You are on page 1of 32

INFINITY.

COM
FINANCIAL SECURITIES LIMITED

SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROJECT


PREPARED BY:

VIRAL H SHAH

CHETANA’S INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT & RESEARCH, MUMBAI

MAY-JULY 2008

UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF:

MR. SHAILESH KADAM (SR. ANALYST, DERIVATIVES)

PINC RESEARCH
MUMBAI (CORPORATE OFFICE)

1218, MAKER CHAMBER V, NARIMAN POINT,

MUMBAI-400021
OPTION PRICING
DECLARATION

This is to declare that the study presented by me to Chetana’s


Institute of Management and Research, in part completion of
the PGDM under the title “OPTION PRICING” had been done
under the guidance of Prof.SUHAS GHARAT.

VIRAL H. SHAH
CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that the study presented by VIRAL H. SHAH to the
Chetana’s Institute of Management and Research in part
completion of the PGDM under the title Study of “Option Pricing”
and the “Understanding of Futures and Option” had been done
under the guidance of Prof. SUHAS GHARAT.

The project in the nature of original work that has not so far been
submitted for any Diploma of Chetana’s Institute of Management
and Research or any other university. Reference of the work and
related sources of information have been given at the end.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

 
 
 
I am thankful to Mr. Shailesh Kadam, (Senior Analyst, Derivatives ‐ project 
mentor) for providing necessary guidance which was helpful in completion of 
this project. 
I would also like to thank Mr. Anand Kuchelan (Senior Analyst, Derivatives) 
&  Mr.  Mihir  Mehta  (Structured  Products,  Derivatives)  for  guiding  us 
whenever we needed their help 
My special thanks to Mr. Sailav Kaji (Head­ Derivatives & Strategist) for his 
unconditional support. 
I would also like to thank my friends providing the kind cooperation time to 
time, when required. 
This Activity has helped me recognise my capabilities which will help me in my 
future endeavours. 
 
LEARNING EXPERIENCE

 
 
 
It  was  a  great  experience  working  on  this  project,  we  have  learnt  a  lot.  This 
project  has  helped  us  analyse  the  different  strategies  used  .  After  the 
completion of this project, we have become very clear about the markets and 
it’s working. 
Besides, we also gained a lot of knowledge relating to Futures & options. This 
internship has helped us understand complicated and technical terms like Call 
& Put and the strategies involved in the F&O market. We have understood the 
overall working of F&O market.  
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Background.................................................................
 
2. Executive Summary…………………………………………………… 

     3. Objective..................................................................................... 

        4. Section 1: Introduction to Futures & Options   ............. 

• Introduction to Derivatives………………………................. 
• Option Strategies.............................................................. 

      5. Section 2: Structure Products............................................. 

• payoffs 

6. Methodology..............................................................

7. Recommendation......................................................

8. Bibliography..............................................................
BACKGROUND

PINC (Pioneer Investcorp Limited), is a full service


financial company and is headquartered in Mumbai. In
a little more than two decades, they have developed
their shares of corporate and institutional clientele, as
well as a name in investment banking and securities
trading, and a sizable reputation as an insurance and
reinsurance broking company. They have put their
stock in lasting and rewarding business and banking
relationships that open doors to capital and support for
their clients and ideas, and in research, which
continually informs and enlightens all the work they do
for their clients.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
 
                 The report has been divided into two sections;   
                The details of each section have been given  
                below: 
               Section I: 
                 This section includes the introduction to Futures  
                and Options that I did in the 1st two weeks of my  
               Summer Internship. It clearly outlines the Futures &  
              Options Market and its working. 
              Section II: 
                This section is about the strategy used to get a  
                positive return on a monthly bases irrespective to  
                the market movements without changing the  
               strategy in tabular form. 

   
OBJECTIVE

Main aim of the strategy is to gives a positive return annually. For this 
there is no need to keep a market watch but to get a positive return at 
the end of the year by using the same strategy throughout. Important 
thing  is  that,  no  matter  what  the  market  is  i.e:  whether  it  is  a  bull 
market or bear market the return should be positive at the end of the 
year. But the process is still on to get a positive return every month by 
not changing the strategy and the loss should not exceed 5 %. Even if 
there is any loss it is to be restricted to some extent. We are trying to 
get a monthly positive return irrespective to the market moments.   

 
   
INTRODUCTION TO
DERIVATIVE

DERIVATIVES DEFINED
Derivatives is a product whose value is derived from the value of one or more 
basic variables, called bases (underlying asset, index or reference rate), in a 
contractual manner. The underlying asset can be equity, forex, commodity or 
any other asset.

DERIVATIVES PRODUCTS
Derivative projects have several variants. The most common are the following: 
 

• Forwards 
A forward contract is a customised contract between two entities, where 
settlement takes place on a specific date in the future at today’s pre‐agreed 
price on Over The Counter Markets. 
 
• Futures 
A futures contract is an agreement between two parties to buy or sell an asset 
at a certain time in the future at a certain price. Futures contract are special 
types of forward contracts in the sense that former are standardised exchange‐
traded contracts. 
 
 
 
 
• Options 
 Options give buyer the right but not the obligation to buy or sell underline. 
Options are two types’ calls and puts. Calls give the buyer the right but not the 
obligation to buy a given quantity of the underlying asset, at a given price on or 
before a given future date. Puts give the buyer the right but not the obligation 
to sell a given quantity of the underlying asset, at a given price on or before a 
given future date. 
 
TYPES OF TRADERS

Derivative markets have been outstandingly successful. The main reason 
is that they have attracted many different kinds of traders and have a 
great deal of liquidity. When an investor wants to take one side  of a 
contract, there is usually no problem in finding someone that is prepared 
to take the other side. 
 
Three broad categories’ of traders can be identified: 
 
• Hedger use derivatives to reduce risk that they face from potential future 
moments in the market variables. Example of hedging using option. 
An investor who in may 2003 owns 1000 microsoft shares. The current share 
price is 28$ per share. The investor is concerned about the possible share price 
decline in the next 2 months and wants protection. The investor could buy ten 
July put option contract on Microsoft on the CBOE (Chicago board options 
exchange) with a strike price of 27.5$. This would give the investor the right to 
sell a total of 1000 shares for the price of $27.50. if the quoted option price is 
$1, then each option contract would cost 100*$1=100$ and the total cost of 
hedging strategy would be 10*$100=1000. The strategy cost $1000 but 
guarantees that the share cab be sold for atleast 27.5$ per share during the life 
of the option.if the marker price of Microsoft falls below 27.5$ the option can 
be exercised, so that 27,500$ is realized for entire holding. When the cost of 
option is taken into account, the amount realized is 26,500. If the market price 
stays above $27.5, the options are not exercised and expire worthless. 
However, in this case the value of the holding is always above $27500. 
 
• Speculators wish to take a position in the market. Either they are betting 
that the price of the asset will go up or they are betting that it will go 
down. 
An example using speculation ‐ using option. 
Suppose that it is October and a speculator consider that amazon.com is likely 
to increase in value over the next 2 months. The stock price is currently $20, 
and a 2‐month call option with a $22.50 strike price is currently selling for $1.  
 
As illustrated in the diagram 
 
 December stock price 
Investor strategy                                         $15                           $27        
Buy 100 shares                                           ($500)                      $700 
Buy 2000 call options                               ($2000)                    $7000 
 
 
Two possible alternatives, assuming that the speculator is willing to invest 
$2000. One alternative is to purchase 100 shares; the other involves the 
purchase of 2000 call option. Suppose that the speculator’s hunch is correct 
and the price of amazon.com’s share rises to $27 by December. The first 
alternative of buying the stock yields a profit of  
                      100*($27‐$20)= $700 
However the second alternative is far more profitable. A call option on Amazon 
with the strike price of $4.5 gives the payoffs of $12.5, because it enables 
something worth $27 to be bought for $22.5. The total payoffs from the 2000 
options that are purchased under the second alternative is  
                             2000*$4.5=$9000 
Subtracting the original cost of the option yield a net profit of 
                              $9000‐$2000=$7000 
The option strategy is therefore 10 times more profitable then the strategy of 
buying the stock. 
 
 
 
• Arbitrageurs involves locking in a riskless profit by simultaneously 
entering into transaction in two or more markets. An example illustrated 
below 
A stock that is traded on both exchanges ie: the New York stock exchange and 
the London stock exchange. Suppose that the stock price is $172 in New York 
and 100 pounds in London at a time when the exchange rate is 1.7500 per 
pound. An arbitrageur could simultaneously buy 100 shares of the stock in 
New York and sell them in London to obtain risk‐ free profits of 
                                                 100*[($1.75*100)‐$172] 
 Or $300 in the absence of transaction costs. Transactions cost would probably 
eliminate the profit for small investor. However a large investment bank faces 
very low transaction cost in both the stock market and foreign exchange 
market. It would find the arbitrageur opportunity very attractive and try to 
take as much advantage of it as possible.     
 

2.2 FUTURES TERMINOLOGY

• Spot Price 
The price at which an asset trades in the spot market. 
• Futures Price 
The price at which Futures contract trades in the futures market 
• Contract Cycle 
The  period  over  which  a  contract  trades.  The  index  futures  contracts  on  the 
NSE have a 1 month, 2 months and 3 months expiry cycle which expires on the 
last Thursday of the month, thus a January expiration contract expires on the 
last Thursday on January and a February expiration contract ceases trading on 
the last Thursday of February. On the Friday following the last Thursday, a new 
contract having a 3 month expiry is introduced for trading. 
 
 
• Expiry Date 
It is a date specified in the Futures Contract. This is the last date on which the 
contract will be traded at the end of which it will cease to exist. 
 
• Contract Size 
The  amount  of  the  asset  that  has  to  be  delivered  under  one  contract.  For 
instance, the contract size on NSE Futures, market is 200 Nifties.  
 
• Basis 
In  the  contract  of  financial  futures  Basis  can  be  defines  as  the  futures  price  ‐ 
the spot price. There will be a different basis for each delivery month for each 
contract.  In  a  normal  market  basis  will  be  positive.  This  reflects  that  futures 
prices normally exceed spot prices. 
 
• Cost of Carry 
The relationship  between  futures  prices  and  spot  prices  and  the  summarised 
in terms of what is known as the cost of carry. This measures the storage cost 
plus the interest that is paid to the finance the asset less the income earned on 
the asset. 
 
• Initial margin 
The  amount  that  must  be  deposited  in  the  margin  account  at  the  time  of 
futures contract is first entered into is known as initial margin. 
 
 
• Marking­to­market 
In  the  Futures  market,  at  the  end  of  each  trading  day  a  margin  account  is 
adjusted  to  reflect  the  investors  gain  or  loss  depending  upon  the  futures 
closing price. 
 
 
• Maintenance margin 
This  is somewhat lower  than  the  initial margin.  This  is set  to  ensure  that the 
balance  in  the  margin  account  never  become  negative.  If  the  balance  in  the 
margin  account  falls  below  the  maintenance  margin,  the  investor  receives  a 
margin call and is expected to top up the margin account to the initial margin 
level before trading comes on trading commences on the next day. 

2.3 OPTION TERMINOLOGY

• Stock Option 
Stock options are options on individual stocks. Options currently trade on over 
500 stocks in the United States. A contract gives the holder the right to buy or 
sell shares at a specified price. 
 
• Buyer of an option 
The buyer of an option is the one who by paying an option premium buys the 
right but not the obligation to exercise his option on the seller. 
 
 
• Writer of an option 
 
Writer of a call or put option is the one who receives the option premium and 
there by obliged to sell or buy the asset if the buyer exercises on him. 

THERE ARE 2 BASIC TYPES OF OPTION

• Call option 
 
A call option gives the holder the right but not the obligation to buy an asset by 
a certain date for a certain price. 
 
 
• Put option 
 
A put option gives the holder the right but not the obligation to sell an asset by 
a certain date for a certain price. The date Option Price 
Option price which the option buyer pays to the option seller. It is also referred 
as an option premium. 
 
• Expiration date 
 
The  date  specified  in  the  options  contract  is  known  as  expiration  date,  the 
exercise date, and the strike date of the maturity. 
 
• Strike price 
 
The price specified in the options contract is known as the strike price or the 
exercise price. 
• American option 
 
It is an option that can be exercised at any time up to the expiration date. Most 
exchange traded options are American.  
 
• European option 
 
It  is  an  option  that  is  exercised  only  on  the  expiration  date  itself.  European 
options are easier to analyse than American options. 
 
• In­the­money option 
 
It  is  an  option  that  would  lead  to  a  positive  cash  flow  to  the  holder  it  was 
exercised  immediately.  A  call  option  on  the  index  is  said  to  be  in  the  money 
when the current index stands at a level higher than the strike price. 
 
• At­the­money option 
 
It  is  an  option  that  would  lead  to  zero  cash  flow  if  it  were  exercised 
immediately.  An option  on  the  index  is  at‐the‐money  when  the  current  index 
equals the strike price. 
 
• Out­of­money option 
 
It  is  an  option  that  would  lead  to  negative  cash  flow  if  it  were  exercised 
immediately.  A  call  option  on  the  index  is  out‐of‐money  when  the  current 
index stands at a level which is less than the strike price. 
 
• Intrinsic value of an option 
 
The  option  premium  can  be  broken  down  into  2  components  intrinsic  value 
and the time value. Intrinsic value of a call is the amount the option is ITM. If 
the call is OTM the intrinsic value is zero. Putting it another way the intrinsic 
value  of  a  call  is  max  (0,  (St‐K))  which  means  the  intrinsic  value  of  a  call  is 
greater  of  zero  or  (St‐K).  Similarly  the  intrinsic  value  of  a  put  is  max  (0(K‐
St)).i.e. the greater of zero or K‐St where K is strike price and St is spot price. 
 
• Time Value of an option 
 
It is the difference between its premium and its intrinsic Value. Both call and 
put have Time Value. An Option that is OTM or ATM has only one Time Value. 
The maximum Time Value exists when the option is ATM. The longer the time 
to expiration the greater is the options Time Value, all else equal. At expiration 
an option should have no Time Value. 
 
 
™ STRATEGIES…AND APPLICATIONS....WHEN TO APPLY

• Butterfly Spread 
 
  An option strategy combining a bull and bear spread. It uses three 
strike prices. The lower two strike prices are used in the bull 
spread, and the higher strike price in the bear spread. Both puts and 
calls can be used.  
 
  This strategy has limited risk and limited profit. 
 

Long Butterfly      (buy call 2 extreme price and sell call at 1 middle price) 

                                     call1     call         call2 
Strike price                 100      140       180   
Premium                        50        30          20

Spot price Call1  Call Call Call2 total 


30 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
40 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
50 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
60 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
70 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
80 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
90 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
100 ‐50  30 30 ‐20 ‐10 
110 ‐40  30 30 ‐20 0 
120 ‐30  30 30 ‐20 10 
130 ‐20  30 30 ‐20 20 
140 ‐10  30 30 ‐20 30 
 

150  0 20  20 ‐20 20


160  10 10  10 ‐20 10
170  20 0  0 ‐20 0

180  30 ‐10  ‐10 ‐20 ‐10


190  40 ‐20  ‐20 ‐10 ‐10
200  50 ‐30  ‐30 0 ‐10
210  60 ‐40  ‐40 10 ‐10
220  70 ‐50  ‐50 20 ‐10
230  80 ‐60  ‐60 30 ‐10

100

50

Series1
0
Series2

Series3
-50
Series4

-100

Short Butterfly        (sell call at 2 extreme price and buy 2 call at 1 
-150
                                        middle price) 
                                    Call1         Call       Call2
Strike price               100        140         180
Premium                    50           30            20   
Spot price  Call1  Call  Call Call2 Total 
30  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
40  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
50  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
60  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
70  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
80  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
90  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
100  50 ‐30  ‐30 20 10
110  40 ‐30  ‐30 20 0
120  30 ‐30  ‐30 20 ‐10
130  20 ‐30  ‐30 20 ‐20
140  10 ‐30  ‐30 20 ‐30
150  0 ‐20  ‐20 20 ‐20
160  ‐10 ‐10  ‐10 20 ‐10
170  ‐20 0  0 20 0
180  ‐30 10  10 20 10
190  ‐40 20  20 10 10
200  ‐50 30  30 0 10
210  ‐60 40  40 ‐10 10
220  ‐70 50  50 ‐20 10
 
230  ‐80 60  60 ‐30 10

150

100

Series1
50
Series2

Series3
0
Series4

-50

-100
• STRADDLE
 
 An options strategy with which the investor holds a position in both a call and put with 
the same strike price and expiration date. 
 
 Straddles are a good strategy to pursue if an investor believes that a stock's price will 
move significantly, but is unsure as to which direction. The stock price must move 
significantly if the investor is to make a profit. As shown in the diagram above, should onl
a small movement in price occur in either direction, the investor will experience a loss. A
a result, a straddle is extremely risky to perform. Additionally, on stocks that are expecte
to jump, the market tends to price options at a higher premium, which ultimately reduces
the expected payoff should the stock move significantly.  
Long Staddle (buy call and buy put at strike price)

• strike price 100


call premium 10
• Put premium          10 
                  
Spot  Cash flow  Cash flow  Total  Net flow 
from call  from put  premium 
70  ‐10  20  20  10 
80  ‐10  10  20 0
90  ‐10  0  20  ‐10 
100  ‐10  ‐10  20  ‐20 
110  0  ‐10  20  ‐10 
120  10  ‐10  20  0 
130  20  ‐10  20  10 
140  30  ‐10  20  20 
150  40  ‐10  20  30 
 

 
 
    
  50

  40
 
  30

  20
  10 Series1
  Series2
  0
Series3
  -10
70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150

 
  -20

  -30
 
 
 
 

Max profit= unlimited


Max loss= total premium
Break-even point = X + prem / X- Prem
 
 
            
 
 
       
  Short straddle ( sell call and put at the strike price )
Strike price                        100 
 
Call premium       10 
 
Put premium       10   
 

 
 
  Spot  Cash  Cash  Total  Net 
price  flow  flow  premium flow 
from  from 
call  put 
70  10  ‐20  20  ‐10
80  10  ‐10  20  0
90  10  0  20  10
100  10  10  20  20
110  0  10  20  10
120  ‐10  10  20  0
130  ‐20  10  20  ‐10
140  ‐30  10  20  ‐20
 
150  ‐40  10  20  ‐30
 
 
 
 
  30
 
  20

 
10
 
  0
  70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 150
  -10 Series1

  Series2
  -20
Series3
  -30
 
  -40
 
  -50

 
 
 
  max profit = premium 
 
  max loss = unlimited 
  breakeven point = X + prem / X ‐ Prem
 
 
 
• STRANGLE
 
  An options strategy where the investor holds a position in both a call 
and put with different strike prices but with the same maturity and 
underlying asset. This option strategy is profitable only if there are 
large movements in the price of the underlying asset.  
 
This is a good strategy if you think there will be a large price 
movement in the near future but are unsure of which way that price 
movement will be.  
  The strategy involves buying an out‐of‐the‐money call and an out‐of‐
the‐money put option. A strangle is generally less expensive than a 
straddle as the contracts are purchased out of the money.  
 
For example, imagine a stock currently trading at $50 a share. To 
employ the strangle option strategy a trader enters into two option 
positions, one call and one put. Say the call is for $55 and costs $300 
($3.00 per option x 100 shares) and the put is for $45 and costs $285 
($2.85 per option x 100 shares). If the price of the stock stays between 
$45 and $55 over the life of the option the loss to the trader will be 
$585 (total cost of the two option contracts). The trader will make 
money if the price of the stock starts to move outside of the range. Say 
that the price of the stock ends up at $35. The call option will expire 
worthless and the loss will be $300 to the trader. The put option 
however has gained considerable value, it is worth $715 ($1,000 less 
the initial option value of $285). So the total gain the trader has made 
is $415.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Long strangle (buy call at higher strike price and buy put at lower price) 

Strike price                   call               put 

                                        120               100  

Premium                         20                 10      
Spot price  Call pay  Put pay Net pay
40  ‐20  50 30
50  ‐20  40 20
60  ‐20  30 10
70  ‐20  20 0
80  ‐20  10 ‐10
90  ‐20  0 ‐20
100  ‐20  ‐10 ‐30
110  ‐20  ‐10 ‐30
120  ‐20  ‐10 ‐30
130  ‐10  ‐10 ‐20
140  0  ‐10 ‐10
150  10  ‐10 0
160  20  ‐10 10
 
 
  60

50

40

30

20 Series1

10 Series2
  Series3
0
 
  -10
  -20
 
  -30
   max profit = unlimited 
-40
   max loss = premium 
   b/e point = lower X ‐ prem & higher X +prem

Short  strangle  (sell call at higher price and sell put at lower price) 

Strike price             call                   put       

                                   120                 100 

Premium                   20                   10 

Spot price  Call pay  Put pay Net pay 


40  20  ‐50 ‐30
50  20  ‐40  ‐20 
60  20  ‐30 ‐10
70  20  ‐20 0
80  20  ‐10 10
90  20  0 20
100  20  10 30
110  20  10 30
120  20  10 30
130  10  10 20
140  0  10 10
150  ‐10  10 0
160  ‐20  10 ‐10
  40

  30

20
 
10

0
40

50

60

70

80

90

100

110

120

130

140

150

160

170

-10 Series1

-20 Series2

Series3
-30

-40

-50

-60
max profit = premium 
max loss = unlimited
b/e point = lower X ‐ prem & higher X +prem
 
 

• STRAP
 
  An options strategy created by being long in one put and two call 
options, all with the exact same strike price, maturity and 
underlying asset. Also referred to as a "triple option". 
  A strap option is used when a trader believes that the future price 
movement of the underlying security will be large and more 
likely up than down. By adding two call options the trader has a 
large gain if he or she is right about the large upward movement. 
But if the forecast is wrong and the price has a large reversal, the 
trader is protected by the put option 
 
 
 

• STRIP
 
  1. For bonds, the process of removing coupons from a bond and 
then selling the separate parts as a zero coupon bond and interest 
paying coupons. Also known as a stripped bond or zero coupon 
bond.  
 
2. In options, a strategy created by being long in one call and two 
put options, all with the exact same strike price.  
  In the context of bonds, stripping is typically done by a brokerage 
 
or other financial institution 
 
 

• CALENDAR SPREAD
 
  An options or futures spread established by simultaneously 
entering a long and short position on the same underlying asset 
but with different delivery months. Sometimes referred to as an 
interdelivery, intramarket, time or horizontal spread.  
  An example of a calendar spread would be going long on a crude 
oil futures contract with delivery next month and going short on a 
 
crude oil futures contract whose delivery is in six months.   
™ METHODOLOGY

The data that is to be used to proceed the project:  
•             NSE  (NATIONAL  STOCK  EXCHANGE)  ‐  collected 
information which is the strike prices of each particular 
expiry months as well the expiry dates. 
•              And  secondly,  the  price  of  each  expiry  months 
and  their  next  month  opening  price  respectively  are 
collected from Bloomberg (software). 
•  And  the  payoffs  has  done  using  formula  taking  200 
shares as its lot size.  And formula used is : 
      Taking  ‘IF’  condition  if(nz1  price(opening  price  for 
the  next  moth)<  strike  price,(nz1‐strike 
price+premium)*200,premium*200).  This  is  for  PUT 
option. 
 And for CALL option the formula used is : 
      If(nz1>strikeprice,(nz1‐strike 
price+premium)*200,premium*200). 
 
 
RECOMMENDATION
 
 
The basic idea behind the strategy is to get an annual profit 
from the invested amount without changing the strategy used. 
Another important thing is that the strategy does not take into 
consideration the market ie whether the market is bull or bear.
 

                  BIBLIOGRAPHY

 
• JOHN  C.  HULL‐‐‐‐  OPTIONS,  FUTURES,  AND  OTHER        
DERIVATIVES 
• www.nseindia.com 
• Bloomberg(software) 
• www.wikipedia.com 
• www.investopedia.com