128.
Note: The Active Channel Sampling Period, Spare Channel Sampling Period,
and SNR Hysteresis features have enabled default values that do not need to
be re-configured.
Note: If cable operators have nothing but bonded cable modems in a
Spectrum Group, then ASPM will not work for frequency agility.
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For example, the following syntax determines that the upstream frequency band of 20
MHz to 30 MHz replaces the existing upstream frequency band when the hop action
is triggered and defines the priority level of the hop:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#hop action band 20000000
30000000 priority 110
Specifying a Hop Action Center Frequency
Use the hop action frequency command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to
determine the frequency hop for discrete center frequencies during the frequency hop
action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action frequency
{<5000000-42000000> | <5000000-65000000> | <1000000-55000000>}
[priority <1-255>]
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
5000000-42000000 is the North America standard frequency in Hz.
5000000-65000000 is the EURODOCSIS standard frequency in Hz.
1000000-55000000 is the J-DOCSIS standard start frequency in Hz.
1-255 is the priority number of the upstream frequency hop action. When no
priority is assigned, the default priority is 128. The lower number takes
precedence.
For example, the following syntax determines that 28 MHz replaces the existing
upstream frequency when a hop action is triggered and defines the priority level
of the hop:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#hop action frequency 28000000
priority 30
Note: Depending on the configuration of the installed 2:8 CMTS Resource
Module, the start and end frequencies will reflect the North American
DOCSIS, EURODOCSIS, or J-DOCSIS standards
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Specifying the Active Channel Hop Sampling Period
The hop sampling-period active-channel command configures the active channel
sampling period which is how often the active channel quality is measured.
The signal quality of the active channel is periodically measured for SNR. The active
channel sampling period is the time between two consecutive signal quality
measurements of the active channel.
Use the hop sampling-period active-channel command to configure the active
channel sampling period, as follows:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
2. Specify the active channel sampling period. The default is 3 seconds.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop
sampling-period active-channel <0-15>
where:
0-15 is the rate, measured in seconds, at which the signal quality of the active
channel is assessed. "0" disables active channel measurement per Spectrum
Group.
Specifying the Spare Channel Hop Sampling Period
The hop sampling-period spare-channel command configures the spare channel
sampling period which is how often the spare channels Spectrum quality is measured
when an active channel is "IMPAIRED" or "NON-OPTIMAL".
If an "IMPAIRED" or "NON-OPTIMAL" active channel could not be swapped with a
spare channel due to the poor signal quality of the spare channels, the spare channels
are periodically assessed on the RF Sentry 9th receiver. The spare channel sampling
period is the time between two consecutive signal quality measurements of all the
spare channels. In each spare channel quality sampling cycle, the first good spare
channel is used.
Use the hop sampling-period spare-channel command to configure the spare
channel sampling period, as follows:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
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MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
2. Specify the spare channel sampling period. The default is 10 seconds.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop
sampling-period spare-channel <10-600>
where:
10-600 is the rate, measured in seconds, at which the signal quality of the
spare channel is assessed.
Specifying SNR Hysteresis
The hop snr hysteresis command specifies the amount of dB degradation in a
downward direction before a channel will be marked as "IMPAIRED". For example.
if a channel is operating in a "NORMAL" state of 20 dB and SNR hysteresis is set to
2 dB, if the channel degrades in a downward direction until it reaches 18 dB, then the
channel will be considered to be in the "IMPAIRED" state. If the channel again
improves to 20 dB, the channel is no longer considered to be "IMPAIRED".
The user must be aware of the effects of lowering or increasing the SNR hysteresis. A
higher SNR hysteresis value will delay switching to a channel that is not impaired. A
smaller SNR hysteresis value could result in too many channel transitions.
Use the hop snr hysteresis command to specify the amount of dB degradation in a
downward direction before a channel will be marked as "IMPAIRED", as follows:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
2. Specify a new SNR hysteresis value. The default is 2 dB.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop snr hysteresis
<2-3>
where:
2-3 specifies the amount of dB degradation in a downward direction before a
channel will be marked as "IMPAIRED".
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Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver
When a Spectrum Group is applied to an upstream receiver, that upstream receiver
belongs to the Spectrum Group.
Follow these steps to assign a Spectrum Group to an upstream port and associated
receiver:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
Cable Interface Configuration Mode:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module. The 2:8
and 2:8 (2.0) CMTS modules will have a MAC Domain number of "0" or
"1".
2. Use the cable upstream spectrum-group command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to apply a Spectrum Group to an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
WORD is the exact Spectrum Group name to be applied to the upstream port.
3. Use the show cable spectrum-group command to verify if the Spectrum Group
is assigned to the upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-fishbowl cable spectrum-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the exact Spectrum Group name applied to the upstream port.
4. Use the show controllers cable upstream to display which Spectrum Group is
applied to each upstream.
MOT:7A(config-fishbowl controllers cable <X/Y> upstream <NUM>
Note: All upstream ports sharing the same return path should be configured
to the same Spectrum Group.
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where:
X/Y displays cable interface controller information for the specified BSR
chassis slot and MAC Domain including RF signal information, the type of
hardware installed, FEC information for both corrected and uncorrected
packets, the spectrum group and the status of the cable interface.
NUM displays information for an upstream port including the upstream
modulation type, channel width, frequency, modulation profile information
(i.e minislots, interleave, preamble, etc.), and upstream Channel ID number.
or
Use the show running config command to see which Spectrum Group is applied
to each upstream.
MOT:7A#show running-config
Configuring Frequency Rollback
The hop sampling-period rollback-channel command configures the channel
rollback sampling period which is how often the configured channel quality is
measured with RF Sentry.
When a primary channel is swapped with the spare channel, if the rollback is
configured, the primary channel is periodically measured for signal quality in the
background using RF Sentry. The primary rollback channel sampling period is the
time between two consecutive signal quality measurements of the primary channel.
To enable Spectrum rollback and specify the rollback sampling period, do the
following:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name.
2. Use the hop sampling-period rollback-channel command to configure the
rollback channel sampling period. The default is 60 seconds.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop
sampling-period rollback-channel <10-300>
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where:
10-300 is the rate, measured in seconds, at which the signal quality of the
primary channel is measured when an upstream is operating on a spare
channel.
Enabling Frequency Rollback
Use the hop action roll-back command to enable the Spectrum rollback function.
The default is disabled.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop action roll-back
Configuring Modulation Profile Agility
Configuring the BSR for Modulation Profile Agility may require the following
procedures:
n Specifying a Modulation Profile
n Configuring Modulation Type SNR Thresholds
n Specifying SNR Hysteresis
n Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver
Specifying a Modulation Profile
Use the hop action modulation-profile command in Cable Spectrum Group mode to
change the modulation profile setting for a hop action:
Note: The Configuring Modulation Type SNR Thresholds and the SNR
Hysteresis features have enabled default values that do not need to be
re-configured.
Note: The modulation type for the hopping profile has to be the same as the
configured channel profile type (i.e.TDMA to TDMA or A-TDMA to A-TDMA,
etc.)
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MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<WORD>)#hop action modulation-profile <1-600>
[priority {<1-255>}]
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
1-600 is the modulation profile number.
1-255 is the priority number of the upstream modulation profile hop action. When
no priority is assigned, the default priority is 128.
For example, the following command syntax determines that modulation profile 200
replaces the existing modulation profile when the hop action is triggered and defines
the priority level of the hop:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:spectrum1)#hop action modulation-profile 200
priority 50
Configuring Modulation Type SNR Thresholds
The hop threshold snr modulation-type command configures the SNR thresholds
for each modulation type.
SNR threshold is used to determine if a channel is capable of operating error free in
the modulation mode that is specified for Long Data or Advanced Long Data IUCs in
the configured modulation profile for the upstream receiver. A default SNR threshold
is used for each modulation type. The operator can override this by configuring a
different SNR threshold for a specific modulation type that is used in the active
channel. This threshold is used to transition channel states. SNR thresholds are
configurable with a resolution of 1dB.
The following table lists the recommended SNR thresholds for different modulation
types without FEC.
Note: The SNR threshold values for the different modulation types must
always be in a low to high order with QPSK being the lowest and 256QAM
being the highest.
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Use the hop threshold snr modulation-type command to configure SNR thresholds
for each modulation type, as follows:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
2. Specify a new SNR threshold for a modulation type.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop threshold snr
modulation-type {128qam | 16qam | 256qam | 32qam | 64qam | 8qam | qpsk}
<13-34>
where:
13-34 is the SNR threshold, in dB, at which a specified modulation type
should operate. This setting is also used to transition channel states.
3. Use the show cable spectrum-group snr-thresholds command to display the
configured SNR thresholds for each modulation type.
MOT:7A(config)#show cable spectrum-group <WORD> snr-thresholds
Modulation Type Default SNR Threshold
QPSK 14dB
8QAM 17dB
16QAM 20dB
32QAM 23dB
64QAM 27dB
128QAM 30dB
256QAM 33dB
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where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
Specifying SNR Hysteresis
The hop snr hysteresis command specifies the amount of dB degradation in a
downward direction before a channel will be marked as "IMPAIRED". For example,
if the SNR threshold is configured to 20dB and the default hop SNR hysteresis of 2dB
is used, then in the event of channel noise, a channel switch from the active channel to
the spare channel will take effect when the SNR value drops to 18dB on the active
channel (provided the spare channels SNR is at least 20dB). When the previously
active channels SNR goes back up to 20dB, the channel will be rolled back.
If a spare channel is not available or the spare channels SNR is below 20dB, and if a
another modulation profile is configured, then the modulation profile of the impaired
active channel will be changed.
The user must be aware of the effects of lowering or increasing the SNR hysteresis. A
higher SNR hysteresis value will delay switching to a channel that is not impaired. A
smaller SNR hysteresis value could result in too many channel transitions.
Use the hop snr hysteresis command to specify the amount of dB degradation in a
downward direction before a channel will be marked as "IMPAIRED", as follows:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
2. Specify a new SNR hysteresis value. The default is 2 dB.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop snr hysteresis
<2-3>
where:
2-3 specifies the amount of dB degradation in a downward direction before a
channel will be marked as "IMPAIRED".
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Applying a Spectrum Group to an Upstream Receiver
When a Spectrum Group is applied to an upstream receiver, that upstream receiver
belongs to the Spectrum Group.
Follow these steps to assign a Spectrum Group to an upstream port and associated
receiver:
1. Use the interface cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter the
Cable Interface Configuration Mode:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module. The 2:8
and 2:8 (2.0) CMTS modules will have a MAC Domain number of "0" or
"1".
2. Use the cable upstream spectrum-group command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to apply a Spectrum Group to an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
WORD is the exact Spectrum Group name to be applied to the upstream port.
3. Use the show cable spectrum-group command to verify if the Spectrum Group
is assigned to the upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable spectrum-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the exact group name applied to the upstream port.
4. Use the show controllers cable upstream to display which Spectrum Group is
applied to each upstream.
MOT:7A(config-if)#show controllers cable <X/Y> upstream <NUM>
Note: All upstream ports sharing the same return path should be configured
to the same Spectrum Group.
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where:
X/Y displays cable interface controller information for the specified BSR
chassis slot and MAC Domain including RF signal information, the type of
hardware installed, FEC information for both corrected and uncorrected
packets, the spectrum group and the status of the cable interface.
NUM displays information for an upstream port including the upstream
modulation type, channel width, frequency, modulation profile information
(i.e minislots, interleave, preamble, etc.), and upstream Channel ID number.
or
Use the show running config command to see which Spectrum Group is applied
to each upstream.
MOT:7A#show running-config
Enabling Modulation Profile Rollback
Modulation Profile Rollback provides the ability for a receiver to use a secondary
modulation profile until the receiver can again operate effectively using another
modulation profile. When there is impairment on the primary or spare channel, the
modulation profile for the channel is changed to use lower mode modulation profile.
When the signal quality of the channel improves and if Modulation Profile Rollback
is configured, the channel will use another higher modulation profile.
To enable Modulation Profile Rollback, do the following:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
2. Use the hop action roll-back command to enable the Spectrum roll-back
function. The default is disabled.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#hop action roll-back
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Excluding Reference Cable Modems
The reference-modem-exclusion command specifies the number of low SNR cable
modem(s) on each upstream channel in a Spectrum Group that are not allowed to be
used for channel assessment.
This value is used to exclude bad or errored cable modems from being selected as the
reference modem. These excluded reference cable modems are those with the lowest
SNR values within the reference cable modem list.
Use the reference-modem-exclusion command to specify the number of low SNR
cable modem(s) on each upstream channel, as follows:
1. Navigate to Cable Spectrum Group mode from Global Configuration mode.
MOT:7A(config)#cable spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name.
2. Specify the number of low SNR cable modem(s) on each upstream channel. The
default is 0.
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#
reference-modem-exclusion <0-25>
where:
0-25 is the number of low SNR cable modem(s) on each upstream in the
Spectrum Group that are not allowed to be used for channel assessment. This
parameter has no effect when the number of registered cable modems on a
specific upstream are less than double this value. A value of "0" indicates that
no cable modem is excluded from the reference cable modem list.
3. Use the show cable spectrum-group modem-exclusion-list command to
display the list of low SNR cable modem(s) that are not allowed to be used for
channel assessment.
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Customizing SNR Hopping Criteria
The cons-imp-measurements command lets you choose how many consecutive bad
SNR measurements are allowed before Spectrum Management marks a channel as
impaired and attempts to take an action such as frequency agility or modulation
agility. The default value is 1 for backward compatibility.
In Cable Spectrum Group mode, use the cons-imp-measurements command to
specify how many consecutive bad SRN measurements should trigger a hopping
action:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:Spectrum Group name)#
cons-imp-measurements <1-5>
where:
1-5 is the number of consecutive impaired SNR measurements allowed
before hopping.
Displaying the Reference Modem List
Use the show cable spectrum-group reference-modem command to display a
list of reference cable modem(s) being used for channel assessment. The
reference cable modem list is built every 5 minutes. Only two cable modems, an
active reference cable modem and a rollback reference cable modem, are
displayed.
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14
Configuring Load Balancing
Introduction
This chapter provides information on configuring various types of load balancing on
the BSR.
Static load balancing moves a device to the least loaded channel, based on the number
of devices registered. The BSR supports load balancing of cable modems and MTAs
across upstream and downstream channels within a load balancing group. In previous
software releases, static and dynamic load balancing was supported only for
non-bonded devices. In Release 6.4 and later, the BSR supports static load balancing
for both non-bonded and bonded (DOCSIS 3.0) cable modems and MTAs.
The following load balancing procedures are described:
n Configuring Static Upstream Load Balancing
n Configuring Static Count-Based Load Balancing
n Configuring Dynamic Load Balancing
n Manually Moving a Cable Modem
n Redistributing CMTS Traffic Among HSIMs
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Configuring Static Upstream Load Balancing
Static upstream load balancing evenly distributes cable modems across multiple
upstream channels serving the same geographical community or Spectrum Group.
The term "static" means that the BSR will only attempt to move a cable modem to
another upstream channel after the registration process is complete. When enabled,
static upstream load balancing occurs automatically to move a newly registered cable
modem to the least loaded upstream channel.
Static upstream load balancing is only based on the cable modem count on each
upstream channel. Cable modem types (DOCSIS 1.0, DOCSIS 1.1, DOCSIS 2.0,
DOCSIS 3.0, or MTA), upstream channel physical parameters (channel type, channel
width, modulation profile, minislot size), reserved bandwidth for each service flow,
channel quality, or channel traffic utilization are not taken into account.
Release 6.4 and later support static load balancing of both non-bonded and bonded
devices (cable modems and MTAs) within or across bonding groups inside a load
balancing group. Release 6.4 and later also support the static load balancing of MTAs
(bonded or non-bonded) separately from the cable modem. Similar to static load
balancing for non-bonded devices, bonded device load balancing is done within the
same load balancing group. The Dynamic Bonding Change (DBC) feature performs
the load balancing of bonded devices.
The mechanism used to load balance bonded DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems or MTAs is
based upon the registration count of each type of device on a particular channel. The
counts of bonded cable modems and bonded MTAs assigned to a channel during
registration are checked against the configured threshold value. The threshold value is
the determining factor in moving cable modems or MTAs to other channels.
Static upstream load balancing can be enabled or disabled per user-defined Spectrum
Group. By default, when a Spectrum Group is first created, the static upstream load
balancing feature will be disabled.
Load-balancing can also be achieved manually through the Command Line
Interfaces cable modem ucc command which uses the DOCSIS Upstream Channel
Change (UCC) mechanism for moving cable modems to a different upstream channel.
Note: Using the static load balancing feature requires a thorough knowledge
of creating and using Spectrum Groups. Refer to the BSR 64000
Configuration and Management Guide and the BSR 64000 Command
Reference Guide for detailed instruction on creating and using Spectrum
Groups.
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Enabling Static Upstream Load Balancing
Use the load-balancing static command in Spectrum Group mode to enable static
upstream load balancing for a Spectrum Group, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<Spectrum Group name>)# load-balancing
static
There are two ways to determine if static load balancing has been enabled:
n A "load-balancing static" entry appears in the running-configuration
file.
n A "load-balancing static" entry appears in the show cable
spectrum-group <WORD> command output, as follows:
MOT:7A# show cable spectrum-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name
Use the no load-balancing static command in Spectrum Group mode to disable static
upstream load balancing for a Spectrum Group, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-spcgrp:<Spectrum Group name>)# no load-balancing
static
Note: Before a new upstream channel that is added to a Spectrum Group is
considered for load balancing, the new upstream channel must have at least
one cable modem registered on it. To do this, a user must use the cable
modem ucc command to manually force a cable modem onto the new
upstream channel. After one cable modem is registered on the new upstream
channel, any subsequently registering cable modems will be eligible for load
balancing. Refer to the Moving a Cable Modem to a Specified Upstream
Channel section for more information.
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If static upstream load balancing is enabled for a Spectrum Group, cable modems are
balanced across the upstream channels within the same Spectrum Group based only
on count. If the cable modem count on the current upstream channel on which the
cable modem is trying to register is greater than the count on the least loaded
upstream channel by a difference of 5, the cable modem is automatically moved to the
least loaded upstream channel.
Note: If load balancing is disabled for a Spectrum Group, that specific
Spectrum Group can still be load balanced by including the Spectrum Group
name with the cable load-balance spectrum-group command. If the cable
load-balance spectrum-group command is used without a specific
Spectrum Group name, any Spectrum Groups that have load balancing
disabled will not be load balanced.
Note: If a user invokes the load-balance feature through the CLI with the
cable load-balance spectrum-group command (see Load Balancing
Across All Upstream Channels), the difference of 5 will not apply and the
number of modems is divided, almost equally, between the available
receivers within the Spectrum Group.
Note: Cable modems will not be moved with the load-balancing static
command if any of the following conditions apply:
a cable modem has TLV type 2, upstream channel ID, assigned in the
configuration file. To move cable modems registered with a TLV type 2,
you must use the cable modem ucc command to move them
manually.
a cable modem de-registers after a UCC failure and attempts to
re-register within 30 seconds of de-registration.
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Load Balancing Across All Upstream Channels
The cable load-balance spectrum-group command balances cable modems across
all upstream channels within the same Spectrum Group. This command can be used
for one specific Spectrum Group or for all Spectrum Groups. If a Spectrum Group
spans multiple CMTS MAC Domains, load balancing will be done on each CMTS
MAC Domain independently.
To balance cable modems across all upstream channels within the same Spectrum
Group, use the cable load-balance spectrum-group command as follows:
MOT:7A# cable load-balance spectrum-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD indicates balancing only a specified Spectrum Group
Moving a Cable Modem to a Specified Upstream Channel
The cable modem ucc command allows an operator to manually move a CM or
embedded MTA to a different upstream channel within the same Spectrum Group and
the same MAC domain. The CM/MTA can be moved after registration to balance the
number of CM/MTAs evenly among the receivers of the CMTS module so that the
entire upstream bandwidth can be used more efficiently.
The cable modem ucc command is the only command that can move a cable modem
registered with a TLV type 2. (Cable modems registered with a TLV type 2 cannot be
moved using the static load balancing feature.)
Note: Entering the cable load-balance spectrum-group command without
specifying a Spectrum Group will load-balance only the Spectrum Groups
that have the static load-balancing feature enabled.
Note: Before a new upstream channel that is added to a Spectrum Group is
considered for load balancing, the new upstream channel must have at least
one cable modem registered on it. To do this, a user must use the cable
modem ucc command to manually force a cable modem onto the new
upstream channel. After one cable modem is registered on the new upstream
channel, any subsequently registering cable modems will be eligible for load
balancing. Refer to the Moving a Cable Modem to a Specified Upstream
Channel section for more information.
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Use the cable modem ucc command in Privileged EXEC mode to move a CM or
MTA to a different upstream channel, as follows:
MOT:7A# cable modem {<mac> | <prefix> } ucc <0-7>
where:
mac is the cable modems MAC address in the form xxxx.xxxx.xxxx
prefix is the cable modems IP address
0-7 is the upstream port number
Upon receipt of the UCC request from the CMTS, the cable modem will perform
ranging on the new upstream channel. The cable modem remains registered over the
channel change.
Displaying Load Balancing Statistics for a Spectrum Group
The show cable spectrum-group load-balance summary command displays a
summary of cable modem distribution and load balancing statistics for a Spectrum
Group.
The show cable modem summary and show cable modem summary total
commands display a summary of cable modem information, including the Spectrum
Group name for each upstream channel, for each cable interface on the BSR.
MOT:7A# show cable spectrum-group <WORD> load-balance summary
where:
WORD is the Spectrum Group name
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show spectrum-group load-balance summary command.
MOT:7A# show cable modem summary
MOT:7A# show cable modem summary total
Note: Cable modems will not be moved with the cable modem ucc
command if any of the following conditions apply:
cable modem is not registered or having pending transaction (UCC or
DSX).
the new upstream channel is not in the same Spectrum group or MAC
Domain.
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Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable modem summary and show cable modem summary total
commands.
Displaying UCC Statistics
The show cable ucc-stats command displays DOCSIS Upstream Channel Change
(UCC) statistics for a MAC Domain.
MOT:7A# show cable ucc-stats [<X/Y>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable ucc-stats command.
Configuring Static Count-Based Load Balancing
Static count-based static load balancing evenly distributes cable modems across
multiple downstream/upstream channels serving the same geographical community or
Spectrum Group. The term "static" means that the BSR will only attempt to move a
cable modem to another channel after the registration process is complete. When
enabled, static count-based load balancing occurs automatically to move a newly
registered cable modem to the least loaded channel.
Static count-based load balancing is based on the cable modem count on each
downstream/upstream channel. All cable modem types (DOCSIS 1.0, DOCSIS 1.1,
DOCSIS 2.0, DOCSIS 3.0, or PacketCable Embedded MTA) are supported by this
feature. The BSR supports static count-based load balancing at registration time. This
is a form of registration-based load balancing that is done at the time that a cable
modem registers. When a cable modem sends its registration request (REG-REQ) and
ranging request (RNG-REQ) messages, the CMTS responds with a ranging response
(RNG-RSP) message that includes a Downstream Frequency Override field that
instructs the a DOCSIS 1.0 cable modem which downstream channels it should use.
All other cable modems use DCC for downstream load balancing.
The cable load-balance command executes downstream or upstream static
count-based load balancing (based on ds-reg or us-reg rules) for all registered cable
modems in the affected load balancing groups. Downstream or upstream static
count-based load balancing evenly distributes cable modems across multiple channels
serving the same geographical community or Spectrum Group. The term "static"
means that the BSR will only attempt to move a cable modem to another channel after
the registration process is complete. Static downstream or upstream load balancing
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occurs automatically moves a newly registered cable modem to the least loaded
channel.
MOT:7A# cable load-balance [downstream| upstream] [loadbalance-group
<WORD>]
where:
downstream enables downstream cable modem count load balancing.
upstream enables upstream cable modem count load balancing.
loadbalance-group WORD load balances the specified load balancing group.
Configuring Dynamic Load Balancing
Dynamic Load Balancing evenly distributes voice/data traffic across upstream and
downstream channels within a load balancing group. A load balancing group is a
cluster of downstream and associated physical upstream channels among which cable
modems can be autonomously load balanced. The BSR assigns a cable modem to a
load balancing group upon successful registration, if the cable modems channel is
associated with that load balancing group. The operator must define load balancing
groups to be consistent with the physical plant topology. Load balancing groups can
also be defined in order to support a specific class of service.
When the BSR is configured for Dynamic Load Balancing, cable modems are moved
from a channel with highest utilization to a channel with lowest utilization based on
the actual bandwidth utilization and the utilization thresholds.The algorithm takes into
account the actual bandwidth utilization of each channel that is configured for the
load balance group, the actual bandwidth utilized by each modem on the highest
utilized channel and the utilization thresholds.
Load Balancing Groups
This section describes configuring load balancing groups. There are two types of load
balancing groups:
n General Load Balancing Groups
n Restricted Load Balancing Groups
A Restricted Load Balancing Group is associated with a specific, provisioned set of
cable modems. Restricted Load Balancing Groups are used to accommodate a
topology specific or provisioning specific restriction such as a set of channels
reserved exclusively for business customers.
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General Load Balancing Groups are open for cable modems which are not
provisioned into a Restricted Load Balancing Group.
The CMTS assigns cable modems to a General Load Balancing Group based on the
upstream channel on which they register. The CMTS will assign a modem to a
Restricted Load Balancing Group only if it is explicitly provisioned (via SNMP or
a configuration file TLV) to be a member of that group. The CMTS will not assign
a cable modem to more than one Load Balancing Group.
Configuring General Load Balancing Groups involves the following tasks:
1. Configuring a Load Balancing Rule
2. Configuring a Load Balancing Policy
3. Configuring the Load Balancing Group
4. Assigning Downstream and Upstream Channels to a Load Balancing Group
Configuring Restricted Load Balancing Groups is described in the Configuring a
Restricted Load Balancing Group section.
Configuring a Load Balancing Rule
Load balancing policies provide control over the autonomous load balancing process
on a per-CM basis. A load balancing policy is described by a set of conditions (rules)
that govern the autonomous load balancing process for the cable modem. When a load
balancing policy is defined by multiple rules, all of the rules apply in combination.
This section describes configuring load balancing rules. Adding rules to a load
balancing policy is discussed in the Configuring a Load Balancing Policy section.
The following rules can be configured:
n dis-period - disables load balancing for a specified time period.
n disable - disables the load balancing rule.
ds-util - the threshold percentage of downstream utilization before
load-balancing starts.
n enable - enables the load balancing rule.
Note: Before configuring a load balancing group, you must configure a load
balancing policy and associated policy rules.
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n interval - the periodic interval for load balancing in minutes.
n us-reg modem-count-thresh - the maximum allowed difference in the cable
modem count between the cable modem's initial upstream channel and the least
loaded upstream channel in the load balance group.
n us-util - the threshold percentage of upstream utilization before load-balancing
starts.
Follow this procedure to configure a policy rule:
Use the cable loadbalance-rule command in Global Configuration mode to create a
new load balancing rule or modify an existing load balancing policy rule, as shown
below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable loadbalance-rule <WORD> {dis-period <0-86400>
<0-86400> | disable | ds-util {min <0-100> delta <0-100> stop <0-100} | enable |
interval <0-480> | rem-dsx | us-reg modem-count-thresh <1-50> | us-util {min
<0-100> delta <0-100> stop <0-100}} [snmp-index <0-4294967295>]
where:
WORD is the policy rule name.
dis-period disables load balancing for a specified time period.
0-86400 is the dis-period start time in seconds after 12:00 AM.
0-86400 is the dis-period length in seconds.
disable disables the load balancing rule.
Note: The load balancing disable time period that is entered in a load
balancing rule cannot span AM to PM (i.e. 4 PM through 9 AM).
For example, to disable load balancing for this time period, you would need to
enter two separate command strings, 4 PM to 11:59:59 PM and 00:00:01 AM
to 9 AM, as follows:
cable loadbalance-rule <WORD> dis-period 57600 28799
cable loadbalance-rule <WORD> dis-period 1 32400
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ds-util min 0-100 is the minimum threshold percentage of downstream
utilization before load-balancing starts.
ds-util delta 0-100 is the delta percentage of downstream utilization between
load-balancing channels to start load balancing.
ds-util stop 0-100 is the delta percentage of downstream utilization between
load-balancing channels to stop load balancing.
enable enables the load balancing rule.
interval 0-480 is the periodic interval for load balancing in minutes.
rem-dsx enables remote DSX resource failure load-balancing
us-reg modem-count-thresh 1-50 is the maximum allowed difference in the
cable modem count between the cable modem's initial upstream channel and the
least loaded upstream channel in the load balance group.
us-util min 0-100 is the minimum threshold percentage of upstream utilization
before load-balancing starts.
us-util delta 0-100 is the delta percentage of upstream utilization between
load-balancing channels to start load balancing.
us-util stop 0-100 is the delta percentage of upstream utilization between
load-balancing channels to stop load balancing.
Note: Only the maximum utilized channel must meet the minimum threshold
value before load balancing starts within a load balancing group.
Note: Only the maximum utilized channel must meet the minimum threshold
value before load balancing starts within a load balancing group.
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Configuring a Load Balancing Policy
Load balancing policies provide control over the autonomous load balancing process
on a per-CM basis. A load balancing policy is described by a set of conditions (rules)
that govern the autonomous load balancing process for the CM. This section describes
configuring load balancing policies.
You configure load balancing policies through Load Balancing Policy Configuration
mode. Load Balancing Policy Configuration mode allows you to create a new load
balancing policy or modify an existing load balancing policy.
Follow these steps to configure a load balancing policy:
1. Use the cable loadbalance-policy command in Global Configuration mode to
enter Load Balancing Policy Configuration mode, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable loadbalance-policy <WORD>
where:
WORD is load balancing policy name.
2. Use the policy rule command to add an existing policy rule to the load balancing
policy, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-lbPolicy:<load balance policy
name>)#policy rule <WORD> [snmp-index <0-4294967295>]
where:
WORD is the policy rule name.
snmp-index 0-4294967295 is the SNMP index value.
Refer to Configuring a Load Balancing Rule for instructions on creating policy rules.
Configuring the Load Balancing Group
This section describes configuring a General Load Balancing Group. General Load
Balancing Groups are open for CMs which are not provisioned into a Restricted Load
Balancing Group.
You configure load balancing group through Load Balancing Group Configuration
mode. Load Balancing Group Configuration mode allows you to create a new load
balancing group or modify an existing load balancing group.
Follow these steps to configure a load balancing group:
1. Use the cable loadbalance-group command in Global Configuration mode to
enter Load Balancing Group Configuration mode, as shown below:
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MOT:7A(config)#cable loadbalance-group <WORD> [snmp-index
<0-4294967295>]
where:
WORD is the name of the load balancing group to be created or modified.
snmp-index 0-4294967295 is the SNMP index value.
2. Use the load-balancing command in Load Balancing Group Configuration mode
to configure the load balancing group, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-lbgrp:<load balance group
name>)#load-balancing {init-tech <1-31> | policy <WORD> | restricted
{false | true}}
where:
init-tech 1-31 configures a default initialization technique bitmap for a load
balancing group.
policy WORD is the load balancing group's policy name.
restricted is the load balancing groups restricted status; false or true.
Configuring a Restricted Load Balancing Group
This section describes configuring a Restricted Load Balancing Group. A Restricted
Load Balancing Group is associated with a specific, provisioned set of cable modems.
Restricting an Entire Load Balancing Group
Follow these steps to designate an entire load balancing group as restricted:
1. Use the cable loadbalance-group command in Global Configuration mode to
enter Load Balancing Group Configuration mode, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable loadbalance-group <WORD> [snmp-index
<0-4294967295>]
where:
WORD is the load balancing group name.
snmp-index 0-4294967295 is the SNMP index value.
2. Use the load-balancing restricted command to designate an entire load
balancing group as restricted, as shown below:
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MOT:7A(config-lbgrp:<load balance group
name>)#load-balancing restricted true
To remove the restricted designation from an entire load balancing group, use
the load-balancing restricted command, as shown below
MOT:7A(config-lbgrp:<load balance group
name>)#load-balancing restricted false
Restricting Selected Cable Modems in a Load Balancing Group
To designate a particular CM or a range of CMs as restricted, use the cable
load-balance restricted command, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable loadbalance-restricted [<1-256> | <WORD>
[snmp-index <0-4294967295>]] no-move [<1-100> [<mac> [<mac>]]]
where:
1-256 the load balancing group ID.
WORD is the load balancing group name.
snmp-index 0-4294967295 is the SNMP index value.
no-move is a restricted cable modem that cannot be moved to another channel.
1-100 the cable modem index of the restricted cable modem that cannot be moved
to another channel.
mac the MAC address of the CM to be restricted from load balancing in the form
of xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
mac the mask to specify a particular CM or a range of CMs in the form of
xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
Note: The cable modem index refers to an index of the Restricted List not the
index of the CM record.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring Load Balancing
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Assigning Downstream and Upstream Channels to a Load
Balancing Group
This section describes assigning a downstream and upstream channel to a load
balancing group.
Use the cable downstream loadbalance-group command to assign a downstream
channel to a load balancing group, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> loadbalance-group
<WORD>
Use the cable upstream loadbalance-group command to assign an upstream channel
to a load balancing group, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> loadbalance-group <WORD>
where:
NUM the upstream port (default channel number = 0)
WORD the load balancing group name
Note: The same downstream channel may be assigned to multiple load
balancing groups.
Note: The upstream channel can not be assigned to multiple load balancing
groups unless the load balancing groups are defined as restricted.
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Enabling/Disabling Dynamic Load Balancing
This section describes enabling or disabling Dynamic Load Balancing on the BSR.
The Dynamic Load Balancing can be enabled or disabled for all CMTS modules in
the BSR chassis or for specific Load Balancing Groups.
Enabling/Disabling Dynamic Load Balancing on all CMTS
Modules
The BSR supports a global Dynamic Load Balancing enable/disable feature that
enables or disables Dynamic Load Balancing on all CMTS modules in the BSR
chassis. This feature can be enabled or disabled through SNMP or the CLI. If
disabled on the BSR, Dynamic Load Balancing operations are only allowed from an
external management station.
Through SNMP:
Dynamic Load Balancing can be enabled or disabled on all BSR CMTS modules
through the docsLoadBalEnabled MIB object. This object takes precedence
over any enable or disable objects that apply to a Load Balancing Group.
Through the CLI:
Dynamic Load Balancing can be enabled or disabled on all BSR CMTS modules
through the CLI. Enabling or disabling Dynamic Load Balancing through the CLI
takes precedence over any commands that enable or disable Dynamic Load
Balancing within a Load Balancing Group.
n Use the cable modem disable loadbalancing command, in Global Configuration
mode, to disable Dynamic Load Balancing on all CMTS modules, as shown
below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modem disable loadbalancing
n Use the no cable modem disable loadbalancing command, in Global
Configuration mode, to enable Dynamic Load Balancing on all CMTS modules,
as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#no cable modem disable loadbalancing
Release 6.4.0 Configuring Load Balancing
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Enabling/Disabling Dynamic Load Balancing for a Load
Balancing Group
Dynamic Load Balancing can be enabled or disabled for each Load Balancing Group.
If enabled, Dynamic Load Balancing operations will occur autonomously (based on
policy rules) between channels that are assigned to this Load Balancing Group.
Use the loadbalancing mode enabled command, in Load Balancing Group
Configuration mode, to enable Dynamic Load Balancing for a Load Balancing Group,
as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-lbgrp:<load balance group name>)#loadbalancing
mode enabled
Use the loadbalancing mode disabled command, in Load Balancing Group
Configuration mode, to disable Dynamic Load Balancing for a Load Balancing
Group, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-lbgrp:<load balance group name>)#loadbalancing
mode disabled
Displaying Dynamic Load Balancing Information
The show cable loadbalance-group command configuration information for all load
balancing groups or a specific load balancing group.
MOT:7A# show cable loadbalance-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the load balancing group name.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable loadbalance-group command.
The show cable modem loadbalance-group command displays cable modem load
balancing group assignments.
MOT:7A# show cable modem loadbalance-group
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable modem loadbalance-group command.
The show cable loadbalance-policy command displays configuration information for
all load balancing policies or a specific load balancing policy.
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MOT:7A# show cable loadbalance-policy [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the load balancing policy name.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable loadbalance-policy command.
The show cable loadbalance-restricted command lists all cable modems associated
with a particular restricted load balancing group or all restricted load balancing
groups.
MOT:7A# show cable loadbalance-restricted [<1-256> | <WORD>] [snmp-index
<0-4294967295>] [ungrouped]
where:
1-256 is the load balancing group ID.
WORD is the load balancing group name.
snmp-index 0-4294967295 is the SNMP index value.
ungrouped displays the ungrouped restricted list.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable loadbalance-restricted command.
The show cable loadbalance-rule command configuration information for all load
balancing rules or a specific load balancing rule.
MOT:7A# show cable loadbalance-rule [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the load balancing rule name.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable loadbalance-policy command.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring Load Balancing
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Manually Moving a Cable Modem
DOCSIS Upstream Channel Change (UCC) and DOCSIS Dynamic Channel Change
(DCC) are software mechanisms that allow an operator to manually move a cable
modem to a different downstream or upstream channels. Cable modems can be moved
after registration to balance the number of cable modems evenly among the receivers
of the CMTS module so that the entire bandwidth can be used more efficiently.
n The cable modem ucc command allows an operator to manually move a
DOCSIS 1.0 cable modem to a different upstream channel.
n The cable modem dcc command allows an operator to manually move DOCSIS
1.1 and 2.0 cable modems to a specified downstream or upstream channel.
Manually Moving a DOCSIS 1.0 or 1.1 Cable Modem with
UCC
Use the cable modem ucc command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to move a DOCSIS
1.0 or 1.1 CM or MTA to a different upstream channel, as follows:
MOT:7A# cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} ucc [init-tech <0-4> | logical <0-3>]>
where:
mac is the cable modems MAC address in the form xxxx.xxxx.xxxx
prefix is the cable modems IP address
init-tech 0-4 is the ranging technique used for DCC:
0 = re-initialize the MAC
1 = perform broadcast initial ranging on the new channel before normal
operation
2 = perform unicast ranging on the new channel before normal operation
3 = perform either broadcast or unicast ranging on the new channel before
normal operation
4 = use the new channel directly without re-initializing or ranging
logical 0-3 is the upstream logical channel
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Manually Moving a DOCSIS 1.1 or 2.0 Cable Modem with
DCC
Use the cable modem dcc command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to move a DOCSIS
1.1 or 2.0 CM or MTA to a different downstream or upstream channel within the same
MAC domain, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable modem {<mac> | <prefix>} dcc [downstream <0-1>
[init-tech <0-4>] | init-tech <0-4>| upstream <0-7>/<0-3> [init-tech <0-4>|
[downstream [init-tech <0-4>]]]
where:
mac is cable modem MAC address in the form of xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
prefix is the cable modem IP address.
downstream 0-1 is the downstream port number
init-tech 0-4 is the ranging technique used for DCC:
0 = re-initialize the MAC
1 = perform broadcast initial ranging on the new channel before normal
operation
2 = perform unicast ranging on the new channel before normal operation
3 = perform either broadcast or unicast ranging on the new channel before
normal operation
4 = use the new channel directly without re-initializing or ranging
upstream 0-7/0-3 is the upstream port/logical channel
Note: The upstream channel must be physically connected for DOCSIS 1.1
and 2.0 cable modems to be manually moved.
When moving a CM or MTA to a different downstream or upstream channel,
the upstream channel must be specified first followed by the downstream
channel.
The same init-tech must be specified for both the upstream and downstream
channels.
Release 6.4.0 Configuring Load Balancing
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Displaying UCC/DCC Statistics
Use the show cable ucc-stats and show cable dcc-stats command to display UCC or
DCC statistics for a MAC Domain, as shown below:"
MOT:7A# show cable ucc-stats [<X/Y>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable ucc-stats command.
MOT:7A# show cable dcc-stats [<X/Y>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show cable dcc-stats command.
Clearing UCC or DCC Statistics
Use the following commands to clear statistics displayed with show cable ucc-stats
and show cable dcc-stats commands:
MOT:7A#clear cable ucc-stats [X/Y]
MOT:7A#clear cable dcc-stats [X/Y]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
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Redistributing CMTS Traffic Among HSIMs
The BSR automatically binds a CMTS module to an HSIM (NIM) by default. An
operator may use the bind cmts command to manually bind a CMTS module to
another HSIM module if a problem is suspected on this HSIM, or to optimize network
efficiency so that CMTS traffic can be appropriately mapped or bound to other
HSIMs. For example, if an HSIM is having hardware or software problems, the
operator can use the bind cmts command to map a CMTS modules traffic to another
HSIM in order to exempt the problem HSIM from passing CMTS traffic so it can be
properly debugged without interrupting network operation.
The balance command automatically redistributes all unbound CMTS module traffic
across the available HSIM modules in the BSR chassis. For example; if there are 7
CMTS modules in the BSR, and 3 have been manually bound using the bind cmts
command, issuing the balance command redistributes the remaining 4 CMTS
modules traffic while leaving the manually bound CMTS modules traffic unaffected.
Follow these steps to redistribute CMTS traffic among HSIMs:
1. Use the slot command in Global Configuration mode to enter a populated CMTS
module slot:
MOT:7A(config)#slot <NUM>
where:
NUM is the number of the CMTS module slot.
For example:
MOT:7A(config)#slot 2
The following prompt displays:
MOT:7A(config-slot02)#
2. Use the bind hsim command in Slot Configuration mode to re-distribute the
CMTS modules traffic to a specified HSIM:
MOT:7A(config-slot02)#bind hsim <NUM>
Note: The no bind hsim command manually unbinds the specified CMTS
module from an HSIM module returning it to its default state.
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where:
NUM is the number of the HSIM slot to which the CMTS module is bound
3. Use the balance command in Global Configuration mode, to automatically
redistribute the CMTS modules traffic across the available HSIM modules in the
BSR chassis:
MOT:7A(config-slot02)#balance
Displaying CMTS to HSIM Bindings
Use the show bindings command to display bindings, or mapping, between CMTS
and HSIM modules:
MOT:7A(config-if)7A#show bindings
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output from
the show bindings command.
Note: The balance command can be accessed in all modes except User
EXEC mode.
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15
Configuring PacketCable
Overview
The BSR fully supports the CableLabs PacketCable 1.x and PacketCable
Multimedia (PCMM) specifications. PacketCable Multimedia, building on the VoIP
capabilities of PacketCable 1.x, provides an IP-based platform for delivering
Quality-of-Service (QoS)-enhanced multimedia services over DOCSIS 1.1 and 2.0
HFC networks. Using PacketCable Multimedia, cable operators can offer subscribers,
in addition to the VoIP telephony services available through PacketCable 1.x,
additional services that include interactive gaming, streaming media, video telephony,
and video conferencing.
PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Components
Both PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia share many of the same architectural
components. The basic difference is that PacketCable provides Quality-of-Service
(QoS) that is independent of applications, while PacketCable Multimedia provides
QoS to applications.
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Table 15-1 describes the PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia functional
components.
Table 15-1 Required PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Functional Components
Functional
Component Description PC PCMM
Application
Manager (AM)
Controls application sessions and communicates with the Customer
Premises Equipment (CPE) Client to enable an application or service
and the Policy Server to pass Quality-of-Service information.
No Yes
Call Management
Server (CMS).
Maintains and manages PacketCable Network Call Signaling (NCS)
based Voice over IP (VoIP) calls.
Yes No
Policy Server
(PS)
Also referred to as the Policy Decision Point (PDP). The Policy Server
applies a policy and manages the relationships between AM(s) and
Cable Modem Termination System(s).
No Yes
Multimedia
Terminal Adapter
(MTA)
A device that provides an interface for a subscribers telephone
service. A Terminal Adapter (TA) that is embedded into a cable
modem becomes an EMTA.
Yes Yes
Client A Client can be a Multimedia Terminal Adapter or other CPE device
that communicates directly with the Application Manager, such as a
gaming console or PC.
No Yes
Common Open
Policy Service
(COPS)
Protocol used to communicate a Quality-of-Service-related decision
message to and from a Policy Decision Point (Policy Server and Call
Management Server) and Policy Enforcement Point (BSR).
Yes Yes
Cable Modem
Termination
System (CMTS)
In a PacketCable or PacketCable Multimedia environment, the CMTS
enforces and manages Quality-of-Service policies through DOCSIS
service flows (i.e. the BSR). The CMTS is referred to as the cable
interface in this document.
Yes Yes
Event Message
System
All Quality-of-Service activities on the BSR are collected and sent
through event messages to a Record Keeping Server for further
processing.
Yes Yes
Record Keeping
Server (RKS)
Stores event messages which are used by applications for billing,
settlements, network usage monitoring, and fraud detection purposes.
Yes Yes
Media Server
(MS)
Plays announcements based on the state of the phone call, which is
determined by the Call Management Server. For example, "The
number you have reached has been disconnected."
Yes No
Media Gateway
(MG)
Provides an interface to the Public Switched Telephone Network
(PSTN).
Yes No
Signaling
Gateway (SG)
Handles the signaling and call control functions to "bridge the gap"
between the PSTN and IP networks.
Yes No
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Configuration Task Summary
PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia share many configuration procedures, but
also have specific configuration procedures. Configure the common configuration
tasks first, then complete those configuration tasks that are specific to the network you
intend to configure (PacketCable 1.x or PacketCable Multimedia).
The following sections contain common network configuration tasks, PacketCable
specific tasks, PacketCable Multimedia specific tasks, and Related Tasks:
n Common Network Configuration Tasks
n PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Configuration Tasks
n Related Tasks
Media Gateway
Controller (MGC)
Manages the connection with the PSTN by controlling the Media
Gateway and Signaling Gateway and maintains the call state for calls
requiring PSTN interconnection.
Yes No
IP Security
(IPSec)
Encrypts data flowing between a gateway and a host, a pair of
gateways, or between a pair of hosts.
Yes Yes
Internet Key
Exchange (IKE)
Management
Authenticates IPSec peers, negotiates IPSec security associations for
the data flow, and negotiates and extracts keys for IPSec. IKE is
asynchronous to call signaling messages and does not contribute to
any delays during communications setup.
Yes Yes
Electronic
Surveillance
Requirement for the Communications Assistance for Law
Enforcement Act (CALEA). Cable operators must satisfy CALEA
requirements if they are a PacketCable Telecommunications Service
Provider (PC/TSP) because this BSR feature provides any Law
Enforcement Agency (LEA) with Call Data Content (CDC) and Call
Content Connection (CCC) information.
Yes No
Note: For detailed PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia information,
refer to the CableLabs PacketCable specifications. These specifications are
available at the CableLabs website: http://www.packetcable.com/
specifications/
Table 15-1 Required PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Functional Components
Functional
Component Description PC PCMM
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Common Network Configuration Tasks
Table 15-2 provides a common configuration task summary:
PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Configuration
Tasks
Table 15-3 provides a summary of tasks specific to PacketCable 1.x and PacketCable
Multimedia:
Table 15-2 Common Configuration Task Summary
Task Refer to:
1. Specify the network or loopback interface IP
address used for the PacketCable protocols.
Specifying the Protocol IP Address on page 15-6
2. Restrict COPS Connections to a specified
Policy Decision Point (PDP) (optional).
Restricting COPS Connections on page 15-7
3. Specify the Policy Enforcement Point to
uniquely identify the BSR(s) that are within
the PacketCable/PacketCable Multimedia
domain (optional).
Specifying the Policy Enforcement Point on page 15-7
4. Enable event messages. Enabling the Event Message System on page 15-9
5. Configure the security policy. Configuring a Security Policy Using IPSec and IKE on
page 15-15
6. Enable IP Security (IPSec) and Internet Key
Exchange (IKE) protocols.
Enabling IPSec and IKE on page 15-21
Table 15-3 PacketCable and PacketCable Multimedia Configuration Task Summary
Task Refer to:
1. Enable Dynamic Quality-of-Service (DQoS).
2. Configure each cable interface to accept
Dynamic Service.
Enabling DQoS on page 15-25
1. Enable PacketCable Multimedia. Enabling PacketCable Multimedia on page 15-29
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Related Tasks
Table 15-4 provides a summary of tasks related to both PacketCable and PacketCable
Multimedia:
Entering PacketCable Configuration Mode
Before you can configure PacketCable 1.x and PacketCable Multimedia, you must
enter Packetcable Configuration mode from the BSR command line interface.
Through PacketCable Configuration mode, you can access PacketCable 1.x and
PacketCable Multimedia configuration parameters.
Use the packet-cable command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter PacketCable
Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)#packet-cable
The prompt changes to the following:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#
Table 15-4 Related Task Summary
Task Refer to:
Enable the COPS status SNMP Trap to view the
status of COPS connections.
Enabling the COPS Status SNMP Trap on page 15-31
Enable the Emergency Call SNMP Trap for
emergency calls.
Enabling the Emergency Call SNMP Trap on page 15-31
Enable the Resource Request SNMP Trap to
view resource problems.
Enabling the Resource Request SNMP Trap on page
15-32
Tear down a gate. Clearing Gates on page 15-32
Clear PacketCable statistics. Clearing PacketCable Statistics on page 15-33
Clear PacketCable configuration. Clearing PacketCable Configuration on page 15-34
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Configuring Common Parameters
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure parameters common to both
PacketCable 1.x and PacketCable Multimedia:
n Specifying the Protocol IP Address
n Configuring COPS Parameters
n Configuring Event Messages
n Configuring IP Security
n Configuring Electronic Surveillance
Specifying the Protocol IP Address
Use the cmts-ip command in PacketCable Configuration mode to specify the network
or loopback interface IP address used for the PacketCable protocols.
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#cmts-ip <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D is the network or loopback interface IP address.
Configuring COPS Parameters
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure the Common Open Policy
Service (COPS) protocol parameters for the Policy Decision Point (PDP) and Policy
Enforcement Point (PEP):
n Restricting COPS Connections
n Specifying the Policy Enforcement Point
n Configuring the COPS Client Timer
n Configuring Access Control Lists for COPS Connections
n Displaying COPS Connections
n Verifying the COPS Configuration
Note: If PacketCable or PacketCable Multimedia is implemented on a BSR
with BGP/MPLS VPNs, the configuration must be implemented on the
"global" VPN network.
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Restricting COPS Connections
The BSR accepts COPS connections from any Policy Decision Point (PDP)
IP address through a TCP connection by default. A PDP is either the Call
Management Server in the PacketCable architecture or the Policy Server in the
PacketCable Multimedia architecture where a Client/MTA policy request is either
serviced or rejected.
Use the cops pdp-ip command in PacketCable Configuration mode to restrict COPS
connections to a specific PDP:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#cops pdp-ip <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D is the PDP IP address.
Repeat this step to restrict additional COPS connections to another PDP.
Specifying the Policy Enforcement Point
Use the cops pep-id command in PacketCable Configuration mode to specify the
default Policy Enforcement Point (PEP) text string, that is used in COPS messaging,
to uniquely identify the BSR(s) that are within the PacketCable/PacketCable
Multimedia domain:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#cops pep-id <WORD>
where:
WORD is a text string that is between 1 and 32 characters. The default is
Motorola CMTS
Configuring the COPS Client Timer
Follow these steps to configure the COPS Client timer:
1. Use the show packet-cable statistics gate command in PacketCable
Configuration mode.
Note: If one or more PDP IP addresses are configured, only connections
from these PDP IP addresses are accepted. Up to 100 trusted PDP
IP addresses can be configured.
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2. If the show packet-cable statistics gate command output for the Client-Open
Sent field in the COPS Statistics section is incrementing, the network and the
PDP server need to be examined to determine the reason for the COPS Client
timeouts. The COPS Client Timer (which is the response timer for sending the
COPS Client-Open message) can be specified if COPS connections timeout
before receiving a Client-Accept message.
3. Use the cops client-timer command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
configure the amount of time permitted for the BSR to receive the Client-Accept
message from the PDP before terminating the COPS connection:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#cops client-timer <1-3600000>
where:
1-3600000 is the COPS Client timer value in milliseconds. The default is
3000.
Configuring Access Control Lists for COPS Connections
Configuration of an access control list (ACL) restricts COPS connections to a trusted
range of IP addresses.
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#cops listener access-list <1-99>
where:
1-99 specifies the number of the access list.
Displaying COPS Connections
Use the show packet-cable cops command in all modes except User EXEC mode to
display COPS connections, which includes the COPS Client handle, PDP IP address,
port number, keep-alive timeout, and duration time:
MOT:7A#show packet-cable cops [inactive]
where:
inactive optionally specifies displaying all inactive COPS Client handles.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output and
field descriptions for the show packet-cable cops command.
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Verifying the COPS Configuration
Use the show packet-cable configuration cops command in all modes except User
EXEC mode to display the COPS configuration and status information for the PEP
ID, Client Timer, and verify if the Status SNMP trap is enabled.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output and
field descriptions for the show packet-cable configuration cops command.
Configuring Event Messages
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure event messages:
n Enabling the Event Message System
n Configuring Event Message Parameters
n Disabling Event Messages
n Displaying Event Message Statistics
Enabling the Event Message System
Follow these steps to enable the event message system and specify an event message
Element ID for each BSR:
1. Use the no em shutdown command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
enable event messaging for the BSR.
2. Use the emelement-number command to specify a unique event message
Element ID for the BSR:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em element-number <0-99999>
where:
0-99999 is the Element ID number. The default is 0.
3. Use the show packet-cable configuration em command to verify that event
messages are enabled and the event message Element ID number is configured
properly.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
and field descriptions for the show packet-cable configuration cops command.
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Configuring Event Message Parameters
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure event message parameters:
n Configuring the Priority for Event Messages
n Configuring the UDP Port for Event Messages
n Configuring the Retry Interval
n Configuring the Retry Message Count
n Configuring the Hold-time for Batched Event Messages
n Configuring the Number of Batched Event Messages
n Configuring a Mask for Disabling Event Messages
n Overriding the Event Message Flag Function
n Disabling the Event Message QoS Descriptor
Configuring the Priority for Event Messages
Based on the overall PacketCable network, the Record Keeping Server can prioritize
event messages from the BSR. The higher the number, the lower the priority.
Use the em event-priority command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
configure the priority value of event messages generated from the BSR relative to
other events:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em event-priority <0-255>
where:
0-255 is the event priority ranking. The default is 128.
Configuring the UDP Port for Event Messages
If the default UDP port is already in use, another UDP port can be configured for
PacketCable event messages. A different UDP port can also be configured for event
messages to enhance security.
Use the em udp-port command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to configure a
UDP port number for event messages:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em udp-port <1-65535>
where:
1-65535 is the UDP port number. The default is 1813.
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Configuring the Retry Interval
When a Record Keeping Server receives and records an Accounting-Request event
message from the BSR, it sends an Accounting-Response message to the BSR. If the
BSR does not receive an Accounting-Response message within the configured retry
interval, it sends another Accounting-Request message to the Record Keeping Server.
The event message retry interval can be configured depending on the amount of
network congestion and the distance between the BSR and the Record Keeping
Server. For example, if the distance caused a time delay, the event message retry
interval can be extended from the default value to allow more time for the BSR to
receive an Accounting-Response message. The network and the Record Keeping
Server should be examined to determine the reason for these timeouts. In most cases
the em retry-count command parameter should be increased before the em
retry-interval command parameter is modified.
Use the em retry-interval command, in PacketCable Configuration, mode to
configure the event message retry interval for receiving an Accounting Response.
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em retry-interval <1-3600>
where:
1-3600 is the retry interval in seconds. The default is 2.
Configuring the Retry Message Count
If an Accounting-Response event message is not received by the BSR from the
Record Keeping Server, the BSR sends the event message again. Once all retries are
exhausted, the BSR tries an alternate Record Keeping Server (if one is available).
The network and the Record Keeping Server should be examined to determine the
reason for these timeouts. The event message retry count can be specified depending
on the amount of network congestion and the distance between the BSR and the
Record Keeping Server.
Follow these steps to configure the event message retry count:
1. Use the show packet-cable statistics command to determine if the event
message retry count needs to be changed.
2. If network congestion causes reported timeouts in the Account Request Failure
field in the show packet-cable statistics command output, Use the em
retry-count command in PacketCable Configuration mode to change the number
of event message retries:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em retry-count <1-16>
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where:
1-16 is the retry count. The default is 3.
Configuring the Hold-time for Batched Event Messages
The hold-time for batched event messages can be configured to allow more time so
that multiple event messages can be combined into one packet to reduce network
traffic.
Use the em max-batch-time command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to
configure the interval that the batched event messages are held before they are sent to
the Record Keeping Server:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em max-batch-time <1-60>
where:
1-60 is the time in seconds for batched event messages to be withheld. The
default is 10.
Configuring the Number of Batched Event Messages
The number of batched event messages can be configured so that multiple event
messages can be combined into one packet to reduce network traffic.
Event messages are batched together before being sent to the Record Keeping Server.
Use the em max-batch-events command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to
configure the amount of event messages that are batched. The collected messages are
sent when the em max-batch-time parameter expires.
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em max-batch-events <2-32>
where:
2-32 is the maximum batched event messages. The default is 6.
Configuring a Mask for Disabling Event Messages
An MSO can disable unwanted event messages to reduce network traffic.
Use the em event-disable-mask command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to
configure a hexidecimal mask to disable event messages:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em event-disable-mask <0x00000000-0xffffffff>
where:
0x00000000-0xffffffff sets the bits that correspond to event message IDs that are
disabled. The default is 0x0 (no mask).
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Table 15-5 describes the QoS event message bit definitions:
For example, if the QoS_Reserve event message is disabled, the following command
is entered:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em event-disable-mask 0x00000040
Overriding the Event Message Flag Function
The Call Management Server handles the logging of event messages to the Record
Keeping Server. This is done in either batch mode (putting event messages together in
a packet) or in real-time mode (sending event messages in packets as they come). The
event flag, which tells the BSR to send event messages to the Record Keeping Server,
can be overridden.
Use the em flag-override command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to force the
BSR to use real-time mode or batch mode regardless of what the Call Manager Server
directs the BSR to do:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#em flag-override {realtime | batch}
where:
realtime sends the event message in real-time mode.
Table 15-5 Event Message Bit Definitions
Event Message Bit Definition 1 Based Hexidecimal value
QoS_Reserve 7 0x00000040
QoS_Release 8 0x00000080
Time_Change 17 0x00010000
QoS_Commit 19 0x00040000
Note: Hexidecimal values can also be combined. For example,
QoS_Release and QoS_Commit event messages can be disabled by
entering the hexidecimal number: 0x00040080.
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batch sends the event message in batch mode.
Disabling the Event Message QoS Descriptor
The QoS descriptor attribute can be disabled if an MSO decides it does not need it
because it wants to reduce the size of the event messages for network traffic
management purposes.
The QoS descriptor attribute contains the Service Class profile name and QoS
parameters. Use the em qos-descriptor-disable command, in PacketCable
Configuration mode, to disable the QoS descriptor attribute.
Disabling Event Messages
Use the em shutdown command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to disable
event messages generated from the BSR if they are not needed.
Displaying Event Message Statistics
Use the show packet-cable statistics em command to display event messages or Gate
statistical information.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show packet-cable statistics em command.
Note: PacketCable Multimedia supports real-time mode only.
Note: Event messages are enabled by default.
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Configuring IP Security
Both voice and signaling data that is transmitted over the PacketCable/PacketCable
Multimedia network must be protected. The BSR uses the Internet Protocol Security
(IPSec) and Internet Key Exchange (IKE) protocols for security and key management.
The security between the CMTS and CM is established through DOCSIS Baseline
Privacy Plus (BPI+).
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure IPSec and IKE:
n Configuring a Security Policy Using IPSec and IKE
n Configuring IPSec and IKE Parameters
n Enabling IPSec and IKE
n Deleting Security Policy Database Policy Entries
n Displaying the IPSec Configuration
Configuring a Security Policy Using IPSec and IKE
A security policy that contains the following attributes must be configured to protect
the network traffic between two IPSec peers:
n source and destination address
n source and destination port
n protocol type to identify the traffic
n encryption algorithm
n authentication method
n key lifetime for the traffic
The IPSec Security Policy Database (SPD) specifies what security services are
offered to the IP traffic depending on source and destination IP address and port
number and protocol type.
Specifying Security Policy Database Pre-shared Keys
Follow these steps to specify the pre-shared keys for the SPD:
Note: The pre-shared key configured in this section must match the
pre-shared key that is configured on the Call Management Server/Gate
Controller or Policy Server and Record Keeping Servers.
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1. Use the ipsec command from Global Configuration mode to enter IPSec
Configuration mode.
2. Use the spd preshared-key command to configure the Pre-shared Key IP address
to allow a Pre-shared secret key to be passed between parties in a communication
flow to authenticate their mutual identities:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#spd preshared-key <A.B.C.D> <string>
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the cable interface.
string is the name of the Pre-shared Key which is between 1 to 128
characters.
3. Repeat Step 2 if more Pre-shared Key IP addresses must be configured or go to
the next step.
4. Use the show ipsec spd preshared-key to verify the SPD pre-shared key
configuration.
In the following example, the IP address of the Call Management Server/Gate
Controller or Call Management Server/Policy Server is 10.1.40.63 with the
Pre-shared Key PACKETCABLE and the IP address of the Record Keeping
Server is 10.1.40.70 with the Pre-shared Key PACKETCABLE:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#spd preshared-key 10.1.40.63 PACKETCABLE
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#spd preshared-key 10.1.40.70 PACKETCABLE
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#show ipsec spd preshared-key
Index Dest IP Address Key Len Key
1 10.1.40.63 11 PACKETCABLE
2 10.1.40.70 11 PACKETCABLE
Specifying the Security Policy Database
The Security Policy Database (SPD) policy is priority based. The lower number index
has a higher priority. The data packets are compared against rules in the SPD policy,
starting with the first index. When a match is found, that rule is applied and no further
comparisons are made against the SPD policy for that data packet.
The SPD adds two rules to the policy during initialization. The first rule forces data
that is specific to the IKE protocol to bypass. The second rule, which is the lowest
priority, discards any packet which has not matched a higher priority rule.
Follow these steps to specify the SPD policy:
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1. Use the ipsec command in Global Configuration mode to enter IPSec
Configuration mode.
2. Use the spd policy command to specify a security policy for the given peers for
the IPSec SPD:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#spd policy <ipAddr{-ipAddr2|:ipMask}>
<ipAddr{-ipAddr2|:ipMask}> <num> <0-65535> <0-65535> {apply transport |
bypass | discard} [after <num>]
where:
ipAddr{-ipAddr2|:ipMask} is the source network IP address followed by a
colon and subnetwork mask. If a hyphen is used between ipAddr and
ipAddr2, this specifies a range of source network IP addresses.
ipAddr{-ipAddr2|:ipMask} is the destination network IP address followed by
a colon and subnetwork mask. If a hyphen is used between ipAddr and
ipAddr2, this specifies a range of destination network IP addresses.
num is the transport protocol number which is the IP protocol from the IP
protocol header. The format is a decimal number. A value of 0 represents
any protocol. For example, the Call Management Server/Gate Controller or
Call Management Server/Policy Server can use TCP Port 6 and the Record
Keeping Server can use UDP Port 17.
0-65535 is the source TCP/UDP port number. 0 represents any port.
0-65535 is the destination TCP/UDP port number. 0 represents any port.
apply transport is used if the packet matches the rule for this policy (i.e.,
ipAddr, ipAddr2, num, source port, or destination port matches the packet
being processed), then apply transport mode IPSEC to the IP Packet.
bypass is used if the packet matches the rule for this policy (i.e., ipAddr,
ipAddr2, num, source port, or the destination port matches the packet being
processed), then the IPSEC processing is bypassed and the IP packet is
processed.
discard is used if the packet matches the rule for this policy (i.e., ipAddr, ip
Addr2, num, source port, or dest port matches the packet being processed),
then discard this IP packet.
after optionally allows a rule to be inserted after an existing rule in the SPD.
If the after is not present, the new rule is added to the first index.
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num is the policy security entry number. The index numbering begins at 1.
3. Use the spd policy bypass command to specify the default bypass policy to allow
a non-protected date to pass:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#spd policy 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255 0.0.0.0-
255.255.255.255 0 0 0 bypass
4. Use the show ipsec spd policy command to verify if SPD policy is configured
correctly.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show ipsec spd policy command.
Overriding SPD Configurations
Use the spd override command in IPSec Configuration mode to override IP
addresses, ports, or protocols that are configured in the IPSec Security Policy
Database (SPD).
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#spd override [addr-selector | port-selector |
protocol-selector]
where:
addr-selector sets the SPD to override a specific IP address within a range of IP
addresses set in the SPD or a wild card IP address set in the SPD.
port-selector sets the SPD to override a specific port with a range of port(s) or
wild card set in the SPD.
protocol-selector sets the SPD to override a specific protocol with a range of
protocol or wild card of protocol set in the SPD.
Note: By default, no SPD override address selector is configured. However,
the SPD override port selector and SPD override protocol selector are
configured by default.
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Allowing a Peer to Negotiate a Connection with the SPD
Use the spd allow-dynamic-rsp command in IPSec Configuration mode to allow a
dynamic response from a peer to negotiate Internet Key Exchange (IKE) even though
the IPSec Security Policy Database (SPD) policy setting is other than the "APPLY"
policy setting.
Displaying the Security Associations Database Configuration
The Security Associations Database (SADB) specifies cryptographic keys and
algorithms, which are used to secure data transfer for IPsec and IKE. Use the
show ipsec sadb command to display its configuration.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show ipsec sadb command.
Configuring IPSec and IKE Parameters
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure IPSec and IKE network
parameters:
n Configuring IKE Retransmissions
n Configuring the IKE Retransmission Timeout Interval
n Configuring the IKE Phase 1 Lifetime Interval and Lifesize Value
n Configuring the IKE Phase 2 Lifetime Interval and Lifesize Value
Configuring IKE Retransmissions
Follow these steps to configure the number of IKE retries for network problems:
1. Use the ipsec command in Global Configuration mode to enter IPSec
Configuration mode.
2. Use the show ipsec ike command in IPSec Configuration mode.
3. Observe the number of IKE retries in the show ipsec ike command output. If the
number of IKE retries is increasing, then the network and server should be
examined to determine the reason for the excessive number of IKE retries.
4. Use the ike retries command to configure the number of IKE retries:
Note: By default, the BSR strictly follows the configured SPD.
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MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#ike retries <1-10>
where:
1-10 is the retries permitted. The default is 3.
Configuring the IKE Retransmission Timeout Interval
Follow these steps to configure the IKE retransmission timeout interval for network
problems.
1. Use the ipsec command in Global Configuration mode to enter IPSec
Configuration mode.
2. Use the show ipsec ike command in IPSec Configuration mode.
3. Observe the number of IKE timeouts in the show ipsec ike command output. If
the number of IKE timeouts is increasing, then the network and server should be
examined to determine the reason for the excessive number of IKE timeouts.
4. Use the ike timeout command to configure the IKE retransmission timeout
interval:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#ike timeout <1-20>
where:
1-20 is the timeout interval in seconds. The default is 10.
Configuring the IKE Phase 1 Lifetime Interval and Lifesize Value
The IKE Phase 1 Lifetime interval and IKE Phase 1 Lifesize can be configured to
enhance security. These settings determine how long the key is exposed. For example,
an MSO administrator can decide to update this key on a regular basis to prevent
successful hacking.
Follow these steps to configure the IKE Phase 1 Lifetime interval and Lifesize value:
1. Use the ipsec command in Global Configuration mode to enter IPSec
Configuration mode.
2. Use the ike phase1 lifetime command in IPSec Configuration mode to configure
the IKE phase 1 lifetime value and the lifesize value that can either trigger or
prevent the expiration of the IKE security association:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#ike phase1 lifetime <0, 300-2592000> [lifesize <0,
10240-4190000>]
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where:
0, 300-2592000 is the lifetime interval value in seconds. The default is
28800. Zero indicates an unlimited lifetime.
0, 10240-4190000 is the lifesize value in kilobytes. The default is 0, which
indicates an unlimited value in kilobytes.
Configuring the IKE Phase 2 Lifetime Interval and Lifesize Value
The IKE Phase 2 Lifetime Interval and IKE Phase 2 Lifesize can be configured to
enhance security. These settings determine how long the key is exposed. For example,
an MSO administrator can decide to update this key on a regular basis to prevent
successful hacking.
Follow these steps to configure the IKE Phase 2 Lifetime interval and Lifesize value:
1. Use the ipsec command in Global Configuration mode to enter IPSec
Configuration mode.
2. Use the ike phase2 lifetime command in IPSec Configuration mode to configure
the IKE phase 2 lifetime value, and optionally configure the lifesize value for the
lifetime:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#ike phase2 lifetime <0, 300-2592000> [lifesize
<0, 10240-4190000>]
where:
0, 300-2592000 is the lifetime interval value in seconds. The default is
28800. Zero indicates an unlimited time.
0, 10240-4190000 is the lifesize value in kilobytes. The default is 0, which
indicates an unlimited size.
Enabling IPSec and IKE
Follow these steps to enable PacketCable IPSec and IKE:
1. Use the ipsec command in Global Configuration mode to enter IPSec
Configuration mode.
2. Use the ike client-addr command in IPSec Configuration mode to specify the IP
address used by the BSR for its source address during IKE protocol exchanges.
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#ike client-addr <A.B.C.D>
where:
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A.B.C.D is the host IP address used for IKE.
3. Use the no ipsec shutdown command to enable IPSEC and IKE.
Deleting Security Policy Database Policy Entries
Follow these steps to delete Security Policy Database (SPD) policy entries:
1. Use the no spd policy command in IPSec Configuration mode to delete SPD
entries when they are no longer needed. A single rule or all the rules in the table
can be deleted at once:
MOT:7A(config-ipsec)#no spd policy {all | <num>}
where:
all deletes all entries in the SPD.
num deletes a specific rule from the SPD specified by the index number.
2. Use the show ipsec spd policy command to verify if the appropriate SPD policy
was deleted.
Displaying the IPSec Configuration
Use the following commands in all modes except User EXEC mode to display the
IPSec configuration.
n Use the show ipsec ike command to display the IKE configuration.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show ipsec ike command.
n Use the show ipsec ipsec command to display the IPSec configuration.
Caution: Improperly configured policies could prevent all IP traffic going in
and/or out of the BSR.
Note: Use caution when deleting more than one SPD entry, because the
SPD index numbers change whenever an index is deleted.
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Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show ipsec ipsec command.
Configuring Electronic Surveillance
Use the following command options, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to
configure electronic surveillance:
n Electronic surveillance is disabled by default. Use the no es shutdown command
to enable electronic surveillance.
n Use the es shutdown command to disable the electronic surveillance.
n Use the es trap-enable command to enable or disable the electronic surveillance
SNMP trap:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#es trap-enable {disable | enable}
where:
disable disables the electronic surveillance SNMP trap.
enable enables the electronic surveillance SNMP trap. The default is
disabled.
Use the following commands to clear electronic surveillance information:
n Use the clear packet-cable statistics es identifier command, in Privileged
EXEC mode, to clear duplicated packet and byte counts:
MOT:7A#clear packet-cable statistics es identifier <0x00000000-0xffffffff>
where:
0x00000000-0xffffffff clears a specific ES identifier.
n Use the clear configuration es command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
clear electronic surveillance SNMP traps and reset es trap-enable to "disabled".
Note: Electronic surveillance conforms to Communications Assistance for
Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) requirements.
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Displaying Electronic Surveillance Information
Use the following show commands to display electronic surveillance information.
n Use the show packet-cable configuration es command to display electronic
surveillance configuration information.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show packet-cable configuration es command.
n Use the show packet-cable statistics em command to display event message
statistical information including the electronic surveillance generated
QoS-Reserve, QoS-Commit and QoS-Release event counts.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show packet-cable configuration em command.
n Use the show packet-cable statistics es identifier command to display
duplicated byte and packet counts along with the gates IP address and UDP
port.
MOT:7A#show packet-cable statistics es identifier <0x00000000-0xffffffff>
where:
0x00000000-0xffffffff is the gate identifier in hexadecimal notation.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show packet-cable statistics es identifier command.
Note: The statistics for an inactive gate are not displayed.
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Configuring PacketCable Specific Parameters
If you intend to configure a PacketCable 1.x network and have already completed the
common configuration tasks as described in Table 15-2 on page 15-4, then complete
the procedures in this section. These procedures are specific to PacketCable 1.x.
PacketCable is configured in the following sections by enabling Dynamic
Quality-of-Service (DQoS), configuring each PacketCable cable interface to accept
DQoS gates, and optionally configuring DQoS Gate Timers:
n Enabling DQoS
n Configuring DQoS Parameters
Enabling DQoS
Follow these steps to enable Dynamic Quality-of-Service (DQoS) and configure each
PacketCable cable interface to accept DQoS gates:
1. Use the no dqos shutdown command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
enable DQoS.
2. Use the end command to go back to Global Configuration mode.
3. Use the interface cable command to enter a cable interface:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
4. \Use the cable dynamic-service authorization-mode command in Interface
Configuration mode to allow each PacketCable cable interface to accept dynamic
service:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable dynamic-service authorization-mode
{auth_no_ecn02064 | authorize | unauthorize}
where:
auth_no_ecn02064 authorizes Dynamic Service based on DQoS gates
without PacketCable ECN 2064 support.
authorize authorizes CM initiated Dynamic Service based on DQoS gates.
This argument is required when DQoS is enabled.
unauthorize accepts all Dynamic Service.
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5. Use the end command to exit the cable interface and return to Global
Configuration mode.
6. Repeat Step 3 through Step 5 if more cable interfaces need to accept dynamic
service.
7. Use the show cable dynamic-service command to verify the dynamic service
configuration status for the configured cable interfaces.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show cable dynamic-service command.
8. Use the show packet-cable configuration dqos command to verify the DQoS
configuration.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show packet-cable configuration dqos command.
Configuring DQoS Parameters
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure DQoS parameters:
n Configuring DQoS Gate T0 and T1 Timers
n Displaying Gates
n Displaying Gate Statistics
Configuring DQoS Gate T0 and T1 Timers
The DQoS Gate Timers have default parameter settings associated with them and they
do not have to be configured. If T0 and T1 timeouts are being counted in the show
packet-cable statistics gate command output, the network and the PDP server need
to be examined. T0 and T1 timers may need to be increased from their default values
to avoid T0 and T1 timeouts.
n The BSR considers the assigned gate ID to be invalid when the DQoS Gate Timer
T0 timer expires.
Use the dqos t0-timer command in PacketCable Configuration mode to limit the
period of time that a gate can be allocated without the gate parameters being
configured:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#dqos t0-timer <1-3600>
where:
1-3600 is the timer value in seconds. The default is 30.
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n The BSR clears all resources reserved for a gate (depending on the state of the
gate) when the DQoS gate Timer T1 expires, which causes the MTA or Client to
delete the gate.
Use the dqos t1-timer command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
configure the T1 timer:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#dqos t1-timer <1-3600>
where:
1-3600 is the timer value in seconds. The default is 250.
Displaying Gates
Use the following show commands to display gate information.
n Use the show packet-cable gate command to display the gate ID in hexidecimal
notation, CM MAC address, CPE (subscriber) IP address, cable interface slot
number, upstream and downstream Service Flow Identifier (SFID) number, status
and committed time gate summary information.
n Use the show packet-cable gate identifier command to display detailed gate
information for a specified gate ID:
MOT:7A#show packet-cable gate identifier <0x0-0xffffffff>
where:
0x0-0xffffffff is the specified hexidecimal number for the gate ID.
n Use the show packet-cable gate cops command to display gate summary
information for the specified COPS Client handle:
MOT:7A#show packet-cable gate cops <0-99>
where:
0-99 is the specified COPS Client handle.
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n Use the show packet-cable gate slot command to display gate summary
information for the specified cable interface slot:
MOT:7A#show packet-cable gate slot <NUM>
where:
NUM is the cable interface slot number.
n Use the show packet-cable gate modem command to display gate summary
information for a specified CM:
MOT:7A#show packet-cable gate modem <mac>
where:
mac is the MAC address of the CM.
n Use the show packet-cable gate subscriber command to display gate summary
information for the specified MTA or Client subscriber using their IP address:
MOT:7A#show packet-cable gate subscriber <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the MTA or Client subscriber.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show packet-cable gate commands.
Displaying Gate Statistics
Use the show packet-cable statistics gate command in all modes except User EXEC
mode to display detailed statistics for all DQoS gates.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show packet-cable statistics gate command.
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Configuring PacketCable Multimedia Specific
Parameters
If you intend to configure a PacketCable Multimedia network and have already
completed the common configuration tasks as described in the Table on Page 13-4,
then complete the procedures in this section. These procedures are specific to
PacketCable Multimedia.
PacketCable Multimedia is configured in the following sections by enabling
PacketCable Multimedia and optionally configuring the Multimedia Gate Timer T1:
n Enabling PacketCable Multimedia
n Configuring the Multimedia Gate Timer T1
Enabling PacketCable Multimedia
Follow these steps to enable PacketCable Multimedia:
1. Use the no mm shutdown command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
enable PacketCable Multimedia and COPS operation on the BSR.
2. Use the show packet-cable configuration mm command to verify if
PacketCable Multimedia operation is enabled.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output
for the show packet-cable configuration mm command.
Configuring the Multimedia Gate Timer T1
The Multimedia Gate Timer T1 has a default setting for the interval that elapses
between authorizing and reserving a PacketCable Multimedia gate.
The multimedia T1 timer starts when a gate is authorized. The Multimedia T1 timer is
stopped when an operation is performed (e.g. The gate state is switched to Reserved).
On expiration of this timer, the BSR deletes the gate.
Follow these steps to configure the multimedia T1 timer:
1. Use the mm t1-timer command in PacketCable Configuration mode to configure
the multimedia T1 timer:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#mm t1-timer <1-3600>
where:
1-3600 is the timer value in seconds. The default is 200.
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2. Use the show packet-cable configuration mm command to verify the
Multimedia T1 Timer setting.
PacketCable DSCP
The PacketCable Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) feature allows an
operator to configure the DSCP field on IP packet headers for PacketCable traffic
generated by the BSR. The DSCP field can be configured for DQoS, MM, EM and
ES.
Differentiated services enhancements enable scalable service discrimination in a
network without the need for per-flow state and signaling at every hop. Differentiated
services can be constructed by a combination of:
1. setting bits in an IP header field at network boundaries
2. using those bits to determine how packets are forwarded by the nodes inside the
network and
3. conditioning the marked packets at network boundaries in accordance with the
requirements or rules of each service
The following commands are used to configure the PacketCable DSCP feature:
n dqos dscp
n em dscp
n es ccc-dscp
n mm dscp
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide for information on these
commands.
Configuring Related PacketCable Tasks
Follow the procedures in these sections to configure related PacketCable tasks:
n Clearing All COPS Connections
n Enabling the COPS Status SNMP Trap
n Clearing Gates
n Clearing PacketCable Statistics
n Clearing PacketCable Configuration
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Clearing All COPS Connections
Use the clear cops pdp-ip all command in PacketCable Configuration mode to
remove all Policy Decision Point (PDP) IP addresses, which causes all COPS
connections to be cleared.
Enabling the COPS Status SNMP Trap
Use the cops status-trap enable command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to
optionally enable the COPS status SNMP trap through the DQoSCopsTrap SNMP
MIB object.
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#cops status-trap-enable [enable | disable]
where:
enable enables COPS status SNMP trap. The default is disabled.
disable disables COPS status SNMP trap.
If the COPS status SNMP trap is enabled, the BSR generates an SNMP trap when one
or more of the following conditions occur:
n a keep alive timeout
n the COPS connection is disconnected
n a failure to establish a TCP connection
n a COPS connection is established
n an unauthorized PDP attempt to establish a COPS connection
Enabling the Emergency Call SNMP Trap
Use the dqos emergency-trap command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to
optionally enable an SNMP trap for Emergency Calls through the
rdnPktDQoSEmergencyTrapEnable SNMP MIB object:
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#dqos emergency-trap-enable [enable | disable]
where:
enable enables Emergency Call SNMP trap. The default is disabled.
disable disables Emergency Call SNMP trap.
If the Emergency Call SNMP trap is enabled, the BSR generates an SNMP trap if an
Emergency Call is initiated.
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Enabling the Resource Request SNMP Trap
Use the dqos res-req-trap command, in PacketCable Configuration mode, to
optionally enable the Resource Request SNMP trap through the DQoSResReq SNMP
MIB object.
MOT:7A(config-pktcable)#dqos res-req-trap-enable [enable | disable]
where:
enable enables Resource Request SNMP trap. The default is disabled.
disable disables Resource Request SNMP trap.
If the Resource Request SNMP trap is enabled, the BSR generates an SNMP trap if a
Resource Request from an MTA is invalid. This would include one or more of the
following conditions:
n an invalid gate ID (DSA-REQ contains an unknown gate ID)
n a missing gate ID (DSA-REQ is missing gate ID)
n requested resources are exceeded
Clearing Gates
PacketCable gate information can be displayed using the show packet-cable gate
command, which provides the information necessary to clear them.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show packet-cable gate command.
Use the following commands, in Privileged EXEC mode, to clear PacketCable gate
information:
n Use the clear packet-cable gate identifier command to clear the specified Gate
ID:
MOT:7A#clear packet-cable gate identifier <0x0 - 0xffffffff>
where:
0x0-0xffffffff is the specified hexidecimal number for the Gate ID.
For example:
MOT:7A#clear packet-cable gate identifier 0x6bde0001
n Use the clear packet-cable gate all command to clear all gates:
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n Use the clear packet-cable gate cops command to clear all gates for a COPS
Client handle:
MOT:7A#clear packet-cable gate cops <0-99>
where:
0-99 specifies the specific COPS Client handle.
n Use the clear packet-cable gate slot command to clear all gates associated with a
specified BSR slot number:
MOT:7A#clear packet-cable gate slot <NUM>
where:
NUM specifies the specific BSR slot number.
n Use the clear packet-cable gate subscriber command to clear a gate associated
with a specified subscriber (MTA or Client) IP address:
MOT:7A#clear packet-cable gate subscriber <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D specifies the subscriber IP address.
n Use the clear packet-cable gate dqos command to clear all DQoS gates.
n Use the clear packet-cable gate mm command to clear all Multimedia gates.
Clearing PacketCable Statistics
PacketCable statistics can be displayed using the show packet-cable gate command,
which provides the information necessary to clear them.
Use the following commands in Privileged EXEC mode to clear PacketCable
statistics:
n Use the clear packet-cable statistics em command to clear event message
statistics.
n Use the clear packet-cable statistics gate command to clear gate statistics for all
COPS connections.
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n Use the clear counters ipsec command to clear the statistic counters displayed in
the output of the show ipsec commands.
Clearing PacketCable Configuration
Use the following command options in PacketCable Configuration mode to clear
PacketCable configuration(s):
n Use the clear configuration cops command to set all COPS configuration
parameters to default values.
n Use the clear configuration dqos command to set all DQoS configuration
parameters to default values.
n Use the clear configuration em command to set all event message configuration
parameters to default values.
n Use the clear configuration mm command to set all PacketCable Multimedia
configuration parameters to default values.
Note: Refer to Configuring Electronic Surveillance on page 15-23, for more
information on clearing PacketCable statistics for electronic surveillance.
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16
Configuring DSG
Introduction
This chapter describes the tasks required to configure Out-Of-Band (OOB) messaging
between a Set-top Controller and customer premises equipment (CPEs) using the
DOCSIS Digital Set-top Gateway (DSG) protocol. Typical out-of-band cable services
include conditional access (CA), electronic program guide (EPG), emergency alert
services (EAS).
DSG allows the BSR CMTS to provide OOB cable services over a DOCSIS network.
DSG merges both set-top box and DOCSIS operations into a single, open network
without having to re-configure their existing network or cable modems. DSG uses the
concept of DSG tunnels which are logical interfaces that are used to encapsulate
various packet types and send them over a created link between two devices at remote
points on the network.
DSG provides a distinct advantage over traditional OOB cable services which use
proprietary protocols over a dedicated channel to provide network management of
customer CPEs (Set Top Boxes (STBs) or Set Top Devices (STDs) The traditional
OOB model hinders MSO flexibility through the use of proprietary application
servers and STDs which limit both upstream bandwidth and scalability for future
interactive services.
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A DSG network consists of:
n DSG Clients - the DSG client operates within the STD, is the termination point
of the DSG Tunnel, and receives OOB content from the DSG Server. There may
be more than one DSG Client within a Set-top Device.
n DSG Server - the DSG server is the source of the OOB data and refers to any
server (such as an Application Server or other network attached device) that
provides data that is transported through the DSG tunnel data to the DSG client.
n DSG Agent - the DSG agent is the implementation of the DSG protocol within
the CMTS. The DSG agent creates the DSG Tunnel, places data from the DSG
server into the DSG tunnel, and transmits the DSG tunnel to the DSG client.
The BSR 64000 implements the DSG Agent. The DSG agent performs two main
functions:
n Provisioning of DSG tunnels to service specific DSG clients on the downstream
channels.
n Forwarding the received OOB transmissions into the appropriate DSG tunnel and
delivering it to the DSG clients in the STDs.
DSG configuration consists of classifying the expected service (e.g. EAS -
Emergency Alert Services; EPG - Electronic Program Guide) traffic and configuring
the appropriate parameters to create a DSG tunnel for that service's DSG client. The
BSR CMTS signals groups of DSG tunnels on the downstream channel through a
DOCSIS MAC message or Downstream Channel Descriptor (DCD) at a repeated
interval. STDs parse the DCD to determine if their services (e.g. EAS, EPG, CA) have
a DSG tunnel present on the downstream and how they should receive its content.The
BSR CMTS forwards DSG traffic received from the DSG server into DSG tunnels on
the cable downstream interface(s). DSG has two modes of operation:
n DSG Basic Mode operates without the DCD message in that clients do not listen
to DCD messages. Address assignment is static. The DSG Tunnel Address is
determined by the DSG Client and set by the DSG Agent through
configuration. This mode provides backwards compatibility with earlier
versions of the DSG specification.
n DSG Advanced Mode operates with the DCD message in that clients listen to
DCD messages. Address assignment is dynamic. The DSG Tunnel Address is
determined by the DSG Agent and learned by the DSG Client in the DCD
message.
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Prerequisites
The following prerequisite configurations must be completed before configuring any
DSG components:
n IP multicast routing must be enabled.
n The PIM routing protocol must be configured, as follows:
PIM must be enabled.
A PIM network must be designated.
Candidate BSRs must be configured.
Candidate RPs must be configured.
n All HSIM interfaces for PIM operation and all the DSG enabled cable
downstream interfaces must be configured for PIM operation.
Note: On the BSR, the configuration of Basic or Advanced mode is identical.
Note: PIM is a multicast routing protocol that runs over an existing Unicast
(legacy) infrastructure. The DSG specification requires support for legacy
DSG services and support for IP networks that may not support IP multicast.
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DSG Configuration Tasks
Table provides a DSG configuration task summary:
Entering DSG Configuration Mode
DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration Mode allows you to configure or modify
various DSG configurations including channel lists, classifiers, client lists, tunnel
group to channel maps, timers, vendor parameters, and DSG tunnels.
To enter DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration Mode, use the cable dsg command,
from Global Configuration mode, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config)#cable dsg
The prompt changes as follows:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#
Table 16-1 DSG Configuration Task Summary
Task Refer to:
Entering DSG Configuration Mode Entering DSG Configuration Mode
Configuring a Channel List Configuring a Channel List
Configuring a Classifier Configuring a Classifier
Configuring a Timer Configuring a Timer
Configuring a Vendor Parameter Configuring a Vendor Parameter
Configuring a DSG Client Configuring a DSG Client
Configuring a DSG Tunnel Configuring a DSG Tunnel
Configuring a DSG Downstream Channel Configuring a DSG Downstream Channel
Displaying DSG Information Displaying DSG Information
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Initial DSG Configurations
This section provides procedural information on initial DSG configurations
procedures.
The following tasks are described:
n Configuring a Channel List
n Configuring a Classifier
n Configuring a Timer
n Configuring a Vendor Parameter
Configuring a Channel List
This section describes configuring a DSG channel list. A channel list is a list of one or
multiple downstream frequencies that are carrying configured DSG tunnels. The
appropriate DSG channel list will be included in the DCD messages on the associated
downstream channel. The DSG Client uses the channel list to determine which
downstream frequencies have DSG Tunnels present.
Use the channel-list command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration mode, to
create a new channel list or modify an existing channel list, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#channel-list <1-4294967295> channel
<1-4294967295> ds-freq <91000000-857000000>
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a channel list index.
channel 1-4294967295 specifies a channel index.
ds-freq 91000000-857000000 specifies the downstream channel frequency in
Hz.
Use the no channel-list delete command to delete a channel list.
Note: Configuring a DSG channel list is optional. A DSG channel list provides
a faster means of searching for DSG Tunnels but is not a mandatory
configuration.
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Configuring a Classifier
This section describes configuring a DSG classifier. A classifier specifies layer 3 and
layer 4 filtering which will be applied to DSG tunnel traffic. DSG Classifiers may be
specified in the DSG Agent and can be sent as a component of the DSG Address
Table in the DCD Message.
Use the classifier command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration mode, to
create a new classifier or modify an existing classifier, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#classifier <1-65535> {destination <A.B.C.D> |
destination-port <0-65535> <0-65535> | include-in-dcd | priority <0-255> | source
<A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D>}
where:
1-65535 is the classifier number.
destination A.B.C.D is the destination IP address to be matched for this classifier.
destination-port 0-65535 0-65535 is the low and high end destination port range
to be matched for this classifier.
include-in-dcd specifies the inclusion of this DSG classifier in DCD messages.
priority 0-255 is the priority of this classifier. The default value of 0 indicates the
lowest priority.
source A.B.C.D A.B.C.D is the IP address and network mask of the DSG server.
Use the no classifier command to delete a classifier.
Note: Specifying a destination IP address is required for the operation of this
DSG classifier.
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Configuring a Timer
This section describes configuring a DSG timer. Four specific DSG timeout timers
can be sent to DSG clients through a DCD message. Each downstream channel is
mapped to only one set of timers.
Use the timer command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration mode, to create
a new timer or modify an existing timer, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#timer <1-4294967295> {dsg1 <1-65535> | dsg2
<1-65535> | dsg3 <1-65535> | dsg4 <1-65535>}
where:
1-4294967295 is the timer group number.
dsg1 is the initialization timeout. This is the timeout period for DSG packets
during the initialization of the DSG client.
dsg2 is the operational timeout. This is the timeout period for DSG packets
during the normal operation of the DSG client.
dsg3 is the two-way retry timer. This is the retry timer that determines when the
DSG client attempts to reconnect with the DSG Agent and establish two-way
connectivity. A value of 0 indicates that the DSG client will continuously retry
two-way operation.
dsg4 is the one-way retry timer. The retry timer that determines when the DSG
client attempts to rescan for a DOCSIS downstream channel that contains DSG
packets after a dsg1 or dsg2 timeout. A value of 0 indicates that the DSG client
will immediately begin scanning upon a dsg1 or dsg2 timeout.
1-65535 is the timer value in seconds.
Use the timer delete command to delete a timer group.
Note: Configuring a DSG timer is optional.
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Configuring a Vendor Parameter
This section describes configuring a DSG vendor parameter. A vendor parameter
allows a vendor to send vendor specific parameters.
Use the vendor-param command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration mode,
to create a new vendor parameter or modify an existing vendor parameter, as shown
below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#vendor-param <1-4294967295> vendor
<1-4294967295> oui <line> value <octet string>
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a vendor parameter index.
vendor 1-4294967295 specifies a vendor index.
oui line specifies a vendor assigned Organization Unique Id (OUI) which is three
bytes of an octet string (e.g. aa056b).
value octet-string specifies a vendor value string of up to 50 characters.
Use the no vendor-param delete command to delete a vendor parameter.
Configuring a DSG Client
A DSG client terminates the DSG tunnel and receives transmission from the CMTS.
There may be more than one DSG Client within a set-top device. Configuring a DSG
client involves specifying the matching parameters for the DSG clients for which the
DSG rules applies.
A DSG client ID uniquely identifies each DSG client. The DSG client ID is unique
per DSG client but is not unique per set-top device as the same DSG client which
provides the same function may exist in multiple set-top devices.
In DSG Advanced Mode, the DSG client ID can be a 6 byte MAC address or may
additionally be a 2 byte Application ID, a 2 byte CA_system_ID, or a broadcast ID.
The set-top device has a fixed MAC address that must be matched by the DSG tunnel.
Use the client-list command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration mode, to
create a new DSG client list or modify an existing DSG client list, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#client-list <1-4294967295> client-id <1-4294967295>
{application-id <line> | broadcast [<1-4>] | ca-id <line> | mac-address <mac> |
vendor-param <1-4294967295>}
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where:
1-4294967295 is the client list number.
client-id 1-4294967295 is the client identifier.
application-id line specifies an application ID in 2-byte hex string (e.g. 12ab).
This indicates a numeric ID for an application running on the set-top device.
broadcast 1-4 specifies the broadcast ID which identifies what types of data
streams are provided through the Broadcast Tunnel.
where:
1 = contains SCTE-65 [SCTE-65] delivery as defined in Annex D
2 = contains SCTE-18 [SCTE-18]delivery as defined in Annex D
3 = contains OCAP Object Carousel [OC-SP-OCAP1.0
4 = contains OpenCable Common Download Carousel
ca-id line specifies a CA ID in 2-byte hex string (e.g. 12ab). This indicates the
type of CA system applicable for the associated embedded cable modem (ECM)
streams.
mac-address mac specifies a DSG client MAC address in the form of
xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.This refers to the MAC address of the DSG Client within
the set-top device.
vendor-param 1-4294967295 is the index of the vendor parameter list specifying
the vendor specific DSG parameters.
Use the no client-list command to delete a DSG client.
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Configuring a DSG Tunnel
A DSG Tunnel is a dedicated channel for transmitting DSG data from the CMTS to
the Set-top Devices. In DSG Basic Mode, a DSG tunnel is only identified by its DSG
tunnel address. In DSG Advanced Mode, a DSG tunnel can be identified by its DSG
Tunnel Address or a combination of the DSG tunnel address and other DSG Rule
parameters such as UCID range, Classifier IP addresses, and TCP port numbers.
This section describes the following tasks:
n Specifying Tunnel Parameters
n Configuring a Tunnel Group
Specifying Tunnel Parameters
Use the tunnel command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration mode, to create
a new DSG tunnel or modify an existing DSG tunnel, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#tunnel <1-4294967295> {classifier <1-65535> |
client-list <1-4294967295> | mac-address <mac> | service-class <WORD>}
where:
1-4294967295 specifies the DSG tunnel number.
classifier 1-65535 specifies a classifier number for this DSG tunnel.
client-list 1-4294967295 specifies a client list number for this DSG tunnel.
mac-address mac specifies a DSG tunnel MAC address in the form of
xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
service-class WORD specifies a Service Class name.
Use the no tunnel command to delete a DSG tunnel.
Note: A DSG tunnel with a minimum specification of classifier, client-list,
and mac-address must be configured before the configuration of a DSG
tunnel group.
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Configuring a Tunnel Group
Pre-configured DSG tunnels must be configured as a group of tunnels. This tunnel
group can then be associated to one or more downstream channels.
Use the tunnel tunnel-group command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway Configuration
mode, to create a tunnel group or modify an existing tunnel group, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#tunnel <1-4294967295> tunnel-group
<1-4294967295>
where:
1-4294967295 specifies the DSG tunnel number.
1-4294967295 specifies the DSG tunnel group number.
Configuring a DSG Downstream Channel
Configuring a downstream channel for DSG operation involves the following
procedures:
n Enabling/disabling DSG DCD messages on a downstream cable interface.
n Mapping/un-mapping a group of DSG tunnels to a downstream cable interface.
n Associating/disassociating a channel list with a downstream cable interface.
n Associating/disassociating DSG timers with a downstream cable interface.
n Associating/disassociating DSG vendor parameters with a downstream cable
interface.
This section describes the following:
n DCD Messages
n Associating Tunnel Groups to a Downstream Channel
n Additional Configuration
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DCD Messages
DSG Downstream Channel Descriptor (DCD) messages contain a group of DSG
Rules and DSG Classifiers. This collection of DSG Rules and DSG Classifiers in the
DCD message is known as the DSG Address Table.
A DSG Rule within the DSG Address Table assigns a DSG client ID to a DSG tunnel
address. A DSG classifier specifies layer 3 and layer 4 filtering which will be applied
to DSG tunnel traffic.
Use the cable downstream dsg enable command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to disable or enable DCD messages on a downstream channel, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> dsg enable
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> dsg enable
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
Associating Tunnel Groups to a Downstream Channel
Tunnel groups can be associated to one or more downstream channels by creating a
DSG group map. A DSG group map contains the downstream port number, DSG rule
priority, UCID range, tunnel group, and vendor parameter identifications. At least one
tunnel has to be configured before a tunnel group can be mapped to a downstream
channel through a group map.
Use the group-map tunnel-group command, in DOCSIS Set-top Gateway
Configuration mode, to associate a tunnel group to one or more downstream channels,
as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-dsg:)#group-map <1-4294967295> tunnel-group
<1-4294967295> {interface cable <X/Y> downstream <NUM> | priority <0-255> |
ucid <1-255> [<1-255>...] | vendor-param <1-4294967295>}
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a group map number.
tunnel-group 1-4294967295 specifies the tunnel group number.
Note: DCD messages are enabled by default.
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interface cable X/Y downstream
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the CMTS module.
NUM is the downstream port number.
priority 0-255 specifies a DSG rule priority level. DSG rule priority determines
the order of which the channel and its associated UCIDs should be applied by the
DSG client.
ucid 1-255 is the upstream channel ID (UCID) for which the DSG rule applies.
vendor-param 1-4294967295 is the index of the vendor parameter list specifying
the vendor specific DSG parameters.
Use the no group-map command to delete a DSG group map.
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Additional Configuration
Channel lists, timers, and vendor parameters can also be associated with a
downstream channel.
n Use the cable downstream dsg channel-list command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to associate a channel list to a downstream cable channel, as
shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> dsg channel-list
<1-4294967295>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
1-4294967295 is the channel list index.
n Use the cable downstream dsg timer command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to associate a timer group to a downstream cable channel, as
shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> dsg timer
<1-4294967295>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number.
1-4294967295 is the timer index.
n Use the cable downstream dsg vendor-param command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to associate a vendor parameter list to a downstream cable
channel, as shown below:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> dsg vendor-param
<1-4294967295>
where:
NUM is the downstream port number (default=0).
1-4294967295 is the vendor parameter index.
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Displaying DSG Information
The show cable dsg command displays all DSG configuration information provided
with the following show commands:
n show cable dsg channel-list
n show cable dsg classifier
n show cable dsg client-list
n show cable dsg downstream
n show cable dsg group-map
n show cable dsg timer
n show cable dsg tunnel
n show cable dsg tunnel-group
n show cable dsg vendor-param
Additionally, the show cable dsg command displays tunnel group associations to one
or more downstream channels.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg command and tunnel group associations to one or more
downstream channels.
The show cable dsg channel-list command displays DSG channel list configuration
information.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg channel-list [<1-4294967295> {channel
<1-4294967295>}]
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a channel list index.
channel 1-4294967295 specifies a channel index.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg channel-list command.
The show cable dsg classifier command displays DSG classifier configuration
information.
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MOT:7A# show cable dsg classifier [<1-65535>]
where:
1-65535 specifies a classifier number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg classifier command.
The show cable dsg client-list command displays DSG client list information.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg client-list [<1-4294967295> {client-id
<1-4294967295>}]
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a client list number.
client-id 1-4294967295 specifies a client identifying number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg client-list command.
The show cable dsg downstream command displays DSG downstream channel
configuration information.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg downstream
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg downstream command.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg group-map [<1-4294967295>]
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a group map number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg group-map command.
The show cable dsg timer command displays DSG timer configuration information.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg timer [<1-4294967295>]
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a timer index.
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Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg timer command.
The show cable dsg tunnel command displays DSG tunnel configuration
information.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg tunnel [<1-4294967295>]
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a tunnel number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg tunnel command.
The show cable dsg tunnel-group command displays DSG tunnel group information.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg tunnel-group [<1-4294967295>]
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a tunnel group number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg tunnel-group command.
The show cable dsg vendor-param command displays DSG vendor parameter
configuration information.
MOT:7A# show cable dsg vendor-param [<1-4294967295>]
where:
1-4294967295 specifies a vendor parameter group number
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable dsg vendor-param command.
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17
Configuring VLAN Tagging
Introduction
The BSR 64000 normally acts as an IP router, forwarding only IP packets at ISO layer
3 between Customer Premises Equipment (CPEs) attached to DOCSIS cable modems
and a network port of the BSR 64000. The VLAN Tagging feature of the BSR
introduces the concept of bridging CPE Ethernet packets at ISO layer 2 onto a
particular Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) appearing on a BSR Gigabit Ethernet
interface. The VLAN Tagging feature allows cable operators to offer "transparent
LAN service (TLS)" or "Layer 2 Virtual Private Network" to their business enterprise
customers while at the same time continuing to offer Internet access via IP routing to
their household subscribers.
The VLAN Tagging feature bridges packets in a point-to-point manner from one cable
modem to one IEEE 802.1Q VLAN. VLAN Tagging allows the BSR to forward
traffic received from CPEs to a uniquely numbered VLAN using 802.1Q
industry-standard trunking encapsulation. A layer 2 switch is required to bridge layer
2 traffic between the cable modem bridged VLANs. The BSR Gigabit Ethernet port
used to forward traffic is called a "trunk port." Trunk ports carry the traffic of multiple
VLANs over a single link and can extend a VLAN across an entire network. The BSR
64000 supports VLAN-tagged bridging and routing IP traffic on the same trunk port.
The routed IP traffic may configured to be tagged or untagged.
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VLAN tagging represents a major business opportunity for cable operators. Many
businesses with multiple branches in the cable operators region interconnect their
branches to their main office using technologies such as Frame Relay connections.
These Frame Relay connections typically provide Layer 2 bridged Ethernet
connectivity between the branch office and the main office. MSOs can offer VLAN
tagging over cable modems as a cost-effective alternative to more expensive
connections such as Frame Relay.
Frame Relay connections typically cost in the hundreds of US dollars per month while
consumer broadband service typically costs a few tens of US dollars per month.
Accordingly, cable operators can provide the same layer 2 connectivity as Frame
Relay with a layer 2 TLS service offering to businesses that has significantly higher
revenue per month than consumer service but is still much cheaper to the
multi-branch enterprise customer themselves.
The diagram in Figure 1-1 depicts a typical TLS deployment:
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Figure 17-1 Transparent LAN Service
The home subscribers of the cable operator continue to have all packets routed
through an Internet router to the Internet. A business enterprise customer A, however,
has all packets connected to a CM on BSR1 bridged through the operators backbone
to the customers main office via a CM connected to BSR 2. The customer's main
office may also be directly connected to the Layer 2/3 backbone of the cable operator.
This is transparent LAN service provided to customer A.
Layer 2/3 Backbone
Internet Router
Internet
BSR 1
L2/L3 Switch
BSR 2
L2/L3 Switch
CM CM
CM
CM
CM
Customer A
Branch
Customer A
Main Office
Home
Subscribers
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With the VLAN tagging feature, each enterprise requires a "per-enterprise" VLAN
implemented on the L2/L3 backbone. In addition, each cable modem configured for
bridging requires a unique "per-CM" VLAN on the connection between the L2/L3
switch and the BSR. The L2/L3 switch performs inter-VLAN bridging of the per-CM
VLANs together into the per-enterprise VLAN. The Gigabit Ethernet connection
between the L2/L3 switch and the BSR is configured as an IEEE 802.1Q "trunk"
mode port, which tags all Ethernet packets with a particular VLAN number.
When the BSR forwards bridged packets to the L2/L3 switch, it always indicates a
particular VLAN for the bridged packet using 802.1Q tags. When the BSR forwards
an IP routed packet, however, it may or may not be tagged, depending on BSR
configuration.
VLAN Tagging Packet Formats
On the BSR Gigabit Ethernet interface, separate VLANs are identified with a tag as
defined by the IEEE 802.1Q standard.
The IEEE 802.1Q standard defines a format for adding 4 additional bytes to Ethernet
packets to identify the packet as belonging to a particular VLAN. The original
two-byte Ethernet Type field is replaced by the special type code 0x8100, followed by
a 16-bit VLAN ID tag. The VLAN ID Tag field contains 12 bits that define the VLAN
ID number for the packet. The three 802.1Q priority bits in the VLAN ID Tag field
are ignored on reception and set to the DOCSIS service flow traffic priority value on
transmission out of a trunk port. The original Ethertype field then follows the VLAN
ID field. The operation of 802.1Q tagging is depicted In Figure 1-2.
Figure 17-2 IEEE 802.1Q VLAN Tagging
Original CPE Ethernet Packet
IEEE 802.1Q VLAN Tagged Ethernet Packet
DA(6) SA(6) Original
Type (2)
Data (1500
bytes maximum)
DA(6) SA(6) 0x8100 VLAN ID
Tag (2)
Original
Type (2)
Data (1500
bytes maximum)
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This chapter describes the following:
n Enabling VLAN Tagging
n Configuring VLAN Tagged Bridging
n Configuring VLAN Tagged Routing
n Configuring the External L2/L3 Switch
n Configuring Cable Privacy Mandatory
n Bridging Packet Sizes
n Displaying VLAN Tagging Statistics
n Clearing VLAN Tagging Statistics
Enabling VLAN Tagging
Follow these steps to designate a network interface as a bridge trunk port and enable
VLAN tagging:
1. Use the interface gigaether command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter
Interface Configuration Mode for the Gigabit Ethernet interface, for example:
MOT(config)#interface gigaether <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the Gigabit Ethernet slot and port number.
2. Use the bridge mode trunk command to enable VLAN tagging for the network
port.
MOT(config-if)#bridge mode trunk
This configures the port to tag all layer 2 forwarded traffic and as a possible trunk
port. By default, all IP layer 3 routed traffic on the trunk is transmitted and
received untagged.
Note: VLAN tagging is only supported on Gigabit Ethernet HSIM modules.
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Enabling VLAN Tagging on Multiple Ports
The BSR 64000 also supports the configuration of VLAN tagging on multiple
network ports with the bridge mode trunk command. If VLAN tagging is enabled on
more than one port, the BSR selects exactly one port to forward VLAN tagged data. If
the selected bridge trunk port fails, the BSR automatically switches VLAN tagged
traffic to another enabled "bridge mode trunk" port.
To control the priority with which the BSR selects a bridge trunk port, an optional
priority argument may be configured.
Use the bridge mode trunk command, in Interface Configuration Mode for the
Gigabit Ethernet interface, to enable the optional priority argument, as follows:
MOT(config-if)#bridge mode trunk <0-255>
where:
0-255 is the priority value of the port.
The BSR will always select the highest numbered available port for VLAN Tagged
traffic forwarding. If a priority value is not specified for a "bridge mode trunk" port,
the default priority value is 128.
Configuring VLAN Tagged Bridging
With the introduction of the VLAN tagging features, cable modems may now be
configured to operate with the BSR as "bridging" CMs, so that the BSR will bridge
their CPE traffic. Any modem not configured as a "bridging" CM will be considered
to be a normal "routing" CM, where the BSR routes the IP traffic from its CPE.
There are two methods of designating a bridging CM:
n Through a CM configuration file TLV parameter.
n Through the BSR Command Line Interface.
With the VLAN Tagging feature, only one bridging CM can be configured for each
VLAN. All downstream packets received on the "trunk mode" Gigabit Ethernet port
of the BSR are examined for VLAN tags. If a VLAN tag is present, the packet may be
bridged or routed depending on the tag value. If a VLAN tag is not present, the packet
will always be routed.
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The BSR 64000 supports bridging of traffic received from CPEs behind a
PacketCable Embedded Multimedia Terminal Adapter (eMTA) which is registered as
a bridging modem. Network traffic originating from the eMTA will be routed while
traffic from the CPE will be bridged from the same eMTA device. The BSR identifies
the traffic originating from an eMTA device based on the source MAC address of
Ethernet frames received from it. The MAC address is extracted from the eMTAs
DHCP packets. To distinguish DHCP packets received from an eMTA device, Option
60 must be enabled with the Vendor Class ID set to "pktc1.0".
Specifying a Bridging Cable Modem through a Bridge Mode
TLV
Motorola supports a Bridge Mode TLV, in a cable modems configuration file, that
associates the cable modems traffic to a specified VLAN by specifying the cable
modem as the Bridging CM. The format of the Bridge Mode TLV is as follows:
Note: Baseline Privacy Interface (BPI) should be configured for all CMs
enabled for bridging. Otherwise, downstream bridged multicasts and
broadcasts will be received by all subscriber CMs, not just the bridging CM.
See Configuring Cable Privacy Mandatory for more information.
Motorola vendor-specific TLV
Type = 43
Length = 15
Subtype=8
Length=3
Value=0x08003E
Subtype = 3
Length = 9
Value = vlan:<VLAN identifying number>
ASCI string with "vlan:"



followed by the decimal (2-4094)
number of the VLAN to which
the CM is bridged.
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The Bridge Mode TLV is received by the BSR when the cable modem makes a
registration request.
Specifying a Bridging Cable Modem through the CLI
The Command Line Interface (CLI) can be used to associate a cable modems traffic
to a specified VLAN by specifying the cable modem as the Bridging CM. Follow
these steps to specify a cable modem as the Bridging CM:
1. Use the bridge cable modem command to associate a particular cable modems
traffic to a specified VLAN, as follows:
Note: Any VLAN association specified in the Bridge Mode TLV can be
overridden with the bridge cable modem command. See Specifying a
Bridging Cable Modem through the CLI.
The Motorola Bridge Mode TLV is supported by all DOCSIS standard cable
modems. A bridging cable modem need not be manufactured by Motorola.
An MSO must change the total length and subtype 3 length values specified
in the TLV file based on the number of characters in the files VLAN Value
field. The VLAN Value field can be from 6-9 characters.
Using the TLV to define the VLAN ID will require that every cable modem
have a unique TLV file. The BSR disallows registration of a modem bridging
to a VLAN when another modem on the same CMTS is already registered as
bridging to that VLAN. The BSR disallows registration of a cable modem
bridging to a VLAN when that VLAN is already configured on the a tagged
routing interface. Although the BSR does not disallow registration of CMs on
different CMTSs with the same bridging VLAN, operation is unspecified. This
is considered a misconfiguration and is indicated in the output of the show
bridge vlan command.
VLAN ID 1 is reserved for use by the attached Layer 2 switch/router for
management purposes and as the default "native" VLAN for that equipment.
VLAN ID 1 may not be configured on the BSR for cable modem Layer 2
bridging.
The same VLAN ID value cannot be configured for both a bridging CM and a
tagged router interface
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MOT(config)#bridge cable modem <mac> <2-4094>
where:
mac is the cable modems MAC Address in the form xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
2-4094 is the VLAN ID number.
2. Use the no bridge cable modem command to remove a particular cable modem
from a specified VLAN, as follows:
MOT(config)#no bridge cable modem <mac> <2-4094>
Configuring VLAN Stacking on a Bridging Cable Modem
VLAN stacking enables the transport of traffic from multiple VLANs by
encapsulating one VLANs traffic within another VLAN. VLAN stacking allows the
BSR to receive and forward stacked VLAN traffic. VLAN stacking is enabled or
disabled on a per cable modem basis to control whether CPE traffic may be tagged
with an inner or stacked VLAN tag by a particular bridging CM. The "outer" or MSO
VLAN tag is added by the BSR. CPE and MSO VLAN tags can co-exist in a single
packet. The BSR does not look at the CPE VLAN tag for any information. Without
VLAN stacking enabled, the BSR does not forward stacked VLAN traffic.
Note: The BSR ignores a VLAN TLV received in the registration request from
a cable modem, if VLAN mapping is already established for that cable
modem with the bridge cable modem command.
VLAN Tagging requires that each bridging cable modem be assigned to a
different VLAN number. An external L2 switch is required to bridge layer 2
traffic between the cable modem bridged VLANs.
VLAN ID 1 is reserved for use by the attached Layer 2 switch/router for
management purposes and as the default "native" VLAN for that equipment.
VLAN ID 1 may not be configured on the BSR for cable modem Layer 2
bridging.
The same VLAN ID value cannot be configured for both a bridging CM and a
tagged router interface
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Enabling VLAN Stacking through an Enhanced Bridge Mode
TLV
Motorola provides a proprietary enhanced Bridge Mode TLV, in a cable modems
configuration file, that enables VLAN stacking for the corresponding cable modem.
The format of the enhanced Bridge Mode TLV is as follows:
Enabling VLAN Stacking through the CLI
The Command Line Interface (CLI) can be used to enable or disable VLAN stacking.
1. Use the bridge cable modem command, in Global Configuration Mode, to
enable VLAN stacking for a particular cable modem, as follows:
MOT(config)#bridge cable modem <mac> <2-4094> stackable
where:
mac is the cable modems MAC Address in the form xxxx.xxxx.xxxx.
Note: An MSO must change the total length and subtype 3 length values
specified in the TLV file based on the number of characters in the files VLAN
Value field. The VLAN Value field can be from 16-19 characters.
Motorola vendor-specific TLV
Type = 43
Length = 26
Subtype=8
Length=3
Value=0x08003E
Subtype = 3
Length = 19
Value = vlan:<VLAN identifying number> stackable"
Indicates that



VLAN stacking is enabled.
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2-4094 is the VLAN ID number.
stackable enables VLAN stacking.
2. Use the no bridge cable modem command to disable VLAN stacking for a
particular cable modem, as follows:
MOT(config)#no bridge cable modem <mac> <2-4094> stackable
Configuring VLAN Tagged Routing
When VLAN tagging is enabled on a network interface with the bridge mode trunk
command, the port still performs layer 3 routing of untagged packets. Some layer 2
switches do not support the concept of a "native" or untagged VLAN for such layer 3
IP packet forwarding to the BSR. For this reason, the BSR allows one of the 802.1Q
VLANs to be configured as the (single) VLAN on which the BSR performs layer 3
routing on a "bridge mode trunk" port. This feature is called "Tagged Routing."
To configure tagged routing on the BSR, do the following:
1. Use the interface gigaether command to navigate to the BSRs Gigabit Ethernet
interface, as follows:
MOT(config)# interface gigaether <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the Gigabit Ethernet slot and port number.
2. If not already configured, use the ip address command to define a router
interface on the port:
Note: VLAN ID 1 is reserved for use by the attached Layer 2 switch/router for
management purposes and as the default "native" VLAN for that equipment.
VLAN ID 1 may not be configured on the BSR for cable modem Layer 2
bridging.
Note: The same VLAN ID value cannot be configured for both a bridging CM
and a tagged router interface.
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MOT(config-if)# ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP host address of the interface.
A.B.C.D is the network mask.
3. Use the encapsulation dot1q command to configure a routed VLAN on the
BSRs Gigabit Ethernet interface, as follows:
MOT(config-if)#encapsulation dot1q <1-4094>
where:
1-4094 specifies the VLAN ID for routed traffic.
Configuring the External L2/L3 Switch
The VLAN tagging feature of the BSR performs point-to-point forwarding from one
CM to one IEEE 802.1Q VLAN. When CPE traffic from multiple cable modems
belonging to the same enterprise customer must be bridged together, an L2 switch
external to the BSR must perform "inter-VLAN" bridging of the different "per-CM"
VLANs into a single "per-Customer" VLAN.
One way to perform inter-VLAN bridging is to configure a sub-interface in the
external L2 switch for each per-CM VLAN, and then bridge each of the sub-interfaces
to the same bridge group. An example of this is depicted below.
In this example, the external Cisco router is configured to connect to the BSR with the
following configuration:
interface Ethernet 0/0.1
encapsulation dot1q 17
bridge group 100
interface Ethernet 0/0.2
encapsulation dot1q 18
bridge group 100
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Configuring Cable Privacy Mandatory
The cable privacy mandatory feature allows a cable operator to enable the encryption
of all routed broadcasts and routed unmapped multicast traffic. Cable privacy
mandatory encrypts otherwise unencrypted downstream routed non-unicasts and only
gives the key to decrypt these messages to routing cable modems. Bridging cable
modems will discard all downstream routed broadcasts or routed multicasts.
Use the cable privacy mandatory command, in Global Configuration or Cable
Interface Configuration Mode, to allow the encryption of all routed broadcasts and
routed unmapped multicast traffic, as follows:
MOT(config)#cable privacy mandatory
Bridging Packet Sizes
The VLAN Tagging feature will accept upstream Ethernet packets from CPEs up to a
maximum size of 1522 bytes from start of the Destination Address to the end of FCS.
A maximum size Ethernet packet with a single "inner" 802.1Q tag added by the
customer CPE is supported. When such packets are bridged onto the trunk mode
network port, the BSR adds an "outer" 802.1Q tag with the configured VLAN for the
CM, increasing the maximum packet size to 1526 bytes. VLAN stacking must be
enabled for this feature to work.
Note: The cable privacy mandatory feature requires that all cable modems
have BPI enabled in order to register. If a cable modem does not have BPI
enabled and cable privacy mandatory is turned on, the cable modem will not
be able to register.
With cable privacy mandatory enabled, routed broadcasts are not received by
VLAN tagging cable modems. Therefore, VLAN tagging cable modems will
not be able to respond to broadcast pings.
Warning: After enabling the cable privacy mandatory feature, the cable
operator must issue the clear cable modem all reset command to
re-register all cable modems and allow non-unicast traffic (including ARPs) to
function correctly.
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Likewise, in the downstream direction, the BSR accepts a maximum packet size of
1526 bytes, and will forward a maximum size packet of 1522 bytes to the bridging
CM.
Displaying VLAN Tagging Statistics
Use the show bridge vlan command to display the bridging cable modem MAC
addresses for all VLANS or a specific VLAN, as follows:
MOT#show bridge vlan [<2-4094>]
where:
2-4094 is the VLAN ID of the bridging CM. If omitted, all VLANs are displayed.
The following is typical screen output from the show bridge vlan command:
The show bridge vlan counters command displays statistical counters for all VLANs
or a specific VLAN.
Note: Some CMs may not forward 1522 byte packets with a customer
provided "inner" 802.1Q tag, and instead only forward a maximum size
packet of 1518 bytes. VLAN stacking of maximum size Ethernet packets is
not supported on such cable modems.
Selected Network Bridge Port: gigaether 15/2
Vlan CM Stackable
---- -------------- ---------
400 0008.0e10.39be disabled
900 000b.0643.33fc disabled
910 0020.409a.24c8 disabled
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MOT#show bridge vlan [counters [<2-4094>]]
where:
2-4094 is the VLAN ID of the bridging CM to display statistics.
The following is typical screen output from the show bridge vlan counters
command:
Clearing VLAN Tagging Statistics
Use the clear bridge vlan counters command, in Privileged EXEC mode, to clear all
upstream and downstream statistics for all VLANs associated with a VLAN cable
modem. These are the same statistics displayed with the show bridge vlan counters
command.
MOT#clear bridge vlan counters [<2-4094>]
where:
2-4094 is the VLAN ID of the bridging CM to display statistics. If omitted, all
VLANs counters are cleared.
VLAN Upstream Upstream Downstream Downstream
ID Packets Discards Packets Discards
---- -------- ------------- ---------- ----------
2 1234 45 1890 56
3 714 23 922 34
4 50 0 45 0
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Configuring Tagged
Sub-Interfaces
Introduction
This chapter provides information on configuring Tagged Sub-Interfaces (TSIs). The
following topics are discussed:
n TSI Feature Description
n Adding and Removing a Sub-Interface
n Associating an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN ID with a Sub-Interface
n Configuring the Physical Interface to Include Optional 802.1P and 802.1Q Tags
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TSI Feature Description
TSIs can be used to logically divide traffic among various classes of traffic. For
example, if an L2 switch is connected to an HSIM, a single physical interface can be
subdivided to segment different ISPs traffic into different VLANs. The 802.1Q (and
optionally 802.1P) tagged packets coming from the HSIM can be used by upstream
router/switches to provide different forwarding treatment and optional Layer 2 QoS.
TSIs can also be used to make an HSIM physical interface part of multiple VPNs. By
accepting VLAN tagged packets for some interfaces, and untagged packets for other
interfaces (based on user configuration), TSIs can be combined with VLAN tagging
to allow a single physical link to transport logically separated routing and bridging
traffic.
The BSR performs 802.1P marking of egress (outgoing) packets using route-maps
and QoS queues for upstream traffic from a cable modem going out a TSI. This is
achieved by configuring a route-map with the QoS queue to be used and the next hop
of the outbound interface, in this case, the TSI. The physical interface (the top-level
interface) corresponding to the TSI configures mapping of the QoS queue, described
in the route-map, to the 802.1P priority bits. Packets from the CMTS are sent to the
TSI via the configured route-map. The VLAN tag and the 802.1P priority bits are
applied to each packet as it is transmitted upstream out of the GIG-E port.
Adding and Removing a Sub-Interface
Up to 31 sub-interfaces are supported, in the range 1-31. In addition to specifying the
slot and port number in the standard X/Y format, the sub-interface number
(represented as N ) must also be specified immediately after the port number, using a
period as a delimiter. To add a sub-interface, do the following:
1. Enter Global Configuration mode.
2. Use the interface gigaether X/Y.N command.
where:
X is the slot number of the Gigabit Interface module.
Y is the port number.
N is the sub-interface number, in the range 1-31.
Example: MOT:7A#(config) interface gigaether 15/0.1
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To remove a sub-interface, do the following:
1. Use the no interface gigaether X/Y.N command from Global Configuration
mode.
Example: MOT:7A#(config) no interface gigaether 15/0.1
Refer to the BSR Command Reference Guide for full command descriptions.
Associating an IEEE 802.1Q VLAN ID with a
Sub-Interface
Each sub-interface is associated with a unique 802.1Q tag, which must be configured
in the sub-interface shell. Perform the following steps to associate an 802.1Q VLAN
ID with a sub-interface:
1. Use the interface gigaether <X/Y.N> command in Global Configuration mode to
specify the slot, port and sub-interface. The sub-interface must be in the range
1-31.
Example: MOT:7A#(config) interface gigaether 15/0.1
2. Use the ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D> command to specify the IP address
and the subnet mask.
Example: MOT:7A#(config-if) ip address 1.1.1.1
255.255.255.0
3. Use the encapsulation dot1q <vlan-id> command to specify the VLAN ID. The
VLAN ID must be in the range 1-4094.
Example: MOT:7A#(config-if) encapsulation dot1q 100
4. Enable the interface with the no shutdown command.
Example: MOT:7A(config-if)# no shutdown
Note: The IEEE 802.1Q VLAN ID cannot be used for TSIs if it is already in
use for the VLAN Tagging feature (bridging) through "bridge cable modem" or
cable modem TLV.
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Configuring the Physical Interface to Include
Optional 802.1P and 802.1Q Tags
A physical interface (the top-level interface, for example 15/0) may be configured as
either a "tagged router interface" (TRI), an "untagged router interface," or neither
(i.e., a tagged sub-interface only).
To configure the physical interface, do the following:
1. Use the interface gigaether <X/Y> command from Global Configuration mode.
Example: MOT:7A(config)#interface gigaether <X/Y>
where:
X is the module slot number with an available Gigabit Ethernet interface.
Y is 0.
2. Optionally, to configure either a tagged router interface or an untagged router
interface, you may use the ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D> command to
specify the IP address and the subnet mask.
Example: MOT:7A#(config-if) ip address 2.2.2.2
255.255.255.0
3. Optionally, to configure a tagged router interface, you may use the encapsulation
dot1q <vlan-id> command to specify the VLAN ID. The VLAN ID must be in
the range 1-4094.
Example: MOT:7A#(config-if) encapsulation dot1q 100
4. Optionally, to configure 802.1P priority bits in tagged router interface and/or
tagged sub-interface outgoing packets, you may use the qos queue <0-7> dot1p
<1-7> command.
Example: MOT:7A#(config-if) qos queue 0 dot1p 0
5. Enable the interface and the configuration change with the no shutdown
command.
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Example: MOT:7A(config-if)# no shutdown
Note: If TRIs and TSIs are configured for the same physical interface,
untagged traffic will be dropped.
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Subscriber Management
Introduction
This chapter provides support, configuration, and command information for the
subscriber management feature:
The BSR supports the CableLabs DOCSIS Subscriber Management MIB (ECN
OSSIv2-05.0215), which extends CMTS filtering capabilities to include embedded
Multimedia Terminal Adapters (eMTAs), embedded Set-top Boxes (eSTBs), and
CableHome portal servers in order to support the DOCSIS Set-top Gateway (DSG)
feature.
In Release 4.2, filter groups were configured on the BSR through the MIB to manage
subscribers. Release 4.2.3 extends this capability so that filter groups can be
configured through the BSR Command Line Interface (CLI).
Creating Filters to Manage Subscribers
Packet Filters and TCP/UDP Filters are used to further identify the multiple Customer
Premises Equipment (CPE) and differentiate the services associated with the cable
modem (CM) to manage subscribers effectively. For example, a cable operator applies
one set of filters so that the CMTS can correctly identify the type of CPE device
behind a CM.
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Creating a Packet Filter Group
Packet filters are applied on the BSR to ensure that packets from CMs and their
respective CPEs go to and from their specified locations. A variety of packet filters
can be applied to a packet filter group. Select from the following packet filter options
in this section:
n Configuring the Source IP Address and Mask
n Configuring the Destination IP Address and Mask
n Configuring the Upper Level Protocol
n Configure the TOS Value and Mask
n Configure the Filter Match Action
n Enabling a Packet Filter
n Displaying the Packet Filter Configuration
n Deleting a Packet Filter
Configuring the Source IP Address and Mask
Use the cable filter group index src-ip command in Global Configuration mode to
configure the source IP address and bit mask, which must match the classified
packets source IP address and bit mask.
MOT:7A(config)#cable filter group <1-32> index <1-64> src-ip <A.B.C.D>
<A.B.C.D>
where:
1-32 is the subscriber management filter group number.
1-64 is the submanagement packet filter number (index).
A.B.C.D is the source IP address.
A.B.C.D is the source IP bit mask.
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Configuring the Destination IP Address and Mask
Use the cable filter group index dst-ip command in Global Configuration mode to
configure the destination IP address and bit mask, which must match the classified
packets destination IP address and bit mask.
MOT:7A(config)#cable filter group <1-32> index <1-64> dst-ip <A.B.C.D>
<A.B.C.D>
where:
1-32 is the subscriber management filter group number.
1-64 is the submanagement packet filter number (index).
A.B.C.D is the destination IP address.
A.B.C.D is the destination IP bit mask.
Configuring the Upper Level Protocol
Each Layer 4 upper level protocol (ULP) has an assigned IP protocol number. ULP IP
protocol numbers are assigned by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority. Click on
the following URL for more information:
http://www.iana.org/assignments/protocol-numbers
Use the cable filter group index ulp command in Global Configuration mode to
configure the ULP, which is to be matched in the classified packet.
MOT:7A(config)#cable filter group <1-32> index <1-64> ulp <0-256>
<A.B.C.D>
where:
1-32 is the subscriber management filter group number.
1-64 is the submanagement packet filter number (index).
0-256 is the ULP number.
Note: If the ULP number is 256, it matches all ULP values.
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Configure the TOS Value and Mask
Use the cable filter group index tos command in Global Configuration mode to
configure the Type of Service (TOS) value and mask, which is to be matched in the
classified packet.
MOT:7A(config)#cable filter group <1-32> index <1-64> tos <0x0-0xff>
<0x0-0xff>
where:
1-32 is the subscriber management filter group number.
1-64 is the submanagement packet filter number (index).
0x0-0xff is the hexadecimal TOS number.
0x0-0xff is the hexadecimal TOS mask.
Configure the Filter Match Action
Use the cable filter group index action command in Global Configuration mode to
configure the action to take when the filter matches.
MOT:7A(config)#cable filter group <1-32> index <1-64> action {accept | drop}
where:
1-32 is the subscriber management filter group number.
1-64 is the submanagement packet filter number (index).
accept accepts the packet for further processing.
drop discards the packet.
Enabling a Packet Filter
Use the cable filter group index enable command in Global Configuration mode to
enable the configured packet filter.
MOT:7A(config)#cable filter group <1-32> index <1-64> enable
where:
1-32 is the subscriber management filter group number.
1-64 is the submanagement packet filter number (index).
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Displaying the Packet Filter Configuration
Use the show cable filter command to display the packet filter configuration.
MOT:7A(config)#show cable filter [group <1-32> [index <1-64>]]
where:
group <1-32> displays the subscriber management filter group number.
index <1-64> displays the submanagement packet filter number (index).
Deleting a Packet Filter
Use the no cable filter group index command in Global Configuration mode to
delete a packet filter.
MOT:7A(config)#no cable filter group <1-32> index <1-64>
where:
1-32 is the subscriber management filter group number.
1-64 is the submanagement packet filter number (index).
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Configuring Filters for TCP or UDP Packet Headers
TCP or UDP packet filters can be applied to a packet filter group. Select from the
following packet filter options in this section:
n Configuring the TCP/UDP Source Port
n Configuring the TCP/UDP Destination Port
n Configuring the TCP Flag Value and Mask
n Enabling the TCP/UDP Packet Filter
n Displaying the TCP/UDP Packet Filter Configuration
n Deleting a TCP/UDP Packet Filter
Configuring the TCP/UDP Source Port
Use the cable tcpudp-filter group index src-port command in Global Configuration
mode to configure the TCP/UDP source port that should be matched in the classified
packet.
MOT:7A(config)#cable tcpudp-filter group <1-32> index <1-64> src-port
<0-65536>
where:
1-32 selects the TCP/UDP packet filter group number.
1-64 selects a packet filter.
0-65536 is the source port to match in the classified packet.
Configuring the TCP/UDP Destination Port
Use the cable tcpudp-filter group index dst-port command in Global Configuration
mode to configure the TCP/UDP destination port that should be matched in the
classified packet.
MOT:7A(config)#cable tcpudp-filter group <1-32> index <1-64> dst-port
<0-65536>
where:
Note: The default source port 65536 matches any value in the TCP or UDP
source field.
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1-32 selects the TCP/UDP packet filter group number.
1-64 selects a packet filter.
0-65536 is the destination port to match in the classified packet.
Configuring the TCP Flag Value and Mask
Use the cable tcpudp-filter group index tcp-flag command in Global Configuration
mode to configure the desired TCP packet header flag value and mask to match in the
classified packet.
MOT:7A(config)#cable tcpudp-filter group <1-32> index <1-64> tcp-flag
<0x0-0x3f> <0x0-0x3f>
where:
1-32 selects the TCP/UDP packet filter group number.
1-64 selects a packet filter.
0x0-0x3f specifies the TCP flag value
0x0-0x3f specifies the TCP flag mask.
Enabling the TCP/UDP Packet Filter
Use the cable tcpudp-filter group index enable command in Global Configuration
mode to enable the configured TCP/UDP packet filter.
MOT:7A(config)#cable tcpudp-filter group <1-32> index <1-64> enable
where:
1-32 is the TCP/UDP packet filter group number.
1-64 is the packet filter.
Note: The default destination port 65536 matches any value in the TCP or
UDP destination field.
Note: The TCP flag value must always be a subset (proper or otherwise) of
the mask field.
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Displaying the TCP/UDP Packet Filter Configuration
Use the show cable tcpudp-filter command to display the TCP/UDP packet filter
configuration.
MOT:7A(config)#show cable tcpudp-filter [group <1-32> [index <1-64>]]
where:
group <1-32> displays a specified TCP/UDP packet filter group.
index <1-64> displays the packet filter.
Deleting a TCP/UDP Packet Filter
Use the no cable tcpudp-filter group index command in Global Configuration
mode to delete a TCP/UDP packet filter.
MOT:7A(config)#no cable tcpudp-filter group <1-32> index <1-64>
where:
1-32 selects the TCP/UDP packet filter group number.
1-64 selects a packet filter.
Configuring Default Packet Filter Group for CMs and CPEs
A default filter group is used when the cable modems (CM) configuration file is sent
upstream from the CM to CMTS and does not specify a particular packet filter group
to use.
Select from the following default packet filter group configurations for CMs and
CPEs:
n Configuring Default Filter Group for a CPE
n Configuring Default Filter Group for a CM
n Configuring the Default Maximum CPEs
n Configuring the Active Default for CPEs
n Configuring the Learnable Default for CPEs
n Displaying the Default Filter Groups and CPE Control Defaults
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Configuring Default Filter Group for a CPE
Use the cable submgmt default filter-group command in Global Configuration
mode to configure the default filter group for traffic applied to or from CPEs
connected to a CM.
MOT:7A(config)#cable submgmt default filter-group {downstream |
upstream} <1-32>
where:
downstream configure the default filter group for a CPE, for traffic going to the
CPE through its connected CM on the downstream from the CMTS.
upstream configure the default filter group for a CPE, for traffic going from the
CPE through its connected CM on the upstream to the CMTS.
1-32 selects the default packet filter group number.
Configuring Default Filter Group for a CM
Use the cable submgmt default filter-group cm command in Global Configuration
mode to configure the default filter group for traffic applied to or from the CM itself.
MOT:7A(config)#cable submgmt default filter-group cm {downstream |
upstream} <1-32>
where:
downstream configure the default filter group for a CM, for traffic going to the
CM on the downstream from the CMTS.
upstream configure the default filter group for a CPE, for traffic going from the
CM on the upstream to the CMTS.
1-32 selects the default packet filter group number.
Configuring the Default Maximum CPEs
Use the cable submgmt default cpe-control max-cpe command in Global
Configuration mode to configure a packet filter for controlling the number of CPEs, if
it is not signaled in the DOCSIS registration request.
MOT:7A(config)#cable submgmt default cpe-control max-cpe <0-1024>
where:
0-1024 selects the default packet filter group number.
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Configuring the Active Default for CPEs
Use the cable submgmt default cpe-control active command in Global
Configuration mode to configure the CPE active default if it is not signaled in the
DOCSIS registration request.
MOT:7A(config)#cable submgmt default cpe-control active {true | false}
where:
true indicates that the CPE is active.
false indicates that the CPE is not active.
Configuring the Learnable Default for CPEs
Sometimes the CMTS does not learn a CPE IP address from the DOCSIS
provisioning entries in a CMs configuration file that is signaled in a DOCSIS
registration request.
Use the cable submgmt default cpe-control learnable command in Global
Configuration mode to configure the default for controlling whether or not a CPE IP
address can be learned.
MOT:7A(config)#cable submgmt default cpe-control learnable {true | false}
where:
true indicates that the CPE IP address can be learned.
false indicates that the CPE IP address cannot be learned.
Displaying the Default Filter Groups and CPE Control Defaults
Use the show cable submgmt cpe-control default command in all modes except
User EXEC mode to display default filter groups and CPE control defaults.
MOT:7A(config)#show cable submgmt cpe-control default
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20
Configuring a Distributed
MAC Domain
Introduction
A Distributed MAC Domain logically binds together upstream channels and
downstream channels from different modules installed in a BSR chassis. A
Distributed MAC Domain is defined on a module containing one or more upstream
channels that binds downstream channels from the same or a different module.
Release 5.2.1 supports up to 10 downstream channels per 2:8 CMTS module in a
distributed MAC Domain. A distributed MAC Domain consists of downstream
channels from a local 2:8 (DOCSIS or EuroDOCSIS) CMTS module and remote
downstream channels on a TX32 module. Support for 10 downstream channels per
2:8 CMTS module allows up to 80 downstream and 64 upstream channels for each
BSR 64000 chassis. Distributed MAC Domains are defined with decoupled CLI
configuration syntax. The Distributed MAC Domain command syntax supports
binding the downstream channels of a 2:8 CMTS module and a TX32 module into a
single logical MAC Domain.
This chapter provides an example of configuring a Distributed MAC Domain between
a 2:8 CMTS module and a TX32 module. Refer to Appendix A for additional
configuration information based on the example depicted in Figure 20-1 on page
20-2.
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In the example topology, the 2:8 CMTS downstream channels are connected through
one port to four fiber nodes; this is called 1:4 splitting. The TX32s RF ports are
also connected through one port to four fiber nodes. In the upstream, two ports are
connected to one fiber node, denoted as 2:1 splitting. This sample configuration and
topology allows one TX32 module to support 32 fiber nodes.
Figure 20-1 Distributed MAC Domain Configuration Example

U5
U7
Fiber Node A
CMTS
2x8
U1
U0
U3
U4
U2
D1
D0
Fiber Node B
Fiber Node C
Fiber Node D
1/8
th
TX32
D0/C0 D0/C1
D0/C2 D0/C3
HSIM4
HSIM4
U6
2x1
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The BSR chassis configuration used in the Distributed MAC Domain configuration
example depicted in Figure 20-1 is shown in the following table:
This chapter discusses the following required procedures needed to configure the
Distributed MAC Domain example:
n MAC Domain Layer 3 Configuration
n Fiber Node Configuration
n MAC Domain Configuration
n TX32 Downstream Port Configuration
Slot Module
0
2:8 CMTS
1
2:8 CMTS
2
2:8 CMTS
3
2:8 CMTS
4
2:8 CMTS
5
2:8 CMTS
6
Spare 2:8
7
SRM4
8
SRM4
9
2:8 CMTS
10
2:8 CMTS
11
<empty>
12
<empty>
13
Primary TX32
14
GigE/Ether-Flex
15
GigE/Ether-Flex
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Downstream Configuration Commands
This section lists the BSR 64000 downstream configuration commands. These
commands allow a user to configure the downstream RF port or channel on the TX32
module and configure the downstream channel on the 2:8 CMTS module. The
following table lists which commands are available for each configuration scenario.
TX32 Downstream
RF Port
TX32 Downstream
Channel
2:8 CMTS Downstream
Channel
cable downstream channel-mode cable downstream carrier-only cable downstream carrier-only
cable downstream description cable downstream channel-id cable downstream channel-id
cable downstream fiber-node cable downstream description cable downstream description
cable downstream
interleave-depth
cable downstream frequency cable downstream fiber-node
cable downstream modulation cable downstream
loadbalance-group
cable downstream frequency
cable downstream power-level cable downstream
primary-capable
cable downstream
interleave-depth
cable downstream scrambler on cable downstream rate-limit
cable downstream
loadbalance-group
cable downstream shutdown cable downstream shutdown
cable downstream shutdown
cable downstream sync-interval cable downstream trap-enable-if
cable downstream power-level
cable downstream
trap-enable-rdn
cable downstream
primary-capable
cable downstream rate-limit
cable downstream scrambler on
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Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide for information on these
commands.
MAC Domain Layer 3 Configuration
Cable bundling allows you to group multiple cable interfaces into a single IP subnet.
This simplifies network management and conserves IP addresses. A cable bundle
comprises two or more cable interfaces: one cable interface is configured as the
master, while the remaining interfaces are configured as slaves to the master. If one
CMTS module is configured as the master, the other CMTS modules can become
slaves. The master cable interface is assigned IP addresses and the slaves share the
same IP addresses with the master. Therefore, the bundling feature eliminates the
need for an IP subnet for each cable interface.
Configuring a loopback interface as a cable bundle master provides a mechanism for
configuring the IP parameters of a cable bundle in a virtual interface which is
independent of physical cable interfaces. The advantage of configuring a virtual
interface as the cable bundle master is that IP configuration information will be
always available regardless of the state of the CMTS hardware. The slave cable
interfaces of a bundle whose master is a virtual interface will not lose their IP
information when the hardware module for one of the cable interfaces has either
failed or been removed.
Creating a Cable Bundle on a Loopback Interface
Follow these steps to configure a cable bundle on a loopback interface:
1. Use the interface loopback command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
loopback interface that you want to designate as the master cable bundle:
MOT:7A(config)#interface loopback <1-255>
where:
1-255 is the loopback interface number for the master cable bundle.
cable downstream
trap-enable-if
cable downstream
trap-enable-rdn
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For example:
MOT:7A(config)#interface loopback 2
2. Use the ip address command in Interface Configuration mode to define an IP
address for the loopback interface:
MOT:7A(config-if)#ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D>
where:
A.B.C.D is the IP address of the BSR interface designated for the loopback
interface and is the primary address used by the cable modem.
A.B.C.D is the subnetwork mask of the IP network, on which the interface is
associated.
3. Use the ip address secondary command in Interface Configuration mode to
optionally configure a secondary IP address for the loopback interface:
MOT:7A(config-if)#ip address <A.B.C.D> <A.B.C.D> secondary
where:
A.B.C.D is the secondary IP address of the BSR interface.
A.B.C.D is the subnetwork mask of the IP network, on which the interface is
associated.
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secondary optionally designates the IP address as a secondary IP address.
Include the keyword secondary after the IP address and subnet mask to
specify additional secondary IP addresses.
4. Use the show running-config command to make sure that DHCP relay is
enabled. Check the command output to see if the IP helper address or cable helper
address is assigned to the master cable loopback interface.
5. If the IP helper address or cable helper address is not configured for the bundle
master cable interface, use the ip helper-address or cable helper-address
command, in Interface Configuration mode. The ip helper-address or cable
helper address specifies the DHCP server.
6. Use the show interfaces loopback command to determine if an IP address is
assigned to the master cable loopback interface:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show interfaces loopback <1-255>
where:
1-255 is the loopback interface number.
7. If the master cable loopback interface does not have IP address, use the ip
address command in Interface Configuration mode to specify the master cable
loopback interface IP address.
Note: The BSR supports 256 secondary IP subnets per CMTS module.The
maximum number of secondary IP subnets that can be configured on the
entire BSR chassis is 1024.
If you are running a BCM 3140-based DOCSIS 2.0 2:8 CMTS module
configured as two 1:4s, the limit is still 256 secondary IP subnets for the
entire 2:8 CMTS module. The total number of secondary IP subnets between
MAC Domain 0 and MAC Domain 1 can only equal 256. Also, if you apply the
same cable bundle to each MAC domain even though the secondary IP
subnets are the same they must be counted twice.
For example, if you have 256 secondary IP subnets in a cable bundle and
you apply that cable bundle to two MAC domains, the total number of
secondary IP subnets would be 512 which exceeds the limit for the DOCSIS
2.0 CMTS module. In this example, there can be no more than 128
secondary IP subnets on the cable bundle.
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8. Use the cable bundle master command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode,
to assign the loopback interface as the master cable interface and assign the
bundle a number:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle <0-255> [master]
where:
0-255 is the number of the cable bundle identifier.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle 1 master
9. Use the show interfaces cable command to make sure that the slave cable
interface does not have an IP address assigned to it:
MOT:7A(config)#show interfaces cable <X/Y>
10. Use the show running-config command to verify the cable bundle configuration
for each loopback interface.
Fiber Node Configuration
In an HFC network, a fiber node represents the point of interface between a fiber
termination and the coaxial distribution. In the BSR configuration, a Fiber Node
reflects the physical connectivity of the cable plant into service areas, in order to
enable channel bonding operation. It is required to assign a name to each fiber node. It
is not required, but recommended to add a description to each fiber node name
configured. The following procedures are described in this section:
n Entering Fiber Node Configuration Mode
n Entering a Description of the Fiber Node
Note: It is required to assign a name to each Fiber Node. It is not required,
but recommended to add a description to each Fiber Node name configured.
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Entering Fiber Node Configuration Mode
Fiber Node Configuration mode allows a user to name and describe a fiber node. To
enter Fiber Node Configuration mode, do the following:
1. Use the cable fiber-node command, in Global Configuration mode, to enter Fiber
Node configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)# cable fiber-node <WORD>
where:
WORD is the fiber node name up to a length of 15 characters.
The command line prompt changes to:
MOT:7A(config-fiber-node:<Fiber Node name>)#
2. Use the end or exit commands to return to Global Configuration mode.
Entering a Description of the Fiber Node
Use the description command, in Fiber Node Configuration mode, to enter a
description of the fiber node:
MOT:7A(config-fiber-node:<Fiber Node name>)description <string>
where:
string is the fiber node description. A maximum of 255 characters can be entered.
The description must be enclosed within double quotes if the description contains
spaces. The description can include any printable ASCII character ( # , \ ! ; ? . &
etc).
For example:
MOT:7A(config-fiber-node:FN-A)description North & East
Downtown
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MAC Domain Configuration
The following procedures are required to configure the MAC domain in the
Distributed MAC Domain configuration example:
n Initial Configuration
n Configuring a Bonding Group
n CMTS 2:8 Downstream Channel Configuration
n CMTS 2:8 Upstream Port Configuration
Initial Configuration
The following procedures are required for the initial configuration of the Distributed
MAC domain in the configuration example:
n Entering a Description of the Distributed MAC Domain
n Associating the Cable Bundle
n Binding the Downstream Channels
Entering Cable Interface Configuration Mode for the 2:8 CMTS
Module
From Global Configuration mode, navigate to Cable Interface Configuration mode for
MAC domain 0 on the 2:8 CMTS module, as follows:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the chassis slot number of an installed 2:8 Primary CMTS module
Y is the number of the MAC domain (e.g. MAC domain 0)
Entering a Description of the Distributed MAC Domain
Use the description command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, to specify
descriptive information for each downstream port. This information is limited to 80
characters. Spaces can be used and are counted as a part of the 80 character limit.
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration file,
and in the display output of various show commands such as the show ip
interface command.
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MOT:7A(config-if)#description <WORD>
where:
WORD is the text that describes the Distributed MAC Domain.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#description Distributed MAC Domain to FN-A,
FN-B, FN-C, and FN-D
Associating the Cable Bundle
Use the cable bundle command, in Interface Configuration mode, to assign this cable
interface as the slave cable interface and assign the bundle the same number as the
bundle master loopback interface configured previously:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable bundle 1
Binding the Downstream Channels
Use the cable bind downstream command to bind the downstream channels for the
Distributed MAC Domain, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)cable bind downstream <NUM>
where:
NUM is a list of local and/or remote downstream channels separated by commas.
Local channels are represented as a single digit channel number. Remote channels
are in the form slot/downstream port number/downstream channel number. No
spaces are allowed in the channel list.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)cable bind downstream 0,1,13/0/0,13/0/1
Use the show cable binding command to display the bind configuration.
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Configuring a Bonding Group
A bonding group is a set of two or more downstream channels that offer multiple
channel through-put to individual bonding cable modems. A bonding group is limited
to two, three, or four downstream channels. Bonding groups are defined within the
context of a MAC domain. However, the downstream channels comprising a bonding
group may span two MAC domains if a bonding domain is configured.
Bonding cable modems ranging and registering on a downstream and upstream
channel pair will be considered to be registered in the MAC domain that contains that
downstream and upstream channel pair. Those cable modems will also belong to the
bonding group configured in that MAC domain. From a forwarding perspective,
downstream packets sent to a bonding modem will be forwarded to the MAC domain/
interface that the bonding modem is registered despite the fact that some of the
packets may transit downstream channels belonging to other MAC domains.
To configure a downstream channel bonding group, do the following:
1. Use the interface cable command in Global Configuration mode to enter the
desired cable interface.
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable <X/Y>
where:
X is the 2:8 CMTS module slot number.
Y is the MAC domain.
For example:
MOT:7A(config)#interface cable 3/0
2. Use the cable downstream bonding-group command to configure a downstream
DOCSIS 3.0 channel bonding group.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream bonding-group <1-65535>
<NUM>
where:
1-65535 is the DOCSIS 3.0 downstream channel bonding group number.
NUM is a list of local and/or remote downstream channels separated by
spaces. Local channels are represented as a single digit channel number.
Remote channels are in the form slot/downstream port number/downstream
channel number. A remote TX32 downstream channel must be bound before
it can be bonded.
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3. Use the cable downstream mot-bonding-group command to configure a
Motorola Proprietary downstream channel bonding group.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream mot-bonding-group <1-65535>
<NUM>
where:
1-65535 is the downstream Motorola proprietary channel bonding group
number.
NUM is a list of local and/or remote downstream channels separated by
spaces. Local channels are represented as a single digit channel number.
Remote channels are in the form slot/downstream port number/downstream
channel number. A remote TX32 downstream channel must be bound before
it can be bonded.
4/[0-7]/[0-3] 9/[0-1] 11/[0-1]
TX32 Module Slot Number/
TX32 Downstream Port Number/
TX32 Downstream Channel Number
2:8 CMTS Module Slot Number/
Downstream Port Number
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4. Use the show cable downstream bonding-groups command to verify that the
channel bonding groups and their downstream channels are enabled and
configured correctly.
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable downstream bonding-groups
2:8 CMTS Downstream Channel Configuration
A CMTS downstream channel is configured to control the data flow from the cable
interface to the users cable modem. The following procedures are used to configure
the 2:8 CMTS downstream channel:
n Entering a Description of the Downstream Channel
n Enabling the Downstream Rate Limit
n Configuring the Downstream Modulation Rate
n Adjusting the Downstream Power Level
n Configuring the Downstream Frequency
n Associating the Fiber Nodes to the Downstream Channel
n Enabling the Downstream Channel
4/[0-7]/[0-3] 9/[0-1] 11/[0-1]
TX32 Module Slot Number/
TX32 Downstream Port Number/
TX32 Downstream Channel Number
2:8 CMTS Module Slot Number/
Downstream Port Number
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Entering a Description of the Downstream Channel
Use the cable downstream description command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to specify descriptive information for each downstream port.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> description <LINE>
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
LINE is the text that describes the downstream port. This information is limited to
80 characters. Spaces can be used and are counted as a part of the 80 character
limit.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream 0 description local dsport 0
Enabling the Downstream Rate Limit
Use the cable downstream rate-limit command to enable the downstream data
transmission rate-limit for cable modems on the HFC network. Once the downstream
data transmission rate-limit function is enabled, data sent from the cable interface to
the cable modems is rate-limited according to each cable modems configuration file.
Packets are buffered by the CMTS if the data exceeds the permitted bandwidth of the
cable modem and then queued for transmission once downstream bandwidth for the
cable modem becomes available.
Follow the steps in this section to enable the downstream rate-limit:
1. Use the cable downstream rate-limit command in Cable Interface Configuration
mode to enable the rate-limiting function:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> rate-limit
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
Use the no cable downstream rate-limit command to disable the downstream
rate-limiting function.
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration file,
and in the display output of various show commands such as the show
cable downstream command.
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2. Use the show running-config command to verify that downstream rate-limiting
is enabled on the cable interface:
MOT:7A#show running-config | inc rate-limit
The following line should be returned for downstream port 0:
cable downstream 0 rate-limit
Configuring the Downstream Modulation Rate
Use the cable downstream modulation command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to set the downstream digital to analog signal modulation rate:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> modulation [64 | 256]
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
64 is 6 bits per downstream symbol Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM).
This is the default downstream digital to analog signal modulation rate.
256 is 8 bits per downstream symbol Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM).
Use the no cable downstream modulation command to restore the default (64
QAM):
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> modulation [64 | 256]
Adjusting the Downstream Power Level
The default downstream power level is 55 decibels per millivolt (55 dBmV). If you
need to adjust the downstream power level, use the cable downstream power-level
command, in Cable Interface Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> power-level <450-630>
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
450-630 is the downstream power level expressed in one tenth of a dB.
Use the no cable downstream power-level command to restore the default
power-level setting (55 dBmV):
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> power-level <450-630>
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Configuring the Downstream Frequency
Follow the steps in this section to configure the downstream center frequency:
Use the cable downstream frequency command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to enter the fixed center frequency for the downstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> frequency {<91000000 -
857000000>}
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
91000000 - 857000000 is the downstream frequency in Hertz.
Associating the Fiber Nodes to the Downstream Channel
Use the cable downstream fiber-node command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to associate a CMTS 2:8 downstream port to one or more configured Fiber
Nodes.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> fiber-node <WORD>
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
WORD is the list of Fiber Node names separated by commas with no spaces
allowed.
Enabling the Downstream Channel
The downstream port is in an administrative shutdown state by default and must be
enabled to function.
Follow these steps to enable the downstream channel:
1. Use the no cable downstream shutdown command, in Cable Interface
Configuration mode, to enable the downstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable downstream <NUM> shutdown
where:
Note: Downstream frequency ranges are different depending on your
regional implementation of DOCSIS, Euro-DOCSIS, or J-DOCSIS. The
frequency ranges that appear in the CLI help are related to your
implementation of DOCSIS.
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NUM is the downstream channel number.
2. Use the show interfaces cable command in Interface Configuration mode to
verify that the downstream port is enabled:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show interfaces cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module.
The following line should be returned for downstream port 0:
cable 3/0 is up, line protocol is up
2:8 CMTS Upstream Port Configuration
An upstream channel is configured to control the data flow passing data traffic from a
cable modem to the cable interface. The following procedures are used to configure
the 2:8 CMTS upstream ports:
n Binding the Upstream Ports
n Entering a Description of the Upstream Port
n Setting the Upstream Frequency
n Enabling the Upstream Port
Binding the Upstream Ports
1. Use the cable bind upstream command to bind an upstream port a to MAC
Domain, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-if)cable bind upstream <NUM>
where:
NUM specifies a single upstream port number, a subset of upstream port
numbers (separated by commas), or all upstream port numbers on the module
separated by commas (0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7).
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)cable bind upstream 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7
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2. Use the show cable binding cable command to verify the binding configuration:
MOT:7A(config-if)#show cable binding cable <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC Domain number of the 2:8 CMTS module.
Entering a Description of the Upstream Port
Use the cable upstream description command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to specify descriptive information for the upstream port that you are
configuring.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> description <LINE>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
LINE is the text that describes the upstream port. This information is limited to 80
characters.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream 0 description 2:8 usport 0
Note: The following procedures must be repeated for each upstream port in
the configuration example.
Entering a Description of the Upstream Port
Setting the Upstream Frequency
Enabling the Upstream Port
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration, and
in the command output of show commands such as the show cable
upstream command.
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Setting the Upstream Frequency
A fixed upstream frequency needs to be set and must comply with the upstream
frequency plan.
1. Use the cable upstream frequency command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to set the upstream frequency for an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable upstream <NUM> frequency
<5000000-42000000>
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
5000000-42000000 is the upstream frequency value in Hertz (Hz) for
DOCSIS.
Enabling the Upstream Port
The upstream port is in an administrative shutdown state by default. Follow these
steps to enable the upstream channel:
Use the no cable upstream shutdown command, in Cable Interface Configuration
mode, to enable the upstream channel. You must perform both procedures.
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream <NUM> shutdown
MOT:7A(config-if)#no cable upstream <X/Y> shutdown
where:
NUM is the upstream port number.
X/Y is the upstream port and logical channel number (0-7).
Note: Make sure that the upstream frequency selected does not interfere
with the frequencies used for any other upstream applications running in the
cable plant.
Note: Upstream frequency ranges are different depending on your regional
implementation of DOCSIS, Euro-DOCSIS, or J-DOCSIS. The frequency
ranges that appear in the CLI help are related to your implementation of
DOCSIS.
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TX32 Downstream Port Configuration
The following procedures are used to configure the TX32 downstream port:
n Entering TX32 Downstream Port Configuration Mode
n Entering a Description of the TX32 Downstream Port
n Configuring the TX32 Channel Mode
n Adjusting the TX32 Downstream Port Power Level
n Configuring the TX32 Downstream Channel Frequency
n Associating the Fiber Nodes to the TX32 Downstream Port
n Entering a Description of the TX32 Downstream Channel
n Enabling a TX32 Downstream Channel
n Enabling a TX32 Downstream Port
n Verifying the TX32 Downstream Port Configuration
n Additional TX32 Downstream Port Configurations
n Additional TX32 Downstream Channel Configurations
Entering TX32 Downstream Port Configuration Mode
TX32 Downstream Port Configuration mode allows a user to configure the TX32
downstream port as described in the above list of procedures.
To enter TX32 Downstream Port Configuration mode, do the following:
1. Use the cable downstream port command, in Global Configuration mode, to
enter TX32 Downstream Port Configuration configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)# cable downstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and downstream port number of the TX32 module.
MOT:7A(config)# cable downstream port 13/0
The command line prompt changes to:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#
2. Use the end or exit commands to return to Global Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-ds) end
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MOT:7A(config-ds) exit
Entering a Description of the TX32 Downstream Port
Use the cable downstream description command, in TX32 Downstream
Configuration mode, to specify descriptive information for the downstream port.
MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream description <LINE>
where:
LINE is the text that describes the downstream port. This information is limited to
80 characters. Spaces can be used and are counted as a part of the 80 character
limit.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream 0 description TX32 dsport 0
Configuring the TX32 Channel Mode
Use the cable downstream channel-mode command, in TX32 Downstream
Configuration mode, to configure the channel mode (1 channel, 2 channel, or 4
channel) of a TX32 downstream RF port. When configured to the default value of
4, the configuration is not displayed in the show running-config downstream port
command output.
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration file,
and in the display output of various show commands such as the show
cable downstream command.
Note: The TX32 downstream RF port must be shutdown before changing the
channel mode of the port. Also, the user must first unbind the already bound
affected channels of the TX32 downstream RF port before changing the
channel mode of the port.
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MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream channel-mode {1 | 2 | 4}
where:
1 allocates 1 channel on this port.
2 allocates 2 channels on this port.
4 allocates 4 channels on this port.
Adjusting the TX32 Downstream Port Power Level
The default downstream port power level is 55 decibels per millivolt (55 dBmV). If
you need to adjust the downstream port power level, use the cable downstream
power-level command, in TX32 Downstream Port Configuration mode, as follows:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream power-level <440-600>
where:
440-600 is the downstream power level expressed in one tenth of a dB.
Use the no cable downstream power-level command in TX32 Downstream Port
Configuration mode to restore the default power-level setting (55 dBmV):
MOT:7A(config-ds)#no cable downstream power-level <440-600>
Note: The allowed power levels that can be specified with the cable
downstream power-level command for theTX32 will vary depending on the
channel mode that the TX32 is set to with the cable downstream
channel-mode command (1, 2, or 4 channel mode).
Power-level ranges valid for a TX32 port are as follows:
Channel Mode 1 Power Level <520-600>
Channel Mode 2 Power Level <480-560>
Channel Mode 4 Power Level <440-520>
If a power level is configured beyond the range allowed, an error will be
displayed and the configuration will be rejected.
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Configuring the TX32 Downstream Channel Frequency
Use the cable downstream frequency command, in TX32 Downstream Port
Configuration mode, to enter the fixed center frequency for the downstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream <NUM> frequency <91000000 -
857000000>
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
91000000 - 857000000 is the downstream frequency in Hertz.
Associating the Fiber Nodes to the TX32 Downstream Port
Use the cable downstream fiber-node command, in TX32 Downstream Port
Configuration mode, to associate a TX32 RF Port to one or more configured Fiber
Nodes.
MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream fiber-node <WORD>
where:
WORD is the list of Fiber Node names separated by commas with no spaces
allowed.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#cable downstream fiber-node
FN-A,FN-B,FN-C,FN-D
Note: The four downstream frequencies of a TX32 downstream port are
configured by setting downstream channel 0s center frequency. Explicit
configuration of the downstream frequency for channels 1-3 is not allowed.
The downstream frequencies of channels 1-3 are derived internally as the
next three contiguous frequencies in the spectrum (based on a channel-width
of 6 or 8 MHz) from the downstream frequency defined for channel 0.
Configuring the frequency for downstream channel 0 automatically
configures the frequency (in 6 MHz or 8 MHz increments) of the remaining
downstream channels for that TX32 port depending on the channel-mode
setting.
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Entering a Description of the TX32 Downstream Channel
Optionally use the cable downstream description command, in Interface
Configuration mode, to specify descriptive information for a downstream port.
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream <NUM> description <LINE>
where:
NUM is the downstream channel number.
LINE is the text that describes the downstream channel. This information is
limited to 80 characters and spaces cannot be used.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-if)#cable downstream 0 description ds-channel0
Enabling a TX32 Downstream Channel
The downstream channel is in an administrative shut-down state by default and must
be enabled to function.
Follow these steps to enable the downstream port:
1. Use the no cable downstream shutdown command, in TX32 Downstream Port
Configuration mode, to enable the downstream channel:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#no cable downstream <0-3> shutdown
where:
0-3 is the downstream channel number.
2. Use the show running-config cable downstream port command to verify that
the downstream channel is enabled:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#show running-config cable downstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and downstream port number of the TX32 module.
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration file,
and in the display output of various show commands such as the show ip
interface command.
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Enabling a TX32 Downstream Port
The TX32 downstream port is in an administrative shut-down state by default and
must be enabled to function.
Follow these steps to enable the TX32 downstream port:
1. Use the no cable downstream shutdown command, in TX32 Downstream Port
Configuration mode, to enable the downstream port:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#no cable downstream shutdown
2. Use the show running-config cable downstream port command to verify that
the downstream channel is enabled:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#show running-config cable downstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and downstream port number of the TX32 module.
Verifying the TX32 Downstream Port Configuration
Use the show running-config cable downstream port command to verify the
downstream port configuration:
MOT:7A(config-ds)#show running-config cable downstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and port number of the TX32 module.
Additional TX32 Downstream Port Configurations
The following additional TX32 downstream port configurations are available through
the following commands:
n cable downstream interleave-depth
n cable downstream modulation
n cable downstream scrambler on
n cable downstream sync-interval
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide for information on these
commands.
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Additional TX32 Downstream Channel Configurations
The following additional TX32 downstream channel configurations are available
through the following commands:
n cable downstream carrier-only
n cable downstream loadbalance-group
n cable downstream primary-capable
n cable downstream rate-limit
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide for information on these
commands.
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21
Cable Traffic Management
A DOCSIS system shares both downstream and upstream RF channels among
hundreds of subscribers. This sharing of bandwidth is feasible because few residential
users are concurrently active and transmitting at their configured maximum rate limit.
Unfortunately, a small minority of highly active modems (HAMs) are significantly
more active than the average, and these HAMs account for the vast majority of traffic.
In one traffic study by Motorola, the top 5 cable modems by traffic out of 340 cable
modems registered (1.4%) accounted for over 50% of downstream traffic during
heavy network utilization periods. Because cable operators base their long-term
capacity planning decisions on channel utilization, the HAMs can cause an operator to
unnecessarily expand downstream or upstream capacity. Another problem with HAM
traffic is that by increasing the number of backlogged cable modems at any instant,
HAM activity will lower the downstream TCP throughput rate of all of the normally
active residential cable modems.
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Theory of Operations
Cable Traffic Management allows an operator to temporarily lower the maximum rate
limit for highly active modems so that they will lessen their impact on peak time
utilization and their impact on normally active modems.
The Cable Traffic Management feature provides three important new concepts within
a BSR64000:
n A Cable Traffic Policy (CTP) is a configuration object that controls the creation
and operation of Traffic Token Buckets. Refer to Cable Traffic Policies.
n A Traffic Token Bucket (TTB) is a run-time object that controls the rate limiter of
a single service flow by monitoring the traffic actually scheduled from the service
flow and reducing the rate limiter to a lower enforced rate when the traffic is
excessive. Refer to Traffic Token Bucket.
n A cable sample interval is the configured number of minutes for calculating
tokens in a Traffic Token Bucket (TTB). Although every TTB is updated once per
cable sample interval, updating of different TTBs is staggered throughout the
cable sample interval. Refer to Traffic Token Bucket.
The following figure conceptually depicts how the Cable Traffic Management feature
controls traffic for downstream and upstream service flows.
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In the downstream direction, the BSR maintains a queue per service flow of packets
awaiting transmission. The BSR implements a scheduler Rate Limit (denoted by L)
that limits the rate at which packets can be scheduled on a downstream channel (or set
of channels, with channel bonding). When a downstream packet at the head of the
packet queue has waited sufficiently long to not exceed its rate limit, the packet is
scheduled along with the head-of-line packets from other service flows and eventually
transferred downstream on a downstream channel.
Rate Limit (L)
Service Flow
Packet (Request) Queue
Packet
Scheduler
RF
Channel(s)
Traffic
Token
Bucket
(TTB)
Sets to M
or E
Cable Traffic Policy
creates
Other SFs
Applies To
Bytes Transferred
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Operation is similar in the upstream direction, except that the BSR enqueues a single
request for an upstream burst of bandwidth rather than individual packets. Even in the
upstream direction, however, the BSR implements the concept of a scheduler rate
limit L that limits the rate of upstream bandwidth grants. The BSR signals a cable
modem with a Dynamic Service Change DOCSIS MAC management message to
change its service flow rate when it is enforced with the Cable Traffic Management
feature. For the upstream direction, this instructs the CM to not request traffic that
exceeds the enforce rate.
When a service flow is created, its initial maximum rate limit is called its
configured Maximum Sustained Traffic Rate (denoted by L). The configured
maximum rate M of a primary service flow is provided in the cable modems
configuration file.
Cable Traffic Policies
A cable traffic policy is said to apply to a service flow. A TTB for a service flow is
created for each cable traffic policy that applies to it. A cable traffic policy can apply
only to the primary downstream service flow and primary upstream service flow.
Each primary service flow can only have one cable traffic policy that applies to it.
Cable traffic policies only apply in a single direction. An operator can define
downstream policies or upstream policies. With the exception of policies that specify
bidirectional enforcement, the upstream and downstream policies operate
independently.
A cable traffic policy also applies to the bonded service flows of DOCSIS 3.0 cable
modems as well as the non-bonded service flows of pre-DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems.
Note: In order to enforce a cable traffic policy for a direction, it is necessary
that all channels in that direction have rate limiting enabled with the cable
downstream rate-limiting or cable upstream rate-limiting commands.
Rate limiting is enabled for downstream or upstream channels by default. In
order to use the Cable Traffic Management feature effectively, a user must
make sure that rate limiting is enabled for all channels on the BSR. The BSR
warns the user when enabling the Cable Traffic Management feature for a
direction if any channel in that direction does not have rate limiting enabled.
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Traffic Token Bucket
The Traffic Token Bucket operates in the background control plane of the
BSR64000, rather than in the high-speed data plane of per-packet processing. The
operator configures a global cable sample interval at which the TTB operates. At
least once every cable sample interval, the TTB updates a token count based on the
traffic actually transmitted for the service flow. If the token count goes negative, the
TTB then adjusts the flows maximum rate limiter to an enforce rate. A flow which is
limited to the lower enforce rate is said to be penalized".
The operation of a Traffic Token Bucket is depicted in the following figure:
A Traffic Token Bucket implements a variation of a leaky bucket algorithm. The
TTB maintains a single signed 32-bit counter of tokens (denoted by T) which can
be visualized as the level of water in a leaky bucket. Each token represents the right to
send one unpenalized byte of traffic at the configured maximum rate. The maximum
number of tokens that can be held in the TTB is called its maximum Credit (denoted
by C), which represents the maximum number of bytes that the flow can transmit
before becoming penalized. A TTB is always initialized to its Credit Maximum value.
As the service flow transfers bytes, the TTB subtracts one token per byte transferred.
A TTB token count only includes subscriber Ethernet payload bytes, from the first
byte of the Ethernet Destination Address to the last byte of the CRC. It does not
include DOCSIS physical or MAC layer overhead bytes. This is the same convention
used for counting service flow byte statistics.
Tokens (T)
Credit (C)
Enforce Rate (E)
Bytes Transferred (B)
0
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The difference between the TTBs initial credit maximum C and its current token
level T (or C-T) is called the traffic count statistic of the TTB and is displayed
through the show commands of the CTM feature.
Token buckets are implemented as signed 32-bit integers storing units of 1000-byte
kilobytes. They are updated in the background processing of the BSR based on the
number of bytes transferred in a cable sample interval.
The Traffic Token Bucket is analogous to a bank account with a credit balance and
direct deposit of a regular paycheck. As long as the balance is positive, the entire
initial credit can be spent, but once the credit is gone, only the regularly earned
paychecks can be spent.
Traffic Token Bucket Monitoring Algorithms
The TTBs token count is controlled via a configured monitoring algorithm. The two
monitoring algorithms are:
n Continuous monitoring
n Peak-time monitoring.
If a cable traffic policy is configured with the peak-time command, the TTBs created
for it use the peak-time monitoring algorithm. If no peak-time interval is defined, all
TTBs created for the cable traffic policy use the continuous monitoring algorithm.
With peak-time monitoring, a TTB only monitors service flow traffic during a
configured peak-time interval during a day. With this algorithm, the TTB resets itself
to the credit maximum C at the start of the peak-time, and only subtracts tokens for
traffic transferred during the peak-time itself. The TTB does not add tokens with
peak-time monitoring. After the peak time ends, the TTB remains frozen at its final
value until the start of the next peak-time interval.
With continuous monitoring, a TTB monitors service flow traffic at all times in the
traditional manner of a token bucket. On every sample interval boundary, the TTB
both subtracts tokens for bytes transferred and adds tokens earned at the enforce
rate for the passage of time, or E * S. In this manner, as long as the flow transfers at or
below the long-term enforce rate, the token level will remain constant. As the flow
transfers over the enforce rate, the token level will drop. When the token level drops
below zero, the flow is enforced to transfer at only the enforce rate itself. Over any
long-term interval T much longer than the sample interval S, the flow can transmit a
total of only C+E*T bytes.
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At the boundary between cable sample intervals, a TTB removes tokens for the
number of bytes transferred for the service flow (denoted by B), i.e. transmitted
downstream or received upstream. Because tokens are updated only on cable sample
interval boundaries, rather than with every packet, the token count of a TTB is
permitted to go negative.
Traffic Enforcement Algorithms
A TTB enforces the traffic rate of a service flow with one of two different
enforcement algorithms:
n A token-based algorithm whereby enforcement is applied whenever a
monitored flow has no positive tokens.
n A penalty-period algorithm, whereby enforcement is applied for a fixed
duration penalty-period.
A TTB uses the penalty-period algorithm when its cable traffic policy is configured
with the penalty-period command. If no penalty-period attribute is configured, the
TTB uses the token-based algorithm.
With either algorithm, when the token level of a TTB drops below zero, the TTB
changes the packet scheduler rate limiter L to the enforce rate E for that service flow
based on the TTBs cable traffic policy enforce configuration. The packet rate
limiter L remains at the lower enforce rate E for the entirety of the next cable sample
interval.
Cable Sample Interval
Cable Traffic Management operates in the background of data forwarding,
periodically updating a Traffic Token Bucket based on background sampling of the
bytes transferred for a service flow. The configured cable sample interval controls the
maximum interval between updates of a TTB for a single service flow. Because
thousands of TTBs must be updated during a sample interval (one for each primary
service flow), the BSR staggers the updates for different flows at different times
during the sample interval. The cable sample interval defines the staggering rate of
traffic token bucket updates assuming that the maximum of 14000 service flows must
be updated during the interval. For example, with the default cable sample interval of
300 seconds, the pacing rate is approximately 46 TTB updates per second.
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Because a TTB is only updated on a time-staggered cable sample interval boundary,
the time at which a TTB recognizes the start or end of a peak-time monitoring
interval may differ from the actual peak-time start by up to one full cable sample
interval. The earliest that a TTB can enforce a flow monitored during a peak-time is
the second cable sample boundary after the peak-time start, so it may take up to two
cable sample intervals after the actual peak-time start time of day for a TTB to enforce
a service flow.
Offline Cable Modems
When a cable modem deregisters, the BSR maintains the current state of primary
service flow TTBs in memory as offline TTBs. Offline TTBs continue to be
updated on cable sample interval boundaries, although no bytes are transferred for the
TTB. When and if the cable modem re-registers, the TTBs for its primary service
flows are updated to reflect the passage of time while the CM was offline rather than
being reset to their initial values. This prevents subscribers from bypassing
enforcement of cable traffic policies by periodically resetting their CM.
The BSR destroys an offline TTB when it updates it back to its initial condition. For
peak-time monitored TTBs, this occurs at the start of the next peak-time interval. For
continuously-monitored TTBs, this occurs when the token count is increased to its
credit maximum and any penalty-period has expired.
The BSR supports a maximum of two TTBs, including both online and offline TTBs,
on a CMTS module for the maximum number of service flows supported by that
module. In Release 5.0.1, the 2:8 CMTS module supports a maximum of 7168 CMs
and a maximum of 14436 TTBs.
Note: During a CMTS switchover, the staggered cable sample interval
boundary for each TTB is recalculated so that the duration of a penalty period
in progress may be up to one cable sample interval shorter or longer than the
penalty period would have been had the CMTS switchover not occurred.
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Other Cable Traffic Management Operational
Features
Cable Traffic Management operates independently of the Dynamic Load Balancing
feature; a service flows traffic token bucket is updated regardless of the particular
channel (or channels) of a MAC domain on which the service flow is assigned.
Cable Traffic Management inter-operates with cable interfaces that are configured
with the Dual 2x8 Channel Bonding feature, i.e. the feature manages bonded service
flow traffic that includes traffic transferred on remote 2:8 CMTS modules. The
Cable Traffic Management feature operates with the distributed MAC domain
feature of the TX32 module, i.e. it manages bonded and non-bonded service flow
traffic transferred on a remote TX32 module.
SRM and CMTS Redundancy is supported by the Cable Traffic Management feature.
Configuring a Cable Traffic Policy
This section discusses the functionality and configuration procedures for the Cable
Traffic Management feature on the BSR. The following topics and procedures are
described:
n Applying Cable Traffic Policies to Subscriber Service Tiers
n Cable Traffic Policy Configuration Tasks
n Configuring the Cable Sample Interval
n Displaying Cable Traffic Management Information
n Clearing Cable Traffic Management Statistics
Applying Cable Traffic Policies to Subscriber Service Tiers
A subscriber service tier is a combination of QoS parameters for the service flows
provided to a single subscriber and is often expressed as the combination of the
configured maximum rate in both the downstream and upstream directions. For
example, a 2/128 tier refers to a configured maximum rate of 2 Mbps in the
downstream direction and 128 kbps in the upstream direction.
A cable traffic policy can be configured to apply to a single subscriber tier or multiple
subscriber tiers. An operator should select only one of these two configuration
strategies for applying cable traffic policies to subscriber tiers.
The following table summarizes how the attributes of a cable traffic policy should be
configured for each configuration strategy:
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With the single-tier configuration strategy, the cable traffic policy matches a single
configured maximum rate value. The token bucket credit maximum and enforce rate
and are both specified in absolute terms.
With a multiple-tier strategy, the policy applies to all primary service flows in the
policys direction regardless of their configured maximum rate. In the multiple-tier
case, the credit maximum and enforce rate of the TTBs controlled by the policy are
specified relative to the configured maximum rate of the flow.
Cable Traffic Policy Configuration Tasks
The following list summarizes the tasks required for the configuration of a cable
traffic policy:
n Entering Cable Traffic Policy Configuration Mode
n Configuring Maximum Rate Matching
n Configuring the Credit Maximum
n Configuring the Enforce Rate
n Configuring the Peak Time
n Configuring the Penalty Period
n Configuring Bidirectional Enforcement
n Enabling a Cable Traffic Policy
Single Tier
per Policy
Multiple Tiers
per Policy Refer to:
max-rate max-rate all Configuring Maximum Rate Matching
credit credit Configuring the Credit Maximum
enforce enforce Configuring the Enforce Rate
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For more detailed descriptions of the commands used for the tasks described in this
section, refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide.
n bidirectional
n cable traffic sample-interval
n cable traffic policy
n clear cable traffic enforcement
n clear cable traffic enforcement
n credit
n enabled
n enforce
n max-rate
n peak-time
n penalty-period
n show cable subscriber-usage
n show cable subscriber-usage summary
n show cable traffic policy
Entering Cable Traffic Policy Configuration Mode
Cable Traffic Policy configuration mode allows a user to configure a Cable Traffic
Policy. A user can either create a new named cable traffic policy in a specified
direction and enters Cable Traffic Policy configuration mode for the new policy or
enters Cable Traffic Policy configuration mode for an existing cable traffic policy.
Use the command the cable traffic policy command to configure a cable traffic
policy, as follows:
MOT(config)#cable traffic policy <ctp-name> {upstream | downstream}
where:
ctp-name is the cable traffic policy name. The name can be from one to 12
case-sensitive alphanumeric characters including underscores and must start with
a letter.
upstream indicates that this cable traffic policy applies in the upstream direction.
downstream indicates that this cable traffic policy applies in the downstream
direction.
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The following prompt displays indicating that the user is in Cable Traffic Policy
configuration mode (config-traffic:<ctp-name>#)
Configuring Maximum Rate Matching
The max-rate command specifies whether a cable traffic policy only applies to
primary service flows with a particular configured maximum rate. The max-rate
configuration is in kilobits per second (kbps). When a cable traffic policy is created,
the default setting is max-rate all which means that the policy applies to all
configured maximum rate values (i.e. all service flows in the direction of the cable
traffic policy). When a cable modem registers, the BSR selects a cable traffic policy
for its primary downstream and primary upstream service flows based on the
configured maximum rate of the service flow. The BSR prioritizes matching to a cable
traffic policy with a specific match for the max-rate <kbps> configuration over a
policy with a max-rate all configuration. The BSR does not permit more than one
cable traffic policy in the same direction to be configured with the same max-rate
configuration.
If max-rate 0-4294967 is configured, the policy will apply to a service flow only if
that service flows configured maximum rate value equals the value specified in the
0-4294967 argument of the command.
Use the max-rate command to specify whether a cable traffic policy only applies to
primary service flows with a particular configured maximum rate, as follows:
MOT(config-traffic:<ctp-name>)#max-rate {<0-4294967> | all}
where:
0-4294967 indicates that the cable traffic policy will apply to a service flow only
if that service flows configured maximum rate value equals the value specified in
the 0-4294967 argument. Entering a max-rate of "0" will specify that the cable
traffic policy applies to all service flows of cable modems without configured
max rates.
all indicates that the cable traffic policy applies to all configured maximum rate
values - all service flows in the direction of the cable traffic policy.
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Configuring the Credit Maximum
The credit command configures how a TTB controlled by a cable traffic policy
determines its credit maximum.
Use the credit command to configure how a TTB controlled by a cable traffic policy
determines its credit maximum, as follows:
MOT(config-traffic:<ctp-name>)#credit {mbytes <1-2147483> | seconds
<1-43200> }
where:
mbytes 1-2147483 indicates that the credit maximum is the absolute number of
megabytes specified.
seconds 1-43200 indicates that the credit maximum is calculated relative to the
configured maximum rate (max-rate) as the number of megabytes (rounded up)
transferred in a specified number of seconds at the rate of bits per second.
Configuring the Enforce Rate
The enforce configures how a TTB controlled by the cable traffic policy determines
its enforce rate for a service flow to which the policy applies. The enforce rate can be
configured to an absolute number with enforce rate command or as a relative
percentage of the configured maximum rate (max-rate) with the enforce percent
command.
Use the enforce command to specify the enforce rate for service flow, as follows:
MOT(config-traffic:<ctp-name>)#enforce { percent <0-100> | rate
<8-200000> }
where:
percent <0-100> configures the enforce rate relative to the percentage of the
service flow's maximum rate (max-rate).
rate <8-200000> configures the enforce rate to a absolute number in kbps.
Note: Motorola recommends that the credit mbytes option for TTBs be
configured to be at least 10 megabytes.
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Configuring the Peak Time
The peak-time command configures a cable traffic policy for peak-time monitoring
mode. In peak-time monitoring mode, a service flow is permitted to send a traffic
count up to a credit limit during a configured peak-interval in the day before being
penalized to an enforced rate. A policy can be configured with up to four
non-overlapping peak-time attributes, each with a different index value.
Use the peak-time command to configure a cable traffic policy for peak-time
monitoring mode, as follows:
MOT(config-traffic:<ctp-name>)#peak-time <1-4> {daily | weekday |
weekend} start {<hh:mm> | <0-23>} duration <1-1440>
where:
1-4 indicates a required index argument that uniquely identifies the peak-time
interval within the cable traffic policy.
daily specifies a peak-time that is defined all seven days of the week.
weekday specifies a peak-time interval that is defined only Monday through
Friday.
weekend specifies the peak-time interval as only on Saturday or Sunday.
start {<hh[:mm]> | <hh>} / start 0-23 specifies the starting hour (and optionally,
minute) of the peak time during the day. hh = 0-23 mm = 0-59
duration 1-1440 specifies the number of minutes that the peak-time interval
lasts. The duration may not extend past 24 hours.
Note: Peak-time monitoring mode is disabled by default. Not configuring the
peak-time command causes the CTM to use Continuous Mode.
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Configuring the Penalty Period
The penalty-period command configures a cable traffic policy to penalize a service
flow exceeding its traffic count credit for a fixed duration penalty period. The penalty
is also enforced for that primary service flow in the opposite direction, provided a
policy is applied in that direction.
Use the penalty-period command to configure a cable traffic policy penalty period,
as follows:
MOT(config-traffic:<ctp-name>)#penalty-period <0-1440>
[expires-end-peak]
where:
0-1440 specifies the penalty period duration in minutes (24 hour maximum). The
minimum penalty-period may be specified as "0" minutes in order to monitor
subscriber traffic without enforcing it.
expires-end-peak stops enforcement of a service flow at the end of the policy
peak time. If the expires-end-peak option is specified, then any penalty-period
being enforced at the end of the peak-time expires. If the expires-end-peak
option is omitted, a penalty period can extend beyond the end of the current
peak-time. Any such late penalty-period expires automatically at the start of the
next peak-time interval. The expires-end-peak option is ignored with continuous
traffic monitoring, i.e. when no peak-time is configured.
Note: The penalty-period mode of traffic enforcement is intended for
compatibility with other vendors subscriber traffic management feature.
Motorola recommends NOT using the penalty-period configuration and using
token-based enforcement instead. Token-based enforcement restores
subscribers to their configured maximum rate limit as soon as they have
earned the tokens to do so minimizing the enforcement duration for the
subscriber.
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Configuring Bidirectional Enforcement
The bidirectional command specifies that when a primary service flow controlled by
a cable traffic policy is enforced in one direction, the penalty is also enforced for that
primary service flow in the opposite direction. If the opposite directions primary
service flow does not have a cable traffic policy applied and the policy is not enabled
when the bidirectional attribute is configured, the BSR logs an event. Each cable
traffic policy can have bidirectional configured as an option.
Use the bidirectional command to configure the bidirectional parameter for a service
flow, as follows:
MOT(config-traffic:<ctp-name>)#bidirectional
Enabling a Cable Traffic Policy
The enabled command enables a configured cable traffic policy. When a cable traffic
policy is first created, it is disabled by default. Cable traffic policies are configured
with working defaults and may be enabled immediately after creation without any
additional configuration. The default values are:

Note: The bidirectional configuration is intended to match the behavior of
other vendors Subscriber Traffic Management enforce-rule options which
penalize both the upstream and downstream primary service flows when a
downstream service flow or upstream service flow's traffic count exceeds its
policy credit maximum. Motorola recommends omitting the bidirectional
configuration so that only the service flow direction which is being abused is
penalized.
Command Command Default
max-rate max-rate all
credit The default cable sample interval in seconds.
The default cable sample interval is 5
minutes, so the default credit maximum is
300 seconds.
enforce enforce percent = 50
bidirectional Disabled
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Use the enabled command to enable a configured cable traffic policy, as follows:
MOT(config-traffic:<ctp-name>)#enabled
Configuring the Cable Sample Interval
The cable traffic sample-interval command configures the cable sample interval at
which Traffic Token Buckets (TTBs) are updated and enforcement applied. The
configured cable sample interval controls the interval between updates of a TTB for a
single service flow.
Use the cable traffic sample-interval command, in Global Configuration mode, to
configure the cable sample interval, as follows:
MOT(config)#cable traffic sample-interval <5-60>
where:
5-60 indicates the cable sample interval in minutes.
penalty-period Disabled
peak-time Disabled
Note: No attribute of an existing cable traffic policy can be changed while it is
enabled. For example, you must disable a cable traffic policy in order to
change the max-rate attribute. When a cable traffic policy is disabled, all
TTBs configured by the policy are deleted and all service flows controlled by
those TTBs are restored to their configured maximum rate.
Note: When any cable traffic policies are enabled, setting the cable traffic
sample-interval will disable and re-enable these policies after the interval is
changed. This will reset any current enforcement. A user will receive the
following warning message:
Changing sample-interval will reset any enabled cable
traffic policies. Continue? [yes/no]:
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Displaying Cable Traffic Management Information
show cable subscriber-usage
The show cable subscriber-usage command displays the cable traffic policy
enforcement state for downstream and upstream primary service flows of online cable
modems for which a cable traffic policy is applied.
MOT:7A# show cable subscriber-usage [ <mac> | <X/Y> ] [ downstream |
upstream] [<ctp-name> | over-consume | sort-byte-count ]
where:
mac displays the cable traffic policy enforcement state for downstream and
upstream primary service flows, for which a cable traffic policy is applied, of the
indicated cable modems MAC address.
X/Y restricts the command output to a single cable interface and MAC domain,
otherwise, all interfaces are shown in order of slot and MAC domain number.
downstream displays all the downstream service flows of the cable traffic policy.
upstream displays all the upstream service flows of the cable traffic policy.
ctp-name indicates the name of a cable traffic policy. Only the configuration for
the this named policy is displayed.
over-consume restricts the command output to service flows that have been
penalized (or were being penalized at that time) since the last clear cable traffic
history command was issued. These are service flows that report a Last
Enforced timestamp in the command output.
sort-byte-count displays the service flows on a given cable traffic policy are
shown in decreasing order of Traffic Count, otherwise, the service flows are
shown in increasing order of the service flow ID.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable subscriber-usage command.
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show cable subscriber-usage summary
The show cable subscriber-usage summary command displays the sum of the traffic
transferred for all service flows controlled by a particular cable traffic policy on a
particular cable interface.
MOT:7A# show cable subscriber-usage summary [ downstream | upstream ]
[<X/Y>]
where:
downstream displays all the downstream service flows of the cable traffic policy.
upstream displays all the upstream service flows of the cable traffic policy.
X/Y restricts the command output to a single cable interface and MAC domain,
otherwise, all interfaces are shown in order of slot and MAC domain number.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable subscriber-usage summary command.
show cable traffic policy
The show cable traffic policy command displays the configuration of all existing
cable traffic policies.
MOT:7A# show cable traffic policy [<ctp-name>]
where
ctp-name indicates the name of a cable traffic policy. Only the configuration for
this policy is displayed.
Refer to the BSR 64000 Command Reference Guide to see typical screen output for
the show cable traffic policy command.
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Clearing Cable Traffic Management Statistics
clear cable traffic enforcement
The clear cable traffic enforcement command clears the Traffic Count fields
displayed with the show cable subscriber-usage command and, depending on the
parameter specified with the clear cable traffic enforcement command, will effect
the summary counts in the show cable subscriber-usage summary output.
MOT:7A# clear cable traffic enforcement {<cmMac> | <ctp-name> | <X/Y> | all}
where:
cmMac indicates a cable modem MAC address. The command clears the TTBs
for the downstream and upstream primary service flows of the indicated cable
modem.
ctp-name indicates a cable traffic policy name. The command clears all TTBs
created by that policy on all cable interface.
X/Y clears the TTBs for all online cable modems registered in the indicated cable
interface and MAC domain.
all clears the TTBs for all online cable modems on all cable interfaces.
clear cable traffic history
The clear cable traffic history command starts a new "Enforced Since" history
period for the show cable subscriber-usage command. The clear cable traffic
history command clears the Last Enforced timestamp for all TTBs and the Last
Enforced field of the show cable subscriber-usage command for all service flows.
Subsequent show cable subscriber-usage commands will display as Last Enforced
only those service flows that had started enforcement since the clear cable traffic
history command was issued.
MOT:7A# clear cable traffic history
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22
Configuring an Integrated
CMTS
Introduction
The RX48 Decoupled Upstream Module has been developed for the BSR 64000 to
address two primary goals of integrated CMTS (I-CMTS) functionality as defined by
the CableLabs MULPI specification.
n The first goal of I-CMTS is independent scalability of CMTS downstream and
upstream functionality (that is, the ability to add upstream channels without
adding downstream channels).
n The second goal is to lower the per-channel cost of upstream capacity.
The BSR provides an I-CMTS solution with decoupled upstream and downstream
functionality using the TX32 and RX48 modules respectively. The decoupling of the
upstream and the downstream functionality allows for a scalable configuration of the
CMTS.
The BSR 64000 RX48 Decoupled Upstream Module provides the upstream support
for the Motorola I-CMTS and future modular CMTS (M-CMTS) DOCSIS 3.0
solutions in accordance with the CableLabs DOCSIS 3.0 specifications. The RX48
module provides increased upstream channel capacity and enhanced network security
to support the deployment of DOCSIS 3.0-based cable services.
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The BSR provides a flexible capacity increase from the traditional CMTS
configuration that supports new DOCSIS 3.0 services with I-CMTS configurations.
The BSRs traditional CMTS configuration supports 22 downstream channels and 88
upstream channels. The following downstream and upstream capacities will be
supported in the I-CMTS BSR chassis configurations with the TX32 and RX48
modules:
n 32 to 128 Downstream Channels with up to 4 TX32 Modules
n 48 to 192 Upstream Channels with up to 4 RX48 Modules
When combined with a TX32 module or multiple TX32 modules to form an I-CMTS
system, the RX48 module functions as a MAC domain slot to manage and provide
control plane functions such as configuring the RX48 module, providing MAC
domain statistics including the TX32 downstream channels, and processing
registration/DSX requests from cable modems.
Integrated CMTS Overview
This section describes the BSR 64000 chassis configurations supported for the
I-CMTS solution with the TX32 and RX48 modules, and the migration from the
traditional CMTS solution with the 2:8 CMTS modules. RX48 redundancy and
upstream channel bonding are planned for a future software release.
Figure 22-1 depicts a BSR chassis populated with 2:8 CMTS, TX32, and RX48
modules. The upstream channel capacity is depicted as 30 Mbps to reflect the current
limitation of most cable modems
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Figure 22-1 BSR Mixed 2:8 CMTS, TX32 and RX48 Configuration




G
i
g
a
b
i
t

E
t
h
e
r
n
e
t
2:8
2:8
2:8
2:8
2:8
Standby
SRM4
SRM4
HSIM4
HSIM4
HSIM4
RX48
RX48
TX32
Standby
TX32
2:8
TX32
Upstream High Speed Data
Five 2:8 CMTS: 1 port/FN and no upstream channel bonding
with redundancy capability
Two RX48: 1 port/FN and 4 bonded upstream channels
Total Upstream: 2x48 = 96 RX48 channels + 5x8 = 40 2:8
CMTS channels (at 30 Mbps per channel) = 136 channels
Downstream High Speed Data
74 ((2x32) + (5x2)) internal downstream channels
Total Downstream: 74x40 = 2.96 Gbps
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RX48 and 2:8 CMTS modules function independently of each other. Upstream
channels on a 2:8 CMTS module can not be shared with upstream channels on an
RX48 module to form a MAC domain.
Even though the RX48 and 2:8 CMTS modules cannot share channels in the same
MAC domain, they can connect to the same fiber node. A fiber node can have
multiple MAC domains; one from an RX48 and another from a 2:8 CMTS.
Configuration Overview
Order of Configuration Procedures for Release 6.0.0 and later with the
RX48 and TX32 Modules
Creating a New Configuration
1. Configure fiber node names (FN)
2. Configure channel frequency and RF parameters (Port)
3. Assign channels to fiber nodes (Port)
4. Bind channels to MAC domain (MAC domain)
5. Configure downstream channel bonding group(s) (MAC domain)
6. Enable downstream TX32 port, channel
7. Enable upstream RX48 port, channel, logical channel
Modifying an Existing Configuration
1. Shut down port or channel (Port)
2. Unbind downstream/upstream channels (MAC domain)
3. Configure fiber node names (FN)
4. Configure channel frequency and RF parameters (Port)
5. Assign channels to fiber nodes (Port)
6. Bind channels to MAC domain (MAC Domain)
7. Configure downstream channel bonding group(s) (MAC domain)
8. Enable downstream port, channel
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9. Enable upstream port, channel, logical channel
Order of Configuration Procedures for Release 6.0.0 and later with the
2:8 CMTS and TX32 Modules
Creating a New Configuration
1. Unbind downstream/upstream channels (MAC domain)
2. Configure fiber node names (FN)
3. Configure channel frequency and RF parameters (Port)
4. Assign channels to fiber nodes (Port)
5. Bind channels to MAC domain (MAC domain)
6. Configure downstream channel bonding group(s) (MAC domain)
7. Enable MAC domain (MAC domain)
8. Enable downstream port
9. Enable upstream channel
Modifying an Existing Configuration
1. Shut down MAC domain (MAC domain)
2. Shut down downstream port (Port)
3. Shut down upstream channel (Port)
4. Unbind downstream/upstream channels (MAC domain)
5. Configure fiber node names (FN)
6. Configure channel frequency and RF parameters (Port)
Note: On the 2:8 CMTS module, Port = Channel
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7. Assign channels to fiber nodes (Port)
8. Bind channels to MAC domain (MAC domain)
9. Configure downstream channel bonding group(s) (MAC domain)
10. Enable MAC domain (MAC domain)
11. Enable downstream port
12. Enable upstream channel
RX48 Distributed MAC Domains
By definition, DOCSIS MAC domains on the RX48 module contain upstream
channels from the RX48 module and downstream channels from a TX32 module.
n All upstream RF channels defined in a MAC domain must be local to the given
RX48 module.
n The term distributed is used in this document because the TX32 downstream
channels are remote to the RX48 module.
n Each RX48 module supports up to 16 MAC domains. Any combination of 32
downstream and 48 upstream channels can form a MAC domain from 1x1 to
32x48.
For any given MAC domain configured on the RX48 module, all downstream
channels bound to that RX48 MAC domain must be from the same TX32 module. For
example, one MAC domain might contain downstream channels from a TX32 module
in slot 2, and another MAC domain might contain downstream channels from a TX32
module in slot 3, but no RX48 MAC domain can contain downstream channels from
the TX32 module in slot 2 and the TX32 module in slot 3.
The upstream RF channels of an RX48 upstream port can reside in, that is, can be
bound to, different MAC domains. However, any given RX48 upstream RF channel
can be bound to only one MAC domain. The downstream channels of a TX32 port can
reside in different MAC domains. However, as with the RX48, any TX32 downstream
channel can be bound to only one MAC domain. A given MAC domain can be
associated with up to 16 fiber nodes.
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MAC Domain Binding Guidelines
When the RX48 module boots, by default it will have 16 MAC domains defined, with
no upstream or downstream channels bound.
n All downstream and upstream RF channels must be in the shutdown state in order
to be bound to a given MAC domain.
n An RX48 MAC domain supports incremental binding and unbinding of RF
channels. The operator can incrementally add or remove an upstream channel to
an existing MAC domain.
Number of MAC Domains
For Release 6.0.0, the RX48 supports up to 16 MAC domains. The 16 MAC domains
are automatically created on each RX48 module. In future releases, the RX48 may
support up to 24 MAC domains.
Binding RX48 Upstream Channels
Each MAC domain can contain from 1 to 48 upstream channels; however, the total of
all upstream channels assigned to all RX48 MAC domains is 48. All of these
upstream channels must be local to the RX48 module and cannot be from a remote
RX48 module. The upstream channels must be in the shutdown state before they can
be bound to the MAC domain. Any given upstream channel can belong to only one
MAC domain. Therefore, all corresponding upstream logical channels of the RX48
upstream channel are part of that MAC domain.
Note: The RX48 differs from the 2:8 CMTS module in this respect because,
on the RX48 module, all of the downstream channels are unknown and
remote to the RX48. The RX48 module does not support auto bind or
default bind features.
Note: The concept of primary-capable channels applies only for
downstream channels, not for upstream channels. A downstream channel
that carries SYNC messages, MDD message (containing ambiguity
resolution TLVs), as well as UCD and MAPS is primary capable.
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Although a single MAC domain can contain all 48 upstream channels available from
an RX48 module, the total number of upstream channels that can be assigned to the 16
supported MAC domains for each RX48 module is 48. In other words, the 48
upstream channels on each RX48 module can be configured into one MAC domain
(1x48) or spread across the 16 supported MAC domains.
n All upstream RX48 channels must be in an operationally shutdown state before
they can be bound to an RX48 MAC domain.
n The BSR rejects the binding of upstream and downstream channels to an RX48
MAC domain if those channels are not associated to a configured fiber node.
Channels must be assigned to fiber nodes prior to configuring MAC domains.
Note: Any attempt to bind upstream channels to a MAC domain from a
different RX48 module (other than the RX48 module where the MAC domain
resides) is automatically prevented based on the syntax of the cable bind
upstream command (refer to Chapter 9 and Configuring RX48 MAC Domain
Binding and Unbinding). The cable bind upstream command syntax does
not accept a slot number for a different RX48.
Note: Any attempt to bind upstream channels to an RX48 MAC domain from
a 2:8 CMTS module is automatically prevented based on the syntax of the
cable bind upstream command (refer to Chapter 9 and Configuring RX48
MAC Domain Binding and Unbinding). The cable bind upstream command
syntax does not accept a slot number for a 2:8 CMTS module.
Note: Initiating a bind operation too soon after a previous unbind operation
will generate an error message. The time period for which a new bind
operation can be initiated immediately after an unbind operation has
completed is approximately one second per 180 cable modems.
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Binding TX32 Downstream Channels
Each RX48 MAC domain can contain from 1 to 32 TX32 downstream channels.
However, all downstream channels bound to a MAC domain must be from the same
TX32 module, and each channel from a given TX32 downstream port must be
associated to the same slot or module for the MAC domain being defined. A single
TX32 downstream channel cannot be assigned to two different RX48 modules (or
CMTS 2:8 modules).
n TX32 downstream channels from a given TX32 port cannot be bound to MAC
domains on an RX48 module and a 2:8 CMTS module. The BSR will reject an
attempt to bind 2:8 CMTS downstream channels to an RX48 MAC domain.
n Downstream channels must be in the shutdown state before they can be bound to
a MAC domain. A downstream channel can only be bound to one MAC domain.
n One to 32 TX32 downstream channels from any TX32 module can be bound to
an RX48 MAC domain. The BSR allows an RX48 module to be associated with
more than one TX32 slot, with the restriction that all of the downstream channels
bound to a given RX48 MAC domain are from the same TX32 module.
Downstream channels must be operationally shut down before they can be bound or
unbound from a MAC domain. Cable modems on other TX32 downstream channels
of other TX32 ports bound to other MAC domains will not be affected. If the TX32
port is administratively shut down, all the channels associated to the port will be
operationally shut down. If any channels are associated to another MAC domain,
those cable modems will be affected. To prevent this, the operator can
administratively shut down the TX32 downstream channels that are being removed
from the given MAC domain.
Note: All downstream channels will be removed from a MAC domain if the
TX32 module is no longer operational.
BSR 64000 CMTS Configuration and Management Guide Release 6.4.0
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Configuring RX48 MAC Domain Binding and
Unbinding
RX48 MAC domains are automatically created on each RX48 module when the
module boots. At boot time, there are no upstream or downstream channels bound to
the MAC domains. Upstream and downstream channels can be bound to any of the 16
MAC domains supported on an RX48 module for a specific cable interface. The
upstream channels must be from a single RX48 module, and the downstream channels
must be from a single TX32 module.
The BSR supports the incremental binding or unbinding of individual channels into
an RX48 MAC domain. To add or remove an upstream channel from a MAC domain,
the channels must be operationally shut down. If the channel is administratively shut
down, it is also operationally shut down. The operator can operationally shut down a
channel in one of several ways:
n Shut down the MAC domain
n Shut down individual ports
n Shut down individual channels
Cable modems on other upstream channels bound to other MAC domains will not be
affected.
Once the channels are operationally shut down, new channels can be incrementally
added or existing channels may be incrementally removed with the cable bind
upstream command. The same holds for downstream channels. Also note that all of
the downstream channels must first be operationally shut down.
Note: If a port is administratively shut down, all channels associated with the
port are automatically operationally shut down. Even though the channel is
not administratively shut down like the port, the operational status of the
channel, by default, is operationally shut down and will not allow the binding
changes.
Note: Binding an upstream or downstream channel to a MAC domain if the
channel is already bound to another MAC domain is not allowed by the BSR.
The channel must be shut down and unbound from the current MAC domain
before the channel can be bound to a new MAC domain
Release 6.4.0 Configuring an Integrated CMTS
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Adding Upstream Channels to an RX48 MAC Domain
Upstream channels can only be added to a MAC domain with the cable bind
upstream command.
Incrementally Adding New Upstream Channels
If an RX48 MAC domain has upstream channels 1, 2, 3, and 4 bound, using the cable
bind upstream 0/4,0/5,0/6 command incrementally adds channels 4, 5, and 6 to the
MAC domain, and the MAC domain will now have upstream channels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
and 6 bound.
Incorrectly Using the cable bind upstream Command
If a MAC domain has upstream channels 1, 2, 3, and 4 bound, using the cable bind 0/
1,0/2,0/3 command does not change the MAC domain. Attempts to remove channel 4
with the cable bind upstream command will be rejected by the BSR.
Removing Upstream Channels from an RX48 MAC Domain
Upstream channels can only be removed from an RX48 MAC domain with the no
cable bind upstream command.
Note: This requirement implies that a new upstream channel cannot be
added with the no cable bind upstream command. It also implies that an
upstream channel cannot be removed from a MAC domain with the cable
bind upstream command.
Note: This requirement implies that a new upstream channel cannot be
added with the no cable bind upstream command. It also implies that an
upstream channel cannot be removed from the MAC domain with the cable
bind upstream command.
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Incrementally Removing Upstream Channels
If a MAC domain has upstream channels 1, 2, 3, and 4 bound, using the no cable bind
upstream 0/2,0/3 command incrementally removes channels 2 and 3 from the MAC
domain, and the MAC domain will now have upstream channels 1 and 4 bound.
Removing All Upstream Channels
If a MAC domain has upstream channels 1, 2, 3, and 4 bound, using the no cable bind
command without arguments removes all channels from the MAC domain, and the
MAC domain will now have no upstream channels bound.
Incorrectly Using the no cable bind upstream Command
If a MAC domain has upstream channels 1, 2, 3, and 4 bound, using the no cable bind
upstream 0/2,0/3,0/6 command does not change the MAC domain. Attempts to
remove upstream channels 2 and 3 and add channel 6 to the MAC domain with the no
cable bind upstream command will be rejected by the BSR.
TX32/RX48 Plant Topology
This section discusses HFC plant topology with respect to RX48 ports and channels,
TX32 ports and channels, MAC domains, fiber nodes, and DOCSIS service groups.
The CMTS must represent the plant topology internally. This representation is used
for channel bonding, load balancing, and multicast replication to downstream channel
sets.
The following topics are discussed in this section:
n The RX48 and Fiber Nodes
n Frequency Isolation
n Typical Plant Topologies
n The BSR and DOCSIS Service Groups
n MAC Domain Channel Assignment and Topology
n RX48 Load Balancing
n Channel Bonding Topology and Fiber Nodes
n Legacy 2:8 CMTS Upstream Ports and Fiber Nodes
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The RX48 and Fiber Nodes
For Release 6.0.0, the RX48 module can support up to 16 MAC domains. Thirty-two
fiber nodes are supported for each RX48 module. All 48 upstream channels can be
configured to a single MAC domain, so that the minimum number of fiber nodes
supported is one. The BSR accepts the binding of up to 16 different MAC domains to
the six upstream channels of each RX48 port. The RX48 supports an average of only
two MAC domains per RF port, since it accepts a total of only 16 MAC domains per
RX48 module. Release 6.0.0 supports up to four RX48 modules in the BSR chassis;
therefore, the maximum number of fiber nodes that the BSR supports is 128.
n One RX48 upstream port can be associated with up to eight fiber nodes, and all of
the upstream channels of that RX48 port would also be associated with the fiber
node(s). Two RX48 upstream ports can be associated to one fiber node.
n The maximum number of upstream channels associated with a single fiber node
is 12, given that two ports (6 channels each) can be associated to the fiber node.
n The upstream frequency space is 5 to 85 MHz, or a range of 80 MHz.
The 80 MHz of frequency space can be divided in channel width increments ranging
from 200 kHz to 6.4 MHz, or any combination of 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, and
6400 kHz.
The number of channels for each width are 400 (200 kHz), 200 (400 kHz), 100 (800
kHz), 50 (1.6 MHz), 25 (3.2 MHz), 12 (6.4 MHz) or combinations. Even though 200
kHz, 400 kHz, and 800 kHz channel widths are still supported on the BSR 64000,
they are typically no longer used in the industry. It is expected that the frequency
space will be divided up by 1.6, 3.2, and 6.4 MHz channels.
Note: The BSR only allows the configuration of an RX48 port to a fiber node
and not to individual RF channels. This implies that all upstream RF channels
(0-5) for an RX48 port are associated to the fiber node.
The associated channels of an upstream or downstream RX48 port must be
unbound from RX48 MAC domains before associating the port to a fiber
node(s).
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Frequency Isolation
Given that multiple channels can be associated to fiber nodes, the BSR must ensure
that the frequencies do not overlap. The topology database is configured at the CMTS
to enable it to maintain frequency isolation for multiple channels reaching the same
fiber node. During configuration, the CMTS ensures that RF channels reaching the
same fiber node have different frequencies. The CMTS uses the topology
configuration to determine which channels can reach a cable modem for channel
bonding, load balancing, and multicast replication.
The BSR enforces non-overlapping frequencies for channels associated to a given
cable modem service group (CM-SG) at the time the frequency is configured with the
cable downstream/upstream frequency command. This implies that a set of fiber
nodes are configured, the port is associated to that set of fiber nodes, and the operator
is changing the frequency of the channel. The BSR ensures that the new frequency
does not overlap with any existing frequencies associated to the fiber node.
The BSR enforces non-overlapping frequencies within the CM-SG of the port at the
time the fiber node is associated with the cable downstream/upstream fiber-node
command. In this case, the frequency for the channel is configured, and the port is not
yet associated to a set of fiber nodes. When the port is being associated to the fiber
nodes, the BSR checks for overlapping frequencies.
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Typical Plant Topologies
This section describes typical plant topologies.
RX48/TX32 with Two Single MAC Domains
Figure 22-2 depicts a plant topology for an RX48 with two MAC domains. Each
MAC domain is associated with a single fiber node. Each MAC domain contains a
four-channel downstream bonding group and six non-bonded upstream channels.
Figure 22-2 RX48/TX32 with Two Single MAC Domains
RX48/TX32 MAC Domain with Dual Fiber Node
Figure 22-3 depicts a topology for an RX48 with two MAC domains. The first MAC
domain is associated with two fiber nodes, and the second is associated with a single
fiber node. The first MAC domain contains two four-channel downstream bonding
groups and four non-bonded upstream channels. The second MAC domain contains
one four-channel downstream bonding group and four non-bonded upstream
channels.
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
DF1 DF2
DF3 DF4
DBG2
TX32 Port 1
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
DF1 DF2 DF3 DF4
DBG1
TX32 Port 0
U
0
U
1
U
2
U
3
U
4
U
5
UF1 UF2 UF3
UF4 UF5 UF6
RX48 US Port 0
FN-A
MAC Domain 1
U
0
U
1
U
2
U
3
U
4
U
5
UF1 UF2 UF3
UF4 UF5 UF6
RX48 US Port 1
FN-B
MAC Domain 2
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Figure 22-3 RX48/TX32 MAC Domain with Dual Fiber Node
RX48/TX32 MAC Domain with Eight Bonded Downstreams
Figure 22-4 depicts a topology that has a single MAC domain comprising one fiber
node with one eight-channel downstream bonding group and six non-bonded
upstream channels associated with the fiber node.
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
DF1 DF2 DF3 DF4
DBG3
TX32 Port 2
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
DF1 DF2
DF3 DF4
DBG1
TX32 Port 0
U
0
U
1
UF1 UF2
RX48 US Port 0
FN-A
MAC Domain 1
U
0
U
1
U
2
U
3
UF1 UF2 UF3 UF4
FN-B
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
DF1 DF2 DF3 DF4
DBG2
TX32 Port 1
FN-B
U
0
U
1
RX48 US Port 1
UF1 UF2
MAC Domain 1
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Figure 22-4 RX48/TX32 MAC Domain with Eight Bonded Downstreams
Multiple MAC Domains per Fiber Node
The BSR allows the configuration of upstream and downstream channels from two or
more MAC domains to reach the same set of fiber nodes.
For simplicity, Motorola recommends that all upstream channels from an RX48
module reaching a fiber node be configured into the same MAC domain. However, in
some cases, an MSO may want to provide separate services to different customers.
For example, it may be desired that business customers or set-top box cable modems
have an entirely separate service from residential high-speeddata cable modems.
This case requires configuring the channels reaching the same fiber node into separate
MAC domains.
Figure 22-5 shows an example of two MAC domains implemented on different
downstream and upstream channels that reach the same set of fiber nodes. In the
topology shown, all downstream channels from both TX32 ports 0 and 1 reach both
fiber nodes FN-A and FN-B. In addition, upstream channels from both RX48 ports 0
and 1 are reached by both fiber nodes FN-A and FN-B. MAC domain 1 is configured
to contain all channels from RX48 port 0 and TX32 port 0, and MAC domain 2 is
configured to contain all channels from RX48 port 1 and TX32 port 1.
This causes the formation of one MAC domain service group (MD-CM-SG) for each
MAC domain. The BSR cannot determine whether the cable modem is physically
connected to FN-A or FN-B. Since cable modems see all downstream and upstream
channels from both TX32/RX48 ports, it is necessary that cable modems register on
the desired MAC domain. The TLV 1 (downstream channel override) or TLV 41
(downstream channel list) must be used to force a cable modem to be on an
appropriate downstream channel of a MAC domain.
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
DF1 DF2
DF3 DF4
TX32 Port 0
U
0
U
1
U
2
U
3
U
4
U
5
UF1 UF2 UF3
UF4 UF5 UF6
RX48 US Port 0
FN-A
MAC Domain 1
D
4
DF5
D
5
DF6
D
6
DF7
D
7
DF8
TX32 Port 1
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Figure 22-5 TX32 and RX48 with Multiple MAC Domains per Fiber Node
The BSR and DOCSIS Service Groups
The CMTS needs to determine the service groups of a DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem for
channel bonding and load balancing purposes. The cable modem provides the
MD-DS-SG-ID that it has selected to the CMTS, if it can determine the identifier, or
zero if it cannot determine the identifier. If the CMTS needs to resolve the
MD-US-SG associated with the cable modem, it sends an upstream channel
adjustment to the cable modem, and the cable modem tunes to the new channel.
Note: All channels must be configured to frequencies that do not overlap
because they are going to a common set of fiber nodes.
D
4
D
5
D
6
D
7
TX32 Port 1
D
0
D
1
D
2
D
3
TX32 Port 0
U
0
U
1
U
2
U
3
RX48 US Port 0
FN-A
MAC Domain 1
U
4
U
5
U
6
U
7
RX48 US Port 1
MAC Domain 2
CM1 CM4 CM3 CM2
FN-B
CM5 CM8 CM7 CM6
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MAC Domain Service Groups
A MAC domain cable modem service group (MD-CM-SG) is the set of upstream
and downstream channels from the same MAC domain that are associated with a fiber
node.
A MAC domain cable modem downstream service group (MD-DS-SG) is the set
of downstream channels from the same MAC domain that are associated with a fiber
node.
A MAC domain cable modem upstream service group (MD-US-SG) is the set of
upstream channels from the same MAC domain that are associated with a fiber node.
MAC Domain Cable Modem Service Group
The MAC domain cable modem service group is the set of all upstream and
downstream channels configured to a MAC domain (with the cable bind command)
that a single cable modem could potentially receive or transmit on. The MAC domain
cable modem service group may be associated with one or more fiber nodes.
The MAC domain cable modem service group can be determined by the CMTS from
the upstream and downstream MAC bindings and the configured fiber node
associations of the channels.
The BSR automatically determines the MAC domain cable modem service group
(MD-CM-SG) for all upstream and downstream channels associated with a particular
MAC domain that can reach a particular cable modem based on the fiber node
configuration. The BSR assigns identifiers, unique per MAC domain, to each MAC
domain cable modem service group (MD-CM-SG-ID). The MD-CM-SG-ID is
associated with the MD-CM-SG during upstream and downstream channel
configurations to a fiber node. An operator can verify the MAC domain cable modem
Note: MAC domain cable modem service groups are subsets of a particular
cable modem service group. One or more MAC domain cable modem service
groups can be associated to a particular cable modem service group.
However, a single MAC domain cable modem service group cannot be
associated to more than one cable modem service group.
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service group associated with a cable modem using the show cable modem detail
command. The maximum number of MAC domain cable modem service groups is 48.
MAC Domain Upstream Service Group
The MAC domain upstream service group is the set of all upstream channels
configured to a MAC domain (with the cable bind command) that a single cable
modem could potentially transmit on. The MAC domain upstream service group can
be associated with one or more fiber nodes.
The MAC domain upstream service group can be determined by the CMTS from the
upstream MAC bindings and the configured fiber node associations of the upstream
channels
The BSR automatically determines the MAC domain upstream service group
(MD-US-SG) for all upstream channels associated with a particular MAC domain that
can reach a particular cable modem based on the fiber node configuration. The show
cable modem detail command can be used to verify the MD-US-SG of the cable
modem.The maximum number of MAC domain upstream service groups is 48. When
an upstream port is connected to more than one fiber node, the port will have more
than one MD-US-SG, and the BSR must utilize upstream ambiguity resolution.
Note: The show cable fiber node and show cable md-cm-sg commands
can be used to verify all MAC domain cable modem service group identifiers
(MD-CM-SG-IDs) and fiber node associations.
Note: MAC domain upstream service groups are subsets of a particular
upstream service group. One or more MAC domain upstream service groups
can be associated to a particular upstream service group. However, a single
MAC domain upstream service group cannot be associated to more than one
upstream service group.
Note: The show cable fiber node and show cable md-us-sg commands
can be used to verify all MAC domain upstream service group identifiers
(MD-US-SG-IDs) and fiber node associations.
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MAC Domain Downstream Service Group
The MAC domain downstream service group is the set of all downstream channels
configured to a MAC domain (with the cable bind command) that a single cable
modem could potentially receive on. The MAC domain downstream service group
can be associated with one or more fiber nodes.
The MAC domain downstream service group can be determined by the CMTS from
the downstream MAC bindings and the fiber node configured associations of the
downstream channels.
Note: The BSR supports upstream ambiguity resolution for determination of
correct MD-US-SG for a registering DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem. In topologies
where upstream ambiguity can not be resolved, the operator can specify the
cable modems load balancing group in the cable modem configuration file.
Note: The output of the show interfaces cable upstream command has
been enhanced to display the MD-US-SG-ID for 2:8 CMTS upstreams, RX48
upstream RF channels, and RX48 upstream logical channels.
Note: MAC domain downstream service groups are subsets of a particular
downstream service group. One or more MAC domain downstream service
groups can be associated to a particular downstream service group.
However, a single MAC domain downstream service group cannot be
associated to more than one downstream service group.
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The BSR automatically determines the MAC domain downstream service group
(MD-DS-SG) for all downstream channels associated with a particular MAC domain
that can reach a particular cable modem based on the fiber node configuration. The
show cable modem detail command can be used to verify the MD-DS-SG of the
cable modem. The maximum number of MAC domain downstream service groups is
32.
Displaying Fiber Node and Service Group Configuration
The show cable fiber-node command displays the fiber node and MAC domain
associations to include the MD-CM-SG-ID, MD-DS-SG-ID, and MD-US-SG-ID.
MOT:7A# show cable fiber-node [<X/Y>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
The fiber node and MAC domain associations are created when a fiber node name is
assigned to an upstream/downstream channel of a MAC domain. Once configured,
the MD-CM-SG-ID, MD-DS-SG-ID and MD-US-SG-ID are assigned internally for
the association.
Without the optional MAC domain X/Y parameter, the show cable fiber-node
command displays on a per MAC domain basis, the fiber node name,
MD-CM-SG-ID, MD-DS-SG-ID, and MD-US-SG-ID. Use the optional MAC domain
X/Y parameter to display the information for a specific MAC domain.
Note: The show cable fiber node and show cable md-ds-sg commands
can be used to verify all MAC domain downstream service group identifiers
(MD-DS-SG-IDs) and fiber node associations.
Note: The MD-CM-SG-IDs, MD-US-SG-IDs and MD-DS-SG-IDs are unique
per MAC domain.
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The show cable md-cm-sg command displays the upstream and downstream service
group IDs associated with the cable modem service groups of MAC domains.
MOT:7A# show cable md-cm-sg [<X/Y>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
The show cable md-us-sg command displays the upstream channels associated with
the upstream service groups of MAC domains.
MOT:7A# show cable md-us-sg [<X/Y>]
where:
X/Y is the slot and MAC domain number of the RX48 module.
Without the optional MAC domain X/Y parameter, the show cable md-us-sg
command displays on a per MAC domain basis, the MD-US-SG-ID and the
associated list of upstream channels. Use the optional MAC domain X/Y parameter to
display the information for a specific MAC domain.
The show cable md-ds-sg displays the downstream channels associated with the
downstream service groups of MAC domains.
MOT:7A# show cable md-ds-sg
The show cable modem topology command displays MAC domain service group
information for DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems.
MOT:7A# show cable modem <cm-mac> topology
cm-mac is the cable modems MAC address
Note: The show cable md-us-sg command displays MD-US-SG information
for RX48 and CMTS 2:8 interfaces. However, since the BSR does not
support a distributed MAC domain between RX48 and CMTS 2:8 channels,
the MD-US-SG information displayed for a particular MAC domain belongs to
either a CMTS 2:8 or an RX48, but not both.
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MAC Domain Channel Assignment and Topology
An operator configures each upstream and downstream channel of a CMTS into a
MAC domain. A MAC domain cable modem service group (MD-CM-SG) is the set
of downstream and upstream channels from the same MAC domain, all of which
reach a single cable modem.
Load Balancing Groups and DOCSIS Service Groups
The MD-CM-SG corresponds to a general load balancing group because it forms the
set of channels among which a cable modem can be moved while remaining
registered on the same MAC domain.
Bonded Cable Modems and DOCSIS Service Groups
All channels of a bonding group to which a bonding capable cable modem is
associated, should belong to the same MD-CM-SG. The MD-CM-SG is determined
for the cable modem during initial ranging. The channels in the bonding group
represent the set of channels among which traffic on bonded service flows can be
scheduled.
The BSR removes all cable downstream bonding group configurations for a MAC
domain from the running configuration file when the no cable downstream binding
command is accepted for that MAC domain.
On an RX48 MAC domain, the BSR rejects a cable downstream bonding-group
command to bind a set of downstream channels when they are not in the same
MD-DS-SG for the given MAC domain.
Note: The BSR supports upstream ambiguity resolution for determination of
correct MD-US-SG for a registering DOCSIS 3.0 cable modem. In topologies
where upstream ambiguity can not be resolved, the operator can specify the
cable modems load balancing group in the cable modem configuration file.
The ambiguity resolution is independent of upstream channel bonding.
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Cable Modem MAC Domain Service Group Determination
The CMTS must attempt to determine the MAC domain cable modem service group
(MD-CM-SG) of a cable modem when it registers. If the CMTS can determine a
unique MD-CM-SG for a given cable modem, it assigns the cable modem to the
MD-CM-SG. If the CMTS cannot determine a unique MD-CM-SG for a cable
modem, it does not assign the cable modem to any MD-CM-SG.
RX48 Load Balancing
For Release 6.0.0, the BSR supports up to 48 upstream load balancing groups on the
RX48. A load balancing group can contain up to 12 upstream channels, and a single
upstream channel can be associated with up to 12 load balancing groups.
A load balancing group can contain up to 32 downstream channels, and a single
downstream channel can be associated with up to 12 load balancing groups.
Functionally, this represents no change between Release 5.3.1 and Release 6.0.0, and
there is no difference between 2:8 CMTS and RX48 module operations with regard to
load balancing groups and downstream channels.
Release 6.0.0, and the introduction of the RX48, changes the way that load balancing
is configured between a TX32 and an RX48. In particular it affects the way:
n General load balancing groups are created and named.
n Load balancing policy, enable/disable controls, and initialization technique are
applied to general load balancing groups.
Note: This behavior applies to both the DOCSIS 3.0 and pre-DOCSIS 3.0
cable modems.
Note: The RX48 module does not support upstream static load balancing
using Spectrum group configurations. This feature is still supported on the 2:8
CMTS module.
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General Load Balancing Groups
The BSR automatically creates and names a general load balancing group for every
MD-CM-SG created. An operator can further configure restricted load balancing
groups that contain a subset of the channels in an MD-CM-SG to which a cable
modem can be assigned. Therefore, all upstream and downstream channels within a
load balancing group must belong to the same MD-CM-SG. The BSR supports up to
320 general and restricted load balancing groups.
n The BSR assigns general load balancing group names based on the fiber node
name. For example, fnA:
cable loadbalance-group fnA snmp-index 1 10/0
n Additionally the BSR assigns another name, synonymous with the fiber node
name. For example:
cable loadbalance-group Glbg-1 snmp-index 1 10/0
For the previous example, the show running-config command would display:
cable loadbalance-group Glbg-1 snmp-index 1 10/0
cable loadbalance-group fnA snmp-index 1 10/0
The reason for the addition of the Glbg-x name is that multiple fiber nodes may exist
in the same MD-CM-SG and therefore the same general load balancing group.
Note: For the 2:8 CMTS module, the user configures general and restricted
load balancing groups as in previous releases.
For the RX48 module, the user configures restricted load balancing groups
through RX48 Interface Configuration Mode using the cable
loadbalance-restricted (RX48) command.
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Load Balancing Policy
When a load balancing policy is assigned to a general load balancing group, that
policy is automatically assigned to all load balancing groups in the same MAC
domain. The default load balancing policy, available initialization techniques, and
enable/disable control for a general load balancing group are configured for the
general load balancing groups MAC domain on the fiber node that the group serves.
Because in most cases a general load balancing group serves a single fiber node, this
MAC domain/fiber node pair maps to a single general load balancing group. If the
general load balancing group serves multiple fiber nodes, the CMTS ensures that all
are configured with the same default policy, initialization techniques, and enable/
disable control.
n All general load balancing groups within a MAC domain are assigned the same
load balancing policy. By default there is no load balancing policy assigned to a
general load balancing group. Different load balancing policies cannot be applied
to different general load balancing groups within the same MAC domain.
n A load balancing policy is assigned per general load balancing group. A change
in load balancing policy to a general load balancing group is assigned to all
general load balancing groups within the MAC domain.
n The initialization technique is assigned per general load balancing group. A
change in the initialization technique for a general load balancing group is
assigned to all general load balancing groups within the MAC domain.
n Enable/disable control is assigned per general load balancing group. A change in
enable/disable control to a general load balancing group is assigned to all general
load balancing groups within the MAC domain.
Channel Bonding Topology and Fiber Nodes
A provisioned bonding group is a configured set of downstream or upstream
channels on the same MAC domain that reach at least one fiber node in common.
Because a single cable modem must be able to reach all channels of a bonding group,
the CMTS restricts the configuration of provisioned bonding groups so that all
channels reach at least one fiber node in common.
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Multicast Replication and Downstream Channel Set
The term downstream channel set (DCS) refers to an identified set of one or more
channels. A DCS is either a single downstream channel or a multiple-channel
downstream bonding group. A downstream service flow is considered to be
assigned to a single DCS at any given point in time. A downstream service flow
assigned to a DCS representing the multiple channels of a downstream bonding group
is called a bonded downstream service flow. A downstream service flow assigned to a
DCS consisting of a single downstream channel is called a non-bonded downstream
service flow.
For downstream multicast forwarding, DCS is an important concept. A DCS is either
a single downstream channel or a downstream bonding group (in scenarios of partial
service, a DCS can be a subset of a downstream bonding group). A downstream
multicast session is said to be replicated onto a DCS, that is, it is either transmitted on
a single downstream channel or transmitted on the multiple channels of a downstream
bonding group.
Legacy 2:8 CMTS Upstream Ports and Fiber Nodes
The BSR still supports 2:8 CMTS module upstream port associations to fiber nodes
on the HFC plant. Upstream channels from the RX48 module can be associated with
the same fiber nodes as CMTS 2:8 upstream channels. This allows an operator to
insert an RX48 module into the BSR chassis and add more upstream capacity to the
existing fiber nodes served by the CMTS 2:8 module. The MAC domains serving the
fiber nodes would be separate for each module.
Configuring an RX48 Port
The RX48 module has eight receiver ports with up to six upstream RF channels for
each port. In addition, each upstream RF channel supports up to four logical channels.
This chapter discusses functional requirements for configuring an upstream port on
the RX48 module. The following procedures are described:
n Entering RX48 Port Configuration Mode
n RX48 Port Administration
n Adjusting for Physical Delay between the Cable Interface and Cable Modems
n Fiber Node Configuration
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Entering RX48 Port Configuration Mode
RX48 Port Configuration mode allows a user to configure an RX48 port and
additionally, upstream RF channels and logical channels. RX48 Port Configuration
mode is available only from RX48 slots in the BSR chassis.
To enter RX48 Port Configuration mode, do the following:
1. Use the cable upstream port command, from Global Configuration mode, to
enter RX48 Port Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)# cable upstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and port number of the RX48 module.
MOT:7A(config)# cable upstream port 13/0
The command line prompt changes to:
MOT:7A(config-us)#
2. Use the end or exit commands to return to Global Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-us)# end
MOT:7A(config-us)# exit
RX48 Port Administration
This section discusses RX48 port administration. The following procedures are
described:
n Enabling an RX48 Port
n Entering a Description of the RX48 Port
Enabling an RX48 Port
The RX48 port is in an administrative shutdown state by default and must be enabled
to function.
To enable the RX48 port, do the following:
1. Use the no cable upstream shutdown command, from RX48 Port Configuration
mode, to enable the port:
MOT:7A(config-us)#no cable upstream shutdown
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2. Use the show running-config cable upstream port command to verify that the
port is enabled:
MOT:7A(config-us)#show running-config cable upstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and port number of the RX48 module.
Entering a Description of the RX48 Port
Use the cable upstream description command, from RX48 Port Configuration
mode, to specify descriptive information for an RX48 port.
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream description <LINE>
where:
LINE is the text that describes the downstream channel. This information is
limited to 80 characters, and spaces cannot be used.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream 0 description us-channel0
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration file,
and in the display output of various show commands such as the show ip
interface command.
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Adjusting for Physical Delay between the Cable Interface
and Cable Modems
The physical delay function is used to adjust the round-trip propagation delay
threshold between the RX48 module and cable modems.
Choose from the following options to adjust the physical delay function:
n Set a single fixed time for physical delay. The default fixed physical delay is 800
microseconds.
n Configure physical delay parameters so that they are adjusted automatically by
the BSR when you use the automatic option with a specified minimum and
maximum range in microseconds.
n If you do not want to specify a range for the automatic option, select the
automatic option without a specified minimum and maximum range in
microseconds.
Configuring an Automatic Physical Delay
Use the cable upstream physical-delay automatic command, from RX48 Port
Configuration mode, to set the automatic physical delay value for an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream physical-delay automatic [<10-1600> |
<10-1600>]
where:
10-1600 is the minimum upstream physical delay in microseconds. The default
value is 10 microseconds.
10-1600 is the maximum upstream physical delay in microseconds. The default
value is 1600 microseconds.
Configuring a Fixed Physical Delay
Use the cable upstream physical-delay command, from RX48 Port Configuration
mode, to set the fixed value for an upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream physical-delay <10-1600>
where:
10-1600 is the fixed upstream physical delay value in microseconds. The default
is 800 microseconds.
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The 800 microsecond default setting is an optimal setting for HFC networks with a
radius of not more than 50 miles (measuring the distance from the CMTS to the
farthest cable modem).
However, when the default setting of 800 microseconds is in force on HFC plants
with a radius larger than 50 miles, cable modems may not be able to register or pass
data reliably since the round-trip propagation delay exceeds the configured value for
the physical delay (that is, cable modems are not given enough time to register).
Should you need to change the default value for the physical delay, refer to the
guidelines in the following table or calculate a setting value using the formulas that
follow the table.
To calculate a setting value for your HFC plant, follow these steps using one of the
formulas provided in step 2:
1. Determine the distance from the BSR 64000 (the CMTS) to the most distant cable
modem measured in miles (or kilometers) of HFC (physical cable length).
Note: Setting a physical delay value larger than required is allowed, although
data passing performance will not be optimized. However, do not set a
physical delay value smaller than required. Doing so might cause some cable
modems to become inoperable.
Transit Delay
(Microsecs)
BSR
Physical
Delay
Setting
(Microsecs)
One-way
Distance
(Miles)
One-way
Distance
(Kilometers)
Round-trip
Distance
(Miles)
Round-trip
Distance
(Kilometers)
800 1,600 100.0 160.9 200.0 321.9
700 1,400 87.5 140.8 175.0 281.6
600 1,200 75.0 120.7 150.0 241.4
500 1,000 62.5 100.6 125.0 201.2
400 800 50.0 80.5 100.0 160.9
300 600 37.5 60.4 75.0 120.7
200 400 25.0 40.2 50.0 80.5
100 200 12.5 20.1 25.0 40.2
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2. Calculate the value for the physical delay using one of the following formulas:
For HFC measured in miles:
16 x L = PD
where:
L is the value determined in step 1.
PD is the value to specify for the command cable upstream physical-delay
For HFC measured in kilometers:
9.95 x L = PD
where:
L is the value determined in step 1.
PD is the value to specify for the command cable upstream physical-delay
Fiber Node Configuration
In an HFC network, a fiber node represents the point of interface between a fiber
termination and the coaxial distribution. In the BSR configuration, a fiber node
reflects the physical connectivity of the cable plant into service areas, in order to
enable channel bonding operations. The following procedures are described in this
section:
n Entering Fiber Node Configuration Mode
n Entering a Description of the Fiber Node
n Associating the Fiber Nodes to the RX48 Upstream Port
Note: The physical delay cannot be configured to a value less than 10
microseconds.
Note: It is necessary to assign a name to each fiber node. It is not necessary,
but recommended, to add a description to each fiber node name configured.
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Entering Fiber Node Configuration Mode
Fiber Node Configuration mode allows a user to name and describe a fiber node.
Enter Fiber Node Configuration mode as follows:
1. Use the cable fiber-node command, from Global Configuration mode, to enter
Fiber Node Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config)# cable fiber-node <WORD>
where:
WORD is the fiber node name up to a length of 15 characters.
The command line prompt changes to:
MOT:7A(config-fiber-node:<Fiber Node name>)#
2. Use the end or exit commands to return to Global Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-us)# end
MOT:7A(config-us)# exit
Entering a Description of the Fiber Node
Use the description command, from Fiber Node Configuration mode, to enter a
description of the fiber node:
MOT:7A(config-fiber-node:<Fiber Node name>)description <string>
where:
string is the Fiber Node description. A maximum of 255 characters can be
entered. The description must be enclosed within double quotes if the description
contains spaces. The description can include any printable ASCII character (# , \ !
; ? . &).
For example:
MOT:7A(config-fiber-node:FN-A)description North & East
Downtown
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Associating the Fiber Nodes to the RX48 Upstream Port
Use the cable upstream fiber-node command, from RX48 Upstream Port
Configuration mode, to associate an RX48 RF port to one or more configured fiber
nodes.
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream fiber-node <WORD>
where:
WORD is the fiber node name. Multiple fiber node names can be entered
separated by commas, with no spaces allowed.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream fiber-node FN-A
Configuring an RX48 RF Channel
The RX48 module has eight receiver ports with up to six upstream RF channels for
each port. In addition, each upstream RF channel supports up to four logical channels.
This chapter discusses functional requirements for configuring an upstream RF
channel on the RX48 module. The following procedures are described:
n Entering RX48 RF Channel Configuration Mode
n Upstream RF Channel Administration
n Configuring the RF Channel Power Level
n Associating a Spectrum Group to an Upstream RF Channel
n Configuring Upstream RF Channel Concatenation or Fragmentation Capabilities
n Configuring BCM 3142 Ingress Noise Cancellation
n Configuring Upstream Scheduler Controls
n Upstream RF Channel State Notifications
Entering RX48 RF Channel Configuration Mode
RX48 RF Channel Configuration mode allows a user to configure an RX48 upstream
RF channel.
To enter RX48 RF Channel Configuration mode, do the following:
1. Use the cable upstream port command, from Global Configuration mode, to
enter RX48 Port Configuration mode:
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MOT:7A(config)# cable upstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and port number of the RX48 module.
MOT:7A(config)# cable upstream port 13/0
The command line prompt changes to:
MOT:7A(config-us)#
2. Use the cable upstream command with the X argument, from RX48 Port
Configuration mode, to configure an upstream RF channel.
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
For example:
MOT:7A(config-us)# cable upstream 0 channel-id
3. Use the end or exit commands to return to Global Configuration mode:
MOT:7A(config-us)# end
MOT:7A(config-us)# exit
Upstream RF Channel Administration
The following configuration procedures define an RX48 RF channel by allowing an
operator to create a description for the RX48 channel, set the channels frequency and
channel width, and enable or disable the channel.
n Entering a Description of the RX48 Port
n Configuring the Upstream RF Channel Frequency
n Configuring Upstream RF Channel Width
n Enabling an RX48 Port
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Entering a Description of the Upstream RF Channel
Use the cable upstream description command with the X argument, from RX48 Port
Configuration mode, to specify descriptive information for an upstream port.
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> description <LINE>
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
LINE is the text that describes the downstream channel. This information is
limited to 80 characters, and spaces cannot be used.
For example:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream 0 description us-channel0
Configuring the Upstream RF Channel Frequency
The cable interface does not operate until a fixed upstream frequency is set. The RF
upstream frequency must comply with the expected cable modem output frequency.
Use the cable upstream frequency command with the X argument, from RX48 Port
Configuration mode, to enter the fixed center frequency for the upstream RF channel:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> frequency <5000000 -
85000000>
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
5000000 - 85000000 is the upstream frequency in Hertz.
Note: The entered description can be seen in the running configuration file
and in the display output of various show commands, such as the show ip
interface cable command.
Note: Make sure that the upstream frequency selected does not interfere
with the frequencies used for any other upstream applications running in the
cable plant.
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Configuring Upstream RF Channel Width
The cable upstream channel-width command is used to specify a channel width for
an upstream RF channel.
MOT:7A(config-us)# cable upstream <X> channel-width [200000 | 400000 |
800000 | 1600000 | 3200000 | 6400000]
where:
200000 - channel width of 200 kHz
400000 - channel width of 400 kHz
800000 - channel width of 800 kHz
1600000 - channel width of 1600 kHz
3200000 - channel width of 3200 kHz
6400000 - channel width of 64000 kHz
Enabling an Upstream RF Channel
An upstream RF channel is in an administrative shutdown state by default and must
be enabled.
Follow these steps to enable the RX48 upstream channel:
1. Use the no cable upstream shutdown command with the X argument, from
RX48 Port Configuration mode, to enable the upstream RF channel:
MOT:7A(config-us)#no cable upstream <X> shutdown
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
2. Use the show running-config cable upstream port command to verify that the
upstream RF channel is enabled:
Note: Upstream frequency ranges are different depending on your regional
implementation of DOCSIS or Euro-DOCSIS. The frequency ranges that
appear in the CLI Help are related to your implementation of DOCSIS. The
upstream frequency value for Euro-DOCSIS is 5000000 to 65000000 Hz.
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MOT:7A(config-us)#show running-config cable upstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and port number of the RX48 module.
Configuring the RF Channel Power Level
The cable interface controls cable modem output power levels to meet the desired
upstream RF channel input power level. Input power level adjustments to an upstream
RF channel compensate for cable interface signal degradation between the optical
receiver and the upstream RF channel. The upstream input power level can be
configured in either absolute or relative mode.
n If the upstream input power level is set to the absolute mode, the input power
level does not change when the upstream channel width is changed. Defining the
input power level in absolute mode could possibly cause upstream return lasers to
clip on a completely populated upstream RF channel. The default power level is
0 dB.
n If the upstream input power level is set in relative mode, the input power level
changes when the upstream channel width is changed. For example, if the input
power level is +11 dBmV for a DOCSIS 3.2 MHz upstream channel bandwidth
setting in relative mode and is changed to 1.6 MHz, the default receive power is
+8 dBmV. The default power levels for the 3.2 MHz and 1.6 MHz channels are
equal relative to their respective channel bandwidth settings.
Caution: If the power level is not explicitly set on the upstream interfaces,
they default to 0 dBmV in absolute mode with a rate of 3.2 MHz, 2560
kilosymbols per second. Ensure that the correct power level is set on each
upstream channel.
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Setting the Upstream Power Level in Relative Mode
The following table describes how the upstream RF channel bandwidth corresponds
to the input power-level range and the default power level for a specific upstream
channel in relative mode.
Use the cable upstream power-level default command with the X argument, from
RX48 Port Configuration mode, to set the upstream input power level in relative
mode:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> power-level default <-150 - +150>
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
<-150 - +150> is the number expressed in dB above or below the default input
power level.
Example 1:
To set the input power level for a 3.2 MHz channel in relative mode from +11 dBmV
to +5 dBmV:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream 0 power-level default -60
The default input power level is reduced by 6 dBmV. The power level is now
+5 dBmV.
Example 2:
To set the input power level for a 3.2 MHz channel in relative mode from +11 dBmV
to 0 dBmV:
Upstream Channel
Bandwidth
Default Power
Level
Power-Level
Range
200 kHz -1 dBmV -16 to +14 dBmV
400 kHz +2 dBmV -13 to +17 dBmV
800 kHz +5 dBmV -10 to +20 dBmV
1.6 MHz +8 dBmV -7 to +23 dBmV
3.2 MHz +11 dBmV -4 to +26 dBmV
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MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream 0 power-level default -110
The default input power level is reduced by 11 dBmV.
Setting the Upstream Power Level in Absolute Mode
Use the cable upstream power-level command with the X argument, from RX48 Port
Configuration mode, to set the upstream input power level in absolute mode:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> power-level <power>
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
power is the input power level, expressed in dB.
Example
To set the upstream input power level to +5 dBmV in absolute mode, which keeps the
input power level at +5 dBmV regardless of the upstream channel bandwidth setting:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream 0 power-level 50
Associating a Spectrum Group to an Upstream RF Channel
This section describes how to associate upstream RF channels to spectrum groups, the
number of associations of a particular channel to different spectrum groups, and the
number of upstream channels that a given spectrum group can have.
Each Broadcom BCM3142 Upstream Phy Chip has six RF channels associated to an
RX48 port. Any one of the twelve RF channels can be configured to a spectrum
group. When a spectrum group is applied to an upstream RF channel, that upstream
RF channel belongs to the spectrum group.
Use the following steps to assign a spectrum group to an upstream port and associated
receiver:
Caution: Use caution when increasing the input power level in absolute
mode. The cable modems on the HFC network increase their transmit power
level by 3 dB for every incremental upstream channel bandwidth change,
causing an increase in the total power on the upstream channel. This
increase may violate the upstream return laser design parameters.
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1. Use the cable upstream spectrum-group command with the X argument, from
RX48 Port Configuration mode, to apply a spectrum group to an upstream RF
channel:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> spectrum-group <WORD>
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
WORD is the spectrum group name to be associated to the upstream RF
channel.
2. Use the show cable spectrum-group command to verify if the spectrum group is
assigned to the upstream port:
MOT:7A(config-us)#show cable spectrum-group [<WORD>]
where:
WORD is the spectrum group name associated to the upstream RF channel.
3. Use the show controllers cable upstream command to see which spectrum
group is applied to each upstream.
MOT:7A(config-if)#show controllers cable <X/Y> upstream <NUM>
where:
X/Y displays cable interface controller information for the specified BSR
chassis slot and MAC domain including RF signal information, the type of
hardware installed, FEC information for both corrected and uncorrected
packets, the spectrum group and the status of the cable interface.
NUM displays information for an upstream port including the upstream
modulation type, channel width, frequency, modulation profile information
(minislots, interleave, and preamble), and upstream channel ID number.
or
Use the show running config cable upstream port command to see which
spectrum group is applied to each upstream.
MOT:7A#show running-config cable upstream port <X/Y>
where:
X/Y is the slot and port number of the RX48 module.
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Configuring Upstream RF Channel Concatenation or
Fragmentation Capabilities
The CMTS concatenation/fragmentation feature allows an MSO to globally enable or
disable concatenation or fragmentation for DOCSIS 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0 cable modems.
Enabling the concatenation/fragmentation feature allows the CMTS to do
concatenation or fragmentation with participating cable modems. Concatenation
increases per-cable modem upstream throughput by combining multiple MAC frames
into one packet request. Cable modems request only one DOCSIS time slot on the
upstream channel for multiple small packets, as opposed to having to request an
individual time slot for each MAC frame.
The CMTS concatenation/fragmentation feature also allows an MSO to disable
CMTS concatenation. Disabling CMTS concatenation can be useful in preventing
potential concatenation-related problems from occurring.
Use the cable upstream capability command with the X argument, from RX48 Port
Configuration mode, to globally enable or disable concatenation or fragmentation
capabilities for an upstream RF channel:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> capability concatenation
MOT:7A(config-us)#no cable upstream <X> capability concatenation
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> capability fragmentation
MOT:7A(config-us)#no cable upstream <X> capability fragmentation
where:
X is the upstream channel number (0-5).
Caution: The cable upstream capability command is intended for Motorola
support purposes only. The command may or may not be displayed in a
running-configuration file, depending on various other configuration settings.
Do not add, delete, or change the cable upstream capability configuration
setting except as directed by Motorola support personnel.
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Configuring BCM 3142 Ingress Noise Cancellation
The cable upstream ingress-canceller enable command enables the ingress
canceller feature for an upstream RF channel of the RX48. This command is used to
protect against plant impairments such as common path distortion (CPD), citizens
band (CB), short-wave radio, and ham radio by opening unused portions of the
upstream spectrum. The ingress canceller feature is enabled by default.
Use the cable upstream ingress-canceller enable command, from RX48 RF
Channel Configuration mode, to enable or disable ingress cancellation for an RX48
upstream RF channel via the BCM 3142 chip:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> ingress-canceller enable
MOT:7A(config-us)#no cable upstream <X> ingress-canceller enable
where:
X is the upstream channel number (0-5).
Configuring Upstream Scheduler Controls
The following configuration procedures are used by the upstream bandwidth
scheduler when creating Upstream Bandwidth Allocation Maps for cable modems.
n Configuring the Upstream Bandwidth Allocation Map Interval
n Configuring the Invited Ranging Interval for Cable Modems
n Configuring the Cable Modem Ranging Delay
n Configuring the Cable Modem Rate Limit
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Configuring the Upstream Bandwidth Allocation Map Interval
The cable upstream map-interval command is used by the upstream bandwidth
scheduler to define the minimum MAP size in microseconds. The actual MAP size
may be longer depending on scheduling of grants for bandwidth requests. The
specified map interval determines both the minimum size of a MAP and the number
of MAPs that are generated per second. For example, the default 4000 microsecond
value specifies a 4 millisecond map size and 250 MAPs per second.
Use the cable upstream map-interval command with the X argument, from RX48
Port Configuration mode, to define the minimum MAP size:
MOT:7A(config-us)#cable upstream <X> map-interval <1000-16000>
where:
X is the upstream RF channel number (0-5).
1000-16000 is the time interval in microseconds. The default is 4000
microseconds.
Configuring the Invited Ranging Interval for Cable Modems
The cable upstream invited-range-interval command is used by the MAC to
determine how often to schedule station maintenance intervals for each cable modem.
The specified invited ranging interval in milliseconds determines how often each
cable modem is allowed to range. For example, the default value of 10000
milliseconds implies that a particular cable modem is sent a station maintenance
opportunity for ranging every 10000 milliseconds (every 10 seconds). Depending on
the number of cable modems supported by the scheduler, there would be station
maintenance opportunities scheduled in every other MAP to handle the periodic
ranging for all cable modems.
Note: The BSR will not generate MAPs and upstream channel descriptors
(UCDs) associated with RX48 logical channels until the corresponding RX48
RF channel is operational, enabled, and bound to a MAC domain.
Note: The BSR does not provide the invited ranging interva