Revit MEP 2009

Metric Tutorial
April 2008
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Contents
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Chapter 1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Using the Tutorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Accessing Training Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Understanding the Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Navigating the User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Express Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Chapter 2 Express Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Creating a Supply Air System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Creating a Secondary Supply Air System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Creating Ductwork for the Secondary Supply Air System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Creating the Primary System Ductwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Adding the Primary System Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Inspecting and Color Coding the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Creating Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Creating Lighting Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Creating Switch Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Tagging Lighting Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Creating Power Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Balancing Electrical Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Developing Your MEP Designs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Chapter 3 Mechanical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Planning Mechanical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
v
Placing Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Creating Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Assigning a Color Scheme to Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Performing a Heating and Cooling Loads Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Chapter 4 Mechanical Systems: Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Designing Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Placing Air Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Using a Schedule as an Air Systems Design Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Using Views to Validate Duct Geometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Drawing the Primary Supply Air Duct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
Sizing the Primary Duct: Velocity Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Assigning a Color Scheme to Duct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Sizing the Secondary Air System Duct: Equal Friction Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Inspecting Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Placing Air Conditioning Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
Completing the Supply Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Checking Air Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Designing Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Creating Piping Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
Placing Radiators and a Boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
Creating the Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Creating Pipe Runs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
Resolving Pipe Interference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215
Connecting the Boiler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
Sizing the Pipe Runs: Friction & Velocity Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Placing Circulator Pumps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
Inspecting Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Checking Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Chapter 6 Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Planning Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Preparing the Electrical Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
Defining Required Lighting Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
Assigning Space Color Fills According to Required Lighting Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278
Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required Lighting Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279
Designing the Electrical System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Adding Lighting Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282
Placing Lighting Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
Placing Power Receptacles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Creating Power & Lighting Usage Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Placing Electrical Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
Creating Power Circuitry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Creating Switch Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Checking Your Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
Defining Circuit Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335
Chapter 7 Plumbing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341
Planning Plumbing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Preparing the Plumbing Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Configuring Plumbing and Piping Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
Designing Plumbing Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
vi | Contents
Add Plumbing Fixtures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344
Begin Creating the Sanitary System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Refining the Sanitary Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369
Refining the Urinal Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373
Adding Vents to the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
Create the Cold Water System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386
Create the Hot Water System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394
Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401
Designing Fire Protection Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401
Starting the Fire Protection Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402
Placing Sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406
Connecting the Sprinklers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427
Completing the Fire Protection Wet System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440
Creating the Fire Protection Dry System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
Modifying Pipe Diameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 452
Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Modifying Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Modifying a Fan Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Modifying Fan Powered VAV Box with Electric Heat Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469
Modifying Electrical Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477
Modifying a Water Closet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482
Modifying a Diffuser Annotation Tag Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 485
Modifying a Light Fixture Annotation Tag Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487
Creating Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492
Creating a Light Fixture Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492
Flange Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 502
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 512
Creating an Annotation Symbol Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548
Revit MEP Family Editor Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555
Connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555
Hosts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562
Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562
Lookup Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562
Parameter Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563
Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 563
Light Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565
Part Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 565
Documenting Your Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 567
Chapter 10 Adding Views and Sheets to a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569
Creating Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569
Duplicating Plan Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 569
Creating Elevation and Section Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 573
Creating Callout Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 580
Modifying View Tag Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 586
Setting Visibility and Graphics Options in Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 589
Creating a View Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 590
View Range and Plan Regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
Using Filters to Control Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 596
Masking Portions of a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 598
Working with Visual Overrides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 601
Creating Drawing Sheets in a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606
Creating Drawing Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 606
Contents | vii
Adding Views to Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610
Modifying the Building Model from a Sheet View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615
Creating and Modifying a Title Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 616
Chapter 11 Tagging and Scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 621
Tagging Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 621
Sequentially Placing and Tagging Rooms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 621
Tagging Doors and Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 627
Tagging Other Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 631
Defining Schedules and Color Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 634
Creating a Window Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 635
Adding Project Parameters to a Window Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 640
Creating a Unit-Based Door Schedule with a Filter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 642
Creating a Room Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 644
Scheduling Rooms from a Program List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 646
Creating a Room Color Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 652
Creating a Material Takeoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 660
Scheduling Shared Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663
Creating a Shared Parameter File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 663
Adding Shared Parameters to a Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 665
Placing, Tagging, and Scheduling a Family with Shared Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 668
Scheduling Uniformat Assembly Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 672
Scheduling Uniformat Assembly Codes and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 672
Exporting Project Information with ODBC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674
Exporting Schedule Information to Microsoft Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674
Chapter 12 Annotating and Dimensioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 677
Changing the Base Elevation of a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 677
Relocating a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 679
Dimensioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 684
Creating Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 684
Creating Automatic Wall Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 693
Controlling Witness Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 695
Creating an Office Standard Dimension Type from Existing Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . 700
Creating Text Annotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703
Adding Text Notes to the Floor Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 704
Chapter 13 Detailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 711
Creating a Detail from a Building Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 711
Detailing the View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 712
Adding Detail Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 718
Adding Text Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 722
Creating Detail Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 724
Adding Keynotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 726
Creating Line-based Detail Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 728
Modifying a Keynote Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 733
Creating a Drafted Detail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 734
Importing a Detail into a Drafting View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 735
Creating a Reference Callout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 735
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 737
Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753
Using Note Blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753
Creating a Note Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753
Using Drawing Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 759
Creating a Drawing List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 759
Using Legends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 761
viii | Contents
Creating a Symbol Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 761
Creating a Component Legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 765
Using Revision Tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770
Setting Up a Revision Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770
Sketching Revision Clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772
Tagging Revision Clouds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 774
Working with Revisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 775
Importing from Other Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 781
Importing Image Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 782
Importing Text Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 782
Importing Spreadsheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 783
Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 785
Using Dependent Views in Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 787
Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 787
Using Dependent Views for Elevation Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 798
Using Advanced Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 803
Chapter 16 Grouping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 805
Creating, Modifying, and Nesting Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 805
Creating and Placing a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 805
Modifying a Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 813
Nesting Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 817
Working with Detail Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 820
Creating a Detail Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 820
Using Attached Detail Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 823
Saving and Loading Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 826
Saving and Loading Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 826
Chapter 17 Sharing Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 829
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 829
Using Worksharing in a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 830
Understanding Worksharing Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 830
Enabling Worksharing and Setting Up Worksets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 834
Working Individually with Worksets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 838
Using Worksets with Multiple Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 841
Borrowing Elements from the Worksets of Other Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 846
Chapter 18 Creating Multiple Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 851
Creating Multiple Design Options in a Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 851
Creating the Structural Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852
Creating the Roof System Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 862
Managing Design Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 869
Chapter 19 Project Phasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 873
Using Phasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 873
Phasing Your Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 874
Using Phase-Specific Room Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 880
Chapter 20 Linking Building Models and Sharing Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 883
Linking Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 884
Linking Building Models from Different Project Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 884
Repositioning Linked Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 893
Controlling Linked Building Model Visibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 896
Contents | ix
Managing Linked Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 898
Sharing Coordinates Between Building Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 901
Acquiring and Publishing Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 901
Relocating a Project with Shared Coordinates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903
Working with a Linked Building Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 906
Managing Shared Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 908
Scheduling Components of Linked Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 909
Customizing Project Settings and Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 913
Chapter 21 Modifying Project and System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 915
Modifying System Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 915
Modifying General System Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 915
Specifying File Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 917
Specifying Spelling Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 919
Modifying Snap Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 920
Modifying Project Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923
Creating and Applying Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 923
Creating and Applying Fill Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 927
Controlling Object Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 929
Modifying Line Patterns and Styles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932
Modifying Annotations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 937
Specifying Units of Measurement, Temporary Dimensions, and Detail Level Options . . . . . . 939
Modifying Project Browser Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 940
Creating an Office Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 943
Choosing the Base Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 943
Modifying Project Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 944
Loading and Modifying Families and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 949
Modifying Views and View Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 951
Modifying Import/Export Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954
Setting up Shared and Project Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 955
Creating Named Print Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 957
x | Contents
Getting Started
1
2
Introduction
This introduction helps you get started with the Revit MEP 2009 tutorials and presents the fundamental concepts of the
product, including:
■ how Revit MEP works.
■ the terms used when working with the product.
■ how to navigate the user interface.
■ how to perform some common tasks in the product.
Using the Tutorials
In this lesson, you learn how to use the Revit MEP tutorials, including where to find the training files and
how to create a new Revit MEP project from a template file.
The Contents tab of the Revit MEP Tutorials window displays the available tutorial titles. Expand a title for
a list of lessons in the tutorial. Expand a lesson title for a list of exercises in the lesson.
NOTE You may find it helpful to print a tutorial to make it easier to reference the instructions as you work in Revit
MEP. The tutorials are also available in PDF format by clicking Help menu ➤ Documents on the Web in Revit MEP.
Accessing Training Files
Training files are Revit MEP projects, templates, and families that were created specifically for use with the
tutorials. In this exercise, you learn where the training files are located, as well as how to open and save
them.
Where are the training files located?
Training files, by default, are located in C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Autodesk\RME 2009\Training. Training files are grouped into 3 folders within the training folder:
■ Common: generic files often used to teach a concept. These files are not dependent on imperial or metric
units. Common file names have a c_ prefix.
1
3
■ Imperial: files for users working with imperial units. Imperial file names have an i_ prefix.
■ Metric: files for users working with metric units. Metric file names have an m_ prefix.
NOTE Depending on your installation, your training folder may be in a different location. Contact your CAD
manager for more information.
IMPORTANT Content used in the tutorials, such as templates and families, is located and accessed in the training
files location. Although this content may be installed in other locations on your system, all content used in the
tutorials is included in the training files location to ensure that all audiences access the correct files.
What is a training file?
A training file is a Revit MEP project that defines a building information model and views of the model that
are used to complete the steps in a tutorial. Many tutorials include a Training File section that references
the training file to be used with the tutorial. In other tutorials, you create a project from a template, rather
than opening an existing training file.
Open a training file
1 Click File menu ➤ Open.
2 In the left pane of the Open dialog, scroll down, and click the Training Files icon.
3 In the right pane, double-click Common, Imperial, or Metric, depending on the type of training
file.
4 Click the training file name, and click Open.
Save a training file
5 To save a training file with a new name, click File menu ➤ Save As.
In many cases, the work you do in a project during a tutorial exercise becomes the starting point
for the next exercise. In many tutorials, you create a project or modify an existing project, save
the changes, and use the saved version of the file to begin the next exercise or lesson.
6 Complete the information in the Save As dialog:
■ For Save in, select the folder in which to save the new file.
You can save the file in the appropriate Training Files folder or in another location. Note
where you save the file so you can open it for additional exercises as required.
4 | Chapter 1 Introduction
■ For File name, enter the new file name.
A good practice is to save the training file with a unique name after you have made changes.
For example, if you open c_settings.rvt and make changes, you should save this file with a
new name such as c_settings_modified.rvt.
■ For Files of type, verify that Project Files (*.rvt) is selected, and then click Save.
Create a project from a template
7 To create a project from a template, rather than using an existing training file, click File
menu ➤ New ➤ Project.
8 In the New Project dialog, under Create new, select Project.
9 Under Template file, verify the second option is selected, and click Browse.
10 In the left pane of the Choose Template dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\Templates.
11 In the Choose Template dialog, review the Revit MEP templates.
Templates are available for specific building types: commercial, construction, and residential.
Each template contains predefined settings and views appropriate for the corresponding building
type. For most tutorial projects, you will use the default template, and customize the project as
necessary.
12 Select DefaultMetric.rte, and click Open.
13 Click OK.
Understanding the Basics
In this lesson, you learn what Revit MEP is and how its parametric change engine benefits you and your
work. You begin with the fundamental concepts on which Revit MEP is built. You learn the terminology,
the hierarchy of elements, how to navigate the user interface, and how to perform some common tasks in
the product.
What is Revit MEP 2009?
The Revit MEP platform for building information modelling is a design and documentation system that
supports the design, drawings, and schedules required for a building project. Building information modelling
(BIM) delivers information about project design, scope, quantities, and phases when you need it.
In the Revit MEP model, every drawing sheet, 2D and 3D view, and schedule is a presentation of information
from the same underlying building model database. As you work in drawing and schedule views, Revit MEP
collects information about the building project and coordinates this information across all other
representations of the project. The Revit MEP parametric change engine automatically coordinates changes
made anywhere—in model views, drawing sheets, schedules, sections, and plans.
Understanding the Basics | 5
What is meant by parametric?
The term parametric refers to the relationships among all elements of the model that enable the coordination
and change management that Revit MEP provides. These relationships are created either automatically by
the software or by you as you work. In mathematics and mechanical CAD, the numbers or characteristics
that define these kinds of relationships are called parameters; hence, the operation of the software is
parametric. This capability delivers the fundamental coordination and productivity benefits of Revit MEP:
Change anything at any time anywhere in the project, and Revit MEP coordinates that change through the
entire project.
The following are examples of these element relationships:
■ The outside of a door frame is a fixed dimension on the hinge side from a perpendicular partition. If you
move the partition, the door retains this relationship to the partition.
■ Windows or pilasters are spaced equally across a given elevation. If the length of the elevation is changed,
the relationship of equal spacing is maintained. In this case, the parameter is not a number but a
proportional characteristic.
■ The edge of a floor or roof is related to the exterior wall such that when the exterior wall is moved, the
floor or roof remains connected. In this case, the parameter is one of association or connection.
How does Revit MEP 2009 keep things updated?
A fundamental characteristic of a building information modelling application is the ability to coordinate
changes and maintain consistency at all times. You do not have to intervene to update drawings or links.
When you change something, Revit MEP immediately determines what is affected by the change and reflects
that change to any affected elements.
Revit MEP uses 2 key concepts that make it especially powerful and easy to use. The first is the capturing of
relationships while the designer works. The second is its approach to propagating building changes. The
result of these concepts is software that works like you do, without requiring entry of data that is unimportant
to your design.
Element behavior in a parametric modeler
In projects, Revit MEP uses 3 types of elements:
■ Model elements represent the actual 3D geometry of the building. They display in relevant views of the
model. For example, walls, windows, doors, and roofs are model elements.
■ Datum elements help to define project context. For example, grids, levels, and reference planes are datum
elements.
■ View-specific elements display only in the views in which they are placed. They help to describe or
document the model. For example, dimensions, tags, and 2D detail components are view-specific elements.
6 | Chapter 1 Introduction
There are 2 types of model elements:
■ Hosts (or host elements) are generally built in place at the construction site. For example, walls and roofs
are hosts.
■ Model components are all the other types of elements in the building model. For example, windows,
doors, and cabinets are model components.
There are 2 types of view-specific elements:
■ Annotation elements are 2D components that document the model and maintain scale on paper. For
example, dimensions, tags, and keynotes are annotation elements.
■ Details are 2D items that provide details about the building model in a particular view. Examples include
detail lines, filled regions, and 2D detail components.
This implementation provides flexibility for designers. Revit MEP elements are designed to be created and
modified by you directly; programming is not required. If you can draw, you can define new parametric
elements in Revit MEP.
In Revit MEP, the elements determine their behavior largely from their context in the building. The context
is determined by how you draw the component and the constraint relationships that are established with
other components. Often, you do nothing to establish these relationships; they are implied by what you do
and how you draw. In other cases, you can explicitly control them, by locking a dimension or aligning 2
walls, for example.
Understanding Revit MEP 2009 terms
Most of the terms used to identify objects in Revit MEP are common, industry-standard terms familiar to
most architects. However, some terms are unique to Revit MEP. Understanding the following terms is crucial
to understanding the software.
Project: In Revit MEP, the project is the single database of information for your design—the building
information model. The project file contains all information for the building design, from geometry to
construction data. This information includes components used to design the model, views of the project,
and drawings of the design. By using a single project file, Revit MEP makes it easy for you to alter the design
and have changes reflected in all associated areas (plan views, elevation views, section views, schedules, and
so forth). Having only one file to track also makes it easier to manage the project.
Level: Levels are infinite horizontal planes that act as a reference for level-hosted elements, such as roofs,
floors, and ceilings. Most often, you use levels to define a vertical height or story within a building. You
Understanding the Basics | 7
create a level for each known story or other needed reference of the building; for example, first floor, top of
wall, or bottom of foundation. To place levels, you must be in a section or elevation view.
Level 2 work plane cutting through the 3D view with the corresponding floor plan
next to it
Element: When creating a project, you add Revit MEP parametric building elements to the design. Revit
MEP classifies elements by categories, families, and types.
Category: A category is a group of elements that you use to model or document a building design. For
example, categories of model elements include walls and beams. Categories of annotation elements include
tags and text notes.
Family: Families are classes of elements in a category. A family groups elements with a common set of
parameters (properties), identical use, and similar graphical representation. Different elements in a family
may have different values for some or all properties, but the set of properties—their names and meaning—is
the same. For example, 6-panel colonial doors could be considered one family, although the doors that
compose the family come in different sizes and materials.
Families are either component families or system families:
■ Component families can be loaded into a project and created from family templates. You can determine
the set of properties and the graphical representation of the family.
8 | Chapter 1 Introduction
■ System families include walls, dimensions, ceilings, roofs, floors, and levels. They are not available for
loading or creating as separate files.
■ Revit MEP predefines the set of properties and the graphical representation of system families.
■ You can use the predefined types to generate new types that belong to this family within the project.
For example, the behavior of a wall is predefined in the system. However, you can create different
types of walls with different compositions.
■ System families can be transferred between projects.
Type: Each family can have several types. A type can be a specific size of a family, such as a A0 title block
or a 910 x 2110 door. A type can also be a style, such as default aligned or default angular style for dimensions.
Instance: Instances are the actual items (individual elements) that are placed in the project and have specific
locations in the building (model instances) or on a drawing sheet (annotation instances).
Navigating the User Interface
One of the advantages of Revit MEP is its ease of use, specifically its clear user interface. The Revit MEP
window is arranged to make navigation easy. Even the toolbar buttons are labeled, making it easy to
understand what each button represents. Revit MEP uses standard Microsoft
®
Windows
®
conventions. If
you have used any other product that follows these conventions, learning Revit MEP is much easier.
In the following illustration, the user interface is labeled. In the steps that follow, you navigate and become
familiar with the user interface.
Navigating the User Interface | 9
Start a new project
1 On the Standard toolbar, click (New).
This creates a new project based on the default template.
The Title Bar
2 Place the cursor at the top of the user interface.
The title bar contains the name of the project and the view that is currently open.
By default, new projects are numbered consecutively until saved with a new name. In addition,
the Level 1 floor plan view is the default open view.
TIP The view opened and the view names are dependent on the template on which the project is
based.
The Menu Bar
3 The menu bar across the top of the window includes standard menu names such as File, Edit,
and View. Click View menu ➤ Zoom.
Many of the commands have shortcut keys, which are listed on the menu. For example, the
shortcut key for Zoom in Region is ZR. While working in the drawing area, you type the required
key combination to perform the command.
Another time-saving tool for selecting commands is to place the cursor in the drawing area and
right-click. A shortcut menu displays a list of available commands, depending on the function
you are performing and what is currently selected.
The Toolbar
4 Click Window menu ➤ Toolbar.
There are several toolbars across the top of the window beneath the menu bar. The toolbar
buttons represent common commands. You can control the visibility of the toolbars and turn
10 | Chapter 1 Introduction
the text labels on or off using the Window ➤ Toolbar menu. You can use the toolbar grips to
resize and move each toolbar.
The Options Bar
5 Click Modelling menu ➤ Wall.
The bar beneath the toolbars contains wall design options. The Options Bar is context-sensitive
and varies depending on the tool or selected component.
6 Click Modelling menu ➤ Door.
The design options available on the Options Bar are now applicable to doors. On the left side
of the Options Bar, a door type is specified.
The Type Selector
7 The drop-down list on the left side of the Options Bar is called the Type Selector. Select the
drop-down list to view the list of doors.
The Type Selector is a context-sensitive drop-down list. When you select the Door tool, the Type
Selector displays a list of doors available in the project. The list of elements in the Type Selector
is identical to the elements listed in the Families branch of the Project Browser under the
respective category.
Navigating the User Interface | 11
8 Click Modelling menu ➤ Wall.
9 In the Type Selector, select the drop-down list to see the walls that are available.
You can use the Type Selector in 2 ways:
■ You can select an element type before you add the element to the building model. For
example, when you add a door, the door type that displays in the Type Selector is the door
type that will be added to the building model.
■ You can use the Type Selector to change an element type after it has been added to the
building model. In the drawing area, you can select any element and then change its type
using the Type Selector.
The Design Bar
10 Click Window menu ➤ Design Bars.
The Show Design Bars dialog displays.
12 | Chapter 1 Introduction
The Design Bar is located on the left side of the interface, immediately below the Type Selector.
There are 10 tabs in the Design Bar, containing buttons grouped by function. You can control
which tabs display by selecting them in the Show Design Bars dialog.
11 Click OK.
Each tab contains frequently used commands that are also available from the menu bar.
■ Basics tab: commands for creating most basic building model components
■ View tab: commands for creating different views in the project
■ Modelling tab: commands to create model elements
■ Drafting tab: commands for adding annotation symbols and creating sheet details for
construction documents
■ Rendering tab: commands for creating rendered images
■ Site tab: commands for adding site components and producing site plans
■ Massing tab: commands for creating conceptual designs with masses
■ Room and Area tab: commands for making room and area schemes and plans
■ Structural tab: commands for adding structural components to the project
■ Construction tab: commands for creating construction industry information
To access the commands in a tab, click the tab in the Design Bar. The respective commands
display on the Design Bar.
Navigating the User Interface | 13
TIP You can control the visibility of each tab by right-clicking on the Design Bar and selecting the
tab from the shortcut menu.
The Project Browser
12 To the right of the Design Bar is the Project Browser. In the Project Browser, select Views (all).
You can use the Project Browser to quickly manage the views, schedules, sheets, reports, families,
and groups of your current project:
■ Right-click in the browser to add, delete, and rename views, families, and groups.
14 | Chapter 1 Introduction
■ The browser is organized by view type (floor plans, elevations, 3D), family category (doors,
walls, windows), and group name. Expand or collapse the browser list by clicking the + or –
next to the name.
■ To open a view, double-click its name.
■ You can also drag and drop from the browser into the drawing area, making it easy to add
a family or group to the project or add a view to a sheet.
■ The browser is dockable, so you can reposition it by dragging the Project Browser title bar
to a new location.
13 In the Type Selector, scroll through the sorting options available for the Project Browser.
14 Click Settings menu ➤ Browser Organization.
You can create and modify Project Browser organization schemes for views and sheets. After
creating a browser organization scheme, you can instantly change the sorting within the Project
Browser by selecting the scheme in the Type Selector.
15 In the Browser Organization dialog, click Cancel.
The Status Bar
16 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Wall.
17 Place the cursor near the center of the drawing area. Do not click.
The cursor displays as a pencil.
Navigating the User Interface | 15
In the bottom left corner of the window, the status bar provides information regarding what
you should do next. In this case, it tells you to "Click to enter wall start point."
TIP The tooltip that displays is identical to the note in the status bar.
18 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the Wall command.
You can control the status bar visibility from the Window menu. The status bar also provides
information, in conjunction with tooltips, regarding selected elements in a view. When you
place the cursor over an element, it highlights and the status bar displays the element name.
19 Place the cursor over the elevation symbol arrow on the left side of the drawing area.
The elevation symbol consists of two parts: the main symbol and the elevation directional arrow
(a triangle). Make sure you place the cursor over the elevation directional arrow. It highlights
when the cursor is over it.
In the status bar, notice that the name of the highlighted element is Views : Elevation : West.
20 Press TAB, and notice that the highlighted element switches to the main elevation symbol,
Elevations : Elevation : Elevation 5.
When attempting to select a specific element in a complex or crowded view, you can use the
status bar and TAB to switch between elements and select the desired element.
Revit MEP 2009 Help
21 Click Help menu ➤ Revit MEP 2009 Help.
Help is available online at all times during a Revit MEP session. You can use this tri-pane, HTML
help window to search for information and quickly display it to read or print. There are several
tools that help you find information. You can select a topic on the Contents tab, find a keyword
on the Index tab, search for all instances of a word or phrase on the Search tab, or save commonly
used pages on the Favorites tab.
16 | Chapter 1 Introduction
In addition, context-sensitive help is available for many parts of the user interface. You can
access context-sensitive help in the following ways:
■ Dialogs: Many dialogs include Help buttons. Click the Help button, and the topic specific
to the dialog opens. If no Help button displays, press F1 for context-sensitive help.
■ Windows: From any window, press F1 for help.
■ Toolbar: From the toolbar, click on the Standard toolbar, and then click a specific menu
command or button for help. You can also press SHIFT+F1.
■ Tooltips: To see tooltips, rest the cursor over the Toolbar button until the tooltip displays.
TIP You can control the level of tooltip assistance using Settings menu ➤ Options.
22 Close the Revit MEP Help window.
Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP
In this exercise, you learn to perform some of the common Revit MEP tasks that are included in the tutorials.
After you are familiar with these tasks, it will be easier to work in Revit MEP and focus on the lessons of each
tutorial.
Use zoom commands to adjust the view
In the tutorials, you are instructed to use a zoom command to adjust the viewable area in the window. For
example, you may be asked to zoom to a specific region of a view or to zoom to fit the entire building or
floor plan in the view. Understanding how to adjust the view will make it easier to work with the building
model in the window.
There are several ways to access zoom options. In the following steps, you open a training file and practice
adjusting the view with the different zoom commands.
1 Click File menu ➤ Open.
2 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Cohouse.rvt.
The 3D isometric view displays:
3 Click View menu ➤ Zoom to display the zoom menu.
Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP | 17
The zoom menu lists the zoom options and their shortcut keys.
4 Click Zoom Out (2x).
In the drawing area, the view zooms out from the building model.
5 On the View toolbar, click the drop-down menu next to the Zoom command to display the
zoom options.
NOTE Clicking the Zoom icon itself activates the Zoom In Region command.
6 Click Zoom To Fit.
The view of the building model is sized to fit the available window.
7 Click in the drawing area, and type the shortcut ZR to zoom in on a region.
The cursor becomes a magnifying glass.
8 Click the upper left corner and lower right corner of the region to magnify; this is referred to
as a crossing selection.
When you release the mouse button, the view zooms in on the selected area.
18 | Chapter 1 Introduction
9 If you use a mouse that has a wheel as the middle button, you can roll the wheel to zoom the
view. Use the wheel mouse to zoom out to see the entire building again.
If you do not have a wheel mouse, use a zoom menu command or the toolbar option to zoom
out.
NOTE As you zoom in and out, Revit MEP uses the largest snap increment that represents less than
2mm in the drawing area. To modify or add snap increments, click Settings menu ➤ Snaps.
Zoom is also available using SteeringWheels. SteeringWheels provide 2D and 3D navigation
tools.
10 To display SteeringWheels, on the View toolbar, click .
The Full Navigation wheel displays in the drawing area.
As you move the mouse, the wheel follows the cursor around the drawing area.
11 Move the cursor over the Zoom wedge of the wheel so that it highlights.
12 Click and hold the mouse button.
The cursor displays a pivot point for the Zoom tool.
13 Drag the cursor down or left to zoom out.
14 Drag the cursor up or right to zoom in.
You can change the pivot point by releasing the mouse button, moving the wheel to the desired
location, and then using the Zoom tool again.
For more information about SteeringWheels, click the pull-down menu on the Full Navigation
wheel, and click Help. To define settings for SteeringWheels, click Settings menu ➤ Options,
and click the SteeringWheels tab.
15 To exit the wheel, press ESC.
Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP | 19
Resize elements using drag controls
16 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click 2nd Flr. Cnst.
When drawing or modifying a building model, it is important to understand how to adjust the
size of components in the drawing area. Small blue dots, called drag controls, display at the
ends of selected lines and walls in a plan view. Similar controls, referred to as shape handles,
display along the ends, bottoms, and tops of selected walls in elevation views and 3D views.
17 Type ZR, zoom in on the upper-left corner of the floor plan, and select the wall, as shown.
Notice the small blue dots that display at both ends of the wall. These are the drag controls.
18 Click and drag the left control, moving the cursor to the left horizontally, to lengthen the wall.
19 Click in the drawing area to deselect the wall.
Move an element
20 Scroll the view down so you can see the couch and table in the floor plan.
21 Select the Craftsman02 table, and on the Tools toolbar, click (Move).
20 | Chapter 1 Introduction
Some commands, such as Move and Copy, require 2 clicks to complete the command. After
selecting the element to move, for example, click to specify the starting position, and click again
to specify the ending position. In this case, you want to move the table closer to the wall.
22 Click the lower-left endpoint of the table.
23 Click next to the lower wall, as shown.
The table moves down, and the lower-left corner is placed at the move endpoint.
Another way to move an element is to select it and drag it to a new location.
24 Select the plant, and drag it on top of the table.
Performing Common Tasks in Revit MEP | 21
Undo commands
25 On the Standard toolbar, click the drop-down menu next to (Undo).
All changes you make to a project are tracked. The Undo command allows you to reverse the
effects of one or more commands. In this example, you decide that you prefer the table in its
original position.
26 On the Undo menu, select the second item in the list, Move.
Selecting the second item in the list will undo the last 2 actions. All commands are canceled up
to and including the selected command. The table and plant are returned to their original
locations.
NOTE To quickly undo the previous action, on the Standard toolbar, click the Undo command, or
press CTRL+Z.
End a command
27 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Lines.
Some commands, such as the Lines command, stay active or current until you choose another
command or end the current command.
28 Click in the drawing area to start the line, and click again to end it.
Notice that the Lines command is still active and you could continue to draw lines.
29 To end the command, use one of the following methods:
■ Choose another command.
■ On the Design Bar, click Modify.
■ Press ESC twice.
30 Close the file without saving your changes.
22 | Chapter 1 Introduction
Express Workshop
23
24
Express Workshop
The Express Workshop tutorials focus on specific areas of Revit MEP functionality and highlight powerful features that
are integral to the most common MEP workflows. Each tutorial demonstrates tools you can use to complete tasks that are
common to an overall workflow. When you have finished these tutorials, you will have a basic understanding of Revit
MEP design and documentation tools, as well as some of the best practices that help you efficiently design and develop
an MEP project.
Creating a Supply Air System
In this lesson, you create a supply air system that consists of 2 low pressure, secondary supply air systems
and a primary, high pressure system.
In Revit MEP, an HVAC system is a logical connection between air terminals and HVAC mechanical
equipment. After air terminals and mechanical equipment are placed in a model, you can create supply,
return, and exhaust systems using these components. The systems are used to perform calculations and
analysis, and to place and size ductwork, which is the physical representation of the system.
The model you use in this lesson contains the secondary system Mechanical Supply Air 1. To create Mechanical
Supply Air 2, you place the variable air volume (VAV) box, connect it to existing air terminals, and size the
ductwork. You then create the main trunk line for Mechanical Supply Air 3 and connect it to the 2 secondary
systems. Finally, you add and connect the air handler, creating the primary supply system.
Creating a Secondary Supply Air System
In this exercise, you place a parallel, fan-powered, VAV box in the model. You then define a logical connection
between the VAV box and 4 existing air terminals, creating a secondary supply system.
2
25
At the beginning of this exercise, the model contains one completed secondary supply air system. In this
exercise, you create the logical system shown above on the left.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files.
If necessary, scroll until the folder is displayed.
■ Open the m Express Workshop Supply Air System.rvt file located in the Metric folder.
Display the Mechanical commands
1 On the Design Bar in the lower-left corner of the screen, click the Mechanical tab.
The Mechanical commands are displayed.
2 If the Mechanical tab is not displayed on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click
Mechanical.
In this tutorial, when you are instructed to click a command on the Design Bar, you find the
command at the far left of the screen.
Adjust the zoom for the model
3 Type ZE to zoom out to the extents of the model.
26 | Chapter 2 Express Workshop
The entire model displays on the screen.
4 Type ZR, which is the keyboard shortcut for the Zoom in Region command.
The cursor displays as a magnifying glass.
5 Click as shown to specify the upper-left corner of the zoom region.
6 Click to specify the lower-right corner of the zoom region.
The model zooms to the specified area. In this tutorial, when you want to change the area of
the model you are working on, you can enter ZE to zoom out. Then, enter ZR and specify a
zoom region to zoom in.
You can also zoom and pan using the mouse wheel. To zoom in and out, roll the wheel. To pan,
hold the wheel down and drag.
Add a VAV box
7 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
Creating a Secondary Supply Air System | 27
Directly above the Design Bar, on the Options Bar, the Type Selector displays the mechanical
equipment that is pre-loaded in the model.
8 In the Type Selector, select M_VAV - Unit Parallel Fan Powered : Size 3 - 200 mm Inlet.
9 Move the cursor to the area near the interior door of the room between grid lines 3 and 4, but
do not click.
The cursor displays as the VAV box outline.
10 Press SPACEBAR once to rotate the VAV box 90 degrees.
11 Click to place the VAV box in the location shown.
12 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
13 Right-click the VAV box, and click Element Properties.
28 | Chapter 2 Express Workshop
14 In the Element Properties dialog:
■ Under Constraints, for Offset, enter 3048.0 mm.
You do not need to enter the units or the decimal point; you can enter just 3048.
This value places the VAV box in the plenum space (between the Level 1 ceiling and the
Level 2 floor.)
■ Under Mechanical - Airflow, verify that SupplyAirFlow is set to 425.00 L/s.
This value is built into the family type for the VAV box. After the system is created, this value
is automatically updated to reflect the supply airflow requirement.
■ Verify that the PrimaryToSupplyRatio is 0.200000 (20%).
This value is built into the family type for the VAV box.
15 Click OK.
16 Press ESC to clear the selection of the VAV box.
Create the system
17 Move the cursor over the leftmost supply air terminal in the model to highlight it.
18 Click to select the air terminal.
19 Move the cursor off the air terminal.
The air terminal turns red, indicating that it has been selected.
20 While pressing CTRL, move the cursor over the supply air terminal to the right, and click to
select it.
Creating a Secondary Supply Air System | 29
21 While pressing CTRL, select the 2 supply air terminals to the right.
When you release CTRL and move the cursor away from the 4 selected air terminals, the air
terminals display in red, indicating that they are selected.
22 On the Options Bar directly above the drawing area, click (Create Supply Air System).
23 On the Options Bar, click (Select Equipment For System).
24 Select the VAV box you just placed.
The red sketch graphics show the logical connection between the components of the system.
25 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
You have created a secondary supply air system that includes 4 air terminals and a VAV box.
Verify the elements of the system
26 Select an air terminal that is an element of the system you just created.
27 On the Options bar, click (Edit System).
The Options Bar displays system information such as the system name, the equipment supplying
the system, and the number of elements that make up the system.
Revit MEP automatically named the system Mechanical Supply Air 2. You could change the
name by overwriting it. In this tutorial, however, you leave it unchanged.
28 In the Supply Air : Mechanical Supply Air 2 dialog, click Finish.
Verify the connections between the system elements
29 Move the cursor over an air terminal in the system to highlight it. Do not click.
30 | Chapter 2 Express Workshop
30 Press TAB.
The sketch graphics highlight, showing the logical connection between the components of the
system.
31 Move the cursor off the air terminal.
Next, you complete the secondary system by adding ductwork.
Creating Ductwork for the Secondary Supply Air System
The model now contains the logical connection for Mechanical Supply Air System 2, the secondary supply
air system shown below on the left. In this exercise, you create the physical connection for the system, the
ductwork.
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Supply Air System.rvt.
Specify the layout
1 Select an air terminal in the system you created.
2 On the Options Bar, click (Layout Path).
3 On the Options Bar, for Solution Type, select Network.
A network layout solution displays with main segments in blue and branch segments in green.
Creating Ductwork for the Secondary Supply Air System | 31
4 On the Options Bar, click (Show Next Solution) to display other suggested network
solutions.
5 Click until the network solution shown below displays.
Specify the layout path settings
6 On the Options Bar, click Settings.
Configuring the layout path settings is usually a one-time process unless you need to change
them during the project. The layout path settings determine the behavior and appearance of
the ductwork and piping for mechanical, piping, plumbing, and fire protection systems, thus
maintaining the consistency of these systems within the project.
7 In the left pane of the Duct Conversion Settings dialog, select Main.
8 In the right pane of the Duct Conversion Settings dialog:
■ Under System Type: Supply Air, for Duct Type, verify that Round Duct: Tees is selected.
■ Verify that Offset is 3048.0 mm.
9 In the left pane of the Duct Conversion Settings dialog, select Branch.
■ Under System Type: Supply Air, for Duct Type, verify that Round Duct: Tees is selected.
■ Verify that Offset is 3048.0 mm.
■ Verify that Flex Duct Type is set to Flex Duct Round : Flex - Round.
■ Verify that the Maximum Flex Duct Length is 609.6 mm.
10 Click OK.
11 On the Design Bar, which is located to the far left of the drawing area, click Finish Layout.
Revit MEP automatically creates and initially sizes all of the ducts and fittings required to connect
the components of the system.
12 If the ductwork displays in wireframe instead of with shading, click View menu ➤ Shading with
Edges, or click in an empty part of the drawing area, and type SD.
Check the connectivity of the system
You can check the connectivity of ducts and fittings using the TAB key.
13 Highlight a segment of the newly created ductwork by moving the cursor over it. Do not click.
You will use TAB to examine the hierarchy of the system components.
32 | Chapter 2 Express Workshop
14 Press TAB.
The branch to which the duct is connected highlights.
15 Press TAB again to highlight the next level of connections.
16 Press TAB until the entire hierarchy of connected ducts, fittings, and equipment is highlighted.
If the entire network does not highlight, the system has not been created properly, and a
disconnection exists at the point where the highlighting stops. A disconnection will negatively
impact calculations involving this system.
17 Click to select the highlighted system.
18 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
19 In the Filter dialog:
■ Click Check None.
■ Select Duct Fittings.
■ Select Ducts.
■ Select Flex Ducts.
20 Click OK.
Size the duct system
21 On the Options Bar, click Sizing.
Revit MEP supports 4 of the most common sizing methods: Friction, Velocity, Equal Friction,
and Static Regain.
22 In the Duct Sizing dialog:
■ Under Sizing Method, select Friction, and enter .065 Pa/m.
■ Verify that Only is selected.
■ Under Constraints, for Branch Sizing, select Calculated Size Only.
23 Click OK.
The ductwork is sized using the friction method at .065 Pascals per meter of ductwork. The
ductwork is automatically updated with all the necessary fittings.
24 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
Verify the sizing
25 In the system you created, select the segment of duct shown.
Creating Ductwork for the Secondary Supply Air System | 33
26 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
27 In the Element Properties dialog, scroll to Mechanical - Airflow.
The Flow value of 235.00 L/s matches the required flow for the air terminal.
28 Click OK.
29 Press ESC to clear the selection.
30 Select the segment of duct shown.
31 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
32 In the Element Properties dialog, scroll to Mechanical - Airflow.
The Flow value of 470 L/s is the sum of the 2 air terminals.
33 Click OK.
34 Press ESC to clear the selection.
Verify the calculated airflow value for the VAV box.
35 Select the VAV box in the system.
36 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
In the Element Properties dialog, under Mechanical - Airflow, the adjusted SupplyAirFlow value
of 940 L/s for the VAV reflects the supply airflow values calculated for the system.
37 Click OK.
38 Press ESC to clear the selection.
Next, you create the ductwork for the primary system and connect it to the 2 secondary systems.
Creating the Primary System Ductwork
In this exercise, you create the main trunk line for the primary system and connect the 2 secondary systems.
34 | Chapter 2 Express Workshop
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Supply Air System.rvt.
Create the primary air duct
1 On the Design Bar, click Duct.
2 On the Options Bar:
■ In the Type Selector, select Round Duct : Taps.
■ For D:, select 300 mm.
This specifies the duct diameter.
■ For Offset, select 3048 mm.
The cursor displays as a pencil.
3 To start the duct run, click near the door in the room to the left of the secondary systems, in
the location shown by the pencil.
4 Click in the location shown to end the first segment of ductwork.
5 Move the cursor past the rightmost VAV, and click to place the second segment of ductwork
and end the run.
6 Press ESC twice to end the command.
The ductwork and the proper fittings are automatically created.
Creating the Primary System Ductwork | 35
7 If your trunk line does not match the above illustration and you want to draw it again, do the
following:
■ On the toolbar above the Options Bar, click (Undo) to undo the last segment of duct.
■ Click again to undo to first section of duct.
■ Draw the main trunk line again, as described above.
Add an end cap
Before you size the ductwork for a system, you must place end caps on all open ends of the ductwork except
for the end that connects to the air source. This determines airflow direction and ensures accurate duct
sizing.
8 Type ZR, and specify a zoom region at the end of the trunk line.
The model is zoomed to the end of the duct.
9 On the Design Bar, click Duct Fitting.
10 In the Type Selector, select Round Duct Endcap : Standard.
11 Place the cursor over the end of the duct to display an endpoint snap point.
36 | Chapter 2 Express Workshop
12 Press TAB until the point snap graphic shown below displays.
In addition to the graphic at the cursor, the type of snap point is also identified in the tooltip
and on the status bat at the lower-left corner of the screen.
13 Click to place the end cap.
This connects the end cap to the ductwork, closing the right end of the duct run.
14 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
15 Type ZP to zoom to the previous view.
Connect one secondary system
You will use 2 methods of drawing a duct from a VAV box to the trunk line. First, you use the Connect Into
tool to automatically draw the duct.
16 Select the leftmost VAV.
17 On the Options Bar, click (Connect Into).
18 In the Select Connector dialog, select Connector 0 : Supply Air : Round : 200 mm : Primary Air
Connector.
19 Click OK.
20 Select the primary air duct.
Ductwork is automatically created to connect the VAV to the primary air flow supply with a tap
connection.
Creating the Primary System Ductwork | 37
Connect the other secondary system
Next, you manually draw the connecting duct.
21 Type ZR, and zoom in on the rightmost VAV box.
22 Select the VAV box.
23 Right-click the 200 mm inlet supply connector, and click Draw Duct.
24 Click on the center of the primary duct in the location where the intersection snap (an X)
displays.
The ductwork is created with a tap connection.
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25 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
26 Type ZP to zoom to the previous view.
Next, you add and connect the air handler for the primary system.
Adding the Primary System Equipment
In this exercise, you place an air handler and connect it to the main trunk line to complete the high pressure,
primary system.
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Supply Air System.rvt.
Place the air handler
1 On the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
2 In the Type Selector, select Air Handler : Metric.
3 Move the cursor to the location shown. Do not click.
The cursor displays as the air handler outline.
4 Press SPACE BAR as needed to rotate the air handler 90 degrees. Do not click.
Adding the Primary System Equipment | 39
5 Move the air handler to the location shown.
6 Click to place the air handler.
7 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
Create a vertical section of duct
8 Move the cursor over an edge of the air handler to highlight it.
9 Click to select the air handler.
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The connectors on the top of the unit are displayed. These are the connectors for the air handler
supply, return, intake, and exhaust. The connectors on the front of the unit, for the hydronic
supply and return, are also visible.
10 Move the cursor over the 609.6 mm x 609.6 mm supply connector.
11 Right-click the connector, and click Draw Duct.
12 On the Options Bar:
■ In the Type Selector, select Rectangular Duct/Radius Elbows Tees.
■ Under Offset, select 3048 mm.
■ On the Options Bar, click (Apply Current Offset).
A vertical section of duct is created.
13 Press ESC.
14 In the Project Browser, which is located directly to the left of the drawing area, expand
Mechanical ➤ 3D Views.
Adding the Primary System Equipment | 41
15 Double-click 3D HVAC.
The vertical section of duct you just created is visible.
16 Close the 3D HVAC view.
Attach a rectangular duct
17 Select the vertical duct you just created.
18 Right-click the center point of the duct, and click Draw Duct.
19 Move the cursor to the right, past the end of the primary duct, and click.
20 Press ESC twice to end the command.
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Create the main system logical connection
21 While pressing CTRL, select the leftmost VAV box, and then select the rightmost VAV box.
22 On the Options bar:
■ Click (Create Supply Air System).
■ Click (Select Equipment for System).
23 Select the air handler.
The sketch graphics show the logical connection between the components.
24 Press ESC.
25 Select the air handler.
26 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
In the Element Properties dialog, under Mechanical - Airflow, notice that the value for
SupplyAirFlow is 15486.96 L/s. This is the capacity of the air handler.
27 Click OK.
28 Click in an empty part of the drawing area to clear the selection.
Connect the ductwork
29 On the Tools toolbar located above the Options Bar, click (Trim/Extend).
30 On the Options Bar, verify that (Trim/Extend to Corner) is selected.
Adding the Primary System Equipment | 43
31 Select the 609.6 mm x 609.6 mm rectangular supply duct by clicking a point on the duct between
the air handler and the primary trunk line.
32 Select the primary 300 mm round duct.
The ducts are trimmed and connected with the proper fittings.
33 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
34 Select the air handler.
35 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
In the Element Properties dialog, under Mechanical - Airflow, the value for SupplyAirFlow has
been updated based upon the primary to supply ratio you specified in the element properties
of the 2 VAV boxes.
36 Click OK.
37 Press ESC to clear the selection.
View the system components
38 On the Design Bar, click System Browser.
The System Browser is a tool that displays a hierarchical, discipline-specific list of all the
components in the model. Elements are listed by the system they belong to. Elements that do
not belong to a system are listed as unassigned elements.
The browser displays 3 mechanical systems: the primary system that you just created, the
secondary system that you created in an earlier exercise, and the secondary system that was
already in the model when you opened it.
39 In the System Browser, expand Mechanical (3 systems).
40 Expand any Supply Air system to view its HVAC components.
41 When you are done, close the System Browser.
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Next, you inspect the system and color code the ductwork.
Inspecting and Color Coding the System
In this exercise, you inspect part of the system you created. You then add a legend to automatically color
code the ductwork based on specific calculated values.
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Supply Air System.rvt.
Inspect the completed supply air system
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ 3D Views, and double-click 3D HVAC.
2 Select a section of a secondary system.
3 On the Options Bar, click (System Inspect).
The selected system maintains its appearance; the other systems are displayed in half tone.
4 On the Design Bar, click Inspect.
5 Move the cursor over a section of the system.
Inspecting and Color Coding the System | 45
The inspection tag describes the section that is being inspected, including flow, static pressure,
and pressure loss. The flow arrows indicate flow direction; the red arrows indicate critical flow
path.
6 On the Design Bar, click Cancel Inspector.
7 Close the 3D HVAC view.
Place a legend and color code the ductwork
Color coding the ductwork provides a quick, visual indication of a system’s air flow.
8 On the Design Bar, click Duct Color Scheme Legend.
9 Click in the drawing area to place the legend to the left of the air handler.
10 In the Choose Color Scheme dialog, under Color Scheme, select Duct Color Fill - Flow.
11 Click OK.
The legend is added and the ductwork is automatically color coded based on the actual flow
values.
Delete the legend and remove color coding from the ductwork
12 Select the legend.
13 On the Options Bar, click .
14 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, under Schemes, select none.
15 Click OK.
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The color is removed from the ductwork, and the color scheme is removed from the legend.
The legend remains selected.
16 On the Standard toolbar at the top of the window, click (Delete) to delete the legend.
17 Click File menu ➤ Close.
18 When prompted to save the model, click No.
You have completed the first Express Workshop lesson, Creating a Supply Air System.
Creating Electrical Systems
In this lesson, you create electrical systems (including lighting circuits, power circuits, and switch systems)
by establishing logical connections between electrical components. After creating the logical connections,
you create the physical connections between the components: the wiring. You then automatically balance
the electrical loads on a panelboard.
The model already contains the electrical components you use to create the systems, including power panels,
lighting fixtures, junction boxes, receptacles, and switches.
Electrical settings have already been specified for the model. Wiring types (including material, temperature
rating, and insulation type), voltage definitions, distribution systems, and demand factors have been defined.
As you create circuits, Revit MEP ensures that components are compatible with the specified voltages and
distribution systems.
Creating Lighting Circuits
In this exercise, you create 2 lighting circuits using lighting fixtures, junction boxes, and a 480V panelboard
that have already been placed in the model. One circuit connects the 4 lighting fixtures on one side of a
room in the model; the other circuit connects the 4 lighting fixtures on the other side of the room.
You use the System Browser to view the created circuits.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files.
Creating Electrical Systems | 47
If necessary, scroll until the folder is displayed.
■ Open the m Express Workshop Electrical Systems.rvt file located in the Metric folder.
Display the Electrical commands
1 On the Design Bar in the lower-left corner of the screen, click the Electrical tab.
The Electrical commands are displayed.
2 If the Electrical tab is not displayed on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click
Electrical.
In this tutorial, when you are instructed to click a command on the Design Bar, you find the
command at the far left of the screen.
Adjust the zoom for the model
3 Type ZE to zoom out to the extents of the model.
The entire model displays on the screen.
4 Type ZR, which is the keyboard shortcut for the Zoom in Region command.
The cursor displays as a magnifying glass.
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5 Click as shown to specify the upper-left corner of the zoom region.
6 Click to specify the lower-right corner of the zoom region.
The model zooms to the specified area. In this tutorial, when you want to change the area of
the model you are working on, you can enter ZE to zoom out. Then, enter ZR and specify a
zoom region to zoom in.
You can also zoom and pan using the mouse wheel. To zoom in and out, roll the wheel. To pan,
hold the wheel down and drag.
Create a lighting circuit
7 Move the cursor over the lighting fixture in the upper-left corner of the large room in the model.
The lighting fixture highlights.
8 Click to select the lighting fixture.
Creating Lighting Circuits | 49
9 Move the cursor off the lighting fixture.
The lighting fixture turns red, indicating that it has been selected.
10 While pressing CTRL, move the cursor over the lighting fixture below the selected lighting fixture,
and click to select it.
11 While pressing CTRL, select the 2 lighting fixtures that are located immediately to the right of
the previously selected 2 lighting fixtures.
When you release CTRL and move the cursor away from the 4 selected lighting fixtures, they
display in red, indicating that they are selected.
12 On the Options Bar directly above the drawing area, click (Create Power Circuit).
The red sketch graphics show the created circuit, which is the logical connection between the
elements.
13 On the Options Bar, click (Select a Panel for the Circuit).
14 Select lighting panel LP-1.
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The red sketch graphics show the logical circuit with the home run pointing toward the selected
panel.
15 Press ESC to clear the sketch graphics.
Create a second lighting circuit
16 Place the cursor above and to the left of the 4 lighting fixtures on the right side of the room,
and then drag diagonally to create a selection window that includes all 4 lighting fixtures as
shown.
17 When you release the mouse button, all the elements within the window are selected.
Creating Lighting Circuits | 51
18 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
19 In the Filter dialog:
■ Click Check None.
■ Select Lighting Fixtures.
■ Click OK.
The lighting fixtures remain selected.
20 While pressing CTRL, click the junction box located among the lighting fixtures to select it.
21 On the Options Bar, click (Create Power Circuit).
The sketch graphics show the created circuit, which is the logical connection between the
elements.
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22 On the Options Bar, click (Select a Panel for the Circuit).
23 Select lighting panel LP-1.
The sketch graphics show the logical circuit with a home run. The components include the 4
lighting fixtures and the junction box.
24 Press ESC to clear the sketch graphics.
Modify a circuit
At this point, you have created 2 lighting circuits.
25 Move the cursor over a lighting fixture in the leftmost circuit so that the lighting fixture
highlights. Do not click.
26 Press TAB to display the circuit.
Creating Lighting Circuits | 53
The circuit includes 4 lighting fixtures.
27 Click to select the highlighted circuit.
28 On the Options Bar, click (Edit Circuit).
29 In the Power : 1 dialog, click (Add To Circuit).
30 Select the junction box located among the lighting fixtures.
31 In the Power : 1 dialog, click Finish.
Verify the modified circuit
32 Highlight the junction box in the circuit and press TAB.
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The modified circuit is highlighted.
33 Move the cursor away from the circuit to remove the highlighting.
Display the electrical systems
The lighting circuits you created are called electrical systems in Revit MEP. At this point, only the logical
connections between the elements exist. The circuits become visible when the physical connections, the
wiring, are created. You can display the logical connections using the TAB key, and you can view the system
components using the System Browser.
34 Select lighting panel LP-1.
35 On the Design Bar, click System Browser.
The System Browser is a tool that displays a hierarchical, discipline-specific list of all the
components in the model. Elements are listed by the system they belong to. Elements that do
not belong to a system are listed as unassigned elements.
36 In the System Browser, expand Electrical (7 Systems) ➤ Power ➤ LP-1.
37 Expand the 2 circuits to view their electrical components.
38 When you are done, close the System Browser.
Next, you assign switches to control the lighting fixtures.
Creating Lighting Circuits | 55
Creating Switch Systems
In this exercise, you create switch systems to define switching behavior. The 4 lighting fixtures on the left
of the room are controlled by one switch, and the 4 lighting fixtures on the right are controlled by another
switch. The switches have already been placed in the model.
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Electrical Systems.rvt.
Create a switch system
1 Select the lighting fixture in the upper-left corner of the room.
2 On the Options Bar, click (Create Switch System).
The sketch graphics show the only currently selected component of the system.
3 On the Options Bar, click (Edit Switch System).
All elements in the drawing except the selected lighting fixture display in halftone.
4 In the Switch System dialog, click (Select Switch).
5 Select the switch as shown.
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The Options Bar displays the selected switch and the number of lighting fixtures currently
selected (1).
6 In the Switch System dialog, click (Add to System).
7 One by one, select the 3 remaining lighting fixtures on the left side of the room.
As you select each lighting fixture, the Number of Fixtures count on the Options Bar is updated,
and the lighting fixture displays in full tone in the drawing area.
Assign an identifier to the switch
8 In the Switch System dialog, click (Switch Properties).
9 In the Element Properties dialog, under Electrical - Lighting, for Switch ID, enter A.
The identifier A is assigned to the switch for reference purposes.
10 Click OK.
11 In the Switch System (A) dialog, click Finish.
Verify the switch system
12 Move the cursor over the switch to highlight it.
13 Press TAB.
The switch system highlights.
Creating Switch Systems | 57
14 Move the cursor away from the switch system to remove the highlighting.
Create a second switch system
15 Drag to draw a selection window that includes the 4 lighting fixtures on the right side of the
room.
16 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
17 In the Filter dialog:
■ Click Check None.
■ Select Lighting Fixtures.
■ Click OK.
The selection is filtered. The 4 lighting fixtures remain selected.
18 On the Options Bar, click (Create Switch System).
19 On the Options Bar, click (Edit Switch System).
20 In the Switch System dialog, click (Select Switch).
21 Select the switch as shown.
Assign an identifier to the switch
22 In the Switch System dialog, click (Switch Properties).
23 In the Element Properties dialog, under Electrical - Lighting, for Switch ID, enter B.
The identifier B is assigned to the switch for reference purposes.
24 Click OK.
25 In the Switch System (B) dialog, click Finish.
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Verify the switch system
26 Move the cursor over the switch and press TAB to highlight the switch system.
Next, you define lighting fixture types and tag the lighting fixtures.
Tagging Lighting Fixtures
In this exercise, you define the lighting fixture types for the room. Then, you add a tag to each lighting
fixture that identifies its type and the switch that controls it.
The lighting requirements for the left side of the room are different from the lighting requirements for the
right side of the room, so each side of the room requires a different lighting fixture type.
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Electrical Systems.rvt.
Tag the lighting fixtures
1 On the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
2 On the Options Bar, clear Leader.
3 Select the upper-left lighting fixture.
The lighting fixture is labeled with an automatically generated tag.
Tagging Lighting Fixtures | 59
The bottom part of the tag displays the identifier (A) for the switch that controls the lighting
fixture. The top part of the tag displays the identifier for the lighting fixture type, which you
have not yet defined.
4 One by one, select the remaining 7 lighting fixtures in the room.
The selected lighting fixtures are tagged.
5 Press ESC to end the command.
Create a new lighting fixture type
6 Select the upper-left lighting fixture.
7 On the Options Bar, select (Element Properties).
8 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
9 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
10 In the Name dialog:
■ Enter M_600x1200 3Lamp A.
■ Click OK.
11 In the Type Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Type Mark, enter A.
12 Click OK.
13 In the Element Properties dialog, click OK.
14 Press ESC to clear the selection.
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The top part of the tag for the lighting fixture with the new type (M_Troffer Corner Insert :
M_600x1200 3Lamp A) is automatically updated to display type mark A.
Change the type for some lighting fixtures
15 On the Tools toolbar, click (Match Type).
The cursor displays as an eyedropper.
16 Select the lighting fixture shown to specify the lighting fixture type to be matched.
17 Select the other 3 lighting fixtures on the left side of the room.
For each lighting fixture, the type is changed, and the tag is updated.
18 Press ESC twice to end the command.
Change the type for the remaining lighting fixtures
19 While pressing CTRL, select the 4 lighting fixtures on the right side of the room.
20 On the Options Bar, in the Type Selector, select M_Troffer Corner Insert : M_600x1200 3Lamp
B.
The 4 selected lighting fixtures are changed to the specified type, and their tags are automatically
updated.
Tagging Lighting Fixtures | 61
21 Press ESC to clear the selection.
Turn off the tags
22 Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
23 In the Visibility/Graphics Overrides dialog, on the Annotation Categories tab, scroll to Lighting
Fixture Tags.
24 Clear Lighting Fixture Tags.
25 Click OK.
The lighting fixture tags are no longer displayed in the model.
Next, you create electrical circuits with wiring.
Creating Power Circuits
In this exercise, you use electrical receptacles and a 208 volt panelboard that have already been placed in
the model to create 2 electrical circuits with arc type wiring. One circuit connects 2 electrical receptacles in
a small room, while the other connects the 8 receptacles in the adjoining large room. You then connect the
2 circuits to create a multi-circuit home run.
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Electrical Systems.rvt.
Create a power circuit with wiring
1 While holding down CTRL, select the 2 receptacles in the small room.
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2 On the Options Bar, click (Create Power Circuit).
The sketch graphics show the logical created circuit.
3 On the Options Bar, click (Select a Panel for the Circuit).
4 Select power panel PP-1.
The sketch graphics show the created circuit home run.
Creating Power Circuits | 63
5 In the drawing area near the created circuit, click as shown to create arc type wiring.
The circuit wiring with a homerun is created.
6 Press ESC to clear the selection.
View conductor information
7 Type ZR, which is the keyboard shortcut for the Zoom to Region command.
The cursor displays as a magnifying glass.
8 Click to specify the upper-left and lower-right corners of the zoom region shown.
You can also specify the zoom region by clicking in one corner and dragging to the other corner.
9 Select the wire shown.
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The tick marks indicate the number of conductors (3) for the wire.
10 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
11 In the Element Properties dialog, under Electrical - Loads, verify the number of conductors of
each type (hot, neutral, and ground).
12 Click OK.
13 Press ESC to clear the selection.
14 Type ZP to zoom to the previous view.
Create a second circuit with wiring
15 In the large room, select the receptacle as shown.
16 While pressing CTRL, select the remaining receptacles in the large room, for a total of 8 receptacles.
17 On the Options Bar, click (Create Power Circuit).
Creating Power Circuits | 65
The sketch graphics show the circuit.
18 On the Options Bar, click (Select a Panel for the Circuit).
19 Select power panel PP-1.
The sketch graphics show the circuit and home run.
20 In the drawing area near the created circuit, click as shown to create arc type wiring.
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The circuit wiring with a homerun is created.
The single arrow at the end of the home run wire indicates a single-circuit home run.
21 Press ESC to clear the selection.
Rewire a circuit
22 Select the home run wire for the small circuit.
23 Right-click, and click Delete.
Creating Power Circuits | 67
The wire is deleted.
24 Type ZR, and zoom in on the region shown.
25 On the Design Bar, click Wire.
The cursor displays as a pencil with arc type wiring.
26 Move the cursor to the location shown.
The cursor is correctly positioned when the point snap graphic displays. If the cursor is
positioned as shown, but the point snap graphic is not displayed, press TAB until the graphic
displays.
In addition to the graphic in the drawing, the displayed snap point is also identified in the
tooltip and on the status bar at the lower-left corner of the screen.
27 With the point snap graphic displayed, click to place the end of the wire.
28 Move the cursor to the location shown.
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If the cursor is positioned as shown, but the point snap graphic is not displayed, press TAB until
the graphic displays.
29 With the point snap graphic displayed, click to place the end of the wire.
The two circuits are automatically connected, creating a multi-circuit home run.
30 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
View the multi-circuit home run
31 Type ZP to zoom to the previous view.
Creating Power Circuits | 69
The 2 arrows on the large circuit home run indicate that it is now a multi-circuit home run.
The wires in the circuit have been automatically resized to accommodate the demand created
by the new multi-circuit home run.
Tag the wires
32 On the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
33 On the Options Bar, select Leader.
34 Highlight a wire in the small circuit as shown.
The temporary label shows the circuit the circuit number (5) and the power panel name (PP-1).
35 Click to place the label.
36 Highlight a wire in the large circuit as shown.
The temporary label shows the 2 circuits (5 and 6) and the power panel name (PP-1).
37 Click to place the label.
38 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
Next, you balance the electrical loads on panelboard PP-1.
Balancing Electrical Loads
In this exercise, you view the panel schedule report for panelboard PP-1 and balance the electrical loads on
this panel.
Dataset
Continue to use the dataset you used in the previous exercise, m Express Workshop Electrical Systems.rvt.
View the panel schedule report
1 Select power panel PP-1.
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2 On the Options Bar, click (Panel Schedule Report).
The Panel Schedule Report view opens.
3 In the Project Browser, which is located directly to the left of the drawing area, scroll down as
needed, and expand Reports ➤ Panel Schedule.
PP-1 is highlighted to show that it is the currently displayed view.
4 In the Project Browser, under Panel Schedule, right-click PP-1, and click Properties.
5 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Appearance on Sheet, click Edit.
The Panel Report Appearance dialog displays. This dialog allows you to control how the panel
schedule report displays when it is included on a sheet.
6 In the Panel Report Appearance dialog, click OK.
7 In the Element Properties dialog, click OK.
8 Close the Panel Schedule Report view.
Balance the loads on the panel
9 Select power panel PP-1.
10 On the Options Bar, click (Edit Circuits on Panel).
The Edit Circuits dialog displays.
All the circuits connected to the panel are listed, and the current loads on phases, A, B, and C,
are shown.
11 In the Edit Circuits dialog, click Rebalance Loads.
Balancing Electrical Loads | 71
The loads are balanced across each phase, and the circuit structure is automatically reorganized.
12 Click OK.
The reorganized circuit structure is reflected in the wire labels.
13 Click File menu ➤ Close.
14 When prompted to save the model, click No.
You have completed the Express Workshop lesson Creating Electrical Systems.
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Developing Your MEP
Designs
73
74
Mechanical Systems
In this tutorial, you design a mechanical system for an office building. This system consists of a VAV duct system and a
hydronic piping system. As you create the mechanical system, you follow a series of lessons and exercises that teach the
recommended system design workflow for Revit MEP 2009. This workflow begins with system planning and concludes
with system designing. By following the recommended workflow, you learn system design best practices while understanding
how Revit MEP makes systems design more efficient.
The goal of this tutorial is to teach you to design a mechanical system using Revit MEP 2009. At the end of this tutorial,
you will understand the process, methodology, and specific techniques for designing mechanical systems.
NOTE All exercises in this tutorial are designed to be completed sequentially; each exercise is dependent on the
completion of the previous exercise. After finishing each exercise, you can choose to save your work. However, it is
highly recommended that you always begin an exercise by opening the provided dataset. This dataset includes the
work from the previous exercise(s) and ensures a seamless training session. The datasets that you use to complete
this tutorial are located in the Training FilesMetric directory. You can search this directory to verify that the datasets
have been downloaded. If the tutorial datasets are not present, go to http://www.autodesk.com/revitmep-documentation
and download them.
Planning Mechanical Systems
To create a mechanical system in Revit MEP, as with any design project, you first carefully plan the system.
In this lesson, you plan the system by first placing spaces in the building. Then you assign zones to the
spaces in order to control the spacial environment. After applying a color scheme to the zones, you perform
a heating and cooling load analysis to determine the heating and cooling requirements for the building.
Placing Spaces
Spaces allow you to calculate the volume of the areas in the building, and contain information about the
locations in which they are placed. This information is used for heating and cooling load analysis. In this
exercise, you place spaces in the areas of the building model. First, you configure the linked architectural
model, as most MEP engineers work with a linked model during system design. Then, you create a plenum
level and place various types of spaces.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
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■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Spaces.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Configure the linked model
The most common method of designing systems in Revit MEP is to work within a linked architectural
building model. In this section, you configure a linked model in order to begin designing systems in it.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans ➤ 1 -
Mech.
The level 1 floor plan of the linked model displays.
2 Place the cursor over the linked model, and after the linked model highlights, right-click, and
click Element Properties.
The Status Bar located below the Design Bar and a tooltip indicate the Linked Revit Model.
3 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
4 In the Type Properties dialog, select Room Bounding, and click OK twice.
This makes the architectural components (such as walls and floors) room-bounding so that they
are recognized as boundaries for spaces.
NOTE When working with a linked file, make certain that the roof is defined as room-bounding, and
that the ceiling is defined as non room-bounding. These components are defined in the architectural
dataset, not in the MEP dataset.
5 On the Basics tab of the Design bar, click Modify.
The linked model is configured. Next, you add a level for plenums.
Add a Plenum level
You create plenum levels to place spaces in the plenum areas (between the ceiling and the floor) of the
building. You must place spaces in all areas (occupied and unoccupied) of the building to achieve an accurate
heating and cooling load analysis.
6 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Elevations (Building Elevation), and
double-click East - Mech.
The elevation view opens.
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7 On the Basic tab of the Design Bar, click Level.
8 In the Type Selector, verify that Level : Plenum is selected.
9 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) is selected.
■ Verify that Make Plan View is selected.
■ Click Plan View Types, and in the Plan View Types dialog clear Ceiling Plan, and click OK.
This creates only a floor plan after the level is added.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.00mm is specified.
10 Draw a plenum level 2600mm above Level 1.
A new plenum floor plan view named Level 7 is created, and its listed in the Project Browser
under Mechanical ➤ ???.
11 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ ??? ➤ Floor Plans, right-click Level 7, and click
Properties.
12 In the Element Properties dialog, do the following:
■ Under Graphics, select HVAC for Sub Discipline.
■ Under Identity Data, enter Level 1 Plenum for View Name, and press ENTER.
If asked to rename the corresponding level and views, click Yes.
■ Scroll down to the Extents category, and click Edit for View Range.
■ In the View Range dialog, do the following:
■ Under Primary Range, for Top, select Level Above (Level 2), and enter an Offset value of
0.00.
■ For Cut plane, enter an Offset of 300mm
■ For Bottom, verify that Associated Level (Level 1 Plenum) is specified with a 0.00 offset.
■ Under View Depth, for Level, verify that Associated Level (Level 1 Plenum) is specified
with a 0.00 offset.
■ Click OK twice.
The Level 1 Plenum floor plan is now listed under HVAC ➤ Floor Plans in the Project Browser.
Notice that the level is renamed in the elevation view.
Place a space in an office area and in an open area
13 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click 1 - Mech, and maximize the window.
14 Click Windows menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows to close the elevation view.
If Close Hidden Windows is unavailable, the 1 - Mech view is not maximized or the elevation
view was closed.
15 Use the mouse scroll wheel, and zoom the office area located in the upper-left corner of the
building.
16 On the Basic tab of the Design Bar, click Space.
The Space tool is also on MEP-specific Design Bar tabs.
17 Verify that Space Tag is selected in the Type Selector.
18 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Tag on placement is selected.
Placing Spaces | 77
■ For Upper Limit, select Level 1 Plenum.
This action specifies the vertical extent of the space.
■ For Offset, enter 0.00.
■ Verify that Horizontal is selected in the tag location box.
■ Verify that Leader is cleared.
■ In the Space box, verify that New is selected.
The Space box contains all unplaced spaces (spaces that were placed in unbounded areas).
New indicates that a new space is being placed.
19 Place the cursor in the office area located in the upper-left corner of the building until the space
snaps to the room-bounding elements.
20 Click to place the space.
Only the space tag displays because the visibility for the interior fill and reference lines is not
activated.
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You activate this visibility later in this exercise.
21 With the Space tool open, enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the drawing area.
This displays the entire floor plan and centers it in the drawing area.
TIP You can also right-click in the drawing area, and click Zoom to Fit.
22 Move the cursor to the large open area in the center of the floor plan, and after the space snaps
to the room-bounding elements, click to place a space as shown.
Make certain that you place the space to the center-right of the open space as shown. Later in
the exercise, you will separate the open space near the entrance and place a space there.
23 Click Modify.
Placing Spaces | 79
Next, you rename the 2 spaces.
24 Zoom in on the space tag in the upper left hand corner office.
25 Click the space tag name.
A text box appears.
Enter Office, and press ENTER.
26 Double-click the space tag number, enter 101 in the text box, and click in the drawing area.
27 Repeat this method, and rename the space in the open area, Open 104.
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Next, you activate spaces visibility.
28 With the view active, enter VG on the keyboard.
29 On the Model Categories tab of the Visibility/Graphics Overides dialog, expand Spaces, and
select Color Fill, Interior, and Reference.
The Interior option displays space shading. Reference displays space reference lines (cross hairs).
Color Fill displays space color fill when it is applied. You apply color fill to spaces in a later
exercise.
30 Click OK.
The 2 spaces display in the floor plan view.
Place a space in the entrance area
You need to place a space in the area next to the building entrance becaue this entrance area will be heated
and cooled more often than the rest of the open space. The entrance area is bound only by the radius
wall—this area is considered semi-bounded. To place a space in the entrance area, you need to make this
area fully-bounded by drawing space separation lines.
31 With the 1 - Mech view active, enter ZR, and draw a zoom region around the upper-corner of
the radius wall as shown.
Placing Spaces | 81
32 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Space Separation.
NOTE If the Mechanical tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click
Mechanical.
33 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw), Chain, and (Line) are selected.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.00mm is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
34 Place the cursor over the upper-corner of the radius wall, and after the end point snap displays,
click to specify the start point for the first space separation line segment.
35 Use the mouse scroll wheel to zoom out the view.
36 Draw the line up, and type 1200mm (notice the text entry box called a dimension listener that
pops up), and press ENTER to specify the end point for the first line segment.
The Draw tool remains open.
37 Move the cursor to the right to draw a horizontal line 9800mm, and click to specify the end
point for the second line segment.
38 Draw the line down 9800mm, and click to specify the end point of the third line segment.
39 Move the cursor to the left 1200mm (which is located over the lower-end of the radius wall),
and after the end point snap displays, click to specify the end point for the last line segment.
If you see a warning that the space tag is outside of its space, click Move to Space.
40 Press ESC twice to close the Draw tool.
Notice that the Open 104 space adjusted its boundaries so that it is not in the new area. The
space separation line created a new fully-bounded area within the large open area.
NOTE If the space or the space tag is inside the smaller area, select the space (reference line) or the
space tag, and drag it to the larger open area. If the space and space tag are inside the new area,
select and drag both of them.
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NOTE Space separation lines are MEP-specific room-bounding lines that separate areas where a wall
is not desired or not possible. After the areas are separated, spaces can be placed in them. Although
room separation lines are recognized in Revit MEP, space separation lines are not recognized in Revit
Architecture.
Next, you place a space in the entrance area.
41 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Space.
42 On the Options Bar, select Level 1 Plenum for Upper Limit, enter 0.00 for Offset, verify that
Horizontal is selected in the tag location box, verify that Leader is cleared, and verify that New
is slected in the Space box.
43 Place a space in the entrance area.
44 Click Modify.
45 Place the cursor over the space, after the space reference lines highlight, right-click and click
Element Properties.
46 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, do the following:
■ For Number, enter 121.
■ For Name, enter Entrance.
Placing Spaces | 83
47 Click OK.
The space is renamed Entrance 121.
Place a space in a chase area
48 Zoom in on the chase that is located to the right of the Mechanical room.
49 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Space.
50 On the Options Bar, select Roof for Upper Limit, and enter 600 for Offset.
All other Option Bar settings are the same as when you placed the other spaces. Roof is specified
for the upper limit because the chase area spans multiple levels and ends at the roof level. The
offset places the space 600mm above the roof.
51 Place a space in the chase area.
52 Press Esc.
53 Rename the space, Chase 118.
Place a space in a plenum area
54 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1 Plenum.
55 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Space.
56 On the Options Bar, select Level 2 for Upper Limit, and enter 0.00 for Offset.
All other Option Bar settings are the same as when you placed the other spaces.
57 Place the cursor in the plenum area, and click to place a space.
58 With the Level 1 Plenum view active, click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
59 On the Model Categories tab of the Visibility/Graphics Overides dialog, expand Spaces, and
select Interior and Reference.
60 Click OK.
The plenum space displays in the floor plan view. Notice that the plenum space is not in the
mechanical room or in the stairwell. This is because the walls prevent space placement.
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61 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save. Otherwise, close the file.
62 In the Save As dialog, enter Spaces Training for File name, navigate to the folder of your choice,
and click Save.
NOTE After finishing each exercise, you can choose to save your work. However, it is highly
recommended that you always begin each exercise by opening the dataset that Autodesk provides.
This dataset includes the work from the previous exercise(s) and ensures a seamless training session.
In this exercise, you created a plenum level and a corresponding floor plan view. You used space separation
lines to create a new fully-bounded area that was part of a larger area, and you placed spaces for various
types of areas. Finally, you modified the spaces visibility for the views. In the next exercise, you add spaces
to zones in order to control the spacial environment and perform an accurate heating and cooling loads
analysis.
Creating Zones
After spaces are placed in the building, Revit MEP immediately adds them to the Default zone. When you
add a space to a zone, that action removes the space from the Default zone. In this exercise, you assign
spaces to zones in the building, and verify the zones in the System Browser. Zones allow you to control the
spacial environment and to perform an accurate heating and cooling loads analysis.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Zones.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
NOTE All space reference lines have been hidden in the dataset to provide a clearer view of the floor plan. Space
shading and the space tags indicate spaces. You can click Reference under Spaces on the Model Categories tab
of the Visibility/Graphics dialog (View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics) to display space reference lines.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
2 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click System Browser.
The System Browser opens and docks to the right of the drawing area.
Creating Zones | 85
NOTE You can also press F9 (with the drawing area active) or click Window menu ➤ System Browser
to open the System Browser.
3 Right-click in Systems Browser, and click View ➤ Zones.
4 Double-click Default to display a list of the spaces in the building model.
This is a hierarchical list of spaces and the zones to which they have been assigned. Notice that
Default is currently the only zone.
NOTE A space cannot be placed into an area without being added to a zone. After a space is placed
in an area, it is automatically added to the Default zone. The recommended workflow is to add each
space to a zone that you create. This removes the space from the Default zone.
Next, you assign spaces to a zone. As you do this, you will use the System Browser to confirm
that the spaces are in the new zone.
Assign a zone to spaces on the same level
5 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Zone.
The Zone tool opens, the Zone toolbar displays, and a new zone is created. The new zone is
listed in the System Browser.
NOTE The Zone toolbar provides zone tools and information. The title bar displays the name of the
new zone. You work with one zone until you click Finish. Using the Zone toolbar, you can add or
remove a space from the zone, and modify the zone properties.
6 On the Zone toolbar, verify that (Add a Space to the Zone) is selected.
7 In the drawing area, place the cursor on Office 101 located in the upper-left corner of the building
until the space highlights.
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8 Click the space to add it to the zone.
In the System Browser, expand the new zone and notice that the Office 101 space is added to
it and removed from the Default zone. To view the zone in the drawing area, you need to activate
the zone visibility which you do next.
9 With the drawing area active, enter VG.
10 On the Model Categories tab of the Visibility/Graphics Overides dialog, expand HVAC Zones,
click Interior Fill and Reference Lines, and click OK.
The new zone displays.
11 With the Zone toolbar open, add the Office 102 and Office 103 spaces to the zone.
Notice that the zone reference line indicates that the 3 spaces are in the zone.
TIP You can drag the zone reference line to relocate it and better view the spaces that are in the
zone.
Next, you rename the zone.
12 On the Zone toolbar, click (Zone Properties).
13 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Name enter 1 - West Offices, and click
OK.
The new zone name displays in the Zone toolbar and the space is renamed in the System Browser.
14 Expand the 1 - West Offices zone in the System Browser to confirm that the 3 spaces are in it.
Creating Zones | 87
15 On the Zone toolbar, click Finish.
Assign a zone for spaces on different levels
16 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click Level 1 Plenum to open the view.
Next, you activate zones visibility for the view.
17 With the drawing area active, enter VG.
18 On the Model Categories tab of the Visibility/Graphics Overides dialog, expand HVAC Zones,
click Interior Fill and Reference Lines, and click OK.
19 Click Windows menu ➤ Floor Plan: 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
20 Enter WT to tile the 2 windows.
21 Zoom in on each floor plan.
22 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Zone.
23 On the Zone toolbar, verify that (Add a Space to the Zone) is selected.
24 On the 1 - Mech floor plan, add the following level 1 spaces to the zone:
■ Open 104
■ Men’s Room 105
■ Mech/Elec 106
■ Ladies Room 107.
25 With the Zone toolbar open, click in the Level 1 Plenum view to make it active.
26 Add the L1 Plenum 122 space to the zone.
27 On the Zone toolbar, click Finish.
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You need to rename the zone. However, you cannot open the Zone tool as this will create a new
zone. Next, you edit the zone to rename it.
28 In either view, select the reference line to the zone that you created.
29 On the Options Bar, click Edit Zone.
The Zone tool opens. Notice that the Zone toolbar displays the name of the zone that you are
editing.
30 On the Zone toolbar, click (Zone Properties).
TIP You can also access zone properties by right-clicking the zone in the System Browser, and click
Properties.
31 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Name, enter 1 - Open Offices, and
click OK.
Creating Zones | 89
The new zone name displays in the Zone toolbar and the space is renamed in the System Browser.
You can expand the 1 - Open Offices zone in the System Browser to view the 5 spaces in it.
32 On the Zone toolbar, click Finish.
Complete the zones for the building
33 For additional practice, use the methods that you learned and assign zones for all the spaces in
the building. The table below lists all spaces and the zones. Make certain that you verify the
spaces in the floor plan views and in the System Browser
If you prefer not to continue with this practice, proceed to the next step. All zones will be
provided in the dataset for the next exercise.
Zones Spaces
1 - East Offices Offices 111, 112, 113
1 - Entrance Entrance 121
1 - North Offices Offices 108, 109, 110
1 - Open Offices Open 104, Men’s Room 105, Elec/Mech 106, Ladies’
Room 107, L1 Plenum 122
1 - South Offices Offices 115, 116, 117
1 - West Offices Offices 101, 102, 103
Stairwells Stairwells 114, 213
2 - Conference Room Conference 214
2 - East Offices Offices 210, 211, 212
2 - North Offices Lounge 208, Office 209
2 - Open Offices Open 204, Men’s Room 205, Elec/Mech 206, Ladies
Room 207, L2 Plenum 217
2 - South Offices Offices 215, 216
2 - West Offices Offices 201, 202, 203
Chases Chases 118, 119, 120
34 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save. Otherwise, close the file.
35 In the Save As dialog, enter Zones Training for File name, navigate to the folder of your choice,
and click Save.
In this exercise, you assigned zones to the spaces that were on the same level and on different levels of the
building, You activated zone visibility in the views, and verified the zones in both the floor plan views and
90 | Chapter 3 Mechanical Systems
in the System Browser. In the next exercise, you assign a color scheme to these zones in preparation for
laying out a VAV duct system.
Assigning a Color Scheme to Zones
In this exercise, you apply a color scheme to the zones that you created in the previous exercise. A color
scheme allows you to communicate and identify parameters visually and spatially rather than you using
space schedules or accessing element properties.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Zone Color Scheme.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
NOTE All zone reference lines and shading have been hidden in this dataset to provide a clearer view of the floor
plan. You can click Reference Lines and Interior Fill under HVAC Zones on the Model Categories tab of the
Visibility/Graphics Overides dialog (View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics) to display zone reference lines and shading.
The zones are also listed in the System Browser.
Create a new color scheme legend type
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
2 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the drawing area.
3 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Color Scheme Legend.
NOTE If the Drafting tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click
Drafting.
4 In the Type Selector, verify that Color Scheme Legend : 1 is selected.
Apply the color scheme
5 Move the cursor in the drawing area and notice that the color scheme legend outline indicates
that no color scheme has been assigned to the view.
The color scheme outline follows the cursor movement to help you accurately position the
legend.
6 Position the color scheme legend outline at the top-right corner of the floor plan, and click to
place the legend.
7 In the Choose Space Type and Color Scheme dialog, do the following:
■ Select HVAC Zones for Space Type.
■ Verify that Schema 1 is selected for Color Scheme.
■ Click OK.
The color scheme is applied to the zones in the 1 - Mech view.
Assigning a Color Scheme to Zones | 91
8 For additional practice, use the method that you learned and add a color scheme for the zones
on the 2 - Mech, Level 1 Plenum, and Level 2 Plenum floor plan views.
If you prefer not to continue with this practice, proceed to the next step. All color schemes will
be provided in the dataset for the next exercise.
9 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save As.
10 In the Save As dialog, enter Zone Color Scheme Training for File name, navigate to the folder
of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you applied a color scheme to the zones in your building. In the next exercise, you perform
a heating and cooling loads analysis to determine the heating and cooling demands of the building.
Performing a Heating and Cooling Loads Analysis
In this exercise, you verify the building, space, and zone information, and view the spaces in the preview
pane to verify space boundaries and volumes. You then perform a heating and cooling loads analysis on
your building to determine the heating and cooling demands of the building, and view the loads report.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Energy Analysis.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Specify Project Settings
1 Click Settings menu ➤ Project Information.
2 In the Element Properties dialog under Energy Analysis, click Edit for Energy Data.
3 In the Type Properties dialog, do the following:
■ Verify that Office is specified for Building Type.
■ For Postal Code, enter 03101.
■ Click for Location, and on the Place tab of the Manage Place and Locations dialog,
select Manchester, NH for City, and click OK.
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■ Verify that VAV - Single Duct is specified for Building Service.
■ For Ground Plane, select Level 1.
■ Verify that <Building> is specified for Building Construction.
■ Verify that Shading surfaces is selected.
■ Verify that New Construction is selected for Project Phase.
■ Verify that 300mm is specified for Sliver Space Tolerance.
■ Click OK twice.
Verify area and volume setting
4 Click Settings menu ➤ Area and Volume Computations.
5 On the Computations tab of the Area and Volume Computations dialog, verify that Areas and
Volumes is selected (default setting), and click OK.
NOTE The Areas and Volumes option must be selected to perform an accurate heating and cooling
loads analysis. After opening the Heating and Cooling Loads tool, if you receive a message that the
Areas and Volumes option is not checked and that the space volumes will be approximate, you need
to select this option.
Verify building information
6 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Heating and Cooling Loads.
A preview pane displays the model and 2 tabs contain heating and cooling information for the
building.
7 Click the Building tab of the Heating and Cooling Loads dialog, and do the following:
■ For Building Type, verify that Office is selected.
■ For Building Construction, Default Space Construction, verify that <Building> is selected.
You can view the building materials for this construction type by clicking (Building
Construction Settings).
■ For Building Service (Default Space Service), verify that VAV - Single Duct is selected.
■ For Place and Location, verify that Manchester, NH is selected.
IMPORTANT The Heating and Cooling Loads dialog contains building information that only affects
the heating and cooling loads analysis. Revit MEP stores this information as project information. You
can also access the building information by clicking Settings menu ➤ Project Information. Then,
under Energy Analysis, click Edit for Energy Data.
You have verified the building information. Next, you view the space and zone volumes in the
building model.
Performing a Heating and Cooling Loads Analysis | 93
View a space
8 In the preview pane, while pressing SHIFT and the mouse scroll wheel, spin the model as shown.
9 In the Heating and Cooling Loads dialog, click the Spaces/Zones tab.
The Spaces and Zones tab contains a hierarchical list of spaces and the zones that have been
assigned to them.
10 On the View Selector (located below the preview pane), verify that Wireframe is selected (default
setting).
NOTE Wireframe displays the analytical volume of a space. The analytical volume is bounded by the
center plane of walls and the top plane of roofs and floors.
11 Expand the 1 - East Offices zone, and select Office 111.
12 Click (Highlight).
The space for Office 111 highlights in red. The Highlight tool allows you to verify that the space
boundaries are as you defined them. You can also view a space in relation to the other spaces
or architecture in the entire building.
TIP You can use the View Cube mouse to spin, pan, and zoom the model to better view the space.
13 Click to deactivate the Highlight tool.
Next, you isolate a space.
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14 With Office 111 selected, click (Isolate).
The space displays while all other spaces are hidden. The Isolate tool allows you to verify one
or more spaces that normally would be obstructed by other spaces or by the architecture which
would normally make it difficult to view.
15 Click to deactivate the Isolate tool.
Next, you view the volume of the space differently.
16 On the View Selector , click Shading.
NOTE Shading displays the inner volume of a space. The inner volume is bounded by interior surfaces
of walls, floors, roofs, and other room-bounding components.
17 Using the methods that you learned, highlight and isolate the space for Office 111 to view its
inner volume.
18 Next, you verify space information.
Verify space information
19 On the Spaces/Zones tab of the Heating and Cooling Loads dialog, select Office 111.
Below the list of spaces and zones, the space information displays for the selected space, Office
111. This space information will be used during a heating and cooling loads analysis of the
space.
Performing a Heating and Cooling Loads Analysis | 95
20 Under the list of spaces and zones, verify the following space information:
■ <Building> is specified for Space Type and Construction Type.
These specify the space usage and construction materials for the space.
■ <Default> is specified for People Data.
This specified the number of people or the area per person for the space.
■ Lighting Loads: <Default> : Power Loads: <Default> is specified for Electrical Data.
This specifies the lighting and power loads for the space.
View a zone and zone information
21 On the View Selector , click Wireframe.
This displays the analytical volume of the spaces in the selected zone.
22 On the Spaces/Zones tab, select 1 - East Offices.
This zone contains 3 spaces, including Office 111.
23 As you did earlier, use the (Highlight) and (Isolate) tools to view the analytical
volume of the spaces in the selected zone.
24 Click (Shading), and repeat the above steps to view the inner volumes of the spaces in the
1 -East Offices zone.
Next, you verify the zone information.
25 Click 1 - East Offices.
Below the list of spaces and zones, the zone information displays for the selected zone, 1 - East
Offices. This zone information will be used during a heating and cooling loads analysis of the
spaces in the zone.
26 Verify the following zone information for the 1 - East Offices zone:
■ <Building> is specified for Service Type.
■ 21.00 °C : 32.00 °C : N/A for Heating Information.
This specifies the heating set point, heating air temperature, and humidification set point.
■ 23.00 °C : 12.00 °C : N/A for Cooling Information.
This specifies the cooling set point, cooling air temperature, and dehumidification set point.
■ N/A : N/A : N/A is specified for Outdoor Air Information.
This specifies the outdoor air per person, outdoor air per area, and air changes per hour.
IMPORTANT The Heating and Cooling Loads dialog contains space and zone information that only
affects the heating and cooling loads analysis. Revit MEP stores this space and zone information as
space and zone properties, respectively. You can also access the space and zone information by
selecting a space or zone in the drawing area or System Browser, right-clicking, and clicking Element
Properties. You can also click (Zone Properties) on the Zone toolbar to access the zone
information. The space and zone information is located under Energy Analysis in the Element Properties
dialog.
View other spaces and zones
27 Using the methods that you learned, view other spaces and zones in the building model, and
verify the space and zone information.
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You may need to spin, pan, or zoom the view to see the selected space or zone.
TIP You can select multiple spaces or zones by pressing CTRL and selecting them, or by pressing
SHIFT to select a range of spaces or zones.
NOTE If you select multiple spaces or zones that contain different information, that information does
not display. For example, if 2 spaces are selected each having different people data, the People Data
option becomes blank.
Now that the project, building, space, and zone information has been verified, you can perform
a heating and cooling loads analysis.
Perform a heating and cooling loads analysis
28 On the Heating and Cooling Loads dialog, click Calculate.
Revit MEP performs a heating and cooling loads analysis using the integrated heating and cooling
loads analysis tool that was developed in partnership with IES (Integrated Environmental
Solutions). Various factors are analyzed including analytical and inner volumes of the spaces.
See Help for more information about the integrated heating and cooling loads analysis tool and
its calculation methods.
RELATED <Virtual Environment> allows you to either export the building and space information to
the IES <Virtual Environment> program to perform an energy analysis and create an IES model, or
import the IES model that has already been created. You must have IES <VE> installed. This product
is not included with Revit MEP.
After the heating and cooling loads analysis is completed, the Heating and Cooling Loads dialog
closes, and a loads report displays.
29 Review the loads report, this report includes project, weather, space, and zone information for
the building model.
NOTE You must perform a new heating and cooling loads analysis each time you modify building,
space, or zone information, or make any changes to the model, otherwise the loads report or schedules
will not reflect your changes.
TIP You can find all generated Loads Reports in the Project Browser under Reports.
30 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save. Otherwise, close the file.
31 In the Save As dialog, enter Energy Analysis Training for File name, navigate to the folder of
your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you verified building, space, and zone information, and viewed the spaces in the preview
pane to verify space boundaries and volumes. You then performed a heating and cooling loads analysis on
your building and viewed the loads report. This concludes the planning stage of the systems project. In the
next lesson, you begin the designing phase by placing air terminals in the spaces.
Performing a Heating and Cooling Loads Analysis | 97
98
Mechanical Systems:Air
Designing Air Systems
Designing air systems in Revit MEP is a straightforward and intuitive process. In this lesson, you will create
supply air systems. You begin your supply air systems design by placing air terminals in rooms and adding
the VAV boxes. Then, you create the secondary and primary supply air system and ductwork to connect the
components that you added. After system creation, you continue designing by resolving routing conflicts,
sizing ductwork, adding AC units, and then you validate your air system design.
IMPORTANT It is highly recommended that you complete Designing Air Systems before starting Designing Piping
Systems. After completing the air systems lesson, you will have been introduced to concepts and practices that
you will use to design the piping systems.
Placing Air Terminals
In this exercise, you place air terminals in the ceiling of the rooms. As you place the air terminals, you create
new views, modify air terminal parameters, and learn a method to precisely place air terminals into the
ceiling plan.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Air Terminals.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Modify a ceiling plan view
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Ceiling Plans, and
double-click 1 - Ceiling Mech to make it the active view.
2 Right-click in the drawing area, and click View Properties.
You can also select the 1 - Ceiling Mech view in the Project Browser and click (Properties).
4
99
3 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, do the following:
■ Select Level 1 for Underlay.
■ Verify that Reflected Ceiling Plan is selected for Underlay Orientation.
4 Scroll down to the Extents category and click Edit for View Range.
5 In the View Range dialog, specify the following:
■ Under Primary Range, for the Top parameter, verify that Associated Level (Level 1) is selected,
and enter 2615 mm for Offset.
You specify 2615mm so that your view captures the air terminals (which will be located at
the ceiling height of 2600mm) and not other system components that may be above the air
terminals and in the same level. These components would obstruct your view of the air
terminals.
■ Under Primary Range, for the Cut plane parameter, enter 0 for Offset.
■ Under View Depth, for the Level parameter, verify that Associated Level (Level 1) is selected,
and enter 2615 for Offset.
NOTE When entering a value, you do not need to type measurement symbols instead, enter the
value, and press Tab. For example, you can enter 2600 and press Tab for 2600mm.
6 Click OK twice.
You will now use this ceiling plan to place the level 1 air terminals.
Add a supply air terminal
7 Verify that 1 - Ceiling Mech is the active view.
8 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Air Terminal.
9 In the Type Selector, select M_Supply Diffuser - Hosted: Workplane-based Supply Diffuser.
10 On the Options bar, make sure that Place on Face is selected.
11 Click to place the supply air terminal in the upper left office as shown.
NOTE The ceiling hosts the diffuser.
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12 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Modify.
TIP When you click Modify, the command in progress terminates. You can also press Esc to accomplish
this result.
Modify the supply air terminal flow and offset parameters
13 Select the supply air terminal that you just placed.
Notice that the selected air terminal turns red.
14 On the Options Bar, enter 150 L/s for Flow.
Move the supply air terminal
15 With the air terminal selected, click (Move) on the Edit toolbar.
TIP To use the Move tool, you first specify a start point on the component that you want to move
and then you specify an end point for the destination. The start point aligns with the end point when
the move is completed.
16 Move the cursor to the bottom right corner of the air terminal, and after the (geometry) end
point snap displays, click to specify the move start point.
17 Move the air terminal to the location shown.
Move the diffuser so that it fits squarely inside a ceiling tile. Since snaps are not available here,
you may have to move it to center it -- use the arrow keys for fine movement control.
Copy the supply air terminal
18 With the Office 101 air terminal selected, click (Copy) on the Edit toolbar.
TIP You use the same procedure with the Copy tool as with the Move tool. First specify a copy start
point on the component that you want to copy and then specify the copy end point (or destination).
19 On the Options Bar, verify that Constrain is cleared and Copy is selected, then select Multiple.
Multiple allows you to place multiple copies of the air terminal without reactivating the Copy
tool after each placement.
20 Select the bottom-right corner of the air terminal as the copy start point, and then click the
midpoint of the Office 102 and then of the Office 103 ceiling grids to specify copy end points,
and then click Modify.
Placing Air Terminals | 101
Copies of the air terminal are placed immediately after you specify each end point. Notice that
after you specify the copy start point, listening dimensions display to aid placement.
TIP You can enter SM to override all other snaps and display midpoint snaps only. Note that snap
overrides deactivate after you make a selection.
Add exhaust air grills and return air terminals
21 On the Mechanical tab on the Design Bar, click Air Terminal.
22 In the Type Selector, select M_Exhaust Diffuser - Hosted: Worplane-based Exhaust Diffuser.
23 Using the add-move-copy placement method, place an exhaust air grill in the Ladies’ Room
(upper restroom), and then copy it to the Men’s Room (lower restroom) as shown.
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Before you copy the exhaust diffuser, make certain that you specify the airflow parameter to
120 L/s.
24 In the Type Selector, select M_Return Diffuser - Hosted: Worplane-based Return Diffuser.
25 Using the same placement method, place 3 return air terminals in the open space to the left of
the restrooms, and specify a 150 L/s airflow for each of them.
Placing Air Terminals | 103
26 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Modify.
TIP Notice that each air terminal type is identified by a different symbol.
Modify the airflow display arrows
27 Select the Office 101 supply air terminal and use the Copy tool to place a copy below the Men’s
Room in the Open 1 area.
28 Select the air terminal that you just placed, right-click, and click Element Properties.
29 In the Element Properties dialog, under Mechanical, clear the UpArrow check box, and click
OK.
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Optional: Complete the level 1 supply air terminal layout
For additional practice of the techniques you have learned so far, continue laying out the level 1 supply
system. You can safely skip this section if you have mastered the design process. The next exercise starts
with a completed drawing.
30 Select the Office 101 air terminal, click on the Edit toolbar.
31 Place copies of this supply air terminal at the ceiling grid intersections as shown below.
After you place the supply air terminals, remember to modify the airflow display arrows for air
terminals that need 2-way and 3-way blow patterns.
Optional: Create the level 2 air terminal layout
For additional practice of the techniques you have learned so far, create the level 2 supply system. You can
safely skip this section if you have mastered the design process. The next exercise starts with a completed
drawing.
32 Using the placement method that you learned for level 1, do the following for level 2:
■ Make 2 - Ceiling Mech the active view.
Placing Air Terminals | 105
■ In the Element Properties dialog, specify the same view parameters as 1 - Ceiling Mech but
use Level 2 as an Underlay and verify that Associate Level (Level 2) is set for the view range
parameters.
■ Use the add-move-copy placement method to place the same type of air terminals on level
2 that you did on level 1. Specify 150 L/s airflow for the supply and return diffusers, and 120
L/s airflow for the exhaust diffusers.
■ Modify the airflow display arrows for air terminals that need 2-way and 3-way blow patterns.
After you finish the level 2 air terminal layout, collapse the ceiling plan views in the Project
Browser. You will be using different views to design the systems. The completed level 2 air
terminal layout is as shown.
33 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
34 In the Save As dialog, enter Air Terminals Training for File name, navigate to the folder of your
choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you placed air terminals in the ceiling of the rooms, modified the air terminal parameters,
and learned a method for precise placement. In the next exercise, you create the air systems. In the next
exercise, you create schedules and use them as not only as documents but as design tools.
Using a Schedule as an Air Systems Design Tool
Schedules allow you to document the mechanical system components and heating and cooling requirements.
More importantly, you can modify this information directly within a schedule making the schedule a design
tool. The schedule as a dynamic design tool is a very powerful method to monitor system requirements, and
to quickly and accurately make real-time system modifications across the entire Revit MEP project.
In this exercise, you create a schedule for the supply air system project. Instead of placing this schedule on
sheets as a construction document, you use it as a design tool to determine whether the correct amount of
airflow is being supplied to each of the rooms in the model. You then use the schedule to adjust the air
terminal airflow properties to more closely meet design requirements.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
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■ Open the m Air System Schedules.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Schedule/Quantities.
Define schedule type
2 In the New Schedule dialog, do the following:
■ Under Category, select Air Terminals.
Notice that the schedule name and the phase is automatically added.
■ Verify that Schedule building components is selected, and that Show categories from all
disciplines is cleared.
■ Click OK.
Define columns
3 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, under Available fields, select Flow, and click
Add to add the Flow field to the list of scheduled fields to include in the schedule.
4 Add Mark and System Type.
5 Under Select available fields from, select Space.
Notice that the content of the Available fields list changes to fields associated with spaces.
6 While pressing Ctrl, select the following fields from the Available fields list:
■ Space: Actual Supply Airflow
■ Space: Calculated Supply Airflow
■ Space: Name
■ Space: Number
7 Click Add to add them to the Scheduled fields list.
8 Select a field and click Move Up and Move Down to arrange the Scheduled fields list as follows:
■ Space: Number
■ Space: Name
■ Mark
■ System Type
■ Flow
■ Space: Actual Supply Airflow
■ Space: Calculated Supply Airflow
If you need to remove a field, select the field and click Remove.
Create a calculated value parameter
9 Click Calculated Value.
10 In the Calculated Value dialog, do the following:
■ Enter Actual Calculated Airflow for Name.
■ Verify that Formula is selected.
■ Select HVAC for Discipline.
■ Select Air Flow for Type.
Using a Schedule as an Air Systems Design Tool | 107
■ Use the button on the right to enter Space: Actual Supply Airflow - Space: Calculated Supply
Airflow for Formula.
11 Click OK.
The Actual Calculated Airflow calculated value is added to the scheduled fields (at the bottom
of the list) and will display as a column in the schedule.
Format the calculated value parameter
12 On the Formatting tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, in the Fields list, select Actual Calculated
Airflow, and click Conditional Format.
13 In the Conditional Formatting dialog, do the following:
■ Verify that Actual Calculated Airflow is selected for Field.
■ Select Not Between for Test.
■ Enter -35 L/s and 35 L/s for Value.
Notice that the conditions that you specified display under Conditions to Use.
■ Click the Background Color and select Red in the Color dialog.
■ Click OK twice.
The Actual Calculated Airflow calculated value parameter allows you to immediately determine
what rooms do not meet the design requirements as they are red in the schedule.
Organize the data
14 On the Sorting/Grouping tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, do the following:
■ Select Space: Number for Sort by.
■ Verify that Ascending is selected.
■ Select Footer, and Count and totals.
■ Select Blank line.
■ Verify that (none) is selected for Then by.
■ Verify that Grand totals is cleared, and Itemize every instance is selected.
■ On the Filter tab, select System Type for Filter by, equals, and select Supply Air.
■ Click OK.
A new view opens called Air Terminal Schedule and is located under Schedules/Quantities in
the Project Browser. Notice that the data is sorted according to room number. The red values
in the Actual Calculated Airflow column immediately report that the actual amount of air being
supplied to the room does not yet meet the design airflow requirements within the range of
plus or minus 35 L/s.
This schedule is not only a construction document but also a design tool. You can change one
or more entries in the schedule to modify your system. Each change is dynamic and immediately
propagates throughout your project. This is because you are modifying the digital database of
building information. This digital database information source is the integral concept of Building
Information Modeling (BIM).
Next, you use the schedule as a design tool to modify the airflow for an air terminal to satisfy
the design requirements.
Use the schedule as a design tool
15 With the Air Terminal Schedule view active, click Window menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows.
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This closes all open windows that are hidden by the schedule.
NOTE If a different project is also open, click Window menu and select the project to make it the
active view, and click File menu ➤ Close to close the project.
16 In the Project Browser, under Views ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, double-click 1 -
Mech to make it the active view.
17 Enter ZR, and draw a zoom region around Office 101 located on the left outer wall of the floor
plan.
18 Enter WT to tile the 2 views.
The schedule and the floor plan display simultaneously in the drawing area.
19 In the schedule, select the 150 L/s Flow parameter (in the Flow column) for the Office 101 air
terminal.
A cursor displays in the selected cell in the schedule enabling you to modify the parameter, and
if you click in the floor plan to make it active, the selected air terminal displays in red.
Notice that the Flow column parameters are the only parameters that you can define in the
schedule. The other parameters are design or calculated parameters.
20 Delete 150 L/s enter 120, and press Tab.
The Actual Calculated Airflow value displays in white indicating that it now complies with the
Office 101 airflow design requirements.
NOTE After you select and modify data in a schedule, the associated system component is immediately
selected and modified in the project as if you used the Element Properties dialog. This allows you to
use schedules to make multiple modifications in one view. These changes dynamically propagate
throughout your project because you are changing the digital database of building information.
Tagging an Air Diffuser
21 Select Tag from the Mechanical tab on the Design bar.
22 Select By Category.
23 On the Options bar, click Leader to clear this option.
24 Click on a diffuser to add a tag.
TIP Editing diffuser tags in schedules, rather than one by one in a drawing, speeds the design process.
Optional: Modifying Other Parameters
The drawing for the next exercise provides completed values.
25 Modify the other supply air terminal Flow parameters for both floors so that the airflow design
requirements are met.
Using a Schedule as an Air Systems Design Tool | 109
NOTE Do not modify the return or exhaust air terminals as these are not supply air terminals and do
not affect the supply airflow.
After you modify the airflow parameters, all Actual Calculated Airflow parameters display in
white.
IMPORTANT By modifying each supply air terminal airflow parameter, you are changing the air
terminal connector size. Air terminal connector sizes are used to calculate airflow but are also used
to calculate ductwork sizing.
26 Close the schedule view, and maximize the 1 - Mech floor plan view.
27 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
28 In the Save As dialog, enter Using Schedules Training for File name, navigate to the folder of
your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you created a schedule to assess airflow for each room in the building. You then used this
schedule as a design tool to modify the airflow so that it meets the design requirements. You modified the
airflow parameters directly in the schedule and all changes occurred dynamically and propagated throughout
the project. This occurred because you were modifying the digital database of building information that the
project sources. This is the power of BIM.
In the next exercise, you create air systems.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems
In this exercise, you create low pressure secondary supply air systems. A system is the logical connection
between system components such as air terminals and mechanical equipment. This logical connection
allows Revit MEP to perform various analyses including energy analysis. You create air systems by placing
air terminals and mechanical equipment, and then create the logical connection between the system
components. After creating the logical connection, you then create ductwork to physically connect the
system components. This is the Revit MEP recommended workflow or best practice for systems creation.
During this exercise, you also use the System Browser to validate your systems.
IMPORTANT All system components are logically connected either to a system that you create or to a default
system. Unlike logical connections, physical connections (ductwork) are not required for systems designing.
However, they are necessary to perform calculations that reference the physical geometry such as sizing.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Modify a floor plan view
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
2 Right-click in the drawing window, and click View Properties.
3 In the Element Properties dialog, under Extents, click Edit for View Range.
4 In the View Range dialog, do the following:
■ Verify that Associated Level (Level 1) is selected for the view range parameters.
■ Under Primary Range, for the Top parameter, enter an Offset value of 3000.
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5 Click OK twice.
6 Type VG on the keyboard.
7 On the Annotation Categories tab of the Visibility/Graphics Overides window, uncheck Air
Terminal tags, and click OK.
You use multiple views to clearly and effectively communicate different systems information.
Different building professionals use different views during the course of the building project.
You will create the level 1 supply air systems in the 1 - Mech view.
Explore the System Browser
8 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click System Browser.
TIP You can also press F9 (Window menu ➤ System Browser) to open or close the System Browser.
If the System Browser does not respond, click in the drawing area to make it active, then press F9.
9 If the System Browser title says Zones, right-click the title and select View ➤ Systems.
10 Expand the Unassigned systems folder, and expand each default systems to view all of the air
terminals that you placed in the building.
IMPORTANT In the System Browser, all system components are organized in a folder tree hierarchy
according to the system that you assigned to them. You assign a system component (mechanical
equipment, air terminals, and so on) to a system either by creating a logical connection (or system)
between the system components or by assigning a system component to an existing system. You
will learn more about systems in this exercise. For now, notice that all of the diffusers (air terminals)
that you added are located under default systems categories in the Unassigned folder. This assignment
occurred because each system component must be assigned to a system after it is placed. So, after
you placed the diffusers, Revit MEP immediately assigned them to the Default Supply Air system
category located in the Unassigned folder. They remain in the default systems category until you
assign them to their proper system. As you assign diffusers to systems, the assigned diffusers move
from the Unassigned folder to their respective assigned system folder. Thus, if all system components
are assigned, each default system category would not contain any system components and would
be considered empty. The System Browser is a powerful tool that allows you to validate and confirm
air systems.
Keep the System Browser open and refer to it as you create your systems.
Place a VAV (variable air volume) box
11 With the view active, enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around Office 101 located in the
top-left corner of the floor plan.
The cursor changes to a magnifying glass when Zoom in Region is activated.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 111
TIP Although this view does not contain room tags, you can identify a room by placing the cursor
over the room component. A tooltip and the Status Bar (located at the lower left under the Design
Bar) confirm the room name and number. If desired, you can add room tags to the mechanical floor
plans using the Room Tag tool on the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar.
12 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
13 In the Type Selector, select M_VAV Unit Parallel Fan Powered: M_Size 3 - 200mm Inlet.
14 Move the cursor to the right of the office door, press Spacebar twice to rotate VAV box 180
degrees, click to place the VAV box, and press Esc twice.
Modify VAV box parameters
15 Right-click the VAV box, and click Element Properties.
16 In the Element Properties dialog, do the following:
■ Under Constraints, enter 2900 for Offset.
Note that the VAV will detect the downstream airflow when connected to diffusers.
■ Click OK.
The offset value places the VAV box in the plenum space (between the level 1 ceiling and the
level 2 floor and above the level 1 air terminals). This VAV box services only Office 101 so the
VAV airflow equals that of the air terminal. Notice that the VAV box listing is placed in the
Unassigned folder under the Default Supply Air system in the System Browser. This is because
you have yet to assign it to a system.
Create a secondary air system containing one diffuser
17 Select the Office 101 rectangular diffuser.
18 On the Options Bar, click (Create Supply Air System).
You created a system that includes the air terminal. Next, you add the VAV to this system.
IMPORTANT After you select a system component, system specific tools display on the Options Bar.
19 On the Options Bar, click (Select Equipment for System), and select the VAV box.
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Notice that only mechanical equipment highlight and can be selected when using the Select
Equipment for System tool.
TIP If you clicked outside of the drawing area, and cleared from the Options Bar, select an
air terminal that you added to the system. This system tool displays along with the other Options Bar
system tools.
The newly created system that logically connects the air terminal to the VAV box displays in
red. This display indicates that the new system is selected. It does not indicate a ductwork layout
path.
Next you create the ductwork to physically connect the air system components (air terminal
and VAV).
IMPORTANT The new system named Mechanical Supply Air 1 is now listed in the System Browser
under Supply Air in the Mechanical folder. The organization is from upstream, the VAV (the parent)
to downstream, the air terminal (the child) with the system between (connecting) them. Notice that
the air terminal listing moved to the assigned system but the VAV box is also listed under Unassigned.
This is because you have yet to assign the VAV primary and return air connections to their systems.
They remain assign to their respective default systems, Default Supply Air and Default Return Air.
TIP If you click in the drawing area and the highlighted system clears, place the cursor over the Office
101 air terminal and press Tab, and select the system. You can also right-click the Mechanical Supply
Air 1 listing in the System Browser, and click Select to select the system.
Create the ductwork
20 With the new system selected, click (Layout Path) on the Options Bar.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 113
The Layout Path tab appears on the Design Bar providing various layout tools. Notice that
Solutions is selected.
21 On the Options Bar, do the following:
22 Verify that Network is selected for Solution Type. ■
■ Click (Next Solution), and select solution 2.
The layout path solution displays with the main in blue and the branch in green.
You can also view possible layout path solutions by pressing the left and right arrow keys on
your keyboard.
23 On the Options Bar, click Settings.
24 In the left pane of the Duct Conversion Settings dialog, select Main.
25 Under System Type: Supply Air, do the following:
■ Verify that Rectangular Duct: Radius Elbows / Taps is selected for Duct Type.
■ Enter 2900mm for Offset.
26 In the left pane of the Duct Conversion Settings dialog, select Branch.
27 Under System Type: Supply Air, do the following:
■ Verify that Rectangular Duct: Radius Elbows / Taps is selected for Duct Type.
■ Enter 2900 for Offset.
■ Select Flex Duct Round : Flex - Round for Flex Duct Type.
■ Verify that 1800 is selected for Maximum Flex Duct Length.
28 Click OK.
NOTE Configuring the duct conversion settings is usually a one-time process unless you need to
change them during your project. You can also configure these settings in the Mechanical Settings
dialog by clicking Mechanical Settings on the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar (or
Settings ➤ Mechanical Settings) before beginning your project. For more information, refer to Help.
29 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
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The physical connection composed of ducts and fittings is created.
NOTE All fittings required to connect the duct system to system components are automatically added.
For example, a transition connecting the elbow was automatically added, as was the elbow itself.
IMPORTANT Notice that the ductwork is not listed in the System Browser. This is because the System
Browser lists system components and systems. The ductwork is a physical not a logical connection,
thus it is not part of the system. For example, you can delete ductwork and the system remains.
Change the geometry display
30 On the View Control Bar located below the bottom left of the drawing area, select Medium for
Detail Level.
The duct geometry now displays in 2-line enabling you to better view the ductwork.
TIP You can easily change the duct geometry representation. On the View Control Bar, select Coarse
detail level for single line, and Medium or Fine detail level for 2-line.
Note that the arrow over the duct is the diffuser airflow display arrow and not the supply airflow
direction in the duct.
Check duct connectivity
31 Place the cursor over the VAV box and after it highlights, and press Tab twice.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 115
The system components and ductwork highlight indicating that they are physically connected.
IMPORTANT When multiple ducts and fittings are connected, you check connectivity by moving
the cursor over a segment of ductwork so that it highlights and then press Tab. The first time you
press Tab, the branch to which the duct is connected highlights. Press Tab a second time to highlight
the entire network of connected ducts up to the first piece of connected equipment. Press Tab a third
time to highlight the entire network of connected ducts, fittings, and equipment. If the entire network
does not highlight, then you know that a disconnection exists. This disconnection will be located at
the point where the highlighting stops. You can repair the connection by dragging the duct segment
end point away from its current connection point and then dragging it back again to reconnect.
Typically the disconnect results from not having enough room between the components that make
the connection. Rerouting usually correct this issue.
Size the duct
32 Place the cursor over the duct, and press Tab twice to highlight the duct and the air terminal,
and click to select them.
Do not highlight or select the VAV box.
33 On the Options Bar, click Sizing.
34 In the Duct Sizing dialog, under Sizing Method, do the following:
■ Select Friction, and enter .65 Pa/m.
■ Verify that Only is selected.
■ Under Constraints, verify that Calculated Size Only is selected for Branch Sizing, and that
Restrict Height and Restrict Width are cleared.
■ Click OK.
The Office 101 low pressure secondary air system ductwork is sized using the Friction method
at .65 Pascals per one meter of ductwork. Other sizing methods and values can also be used as
well.
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IMPORTANT The Duct Sizing dialog displays the sizing settings that were last used. It does not report
the sizing settings of the selected duct.
35 With the VAV selected, right-click and select Element Properties.
Note that the airflow is set to 120 L/s, the required airflow for the space and the airflow assigned
to the diffusers.
36 Click Cancel.
Create a secondary air system containing 2 diffusers
37 Click in the drawing area, enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around Offices 102 and 103 (the
offices immediately below Office 101).
38 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
39 In the Type Selector, select VAV Unit - M_Parallel Fan Powered VAV : M_Size 3 - 200mm Inlet.
40 Move the cursor to the right of the Office 102 door, press Spacebar twice to rotate VAV box 180
degrees, click to place the VAV box, and click Modify on the Basics tab of the Design Bar.
41 In the left column of the System Browser, in the Unassigned folder under Default Supply Air,
double-click the second VAV box listed.
You can also right-click the second VAV box listed, and click Element Properties.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 117
IMPORTANT Remember that all system components that you have not assigned to a system are
placed in the Unassigned folder in the System Browser.
TIP To locate a system component in the System Browser, right-click the component in the left
column, and click Select from the context menu. The component highlights in the drawing area.
Note that the correct view must be active to see the highlighted component. If not, click Show from
the context menu to open the appropriate window and zoom in on the selected system component.
42 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, enter 2900mm for Offset, and click OK.
TIP You can verify the airflow for the air terminals by opening the Air Terminal Schedule that you
created in a past exercise, or select an air terminal and the airflow displays on the Options Bar.
43 Select the Office 102 rectangular diffuser.
The selected diffuser and its connector highlights.
NOTE After you select a system component, the selected component and its connector(s) highlight.
44 Place the cursor over the diffuser connector, right-click, and click Create Supply Air System from
the context menu.
You can also select the diffuser and click (Create Supply Air System) on the Options Bar.
NOTE Remember that after select Create Supply Air System from the context menu or click
on the Options Bar, a new system is immediately created. This system includes the selected system
component(s). You can verify this new system in the System Browser.
45 Click (Edit System).
The Edit System tab appears on the Design Bar providing various system editing tools. Notice
that the Options Bar allows you to verify or modify the system name, system equipment, and
number of elements in the active being edited.
46 On the Edit System tab of the Design Bar, click Add To System.
System components that were not selected for this system are grayed out.
47 Place the cursor over the Office 103 rectangular diffuser.
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48 Notice that the cursor changes to indicate that Add To System is active.
49 Select the Office 103 rectangular diffuser.
The bottom diffuser is no longer grayed out as it is now part of the system. On the Options Bar,
the number of elements has increased to 2.
50 On the Edit System tab of the Design Bar, click (Select Equipment).
51 Place the cursor over the VAV box located outside Office 102.
Notice that the cursor changes indicating that Select Equipment is active.
52 Select the VAV box.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 119
On the Options Bar, the selected VAV is listed for System Equipment.
53 On the Edit System toolbar, click Finish.
54 Place your cursor over the Office 102 rectangular diffuser and press Tab to display the new
system.
If you leave the mouse stationary, a tooltip displays the system name as Duct Systems :
Mechanical Supply Air 2.
55 Click to select the system.
The system displays in red.
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Modify the layout path and create the ductwork
56 On the Options Bar, click Layout Path.
57 On the Options Bar, verify that Network is selected for Solution Type.
58 Use the left or right arrow keys on your keyboard to view the various layout solutions, and select
solution 3.
The layout path solution displays with the main in blue and the branch in green.
You already configured the duct conversion settings for the first system. These settings remain
the same and do not need to be changed.
59 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
Ignore the warning reporting that no auto-route solution was found. You can click in the drawing
area to close the warning.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 121
The ductwork physically connecting the system components is created.
Notice that the main is open and an endcap is needed to close the duct. This was the reason for
the warning message.
IMPORTANT When creating layouts, you are creating the physical duct and not altering the logical
system. So, if a layout solution causes errors (not warnings) while attempting create duct, it is because
the duct usually has insufficient space to be created. You can either relocate the VAV box, select or
modify a different layout solution using the Layout Path tool, or modify the duct manually. Remember
to check duct connectivity after modifying ductwork. If a warning occurs, you can review it and take
action if necessary, or click in the drawing area to close the warning and continue your work.
Add an endcap
60 Zoom in on the open (left) end of the main duct in Office 102.
NOTE It is highly recommended to zoom the view to accurately place an endcap.
61 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Duct Fitting.
62 In the Type Selector, select M_Rectangular Duct Endcap : Standard.
63 Move the cursor over the end of the main, and after the end point snap displays, click to place
the endcap.
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Notice that the centerline snap displays to aid in fitting placement.
64 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Duct Fitting tool.
65 With the VAV selected, right-click and select Element Properties.
Notice the airflow value of 530 CFM.
66 Click Cancel.
Size the duct
67 Place the cursor over the duct, and press Tab twice to highlight the duct and the air terminals,
and click to select them.
Do not highlight or select the VAV box.
68 On the Options Bar, click Sizing.
69 In the Duct Sizing dialog, under Sizing Method, do the following:
■ Select Friction, and enter .65 Pa/m.
■ Verify that Only is selected.
■ Under Constraints, verify that Calculated Size Only is selected for Branch Sizing, and that
Restrict Height and Restrict Width are cleared.
■ Click OK.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 123
The low pressure secondary air system ductwork for Offices 102 and 103 is sized using the Friction
method at .65 Pascals per one meter of ductwork.
IMPORTANT Remember that the Duct Sizing dialog displays the sizing settings that were last used.
It does not report the sizing settings of the selected duct.
Check duct connectivity
70 Place the cursor over the VAV box and after it highlights, and press Tab twice.
The VAV box, air terminals, and ductwork highlight indicating that they are physically connected.
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Next, you create a low pressure secondary air system in which you modify the layout path and
add a new system component to it. However, this time you will add the component after the
ductwork has been created.
Create and modify a secondary supply air system containing multiple diffusers
71 Right-click in the drawing area, click Zoom in Region from the context menu.
72 In the 1 - Mech view, sketch a zoom region around the air terminals in Open 1 (the large open
space).
73 Use your mouse scroll wheel to adjust the view as shown below.
74 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
75 In the Type Selector, select M_VAV Unit - Parallel Fan Powered Size 3 - 200mm Inlet.
76 Move the cursor to the left of the air terminals, and click to place the VAV box.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 125
77 Click Modify on the Basics tab of the Design Bar.
78 Select the VAV, and on the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
79 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, enter 2900 for Offset, and click OK, and
click again to deselect the VAV.
80 While pressing CTRL, select the 4 air terminals above and to the right of the VAV.
Do not select the air terminal in the upper-right corner. You will add this later.
The selected diffusers highlight in red (shown here as circled).
81 On the Options Bar, click (Create Air Supply System).
The new supply air system displays in red.
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The new system named Mechanical Supply Air 3 is now listed in the System Browser under
Supply Air in the Mechanical folder. Notice that the selected diffusers are included in the system.
TIP If you clicked outside of the drawing area, and the red system display cleared, place the cursor
over one of the air terminals in the system, and press TAB once to highlight the system. Then, click
to select the system.
82 On the Options Bar, click (Select Equipment for System).
83 Select the VAV to add it to the system.
The system displays in red and now includes the VAV. Remember that this display indicates
that the new system is selected. It does not indicate a ductwork layout path.
You have logically connected the air system components. Next, you create the ductwork to
physically the system components.
Modify the layout path and create the ductwork
84 With the system selected, click Layout Path on the Options Bar.
85 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Network is selected for Solution Type.
■ Click , and select solution 1.
The layout path solution displays with the main in blue and the branch in green.
86 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Modify.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 127
87 In the drawing area, select the left section of the branch.
After you select the branch, notice that drag controls display.
IMPORTANT Layout Path provides 2 drag controls enabling you to modify the layout. The parallel
control (horizontal and vertical arrows) move the layout horizontally and vertically. The end control
points (dots) moves the layout ends in any direction.
88 Click the parallel drag control and drag the left section of the branch to the right until it snaps
creating a straight path to the VAV.
89 Repeat this procedure and move the connection to the upper right branch, and then snap and
move down the right section of the main to create a straight main to the VAV.
90 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
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The ductwork is created. Remember that all duct and fittings are created automatically according
to the duct conversion settings that you configured earlier. The system components are now
physically connected.
A change has occurred in the air system design, and you will need to add an air terminal to this
system and connect it to the existing ductwork.
Add a diffuser to a system containing ductwork
91 Select the main duct, and (Edit) on the Options Bar.
IMPORTANT After system components (air terminals, mechanical equipment, and so on) are logically
connected by a system and ductwork is created, you can select the duct or component to display
system controls on the Options Bar. This allows you to modify the system (logical connection).
92 On the Edit Systems tab of the Design Bar, click Add to System.
93 Select the upper-right diffuser to add it to the system.
Notice that on the Options Bar, the Number of Elements increased to 5. This number verifies
the added diffuser. You can also verify the added diffuser by referring to the system in the System
Browser.
94 On the Edit Systems tab of the Design Bar, click Finish.
TIP You can also add a system component (air terminal, VAV, and so on) to a system by right-clicking
the system component connector and selecting Add to System from the context menu. Then, select
a system component that is already part of a system. The new system component is now part of the
same system.
95 Place the cursor over the new diffuser and press TAB once to highlight the logical connection.
Next, you need to manually modify the ductwork to physically connect the diffuser.
96 Use the mouse scroll wheel and zoom in on the end of the ductwork.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 129
97 While pressing CTRL, and working from the end of the main, select the flex duct and the transition
on the diffuser.
98 With the duct work selected, right-click and select Delete to remove the unwanted duct work.
99 Zoom out the view, and select an air terminal in the system to display the system tools on the
Options Bar.
100 Click Layout Path on the Options Bar.
101 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Network is selected for Solution Type.
■ Click , and select solution 1.
102 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
The new ductwork is created.
Now that the duct work is in place, you need to check that all the parts are connected.
Check duct connectivity
103 Place the cursor over the VAV box and after it highlights, and press Tab twice.
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The system components and ductwork highlight indicating that they are physically connected.
TIP Depending on your ductwork layout, you may need to press TAB 2 or 3 times to check connectivity.
Size the duct
104 Place the cursor over the main duct, and click TAB twice to highlight the duct and diffusers but
not the VAV, and click to select them.
The selection displays in red.
105 On the Options Bar, click Sizing.
106 In the Duct Sizing dialog, under Sizing Method, do the following:
■ Select Friction, and enter .65 Pa/m.
■ Verify that Only is selected.
■ Under Constraints, verify that Calculated Size Only is selected for Branch Sizing, and that
Restrict Height and Restrict Width are cleared.
■ Click OK.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 131
This low pressure secondary air system ductwork is sized using the Friction method at .65 Pascals
per one meter of ductwork. Other sizing methods and values can also be used as well.
IMPORTANT Remember that the Duct Sizing dialog displays the sizing settings that were last used.
It does not report the sizing settings of the selected duct.
Next, you complete the low pressure secondary supply air systems for level 1.
Optional: Complete the level 1 secondary supply air systems
(See the next exercise for a completed drawing.)
107 In the Project Browser, under Mechanical, double-click 1 - Mech floor plan to make it the active
view.
108 Using the systems creation methods that you learned, complete the level 1 system layout
according to the following specifications and floor plan layout:
■ M_Parallel Fan Powered VAV : M_Size 3 - 200mm Inlet with a 2900mm offset. Reposition
and rotate if necessary.
■ Select and modify a Network layout path solution. You may experience cases where you
need to modify the duct manually such as a drag flex duct segment to connect it. Do not
change the duct conversion settings. Review the no auto-route solution warnings as some
may be caused by disconnected diffusers due to proximity issues and others due to the need
for endcap fittings. If you receive errors, see the note below.
■ Add M_Rectangular Duct Endcap : Standard fittings where needed. Remember to zoom the
view for accurate placement.
■ Size the duct using the Friction sizing method at .65 Pa/m and select Only. Select Calculated
Size Only for Branch Sizing. Verify that all Other options are cleared. If you receive errors,
see the note below.
■ Use TAB to check duct connectivity after creating ductwork and after performing sizing.
IMPORTANT Remember that when creating layouts and sizing duct, you are creating and sizing the
physical duct and not altering the logical system. So, if a layout solution or duct sizing causes errors
or it seems incorrect, it is because either the duct usually has insufficient space, an offset elevation is
incorrectly specified, or the duct or duct fittings are not connected properly. You can either relocate
the VAV box, modify the layout, select a different layout solution using the Layout Path tool, modify
the duct manually, or reinsert duct fittings. You should always check duct connectivity after modifying
ductwork.
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The completed level 1 secondary supply air systems are shown below. Note that created ductwork
may vary slightly from the illustration.
Next, you create the low pressure secondary supply air systems for level 2.
Optional: Create the level 2 secondary supply air systems
109 Use the 2 - Mech mechanical floor plan view. Verify that Associate Level (Level 2) is selected for
all View Range parameters, set the Primary Range Top Offset to 3000mm and the Detail Level
to Medium.
110 On the Annotations tab of the Visibility Graphics window, turn off Air Terminal tags.
111 Using the systems creation methods that you learned for level 1, create the level 2 system and
duct layout according to the following specifications and floor plan layout:
■ M_Parallel Fan Powered VAV : M_Size 3 - 200mm Inlet with a 2900mm offset. Reposition
and rotate if necessary.
■ For VAV airflow, specify the air terminal airflow. If multiple air terminals are connected to
a system, specify the total air terminal airflow for VAV airflow.
■ Select and modify a Network layout path solution. You may experience cases where you
need to modify the duct manually such as a drag flex duct segment to connect it. Do not
change the duct conversion settings. Review the no auto-route solution warnings as some
may be caused by disconnected diffusers due to proximity issues and others due to the need
for endcap fittings. If you receive errors, see the note above.
■ Add M_Rectangular Duct Endcap : Standard fittings where needed. Remember to zoom the
view for accurate placement.
■ Size the duct using the Friction method at .65 Pa/m and select Only. Select Calculated Size
Only for Branch Sizing. Verify that all Other options are cleared. If you receive errors, see
the note above.
■ Use TAB to check duct connectivity after creating ductwork and after performing sizing.
Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems | 133
The completed level 2 secondary supply air systems are shown below. Again note that the created
ductwork may vary slightly from the illustration.
112 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
113 In the Save As dialog, enter Creating Secondary Supply Air Systems Training for File name,
navigate to the folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you created low pressure secondary supply air systems for the building. You used the Create
Supply Air Systems tool to logically connect the air terminals to the VAV boxes. You also modified a system
by adding an air terminal to an existing system. After creating each system, you used the Layout Path tool
to create and modify duct layouts to physically connect the system components. You also specified VAV
airflow, checked duct connectivity, sized the ductwork, and validated the systems in the System Browser.
In the next exercise, you create 2 different views to validate the ductwork geometry.
Using Views to Validate Duct Geometry
In this exercise, you use 2 different types of views to validate the duct geometry of the secondary supply air
systems that you created. Although you already checked duct connectivity, it is recommended to validate
the duct geometry to confirm that the geometry corresponds to your design intent.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Using Views for Duct Validation.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
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Create and use a section view to validate duct geometry
2 Right-click in the empty space of the drawing area, and click Zoom to Fit.
This zooms the view to fit the drawing area.
3 Place the cursor in the drawing area, enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around Offices 101 -
103.
TIP Although room tags were not copied when you created this view, you can identify a room by
placing the cursor over the room component. A tooltip and the Status Bar (located at the lower left
under the Design Bar) confirm the room name and number.
4 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Section.
Adding a section view is a 2-click process. The first click specifies the section head, and the
second click specifies the section tail. After you add the section, you can flip the view direction
or modify the extents of the view.
5 Place the cursor just above the Office 101 air terminal and click to set the start point for the
section, move the cursor down and click just below the Office 103 air terminal to set the end
point.
A new section view named Section 1 is created and located in the Project Browser under ???.
6 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ ??? ➤ Sections (Building Section), right-click
Section 1, and click Properties.
7 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, select HVAC for Sub Discipline, and click OK.
The section relocates under HVAC.
8 In the drawing area, click the section.
The selected section displays in red.
9 Using the shape handles (triangles) on the far right, drag the clip planes of the view so that you
capture only the systems that you created and set the depth just past the VAV boxes as shown.
Using Views to Validate Duct Geometry | 135
You many need to zoom out to view the shape handles.
10 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
The section head displays in blue, similar to the level heads in the elevation view. All section
heads are linked directly to their corresponding section view.
11 Double-click the section head to open the Section 1 view.
12 On the View Control Bar, select Medium for Detail Level, and Shading with Edges for Model
Graphics Style.
The system geometry displays with shading and outlined edges.
13 Use the mouse scroll wheel and zoom in on the bottom-right duct servicing offices 102 and
103, and verify that the geometry and location of the duct that you created is as you expect it
to be.
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14 Continue to validate the duct geometry of the other secondary supply air systems in the Section
view.
15 Sections are extremely useful in visualizing the detailed connections between ductwork and
equipment in a vertical space. They offer easy and immediate accessibility to all floors. You will
create a number of sections to both inspect and modify the duct layouts that you create.
Modify and use a 3D view to validate duct geometry
16 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
17 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ 3D Views, and
double-click {3D} to make it the active view.
18 On the View Control Bar, select Shading with Edges for Model Graphics Style.
Notice that in the 3D view, all of the mechanical elements display as shaded with edges but all
architectural elements displays as halftone underlays that highlight when you move the cursor
over them. This allows you to quickly and easily target your mechanical systems without the
architecture obstructing the mechanical design.
19 Right-click in the drawing area, and click View Properties.
20 In the Element Properties dialog, under Extents, select Section Box, and click OK.
A section box displays around the building model.
Using Views to Validate Duct Geometry | 137
NOTE A section box allows you to limit the view so that you can target only the geometry that you
want to view. It is especially helpful in 3D views in which the three dimensional space makes it difficult
to view some geometry.
21 In the drawing area, click the section box and locate the top center drag handle.
22 Zoom in on the view and slowly drag the top center drag handle down to adjust the crop
boundary until the plenum space for the level 1 ceiling is exposed.
TIP Release the drag handle at certain points to see a preview of the section at the current crop
boundary position.
23 Click in the drawing area to deactivate the crop boundary.
24 Use the ViewCube in the upper right corner of the drawing area to rotate the image so that you
can verify that the Office 101, 102, and 103 duct geometry is as you expected.
25 Zoom in on each air system to verify that the geometry and location of the systems that you
created are as you expect them to be.
3D views allow you to validate geometry of multiple duct runs in a three dimensional space by
using the zoom and spin controls. You will use both section and 3D views during your systems
designing.
26 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
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27 In the Save As dialog, enter Using Views for Duct Validation Training for File name, navigate to
the folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise you created a section view and used a 3D view to validate the secondary supply air system
duct geometry. In the next exercise, you draw the primary supply air system ductwork.
Drawing the Primary Supply Air Duct
In this exercise, you draw the high pressure primary supply air ductwork and connect the primary to the
VAV boxes. Unlike the previous exercise in which you created the systems first and then selected from a
series of duct layouts, you manually draw the primary duct and connect to the VAVs. You will create the
primary systems in a later exercise. This exercise allows you to become familiar with manually drawing and
modifying ductwork which is very important for resolving duct layout errors caused by insufficient space.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Drawing Primary Supply Air Duct.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Draw the primary duct
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
2 Enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around Mechanical/Electrical room.
3 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Duct.
4 In the Type Selector, select Round Duct : Taps.
5 On the Options Bar, do the following;
■ Verify that 300 is selected for diameter (D:).
■ Verify that Auto Connect is selected.
■ Enter 2900 for Offset.
6 Place the cursor in the Mechanical/Electrical room in the approximate location shown, and
click to specify the start point.
Drawing the Primary Supply Air Duct | 139
7 Draw duct as shown in the following image. After placing the duct, you can select individual
segments and use the arrow keys to adjust location.
Connect the VAV boxes to the primary duct
8 Enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around the VAV box outside of Office 101.
9 Click on the VAV, right-click on the air connection, and click Draw Duct.
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NOTE You must place the cursor over the connector to connect to the VAV primary. When drawing
duct, use the connector snap to quickly and accurately locate a connector. If you pause briefly,
a tooltip appears confirming the connector.
10 Move the cursor to the right to begin drawing duct, and press Spacebar to automatically change
the duct diameter and offset to match the 200mm VAV primary connector diameter.
You can also change the duct diameter from the Options Bar.
TIP When drawing duct, press the Spacebar after you specify your start point and move the cursor
to begin drawing duct. This automatically specifies the duct diameter or width and height, and offset
parameter to match that of the selected start point object. If a warning appears informing you that
the line is too short, you pressed Spacebar before you began drawing duct. Note that the Spacebar
does not automatically specify the duct type. You should always verify the duct type in the Type
Selector.
11 Draw the first duct segment 600mm to the right, and click to specify the end point.
12 Move the cursor down and draw an approximate 2300mm vertical second duct segment, and
click or press Enter to specify the end point.
Drawing the Primary Supply Air Duct | 141
13 Move the cursor to the right and over the primary duct, and click after the centerline snap
displays to specify the end point for the third duct segment.
TIP When connecting duct to the centerline of another duct, the centerline snap makes the process
quick and easy.
After you click to specify the end point, the duct run connecting the Office 101 VAV to the
primary is complete.
14 With the Draw tool open, zoom in on the VAV box outside of Office 102.
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TIP When zooming or reorienting a view that uses Medium or Fine for Detail Level, you may experience
performance issues depending on the size and complexity of the system geometry. On the View
Control Bar, change the Model Graphics Style to Wireframe to improve performance. This allows you
to continue to use the 2-line display. You can also specify the Detail Level to Coarse for viewing a
single line display
15 Place the cursor over the Office 102 VAV box supply air connection, and after the connector
snap displays, click to specify the start point.
16 Draw the duct to the right and connect it to the centerline of the primary.
17 Connect the other three VAVs to the primary duct as shown.
18 Using the draw duct methods that you learned, zoom the view to the right of the primary, and
connect the 2 VAVs in Open 1 to the primary duct as shown.
Check connectivity
19 Place the cursor over the primary duct and press Tab twice to check connectivity up to but not
including the VAV boxes.
Drawing the Primary Supply Air Duct | 143
You can press TAB 3 times to check connectivity including the VAVs and secondary system
ductwork.
20 Validate the primary duct geometry using the Section 1 and 3D views.
NOTE Do not size the primary at this time, you will do that in a later exercise.
IMPORTANT Notice that the VAV boxes are still listed in the Unassigned folder under Default Supply
Air because you physically connected the VAVs to the primary duct, but you have not logically
connected the VAVs with a system. You will create a system for the primary and add the VAVs to it
in a later exercise.
Optional: Complete the level 1 primary duct
(See next exercise for a completed drawing.)
21 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1-Mech to make it the active view.
22 Using the duct drawing methods that you learned, complete the level 1 primary duct according
to the following specifications and floor plan layout:
■ Draw the primary duct using Round Duct : Taps. The main has a 300mm diameter and the
connections to the VAV boxes have a diameter of 200mm. On the Options Bar, specify a
2900mm offset, and verify that Auto Connect is selected, and Angle is cleared. Use
approximate duct segment lengths from the layout below.
■ Do not size the primary. You will size the primary in a later exercise.
■ Check connectivity, and use the Section 1 and 3D views for duct geometry validation.
IMPORTANT Remember that when drawing duct, you may encounter errors when connecting to
the primary duct or a VAV. This is usually caused by insufficient space preventing duct creation or
fitting insertion. Modify the duct length or relocate the VAV box to make sufficient space, and use
the Draw Duct tool to reconnect. Finally, remember to always check connectivity and validate the
duct geometry.
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The completed level 1 air system layout is shown below.
Optional: Draw the level 2 primary duct
23 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Mech to make it the active view.
24 Using the duct drawing methods that you learned, complete the level 2 primary duct according
to the following specifications and floor plan layout:
■ Draw the primary duct using Round Duct : Taps. The main has a 300mm diameter and the
connections to the VAV boxes have a diameter of 200mm. On the Options Bar, specify a
2900mm offset, and verify that Auto Connect is selected, and Angle is cleared. Use
approximate duct segment lengths from the layout below.
■ Do not size the primary. You will size the primary in a later exercise.
■ Check connectivity, and use the Section 1 and 3D views for duct geometry validation.
Drawing the Primary Supply Air Duct | 145
The completed level 2 air system layout is shown below.
25 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
26 In the Save As dialog, enter Drawing Primary Supply Air Duct Training for File name, navigate
to the folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you used the Duct tool to manually draw the high pressure primary supply air duct and
physically connect the VAV boxes to the primary duct. You will connect the primary duct to AC units in a
later exercise. While drawing duct, you learned how to use connectors to create ductwork. Finally, you
checked duct connectivity and validated duct geometry using different views. In the next exercise, you
resolve routing conflicts with the primary duct.
Sizing the Primary Duct:Velocity Method
In a previous exercise, you created the high pressure primary duct that supplies air to the VAV boxes, but
you have yet to size the primary. In this exercise, you size the primary to meet airflow requirements using
the same sizing tool that you previously used to size the low pressure secondary supply air ductwork. However,
you use the Velocity sizing method rather than the Friction method. Before sizing the primary, you must
first determine the direction of the airflow in the primary duct.
The airflow direction inside the primary must be determined to accurately size the primary duct run.
Considering that both ends of the primary are open, you place an endcap where no further connections are
planned. This determines the airflow direction.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Duct Sizing - Velocity.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
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Place an endcap on the level 1 primary to determine airflow
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
2 Zoom in on the lower end of the left primary located near the wall between Offices 117 and
116.
The upper end of the primary duct run will connect to a rooftop AC unit.
NOTE It is highly recommended to zoom the view to accurately place the endcap.
3 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Duct Fitting.
NOTE If the Mechanical tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click
Mechanical.
4 In the Type Selector, select M_Round Duct Endcap : Standard.
5 Move the cursor over the end of the left primary duct run, and after the end point snap displays,
click to place the endcap.
Notice that the centerline snap displays to aid in fitting placement.
6 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Duct Fitting tool.
IMPORTANT When sizing duct that has multiple open ends, you must place endcaps to close all
open ends except the one that connects to the air source. This determines the airflow direction and
the duct will size accurately.
7 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the drawing area.
Sizing the Primary Duct:Velocity Method | 147
Size the level 1 primary duct
8 Place the cursor on the left primary duct run and press Tab twice to highlight the entire run
including the VAV connections but not the VAV boxes, and click to select it.
The selected primary displays in red.
9 On the Options Bar, click Sizing.
IMPORTANT Remember that the Duct Sizing dialog displays the sizing settings that were last used.
It does not report the sizing settings of the selected duct.
10 In the Duct Sizing dialog, under Sizing Method, do the following:
■ Select Velocity, and enter 12.5 m/s.
■ Verify that Only is selected.
■ Under Constraints, verify that Calculated Size Only is selected for Branch Sizing, and that
Restrict Height and Restrict Width are cleared.
■ Click OK.
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The sized left primary is shown below.
IMPORTANT Remember that when creating layouts and sizing duct, you are creating and sizing the
physical duct and not altering the logical system. So, if a layout solution or duct sizing causes errors
or it seems incorrect, it is because either the duct usually has insufficient space, or duct or duct fittings
are not connected properly. You can either relocate the VAV box, modify the layout, select a different
layout solution using the Layout Path tool, modify the duct manually, or reinsert duct fittings. You
should always check duct connectivity after modifying ductwork.
11 Place the cursor over each left side of the primary duct run, and press TAB twice.
The primary and the connections to the VAVs highlight indicating that they are physically
connected.
Next, you place an endcap on the right side of the primary in order size the duct.
12 Zoom in on the lower end of the right primary duct run located outside Office 117.
Sizing the Primary Duct:Velocity Method | 149
13 Using the process that you just learned, place a round duct endcap at the lower end of the right
primary duct run, and size this primary using the same sizing method and parameters that you
used for the left primary.
The sized right primary is shown below.
14 Using the method you have learned, check the connectivity of the right side of the primary
duct run.
Optional: Size the level 2 primary duct run
(See the next exercise for a completed dawing.)
15 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Mech to make it the active view.
16 Using the process that you learned for the level 1 primary duct run, place a round duct endcap
on the lower end of the left and right side of the primary duct run to determine airflow direction.
As in level 1, the upper ends of the primary duct run will connect to a rooftop AC unit.
17 Size both the left and right sides of the primary duct run using the same sizing method and
parameters that you used for the level 1 primary duct run.
18 Check connectivity for both sides of the primary duct.
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The completed level 2 primary duct run is shown below.
19 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
20 In the Save As dialog, enter Duct Sizing - Velocity Training for File name, navigate to the folder
of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you sized the primary duct for the building. First, you placed an endcap at the end of each
side of the primary duct run where no connection was planned. This determined the airflow direction inside
the primary. Then, you used the Duct Sizing tool to size the primary using the Velocity sizing method. In
the next exercise, you assign a color fill to the ductwork.
Assigning a Color Scheme to Duct
In this exercise, you assign a color scheme to the ductwork in your project. This procedure is similar to the
one that you used for rooms in a previous exercise. Like room color scheme, duct color scheme can help
you communicate your design immediately and effectively. This makes it much easier to determine whether
the plan meets your requirements.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Duct Color Scheme.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Create a new view
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans,
right-click 1 - Mech, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
A new floor plan view called Copy of 1 - Mech is created and becomes the active view.
2 In the Project Browser, right-click Copy of 1 - Mech, and click Rename.
3 In the Rename View dialog, enter 1 - Mech Duct Classes for Name, and click OK.
Assigning a Color Scheme to Duct | 151
Apply the color scheme
4 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Duct Color Scheme Legend.
NOTE If the Mechanical tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click
Mechanical.
5 In the Type Selector, verify that Color Scheme Legend : 1 is selected for color scheme legend
type.
6 Move the cursor in the drawing area and notice that an outline of the color scheme legend
indicates that no color scheme has been assigned to the view displays.
7 Position the color scheme legend outline at the top-right corner of the floor plan, and click to
place the legend.
The color scheme outline follows the cursor movement to help you accurately position the
legend.
8 In the Choose Color Scheme dialog, verify that Duct Color Fill - Flow is selected for Color Scheme,
and click OK.
Next, you change the color scheme.
NOTE Elevations have been hidden for legend clarity.
Edit the color scheme
9 In the Drawing area, select the duct color scheme legend that you placed, and on the Options
Bar, click Edit Color Scheme.
10 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, do the following:
■ Select Velocity for Color, and click OK after a warning indicates that colors are not preserved.
■ Select By range.
■ In the At Least column, click in the second row, and enter 7.5 m/s.
■ In the Caption column, delete the existing text, and enter low velocity for the first row, and
enter high velocity for the second row.
■ In the Color column, click in the first row and select Green from the Basic colors in the Color
box.
■ In the Color column, click in the second row and select Red from the Basic colors in the
Color box.
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TIP Color names are displayed under Name in the Color box.
■ Click OK.
The duct color scheme legend now identifies the duct by velocity. Notice that duct fittings do
not have color scheme applied to them.
Assign color scheme to the level 2 duct
11 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans,
right-click 2 - Mech, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
A new floor plan view called Copy of 2 - Mech is created and becomes the active view.
12 In the Project Browser, right-click Copy of 2 - Mech, and click Rename.
13 In the Rename View dialog, enter 2 - Mech Duct Classes for Name, and click OK.
14 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Duct Color Scheme Legend.
15 In the Type Selector, verify that Color Scheme Legend : 1 is selected for color scheme legend
type.
16 Position the color scheme legend outline at the top-right corner of the floor plan, and click to
place the legend.
17 In the Choose Color Scheme dialog, verify that Duct Color Fill - Flow is selected for Color Scheme,
and click OK.
The same velocity-based color scheme that you created for level 1 is automatically applied to
the level 2 duct. Using the same color scheme allows you to quickly assign consistent color
throughout your design.
The completed level 2 duct color scheme legend is shown below.
Assigning a Color Scheme to Duct | 153
18 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
19 In the Save As dialog, enter Duct Color Fill Training for File name, navigate to the folder of your
choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you added duct color scheme legends to both levels of ductwork in your project. You edited
the color scheme by associating colors to velocity parameters and changed the caption text. In the next
exercise, you size one of the secondary supply air system duct runs using the Equal Friction sizing method.
Sizing the Secondary Air System Duct: Equal Friction Method
In 2 previous exercises, you sized the secondary air system ductwork using the Friction sizing method and
then you sized the primary duct run using the Velocity method. In this exercise, you size the duct for one
of the secondary air systems that you previously sized. This allows you to more closely meet airflow
requirements for that system. First, you split the duct main into multiple pieces, and then you size the duct
run using the Equal Friction method. Finally, you tag the main duct of the secondary air system to annotate
the duct segment sizes.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Duct Sizing - Equal Friction.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Locate the secondary air system
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
2 In the System Browser, expand the Mechanical systems folder.
TIP If the System Browser is closed, press F9 (or Window menu ➤ System Browser) to open or close
it. If the System Browser does not respond, click in the drawing area to make it active, then press F9.
All mechanical systems that have been created for the project are organized by system type in
the Mechanical folder. Remember that only systems (logical connections) and the assigned
system components are in the System Browser, not ductwork (physical connections).
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3 Right-click Supply Air, and click Expand All.
Every supply air system that you created is listed. Notice that each system listing consists of a
system name and number, such as Mechanical Supply Air 6, and a hierarchy of system
components that you assigned to each system, such as a VAV box and diffusers.
4 Right-click Mechanical Supply Air 3, and click Show.
The 1 - Mech view automatically zooms on the selected system, and the system including the
assigned components and the ductwork displays in red.
5 In the Show Element(s) In View dialog, click Close to deactivate the Show tool.
Notice that the main duct connecting the VAV box to the diffusers is one size.
You need to reduce the size of the main to ensure that the air pressure meets airflow requirements.
To accomplish this reduction, you split the main into multiple duct segments and then size
each segment.
Split the main
6 On the Tools toolbar, click (Split).
7 Move the cursor along the top edge of the main and to the right of the 2 middle diffusers.
8 Watch the listening dimensions, and split the main about 3400mm from the end of the main.
TIP When splitting duct in 2-line display, move the cursor along the top or bottom edge of the duct
to view the split line and the listening dimensions.
9 With the Split tool open, split the main to the right of the second branch as shown.
Sizing the Secondary Air System Duct: Equal Friction Method | 155
10 Press Esc twice to deactivate the Split tool.
Notice that a Rectangular Duct Union fitting is automatically inserted to connect the duct at
each split. You can place the cursor over the union and both a tooltip and the Status Bar confirm
the fitting.
Size the system
11 Move the cursor over the main, and press Tab twice to highlight the ductwork and air terminals
located downstream from the VAV box, and click to select them. Note that the VAV box is not
selected.
12 On the Options Bar, click Sizing.
13 In the Duct Sizing dialog, under Sizing Method, do the following:
■ Select Equal Friction, and enter .65 Pa/m.
■ Under Constraints, verify that Calculated Size Only is selected for Branch Sizing, and that
Restrict Height and Restrict Width are cleared.
■ Click OK.
IMPORTANT Equal Friction sizing is an iterative process. The completion time varies according to
the speed of your computer.
NOTE If a Warning dialog opens alerting you that there is no loss defined, ignore this warning. You
can click anywhere in the drawing area to close it.
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The low pressure secondary air system ductwork is sized using the Equal Friction method at .65
Pascals per one meter of ductwork.
Notice that as the airflow decreases, transitions are automatically added to reduce duct size and
maintain air pressure. Next, you tag the main to annotate the duct segment sizes.
Tag the main
14 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
15 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Horizontal is selected.
■ Clear Leader.
■ Click Tags.
16 In the Tags dialog, under Category, for Ducts, verify that M_Duct Size Tag is loaded, and click
Cancel.
17 Move the cursor over the 3 segments of the main, and notice that the tag outline dynamically
displays the size of each segment.
18 Position the tag outline in the center of each segment, and click to place each tag.
TIP To reposition a tag, select the tag and drag it to a new location. You may want to zoom the view
for accurate placement.
19 Click Modify on the Mechanical tab to deactivate the Tag tool.
The low pressure secondary air system duct run is sized and tagged.
20 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
21 In the Save As dialog, enter Duct Sizing - Equal Friction Training for File name, navigate to the
folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you sized low pressure secondary air system ductwork to more closely meet airflow
requirements. First, you used the Split tool to split the main into multiple segments, and then you sized the
duct run using the Equal Friction sizing method. Finally, you tagged the main to annotate the duct segment
Sizing the Secondary Air System Duct: Equal Friction Method | 157
sizes. In the next exercise, you use the System Inspector to check flow and pressure in the secondary air
system that you just sized.
Inspecting Air Systems
In this exercise, you use the System Inspector to inspect the low pressure secondary air systems. The System
Inspector is a unique tool enabling you to inspect each system for airflow, pressure, and pressure loss by
placing the cursor over it. Using this tool, you can target problem areas directly in your design and resolve
them.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Inspecting Air Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Mech to make it the active view.
2 Right-click in the view, click Zoom in Region from the context menu.
3 Draw a zoom region around the lower-right secondary air system in Open 2.
You will inspect this system.
4 Select the VAV box that you assigned to the secondary air system.
IMPORTANT To select a system, select any duct segment, duct fitting, diffuser, or mechanical
equipment that you have assigned to a system. System tools display on the Options Bar.
5 On the Options Bar, select (Inspect).
The System Inspector tab opens providing system inspection tools on the Design Bar.
RELATED If you select a system component that has been assigned to more than one system such
as an AC unit or a VAV box and click , the Select System dialog opens enabling you to select
a system to inspect. Each selected system highlights in red enabling you to preview it.
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6 On the System Inspector tab of the Design Bar, click Inspect.
NOTE You can also use System Inspector from in the System Browser. Right-click a system from the
System Browser, and click Inspect from the context menu. After the System Inspector opens, click
Inspect from the System Inspector tab on the Design Bar.
7 Place the cursor over the upper-left flex duct branch of the secondary air system to highlight it.
An inspection flag dynamically reports the airflow, pressure, and pressure loss in the highlighted
duct segment. Arrows display on the duct indicating the airflow direction for both the main
and the branches in the air system. A tooltip also displays the system information.
IMPORTANT As you inspect a system, remember that all information is color coded according to
pressure. Red information and arrows indicate the highest percentage of pressure loss due to friction,
also known as the critical path.
Notice that the secondary air system and the assigned system components highlight and can
be selected, but you cannot select other secondary air systems or the primary duct run. These
are not logically connected to this system.
Next, you inspect 2 areas of the air system to compare information.
Compare system information
8 With the cursor over the upper-left duct segment, click to temporarily place the inspection flag
on the segment.
9 Place the cursor over the middle duct segment to compare the airflow and pressure information
with that of the upper-left duct segment.
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10 Click to place the current inspection flag and close the prior one.
11 Move the cursor over the upper-right air terminal to compare its information with that of the
middle duct segment.
You can continue to use this method to compare inspection information for system components
or duct across the selected system.
12 Click a blank space in the view to close the current inspection flag.
13 Continue to inspect the remaining secondary air systems in the building.
TIP You can also inspect systems in a 3D view.
14 On the System Inspector tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Inspector to deactivate the System
Inspector.
15 Use the System Inspector to inspect other secondary air systems in the project.
NOTE To use the System Inspector to inspect airflow and pressure inside ductwork, the selected
system components or duct must be logically and physically connected. Ductwork and system
components must be connected to a system (logical connection) and a system must contain ductwork
(physical connection). For example, you cannot inspect the primary high pressure duct run because
you have not created a system for it. The primary is physically but not logically connected. In a later
exercise, you will create a system for the primary and then you can inspect the primary duct run.
16 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
17 In the Save As dialog, enter Inspecting Air Systems Training for File name, navigate to the folder
of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you used the System Inspector to inspect the airflow direction, airflow, and pressure
information for various systems in the project. You learned that airflow and pressure information is specific
to the selected system component, and that all system information is color-coded for either the duct main
or the branch. You also compared system information across a system. In the next exercise, you place 2 AC
units.
Placing Air Conditioning Units
In this exercise, you place 2 air conditioning roof top units (RTU) on the building. You also use create and
use new views to precisely locate the AC units.
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Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Placing AC Units.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Create a new roof plan view
1 Click the View menu ➤ New ➤ Floor Plan.
2 Select Roof and click OK.
3 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans ➤ Roof.
4 Right-click Roof, and click Rename.
5 Enter Roof Mech for Name, and click OK.
6 Click Yes to rename corresponding views.
Ignore the warning about the name changing.
7 Right-click in the drawing area of the new view, and click View Properties.
8 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, select Mechanical for Discipline, and HVAC
for Sub-Discipline.
9 Under Extents, click Edit for View Range and select Level 2 for View Depth: Level. Click OK
twice.
10 Change the Graphics Style to Wireframe.
11 Set the Detail Level to Medium.
This action specifies halftone for all architectural elements in the Roof Mech view. Notice that
the level 2 system components and ductwork display as an underlay. Also notice that the Roof
Mech view is now located under the Mechanical HVAC floor plans in the Project Browser.
Add the AC Unit that services level 2
12 In the Roof Mechanical view, enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around Men’s Room (located
below the Mechanical/Electrical room).
You need to place the AC unit that services level 2 on the roof above the Men’s Room.
13 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
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14 In the Type Selector, select M_Rooftop AC Unit 53-88 KW - Bottom Return Connection : M_53
KW.
15 Move the cursor over the Men’s Room, and press Spacebar 3 times to rotate the unit.
The AC unit supply connection is now located at the top.
16 Place the unit in the approximate location shown below.
17 Click to place the AC unit, and then click Modify on the Design Bar.
Next, you create a section view to precisely relocate the AC unit.
Create a new section view
18 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the drawing area.
19 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Section.
20 Place the cursor below the AC unit and over the Office 203 VAV box, and click to specify the
section start point.
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21 Move the cursor to the right, and after the cursor is past the AC unit, click to specify the section
end point.
A new section view named Section 2 is created and located in the Project Browser under ???.
22 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ ??? ➤ Sections (Building Section), right-click
Section 2, and click Properties.
23 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, select HVAC for Sub Discipline, and click OK.
The section relocates under HVAC ➤ Sections (Building Section).
24 Select the section tail to display the drag handles.
25 Drag the top shape handle to adjust the depth view clip plane just past the AC unit. You may
need to scroll the view up to access the top shape handle.
The section should partially capture the VAV on the left.
26 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Relocate the AC unit to the roof surface
27 Double-click the section head to open the Section 2 view.
28 On the View Control Bar, click Medium for Detail Level.
This changes the duct display from single line to 2-line. You may need to adjust the top border
to see all of the AC unit.
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29 Zoom in on the AC unit and watch the level indicators, notice that the unit is located on the
roof level and not on the roof surface.
NOTE As with air terminals and VAV boxes, AC units are level-based components. Notice that the
roof level is not referencing the roof surface but the underside of the roof. To place the AC unit on
the roof surface, you must relocate it.
30 Select the AC unit, and click (Move) on the Edit toolbar.
31 Move the cursor over the bottom-left corner of the AC unit, and after the end point snap displays,
click to specify the move start point.
32 Move the cursor up along the left edge of the AC unit, and after the intersection and centerline
snaps display at the roof surface, (300mm directly above the start point), click to specify the
move end point.
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This specifies the AC unit offset level of 300mm which moves the AC unit to the roof surface.
TIP You can also specify the offset level in the Element Properties dialog.
Place the level 1 AC unit
33 Using the methods that you learned, place an AC unit for the level 1 supply air system according
to the following specifications and procedures (see the next exercise for approximate locations):
■ Work in the Roof Mech view, and place a M_Rooftop AC Unit 15 - 25 Ton - Bottom Return
Connection : M_15 Ton above the Mechanical/Electrical room. First rotate the unit so that
the return connection is at the top.
TIP You can copy the first AC unit you placed. Copying eliminates the elevation adjustment.
Note that you must locate this AC unit above the Mechanical/Electrical room to allow the
supply and return air duct riser to pass through the level 2 Mechanical/Electrical room and
into the level 1 plenum space below.
Placing Air Conditioning Units | 165
■ The 2 AC units and the section headers are as shown.
34 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
35 In the Save As dialog, enter Placing AC Units Training for File name, navigate to the folder of
your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you added 2 rooftop AC units to the design. You created 2 section views and used the Move
and the Align tools to relocate the AC units to the roof surface. In the next exercise, you connect the AC
units to the high pressure primary supply air ductwork.
Completing the Supply Air Systems
In this exercise, you complete the supply air systems that you began in previous exercises. First, you draw
the duct to physically connect AC units to the high pressure primary supply air ductwork. Then, you create
the systems to logically connect the VAV boxes to the AC units.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Completing Supply Air Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Modify the 3D view
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ 3D Views, and
double-click {3D} to make the view active.
2 Select the section box, and drag the center drag handle up to move the crop boundary past the
roof.
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The entire building including the AC units display.
If you like, you can drag the bottom set of drag handles up above the level 1 system to hide that
system. Remember that, if you do this, you will need to reset this boundary to validate the level
1 supply air system later.
3 Use the ViewCube in the upper right corner of the drawing area to rotate the image so that it
displays as shown below.
Next, you tile the Roof Mech and the 3D views so that you can work on and validate your system
design simultaneously.
Tile the views
4 With the 3D view active, click Window menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows.
This closes all windows that you previously opened during the current design session. Note that
if this option is unavailable, the active view is the only open window.
5 In the Project Browser, under Mechanical, double-click Roof Mech to make it the active view.
6 Enter WT to tile both windows.
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TIP When tiling 2 views, the active view is tiled to the left.
7 Zoom the view in both windows as shown.
You are ready to create the duct riser for the level 2 supply air system.
Draw the supply duct riser from the AC Unit to the level 2 plenum space
8 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Duct.
9 In the Type Selector, select Rectangular Duct : Mitered Elbows / Taps.
10 In the Roof Mech view, place the cursor over the center of the level 2 AC unit (lower unit) supply
duct connection, the connector snap displays.
11 Click to specify the duct riser start point.
12 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Enter 1700 for W: (width), and 500 for H: (height).
This specifies the proper dimensions for the duct.
■ Verify that Auto Connect is selected.
■ Enter -750 for Offset, and press Tab.
The -750mm offset creates the supply duct riser from the Roof reference level down into the
level 2 plenum space and places the riser at the same level as the level 2 supply air system,
2900mm. Notice that the duct riser is offset from the Roof reference level and not from the roof
surface which is the location of the AC unit.
IMPORTANT When setting offset parameters for system components, Revit MEP offsets the selected
component from the reference level and not its location. If the 2 are different, connections are
automatically created. Note that Auto Connect must be selected on the Options Bar.
13 Move the cursor up, and after listing dimensions display, enter 1050 and press Enter to specify
the end point.
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The duct riser is drawn down from the AC unit to 2900mm from level 2, and then the duct
continues horizontally for 1050mm.
Notice that a green supply duct riser symbol displays to indicate that a supply duct riser exists.
14 Click Modify on the Design Bar.
15 Validate the duct riser geometry in the 3D view.
Notice that the mitered elbow fitting is automatically inserted.
16 Close the Roof Mech view.
You now switch to the 2 - Mech view to more accurately draw the duct in order to connect the
primary supply duct to the duct riser.
Completing the Supply Air Systems | 169
Connect the primary duct to the duct riser
17 In the Project Browser, double-click 2 - Mech to make it the active view.
18 Click Window menu ➤ Tile to tile the 2 views, and zoom in on the duct riser in the 2 - Mech
view.
TIP When zooming or reorienting a view that uses Medium or Fine for Detail Level, you may experience
performance issues depending on the size and complexity of the system geometry. On the View
Control Bar, change the Model Graphics Style to Wireframe to improve performance. This allows you
to continue to use the 2-line display. You can also specify the Detail Level to Coarse for viewing a
single line display.
Notice that only the duct riser displays. This is because the AC unit is beyond the top view range
of the 2 - Mech view. You can change the Top view parameter to see the AC unit, but for this
exercise you only need to see the riser. You can also validate the duct riser geometry in the 3D
view.
19 Zoom out the view to show the duct riser and the left primary duct segment.
The horizontal primary duct segment needs to be removed as it was an approximate location
and it is no longer needed.
20 In the 2 Mech view, select the horizontal primary segment, and while pressing CTRL, select the
adjoining elbow.
The selected items display in red.
21 Press DELETE to delete the selected duct segment and elbow.
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22 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Duct.
23 In the Type Selector, select Round Duct : Taps.
24 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For D: (diameter), select 200.
■ Verify that Auto connect is selected.
■ For Offset, verify that 2900 is specified.
25 Place the cursor over the left edge of the duct riser, and after the mid point snap displays, click
to specify the start point.
26 Move the cursor over the primary, and after the centerline snap displays, click to specify the
end point.
Completing the Supply Air Systems | 171
The left primary is connected to the AC unit.
27 Press ESC to deactivate the Draw tool.
28 Validate the geometry in the 3D view.
Next, you connect the right primary duct to the AC unit.
29 Spin the 3D view around and zoom as shown to validate the right primary connection.
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You will also use this view to validate endcap placement.
30 In the 2 - Mech view, pan the view to the right to show the duct riser and the right primary
segment.
31 Select the right primary duct, and place the cursor over the end connector.
32 Drag the connector down and to the right, and past the Mechanical/Electrical room wall.
Notice that the Draw tool opens (pencil icon) as you drag the duct and closes after you release
the mouse button to specify the end point.
33 Select the right primary duct, right-click and select Draw Duct.
34 Draw a short run of duct with a downward 30 degree angle and click to set the endpoint.
Completing the Supply Air Systems | 173
35 With the draw tool still active, draw a horizontal run and connect it to the midpoint snap of
the riser
.
36 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Draw Duct tool.
37 Validate the geometry in the 3D view.
You physically connected the primary duct to the AC unit. However, you still need to check
connectivity to make certain that all duct and duct fittings are connected.
Check connectivity
38 In the 2 - Mech view, place the cursor over the duct riser and press Tab twice.
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The entire primary supply air duct run including the VAV box connections highlight indicating
that they are connected. You may want to zoom out to see the entire primary duct run.
You now need to add endcaps to the left primary and to the duct riser to close the ductwork.
Add endcaps
39 In the 2 - Mech view, zoom in on the duct riser.
40 On the Mechanical Tab of the Design Bar, click Duct Fitting.
41 In the Type Selector, select M_Rectangular Duct Endcap : Standard.
Notice that the endcap snap follows the cursor.
42 Place your cursor over the top edge, after the endcap snap aligns to the duct edge and the
centerline snap displays, click to add the endcap.
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43 With the Duct Fitting tool open, move the view to the left to show the end of the primary where
you deleted the duct segment and elbow.
44 In the Type Selector., select M_Round Duct Endcap : Standard.
TIP It is a best practice to zoom in close for accurate endcap placement. The endcap snap aligns
with the duct edge to indicate proper placement.
45 Place the cursor over the end of the primary duct segment and after the endcap snap aligns and
the centerline snaps displays, click to add the endcap.
46 Press Esc twice to deactivate the Duct Fitting tool.
Verify endcap placement
47 Place the cursor over the primary duct round endcap to verify endcap placement.
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A tooltip and the Status Bar (located at the lower left under the Design Bar) confirm the endcap.
Additionally endcap edges display enabling you identify the endcap.
48 In the 3D view, use the same method to validate the endcap geometry.
49 Using the 2 views, verify the duct riser endcap, and then validate its geometry.
50 Press Tab to check connectivity.
You physically connected the AC unit to the level 2 VAV boxes by drawing ductwork. Next, you
finish the level 2 supply air system by creating a system to logically connect the level 2 VAV
boxes to the AC unit.
Create the high pressure supply air system.
51 With the 2 views tiled, click in the 2 - Mech view to make it active, and enter ZF to zoom the
view to fit the window.
52 Place the cursor outside of the building at the upper left corner, drag the cursor to the lower
right corner to draw a pick box around the entire level 2 floor plan.
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Notice that all of the selected elements highlight.
53 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection) to filter the selected elements.
54 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, and then select Mechanical Equipment, and click OK.
All level 2 VAV boxes are selected. This is because they are the only mechanical equipment on
level 2. You can verify the selected VAV boxes in the 3D view. Remember that when drawing a
pick box or using cross-picking (right to left dragging) all elements visible in the view range of
the current view are selected. In this case, only the level 2 VAV boxes are within the 2 - Mech
view range.
55 On the Options Bar, click (Create Supply Air System) to create a supply air system and
assign the selected VAV boxes to it.
56 Click (Select Equipment for System) to assign the AC unit to the system.
57 Click the 3D view title bar to make the window active, and select the level 2 AC unit.
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You just created the high pressure primary supply air system to logically connect the level 2
VAV boxes to the rooftop AC unit.
58 Press Esc or click in the drawing area to deactivate the Create Supply Air System tool.
IMPORTANT Although you can draw duct to physically connect system components, all system
components must be logically connected by a system. Remember that systems can be created before
or after you draw ductwork, or even without ductwork. However, ductwork must exist for Revit MEP
to perform system calculations such as airflow and pressure. These calculations are used during duct
sizing and can be viewed using the System Inspector.
Validate the primary supply air system
59 Press F9 to open the System Browser.
60 In the System Browser, expand Mechanical, Supply Air, and notice that the rooftop AC unit is
listed.
61 Expand M_Rooftop AC Unit 53-88 KW - Bottom Return Connection : M_53 KW to display the
Mechanical Supply Air 25 system listing.
This is the system that you just created.
62 Expand Mechanical Supply Air 25 to view the VAV boxes.
IMPORTANT The system components (air terminals and VAV box) that you assigned to a system are
organized in a hierarchy from upstream (parent) to downstream (child). In the Unassigned folder,
notice that only level 1 VAV boxes are listed in the Default Supply Air category. This is because you
have assigned all level 2 VAV supply air connectors to the secondary and primary supply air systems.
After you assign the level 1 system components to a primary supply air system, all supply air system
components will be assigned and the Default Supply Air category will be empty.
63 Right-click Mechanical Supply Air 25, and click Select.
Completing the Supply Air Systems | 179
The new level 2 primary supply air system highlights in red.
Next, you inspect the system.
Inspect the primary supply air system
64 In the System Browser, right-click Mechanical Supply Air 25, and click Inspect.
IMPORTANT Another way to select a system is to select any duct segment, duct fitting, diffuser, or
mechanical equipment that has been assigned to a system. You can then use system tools from the
Options Bar. Ductwork must exist to access the System Inspector. If you select a system component
that has been assigned to multiple systems such as an AC unit or a VAV box, the Select System dialog
opens enabling you to select the system to inspect.
65 On the System Inspector tab of the Design Bar, click Inspect.
The System Inspector tool opens.
66 On the System Inspector tab of the Design Bar, click Inspect.
67 Click a blank space in the 2 - Mech drawing area to make the view active.
68 Move the cursor over the primary supply air system duct run to inspect the air flow and pressure
within the duct.
Remember that you can click to place a temporary inspection flag in the view enabling you to
compare inspection information.
69 Make the 3D view active and continue to inspect the primary supply air system.
70 On the System Inspector tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Inspector to deactivate the tool.
71 You have completed the level 2 high pressure primary supply air system. Next, you complete
the level 1 primary supply air system.
Optional: Complete the level 1 supply air system
72 Using the methods that you learned in this exercise, complete the level 1 primary supply air
system to the following specifications:
■ In the Roof Mechanical view, draw the supply duct riser using Rectangular Duct : Mitered
Elbows / Taps and specify a 1700mm width, and a 500mm height.
■ Specify the offset to -4400mm. This offset routes the duct through the level 2
Mechanical/Electrical room and into the level 1 plenum space terminating at the same level
as the level 1 supply air system, 2900mm.
■ Click the supply connector, move the cursor down, and enter 1050mm, and press Enter to
specify the duct end point. Verify the duct riser geometry in the 3D view.
180 | Chapter 4 Mechanical Systems: Air
This is the opposite of what you did with the level 2 AC unit. This is because the location
of the supply and return connections are reversed due to rotating the AC units at placement.
Notice that the duct riser passes through level 2 as confirmed by the green supply riser symbol
in the 2 -Mech view.
■ Close the Roof Mech view and the 2 - Mech view (if open), open the 1 - Mech view, and tile
it to the left of the 3D view.
■ In the 1 - Mech view, select the left primary horizontal duct segment and elbow, and drag
them down to align with the centerline of the right primary duct. Watch for the centerline
snap as shown.
Completing the Supply Air Systems | 181
■ Connect the primary to the AC. Instead of drawing duct, select the left primary duct segment,
and drag the end connector over the left edge of the duct riser to open the Draw tool. The
edge snap displays when the connector is over the edge.
■ Drag the right primary duct connector to the right edge of the AC duct riser, and after the
edge highlights, release the mouse button.
The level 1 primary duct run is connected to the AC unit.
■ In the 1 - Mech view, add an endcap on the end of the duct riser. Use M_Rectangular Duct
Endcap : Standard, and remember to zoom the view.
■ Use Tab to check duct connectivity, and validate the duct geometry in the 3D view.
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■ Create a system for the level 1 primary supply air system, and assign the VAV boxes and the
AC unit to it.
■ Validate the system using the System Browser, and inspect the system with the System
Inspector.
The completed level 1 primary supply air system is as shown.
73 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
74 In the Save As dialog, enter Completing Supply Air Systems Training for File name, navigate to
the folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you connected the level 1 and level 2 high pressure primary supply air duct runs to separate
rooftop AC units. Using tiled windows, you drew the AC duct risers and then you physically connected each
AC unit to its respective primary duct run. You then created 2 systems to logically connect the AC units to
their VAV boxes, and validated these logical connections. These systems allow Revit MEP to perform
calculations such as flow and pressure on the primary supply air systems. You have completed the high and
low pressure (primary and secondary) supply air systems for the building. In the next exercise, you check
the systems in your project.
Completing the Supply Air Systems | 183
Checking Air Systems
Revit MEP uses both the duct geometry and logical system to perform calculations such as airflow and
pressure, and for duct sizing. Because both the logical (system) and physical (ductwork) connections play a
vital role in the overall systems design, you need to validate them. In this exercise, you use the Check Duct
Systems tool to immediately check these connections for all systems throughout your project, and quickly
target those systems that need attention.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Checking Air Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Perform a systems check
1 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Check Duct Systems.
Revit MEP checks both the logical (system) and the physical (duct) connections of each system
throughout the project. Warnings report that the Default Exhaust Air and Default Return Air
systems (for levels 1 and 2) and are not empty. These warnings direct you to check the Unassigned
folder in the System Browser. As you view the warnings, Revit MEP lists the system components
that are associated with each warning. Notice that no warnings refer to the supply air systems
indicating that they are valid.
NOTE The Check Duct Systems warnings contain a system type and a description. These warnings
can refer to both physical connection issues (such as a disconnected or problematic duct) or logical
connection issues (such as an improperly assigned system) in a system. Remember that after you
create ductwork to physically connect a system, the duct is now associated with that system. The
duct geometry is used for system airflow and pressure calculations, and for duct sizing. Note that
only physical connections associated with an assigned system are checked. Ductwork that is associated
with a default system (located in the Unassigned folder) is not checked.
IMPORTANT The most common Check Duct Systems warning is the “default system is not empty”
warning. As you learned when placing air terminals and VAV boxes, all system components must be
assigned to a system immediately after placement. If you place air terminals and VAV boxes without
assigning them to a system, Revit MEP creates a default system and assigns them to it in order to
perform system calculations. The default system is placed in the Unassigned folder until you select
the system components and create a system for them, thus assigning the components to a system.
After you assign the system components to a system, Revit MEP places them in their assigned systems
folder and removes them from the Unassigned folder. After you have assigned all system components
for the project to their systems, the Unassigned folder will be empty and Check Duct Systems will no
longer display “not empty” warnings. Note that a system component may be listed in both its assigned
system and in the Unassigned folder. This occurs because the assigned system component can be
connected to multiple systems (it contains different system connectors), and you have not assigned
the component to the other systems. For example, you assigned a VAV to a supply air system but
the same VAV has a return air and another supply air connector that you have not assigned to system.
In the System Browser, the VAV is listed in the assigned system and associated with the Default Return
Air system in the Unassigned folder.
These Check Duct System warnings refer to different systems that you have yet to design. So,
you can click in the drawing area to close the message window and continue designing other
systems. However, as a tutorial exercise, you open the System Browser to view the unassigned
system components in the Unassigned folder. Then, you confirm that the assigned system
components are in their proper systems.
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Use the System Browser to confirm duct system assignments
2 Click Window menu ➤ System Browser to open the System Browser.
3 Expand the Unassigned folder and notice that both Default Return Air and Default Exhaust Air
systems are listed.
4 Expand Default Return Air and notice the air terminals and mechanical equipment that were
automatically assigned to the Default Return Air system.
5 Right-click Default Return Air, and click Select to view all of the unassigned system components.
The red lines represent the default logical connection.
TIP If you have multiple views open, you can click Show in the Show Element(s) In View dialog to
switch between views, otherwise click Close.
6 Using the same methods, confirm the unassigned system components in the Default Exhaust
Air system.
You confirmed all of the unassigned default systems in the Unassigned systems folder. You now
confirm the systems that you created.
7 Collapse the Unassigned folder and expand the Mechanical systems folder.
8 Right-click Supply Air, and click Expand All to view all systems that you created including their
assigned diffusers (air terminals) and mechanical equipment.
Notice that each system contains a system type and an assigned number, such as Mechanical
Supply Air 3.
9 Right-click a system, and click Select to view it and its assigned system components.
You have validated both the unassigned and the assigned system components and their systems.
10 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
11 In the Save As dialog, enter Checking Air Systems Training for File name, navigate to the folder
of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you used the Check Duct Systems tool and the System Browser to validate the supply air
systems that you created. You also confirmed that the air terminals and mechanical equipment for the return
and exhaust air systems were unassigned as they were located in their respective default systems in the
System Browser and “not empty” warnings were generated by Check Duct Systems. Depending on your air
systems design, you may need to assign these system components to their proper systems. You have completed
the supply air systems for the building. To view the completed mechanical systems for this tutorial including
Checking Air Systems | 185
the supply air system, open the m Completed Mechanical Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical
folder under Training Files. In the next lesson, you design a hydronic piping system for the building.
186 | Chapter 4 Mechanical Systems: Air
Mechanical Systems:
Piping
Designing Piping Systems
As with designing air systems, designing piping systems in Revit MEP is a straightforward and intuitive
process. You will use many of the same methods and practices that you learned while designing the air
systems. In this lesson, you create hydronic piping systems. You begin your piping systems design by placing
fin-tube radiators in rooms and adding a boiler. Then, you create the systems and pipe runs to logically and
physically connect the system components. You continue designing by resolving pipe interference, placing
a circulator pump, and inspecting the piping system.
IMPORTANT It is highly recommended that you complete the air systems part of this tutorial before creating
hydronic piping systems. After completing the air systems lesson, you will have been introduced to concepts and
practices that you will use to design the hydronic piping systems.
Creating Piping Views
In this exercise, you begin designing the level 2 hydronic piping systems for the building. The hydronic
piping systems consist of wall mounted hydronic fin-tube radiators, a boiler, circulator pump, pipes, and
the systems to logically connect the system components. First, you create new views in which to design the
piping system.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Creating Piping Views.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Create the level 2 piping floor plan view
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans,
right-click 2 - Mech, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
A new view called Copy of 2 - Mech is created and becomes the active view.
5
187
2 In the Project Browser, right-click Copy of 2 - Mech, and click Rename.
3 In the Rename View dialog, enter 2 - Piping for Name, and click OK.
Modify the view properties
4 With the 2 - Piping view selected in the Project Browser, click (Properties) to modify the
view properties.
5 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, do the following:
■ Verify that Mechanical is specified for Discipline.
■ Delete HVAC and enter Piping for Sub-Discipline.
Next, you change the view range.
6 In the Element Properties dialog, scroll down to the Extents category, and click Edit for View
Range.
7 In the View Range dialog, under Primary Range do the following:
■ For Top, verify that Associated Level (Level 2) is selected, and enter 950mm for Offset.
■ Enter 950 for Cut plane Offset.
■ For Bottom, verify that Associated Level (Level 2) is selected, and enter -3500mm for Offset.
■ Under View Depth, for Level, verify that Associated Level (Level 2) is selected, and enter
-3500 for Offset.
This specifies the top view range above the radiators on level 2 and a bottom view range below
the return connection of the boiler on level 1. This allows you locate the boiler and connect to
it from one view.
TIP When entering a value, you do not need to type measurement symbols, just enter the value, and
press Tab. For example, you can enter 2600 and press Tab for 2600mm.
8 Click OK twice.
The 2 - Piping view displays all architectural elements in halftone and it displays the level 1 air
systems. Also notice that 2 - Piping is now located under Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans in
the Project Browser.
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You use this view to create the pipe run that services level 2. You can use the level 1 ductwork as a reference
to avoid interference with the level 2 pipe run. However, the pipe run will be located near the outer walls,
and the vertical pipe run from the boiler will be routed in the Mechanical /Electrical room. So the pipe will
not interfere with the duct. Considering this, you can hide the level 1 duct and system components to make
it easier to view the pipe run.
Next you create a series of filters to hide the level 1 duct and system components. You can then use these
filters to hide or show objects in other views.
Create and define filters
9 In the 2 - Piping view, click in the drawing area to make the view active, and enter VG.
10 In the Visibility Graphics dialog, click the Filters tab.
On the Filters tab, you can add and activate filters. Notice that some predefined filters are listed
under Name.
11 Click Edit/New.
IMPORTANT You can create and define filters in the Filters dialog. Notice that filters are already
created and listed under Filters. These system filters show or hide certain system elements that share
the same system type. You could use the system filters to filter some duct and duct fittings, however,
they will not filter all system elements needed. So, it will be best to create filters. You can use the
system filters for tasks such as color-coding your systems. In this lesson, the system filters are not
used.
12 In the Filters dialog, under Filters, click (New).
13 Enter VAV Boxes for Name, and click OK.
14 Under Categories, select Mechanical Equipment.
15 Under Filter Rules, do the following:
■ Select Family Name for Filter by, and verify that equals is selected.
■ Select M_VAV Unit - Parallel Fan Powered for the family name.
■ Verify that none is selected for And.
■ Click Apply.
IMPORTANT You can filter by many types of criteria, such as family name, type name, system type,
or even a description that you define. You can create filters that are either general or specific in scope
depending on the filter criteria. Note that if you are filtering multiple categories or multiple types in
one category, you must select filter criteria that is common and shared by all selected components
that you want to filter. A quick way to determine common filter criteria is to draw a pick box around
all components in a view, and click on the Options Bar to view certain components. Then you
can view the common filter criteria from the Element Properties dialog. Note that if at least one type
parameter is different amongst the selected components, then no type parameter will display in the
Type Properties dialog. However, common (shared) instance parameters will display even if other
instance parameters are different (the different instance parameters do not display). Depending on
the filter criteria, you may want to select each component type separately.
The new VAV Boxes filter is listed in the Filters list. This filter will hide all parallel fan powered
VAVs in the view after it is added and activated.
Next, you create a filter to hide all 3 types of air terminals. To do this, you need a define common
filter criteria.
Creating Piping Views | 189
16 In the Filters dialog, under Filters, click .
17 Enter Air Terminals for Name, and click OK.
18 Under Categories, click Air Terminals.
19 Under Filter Rules, select Description for Filter by, and verify that equals is selected.
You do not have common filter criteria for the supply, return, and exhaust air terminals but
they all have a Description type parameter. So, you create a description as the common filter
criteria.
NOTE The Description type parameter is applied to all components of that type. This is different
from the Comment instance parameter which only affects the selected component (or instance).
20 Enter Air Terminal for the description, and click OK twice.
Next, you need to assign the new description to all 3 air terminal types that you use in the
project.
21 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Air Terminal.
22 In the Type Selector, select M_Exhaust Diffuser - Hosted: Workplane-based Exhaust Diffuser.
23 On the Options Bar, click (Properties).
24 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
25 In the Type Properties dialog, under Identity Data, enter Air Terminal for Description.
26 Click Apply.
This action adds a description for all Exhaust Diffuser air terminals. It also creates common
criteria that associates all of these exhaust air terminal types to the Air Terminal filter.
NOTE When entering filter criteria and assigning it to a family, you must spell both verbatim, otherwise
the filter will not work. This is the same rule for using formulae.
Next, you add a description for the supply air diffusers.
27 In the Type Properties dialog, do the following:
■ For Family, select M_Supply Diffuser - Hosted.
■ For Type, select Workplane-based Supply Diffuser.
28 Under Identity Data, click in the Value column for Description, and select Air Terminal, and
click Apply.
Because you already entered the description, you can select it.
29 Repeat the method that you learned to add a description to the Return air diffusers.
Remember to click Apply.
30 Click OK twice.
31 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Air Terminal tool.
NOTE If you drew a pick box and filtered to select all air terminals, you will not see the Description
type parameter. This is because the selected supply, return, and exhaust air terminals have at least
one different type parameter. Remember, if differences exist in the selected elements, then the type
parameters will not display. By selecting each air terminal type separately, you can view the Description
type parameter and identify it as common to all air terminal types.
Next, you continue to create and define the filters.
32 Click in the 2 - Piping view to make it active, and enter VG.
190 | Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping
33 In the Visibility Graphics dialog, click the Filters tab.
34 On the Filters tab, click Edit/New.
35 Using the methods that you just learned, create the following new filters according to the
specifications, and remember to click Apply in the Filters dialog after you define each filter to
create it:
■ Supply Air - Duct Fittings. Category: Duct Fittings; Filter by: System Type, verify that equals
is selected, and enter Supply Air for system type name.
To filter multiple duct fitting types, you need a common filter criteria. All duct fittings in
your project have a System Type instance parameter defined as Supply Air in the element
properties. So, you filter duct fittings by system type.
■ Flex Ducts - Round. Category: Flex Ducts; Filter by: Family Name, verify that equals is selected,
and select Flex Duct Round for the family name.
■ Round Ducts. Category: Ducts; Filter by: Family Name, verify that equals is selected, and
select Round Duct for the family name.
Next, you have 2 types of rectangular duct. You want to view only the rectangular duct with
mitered elbows because this the duct riser which is in the Mechanical /Electrical rooms and
you want to avoid it when routing the pipe from the boiler. So, you specify a family and a
type name.
■ Rectangular Ducts Radius Elbows/Taps. Category: Ducts, Filter by: Family Name, verify that
equals is selected, and select Rectangular Duct for the family name; And: Type Name, verify
that equals is selected, and select Radius Elbows / Taps for the type name.
■ Rectangular Ducts Mitered Elbows/Taps. Category: Ducts, Filter by: Family Name, verify
that equals is selected, and select Rectangular Duct for the family name; And: Type Name,
verify that equals is selected, and select Mitered Elbows / Taps for the type name.
Remember that you must click Apply after defining each filter and before defining the next one
in order to create the filter. If you did not click Apply, you need to define the filter again.
36 Click OK.
You defined and created all of the filters that you will need to create the hydronic piping system.
Notice that the Filters tab in the Visibility Graphics dialog does not list the new filters even
though you created them. This is because you have not added them. Next, you add and activate
the filters.
Add and activate filters
37 In the Visibility Graphics dialog, click Add.
38 In the Add Filters dialog, select all of the filters that you created, and click OK.
The new filters are listed on the Filters tab of the Visibility Graphics dialog. Notice that you have
visibility controls similar to visibility categories on other Visibility Graphics dialog tabs.
Next, you activate the filters.
39 Under Visibility, clear all check boxes except for Mechanical - Supply and Rectangular Ducts
Mitered Elbows/Taps.
You used this duct to create the duct riser. You will use the duct riser as a reference to avoid
interfering with it when routing the pipe run from the boiler.
40 Click OK twice.
Creating Piping Views | 191
All filtered components hide from view except for the duct riser in the Mechanical/Electrical
room.
TIP Filters allow you hide geometry making visibility clearer. It also improves viewing performance
because geometry that would normally be regenerated is hidden. You can also set the Detail Level
to Wireframe to increase viewing performance.
Next, you create the level 1 piping view in order to place the boiler.
Create the level 1 piping view
41 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans,
right-click 1 - Mech, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
A new view called Copy of 1 - Mech is created and becomes the active view.
42 In the Project Browser, right-click Copy of 1 - Mech, and click Rename.
43 Enter 1 - Piping for Name, and click OK.
You now define the view properties.
44 Right-click in the drawing area, and click View Properties.
45 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, do the following:
■ Verify that Mechanical is specified for Discipline.
■ Select Piping for Sub-Discipline.
Next, you change the view range.
46 In the Element Properties dialog, scroll down to the Extents category, and click Edit for View
Range.
47 In the View Range dialog, under Primary Range, verify that Associated Level (Level 1) is selected
and that 3000 is specified for Top Offset.
48 Click OK twice.
The 1 - Piping view displays the new view settings. Unlike the 2 - Piping view, this view only
displays ducts and pipes on its level. The 3000mm top offset prevents the level 2 pipes (except
192 | Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping
for the boiler pipe connection), ducts, and fin-tub radiators from displaying. You use this view
to place the boiler that services level 2, and to create the level 1 piping system.
As you create the pipe runs, you will want to validate the geometry. Next, you create the 3D
piping view to be able to validate this geometry.
Create the 3D Piping view
49 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ 3D Views, right-click
3D, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
The new view is created using the view properties from the 3D Mech view, such as halftone
architecture.
50 In the Project Browser, right-click Copy of 3D Mech, and click Rename.
51 Enter 3D Piping for Name, and click OK.
52 Right-click in the drawing area, and click View Properties.
53 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, do the following:
■ Verify that Mechanical is selected for Discipline.
■ Select Piping for Sub-Discipline.
■ Click Edit for Visibility/Graphics Overrides.
You need to use the filters that you created earlier so that you can view only the pipes and
the level 1 duct riser. If you turn off ducts visibility, you will be unable to view the duct riser.
54 In the Visibility Graphics dialog, click the Filters tab.
55 On the Filters tab, click Add.
56 In the Add Filters dialog, select all of the filters that you created, and click OK.
The selected filters are listed on the Filters tab.
57 Under Visibility, clear all check boxes except for Rectangular Ducts Mitered Elbows/Taps.
You used this duct to create the duct riser. You want to view it to avoid interfering with it when
routing the pipe run from the boiler.
58 Click OK.
59 In the Element Properties dialog, under Extents, clear Section Box to turn it off.
Creating Piping Views | 193
60 Click OK.
The duct risers and AC units display in the view. The AC units display because you did not create
a filter to hide them. Notice that the duct fittings are filtered. This is fine because you are using
the riser as a reference to avoid interference with the boiler piping.
61 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
62 In the Save As dialog, enter Creating Piping Views Training for File name, navigate to the folder
of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you created and modified 2 floor plans and a 3D view. You also created filters to display
certain system components. In the next exercise, you place the radiators and a boiler.
Placing Radiators and a Boiler
In this exercise, you place the fin-tube radiators on level 2 and the boiler on level 1 that services the level 2
radiators.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Placing Radiators and Boiler.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
2 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the drawing area.
3 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
NOTE If the Piping tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click Piping.
4 In the Type Selector, select M_Radiator - Hosted: 25.
5 Move the cursor over a wall and notice that an outline of the radiator and listening dimensions
display only if the cursor is over the wall.
This is because the fin-tube radiator is a wall-hosted family and can only be placed on a wall.
6 Zoom in on Office 201 located in the upper-left corner of the floor plan.
TIP Although room tags were not copied when you created this view, you can identify a room by
placing the cursor over the room component. A tooltip and the Status Bar (located at the lower left
under the Design Bar) confirm the room name and number.
194 | Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping
7 Place the cursor over the top exterior wall, and center a fin-tube radiator under the upper-right
window as shown.
8 Click to place the radiator, and notice that the connectors display.
To place the radiator precisely under the window, select it and use the arrow keys to move it
into position.
9 Continue placing radiators centered under all windows on level 2 as shown, except for the
windows on the radius wall.
Placing Radiators and a Boiler | 195
You may need to move the Section 1 head and tail to place the Office 6 upper-left radiator. If
so, drag the section tail. Do not delete the section as you will reuse it later in this lesson.
TIP Remember to zoom the view to accurately place the radiators.
10 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Mechanical Equipment tool.
Next, you modify the radiator flow rate.
Modify radiator flow rate
11 In the drawing area, right-click a radiator, and click Select All Instances.
All level 2 radiators display in red.
NOTE Note that Select All Instances selects all components of the same type in the entire model. If
the same type of component exists on another level, and you do not want to include it, then it would
be better to use other selection methods such as drawing a pick box.
12 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
13 In the resulting dialog, under Mechanical Loads, for Flow, verify that 15.30 L/s is specified for
all of the selected radiators.
IMPORTANT If you select multiple objects and then view their properties, the parameters that display
are common to all of the selected objects. If parameters are blank, then these are different across the
selected objects.
Your design specification recommends a flow rate of 0.25 L/s for all fin-tube radiators in the
building. The existing radiator flow rate needs to be changed.
14 Enter .25 for Flow, and click OK.
The flow rate changes for all radiators on level 2. You selected all instances of the level 2 radiators
because Flow is an instance parameter and must be applied to each instance that you want to
modify. Next, you place the boiler.
Place the boiler
15 In the Project Browser, double-click 1 - Piping to make this the active view.
The boiler that services the level 2 radiators will be located on level 1.
196 | Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping
16 Enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around Mechanical/Electrical room.
17 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment, and select M_Boiler : Standard
from the Type Selector.
18 Move the cursor to the right of the duct riser, watch the listening dimensions, and click to place
the boiler approximately as shown.
Notice that the connectors display after you place the boiler.
19 Press Esc twice to deactivate the Mechanical Equipment tool.
Next, you verify the boiler flow rate.
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20 In the drawing area, right-click the boiler, and click Element Properties.
21 In the Element Properties dialog, under Type Parameters, verify that 14.50 L/s is set for Max
Flow.
The boiler maximum flow rate complies with the design specification.
22 Click OK.
23 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
24 In the Save As dialog, enter Placing Radiators and Boiler Training for File name, navigate to the
folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you placed wall mounted fin-tube radiators on level 2, and the boiler that services those
radiators on level 1. You also modified the radiator flow rate and verified the boiler flow rate so that they
complied with design specifications. In the next exercise, you create the systems to logically connect the
system components.
Creating the Piping Systems
In this exercise, you create the supply and return piping systems. A system is the logical connection between
system components such as fin-tube radiators and a boiler. This logical connection allows Revit MEP to
perform various analyses including flow and pressure. You create piping systems by placing mechanical
equipment and other system components, and then create the logical connection between these system
components. After creating the logical connection, you then create pipes to physically connect the system
components. This is the recommended workflow or best practice for systems creation. During this exercise,
you also use the System Browser to confirm your systems.
IMPORTANT All system components are logically connected either by a system that you create or by a default
system. Unlike logical connections (systems), physical connections (pipes) are not required for systems creation.
You can create pipes to connect system components but without a corresponding system, analyses cannot be
performed. It is not a pipe system but only a physical connection.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Creating Piping Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
2 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the window.
Explore the System Browser
3 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click System Browser.
TIP You can also press F9 (or Window menu ➤ System Browser) to open or close the System Browser.
If the System Browser does not respond, click in the drawing area to make it active, then press F9.
4 Expand the Unassigned folder, and expand the Default Hydronic Supply and the Default Hydronic
Return systems to view the level 2 radiators and the boiler that you placed in the building.
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IMPORTANT In the System Browser, all system components are organized in a folder tree hierarchy
according to the system that you assigned to them. You assign a system component (mechanical
equipment, and so on) to a system either by creating a logical connection (or system) between the
system components or by assigning a system component to an existing system. Notice that all of the
mechanical equipment that you added are located under Default systems categories in the Unassigned
folder. This occurred because each system component must be assigned to a system after it is placed.
So, after you placed the radiators and boiler, Revit MEP immediately assigned them to the Default
Hydronic Supply and Default Hydronic Return system category located in the Unassigned folder. They
remain in the Default systems category until you assign them to their proper system. As you assign
radiators to systems, the assigned radiators move from the Unassigned folder to their respective
assigned system folder. Thus, if all system components are assigned, each Default system category
would not contain any system components and would be considered empty. The System Browser is
a powerful tool that allows you to validate and confirm systems.
Keep the System Browser open and refer to it as you create your systems.
Create the supply hydronic piping system
5 Select a fin-tube radiator, right-click, and click Select All Instances.
All level 2 radiators display in red.
6 On the Options Bar, click (Create Hydronic Supply System).
Notice that after you click , the hydronic supply system is immediately created and listed
in the System Browser along with the fin-tube radiators that were assigned to it.
7 On the Options Bar, click (Select Equipment for System), and select the boiler to assign
it to the supply system.
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TIP If you have trouble selecting the boiler, click the Edit Systems button and then choose Boiler:
Standard from the System Equipment drop-down list on the Options bar.
Notice that you can select only valid system components, all other components are unavailable.
The supply system that logically connects the radiators to the boiler displays in red. This display
indicates that the new system is selected. It does not indicate a pipe layout path.
TIP If you click in the drawing area and the red system display clears, place the cursor over a radiator
or the boiler, press Tab, and select the system. You can also right-click the Hydronic Supply 1 listing
in the System Browser, and click Select to select the system.
IMPORTANT The new system named Hydronic Supply 1 is now listed in the System Browser under
Hydronic Supply in the Piping folder. The organization is from upstream, the boiler (the parent) to
downstream, the radiator (the child) with the connecting system between them. Notice that the
Default Hydronic Supply category no longer displays. This indicates that you have assigned all hydronic
supply system components in the model. Thus, the Default Hydronic Supply system is empty and
does not display.
Next, you create the return piping system.
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Create the return hydronic piping system
8 Select a radiator, right-click, and click Select All Instances to select all level 2 radiators.
Remember that the only radiators that exist in the project are on level 2. So, Select All Instances
is an appropriate selection tool.
9 On the Options Bar, click (Create Hydronic Return System) to create the hydronic return
system and assign the selected fin-tube radiators to it.
Notice that (Create Hydronic Supply System) does not display because the selected
components already have a hydronic supply system assigned to them.
10 On the Options Bar, click (Select Equipment for System), and select the boiler to assign
it to the return system.
TIP If you have trouble selecting the boiler, click the Edit Systems button and then choose Boiler:
Standard from the System Equipment drop-down list on the Options bar.
11 The return system displays in red.
TIP If you clicked outside of the drawing area, and cleared from the Options Bar, select one
of the radiators that you added to the system to display this tool and the other Options Bar system
tools.
Confirm and validate the systems
12 In the System Browser, expand Piping, and notice that Hydronic Supply and Hydronic Return
systems categories are listed.
13 Right-click each category, and click Expand to view the boilers and the Hydronic Supply 1 and
Hydronic Return 1 system listings.
These listings represent the systems that you just created.
14 Expand Hydronic Supply 1 to view the radiators.
You can now view the supply system hierarchy: Hydronic Supply 1 logically connects the boiler
(parent) with the radiators (children).
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15 Right-click Hydronic Supply 1, and click Select.
The hydronic supply system highlights in red indicating the logical connection.
IMPORTANT Although you can draw pipe to create the physical pipe connections, you must create
a system for Revit MEP to perform calculations such as flow and pressure. Remember that systems
can be created before or after pipe, or even without pipe being drawn.
16 Repeat this method to validate the Hydronic Return System logical connection.
17 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
18 In the Save As dialog, enter Creating Piping Systems Training for File name, navigate to the
folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you created the supply and return piping systems to logically connect the radiators and
boiler. You learned how the System Browser organizes system components and systems, and you used the
System Browser to confirm and validate the newly created systems. Now that you logically connected the
piping system components, in the next exercise, you create the level 2 pipe runs to physically connect the
system components.
Creating Pipe Runs
In this exercise, you design 2 pipe layouts and then create the supply and return pipe runs based on these
layouts. The pipe runs physically connect the level 2 radiators. In a later exercise, you connect the boiler to
the pipe runs.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Creating Pipe Runs.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
Create the level 2 supply pipe layout
2 Place the cursor outside of the building at the upper left corner, drag the cursor to the lower
right corner to draw a pick box around the entire floor plan.
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Notice that all components that are in the 2 - Piping view range highlight.
3 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection) to filter the selected elements.
4 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, and then select Mechanical Equipment, and click OK.
The level 2 radiators and the level 1 boiler are selected (and display in red). This occurs because
when you draw a pick box to select components, you are selecting all components within the
view range of the active view. (You can see the level 1 boiler in the 2 - Piping view).
TIP Instead of selecting all components and filtering, you can place the cursor over a radiator, press
Tab to highlight the system and select it. Then, you can click Layout Path on the Options Bar.
5 On the Options Bar, click Layout Path.
The Layout Path tool and the Select a System dialog open. Notice that the radiators, the boiler,
the return system that logically connects the components display in red. You can click each
system in the Select a System dialog to view it.
Creating Pipe Runs | 203
IMPORTANT If you select system components to create a pipe layout and the selected system
components are already connected to more than one system (because they have multiple system
connectors), then the Select a System dialog will open. You will need to select a system to create the
layout. You can select each system in the dialog to view it.
6 In the Select a System dialog, select Hydronic Supply 1 and click OK.
The system displays in red.
The Layout Path tool activates providing various layout tools.
7 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, verify that Solutions is selected.
8 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Select Perimeter for Solution Type.
You want the pipes to run along the perimeter of the radiators.
NOTE The Perimeter solution creates a layout that runs parallel (along a perimeter) to the
connectors of the selected system components. It does not reference the architecture.
■ Click (Next Solution), and select solution 4 of 4.
You can also view all possible layout path solutions by pressing the left and right arrow keys
on your keyboard.
The layout path solution displays with the main in blue and the branch in green.
■ Verify that 0.00° is specified for Slope.
This option slopes the entire pipe layout.
■ Enter 300 for Inset.
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The inset is the distance from the pipe to the connection on the selected system component.
Using this inset, you create the supply pipe run 300mm from the radiator pipe connections
(not from the outside wall).
NOTE Notice that the Perimeter layout solution inset modifies the layout path. Later in this
exercise, you modify the layout segments that are tangent to the radius wall.
Next, you specify the pipe conversion settings that you use to convert the layout path to a
pipe run.
9 On the Options Bar, click Settings.
10 In the left pane of the Pipe Conversion Settings dialog, verify that Main is selected.
11 Under System Type: Hydronic Supply do the following:
■ Verify that Pipe Types: Standard is selected for Pipe Type.
■ Enter -375mm for Offset.
This negative offset elevation places the pipe main at 3275mm in the level 1 plenum space.
Remember that you are working in the level 2 piping view.
12 In the left pane of the Pipe Conversion Settings dialog, select Branch.
13 Under System Type: Hydronic Supply, do the following:
■ Verify that Pipe Types: Standard is selected for Pipe Type.
■ Enter -375 for Offset.
IMPORTANT The branch offset allows you to automatically create branches that run above or
below the main, and other obstacles. This is useful for avoiding interference with pipes, duct,
structural beams, or architecture.
14 Click OK.
NOTE Configuring the pipe conversion settings is usually a one-time process unless you need to
change them during your project. You can also configure these settings by clicking Mechanical
Settings on the Piping tab of the Design Bar (or Settings ➤ Mechanical Settings). For more information,
refer to Help.
After configuring the pipe conversion settings, you now modify the layout path.
Creating Pipe Runs | 205
Modify the level 2 supply pipe layout
15 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Modify.
You now modify the layout paths that are tangent to the radius wall. The layout path is located
under the radiators.
16 In the drawing area, zoom the view, and select the lower layout path main that is tangent to
the radius wall.
A drag control displays.
17 Using the drag control, drag the main to the right at approximately the same inset as the layout
path.
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18 Repeat the process to modify the upper layout path tangent to the radius wall.
TIP Use the Ctrl key to select both the main and the branch line.
19 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
Ignore the no auto-route solution warning. You will address the cause of this warning later in
this exercise. The supply pipe run (main and branches) is created and all required pipe fittings
Creating Pipe Runs | 207
are automatically inserted. This pipe run physically connects the supply side (supply connectors)
of the system components.
Notice that the pipes are not listed in the System Browser. This is because the System Browser
lists system components and systems. Pipes are a physical not a logical connection, and is not
part of the system. For example, you can delete pipes and pipe fittings and the system remains
unaffected.
IMPORTANT Errors may occur while attempting to create pipe geometry as a result of converting
a layout or during sizing. The most common cause of these errors is that the pipe usually has insufficient
space to be created, or offset elevations are incorrect. Either relocate the system components, select
a different layout solution, or manually modify the pipe. Remember to always check pipe connectivity
after modification.
Change the geometry display
20 Enter ZR and draw a zoom region around the Office 201.
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Notice that the pipes and symbolic fittings display in single line. Also notice that a rise/drop
symbol displays indicating the pipe riser. Some pipes are hidden causing a gap. This is caused
by the hidden line setting.
IMPORTANT Creating Hydronic Piping Systems uses a hidden (haloed) line display. If a pipe is hidden
by an object, a gap displays indicating the hidden geometry. To turn off hidden lines, click Mechanical
Settings on the Piping tab of the Design Bar (or click Settings menu ➤ Mechanical Settings). In the
Mechanical Settings dialog, select Hidden Line and specify the inside and outside gap to 0. The
Hidden Line mechanical setting is not to be confused with the Hidden Lines Model Graphics Style
located on the View Control Bar.
21 On the View Control Bar (located at the lower left of the drawing area), select Fine for Detail
Level.
The pipe geometry displays in 2-line enabling you to better see it.
22 Zoom the view and notice that the symbolic fittings and rise/drop symbol have been replaced
by fitting geometry and a green pipe riser symbol.
You use the 2-line display to design the piping system.
Creating Pipe Runs | 209
TIP You can easily change the pipe geometry representation by changing the Detail Level. On the
View Control Bar, select Coarse for single line display, Medium for 2-line duct display, or Fine for
2-line pipe display. If you experience slower viewing performance while using the higher detail
settings, change the Model Graphics Style to Wireframe and/or turn off component visibility in the
Visibility Graphics dialog.
Next, you modify the pipe run so that it better fits in with the design. The design requires 2
zones. So, you will need 2 pipes connecting the boiler to the supply pipe run. A single pipe does
not conform to the hydronic piping design. Instead of moving the pipe, it is easier to delete the
pipe and fittings and draw a new one later. The deletion also divides the pipe run into left and
right sides. Additionally, the pipe run needs to be changed to a 25mm diameter.
Modify the pipe run
23 Zoom in on the pipe connecting the boiler to the supply pipe run.
24 Place the cursor over the pipe, and press TAB twice to highlight the pipe and the adjacent pipe
fittings, and click to select them.
The selected pipe and pipe fittings display in red.
25 Press Delete to delete the selection.
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Remember that although the physical connection from the boiler to the radiators has been
deleted, the logical connection (or system) is still intact. Next, you modify the supply pipe run
diameter.
26 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the drawing area.
27 Place the cursor over the left side of the supply pipe run (left of the split that occurred after
deleting the boiler connecting pipe), and press TAB twice to highlight the pipe run (main and
branches but not the radiators), and click to select it.
28 On the Options Bar, select 25mm for D: (diameter), and click Modify on the Design Bar.
The diameter of the main and branches change to 25mm.
29 Repeat this method to change the right side of the supply pipe run to the same diameter.
NOTE It is important to recognize that changing the diameter, width, or height of pipe on the
Options Bar is not sizing. Sizing is performed using the Sizing tool (Sizing dialog) and sizes the pipe
based on a series of parameters and calculations.
30 Verify the diameter changes by pressing TAB twice to highlight, the pipe run and click to select
each side of the pipe run.
The diameter on the Options Bar displays as 25mm indicating that all pipe for the selected pipe
run have been modified to the specified diameter. If the pipes had different diameters, the
Creating Pipe Runs | 211
diameter would not display. Next, you check to make certain that the pipe run is physically
connected to the radiators.
Check connectivity
31 Right-click in the view and click Zoom to Fit from the context menu.
32 Place the cursor over the right side of the supply pipe run and after it highlights, press Tab 3
times.
All radiators and pipe highlight indicating that they are physically connected.
IMPORTANT When pipes and fittings are connected, you check connectivity by moving the cursor
over a segment of pipe so that it highlights and then press Tab. The first time you press Tab, the
branch to which the pipe is connected highlights. Press Tab a second time to highlight the entire
network of connected pipe and pipe fittings up to the first piece of connected equipment. Press Tab
a third time to highlight the entire network of connected pipes, fittings, and equipment. If the entire
network does not highlight, then you know that a disconnect exists. This disconnect will be located
at the point where the highlighting stops. You can repair the connection by dragging the pipe
segment end point away from its current connection point and then dragging it back again to
reconnect, or you may need to convert a fitting and draw pipe. Typically the disconnect results from
not having sufficient room to make the connection.
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After the pipe run and radiators are highlighted, you can click to select them. This allows you
to better see disconnects.
33 Repeat this method to check the connectivity of the left supply pipe run.
Next, you create the return pipe run.
Create the level 2 return pipe run
34 Using the methods that you learned to create the supply pipe run, create the level 2 return pipe
run according to the following specifications:
■ In the 2 - Piping view, create a layout for the Hydronic Return 1 system.
■ Select Perimeter solution 4.
■ Enter 600 for Inset.
■ Verify that 0.00° is specified for Slope.
■ For pipe conversion settings, verify that Pipe Types: Standard is selected, and enter -525mm
for both the main and branch offsets.
This places the pipes at a 3125mm elevation in the level 1 plenum space.
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■ In the Layout Path tool, modify the 2 layout path mains that are tangent to the radius wall
to approximately the same inset as the other sides of the return layout path.
■ Delete the pipe and the 2 fittings that connect the boiler to the return pipe run. The deleted
pipe divides the return pipe run into left and right sides.
■ Change the diameter of each return pipe run side to 25mm. Remember, do not select the
radiators when selecting the return pipe runs.
■ Check connectivity and inspect the corner connections for disconnects.
■ Use the same method to correct any disconnects.
■ Validate the pipe geometry using the 3D Piping view.
The level 2 return pipe run is as shown.
35 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
36 In the Save As dialog, enter Creating Pipe Runs Training for File name, navigate to the folder of
your choice, and click Save.
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In this exercise, you used the Layout Path tool to design the supply and return pipe layouts. You then
converted these layouts to create the supply and return pipe runs that physically connect the radiators. You
also modified the pipe runs so that they were a better fit with the systems design. You checked connectivity,
converted fittings, corrected disconnects, and validated the pipe geometry in the 3D view. In the next
exercise, you resolve interference issues with the new pipe runs.
Resolving Pipe Interference
The supply and return pipe runs that you created seem to interfere with the 2 staircases in the building. In
this exercise, you create new views to confirm this interference and then modify the pipe run to resolve it.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Resolving Pipe Interference.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
Notice that the supply and return pipe runs seem to interfere with the 2 staircases.
Resolving Pipe Interference | 215
Resolve pipe interference with the lower staircase
2 Right-click in the drawing area, click Zoom in Region, and draw a zoom region around the right
stairwell.
You need to create a section view to confirm pipe interference.
Create a section view to confirm interference
3 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Section.
Adding a section view is a 2-click process. The first click specifies the section head, and the
second click specifies the section tail. After you add the section, you can flip the view direction
or modify the extents of the view.
4 Place the cursor over the left wall of the room that is below the stairwell and click to specify the
section head location.
5 Move the cursor to the right and click just past the exterior wall of the building to specify the
section tail.
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A new section view named Section 3 is created and located in the Project Browser under ???.
6 Use the drag handles to modify the clip planes so that you capture the pipe run and the stairwell.
NOTE Make certain that the clip planes do not capture the pipe branch above.
7 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Resolving Pipe Interference | 217
The section head and tail display, similar to the level heads in the elevation view.
8 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ ??? ➤ Sections (Building Section), right-click
Section 3, and click Properties.
9 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, select Piping for Sub Discipline, and click OK.
The section relocates under Piping.
10 Double-click the section head to open the Section 3 view.
All section heads link directly to their corresponding section view. You can also open the section
view from the Project Browser under Sections.
11 On the View Control Bar, select Fine for Detail Level, and Wireframe for Model Graphics Style.
The geometry displays with shading and outlined edges.
12 Draw a zoom region around the staircase.
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The section view confirms that the pipe runs do interfere with the right staircase.
TIP Sections are very useful in visualizing and validating your designs. They offer immediate accessibility
to all floors and areas. You will usually create many sections to both inspect and modify pipe runs,
mechanical equipment placement, and other aspects of your systems design.
Next, you modify the pipe runs around the staircase.
Modify the pipe runs around the staircase
13 Click Window menu ➤ Floor Plan: 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
14 Zoom in on the stairwell.
15 Click the return pipe segment that is interfering with the stairs, and after the connectors display,
place the cursor over the top connector.
These connectors connect to the tee fittings. The tees connect the radiator return branches to
the return pipe run.
16 Zoom in on the top pipe connector to view the tee fitting.
17 Drag the top pipe connector down and notice that the cursor changes to a pencil to indicate
that the Draw tool is active.
Resolving Pipe Interference | 219
18 Drag the pipe connector up to the tee fitting, and after the fitting end point snap displays,
release the mouse button to reconnect it.
This is another way to use the Draw tool to create pipe.
NOTE When modifying pipe, always connect to pipe segments, fittings, or mechanical equipment
after a snap displays. Usually a connector snap displays but other snaps may display such as an end
point snap. Remember to always check connectivity after connecting.
19 Zoom out, and select the return pipe segment again.
20 Drag the top pipe segment connector down to the area outside the stairwell as shown.
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You drag the pipe segment instead of splitting it because you will convert the vertical tee fitting
to a horizontal tee fitting. If you split the pipe, a small pipe segment will be created that will
need to be removed.
Next, you split the supply pipe segment.
21 On the Edit toolbar, click (Split).
The cursor changes to a knife to indicate that the Split tool is open.
22 Place the cursor over the supply pipe run above the stairwell.
23 Watch the listening dimensions, and click to split the pipe approximately as shown.
You may need to zoom the view to get the correct snap dimensions.
Resolving Pipe Interference | 221
Zoom the split and notice that a line displays across the pipe. This indicates that a pipe fitting
was automatically inserted at the split. You can place your cursor over the fitting and a tooltip
and the Status Bar confirm the pipe fitting. Zoom out the view.
24 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Split tool.
25 Select the pipe segment that is over the staircase, and press Delete to delete it.
Notice that the fittings that were inserted at the splits have been deleted.
Next, you convert a tee fitting, and draw the pipe around the stairs.
26 Zoom in the return tee fitting above the stairs.
27 Select the tee, right-click and select Delete.
28 Select Trim, and then select the two adjacent pipes to add an elbow, and then click Modify.
29 Select the elbow and click on the upper plus (+) sign to convert the elbow to a tee.
The new tee has a horizontal, not vertical, orientation.
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30
Notice that the return pipe is hidden under the supply pipe due to the hidden (haloed) line
mechanical setting.
On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click Pipe to open the Draw tool.
31 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Types : Standard is selected.
32 Place the cursor over the end of the return tee fitting that you just converted, and after the end
point connector snap displays, click to specify the start point for the first pipe segment.
33 Zoom out the view, and move the cursor to the left, and press Spacebar to automatically specify
the pipe diameter and offset to that of the pipe run.
34 Draw the pipe 4000mm to the left outside the stairwell, and click to specify the pipe segment
end point and specify the start point for the second pipe segment.
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35 Draw the pipe down, and after a snap displays aligning with end of the return pipe run, click
to specify the end point and the start point of the third segment.
NOTE When drawing pipe, always make certain that you provide sufficient space for segment and
fitting geometry, especially when connecting to mechanical equipment. Consider that pipe geometry
may be larger and additional fittings may be inserted after performing sizing.
36 Draw the pipe to the return pipe run on the right, and after the connector snap displays, click
to specify the segment end point.
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The return pipe run is connected as shown.
37 Press Esc to deactivate the Draw tool.
38 Select the supply pipe segment above the stairs to display its connectors.
39 Right-click the lower connector, and click Draw Pipe from the context menu.
Resolving Pipe Interference | 225
This activates the Draw tool, and automatically matches the pipe diameter and offset of the
selected pipe.
40 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Types : Standard is selected.
NOTE If you right-click a connector and click Draw Pipe on the context menu, the pipe diameter,
or width and height, and offset automatically match that of the selected connector. However, you
should always verify the pipe type in the Type Selector.
41 Using the pipe drawing methods that you learned, draw the supply pipe run around the stairs
as shown.
If necessary, use the arrow keys to move pipes to the exact location required. The amount of movement that
these keys provide depends upon the zoom factor.
Optional: Resolve pipe interference with the upper staircase
42 Click the Section 1 tail (located on the upper-left of the building).
The section displays in red.
43 Drag Section 1 to the left of the stairwell, and adjust the view clip planes as shown.
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Although this section was used for air systems, you reuse it to confirm pipe interference with
the stairs instead of creating a new section.
NOTE If you use a section view to check pipe interference, you must adjust the section view clip
planes to capture only the stairs and not the pipes beyond the stairs. Otherwise, you may get a false
positive result.
44 Press ESC, and double-click the section head to open the section view.
45 On the View Control Bar, select Fine for Detail Level.
46 Zoom in on the staircase and notice that the pipes do interfere with the stairs.
47 Click Window menu ➤ Floor Plan: 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
48 Zoom in on the stairwell.
49 On the Edit toolbar, click (Split).
50 Move the cursor to the left of the stairs and over the supply pipe, watch the listening dimensions,
and split the supply pipe at 3600mm from its left connector.
51 Use the same procedure to split the return pipe run at 1500mm from its left connector.
52 Using the methods that you learned, modify the supply and return pipe segments as shown.
Resolving Pipe Interference | 227
You can either drag the pipe segments to the right past the stairs or split and delete them.
53 Again, using the methods that you learned, draw the supply and return pipe segments as shown.
Remember to watch for connector snaps.
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54 The level 2 supply and return pipe runs are as shown.
IMPORTANT You have learned 3 different methods to create pipe using the Draw tool. You can click
Pipe from the Design Bar and press Spacebar to match the diameter (or width and height), and offset
elevation to that of the selected pipe connector. You can right-click a connector and click Draw Pipe
from the context menu. You can also drag a pipe connector to modify a segment. Using these 2
methods, the start point, diameter (or width and height), and offset are automatically specified.
Another method to create pipe is to select the pipe to create, and click (Create Similar) on the
Edit toolbar. Using Create Similar, the pipe type is also matched. Remember that after you create
pipe, always: (1) Provide sufficient space for segment and fitting geometry, (2) Connect to a snap,
preferably a connector snap, (3) Verify the pipe type in the Type Selector (not necessary with Create
Similar), and (4) Check connectivity after making a connection.
55 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
56 In the Save As dialog, enter Resolving Pipe Interference Training for File name, navigate to the
folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you used section views to confirm pipe interference with the stairs. Then, you used the Split,
Draw, and Move tools to modify the pipes that interfered with the stairs, and rerouted pipes to resolve the
interference. In the next exercise, you connect the boiler to the pipe runs.
Connecting the Boiler
In this exercise, you connect the boiler to the level 2 supply and return pipe runs. You also tile 2 views to
simultaneously create the pipe connections and validate the pipe geometry.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Connecting Boiler.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ 3D Views, and
double-click 3D Piping to make it the active view.
Connecting the Boiler | 229
Tile the views
2 With the 3D Piping view active, click Window menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows.
This closes all windows that you previously opened during the current design session. Note that
if this option is unavailable, the active view is the only open window.
3 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
4 Enter WT to tile both windows.
TIP When tiling 2 views, the active view is tiled to the left.
5 Adjust the view in both windows to view the boiler and the pipe runs as shown.
You will design in the 2 - Piping view and validate the pipe geometry in the 3D Piping view.
You are ready to connect the boiler to the supply and return pipe runs.
Connect the boiler to the supply pipe run
6 Zoom in on the split supply and return pipe runs located above the boiler.
Remember that these pipe runs split as a result of deleting the pipe that connected the boiler
to the pipe runs.
7 Click each pipe segment and drag the connectors to adjust the pipe segments to provide ample
space to connected the boiler connector pipes as shown.
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8 Zoom in on the boiler.
9 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click Pipe.
10 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Types : Standard is selected.
11 Place the cursor over the supply connection on the boiler, and after the connector snap displays,
click to specify the first pipe segment start point.
12 Draw the pipe to the left, and press Spacebar to match the pipe diameter and the offset elevation
to that of the boiler connector.
13 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that 80mm is specified for D: (diameter)
■ Verify that Auto Connect is selected.
■ Enter -1500 for Offset.
This offset places the horizontal pipe segment at 2150mm from level 1.
14 Move the cursor to the left, watch the listening dimensions, and click to specify the pipe segment
end point at approximately 450mm from the boiler connection.
Connecting the Boiler | 231
A green pipe riser symbol displays to indicate a pipe riser.
TIP If the exact dimension snap increment does not display, zoom the view and try again. You can
also add a dimension snap increment in the Snaps dialog (click Settings menu ➤ Snaps). Remember
to always use a semi-colon (;) to separate snap increments.
15 Draw the pipe up to 600mm, and click to specify the end point.
In a later exercise, you will place a circulator pump on this pipe segment.
TIP When drawing pipe, after listening dimensions display, you can enter a dimension and press
Enter instead of drawing to the preferred dimension.
16 On the Options Bar, enter -375 for Offset.
This creates a pipe segment at the same offset as the supply pipe run, 3275mm from level 1.
TIP After entering a value in Options Bar, you may need to press TAB to make the drawing area
active.
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17 Draw the pipe segment straight up toward the supply pipe run, and after the centerline and
intersection snaps display, click to specify the pipe segment end point.
The boiler supply connector pipe is created.
18 Click Modify on the Design Bar.
19 Zoom in on the left supply pipe run segment and the boiler connector pipe.
20 Click the left supply pipe run segment to display the connectors.
21 Drag the right connector toward the boiler connector pipe, and after the connector snap displays,
release the mouse button to connect to it.
Connecting the Boiler | 233
The boiler is connected to the left supply pipe run.
22 Place the cursor over the boiler connector pipe and press Tab.
The connector pipe and the left supply pipe run segment highlight indicating that they are
physically connected.
23 Validate the geometry in the 3D Piping view.
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Next, you connect the boiler to the right supply pipe run.
24 With the windows tiled, click in the 3D Piping view to make it active.
25 Zoom in on the elbow fitting above the boiler.
26 Use the selection tool to draw a box around the tee to select it.
27 Click on the lower of the two plus (+) signs to convert the elbow to a horizontal tee.
Connecting the Boiler | 235
28 In the 3D Piping view, select the tee to display the connectors.
29 Click in the 2 - Piping view to make it active.
Notice that the fitting is selected in the floor plan view and remains selected in the 3D view.
30 Zoom in on the tee, right-click the right connector, and click Draw Pipe from the context menu.
The pipe diameter and offset are specified to that of the selected connector, and the start point
is automatically specified.
31 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Types : Standard is selected.
32 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Auto Connect is selected.
■ Verify that -1500 is specified for Offset.
33 Draw the pipe 600mm to the right and click to specify the segment end point.
34 Draw the pipe up, and after listening dimensions display, enter 600 and press Enter.
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This creates a 600mm pipe segment. In a later exercise, you will place a circulator pump on this
segment.
35 On the Options Bar, enter -375 for Offset.
36 With the Draw tool activated, draw the pipe segment straight up toward the supply pipe run,
and after the intersection and centerline snaps display, click to specify the end point.
37 Press ESC twice to deactivate the Draw tool.
38 Using the same method that you used to connect the left supply pipe run, connect the right
supply pipe run.
Connecting the Boiler | 237
The right supply pipe run is connected to the boiler.
39 Check connectivity.
40 Validate the pipe geometry.
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Next, you connect the boiler to the return pipe run.
Optional: Connect the boiler to the return pipe run
41 With the windows tiled, and the 2 - Piping the active view, zoom in on the boiler.
42 Select the boiler, and right-click the return connector, and click Draw Pipe.
43 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Types : Standard is selected.
44 On the Options Bar, verify that 80mm is specified for D: (diameter), and that Auto Connect is
selected.
Notice that the return connection is at an offset elevation of -3396mm from level 2. This places
the return connection 250mm above level 1. Next, you draw a 150mm pipe segment at this
elevation and then create a pipe riser.
45 Move the cursor up, and enter 150 and press Enter.
46 On the Options Bar, enter -525 for Offset.
This places the next pipe segment at an elevation of 3125mm from level 1.
Connecting the Boiler | 239
47 Draw the pipe to the left, and after pipe segment aligns with end of the left return pipe run
located above, click the specify the end point.
48 Draw the pipe up toward the return pipe run, and after the connector snap displays, click to
connect to the left return pipe run.
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The boiler is connected to the left side of the return pipe run.
49 Press ESC to deactivate the Draw tool.
50 Zoom in on the boiler, and click the elbow fitting on the return pipe above the boiler to display
the fitting conversion controls.
51 Using the fitting conversion methods that you learned, convert the elbow to a tee with a
horizontal orientation.
52 Select the tee fitting, right-click the right connector, and click Draw Pipe.
53 Draw the pipe 300mm to the right, and click to specify the end point.
Connecting the Boiler | 241
54 Draw the pipe toward the return pipe run, and after the intersection and centerline snaps display,
click to specify the end point.
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55 Using the method that you learned, drag the right return pipe segment and connect it to the
boiler connector pipe.
The boiler is connected to the right side of the return pipe run. Remember that hidden lines
display when the pipe display is obstructed.
56 Click Modify on the Design Bar.
Check connectivity and validate pipe geometry
57 Place the cursor over the return pipe before the tee fitting, and press TAB 3 times to check
connectivity for both sides of the return pipe.
The return pipes highlight indicating that they are physically connected.
Connecting the Boiler | 243
58 Validate the return pipe geometry in the 3D Piping view.
Next, you align the boiler return connector pipes with the supply connector pipes.
Align the boiler supply and return connector pipes.
59 With the 2 - Piping and the 3D Piping views tiled, in the 2 - Piping view, zoom in on the boiler
and supply and return connector pipes.
60 On the Tools toolbar, click (Align).
If the Tools toolbar is not available, click Window menu ➤ Toolbar ➤ Tools.
IMPORTANT Using the Align tool is a 2-click process. First, select the reference point where you
want to align, and then you select the point to align.
61 Place the cursor over the left supply pipe, and after highlights, click to specify the alignment
reference point.
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NOTE Make certain to click the supply pipe and not the return.
62 Move the cursor over the left return pipe, and after the centerline highlights, click to specify
the point to align.
Connecting the Boiler | 245
The left return pipe is aligned with the left supply pipe. Notice that the return pipe parametrically
adjusts.
63 Using the alignment method you just learned, align the right return pipe with the right supply
pipe.
64 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Align tool.
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The aligned return pipes are as shown. Notice that the return pipe runs also are parametrically
adjusted. This situation results because they are connected to the return boiler connector pipes
that you aligned.
65 Place the cursor below the tee fitting, and press Tab 3 times to check connectivity.
66 Validate the geometry in the 3D Piping view.
Connecting the Boiler | 247
The boiler is physically connected to the radiators and the hydronic piping system is now a
closed loop.
67 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
68 In the Save As dialog, enter Connecting the Boiler Training for File name, navigate to the folder
of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, connected the boiler to the supply and return pipe runs. You used the Split tool to create 2
separate supply and return pipe runs. You then drew pipes that had different offset elevations to connect
the boiler to the supply and return pipe runs. You worked in 2 tiled views enabling you to design and validate
geometry simultaneously. It also allowed you to better understand the Auto Connect behavior. Finally, you
used the Align tool to align the return pipes to the supply pipes. In the next exercise, you size the supply
and return piping runs.
Sizing the Pipe Runs: Friction & Velocity Methods
You created the level 2 supply and return pipe runs to physically connect the boiler to the radiators. Next,
you size the pipe runs using both Friction and Velocity sizing methods.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Pipe Sizing - Friction & Velocity.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
2 Place the cursor over the boiler, and after it highlights, press Tab 4 times to highlight both the
supply and return pipe runs including the radiators and the boiler, and click to select them.
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The selected pipe runs and mechanical equipment display in red.
3 On the Options Bar, click Sizing.
IMPORTANT Remember that the Pipe Sizing dialog displays the sizing settings that were last used.
It does not report the sizing settings of the selected pipe segment or pipe run.
4 In the Pipe Sizing dialog, do the following:
■ Under Sizing Method, select Friction, and enter 250.00 Pa/m.
■ Select And, and enter 2.5 m/s for Velocity.
■ Under Constraints, select Match Connector Size for Branch Sizing, and that Restrict Size is
cleared.
Match Connector Size matches the pipe to the connector size of the mechanical equipment
to which the branch is connected.
■ Click OK.
The sized pipe runs are sized.
IMPORTANT Errors may occur while attempting to create pipe geometry as a result of converting
a layout or during sizing. The most common cause of these errors is that the pipe usually has insufficient
space to be created. Either relocate the system components, select a different layout solution, or
manually modify the pipe. Remember to always check pipe connectivity after modification.
5 Zoom in and confirm the pipe sizing.
Sizing the Pipe Runs: Friction & Velocity Methods | 249
Notice that the branch sizing used the size information from the connector on the fin-tube
radiator and not from the connector on the main pipe. This is because you selected Match
Connector Size for branch sizing.
6 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ 3D Views, and
double-click 3D Piping to make it the active view.
7 Validate the sized pipe geometry.
8 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
9 In the Save As dialog, enter Pipe Sizing - Friction & Velocity Training for File name, navigate to
the folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you sized the supply and return pipe runs using both the Friction and Velocity sizing
methods. You also specified branch sizing that was different than the main pipe sizing. In the next exercise,
you place the circulator pumps for the supply pipe runs.
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Placing Circulator Pumps
In this exercise, you place 2 in-line circulator pumps on the hydronic supply pipe runs that you sized.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Placing Circulator Pumps.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ 3D Views, and
double-click 3D Piping to make it the active view.
Tile the views
2 With the 3D Piping view active, click Window menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows.
This closes all windows that you previously opened during the current design session. Note that
if this option is unavailable, the active view is the only open window.
3 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
4 Enter WT to tile both windows.
TIP When tiling 2 views, the active view is tiled to the left.
5 Adjust the view in both windows to view the boiler and connecting pipes as shown.
You place the pumps in the 2 - Piping view and validate the geometry and rotate the pumps in
the 3D Piping view.
Place in-line circulator pumps
6 In the 2 - Piping view, zoom in on the boiler and the 2 supply pipes to the left and right of the
boiler.
7 On the Edit toolbar, click (Split).
8 Watch the listening dimensions, and make 2 splits on the left pipe 160mm from the upper and
the lower elbow fittings as shown.
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Notice that a pipe fitting is automatically inserted at each split. You can place your cursor over
one and a tooltip and the Status Bar confirm the fitting.
9 Click Modify on the Design Bar to deactivate the Split tool.
10 Click the pipe segment between the 2 splits.
The selected pipe segment displays in red.
11 Press Delete to delete the pipe segment.
Notice that the pipe fittings that were automatically inserted are also deleted.
12 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment.
13 In the Type Selector, select M_In-line Circulator : M_Standard.
14 Place the cursor between the pipe openings and click to place the circulator pump.
15 Select the pump and click Rotate on the toolbar.
16 Flip the pump so that the motor is on the left.
17 Click Align on the toolbar and select the middle of the pipe above and the middle of the circulator
connector.
NOTE You must align the pump correctly in order to connect it to the pipes above and below.
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18
TIP If you need to reposition the circulator pump, drag the pump away from the pipe, and then
move it over the pipe opening, and watch for the centerline snaps. You can also use the cursor keys
or the Move tool for precise placement.
19 Press ESC twice.
20 In the 3D Piping view, notice that the pump is not located near the selection point.
Actually, the pump is on the selection point but at the default offset elevation. You need to
specify the pump offset.
21 In the 2 - Piping view, click the pump.
The selected pump displays in red.
22 On the Options Bar, click .
You can also right-click the pump, and select Element Properties.
23 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, enter -1500 for Offset.
This is the offset elevation of the horizontal pipe on which you are placing the pump.
TIP To quickly view the pipe offset value, click the pipe segment. The offset appears on the Options
Bar and in the drawing area. You can also open the Element Properties dialog to view the offset.
Placing Circulator Pumps | 253
24 Click OK.
The circulator pump is placed at the same offset as the horizontal pipe segment.
If the pump remains selected, click in the drawing area to clear the selection. Next, you connect
the pump.
TIP Sometimes a selected object remains selected (displays in red) after an action upon it has finished.
To clear the selection, you can click in the drawing area, click Modify on the Design Bar, or press ESC.
25 In the 2 - Piping view, click the upper pipe segment to display the connectors.
26 Drag the pipe connector down toward the pump, and after the connector snap displays, release
the mouse button to connect the pipe to the pump.
Notice that the necessary pipe fittings are automatically inserted. Also notice that the modified
pipe segment remains selected after connecting to the pump.
27 Press ESC to clear the selection.
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28 Repeat this method to connect the lower pipe segment to the pump above.
After connecting the pump, you need to check connectivity.
29 Place the cursor over the pump, and press TAB.
The pump and the pipe segments highlight indicating that they are physically connected.
30 Using the methods that you just learned, connect the circulator pump the services the right
side of the supply pipe, and check connectivity.
Make certain that you align the right pump to the left.
Next, you rotate the pumps so that the motor is located as the top.
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31 With the 2 - Piping and the 3D Piping views tiled, click in the 3D Piping view to make it active.
32 Adjust the view so that both circulator pumps are in the view.
33 Click the left pump to display rotation controls.
34 Click the rotation control on the right.
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The pump rotates 90 degrees to the right.
35 Using the method that you just learned, rotate the right pump so that motor is at the top.
The in-line circulator pumps are rotated.
Assign the pumps to the supply system
36 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click System Browser.
You can also press F9.
37 In the System Browser, do the following:
■ Expand the Unassigned folder.
■ Expand the Piping folder, right-click Hydronic Supply and click Expand All to view all of
the system components assigned to Hydronic Supply 1 system.
Notice that the 2 circulator pumps are in the Unassigned folder. As you learned in previous
exercises, you must assign all system components (mechanical equipment, and so on) that you
placed to a system. Immediately after placement, Revit MEP associates the unassigned components
with a default system in order to perform calculations. These unassigned components are located
Placing Circulator Pumps | 257
in the Unassigned folder in the System Browser. After you assign the components to a system,
they move to their respective system folder.
You need to assign the 2 circulator pumps to the hydronic supply system.
38 In the 3D Piping view, select the left supply pipe riser.
System tools display on the Options Bar.
TIP You can select any system component or piping that has been assigned to a system to access
system tools on the Options Bar.
39 On the Options Bar, click (Edit System).
The Edit System tab appears on the Design Bar providing various system editing tools.
NOTE Do not click . You use this tool to add mechanical equipment that is located upstream
in a system, such as VAV boxes, boilers and AC units. If you use this tool, the boiler will be considered
unassigned and it will move to the Unassigned folder.
40 On the Edit System tab of the Design Bar, click Add To System.
System components that were not assigned for this system are grayed out. Notice that the cursor
changes to indicate that Add To System is active.
41 Click the left and right circulator pumps to add them to the supply hydronic system.
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Notice that the pumps moved from the Unassigned folder in the System Browser to the Hydronic
Supply 1 system listing in the Piping folder. This indicates that the pumps have been assigned
to the supply hydronic system. They are now logically connected to the boiler and radiators.
42 On the Edit System tab of the Design Bar, click Finish System.
43 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
44 In the Save As dialog, enter Placing Circulator Pumps Training for File name, navigate to the
folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you used tiled floor plan and 3D views to place 2 in-line circulator pumps for the hydronic
supply piping system. You used the Split tool to open the pipe segments to accommodate the pumps and
then you connected the pumps. You rotated the pumps in 2 different ways by pressing the Spacebar, and
by clicking the rotation controls. Finally, you assigned the circulator pumps to the supply hydronic system
and confirmed the assignments in the System Browser. In the next exercise, you inspect the hydronic piping
systems for flow and pressure.
Inspecting Piping Systems
In this exercise, you use the System Inspector to inspect the level 2 hydronic piping system. The System
Inspector is a unique tool enabling you to inspect each piping system for flow, pressure, and pressure loss
by placing the cursor over a pipe or mechanical equipment that you assigned to the system. Using the System
Inspector, you can immediately target problem areas directly in your design and resolve them.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Inspecting Piping Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
2 Right-click in the view, click Zoom in Region from the context menu.
3 Draw a zoom on the boiler in the Mechanical/Electrical room.
You will inspect the hydronic supply system.
4 Select the boiler.
System tools appear on the Options Bar. You select the boiler because you assigned it to the
hydronic supply system.
NOTE To select a system, select any pipe segment, fitting, mechanical equipment, and so on that
you have assigned to a system. System tools display on the Options Bar.
5 On the Options Bar, click (Inspect).
6 In the Select a System dialog, select Hydronic Supply 1, and click OK.
The System Inspector tab opens providing inspection tools on the Design Bar.
IMPORTANT If you select a system component that has been assigned to multiple systems such as
a boiler, the Select System dialog opens enabling you to select the system to inspect. You can click
a system in the dialog and the system highlights in red enabling you to preview it.
7 On the System Inspector tab of the Design Bar, click Inspect.
Inspecting Piping Systems | 259
NOTE You can also use System Inspector from within the System Browser. Right-click a system from
the System Browser, and click Inspect from the context menu. After the System Inspector activates,
click Inspect from the System Inspector tab on the Design Bar.
8 Place the cursor over the boiler to inspect system information pertaining to the boiler.
The boiler highlights and an inspection flag dynamically reports the section number, flow, and
pressure information including pressure loss. A tooltip also displays this system information.
Arrows display on the pipe indicating the flow direction for both the main and the branches in
the pipe system.
IMPORTANT As you inspect a system, remember that all information is color coded according to
pressure. Red information and arrows indicate the highest percentage of pressure loss due to friction,
also known as the critical path.
As you inspect, notice that the assigned system components highlight and can be inspected but
you cannot inspect system components that have not been assigned to the selected system.
Next, you inspect 2 areas of the selected piping system to compare system information.
Compare system information
9 Place the cursor over the left pipe segment above the pump, and click to temporarily place the
inspection flag on the segment.
10 Move the cursor over the right pipe segment above the pump to compare the flow and pressure
information with that of the left pipe segment.
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11 Click to place the current inspection flag and close the prior one.
12 Move the cursor over one of the circulation pumps, click and compare its information with that
of the right pipe segment.
13 Click in the view to close the current inspection flag.
You can also inspect systems in a 3D view.
14 With the System Inspector activated and the Hydronic Supply 1 system selected, double-click
the 3D Piping view, and inspect a fin-tube radiator.
Continue to use this method to inspect and compare inspection information for system
components and pipe across the selected Hydronic Supply 1 system. Remember that you can
switch between the floor plan and 3D views without closing the System Inspector.
Inspecting Piping Systems | 261
15 On the System Inspector tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Inspector to deactivate the System
Inspector.
16 Using the methods that you learned, use the System Inspector and inspect the return piping
systems in the project.
NOTE To use the System Inspector to inspect flow and pressure inside pipe, the selected system
components and pipe must be logically and physically connected. The pipe and the system
components must be connected to a system (logical connection) and a system must contain pipe
(physical connection).
17 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
18 In the Save As dialog, enter Inspecting Piping Systems Training for File name, navigate to the
folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you used the System Inspector to inspect the flow direction, flow, and pressure information
for the hydronic supply system in the project. You noticed that flow and pressure information is specific to
the selected system component, and that all system information is color-coded for either the main or the
branch. You also compared system information across a system. In the next exercise, you check the piping
systems.
Checking Piping Systems
Revit MEP uses both the pipe geometry and the system to perform calculations such as flow and pressure,
and for pipe sizing. Because both the logical (system) and physical (pipe) connections play a vital role in
the overall systems design, you need to validate them. In this exercise, you use the Check Pipe Systems tool
to immediately check these connections for all systems throughout your project, and quickly target those
systems that need attention.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Checking Piping Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder.
Perform a systems check
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Piping ➤ Floor Plans,
double-click the 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
2 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click Check Pipe Systems.
Revit MEP checks both the logical (system) and the physical (pipe) connections of each piping
system throughout the project. A warning appears, but does apply to the piping system. The
piping system is logically and physically valid.
However, check system warnings may occur. As a tutorial exercise, you check the air systems to
view check systems warnings.
NOTE If the Piping tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click Piping.
3 On the Mechanical tab of the Design Bar, click Check Duct Systems.
Warnings display. Notice that these warnings indicate that the default systems are “not empty.”
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4 NOTE The check systems warnings contain a system type and a description. These warnings can
refer to both physical connection issues (such as a disconnected or problematic pipe) or logical
connection issues (such as an improperly assigned system). Remember that after you create pipe to
physically connect a system, the pipe is now associated with that system. Pipe geometry is used for
system flow and pressure calculations, and for pipe sizing. Note that only physical connections
associated with an assigned system are checked. Pipe that is associated with a default system (located
in the Unassigned folder) is not checked.
IMPORTANT The most common check systems warning is the “default system is not empty” warning.
As you learned when placing fin-tube radiators, all system components must be assigned to a system
immediately after placement. If you place radiators without assigning them to a system, Revit MEP
creates a default system and assigns them to it in order to perform system calculations. The default
system is placed in the Unassigned folder until you select the system components and create a system
for them, thus assigning the components to a system. After you assign the system components to a
system, Revit MEP places them in their assigned systems folder and removes them from the Unassigned
folder. After you have assigned all system components for the project to their systems, the Unassigned
folder will be empty and Check Pipe Systems will no longer display “not empty” warnings. Note that
a system component may be listed in both its assigned system and in the Unassigned folder. This
occurs because the assigned system component can be connected to multiple systems (it contains
different system connectors), and you have not yet assigned the component to the other systems.
For example, you assigned a fin-tube radiator to a supply hydronic system but the same radiator has
a return system connector that you have not assigned to a system. In the System Browser, the fin-tube
radiator is listed in the assigned system and assigned to the Default Hydronic Return system in the
Unassigned folder.
Next, you open the System Browser to view the unassigned air system components and the
associated default air systems. Then, you confirm the validity of the assigned piping system
components and systems. Next, you confirm the system component assignments.
Use the System Browser to confirm piping system assignments
5 Click Window menu ➤ System Browser to open the System Browser.
TIP You can press F9 (or Window menu ➤ System Browser) to open or close the System Browser. If
the System Browser does not respond, click in the drawing area to make it active, then press F9.
Because you assigned all piping components, you will check the unassigned air system
components to learn how to use the System Browser to confirm default system assignments.
6 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans,
double-click 2 - Mech to make it the active view.
7 Expand the Unassigned folder and notice that both Default Return Air and Default Exhaust Air
systems are listed.
8 Expand Default Return Air and notice the air terminals and mechanical equipment that were
automatically assigned to the Default Return Air system.
9 Right-click Default Return Air, and click Show to view all of the unassigned system components.
Checking Piping Systems | 263
The red lines represent the default logical connection. A dialog lets you click Show multiple
times for different views.
TIP If you have multiple views open, you can click Show in the Show Element(s) In View dialog to
switch between views, otherwise, click Close.
10 Using the same methods, confirm the unassigned system components in the Default Exhaust
Air system.
Now that you confirmed all of the unassigned component for the default air systems, you
confirm the piping system assignments.
11 Click Window menu ➤ Floor Plan: 2 - Piping to make it the active view.
12 In the System Browser, collapse the Unassigned folder and expand the Piping folder.
13 Right-click Hydronic Supply, and click Expand All.
The supply system that you created, Hydronic Supply 1 is listed along with the boiler, fin-tube
radiators and the circulator pumps that you assigned to this system. Notice that the system
contains a system type and an assigned number.
264 | Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping
14 Right-click Hydronic Supply 1, and click Select to confirm this system and the assigned system
components.
15 Using the methods that you learned, confirm the system and the system assignments for the
hydronic return system.
You have confirmed and validated both unassigned and assigned system components and their
systems.
16 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save.
17 In the Save As dialog, enter Checking Piping Systems Training for File name, navigate to the
folder of your choice, and click Save.
In this exercise, you used the Check Pipe Systems tool and the System Browser to validate the level 2 supply
and return hydronic piping systems that you created. You also confirmed that the air terminals and mechanical
equipment for the return and exhaust air systems were unassigned as they were located in their respective
default systems in the System Browser and “not empty” warnings were generated by Check Duct Systems.
Depending on your air systems design, you may need to assign these system components to their proper
systems. The piping system that you designed did not return any check system warnings; it is a valid system
without problems. You have completed the level 2 piping systems for the building. To view the completed
mechanical systems for the tutorial including the level 2 hydronic piping system, open the m Completed
Mechanical Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder under Training Files.
For additional practice, use the methods that you learned and create the level 1 hydronic piping system.
Design the system in the 1 - Piping view and filter the visibility of objects as needed. Use the same piping
system components that you used for level 2. For pipe offset, specify 2975mm for the supply and 2825mm
for the return pipe offset elevation.
In the lesson, you created a hydronic piping system consisting of a supply and return pipe runs, circulator
pumps, a boiler, and fin-tube radiators. You validated rigid pipe connections and geometry using floor plan,
3D, and section views. You inspected the logical systems using System Inspector and the System Browser.
Finally, you checked the logical and physical connections for the system using Check Pipe Systems. This
completes the Designing Piping Systems lesson.
In this tutorial, you created a supply air system and a hydronic piping system, Each was a completely different
mechanical system that consisted of different system components however, the creation and modification
methods remained the same. You also learned the difference between creating rigid physical duct or pipe
Checking Piping Systems | 265
connections and creating logical systems. The completed mechanical systems are included in the m Completed
Mechanical Systems.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Mechanical folder under Training Files. Feel free to
modify the systems or create entirely new mechanical systems. Explore different system designs, parametrically
modify those designs, and see the results dynamically in views and design documents. This is the power
BIM (Building Information Modeling). This is the future of systems designing—Revit MEP 2009.
266 | Chapter 5 Mechanical Systems: Piping
Electrical Systems
In this tutorial, you learn to create electrical systems using a linked architectural model of a building project. The building
contains a variety of spaces where you will design lighting and power systems. The first lesson consists of exercises that
prepare your project for the types of systems that you will design in the following lesson.
NOTE The architectural model used with this tutorial is in the Architectural folder. You should maintain the relative
path to the architectural model. However, if the link is lost, you can click File menu ➤ Manage Links to reload the
linked model. On the Revit tab on the Manage Links dialog, click Reload From, navigate to Training
Files ➤ Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ Metric_Arch_Model, and select m Office Building.rvt.
The datasets that you use to complete these exercises are located in the Training Files directory. You can search the Training
Files ➤ Metric directory to verify that the datasets have been downloaded. If the tutorial datasets are not present, go to
http://www.autodesk.com/revitmep-documentation and download them.
NOTE All exercises in this tutorial are designed to be completed sequentially; each exercise is dependent on the
completion of the previous exercise. After finishing each exercise, you can choose to save your work. However, it is
highly recommended that you always begin an exercise by opening the dataset that Autodesk provides. This dataset
includes the work from the previous exercise(s) and ensures a seamless training session.
Planning Electrical Systems
The most common method of designing systems in Revit MEP is to work within a linked architectural
building model. In this tutorial, you will use a project file that has already been linked to an architectural
model, with Space components placed in the areas throughout the model. To learn more about linking and
preparing an architectural model, see Planning Mechanical Systems in the Mechanical Systems tutorial.
In this lesson you specify electrical settings, load the families containing the electrical components that will
make up your electrical system, and create schedules that you will need to design the electrical systems for
your project.
Preparing the Electrical Plan
In this exercise you define the basic parameters for your electrical system, and select the component families
that you will use in the plan.
6
267
The electrical settings determine the voltages, wiring, distribution systems, and demand factors that are
applied in the design.
Lighting, power, and ceiling plans for each have been prepared by duplicating architectural views, then
applying the appropriate template to each plan:
■ Power plans where you will place electrical devices and equipment and design power circuits.
■ Electrical Ceiling Plans where you will place lighting fixtures.
■ Lighting Plans where you will design lighting circuits.
Revit MEP provides families of common electrical components that you place in your power and lighting
plans. You load the families that comprise the specific components that will be used in your electrical system.
As you develop more advanced skills working with Revit MEP, you can customize components and expand
the library of electrical families.
All of Revit MEP’s electrical (and mechanical) components are designed with connectors. Connectors allow
Revit MEP to maintain information about the systems that you create, and make it possible for Revit MEP
to perform calculations to assist you with your design. It is important that the connectors associated with
components that you place in a view are within the View Range or level offset. For example, the connectors
for the ceiling-hosted lighting fixtures that you will place in spaces are above the ceiling level. For this reason,
the Limit Offset, in the Element Properties dialog for Spaces, has been set to 2300 mm for the building used
with these exercises. This allows the illuminance of the lighting fixtures to be considered when calculating
required lighting levels.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Creating Electrical Views.rvt.
Specify Electrical Settings
1 Electrical settings let you specify the voltages, power distribution systems, wiring, and demand
factors that you will use in your project. Later, as you place components and create circuits in
your electrical plan, Revit MEP checks to assure that those components are compatible with
voltages and distribution systems that you specify here.
Click Settings menu ➤ Electrical Settings.
2 In the Electrical Settings dialog, in the left pane, expand Wiring.
3 Click Wiring Types, and in the right pane, click Add (below the table).
4 Specify the following parameters for this wire type as follows:
Value Parameter
CU-THWN Name
Copper Material
75 Temperature Rating
THWN Insulation
500 Max Size
268 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
Value Parameter
1.0 Neutral Multiplier
selected Neutral Required
Hot Conductor Neutral Size
Steel Conduit Type
5 In the tree view, click Voltage Definitions.
6 The Voltage Definitions table is where you specify a range of voltages that will be used with
your Voltage Definitions. By specifying a range, you allow circuits to be created between
components with rated voltages that do not precisely match the voltage definition value. For
example, many components intended for use in a 120V circuit are rated anywhere from 110V
to 130V. Regardless of the Name value for a voltage definition, the numeric value in the Value
column is the actual voltage used for calculations involving this definition.
Verify that voltage definitions have been specified with the following parameters:
Maximum Minimum Value Name
130.00 V 110.00 V 120.00 V 120
220.00 V 200.00 V 208.00 V 208
250.00V 220.00V 240.00V 240
280.00 V 260.00 V 277.00 V 277
490.00 V 460.00 V 480.00 V 480
Preparing the Electrical Plan | 269
Voltage definitions can be deleted only if they are not currently in use with any distribution
system.
NOTE Revit MEP does not prevent specifying unfeasible voltage values. For example, you could
specify a distribution system with a L-L Voltage value of 120 and an L-G Voltage value of 480, even
though this is physically impossible.
7 In left pane of the Electrical Settings dialog, click Distribution Systems.
8 In the right pane, verify that distribution systems have been specified with the following
parameters:
L-G L-L Wires Configuration Phase Name
120 208 4 Wye Three 120/208 Wye
120 240 3 None Single 120/240 Single
277 480 4 Wye Three 480/277 Wye
Distribution systems can be deleted only if they are not currently assigned to any devices.
270 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
NOTE Although it is possible to specify a distribution system with a Configuration value of Delta and
a Wire value of 4, this type of system (High, Red, or Wild leg) is currently not supported in Revit MEP
because there is no way to specify the high leg voltage.
9 Click Demand Factors.
Demand factors let you adjust the rating of the main service for a building based on the
expectation that, at any given time, only a portion of the electrical equipment will be drawing
at its full rated load. You can specify one or more Demand Factors, applying different Demand
Factors to Lighting, Power, HVAC, or Other systems in your project based on their load. The
particular system for which Demand Factors are applied is selected from the Load Classification
drop-down list.
More Than and Less Than values define the range for the associated Demand Factor:
■ More Than specifies the lower limit of a range of loads.
■ Less Than specifies the upper limit of a range of loads.
■ Demand Factor (%) specifies the anticipated a percentage of full rated load that will exist at
any given time for the specified range.
You can Split the default range to create several load ranges for a particular system and apply a
different demand factor to each range. For example, you can specify the following parameters
for a building lighting system:
Demand Factor Less Than More Than
100% 3,000VA
50% 10,000VA 3,000VA
30% 10,000VA
The settings in this example apply a 100% demand factor to loads less than 3000VA, a 50%
demand factor to loads between 3000VA and 10,000VA, and a 30% demand factor for loads
greater than 10,000VA.
For this exercise, leave the default settings as shown here.
10 Click OK.
Preparing the Electrical Plan | 271
Load component families
11 NOTE The components used throughout this tutorial have been copied from the Metric Library to
the m families sub-folder. As an alternative, you can load from the components from that location.
Click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load Family.
12 In the Open dialog, expand Electrical Components ➤ Lighting Devices.
13 Select M_Lighting Switches.rfa, and click Open.
14 Using the same method, reopen Electrical Components ➤ Power Devices, and load M_Duplex
Receptacle.rfa.
15 Click Open.
16 In the Project Browser, expand Families.
An Electrical Fixtures ➤ M_Receptacle folder containing receptacles has been added to the
families currently available for your design. A Lighting Devices ➤ M_Lighting Switches folder,
containing several switch types, has also been added under Lighting Device.
17 Using the same method, reopen Electrical Components ➤ Electrical Equipment ➤ Panelboard
folder, and load the following families:
■ M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 480V MCB - Surface.rfa
■ M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 208V MLO - Surface.rfa
18 Using the same method, reopen Electrical Components ➤ Electrical Equipment ➤ Transformer
folder, and load M_Dry Type Transformer - 480-208Y120 - NEMA Type 2.rfa.
19 Open the Electrical Components ➤ Lighting Fixtures folder and load the M_Troffer Corner
Insert.rfa family.
As you loaded each of the component families, they were added to the Families in the Project
Browser.
20 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
21 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
22 Proceed to the next exercise, Defining Required Lighting Levels on page 272.
In this exercise, you prepared views specifically for your power and lighting plans, selected components for
your electrical systems, and established the parameters for your wiring, voltages, distribution systems, and
demand factors.
Defining Required Lighting Levels
In this exercise you specify the lighting levels that are required for the different spaces within the building.
Particular lighting levels are generally specified for different types of spaces (offices, restrooms, conference
rooms, and so on). You begin by adding a new Project Parameter (Required Lighting Level), then you create
a Key Schedule that links your new parameter to the various types of spaces in your project. Key schedules
provide an efficient way to create an instance parameter that can be used to map specific parameter values
to particular key styles. In this case the key style is the type of space and, because the key is linked to your
new project parameter, its value becomes to the Required Lighting Level.
Later, in the Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required Lighting Levels exercise, you will use the new
parameter again to compare the value for Required Lighting Level against the actual illumination provided
by fixtures that you place in the plan.
272 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Defining Lighting Levels.rvt.
Before you can specify a lighting requirement for the spaces within your project, you must first create a
parameter that will hold the value for the lighting requirement.
Create a Required Lighting Level parameter
1 Click Settings menu ➤ Project Parameters.
2 In the Project Parameters dialog, click Add.
3 In the Parameter Properties dialog:
■ Verify that Project parameter is selected for Parameter Type.
■ Under Parameter Data, enter Required Lighting Level for Name.
■ For Discipline, select Electrical.
■ For Type, select Illuminance.
■ For Group, select Electrical-Lighting.
■ Select Instance.
■ Under Categories, select Spaces.
4 Click OK twice.
The new Required Lighting Level parameter is added to the list in the Project Parameters dialog
and is now an instance parameter for Spaces under Electrical - Lighting in the Space Element
Properties dialog.
The new parameter you have just created applies to all spaces in the project. To verify this, you
can look at the properties for one of the spaces.
Verify the new parameter
5 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Floor Plans,
double-click 1 - Lighting to make it the active view.
6 Zoom in on the upper-left corner of the plan, move the cursor over the office in the upper-left
corner, and when the cross-hairs display, click to select the space.
Defining Required Lighting Levels | 273
7 On the Options Bar, click (Properties).
In the Element Properties dialog, your new Required Lighting Level parameter is now listed
under Instance Parameters in the Electrical - Lighting category.
You could use your new parameter to enter a Required Lighting Level value in the Element
Properties dialog for each space. However, there are many spaces in this project that have similar
lighting requirements, and it is more efficient to create a key schedule and use it to assign
Required Lighting Level values based on space type.
8 Click Cancel.
Create a key schedule
9 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Schedule/Quantities.
10 In the New Schedule dialog:
■ Select Spaces for Category.
■ For Name, enter Space Lighting Requirements.
This name will appear as the title for the resulting schedule.
■ Click Schedule keys.
■ For Key Name, enter Lighting Levels.
Lighting Levels is added as a new instance parameter for the space component. The value
that you specify for each Key Name in the schedule will be used to determine the required
lighting level for each space type.
■ Click OK.
The Shedule Properties dialog displays.
NOTE Schedules can be used as a design interface (Key schedule) as well as a documentation tool
(Schedule building components). You determine the type of schedule by clicking Schedule building
components or Schedule keys in the New Schedule dialog when creating a new Schedule/Quantities
view.
11 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, select Required Lighting Level from the
Available fields list, and click Add to add this field to the Scheduled fields (in order) list.
12 Click OK.
The key schedule displays in the drawing area.
13 Drag column borders horizontally to the desired column width.
NOTE You can double-click column dividers to auto-fit column width to its content.
Enter lighting level requirements in the key schedule
14 On the Options Bar, click New 8 times to add 8 rows in the key schedule, one for each type of
space in the building.
The new rows are added with 1 through 8 as the default Key Names.
274 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
Enter a space type in the Key Name column and a corresponding lighting level in the Required
Lighting Level column for the different types of spaces in the project, according to the values
in the following table:
Required Lighting Level (lx) Space Type
325 Private Office
485 Open Office
485 Main Entrance
270 Lounge
325 Restroom
375 Conference
215 Elec/Mech
225 Stair/Circulation
When completed, the Key Schedule should looks like this:
TIP Your entries are automatically sorted alphabetically by Key Name. You can change the sort keys
for the schedule. In the Project Browser, right-click in the Space Lighting Requirements schedule,
click View Properties and, in the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters edit the
Sort/Grouping parameter.
Assign space keys to the spaces in the project
15 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Floor Plans,
double-click the 1 - Lighting floor plan to make it the active view.
16 Zoom in on the large open area (not the main entrance) in the center of the floor plan.
17 Move the cursor over the space until a cross-hair displays, then right-click, and click Element
Properties.
18 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Identity Data
category, and for Lighting Levels parameter, click , and select Open Office.
19 Scroll up to the Electrical - Lighting category, and notice that the value for Required Lighting
Level is now 485 lx, the value that you entered for this space type in the key schedule. The value
Defining Required Lighting Levels | 275
is grayed out and cannot be edited because you associated this parameter with the Key Name
specified by the Space Lighting Requirements key schedule.
20 Click OK.
21 Using the same method, continue applying Lighting Level keys to the remaining spaces in
1 - Lighting, then open 2 - Lighting and apply Lighting Level keys to the remaining spaces in
the project according to the following table:
TIP You can select multiple spaces of the same type and set the Lighting Level parameter from the
same Element Properties dialog. While pressing Ctrl, select multiple spaces of the same type (for
example, Office), then right-click one of the selections, and click Element Properties to open the
Element Properties for the selected spaces.
Key Name Name Number Level
Private Office Office 101 101 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 102 102 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 103 103 1 - Lighting
Private Office Open 104 104 1 - Lighting
Restroom Mens Room 105 105 1 - Lighting
Mech/Elec Elec/Mech 106 106 1 - Lighting
Restroom Ladies Room 107 107 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 108 108 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 109 109 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 110 110 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 111 111 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 112 112 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 113 113 1 - Lighting
Stair/Circulation Stairwell 114 114 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 115 115 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 116 116 1 - Lighting
Private Office Office 117 117 1 - Lighting
Main Entrance Main Entrance 121 121 1 - Lighting
276 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
Key Name Name Number Level
Private Office Office 201 201 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 202 202 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 203 203 2 - Lighting
Private Office Open 204 204 2 - Lighting
Restroom Mens Room 205 205 2 - Lighting
Mech/Elec Elec/Mech 206 206 2 - Lighting
Restroom Ladies Room 207 207 2 - Lighting
Lounge Lounge 208 208 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 209 209 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 210 210 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 211 211 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 212 212 2 - Lighting
Stair/Circulation Stairwell 213 213 2 - Lighting
Conference Conference Room 214 214 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 215 215 2 - Lighting
Private Office Office 216 216 2 - Lighting
22 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
23 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
24 Proceed to the next exercise, Assigning Space Color Fills According to Required Lighting Levels
on page 278.
In this exercise you created a new project parameter and used it in a key schedule to specify a parameter
value (Required Lighting Level) for the spaces in your project. You can use a key schedule to specify more
than one parameter for a component, if required. For example, you could create a key schedule named Space
Variables, and select both Required Lighting Level and Temperature as parameters. Now the key schedule
will have one column for Required Lighting Level and another for Temperature where you can specify values
according to space type. Consequently, selecting a space type for your new Space Variables parameter in a
space’s Element Properties dialog will specify values for both parameters according to the key schedule.
Defining Required Lighting Levels | 277
Assigning Space Color Fills According to Required Lighting Levels
Revit MEP lets you add color fills to spaces based on specific space parameters. Space color fills can be helpful
as a design tool and as a design communications document. In this exercise you will create a space color fill
using the lighting levels that you specified in the previous exercise. Space color fills can be used with any
parameter that exists on the space components.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Space Color Fills.rvt.
Activate color fill
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Floor Plans,
double-click the 1 - Lighting floor plan to make it the active view.
2 Click Settings menu ➤ Color Fill Schemes.
3 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, select Spaces for Category, and click (Duplicate).
4 In the New Color Scheme dialog, for Name, enter Required Lighting, and click OK.
5 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, for Title, enter Required Lighting Levels.
6 For Color, select Required Lighting Level, and click OK to dismiss the alert message.
7 Click OK.
8 On the Drafting tab on the Design Bar, click Color Scheme Legend, and place it in the drawing.
9 In the Choose Color Scheme dialog:
■ For Space Type, select Spaces,
■ For Color Scheme, select Required Lighting
10 Click OK.
11 Right-click the color scheme legend, and click Element Properties.
12 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
13 In the Type Properties dialog, specify the following Type Parameters:
■ Under Graphics, select Show Title.
■ Under Title Text, select Underline.
14 Click OK twice.
15 Drag the color scheme legend preview to the lower-left corner of the plan.
The color scheme for the Level 1 floor plan should now look something like the image below.
278 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
16 Make the 2 - Lighting floor plan the active view.
17 Using the same method, activate the color scheme as you did for 1 - Lighting.
Notice that the color scheme you created is still in effect. This is because the color scheme is a
type within the project. You can have more than one color scheme in the project, but only one
per view.
18 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
19 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
20 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required Lighting Levels on
page 279.
Color fill plans can be useful as design documents and as communication documents to show other team
members design intent while the project is in the design phases. Color fills can be applied for any parameter
that already exists for spaces, or for any parameter that you want to create for a space (such as the Required
Lighting Level parameter you created in the previous exercise).
Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required Lighting Levels
In this exercise you create a space lighting analysis schedule that you will use as a check document rather
than as a construction document. Your schedule will compare the actual lighting levels in each space against
the required lighting levels that you specified in the Defining Required Lighting Levels exercise. As you place
lighting fixtures in the spaces in your project, you will refer to the schedule to assure that the lighting level
falls within the +/- 55 lx range specified in the schedule.
Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required Lighting Levels | 279
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Space Schedule Lighting Requirements.rvt.
Create space lighting analysis schedule
1 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Schedule/Quantities.
2 In the New Schedule dialog:
■ Under Category, select Spaces.
■ For Name, enter Space Lighting Analysis
■ Verify that Schedule building components is selected.
■ Click OK.
3 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, scroll down the Available fields list,
double-click the following fields to add them to the Scheduled fields (in order) list:
■ Number
■ Name
■ Required Lighting Level
■ Average Estimated Illumination
■ Ceiling Reflectance
■ Wall Reflectance
■ Floor Reflectance
■ Lighting Calculation Workplane
Create a new schedule parameter
4 In the middle of the Schedule Properties dialog, click Calculated Value.
5 In the Calculated Value dialog:
■ For Name, enter Lighting Delta.
■ For Discipline, select Electrical.
■ For Type, select Illuminance.
■ For Formula, enter Average Estimated Illumination - Required Lighting Level.
NOTE Formulas are case sensitive
6 Click OK.
The Lighting Delta parameter is added to the Scheduled fields list.
7 On the Sorting/Grouping tab:
■ For Sort by, select Number.
■ Verify that Ascending is selected.
280 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
■ Verify that Itemize every instance is selected.
8 On the Formatting tab, under fields, select Lighting Delta.
9 Click Conditional Format.
10 In the Conditional Formatting dialog:
■ For Field, select Lighting Delta.
■ For Test, select Not Between.
■ For Value, enter -55 lx and 55 lx in the text boxes.
11 Click the Background Color chip.
12 In the Color dialog, under Basic colors, click the red color chip.
13 Click OK twice.
14 On the Formatting tab, under Fields, select Ceiling Reflectance, and click Field Format.
15 In the Format dialog:
■ Clear Use default settings.
■ For Units, verify that Fixed is selected.
■ For Rounding, select 2 decimal places.
16 Click OK.
17 Using the same method, specify rounding to 2 decimal places for the Wall Reflectance and Floor
Reflectance fields.
18 Click OK.
19 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
20 Click File menu ➤ Close.
Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required Lighting Levels | 281
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
21 Proceed to the next lesson, Designing the Electrical System on page 282.
The schedule that you have just created shows the Average Estimated Illumination level for all of the spaces
as 0. This is because you have not yet added lighting fixtures to any of the spaces. You can also see that the
Lighting Delta has been calculated for each of the occupied spaces, and in every case the Lighting Delta field
is red. This is because the value is not within the range that you specified in the Conditional Formatting
dialog.
NOTE Space components are placed in chases and plenums to permit reliable heating and cooling load analysis.
As a result, these spaces appear in the Space Lighting Analysis schedule. However, there is no required lighting
level specified, and these areas will not be lighted.
In this exercise, you created a schedule that you will refer to as you add lighting fixtures to the project. The
schedule will be used to check the actual design against the design requirements that were specified in a
previous exercise. This type of schedule can be useful as a method for checking design components in the
project.
Designing the Electrical System
In this lesson you use the views and schedules that you created in Lesson 1 to place electrical devices, electrical
equipment, and lighting fixtures throughout your building project. Once the equipment is in place, you
will create power and lighting circuits, and make connections to electrical equipment.
Adding Lighting Fixtures
In this exercise you add lighting fixtures throughout your project. As you select and place lighting fixtures,
the key schedule that you created in the previous lesson serves as a tool to verify that the design meets each
space’s lighting requirement.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Adding Lighting Fixtures.rvt.
Place the initial lighting fixture
1 In the Project Browser, expand Schedules/Quantities, and double-click Space Lighting Analysis
to open the schedule created in the previous lesson.
2 Right click in the Required Lighting Level column, and click Hide Column(s) to hide that column.
3 Repeat the previous step to hide the Ceiling Reflectance, Wall Reflectance, Floor Reflectance,
and Lighting Calculation Workplane columns.
Only the Number, Name, Average Estimated Lighting, and Lighting Delta columns should
remain visible in the schedule.
NOTE Right-click a heading, and click Unhide All Columns to restore the hidden columns.
4 On the Windows menu, click Close Hidden Windows.
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5 Resize the view containing the schedule to show only the 4 remaining columns.
6 In the Project Browser, under Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Ceiling Plans, double-click 1 - Ceiling Elec
to make it the active view.
You need to add lighting fixtures in a ceiling plan because you want to align the lighting fixtures
to the ceiling grid, and the ceiling grid is not visible in a floor plan view.
7 On the Windows menu, click Tile, and arrange the windows as shown.
8 In the 1 - Ceiling Elec view, zoom in to the upper-left corner of the plan.
9 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Lighting Fixture.
10 In the Type Selector, select M_Troffer Corner Insert : M_600x1200 3 Lamp, and move the cursor
into the ceiling plan view.
NOTE A preview of the lighting fixture is not displayed until you move the cursor over a ceiling. You
cannot place this type of lighting fixture in a non-ceiling location.
11 With the cursor in the space in the upper-left corner of the plan, click to place the lighting
fixture in the ceiling as shown.
It is not necessary to align the lighting fixture to the grid in this step. In the next step you will
use the Move command to snap the fixture to a ceiling grid intersection.
Adding Lighting Fixtures | 283
12 Click Modify.
13 Zoom in on the lighting fixture, select it, and on the Toolbar, click (Move).
14 Move the cursor over the lower-left corner of the lighting fixture, and when Endpoint displays,
click to specify the start point.
15 Move the cursor over an intersection of the ceiling grid lines where you want to place the fixture,
and click when Intersection displays.
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In the Space Lighting Analysis schedule, the Lighting Delta for Office 101 is closer to the required
+/- 55 lx.
Copy and place additional lighting fixtures
16 Select the lighting fixture, and on the toolbar, click (Copy).
17 On the Options Bar, select Multiple.
This will let you place multiple copies of the lighting fixture after selecting a start point.
18 Select the lower-left Endpoint of the lighting fixture as the start point, and then select ceiling
grid intersections as the destination move endpoints to place 5 copies of this fixture in the 3
offices in the upper left area of level 1, as shown.
Adding Lighting Fixtures | 285
Check the illumination levels against the Space Lighting Analysis schedule
19 Check the Average Estimated Illumination and Lighting Delta in the Space Lighting Analysis
schedule.
The Average Estimated Illumination for Office 101, 102, and 103 is now nearer the required
lighting level target of 325 lx, but is still not within the +/- 55 lx range, so the Lighting Delta
column remains red for these spaces.
To adjust the illumination level downward, you decide to replace one of the 3-lamp fixtures in
each space with a 2-lamp fixture.
NOTE Average Estimated Illumination levels are calculated using the lumen method for lighting
calculations. Point by point analysis is not currently supported.
Change lighting fixture type
20 In 1 - Ceiling Elec, select one of the lighting fixtures in each space, and in the Type Selector,
select M_Troffer Corner Insert : M_600x1200 2Lamp.
TIP You can select multiple components by pressing Ctrl while selecting components in a drawing.
If you select a component inadvertently, press Shift while clicking the component to remove it as a
selection.
21 Again, check the Average Estimated Illumination and Lighting Delta in the Space Lighting
Analysis schedule, and verify that the lighting levels are now within the specified range.
The Average Estimated Illumination is now within the +/- 55 lx range.
You can perform the following steps to complete this exercise, placing lighting fixtures in the remaining
Level 1 and Level 2 spaces or you can close this dataset, and go on to the next exercise. The lighting fixtures
are all placed in the next dataset.
22 Using the same method, continue placing 2-lamp and 3-lamp lighting fixtures in the remaining
spaces in the 1 - Ceiling Elec and 2 - Ceiling Elec views. Use the Space Lighting Analysis schedule
to determine when the lighting levels are within the specified range.
When you are finished, only the Mechanical/Electrical spaces (without ceilings) will have a red
background in the Space Lighting Analysis schedule. Plenum and chase spaces will be blank.
Completed lighting layouts for Level 1 and Level 2 should appear similar to those shown below
along with the Space Lighting Analysis schedule.
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Level 1
NOTE Lighting fixtures were not added to the Mechanical/Electrical spaces.
Level 2
Adding Lighting Fixtures | 287
23 In the Space Lighting Analysis schedule, right-click one of the headings, and click Unhide All
Columns.
With the exception of the 2 Mechanical/Electrical spaces, your Lighting Delta column for all of
the spaces should be white.
24 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
25 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
26 Proceed to the next exercise, Placing Lighting Switches on page 288.
In this exercise, you learned how to place lighting fixtures in ceiling plans, and how to verify the lighting
layout using the schedule that you created as a design tool in Creating a Space Schedule to Check Required
Lighting Levels on page 279.
Placing Lighting Switches
In this exercise you add switches for the lighting fixtures in your project. The procedure for placing switches
is the same as for placing any hosted components in Revit MEP.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Placing Switches.rvt.
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Turn off the color scheme
1 In the Project Browser, right-click 1 - Lighting, and click Properties.
2 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, click in the Value column for Color
Scheme.
3 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, under Schemes for the Spaces Category, click (none).
4 Click OK twice.
5 Using the same method, turn off the color scheme on level 2.
Place switches in spaces
6 In the Project Browser, double-click 1 - Lighting to make it the active view.
7 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Device.
8 In the Type Selector, select M_Lighting Switches : M_Single Pole.
9 On the Options Bar, verify that (Place on Vertical Face) is selected.
10 Zoom in on the upper-left corner of the building and move the cursor along the right wall of
space 101.
Because the switch requires a wall to serve as the host, it is only previewed when the cursor is
over a wall.
11 Position the switch preview on the interior wall of the space as shown, and click to place the
switch.
12 Continue placing switches of this type in the remaining spaces in the 1 - Lighting view as shown.
Level 1
Placing Lighting Switches | 289
13 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Device, and in the Type Selector, select M_Lighting
Switches : M_Three Way.
14 Zoom in on the upper-left corner of the plan, and place a 3-way switch on the open office side
of the upper restroom wall as shown.
15 Zoom in on the stairwell at the lower-right corner of the plan, and place one 3-way switch on
the wall inside the stairwell near the door to the open office, and place another 3-way switch
on the wall of the open office outside of the stairwell, as shown.
16 In the Type Selector, select M_Lighting Switches : M_Four Way.
17 Place a 4-way switch near the exit door on the right side of the stairwell as shown.
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18 In the open office area, place a 4-way switch near each end of the curved wall as shown.
19 Click Modify.
20 In the Project Browser, double-click 2 - Lighting to make it the active view.
21 On the Design Bar, click Device, and in the Type Selector, select M_Lighting Switches : M_Three
Way.
22 Place a 3-way switch on the open office wall near the stairwell in the upper-left corner of the
plan as shown.
Placing Lighting Switches | 291
23 Zoom in on the stairwell at the lower-right corner of the plan, and place a 3-way switch on the
wall inside the stairwell near the door to the open office, and place another 3-way switch on
the wall of the open office outside of the stairwell, as shown.
24 You can perform the following steps to complete this exercise, placing lighting switches in the
remaining Level 1 and Level 2 spaces or you can close this dataset, and go on to the next exercise.
The lighting switches are all placed in the next dataset.
On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Device, in the Type Selector, select M_Lighting
Switches : M_Single Pole, and place single pole switches in second-floor offices and restrooms
as shown.
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Level 2
25 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
26 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
27 Proceed to the next exercise, Placing Power Receptacles on page 293.
Placing Power Receptacles
In this exercise you will be placing receptacles that will be hosted by architectural components in the project.
The process is similar to placing switches as you did in the previous exercise.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Placing Receptacles.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power to make it the active view.
Hide lighting components and specify view ranges
2 Right-click in the drawing area, and click View Properties.
Placing Power Receptacles | 293
3 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Properties, for Visibility/Graphics Overrides,
click Edit.
4 In the Visibility Graphics dialog, on the Model Categories tab, scroll down and, clear Lighting
Devices and Lighting Fixtures.
5 Click OK.
6 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to View Range, and
click Edit.
7 In the View Range dialog, under Primary Range, for Top, select Associated Level (Level 1), and
for Offset, enter 1200 mm.
8 Click OK twice.
9 In the Project Browser, right-click 2 - Power, and click Properties.
10 Using the same method, edit the Visibility/Graphics Overrides for the view to hide lighting
fixtures and lighting devices, and edit the View Range to select Associated Level (Level 2), and
specify the top of the view range as 1200 mm.
Place wall-hosted receptacles
11 In the 1 - Power plan view, zoom in to the upper-left corner of the view.
12 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Device.
13 In the Type Selector, select M_Duplex Receptacle : Standard.
14 On the Options Bar, verify that (Place on Vertical Face) is selected.
15 In the left side of the plan, place receptacles along the walls in the offices as shown.
16 Continue placing receptacles throughout the offices on Level 1 and Level 2 approximately as
shown, including the wall-based receptacles in the open office areas.
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1-Power
Placing Power Receptacles | 295
2-Power
Place floor-hosted receptacles
17 In the Project Browser, double-click 1 - Power.
18 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Device.
19 In the Type Selector, select M_Duplex Receptacle : Standard.
20 On the Options Bar, click (Place on Work Plane), and verify that Level : Level 1 is selected
for Plane.
NOTE You can select a work plane from the Plane drop-down list on the Options Bar. The current
level is selected by default.
21 Zoom in on the upper-right corner of the Open Office, and place a receptacle on the floor as
shown.
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22 Click Modify.
When placing a receptacle on a work plane, its connector is located below the level of the work
plane. Just as it was for ceiling hosted lighting fixtures, it is important that the connector be
within the space to allow Revit MEP to maintain information about the electrical system and
perform calculations for spaces in your design. In the next steps, you will flip the work plane
of the receptacle to locate the connector above the work plane. Then you will create copies of
the flipped receptacle to place the remaining floor-based receptacles.
23 Select the receptacle and click (Flip WorkPlane) to locate the connector above the work
plane (within the space).
24 On the Toolbar, click (Copy).
25 On the Options Bar, select Multiple.
This will let you place multiple copies of the receptacle after selecting a start point.
26 Select an Endpoint on the receptacle as the start point, and then place 3 copies of the receptacle
in the upper right area of the first floor, as shown.
27 Draw a pick box around the 4 floor-based receptacles, click , select Multiple on the Options
Bar and using the previous procedure, place 2 copies of the flipped receptacles along the right
side of the Level 1 open office, as shown.
Placing Power Receptacles | 297
28 Draw a pick box around the 2 floor-based receptacles, as shown, and click , select Multiple
on the Options Bar.
29 Using the previous procedure, place 2 copies of the flipped receptacles below, and to the left of
the men’s restroom, as shown.
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30 Using the same procedure, place receptacles on the floor of the open office in 2 - Power as shown.
TIP You can select all of the floor-hosted receptacles in the 1 - Power view, then copy and paste them
in the 2 - Power view. Select all 1 - Power floor receptacles, click Edit menu ➤ Copy to Clipboard,
open 2 - Power, and click Edit ➤ Paste Aligned ➤ Current View.
31 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
32 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
33 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Power & Lighting Usage Reports on page 300.
Placing Power Receptacles | 299
In this exercise you placed wall-hosted receptacles on the walls and floor-hosted receptacles on the floor. It
is good to be familiar with this concept of placing hosted components, because it is quite common in Revit
MEP.
Creating Power & Lighting Usage Reports
In this exercise you will create a consumption usage report for power and lighting in this project. With the
introduction of local energy codes, the amount of electricity consumed by different systems within the
building is becoming increasingly important to the design. When the HVAC designer asks what the wattage/SF
amounts are for different spaces, you can refer to this report rather than having to measure spaces and count
fixtures.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Creating Usage Reports.rvt.
1 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Schedule/Quantities.
2 In the New Schedule dialog, scroll down the Category list, and select Spaces.
3 Verify that Schedule building components is selected, and for Name, enter Power & Lighting
Usage.
4 Click OK.
5 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, under Available Fields, select and add the
following fields to the Scheduled fields (in order) list in the order shown:
■ Number
■ Name
■ Area
■ Actual Lighting Load
■ Actual Power Load
■ Actual Lighting Load/Area
■ Actual Power Load/Area
6 Click OK.
A schedule is created similar to the one shown.
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7 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
8 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
9 Proceed to the next exercise, Placing Electrical Equipment on page 301.
In this exercise you created a schedule that can be used as input for the HVAC engineers or as input for
energy analysis and code review. The information in this schedule was produced using the data that you
entered into the model.
Placing Electrical Equipment
In this exercise you add the electrical equipment for the distribution systems in your plan. Although the
connections between this type of equipment are not typically shown on plans, you need to create logical
connections to define the topology. The following diagram shows the connectivity for your electrical
equipment. You start at the low voltage panels (L-1 and L-2), and work toward the higher voltage, main
distribution panels (H-2 and MDP).
Placing Electrical Equipment | 301
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Placing Electrical Equipment.rvt.
Add a panel
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power.
2 Zoom in on the Mechanical/Electrical space between the 2 restrooms.
3 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Electrical Equipment.
4 In the Type Selector, select M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard 480V MCB - Surface : 250 A,
and click to place the panel as shown.
5 On the Design Bar, click Modify and select the panel you just placed.
6 On the Options Bar, for Distribution Sys, select 480/277 Wye.
TIP The Distribution System Types parameter is also accessible in the Element Properties dialog.
Right-click the panel, click Element Properties, scroll down the Instance Parameters and, under Electrical
- Loads, select 480/277 Wye for Distribution System Types.
Name the new panel
7 With the panel still selected, click .
8 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Electrical - Loads
category, and for Panel Name, enter MDP to indicate Main Distribution Panel.
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This will be where the primary electrical service enters the building.
9 Click OK.
Add a transformer
10 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, select Electrical Equipment.
11 In the Type Selector, select M_Dry Type Transformer - 480-208Y-120 - NEMA Type 2 : 45kVA,
and place the transformer in the Mechanical/Electrical space to the right of the panel as shown.
12 Click Modify
13 Select the transformer, and on the Options Bar, for Distribution Sys, select 480/277 Wye.
14 On the Options Bar, click .
Since this is a transformer, you must also specify a Secondary Distribution System parameter.
15 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Electrical - Loads
category, and specify the following:
■ For Secondary Distribution System, select 120/208 Wye.
■ For Panel Name, enter T1.
16 Click OK.
Add another panel
17 On the Design Bar, select Electrical Equipment.
18 In the Type Selector, select M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 208V MLO - Surface : 100
A, and place the panel to the right of the transformer.
19 Click Modify.
Placing Electrical Equipment | 303
20 Select the panel you just placed, and on the Options Bar, for Distribution Sys, select 120/208
Wye.
21 On the Options Bar, click .
22 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Electrical - Loads
category, and for Panel Name, enter L-1.
23 Click OK.
Add panels and a transformer to second floor
24 Using the same method, add the following components in the Mechanical/Electrical space in
the 2-Power view:
■ M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard 480V MCB - Surface : 250 A named H-2
■ M_480-120-208V Dry Type Transformers: M_45kVA named T2
■ M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 208V MLO - Surface : 100 A named L-2
NOTE Remember to select the appropriate Distribution System Types parameter values for each
equipment component, including the Secondary Distribution System for T2.
Create logical circuits between equipment
25 In the 2-Power view, select panel L-2.
26 On the Options Bar, click (Create Power Circuit).
A Bounding Box displays as a dashed box surrounding the components that make up the circuit.
27 Click (Select Panel).
In this case you are going to select something other than a panel, because the circuit on the
mains of this panel is connected to a transformer rather than to another panel.
28 On the Options Bar, select T2 for Panel to establish the connection between the L-2 panel and
T2 transformer.
The Bounding Box expands to enclose the transformer and panel L-2 and you will see temporary
circuit indicating that the panel has been connected to the transformer.
29 Select the transformer T2, and click .
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30 On the Options Bar, click , and select panel H-2 for Panel. The temporary circuit displays
as shown.
31 Close all open views except 1-Power and 2-Power
32 Click Window menu ➤ Tile to display both views in the drawing area.
33 Zoom in on each view and scroll as necessary to display the Level 1 and Level 2
Mechanical/Electrical spaces side-by-side.
34 In the 2-Power view, select the H-2 panel, and on the Options Bar, click .
35 On the Option Bar, click .
36 Click anywhere in 1-Power view to make it the active view, and select the MDP panel.
The temporary circuit is displayed as shown, indicating that a connection has been made between
H-2 and MDP.
A circuit is created between H-2 and MDP.
37 Close the 2-Power view, and maximize the 1-Power view to make it easier to work with.
38 On the Options Bar, select the L-1 panel, and click .
39 Click , and select the T1 transformer as the panel.
Placing Electrical Equipment | 305
40 Select the T1 transformer, and click .
41 On the Options Bar, click , and select the MDP panel.
42 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
43 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
44 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Power Circuitry on page 306.
In this exercise you placed the electrical distribution equipment required for the project. You also defined
how the pieces of electrical equipment are connected by creating logical connections between the different
pieces of equipment.
Creating Power Circuitry
In this exercise you will learn methods for creating power circuits (circuit groups). Circuits are used for
power, lighting, and data systems. The concept of grouping similar functions into systems is used to show
logical connections between different components in the system.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
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■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Creating Power Circuitry.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power to make it the active view.
2 Zoom in on the upper-left corner of the plan.
Creating an electrical circuit to connect the devices (receptacles) in this view is similar to creating
the electrical circuits in the previous exercise. The difference here is that you will have several
components in the circuit.
3 While pressing Ctrl, select all the receptacles in the corner office.
4 On the Options Bar, click .
Temporary circuits are display as dashed lines between the components to indicate the
interconnection of the devices that you selected for this circuit.
The generate wiring controls ( ) let you create permanent wiring for the circuit. For now,
leave the circuit as a temporary logical circuit. You will add permanent wiring in a later exercise.
5 Select one of the receptacles in the corner office, and observe that the information displayed
indicates the number of poles (#1), load (180 VA), and voltage (120 V).
Creating Power Circuitry | 307
A question mark is displayed for this receptacle because no Label has been specified in the Type
Properties for this particular receptacle type.
Revit MEP will only let you make a connection between compatible components. You cannot
connect components having a different number of poles or a different voltage specified for the
distribution system types.
NOTE When all of the devices for the circuit have their distribution system specified as instance
parameters, the Specify Circuit Information dialog is displayed. You use the Specify Circuit Information
to specify the distribution system parameters for the circuit.
6 Click Modify.
7 Move the cursor over one of the receptacles in the corner office so that it is highlighted, press
Tab, and click to select the circuit again.
8 On the Options Bar, click (Select a Panel for the Circuit), and select panel L-1 as the panel
for this circuit.
NOTE You can click a panel in the drawing area or select the panel name from the drop-down list
on the Options Bar. The drop-down list on the Option Bar lists only those panels that are compatible
with the circuit’s distribution system and have an available circuit.
9 Highlight one of the receptacles in the office, and press Tab.
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10 Click to select the circuit and all of the devices on the circuit.
11 On the Options Bar, click (Edit Circuit).
The Edit Circuit tab is activated on the Design Bar. When editing a circuit, all but the components
in the circuit are dimmed, making it easy to identify the components that are part of the circuit
group.
12 On the Edit Circuit toolbar, click (Circuit Properties).
In the Element Properties dialog for this circuit, notice that most of the Instance Parameter
values are grayed out. They cannot be edited because they are calculated according to the
components in the circuit. The Voltage value for the circuit is 120V because all the receptacles
and the panel in the circuit are 120V components. The editable parameters, Wire Type and
Rating, will be discussed in a later exercise. In the next 2 steps you will see how parameters
interact as Revit MEP calculates values for the circuit.
13 Scroll down to the Wire Size parameter.
The currently specified values are 1-#12, 1-#12, 1-#12, which are the wire sizes for the load,
neutral, and ground wiring, respectively for this circuit. These values are calculated based on
the Rating and Voltage Drop values.
14 Scroll back up to the Rating parameter, change the value from 20A to 50A, and then scroll back
down to Wire Size.
Notice that the Wire Size values have changed to 1-#6, 1-#6, 1-#10.
Creating Power Circuitry | 309
15 Click Cancel to close the Element Properties dialog and cancel your changes.
16 On the Edit Circuit toolbar, click Cancel.
17 Continue selecting receptacles, creating power circuits, and assigning them to panel L-1 on a
space-by-space basis for all of the offices around the perimeter of the building.
18 Select the receptacle in the stair well, click , click , and try to select panel L-1.
Panel L-1 is not listed on the drop-down list. If you select L-1 in the drawing, Revit MEP displays
a warning message indicating that adding this circuit group exceeds the number of available
slots on panel L-1.
19 Close the warning message.
Add additional slots to panel
20 Right-click panel L-1, and click Element Properties.
21 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Electrical - Loads
category, and change the value for Max #1 Pole Breakers from 12 to 18.
22 Click OK.
You should now be able to create the circuit for the stairwell, and add it to panel L-1.
23 Select the receptacle in the stairwell again, click , and select panel L-1.
The circuit is created.
24 After circuits have been created and assigned for all of the individual offices, zoom in to the
upper part of the large open office, and select the 4 floor-mounted receptacles as shown.
25 On the Options Bar, click , click , and then select panel L-1.
26 Continue creating circuits, as previously described, for the remaining groups of 4 floor-hosted
receptacles.
NOTE Do not create a circuit for the 5 wall-hosted receptacles on the walls in the large open area
at this time. These will be connected in a later exercise.
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27 Using the same procedures, create circuits in the 2 - Power view and assign them to panel L-2.
Increase the number of circuits on panel L-2 to 18.
NOTE Do not create a circuit for the 5 wall-hosted receptacles on the walls in the large open area
of Level 2 at this time. These will be connected in a later exercise.
28 Double-click 1 - Power to make it the active view.
29 Select the L-1 panel, and on the Options Bar, click (Edit Circuits on Panel).
In the Edit Circuits dialog, notice that circuit descriptions have been automatically created based
on information from the devices themselves. Notice also that all the circuits have been assigned
to a location on the panel. Although this panel is currently capable of supporting 18 circuits,
you have assigned only 17.
30 Click OK.
31 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
32 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
33 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires on page 311.
In this exercise you learned how to create circuit groups (circuits) and assign the circuits to panels. You also
learned how voltage definitions and distribution systems determine the kinds of electrical systems that you
can define for your project. Finally, you learned how to add slots to a panel to accommodate circuits.
Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires
In this exercise you become more familiar with the wiring settings, then create lighting circuitry and add
wiring as the circuits are created. Adding wiring to a project is optional. As you saw in the previous exercise,
you can create circuits and maintain the information associated with them without adding wiring to the
project.
Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires | 311
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires.rvt.
Create an Electrical Lighting Plan template for Lighting Views
1 Click Settings menu ➤ View Templates.
2 In the View Templates dialog:
■ For Show Type, select <all>.
■ For Names, select Electrical Plan
Click , and in the New View Template dialog, enter Electrical Lighting Plan.
3 In the right pane, under View Properties, for View Range, click Edit in the Value column.
4 In View Range dialog:
■ Under Primary Range, for Top, select Level Above, and for Offset, enter -100
■ For Bottom, select Associated Level, and for Offset, enter 800
■ Under View Depth, for Level, select Associated Level, and for Offset, enter 800
5 Click OK.
6 Scroll down to Sub-Discipline, in the Value column, select Lighting, and click OK.
7 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Floor Plans, right-click
1 - Lighting, and click Apply View Template.
8 In the Apply View Template dialog, under Names, select Electrical Lighting Plan, and click OK.
Create lighting circuits
9 In the Project Browser, double-click 1 - Lighting to make it the active view.
10 Zoom out so that the entire plan is visible.
11 Draw a pick box around the plan to select everything.
12 On the Options Bar, click (Filter).
13 In the Filter dialog, click Check None to clear all the check boxes, re-select Lighting Devices and
Lighting Fixtures, and click OK.
Only the lighting fixtures and switches on Level 1 should now be selected, as shown.
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14 On the Options Bar, click .
This should generate a Warning message indicating that the load for the circuit exceeds 80% of
the defined rating (20A).
15 Close the message window and, click (Undo) to undo the circuit creation.
16 Select all the light fixtures and switches in the large open office (Open 1) as shown.
Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires | 313
17 On the Options Bar, click , click , and then select panel MDP as the panel for the
circuit.
18 On the Options Bar, click .
This changes the temporary wiring graphics into permanent wiring graphics as shown.
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When creating wires, as in this step, you can choose to create either arc or chamfered wiring.
Arc wiring is sometimes used to indicate wiring that is concealed within walls, ceilings, or floors.
Chamfered wiring can be used to indicate wiring that is exposed.
In this step, you created arc type wiring. Later, when you create wiring manually, you can specify
splined wiring. Splined wiring is similar to arc, but with an additional vertex. You can add or
remove vertices from wires by right-clicking the wire and clicking Insert Vertex or Delete Vertex.
Tick marks (the short lines that intersect a wire run) indicate the number and type of conductors
(load, neutral, ground) in the wire run. The meaning for each tick mark varies according to the
style of the tick mark selected on the Wiring panel in the Electrical Settings dialog.
In the next steps, you add a conductor in the wiring path between the 3-way and 4-way switches
to allow switching the lights on or off from any of the switches in the open office area.
Adjust the number of conductors in a path between switches
19 Select the 4-way switch at the left end of the curved wall, move the cursor to highlight the 4-way
switch at the right end of the curved wall, press Tab, and click the switch to select the switches,
lighting fixtures, and wire segments on the path between the 2 switches.
20 On the Options Bar, click (Filter).
21 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Wires, and click OK.
Only the wire segments are selected in the path between the switches.
22 On the Options Bar, click .
23 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, for Hot Conductors, enter 2, and
click OK.
Notice that there are now 4 tick marks on the wire segments on the path between the switches
(2 hot conductors, one neutral conductor, and one ground conductor).
24 Using the same method, add a hot conductor to the wire segments between the remaining
switches in the open office and between the 2 switches in the Level 1 stairwell.
NOTE The Hot Conductors parameter value will be blank if the path being selected contains wire
segments with a combination of both 1 and 2 specified as the value for Hot Conductors. When this
occurs, enter 2 as the value, and click OK.
25 In the Mech/Elec space, right-click the MDP panel, and click Element Properties.
26 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Electrical - Loads
category, change the value for Max #1 Pole Breakers from 12 to 22, and click OK.
Creating Lighting Circuitry and Wires | 315
27 Create lighting circuits for the private offices, restrooms and stairwell on Level 1, and assign
each circuits to panel MDP.
28 Create permanent wiring for each circuit.
The wiring layout should look similar to the following:
29 For more practice, continue performing the steps in this exercise using the procedures and tools
described previously to create another lighting circuit for the rest of the lighting fixtures and
switches on the 1 - Lighting view, then creating lighting circuits in 2 - Lighting.
Otherwise, close the dataset and go on to the next exercise, Creating Switch Systems on page
317.
30 Right-click panel H-2, and in the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll
down to the Electrical - Loads category, change the value for Max #1 Pole Breakers from 12 to
18, and click OK.
31 Create a lighting circuit for the open area on Level 2, assign the circuit to panel H-2.
32 Create lighting circuits and wiring for the private offices, lounge, conference room, and restrooms
in the 2 - Lighting view, and assign each circuit to panel H-2.
NOTE Do not include the two lighting fixtures and 3-way switch in the stairwell in either circuit.
These will be connected in a later exercise.
The wiring layout should look similar to the following:
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33 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
34 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
35 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Switch Systems on page 317.
In this exercise you learned how to create lighting circuitry and used the basic methods for adding and
editing wires. You also learned about the settings that control how Revit MEP performs wire sizing. You also
saw that the Revit MEP warns you when you try to put too much load on a circuit, but does not prevent
you from doing so.
Creating Switch Systems
You create switch systems to specify switches that control groups of lighting fixtures in a project. In this
exercise you will create switch systems on Level 1 and Level 2, assign lighting fixtures to switches, and specify
switch IDs for switches. After creating the switch systems on Level 1, you will create a space schedule with
an embedded schedule listing switch IDs, fixtures, and panel information.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Creating Switch Systems.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Lighting to make it the active view.
Creating Switch Systems | 317
2 Select all the lighting fixtures in the large open office (Open 1).
TIP Because all of the lighting fixtures in the open office are part of the same lighting system, you
can highlight one of the lighting fixtures, press Tab, and click to select everything in the system.
Then, click (Filter) to select only the lighting fixtures.
3 On the Options Bar, click (Create Switch System).
4 Click (Select Switch for System), and click the 4-way switch at the left end of the curved
wall to designate the switch controlling the fixtures.
After creating the switch system, you decide to assign several fixtures to a different switch in
the large open area.
5 With the switch system still selected, on the Options Bar, click (Edit Switch System).
The Switch System toolbar is activated.
6 On the Switch System toolbar, click (Remove From System), and on the Options Bar, select
Multiple.
The Options Bar provides the following information about the currently selected switch system.
■ Switch ID: the identifier for the switch that is currently assigned to the system.
■ Number of Fixtures: the number of components in the system (excluding switches).
With Multiple selected on the Options Bar, you can use a pick box to select several fixtures.
When you have selected as many fixtures as you want, click Finish to confirm your selections.
7 Draw a pick box around the 6 lighting fixtures to the left of the restrooms.
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8 On the Options Bar, click Finish.
The Number of Fixtures field now displays 27 fixtures remaining in the system.
9 Click (Switch Properties).
10 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Properties, for Switch ID, enter Main Entrance
- West, and click OK.
The Switch ID is updated on the Options Bar.
11 On the Switch System toolbar, click Finish.
12 Select the 6 lighting fixtures to the left of the restrooms.
13 On the Options Bar, click .
14 On the Switch System toolbar, click (Select Switch), and select the switch on the wall
outside the ladies’ restroom.
15 Click .
16 Click (Switch Properties).
17 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Properties, for Switch ID, enter North Stairwell
- 1st Floor, and click OK.
18 On the Switch System toolbar, click Finish.
Creating Switch Systems | 319
19 Zoom in on the upper-left corner of the plan, select both lighting fixtures in the corner office,
and on the Options Bar, click .
20 Click , and click the single-pole switch on the right wall of the office to designate the
switch controlling the fixtures in the office.
21 Using the same method, create switch systems for the remaining private offices, stairwell, and
restrooms in the 1 - Lighting view.
Create a switch system schedule
22 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Schedule/Quantities.
23 In the New Schedule dialog:
■ Under Category, select Spaces.
■ For Name, enter Switch Systems.
■ Verify that Schedule building components is selected.
■ Click OK.
24 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, scroll down the Available fields list,
double-click the following fields—in the order shown—to add them to the Scheduled fields (in
order) list:
■ Number
■ Name
25 On the Sorting/Grouping tab:
■ For Sort by, select Number.
■ Verify that Ascending is selected.
■ Verify that Itemize every instance is selected.
26 On the Formatting tab, select Number from the Fields list, and for Heading, enter Space Number.
27 On the Embedded Schedule tab:
■ Select Embedded Schedule
■ Under Categories, select Lighting Fixtures
■ Click Embedded Schedule Properties.
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28 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, scroll down the Available fields list,
double-click the following fields—in the order shown—to add them to the Scheduled fields (in
order) list:
■ Switch Id
■ Type
■ Panel
■ Circuit Number
29 Click OK twice.
The Switch System schedule displays in the drawing area, and is added to the Project Browser
under Schedules/Quantities. The embedded lighting fixture content is arranged so that the
information about a switch system displays below the space containing that system.
30 For more practice, continue creating switch systems in the 2 - Lighting view. Create separate
systems for the lounge, restrooms, conference room, and private offices. Create a system for all
the lighting fixtures in the large open area and assign them to the switch near the east stairwell.
Specify Open Area - 2nd Floor for the switch ID.
The Switch Systems schedule is automatically updated as you specify switch IDs or make changes
to the lighting.
Otherwise, close the dataset and go on to the next exercise, Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs
on page 322.
31 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
Creating Switch Systems | 321
32 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
33 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs on page 322.
Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs
In this exercise you will see how Revit MEP deals with wiring runs that contain more than a single circuit.
You will design the power wiring for the 3 offices in the upper-left portion of 1-Power view to serve as an
example of the multi-circuit wiring run.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Creating Multi-Circuit Wiring.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power to make it the active view.
2 Zoom in on the office at the upper-left corner of the plan.
3 In the corner office, move the cursor over one of the receptacles to highlight it, press Tab to
highlight the entire circuit, and click to select the circuit and all of the components connected
to it.
4 On the Options Bar, click to generate arc type wiring for the selected circuit.
5 Using the same method, generate permanent wiring for the circuits in the remaining spaces
along the left side of the plan.
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6 Select the home runs that extend out into the open office from the 2 upper offices, and delete
both home runs.
7 Adjust the view so that the 2 upper offices are visible.
8 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Wire.
9 On the Options Bar, verify that (Arced Wire) is selected.
10 Click the connector for the receptacle on the east wall of the top office to specify the start point
for the wire.
Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs | 323
11 Click in the open area near the door for the office to specify the second point for the wire, as
shown.
12 Click the connector for the receptacle on the east wall of the middle office to specify the endpoint
for the wire.
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NOTE When neither of the 2 groups of components on the circuit has a free home run, Revit MEP
temporarily assigns a direction to the home run. The direction will be corrected, if necessary, when
the wiring is completed.
13 Adjust the view so that the 2 lower offices are visible, and using the same method, create wiring
between receptacles in the 2 lower offices.
When completed, your layout should look similar to the following:
Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs | 325
Home run arrows are used to indicate that a wiring run is returning to a panel. Multi-circuit
wiring runs appear with multiple arrows on the home run. As wiring runs are collected into a
multi-circuit wiring run, the number of tick marks is increased to show the increase in the
number of hot conductors. In the previous steps, as the circuits in each office was added to the
wiring run, the number of tick marks and home run arrows is increased such that the final home
run has 3 home run arrows and 5 tick marks (3 hot conductors, a shared neutral, and a shared
safety ground).
14 Click Modify.
Adjust the home run routing
15 Select the home run extending from the lower office, and notice the vertex controls at each end
of the wire and another in the center.
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16 Drag the center vertex to the left so that it is closer to the receptacle in the lower office as shown.
17 Right click the wire run, select Insert Vertex, drag the new vertex along the wire run to a point
midway between the other vertex and the connector, and click.
18 Drag the vertex at the end of the home run toward the lower restroom, and drag the new vertex
up and to the left to arrange the wire run so that it looks similar to the following image.
Creating Multi-Circuit Wire Runs | 327
Vertices let you route wires in your project views. The wire behaves like a spline, adjusting its
shape according to the vertex location.
19 For additional practice, you can continue creating permanent wiring for the circuits in the
1 - Power and 2 - Power views, or you can close this dataset and go on to the next exercise.
Examples of completed plans are provided below for reference.
Completed 1-Power
328 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
Completed 2-Power
20 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
21 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
22 Proceed to the next exercise, Checking Your Design on page 329.
In this exercise, you created wiring runs from the circuits that you created in a previous exercise and combined
these to form multi-circuit wiring runs. You also learned how to adjust the layout of wiring runs and interpret
tick marks and home run arrows.
Checking Your Design
In this exercise you learn how to use the System Browser to examine the circuitry that you created in previous
exercises. The System Browser is a useful tool for checking the design and locating components in your
project. You also learn to use the Check Circuits tool to verify that all of the circuits in your plan are
connected.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Checking Your Design.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power to make it the active view.
Checking Your Design | 329
2 Zoom in on the upper-left corner of the drawing so that the corner office is visible.
3 Click Window menu ➤ Systems Browser.
The System Browser is displayed to right of the drawing area.
4 Click and hold the Title Bar of the System Browser, drag it to the bottom of the drawing area,
and when the preview expands to the width of the window, release the mouse button.
5 Right-click a column heading, and click View ➤ Electrical to limit the information displayed to
the electrical discipline.
6 Right-click a column heading in the System Browser, and click AutoFit All Columns to resize
the columns in the System Browser.
7 In the System Browser, expand Power ➤ L-1 ➤ circuit 1.
The System Browser provides another way of viewing information about the circuits that are
connected to panel L-1. There are 4 devices connected to circuit 1, each with a load of 180VA.
The System Browser also provides the name and number of the space in which the devices are
located.
8 In the System Browser, right-click one of the devices under circuit 1, and click Select.
The device you selected in the System Browser is also selected in 1 - Power.
Resolve unassigned electrical components
9 In the System Browser, collapse Power, and expand Unassigned.
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This list displays connectors and circuits that have not been assigned to a panel. The list includes
the main distribution panel (MDP), a 3-way switch and 2 lighting fixtures in the Level 2 stairwell,
6 receptacles in the open area of Level 1, and 6 receptacles in the open area of Level 2.
10 Open the 1 - Lighting and 2 - Lighting views and close any windows.
11 Click Window menu ➤ Tile to display both these views in the drawing area.
12 Zoom in on the stairwells in both lighting plans as shown.
The lighting fixtures and 3-way switch in the 2 - Lighting view have not yet been connected.
You need to add the switch and lighting fixtures in the upper level to the same circuit as the
switches and lighting fixtures in the lower level.
Add Level 2 components to the existing Level 1 lighting circuit.
13 In the 1 - Lighting view, select one of the lighting fixtures in the stairwell, and on the Options
Bar, click .
14 On the Edit Circuits toolbar, click (Add to Circuit).
15 On the Options Bar, clear Multiple.
16 Click the title bar of the 2 - Lighting view, and select both lighting fixtures and the 3-way switch
in the Level 2 stairwell.
17 On the Edit Circuits toolbar, click Finish.
Checking Your Design | 331
In the System Browser, the 2 lighting fixtures and 3-way switch have been moved from the
Unassigned folder to Power ➤ MDP ➤ Circuit 2.
18 Highlight one of the lighting fixtures in the Level 2 stairwell, press Tab several times, until the
power circuit is previewed, click to select the circuit, and on the Options Bar, click to
create permanent wiring.
Add a Hot Conductor to the wiring for the stairwell lighting circuit.
19 In the 1 - Lighting view, select the 3-way switch in the stairwell, click the title bar of the
2 - Lighting view, highlight the 3-way switch in the Level 2 stairwell, press Tab, and click to
select all of the components in the path between the 2 switches.
20 On the Options Bar, click .
21 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Wires, and click OK.
Only the wire segments are selected in the path between the switches.
22 Click .
23 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, for Hot Conductors, enter 2, and
click OK.
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In the System Browser, the only remaining unassigned components should be the MDP and the
receptacles in the 2 open areas.
Assign remaining receptacles to circuits
24 In the Project Browser, double-click 1-Power to make it the active view, arrange the view so that
the System Browser and the 5 unassigned receptacles are visible.
25 In the drawing area, select the unassigned receptacles in the open area.
26 On the Options Bar, click to create a power circuit for these receptacles.
27 On the Options Bar, click , and in the Mechanical/Electrical space, select panel L-1.
28 Click to create permanent wiring.
Checking Your Design | 333
29 Using the same method, create a power circuit for the 6 unassigned receptacles in Open 2 in
the 2-Power view.
The MDP panel is now the only component listed in the Unassigned category.
Check Circuits
30 On the Electrical tab on the Design Bar, click Check Circuits.
31 In the warning window that is displayed indicating an unconnected power connector.
32 Click to view details of the warning.
33 Expand the warning categories until you can see that the piece of equipment that is not connected
is the MDP panel.
334 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
This warning refers to the feed from the outside power service and can be ignored.
34 Close the Warning dialog.
35 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
36 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
37 Proceed to the next exercise, Defining Circuit Loads on page 335.
In this exercise, you learned how to use the System Browser to examine electrical components in your project
and resolve unassigned and unnamed circuits. You also learned how to use the Check Circuits tool to verify
that all of the circuits in your project were connected.
Defining Circuit Loads
In this exercise you begin by balancing the loads at the Level 1 and Level 2 panels, then you examine the
loads presented at the panels to set your final breaker sizes. Finally, you verify and adjust wire sizes that
Revit MEP recommends for handling the loads on those circuits.
Open the provided dataset, as described below.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Electrical ➤ m Defining Circuit Loads.rvt.
Balance circuit loads
1 Circuit loads should be balanced to present as nearly as possible an equal load to each phase.
This will reduce neutral current as well as prevent an excess voltage drop due to one phase being
overloaded. Balancing loads begins with adjusting the loads at the panels farthest from the
power source.
In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Power.
2 In the Mechanical/Electrical space, select panel L-2.
Defining Circuit Loads | 335
3 On the Options Bar, click .
Examination of the loads on Phase A, B, and C shows a slight imbalance with the heaviest load
on Phase B (4860 VA), while Phase A provides 4500 VA, and Phase C provides 4320 VA.
4 In the Edit Circuits dialog, click Rebalance Loads.
After re-balancing loads, the distribution is shifted, but the overall load on the three phases
remains the same. Had there been a greater imbalance, the loads would have been moved to
different circuits to achieve better balance.
5 Click OK.
336 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
6 Select panel H-2, and on the Options Bar, click .
7 Click Rebalance Loads to adjust the loads on panel H-2.
8 In the Project Browser, double-click 1 - Power.
9 Repeat the previous procedures to balance the loads on the Level 1 panels, L-1 and MDP.
Adjust circuit breaker sizes
10 Select panel MDP, and on the Options Bar, click .
NOTE If you have continued to save and use your own dataset throughout these tutorials, you may
see different values for the loads. This is because you may have selected a different mix of lighting
fixtures to attain the required lighting levels.
Transformer T1 was specified as a 45kVA transformer but, the actual load connected to it
(12960 VA) is less than 15kVA. Therefore, you can use a 30kVA transformer, which will require
a 40A circuit breaker.
11 In the Edit Circuits dialog, for panel H-2, enter 100A for the Trip value, and for T1, enter 40A
for the Trip value.
The lighting circuits connected to MDP are already specified as 20A circuits, so no further changes
are required.
12 Click OK.
13 In the 1 - Power view, in the Mechanical/Electrical space, select the T1 transformer.
14 In the Type Selector, select M_480-120-208V Phase Dry Type Transformer: M_30kVA.
Now that you have specified transformer T1 as a 30kVA transformer and restored it to the circuit,
you should verify that the wire sizes for panel L-1 is set correctly.
Verify/adjust wire sizes
15 Right-click panel L-1, and click Element Properties.
Defining Circuit Loads | 337
16 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Electrical-Loads
category, and notice that the current value for Mains is 100.00A.
100.00A is the correct size panel for a 30kVA transformer.
17 Click OK.
18 With panel L-1 selected, on the Options Bar, click (Circuit Properties).
19 In the Element Properties dialog for the circuit, scroll down and verify that the current value
for the Wire Size parameter is 3-#12, 1-#12, 1-#12.
20 Under Electrical-Loads, enter 100A for Rating.
Revit MEP automatically calculates wire sizes based on circuit rating.
21 Scroll down, and click the value for the Wire Size parameter.
Notice that it changes to 3-#1, 1-#1, 1-#8.
22 Click OK.
23 In the Project Browser, double-click 2 - Power to make it the active view.
24 In the Mechanical/Electrical space, select panel H-2, and on the Options Bar, click .
Similar to the situation you observed for transformer T1, the load presented by T2 is less than
14kVA and you decide to change the transformer from 45kVA to 30kVA, which will require a
40A circuit breaker.
25 In the Edit Circuits dialog, for transformer T2, enter 40A for the Trip value.
26 Click OK.
27 In the 2 - Power view, in the Mechanical/Electrical space, select the T2 transformer.
28 In the Type Selector, selectM_480-120-208V Phase Dry Type Transformer: M_30kVA.
Now that you have set transformer T2 to be a 30kVA transformer and restored it to the circuit,
you should verify that the size of panel L-2 is set correctly.
29 Right click panel L-2 and click Element Properties.
338 | Chapter 6 Electrical Systems
30 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, scroll down to the Electrical-Loads,
and verify that the current value for Mains is 100.00A.
31 Click OK.
Size the service entrance conductors
32 In the Project Browser, double-click 1 - Power to make it the active view.
33 With the MDP panel selected, click .
A warning indicates that the total connected load exceeds 80% of the defined value of 20A for
the circuit you are creating.
34 Close the Warning.
35 On the Options Bar, click .
36 In the Element Properties dialog for the circuit, under Electrical Loads, enter 225A for the Rating
parameter. Notice that the value for the Wire Size parameter changes appropriately.
37 You can save the open file if you wish.
38 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
This completes the Electrical Tutorial.
Defining Circuit Loads | 339
340
Plumbing Systems
The most common method of designing systems in Revit MEP is to work within a linked architectural building model. In
this tutorial, you will use a project file that has already been linked to an architectural model, with Space components
placed in the areas throughout the model.
NOTE The architectural model used with this tutorial is in the Architectural folder. You should maintain the relative
path to the architectural model. However, if the link is lost, you can click File menu ➤ Manage Links to reload the
linked model. On the Revit tab on the Manage Links dialog, click Reload From, navigate to Training
Files ➤ Architectural, and select m Office Building.rvt.
In this tutorial, you create the plumbing systems for the second floor men’s room in an office building, including plumbing
fixtures, hot and cold water piping, and sanitary piping. As you create the plumbing system, you follow a series of lessons
and exercises that teach the recommended systems design workflow for Revit MEP 2009. By following this workflow, you
learn system design best practices while understanding how Revit MEP makes systems designing more efficient.
The goal of this tutorial is to teach you to design plumbing systems using Revit MEP 2009. At the end of this tutorial, you
will understand the process, methodology, and specific techniques for designing plumbing systems.
The datasets that you use to complete these exercises are located in the Training Files directory. You can search the Training
Files ➤ Metric directory to verify that the datasets have been downloaded. If the tutorial datasets are not present, go to
http://www.autodesk.com/revitmep-documentation and download them.
NOTE All exercises in this tutorial are designed to be completed sequentially; each exercise is dependent on the
completion of the previous exercise. After finishing each exercise, you can choose to save your work. However, it is
highly recommended that you always begin an exercise by opening the dataset that Autodesk provides. This dataset
includes the work from the previous exercise(s) and ensures a seamless training session.
7
341
Planning Plumbing Systems
Creating plumbing systems in Revit MEP is similar to any design project; planning is critical to a successful
design. In this lesson, you plan each system by loading the fixtures and fittings that you will need to design
the plumbing system.
Preparing the Plumbing Plan
Revit MEP provides families of common plumbing components that you place in your plumbing plan. You
load the families of components that comprise your plumbing systems. As you develop more advanced skills
working with Revit MEP, you can customize components and expand the library of plumbing families.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Loading Plumbing Parts.rvt.
Load plumbing component families
1 Click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load Family.
2 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
3 Expand Metric ➤ Plumbing.
4 While pressing Ctrl select the following files:
■ M_Water Closet - Flush Valve - Floor Mounted.rfa
■ M_Urinal - Wall Hung.rfa
5 Click Open.
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6 In the Project Browser, expand Families ➤ Plumbing Fixtures.
Notice that 2 folders have been added to the families currently available for your design: M_Water
Closet - Flush Valve - Floor Mounted and M_Urinal - Wall Hung.
Load piping component families
7 Click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load Family.
8 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
9 Expand Metric ➤ Plumbing.
10 While pressing Ctrl select the following files:
■ M_Pipe Bend - DWV - Glued.rfa
■ M_Pipe Reducing Short Tee - Sanitary - Glued.rfa
11 Click Open.
The selected component families are loaded into the project. All of the loaded families, are added
under Families in the Project Browser.
12 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
13 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
14 Proceed to the next exercise, Configuring Plumbing and Piping Systems on page 343.
Configuring Plumbing and Piping Systems
In this exercise, you create new PVC pipe types and specify the default fittings that will be used with them.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Configuring Plumbing and Pipe Systems.rvt.
Create new pipe types and specify default pipe fittings
1 In the Project Browser, expand Families ➤ Pipes ➤ Pipe Types.
2 Right-click PVC, and click Duplicate.
3 Right-click PVC 2, and click Properties.
4 In the Type Properties dialog, click Rename.
5 In the Rename dialog, for New, enter PVC Sanitary, and click OK.
6 Under Mechanical, do the following:
■ For Elbow, select M_Pipe Bend - PVC: Standard
■ For Preferred Junction Type, select Tee
■ For Tee, select M_Pipe Short Tee - Sanitary - PVC: Standard
■ For Tap, select None
■ For Cross, select M_Pipe Cross - PVC - Glued: Standard
■ For Transition, select M_Pipe Transition - PVC: Standard
Configuring Plumbing and Piping Systems | 343
■ For Union, select M_Pipe Coupling - PVC: Standard
7 Click Apply, then click Duplicate.
8 In the Name dialog, for Name, enter PVC Sanitary Vent, and click OK.
9 Under Mechanical, do the following:
■ For Elbow, verify that M_Pipe Bend - PVC : Standard is selected
■ For Preferred Junction Type, select Tee
■ For Tee, select M_Pipe Tee - Vent - PVC : Standard
■ For Tap, select None
■ For Cross, verify that M_Pipe Cross - PVC - Glued : Standard is selected
■ For Transition, verify that M_Pipe Transition - PVC : Standard is selected
■ For Union, verify that M_Pipe Coupling - PVC : Standard is selected
10 Click OK to close the Type Properties dialog.
11 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
12 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
13 Proceed to the next exercise, Add Plumbing Fixtures on page 344.
Designing Plumbing Systems
Designing plumbing systems in Revit MEP is a straightforward process. In this lesson, you add plumbing
fixtures to physically connect them with piping. You then modify the piping. Finally, you create systems
to logically connect the fixtures.
Add Plumbing Fixtures
In this exercise, you add 2 toilets, 3 urinals, 3 sinks, and a floor drain to the second floor men’s room.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Adding Plumbing Fixtures.rvt.
Place floor-mounted toilets
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click 2 -
Plumbing to make it the active view.
2 Enter the keyboard shortcut, ZR (Zoom Region), and draw a left-to-right pick box around the
second floor men’s room.
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The men’s room is partitioned for 2 toilet stalls, 3 wall-mounted urinals, and 3 sinks.
3 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Plumbing Fixture.
4 Select M_Water Closet - Flush Valve - Floor Mounted : Private 6.1 Lpf in the Type Selector.
5 Move the cursor over the upper-right corner of the men’s room, and click to place the toilet in
the approximate location shown.
6 Click Modify.
Position the first toilet
7 Position the toilet 160 mm from the upper wall, and 460 mm from the right wall.
a On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
Add Plumbing Fixtures | 345
b On the Options Bar, verify that (Aligned) is selected, Wall faces is selected for Prefer,
and Individual References is selected for Pick.
c Click the face of the right wall, move the cursor over the center of the toilet, and click.
d Move the cursor down, and click to place the dimension annotation.
e Using the same method, place a dimension annotation between the upper wall and the
back of the toilet.
f Click Modify.
g Select the toilet, click the value for the blue dimension to the right, enter 160, and press
Enter.
The toilet is placed 160 mm from the upper wall of the toilet stall.
h Click the value for the blue dimension below the toilet, enter 460, and press Enter.
The toilet is placed 460 mm from the right wall.
i Click Modify.
j Delete both dimension annotations.
Add a second toilet
8 Select the toilet, and on the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
9 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Clear Constrain
■ Verify that Copy is selected
■ Clear Multiple
10 Click the center line of the toilet to establish a start point.
11 Move the preview of the toilet 1500 mm to the left (into the left stall), and when the alignment
snap displays and the preview is from the original toilet, click to place the toilet as shown.
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Place wall-mounted urinals
12 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Plumbing Fixture.
13 Select M_Urinal - Wall Hung : 20mm Flush Valve in the Type Selector, and on the Options Bar,
verify that (Place on Vertical Face) is selected.
14 Move the cursor over the upper-left corner of the men’s room, and place 3 urinals approximately
as shown.
15 Click Modify.
16 On the Design Bar, click Dimension, and on the Options Bar, do the following.
■ Verify that (Aligned) is selected
■ For Prefer, select Wall centerlines
■ Verify that Individual References is selected for Pick
17 Click the centerline of the left wall, move the cursor over the center of the leftmost urinal, and
click.
18 Move the cursor down, and click to place the dimension annotation.
Add Plumbing Fixtures | 347
19 Using the same method, place a dimension annotation for the rightmost toilet.
20 Working from left to right, click the centerline of each urinal in succession, then move the
cursor up, and click to place the dimensions annotation.
21 Select the rightmost urinal, click the value for the blue dimension, and enter 500.
The urinal is placed 500 from the wall of the toilet stall.
22 Using the same method, place the leftmost urinal 500 from the left wall.
23 Select the dimension annotation above the urinals, and click the blue (Equal Control)
above the dimension values to space the urinals evenly along the wall.
24 Press Delete to remove the dimension from the drawing, and click Unconstrain in the warning
dialog.
25 While pressing Ctrl, select the 2 remaining dimension annotations, and press Delete.
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Place sinks
26 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Plumbing Fixture, and in the Type Selector, select
M_Sink - Island - Single : 455mmx455mm - Private.
27 On the Options Bar click (Place on Face).
28 In the drawing area, select the counter top.
29 Move the cursor over the counter top in the lower-right corner of the men’s room, and press
the Space Bar twice to rotate the sink into the proper orientation.
30 Place 3 sinks, approximately as shown.
31 Click Modify.
32 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
33 Using the same method you used to evenly space the urinals, specify the distance between the
center line of the outer sinks and the center line of the walls as 560, specify the distance between
the drain center line and the lower wall as 460mm, then equalize the space between sinks.
34 Delete the dimension annotations.
Place the floor drain
35 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Plumbing Fixture, and in the Type selector, select
M_Floor Drain - Round : : 125mm Stainer - 80mm Drain.
36 On the Option Bar click (Place on Work Plane), and for Plane, select Level : Level 2.
37 Move the cursor to a point where the walls for the toilet stalls meet, as shown, and click to place
the floor drain.
38 Click Modify.
Add Plumbing Fixtures | 349
39 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
40 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
41 Proceed to the next exercise, Begin Creating the Sanitary System on page 350.
Begin Creating the Sanitary System
This is the first of 3 exercises that will guide you through creating the piping for the men’s room sanitary
plumbing system. In this exercise, you create a sanitary system consisting of the toilets, urinals, and floor
drain. You then use Revit MEP‘s Layout Path tools to create sloped piping to connect the fixtures to a sanitary
outlet.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Starting the Sanitary Piping System.rvt.
Prepare for sanitary piping
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click 2 -
Plumbing to make it the active view.
Because most of the piping for the sanitary system will be placed below the floor level, you need
to adjust the view depth to make the piping visible in the view.
2 Right-click in the drawing area, and click View Properties.
3 In the Element Properties dialog, under Extents, scroll down to View Range, and click Edit.
4 In the View Range dialog, verify the view range settings:
■ Under Primary Range, specify Associated Level (Level 2) and -1500 for Bottom Offset
■ Under View Depth, specify Associated Level (Level 2) and -1500 for Level Offset
5 Click OK twice.
6 On the View Control Bar, specify Fine for Detail Level, and Wireframe for Model Graphics Style.
The fine setting displays 2-line piping and plumbing components, while coarse and medium
display plumbing components as 1-line symbols.
Specify mechanical settings for piping
7 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Mechanical Settings.
8 In the left pane of the Mechanical Settings dialog, expand Pipe Settings ➤ Conversion, and click
Main.
9 In the right panel, select Sanitary from the System Type list.
10 In the table:
■ For Pipe Type, specify Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary
■ For Offset, specify -300
11 In the left panel, click Branch, and select Sanitary from the System Type list.
12 In the table:
■ For Pipe Type, specify Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary
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■ For Offset, specify -300
13 Click OK.
Create the sanitary plumbing system
14 When you are creating systems the System Browser can help you identify components that have
not been added to a system.
Click Window ➤ System Browser.
TIP You can also access the system browser using the F9 keyboard shortcut.
15 Click the title bar for the browser, and dock it by dragging it to the bottom of the drawing area.
16 Right-click in the system browser table heading, click View ➤ Piping.
17 Expand the Unassigned folder, and notice that all of the plumbing fixtures are currently
unassigned.
18 Zoom in on the men’s room, and draw a left-to-right pick box around the urinals, toilets, and
floor drain, as shown.
19 On the Options Bar, click (Create Sanitary System).
The urinals, toilets and the floor drain are moved from the Unassigned folder to the newly
created Sanitary ➤ Sanitary 1 folder in the System Browser.
20 Zoom out to include the chase near the top-right corner of the second floor men’s room in the
view.
21 Click (Thin Lines) on the toolbar.
22 Select one of the components in the newly created sanitary system, and on the Options Bar,
click (Layout Path).
23 In the Select a System dialog, click Sanitary 1, and click OK.
The Layout Paths tab is activated on the Design Bar, and a preview of the piping layout displays.
24 On the Layout Paths tab on the Design Bar, click Place Base.
25 Move the cursor over the chase, and click to place the base approximately as shown.
Begin Creating the Sanitary System | 351
26 On the Options Bar, for Offset, specify -1200 and for D, select 100 mm.
The elevation of the base with relation to the other components in the system is critical. The
elevation is specified low enough to allow sloping the sanitary piping in the system.
27 On the Design Bar, click Solutions, and on the Options Bar, enter 1.00% for Slope.
28 Verify that Network is selected for Solution Type.
Up to 6 piping layout solutions are suggested on the Options Bar. You can click (Previous)
and (Next Solution), as needed, to view them. The layout preview displays the main piping
as blue lines and the branch piping as green lines.
29 Select solution 1, and on the Design Bar, click Modify.
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Customize the layout
30 The alignment of segments is critical when customizing a layout. It’s easier if each segment can
be moved to a snap. Review the following steps prior to using them to customize the layout.
Select the horizontal main segment above the rightmost urinals and toilets, and do the following:
a Use the (Parallel Movement Control) control to drag the segment down into the middle
of the chase above the urinals.
b Move the cursor to the left to the junction between the main and the branch to the
rightmost toilet. This makes it easier to locate a snap. Snap the main in the middle of the
chase.
Begin Creating the Sanitary System | 353
c Using the same method, select the horizontal branch segment above the leftmost urinal,
and drag the segment down into the chase.
d Move the cursor to the right to locate the snap above the center urinal, and click to align
the branch to the main segment.
NOTE You press Ctrl to select multiple segments when you want to move more than one segment
to the same location.
31 Click Finish Layout.
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32 Examine the piping that was automatically created, checking for the proper connectivity, slope,
and orientation of fittings:
a Highlight one of the plumbing fixtures, and press Tab 3 times to check connectivity. The
first tab highlights the fixture and the branch. The second tab highlights the fixture, branch
and the fixture connecting it to the main segment. The third tab should highlight the entire
system.
b Select each pipe segment in the system, and check the slope control. The slope control for
every segment should indicate that the slope is toward the sanitary outlet, as shown.
c Examine the sanitary tees to assure proper orientation. When a fitting is reversed, select
the fitting and click (Flip) to reorient it.
Begin Creating the Sanitary System | 355
33 In the Project Browser, expand Plumbing ➤ 3D Views, and double-click 3D Plumbing.
34 It is easier to work with Revit MEP components if model categories from other disciplines are
hidden in the view.
Enter the keyboard shortcut, VG (Visibility/Graphics).
35 In the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, click Show categories from all disciplines, and on the
Model Categories tab clear the following categories:
■ Casework
■ Ceilings
■ Columns
■ Curtain Panels
■ Curtain Systems
■ Curtain Wall Mullions
■ Doors
■ Floors
■ Lines
■ Railings
■ Roofs
■ Shaft Openings
■ Stairs
■ Walls
■ Windows
36 Click OK.
37 On the View Control Bar, specify Fine for Detail Level, and Hidden Line for Model Graphics
Style.
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38 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
39 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
40 Proceed to the next exercise, Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System on page 357 to continue
creating the sanitary system.
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System
In this exercise you continue with the work from the last exercise, adding the sinks in the men’s room, and
creating the piping that connects them to the sanitary system.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Connecting Sink Drain Lines.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click 2 -
Plumbing to make it the active view.
2 Zoom in on the piping to the right of the men’s room.
3 Select the sanitary elbow to the right of the rightmost toilet, and click the plus sign below the
fitting to upgrade the fitting to a tee.
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System | 357
4 Select the tee, right-click the connector on the open leg, and click Draw Pipe.
5 Verify that Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary is selected in the Type Selector, and on the Options Bar,
verify that 1.00 is specified for the slope.
6 Drag the preview of the pipe down parallel to the wall, press the Space Bar once, enter 3950, and
press Enter.
When you press the space bar, the pipe being drawn automatically assumes the size and elevation
of the fitting. Entering a length dimension while drawing pipes activates Revit MEP’s listening
dimension tool, which automatically sets the length of the pipe to the value entered. Pressing
Return completes the dimensioning.
7 Click Modify.
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If you select the pipe, you can verify that the slope has been applied in the correct direction:
toward the sanitary outlet.
8 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe Fitting, and select M_Pipe Reducing
Wye - DWV - Glued : Standard in the Type Selector.
9 Move the cursor over the open end of the pipe, and when the snap displays, click to place the
fitting.
10 Click Modify.
11 Select the fitting, click the blue size control for the wye leg, enter 50, and press Enter.
12 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe Fitting, and select M_Pipe Plug-PVC : Standard
in the Type Selector.
13 Move the cursor over the straight leg of the reducing wye, and when the extension snap displays,
click to place the fitting.
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System | 359
14 Click Modify.
15 Using the method learned earlier, highlight the wye, and press Tab 3 times to check connectivity.
16 Select the wye fitting, right-click the connector on the open leg, and click Draw Pipe.
17 Verify that the Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary is selected in the Type Selector, and on the Options
Bar, verify that Auto Connect is selected, and that 1.00% is specified for slope.
18 Drag the end of the pipe to the left and down to a point approximately even with the centerline
of the wall below the sinks, press the Space Bar once so that the pipe assumes the size and
elevation of the fitting, and when the end of the pipe is even with wall centerline, click to specify
the end of the first segment of pipe.
19 Continue this section of pipe by dragging the preview along the centerline of the wall, and
when the snap for the center point of the middle sink displays, click to specify the end of the
pipe.
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20 On the Options Bar, enter 150 for Offset, click Apply, and click Modify.
Changing the Offset while drawing pipe creates a vertical segment. In this case, the vertical pipe
extends 150 mm above the level of the floor.
21 In the Project Browser, expand Plumbing ➤ 3D Views and double-click 3D Plumbing to view
the piping just added.
If necessary, clear unwanted components from the 3D view using the Visibility/Graphic Overrides
dialog as described in the previous exercise.
22 In the 3D view, check the slope and connectivity for the added piping as described previously.
23 Zoom in on the vertical segment behind the middle sink.
24 On the Plumbing tab, click Pipe Fitting, and in the Type Selector select M_Pipe Double
Wye - DWV - Glued : Standard.
25 Move the cursor near the open end of the vertical pipe, and when the Extension snap displays
and the end is outlined in blue, press Space, and click to place the fitting.
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System | 361
The double wye is added to the vertical segment. If necessary, click to orient the fitting, as
shown above.
26 Click Modify.
27 Select the double wye fitting, and on the Options Bar, specify 200 for Offset.
Add pipe stubs to the double wye
28 Double-click 2 - Plumbing to make it the active view.
29 On the View tab Design Bar, click Section, and in the drawing area, place a section below the
sinks as shown.
In the next steps you add 2 short pipe segments to the double wye.
30 Double-click the head of the section to open the section view.
31 On the View Control Bar, for Detail Level, specify Fine, and for Model Graphics Style, specify
Hidden Line.
32 Enter the keyboard shortcut, VG (Visibility/Graphics) to hide architectural components that will
interfere with selecting plumbing components.
33 In the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, do the following:
a Click Show categories from all disciplines
b Click All, and clear the check from any category
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c Clear Show categories from all disciplines, and click All again
d Select any category, click None, then clear the check from Lines
e Click OK
34 NOTE There is a known issue when connecting piping to the double-wye. The fitting moves to the
left when pipe is connected to the left leg, then to the right when pipe is connected to the right leg.
After adding the piping to the right and left leg, it is necessary to restore the offset for the fitting.
On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe.
35 Click the connector snap on the left leg, draw the pipe up to the left, in line with the angle for
the leg, press the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes the size and enter 300 and press Enter.
36 Click Modify.
37 Using the same method, draw a 300mm pipe from the right leg of the double-wye.
38 Click the connector snap on the center leg, draw the pipe up, press the Space Bar so that the
pipe assumes the size and enter 150 and press Enter.
39 Click Modify.
40 Select the double-wye fitting again, and on the Options Bar, for Offset, specify 150.
41 Click Modify.
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System | 363
42 In the Project Browser, expand Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click 2 - Plumbing.
43 Zoom to a level that lets you view all 3 sinks, and select the leftmost sink.
44 Right-click the connector for the sink drain, and click Draw Pipe, and in the Type Selector, select
Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary.
45 Drag the pipe preview a short distance from the drain, press the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes
the size and elevation of the sink drain, and on the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For Offset, enter 450, and click Apply
■ Verify 1.00% is specified for slope
46 Drag the pipe preview down to a point between the sink and the wall, and click to specify the
end of the pipe.
47 Click Modify.
48 Using the same method, connect drain pipes to the other 2 sinks.
49 In the Project Browser, expand Plumbing ➤ 3D Views, double-click 3D Plumbing.
50 Zoom in to a level that allows you to view all 3 sinks and the double wye fitting.
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Using Routing Solutions to finish the sanitary piping
51 Routing Solutions works best when the segments being routed are the same size.
While pressing Ctrl, select the double-wye and the 3 short segments of pipe connected to it, and
on the Options Bar, for D, specify 40 mm.
52 Click Modify.
53 While pressing Ctrl, select the short pipe connected to the right leg of the double wye and the
horizontal pipe from the drain of the rightmost sink.
54 On the Options Bar, click Routing Solutions.
Routing Solution tools are activated on the Options Bar that let you (Add Control Points)
or (Remove Control Points), and select a proposed solution. You use the plus and minus
buttons to add vertex controls to pipe segments. Transitions and fittings are automatically added
to maintain connections. You use (Previous) and (Next) buttons to cycle through
the proposed solutions.
55 Select solution 9 of 16, and click Finish to create piping for that solution.
56 While pressing Ctrl, select the short pipe connected to the center leg of the double wye and the
horizontal pipe from the drain of the middle sink, and on the Options Bar, click Routing
Solutions.
57 Select solution 8 of 8, and click Finish to create piping for the middle sink.
58 Click Modify.
59 Using the same method, select the pipe from the left sink and the pipe connected to the left leg
and create the piping by selecting solution 9 of 16.
60 Click Finish to create piping for the third sink.
61 Select the double-wye, and on the Options Bar, for D, specify 50 mm.
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System | 365
Specify slope for the sink sanitary piping
62 Draw a right-to-left pick box to select the elbow and adjoining 2 pipes between the double wye
and the sink drain for the rightmost sink as shown.
63 Click Window ➤ Toolbar ➤ Routing Modify to place the Slope and Justify tool on the toolbar.
64 On the toolbar, click (Slope) to activate the slope tools on the Options Bar.
65 On the Options Bar, for Slope, enter 1.00 , and click Finish.
A warning displays and the pipe from the leg of the double-wye is highlighted to indicate the
segment where the slope could not be applied. This is to be expected. Close the warning.
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66 Using the same method, specify the slope for the piping to the left sink.
Since the routing solution applied to the middle sink used the existing pipe (without adding a
segment), the piping to the middle sink is already sloped.
NOTE In applications where the elevation of a sloped pipe is critical, you can specify the elevation
of a pipe’s reference end in the Element Properties for the pipe. If necessary, click to select the
reference end of the pipe. Then, right-click the pipe, click Element Properties, and under Instance
Parameters, specify the exact Offset. This will set the elevation for the pipe’s reference end without
changing the slope.
67 In the System Browser, expand Sanitary, right-click Sanitary 1, and click Select.
68 On the Options Bar, click (Edit System).
69 On the Edit System toolbar, click (Add to System), and on the Options Bar, click Multiple.
70 In the drawing area, while pressing Ctrl, select all 3 sinks, click Finish on the Options Bar, then
click Finish on the Edit System toolbar.
The sinks are added to the Sanitary 1 system in the System Browser.
With the piping created and the slope and connectivity properly defined, you can make minor
adjustments to the system. You can move fixtures by dragging, modifying offset values, or by
using the arrow keys on your keyboard.
Make minor adjustments to the sanitary system
71 Zoom in and select the double wye fitting for the sink drains, and press the up arrow on your
keyboard twice.
The fitting moves up and at the same time the piping attached to its legs automatically adjusts
and maintains connectivity. The amount of adjustment with each keystroke is proportional to
the zoom level. When zoomed in close, there is a smaller movement.
72 Press the down arrow on the keyboard twice to return the fitting to its original location.
When the piping was created for the sink drains, M_Pipe Bend - PVC : Standard components
were used because the shorter size of this fitting works well with the automated Routing Solutions.
Now that the routing is completed, you can change these to the more commonly used M_Pipe
Bend - DWV - Glued : Standard.
73 While pressing Ctrl, select the 2 bends connecting the 45-degree legs of the double-wye to the
horizontal pipe segments, and in the Type Selector, select M_Pipe Bend - DWV - Glued : Standard.
Connecting Sinks to the Sanitary System | 367
74 Select the 2 elbows in the section of piping between the double wye fitting and the reducing
sanitary wye, and select M_Pipe Bend - DWV - Glued : Standard in the Type Selector.
75 Using the method learned earlier, highlight the leftmost sink, and press Tab 3 times to check
connectivity. (After the third tab, the entire system should be highlighted.)
76 If you want to save your work, click File menu ➤ Save As; otherwise, skip the next 2 steps.
77 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
78 Click File menu ➤ Close.
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NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
79 Proceed to the next exercise, Refining the Sanitary Stack on page 369 to continue creating the
sanitary system.
Refining the Sanitary Stack
In this exercise you continue with the work on the sanitary system, adjusting the sanitary stack.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Refining Waste Stack Connection.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ 3D Views, and double-click 3D
Plumbing to make it the active view.
2 Zoom in on the elbow at the upper end of the vertical pipe connected to the sanitary outlet,
and select the horizontal pipe.
3 Click the pipe’s connector snap at the elbow, and carefully drag it away from the elbow, while
maintaining the same angle.
4 Select the elbow, and press Delete.
5 Select the vertical pipe segment, and on the Options Bar, specify 150 mm for D (diameter).
Refining the Sanitary Stack | 369
Add a reducing wye to the stack
6 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe Fitting, and select M_Pipe Reducing Wye -
DWV - Glued : Standard.
7 Move the cursor over the center of the open end of the vertical pipe, and when the Extension
snap displays, press the Space Bar once (so that the fitting assumes the elevation of the end of
the pipe), and click to place the fitting.
8 Click Modify.
The wye is added to the vertical segment.
If necessary, select the wye, and click to rotate the 45 degree leg until it is pointing toward
the sanitary piping.
9 Select the wye, click the value for the 45 degree leg, enter 100 to change its size, and press Enter.
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Create a Section view to complete the stack connections
10 Expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, double-click 2 - Plumbing,
and zoom in on the sanitary outlet.
11 On the View tab on the Design Bar, click Section, draw a section to the right of the sanitary
outlet as shown, and click Modify.
12 Double-click the section view symbol in the drawing area to open the new section view.
13 On the View Control Bar, for Detail Level, specify Fine.
14 Zoom in, and select the reducing wye fitting.
15 On the Options Bar, enter -750 for Offset, and press Enter.
This places the wye at a level that will allow creating a routing solution that will not change
the slope of the main segment.
16 Right-click the connector on the 45 degree leg, click Draw Pipe, press Space so that the pipe
assumes the size and elevation of the fitting, and draw the pipe in line with 45 degree leg and
when the center line for the main segment displays, click to specify the end of the pipe.
Refining the Sanitary Stack | 371
NOTE There is a known issue when connecting piping to the reducing tee. The fitting moves toward
the pipe being added after the pipe is drawn. The exact position of the riser is not critical in this
application. However, when the location is critical, it will be necessary to move the piping after making
the connection.
17 Click Modify.
This adds a short segment of pipe (from the wye).
18 While pressing Ctrl, select the short pipe segment and the main pipe, and on the Options Bar,
click Routing Solutions.
19 On the Options Bar, select solution 3 of 3, and click Finish to create piping for that solution.
20 Select the bend created by the routing solution tool, and in the Type Selector select M_Pipe
Bend - DWV - Glued : Standard.
21 Right-click the open connector on the reducing wye, click Draw Pipe, and in the Type Selector,
select Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary Vent.
22 Move the cursor up and press Space to assume the size and elevation of the fitting, then enter
1200 and press Enter to add a 1200 mm vertical vent pipe.
23 Click Modify.
24 Check slope and connectivity as described previously.
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25 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
26 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
27 Proceed to the next exercise, Refining the Urinal Lines on page 373 to continue creating the
plumbing system.
Refining the Urinal Lines
The waste piping from the urinal extends down through floor directly beneath the urinals before connecting
to the sanitary main piping. In this exercise you change the routing for the waste piping from the urinals,
running it inside the wall, then down to connect with the sanitary main.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Refining Urinal Waste Lines.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click 2 -
Plumbing to make it the active view.
2 Zoom in on the piping behind the urinals, and draw a left-to-right pick box around the piping
above the urinals as shown. (If necessary, use the Filter tool to select only piping and fittings.)
Refining the Urinal Lines | 373
3 Press Delete.
4 Select the pipe connected to the wye above the leftmost toilet, click the connector snap, and
drag it to the right to a point midway between the toilet and urinal.
The next 4 steps draw a series of pipe segments, starting at the level of the original pipe, then
placing a vertical segment and continuing the run at 150, and finally connecting to the sanitary
drain on the left urinal.
5 Right-click the connector at the open end of the shortened pipe, click Draw Pipe, press the Space
so that the pipe assumes the size and elevation of the existing pipe.
6 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary is selected in the Type Selector
■ For D, specify 50 mm
■ Click (Auto Connect)
■ For slope, specify 1.00
7 Drag the preview to the left approximately 200 mm, and click to specify the end of the pipe.
8 On the Options Bar, for Offset, enter 150 and press Tab.
9 Continue drawing the pipe run to the left, and when the snap for the center line of the leftmost
urinal displays, click to specify the end of the pipe.
10 Click Modify.
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11 Select the leftmost urinal, and on the Options Bar, click (Connect Into).
12 In the Select Connector dialog, click Connector 2 : Sanitrary Round : 50mm Out, and click OK.
13 In the drawing area, click the pipe above the urinal.
14 Using the same method, connect the remaining urinals to the sanitary main.
15 Draw a pick box around the 3 urinals and the horizontal 50 mm piping just added as shown,
and on the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection). Do not include the riser and fitting.
16 In the Filter dialog, clear Plumbing Fixtures and click OK.
17 On the Routing Modify toolbar, click (Slope).
18 On the Options Bar, verify that 1.00 for Slope, and click Finish.
Refining the Urinal Lines | 375
The slope is applied to the selected piping.
19 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ 3D Views, double-click 3D- Plumbing
to make it the active view, and check the slope and connectivity as described previously.
Resize pipes
20 In the Project Browser, double-click 2 - Plumbing to make it the active view.
21 Zoom in on the piping above the urinals, and draw a left-to-right pick box around only the
main piping (including the short 100 mm segment) as shown.
22 On the Options Bar, specify 80 mm for D (diameter).
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In the next steps you will change the elbow behind the left urinal to a tee to create the cleanout.
However, you cannot upgrade an elbow to a tee unless all of the connections are the same size.
So, first you must temporarily resize the pipe to the urinal.
Add a cleanout
23 Select the pipe between the 80 mm elbow and the left urinal, and on the Options Bar, specify
80 mm for D (diameter).
24 Select the elbow, and click the + control on the left to add a leg for the cleanout.
25 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe Fitting, and in the Type Selector, select M_Pipe
Plug - PVC : Standard.
26 Move the cursor over the open connector on the sanitary tee above the leftmost urinal, and
when the extension snap displays, click to place the plug on the tee.
27 Select the pipe to the urinal again, and on the Options Bar, specify 50 mm for D.
Redefine fittings
28 Select the 3 sanitary tees behind the urinals, and in the Type Selector, verify that M_Pipe Reducing
Short Tee - Sanitary - Glued : Standard is selected.
29 Select the 50 pipes connecting the urinal drains to the main, and on the Options Bar, for D,
select 80 mm, then select 50 mm.
This eliminates the need for transitions between the pipes and the tees.
30 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ 3D Views, double-click 3D- Plumbing
to make it the active view.
31 Click View menu ➤ Orient ➤ North, and zoom in on the area between the toilet and the leftmost
urinal.
32 Select the vertical pipe segment between the toilets and the urinals, and drag it to a point midway
between the 2 sanitary tees.
Refining the Urinal Lines | 377
This will provide the space required to change the short elbows to the DWV Bends that allow
better sanitary waste flow.
33 Click View menu ➤ Orient ➤ Northeast, and zoom in on the area between the toilet and the
leftmost urinal.
34 Select the elbows at each end of the vertical pipe, and select M_Pipe Bend - DVW - Glued :
Standard.
35 Check slope and connectivity as described previously.
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36 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
37 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
38 Proceed to the next exercise, Adding Vents to the System on page 379 to continue creating the
plumbing system.
Adding Vents to the System
In this exercise you finish the work on the sanitary system, adding the vent piping at several points in the
waste piping.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Creating Sanitary Vent Piping.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Plumbing ➤ 3D Views and double-click 3D Plumbing to view
the piping just added.
If necessary, clear unwanted components from the 3D view using the Visibility/Graphic Overrides
dialog as described previously.
2 Click View menu ➤ Orient ➤ Northeast, and zoom in on the area between the toilets and the
urinals.
3 Select the elbow at the upper end of the vertical pipe segment, and click the + control above it
to change the fitting to a tee.
4 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe, and in the Type Selector, select Pipe Types
: PVC Sanitary Vent.
5 Click the connector at the upper end of the tee to specify the start of the pipe.
6 On the Options Bar, specify 50 mm for D (diameter), and specify 4000 for Offset, specify 0.00
for Slope Angle.
Adding Vents to the System | 379
NOTE You must press Tab or move the cursor into the drawing area for the new offset value to be
recognized.
7 Click Apply.
8 Click Modify.
Apply a filter to the vent piping
9 Enter the keyboard shortcut, VG (Visibility/Graphics).
10 On the Filters tab in the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, do the following:
a Click Edit/New.
b In the Filters dialog, select Sanitary from the Filters list, and click (Duplicate).
c Right-click Sanitary 1, click Rename, rename the filter Sanitary Vent, and click OK.
d Under the Filter Rules, specify Filter by as System Type ➤ contains ➤ Sanitary Vent, and
click OK.
e In the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, click Add.
f In the Add Filters dialog, select Sanitary Vent, and click OK.
g For Sanitary Vent, click the Lines column, and click Override.
h In the Line Graphics dialog, click the Color button, and in the Color dialog, select
(green), and click OK.
i In the Line Graphics dialog, for Pattern, select IMPORT-DASHED (2)
j Click OK twice.
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Vent piping throughout the plan appear as dashed green lines.
Create additional vents
11 Double-click Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans ➤ 2 - Plumbing to make it the active view, and zoom in
to view the urinals and toilets.
12 On the View tab on the Design Bar, click Section, and place a section above the urinals and
toilets as shown.
13 Double-click the section symbol to open the section view, and enter the keyboard shortcut VG.
14 In the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, clear unwanted architectural components from the
view as described previously.
15 On the View Control Bar, for Detail Level, specify Fine, and for Model Graphics Style, specify
Wireframe.
16 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe, and verify that Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary
Vent is selected in the Type Selector.
17 On the Options Bar, verify the (Auto Connect) is selected, and enter for slope.
18 Click a point midway between the tees connecting the first toilet and floor drain to specify the
start of the pipe.
Adding Vents to the System | 381
19 Begin drawing the vertical pipe, and on the Options Bar, specify 50 mm for D (diameter).
20 At a point above the toilets, click to specify the end of the first pipe section, then drag the
preview to the right and when the center snap for the previously created vent displays, click to
make the connection to the vent as shown.
21 Click Modify.
The vent is automatically created and connected with the earlier vent pipe.
22 Right-click the new horizontal pipe, and click Element Properties.
23 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, for Offset, enter 2800 to specify
the elevation for the reference end of the pipe, and click OK.
24 Select the tee that was inserted when you connected the vents, and click the + control to update
the tee to a cross.
25 Place another vent between the two rightmost urinals:
a Click the midpoint of the pipe between the urinals.
b Begin the vertical pipe.
c For D, specify 50 mm.
d When the snap for the center line for the cross displays, draw the pipe to the left to the
open leg of the cross.
e If necessary, press Tab to display the connector, and click to make the connection.
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f Click Modify.
26 Double-click 3D - Plumbing to make it the active view.
27 If either of the tees that were added need to be reoriented according to the slope of the piping,
use the Flip control to make the adjustment.
Adding Vents to the System | 383
Add a vent to the sinks
28 Click View menu ➤ Orient ➤ Southeast, and zoom in on the area of the double wye behind the
sinks.
29 Select the elbow above the double wye for the drain section to the middle sink, and click the +
control above the elbow to change it to a tee.
30 While pressing Ctrl, select the tee and the short pipe segment that connects it to the double wye,
and on the Options Bar, specify 50 mm for D (diameter).
31 Right-click the tee, click Draw Pipe, verify that Pipe Types : PVC Sanitary Vent is selected in the
Type Selector, and begin drawing a vertical vent pipe.
32 On the Options Bar, specify 50 mm for D (diameter), and specify 2800 for Offset, move the
cursor into the drawing area, then click Apply.
33 Click Modify.
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34 Zoom out to view the vents from the toilets and urinals and the new vent from the sinks.
35 Select the vent, right-click the connector at the open end, click Draw Pipe, and press the Space
Bar so that the pipe assumes the size and elevation of the vent pipe.
36 On the Options Bar specify 0.00 for slope.
37 Drag the pipe preview, while maintaining a 90 degree angle, toward the horizontal vent segment
between the toilets and urinals, and click the snap at the horizontal vent pipe to specify the
endpoint for the pipe.
A tee is automatically inserted at the joint.
38 Select the horizontal vent pipe, and on the Routing Modify toolbar, click (Slope).
39 Enter 1.00 for slope, and click Finish.
Adding Vents to the System | 385
40 Highlight any component in the system and press Tab 3 times to check the connectivity of the
system as described previously.
41 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
42 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
43 Proceed to the next exercise, Create the Cold Water System on page 386 to continue creating the
plumbing system.
Create the Cold Water System
In this exercise you create the cold water system and add piping to connect all of the fixtures in the men’s
room to the system.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Creating Cold Water Piping.rvt.
Create new pipe types and specify default pipe fittings
1 In the Project Browser, expand Families ➤ Pipes ➤ Pipe Types, right-click Standard, and click
Duplicate.
2 Right-click Standard 1, click Properties.
3 In the Type Properties dialog, click Rename.
4 In the Rename dialog, for New, enter Cold Water, and click OK.
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5 In the Type Properties dialog, in the Type Parameters under Mechanical, verify that the following
default fittings are specified:
■ For Elbow, specify M_Pipe Elbow : Standard
■ For Preferred Junction Type, specify Tee
■ For Tee, specify M_Pipe Tee: Standard
■ For Tap, specify None
■ For Cross, specify M_Pipe Cross: Standard
■ For Transition, specify M_Pipe Transition : Standard
■ For Union, specify M_Pipe Straight Coupling: Standard
6 Click Apply, then click Duplicate, and in the Name dialog, for Name, enter Hot Water, and click
OK twice.
The default fittings for the hot water pipe are the same as those specified for the cold water pipe.
Specify Mechanical Settings for the cold and hot water systems
7 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Mechanical Settings.
8 In the left pane of the Mechanical Settings dialog, expand Pipe Settings ➤ Conversion, click
Main, and in the right pane, select Domestic Cold Water from the System Type list.
9 In the table, specify Pipe Types : Cold Water for Pipe Type and 2700 for Offset.
10 In the left pane, click Branch, in the right pane, select Domestic Cold Water from the System
Type list, and specify Pipe Types : Cold Water for Pipe Type and 2700 for Offset.
11 In the left pane, click Main, and in the right pane, select Domestic Hot Water from the System
Type list.
12 In the table, specify Pipe Types : Hot Water for Pipe Type and 2650 for Offset.
13 In the left panel, click Branch, in the right pane, select Domestic Hot Water from the System
Type list, and specify Pipe Types : Hot Water for Pipe Type and 2650 for Offset.
You now have the cold water piping at 2700 and the hot water piping at 2650, which places
the piping above the ceiling, and avoids potential obstructions and conflicts between systems.
14 Click OK.
Create the cold water system
15 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click
2 - Plumbing to make it the active view.
16 Press F9 to open the System Browser, click the title bar for the browser and dock it by dragging
it to the bottom of the drawing area.
17 Right-click a table heading in the system browser, click View ➤ Piping.
18 Draw a left-to-right pick box around all of the plumbing fixtures in the men’s room, and on the
Options Bar click (Filter Selection).
19 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, then select Plumbing Fixtures, and click OK.
20 While pressing Shift, click the floor drain.
The floor drain has neither a hot or cold water connector, and as long as there is a fixture without
a common connector type, the Options Bar will not have active tools for creating a system.
21 On the Options Bar, click (Create Domestic Cold Water System).
Create the Cold Water System | 387
The Domestic Cold Water folder is added in the system browser and all of the fixtures have been
added to the Domestic Cold Water 1 system.
Create piping for the cold water system
22 Zoom in on the area below the sinks.
23 On the Plumbing tab on the Design Bar, click Pipe, and in the Type Selector, select Pipe Types
: Cold Water.
24 On the Option Bar, specify 0.00 for Slope.
25 Move the cursor over the cold water connector on the leftmost sink, click to specify the starting
point for the pipe, and press the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes the size and elevation of the
connector.
26 On the Options Bar, specify 750 for Offset, click a point between the sink and the wall to specify
the endpoint for the pipe.
27 Drag the preview to the right until the snap for the cold water connector for the rightmost sink
displays, and click to specify the end the segment.
28 Move the preview up to the cold water connector on the sink, and click to end the run as shown.
29 Click Modify.
30 Enter the keyboard shortcut VG.
31 In the Visibility/Graphic dialog, click Show categories from all disciplines, clear Casework, and
click OK.
32 Select the middle sink in the view, and on the Options Bar, click (Connect Into).
33 In the Select Connector dialog, select the domestic cold water connector, click OK, and click
the cold water pipe behind the sinks.
Piping is added to connect the sink to the cold water system.
34 Zoom in on the area between the middle and rightmost sink.
35 On the Plumbing tab, click Pipe.
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36 Move the cursor over the cold water pipe at a point between the sinks.
37 Click to specify the starting point for the pipe as shown, drag the preview into the center of the
wall behind the sinks, press Tab to avoid connecting to the sanitary piping, and click to end
that segment.
38 On the Options Bar, specify 2700 for Offset, drag the preview up and into the mechanical room
above the men’s room, and click to specify an endpoint for the pipe.
39 Click Modify.
40 Zoom in on the area between the toilets, and verify that the cold water pipe is not obstructed
by the vertical vent. (If necessary, select the cold water pipe, and use the keyboard left arrow to
move the pipe to the left.)
41 On the Plumbing tab, click Pipe.
42 Move the cursor over a point on the cold water pipe in the chase, just above the wall, click the
snap on the cold water pipe, and press the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes the size and
elevation of the existing pipe.
43 Drag the preview to the left, and at a point near the vent that rises between the toilets and
urinals, click to specify the end of the pipe.
44 On the Options Bar, specify 356 for Offset, press Tab, and click Apply.
Create the Cold Water System | 389
45 Click Modify.
46 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ 3D Views, double-click 3D- Plumbing,
and click View menu ➤ Orient ➤ Northeast.
47 Zoom in on the area behind the toilets, select the rightmost toilet.
48 On the Options Bar click (Connect Into), and then click the vertical cold water pipe.
Piping is automatically created between the vertical pipe and the toilet cold water connector.
49 Select the elbow behind the toilet, and click the + control to change it to a tee.
50 On the Plumbing tab, click Pipe.
51 Select the tee, right-click the open connector, click Draw Pipe, and press the Space Bar so that
the pipe assumes the size and elevation of the fixture.
52 Drag the preview to the left while maintaining the same angle, and when the center line for
the left toilet displays, click to specify the endpoint as shown.
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53 Click Modify.
54 Select the leftmost toilet, and on the Options Bar click , and click the horizontal cold
water pipe that you added to the tee.
Piping is automatically created between the vertical pipe and the toilet cold water connector.
55 Select the rightmost urinal, and on the Options Bar click , and click the vertical cold water
pipe.
Piping is automatically created between the vertical pipe and the toilet cold water connector.
56 Use the same method, connect the remaining urinals to the horizontal cold water pipe.
Create the Cold Water System | 391
All of the cold water piping is in place. The final steps in this exercise adjust the size of several
sections of the piping.
Adjust cold water pipe sizes
57 Use the View Cube in the upper-right corner of the view to spin the 3D - Plumbing view as
shown.
58 Select the main cold water piping from the mechanical room, the tee, and the horizontal segment
to the sinks, as shown.
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59 On the Options Bar, specify 50 mm for D (diameter).
60 Select the cold water branch piping from the main, feeding the toilets and urinals (including
the tees, but leaving the branch to the urinals as is), as shown.
61 On the Options Bar, specify 40 mm for D (diameter).
62 Spin the 3D Plumbing view as needed to see the piping behind the sinks.
63 Select the main and branch pipe segments as shown (including the tee behind the middle sink).
Create the Cold Water System | 393
64 On the Options Bar, specify 20 mm for D (diameter).
65 Highlight a segment of cold water pipe in the system and press Tab to check the connectivity
of the system as described previously.
66 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
67 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
68 Proceed to the next exercise, Create the Hot Water System on page 394.
Create the Hot Water System
In this exercise you add a water heater, create the hot water system, and add piping to connect the sinks in
the men’s room to the system.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Plumbing ➤ m Creating Hot Water Piping.rvt.
Create the hot water system
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, double-click 2 - Plumbing,
and zoom in on the sinks.
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2 Press F9 to open the System Browser, click the title bar for the browser, and dock it by dragging
it to the bottom of the drawing area.
3 Right-click a table heading in the System Browser, and click View ➤ Piping.
4 Draw a left-to-right pick box around the 3 sinks in the men’s room, and on the Options Bar,
click (Filter Selection).
5 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Plumbing Fixtures, and click OK.
6 On the Options Bar, click (Create Domestic Hot Water System).
The Domestic Hot Water folder is added in the system browser and all of the fixtures have been
added to the Domestic Hot Water 1 system.
Add a water heater to the hot and cold water systems
7 Click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load Family.
8 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
9 Expand Metric ➤ Plumbing.
10 Double-click M_Water Heater.rfa.
11 Zoom in on the mechanical room above the men’s room.
12 On the Mechanical tab on the Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment, and in the Type Selector,
select M_Water Heater :152L.
13 Move the water heater preview into the mechanical room, to the left of the main cold water
pipe, press the Space Bar 3 times to orient the water heater with the electrical connections to
the left, and click to place the water heater as shown.
14 In the System Browser, expand Domestic Hot Water, right-click Domestic Hot Water 1, and click
Select.
15 On the Options Bar, click (Edit System).
The Edit System toolbar is activated.
16 On the Edit System toolbar, click (Add to System), click the water heater, and on the Edit
System toolbar, click Finish.
17 In the System Browser, expand Domestic Cold Water, right-click Domestic Cold Water 1, and
click Select.
Create the Hot Water System | 395
18 On the Options Bar, click (Edit System).
19 Using the same method, add the water heater to the cold water system.
20 Select the water heater in the view, and on the Options Bar, click (Connect Into).
21 In the Select Connector dialog, select the domestic cold water connector, click OK, and click
the main cold water pipe.
A segment of pipe is added connecting the water heater to the cold water system.
22 Select the open end of the main cold water pipe, right-click the connector, click Draw Pipe, and
add 2 segments extending the main cold water piping into the chase.
23 On the Plumbing tab, click Pipe, and in the Type Selector, select Pipe Types : Hot Water.
24 Move the cursor over the water heater, click when the hot water connector displays, and press
the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes the size and elevation of the connector.
25 On the Options Bar, specify 2650 for Offset.
26 Specify an end point for the pipe between the water heater and the cold water pipe to the right,
and then drag the pipe preview down to a point to the right and just above the middle sink.
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27 Click Modify.
28 On the Plumbing tab, click Pipe, and in the Type Selector, select Pipe Types : Hot Water.
29 Move the cursor over the hot water connector on the leftmost sink, click to specify the starting
point for the pipe, and press the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes the size and elevation of the
connector.
30 On the Options Bar, specify 800 for Offset.
31 Click a point between the cold water piping and the wall to specify the endpoint for the pipe,
drag the preview to the right until the snap below the hot water connector for the rightmost
sink displays, and click to specify the end of the segment.
32 Move the preview up to the hot water connector on the sink and click to end the run as shown.
33 Click Modify.
Create the Hot Water System | 397
34 Select the middle sink in the view, and on the Options Bar, click (Connect Into), and
click the hot water pipe below the sinks.
In this case, the Select Connector dialog was not displayed because the only possible connection
was to the hot water system.
35 Select the hot water piping from the water heater.
36 Right-click the open connector, click Draw Pipe, and press the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes
the size and elevation of the connector.
37 Drag the preview down into the center of the wall below the sinks, and click to end that segment.
38 On the Options Bar, specify 800 for Offset, click Apply.
39 Click Modify.
40 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ 3D Views, double-click 3D- Plumbing,
click View menu ➤ Orient ➤ Southeast, and zoom in on the area behind the sinks.
41 On the Plumbing tab, click Pipe, click the connector at the open end of the vertical hot water
pipe, press the Space Bar so that the pipe assumes the size and elevation of the connector.
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42 While maintaining a 90 degree angle, drag the preview to the piping connecting the hot water
connectors for the sinks, and click.
43 Click Modify.
44 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Plumbing ➤ Floor Plans, double-click 2 - Plumbing.
45 Highlight a fixture in the view, press Tab 3 times to check connectivity as described previously.
46 You can save the open file if you wish.
47 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
This concludes the tutorial for plumbing systems.
Create the Hot Water System | 399
400
Fire Protection Systems
In this tutorial, you create a wet and dry fire protection system using a linked architectural model of a building project.
As you create the systems, you follow a series of exercises that teach the recommended systems design workflow for Revit
MEP 2009. By following the recommended workflow, you learn the best practices for designing systems with Revit MEP.
The goal of this tutorial is to teach you to create a fire protection system using Revit MEP 2009. At the end of this tutorial,
you will understand the process, methodology, and specific techniques for designing fire protection systems.
NOTE All exercises in this tutorial are designed to be completed sequentially; each exercise is dependent on the
completion of the previous exercise. After finishing each exercise, you can choose to save your work. However, it is
highly recommended that you always begin an exercise by opening the provided dataset. This dataset includes the
work from the previous exercise(s) and ensures a seamless training session. The datasets that you use to complete
this tutorial are located in the Training Files ➤ Metric directory. You can search this directory to verify that the
datasets have been downloaded. If the tutorial datasets are not present, go to
http://www.autodesk.com/revitmep-documentation and download them.
Designing Fire Protection Systems
The most common method of designing systems in Revit MEP is to work within a linked architectural
building model. In this tutorial, you will use a project file that has already been linked to an architectural
model, with Space components placed in the areas throughout the model. To learn more about linking and
preparing an architectural model, see Planning Mechanical Systems in the Mechanical Systems tutorial.
NOTE The architectural model used with this tutorial is in the Architectural folder. You should maintain the relative
path to the architectural model. However, if the link is lost, you can click File menu ➤ Manage Links to reload the
linked model. On the Revit tab on the Manage Links dialog, click Reload From, navigate to Training
Files ➤ Metric ➤ Fire Protection ➤ Metric_Arch_Model, and select m Office Building.rvt.
In this lesson, you will create both wet and dry fire protection systems for the second floor of an office
building. You begin each fire protection system design by placing sprinklers in the rooms. Then, you create
a system to logically connect the sprinklers, and finally, you create piping to physically connect the sprinklers.
During the fire protection design process, you create views and pipe types, manually modify the pipes and
fittings, insert fittings, create schedules, and size and tag the pipes.
8
401
Starting the Fire Protection Project
In this exercise, you begin work on the project that contains both the wet and dry fire protection systems.
You create new pipe types, and then you configure conversion settings that you will use when you create
piping to physically connect the sprinklers. You will also check a Space Schedule that you can use to assess
the coverage for the fire protection systems.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Starting the Fire Protection Project.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection ➤ folder.
Create new pipe types
1 In the Project Browser, expand Families ➤ Pipes ➤ Pipe Types.
2 Right-click Standard, and click Duplicate.
A copy is made of the Standard pipe type.
3 Right-click the copy, and click Properties.
4 In the Element Properties dialog, click Rename.
5 In the Rename dialog, for New, enter Fire Protection Wet, and click OK.
The new pipe type is created based on the Standard pipe type. Next, you modify the pipe type
properties.
6 In the Type Properties dialog, under Mechanical, for Material, select Carbon Steel.
Next, you create another pipe type based on the new pipe type that you created.
7 With the Type Properties dialog open, click Duplicate, and enter Fire Protection Dry for the new
pipe type name, and click OK.
Notice that the new dry pipe type inherits the same type properties from the wet pipe type,
including the new material property.
8 Click OK twice to create the new wet and dry pipe types.
9 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Types : Fire Protection Wet and Pipe Types : Fire Protection
Dry are listed.
Next, you need to configure the pipe conversion settings.
Configure pipe conversion settings
10 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click Mechanical Settings.
NOTE If the Fire Protection tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and
click Fire Protection.
You can also click Settings menu ➤ Mechanical Settings.
11 In the left pane of the Mechanical Settings dialog, under Pipe Settings ➤ Conversion, select
Main.
12 For System Type, select Fire Protection Wet.
The conversion settings for the Fire Protection Wet system type display.
13 Under System Type, do the following:
■ For Pipe Type, select Pipe Types : Fire Protection Wet.
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■ For Offset, verify that 2800 is selected.
This offset elevation places the pipe main at 2800 mm above the referenced level for the
views. Level 2 is the referenced level for the views where you will be designing. So, the pipe
main will be offset from level 2. You now specify the conversion settings for the pipe branches.
14 In the left pane of the Mechanical Settings dialog, select Branch.
15 For System Type, select Fire Protection Wet.
16 Under System Type, do the following:
■ For Pipe Type, select Pipe Types : Fire Protection Wet.
■ For Offset, verify that 2800 is specified.
This offset elevation places the pipe branches at 2800 mm above the referenced level for the
views.
IMPORTANT The branch offset allows you to automatically create branches that run above or below
the main and other obstacles. This is useful for avoiding interference with pipes, duct, structural
beams, or architectural components.
17 Using the same method, for System Type Fire Protection Dry, for Offset verify 2800, and specify
Pipe Types : Fire Protection Dry for the Main and Branch piping.
18 Click OK.
NOTE Conversion settings are applied when you convert the pipe layout path to physical piping.
You can configure the Conversion settings at the beginning or during your project. However, you
should configure or verify the Conversion settings before you convert a layout path. Configuring the
Conversion settings is usually a one-time process unless you need to change them during your project.
You can also configure these settings by clicking Settings on the Options Bar when the Layout Path
tool is open.
Create a Space Schedule
19 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click Schedule/Quantities.
20 In the New Schedule dialog, do the following:
■ Under Category, select Spaces.
Notice that the schedule name and the phase are automatically added.
■ Verify that Schedule building components is selected.
■ Click OK.
Define columns
21 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, under Available fields, select Area, and click
Add.
This adds the Area field to the list of scheduled fields to include in the schedule. Scheduled fields
display as columns in the schedule.
22 While pressing Ctrl, select the following fields from the Available fields list:
■ Level
■ Name
■ Number
23 Click Add to add the fields to the Scheduled fields list.
To remove a field, select it, and click Remove.
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24 Select a field, and use the Move Up and Move Down buttons to arrange the Scheduled fields list
as follows:
■ Number
■ Name
■ Level
■ Area
Next, you create a calculated value parameter to indicate the minimum number of sprinklers
required for each space. This information is based on the project specification and the fire
protection codes.
Create a calculated value parameter
25 Click Calculated Value.
26 In the Calculated Value dialog, do the following:
■ For Name, enter Minimum Sprinklers.
■ Verify that Formula is selected.
■ For Discipline, verify that Common is selected.
■ For Type, verify that Number is selected.
■ For Formula, enter Area/12.1.
The fire protection code requires one sprinkler for every 12.1 square meters.
NOTE Formulas are case sensitive.
27 Click OK.
The Minimum Sprinklers calculated value is added to the scheduled fields (at the bottom of the
list). This calculated value parameter allows you to immediately determine what spaces meet
the sprinkler design and code requirements.
Organize the data
28 On the Filter tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, do the following:
■ For Filter by, select Level.
■ Verify that equals is selected.
■ Under Level, select Level 2.
■ For And, verify that (none) is selected.
29 On the Sorting/Grouping tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, do the following:
■ For Sort by, select Number.
■ Verify that Ascending is selected.
■ For Then by, verify that (none) is selected.
■ Verify that Grand totals is cleared and Itemize every instance is selected.
30 On the Formatting tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, do the following:
■ Under Fields, select Minimum Sprinklers.
■ For Field formatting, click Field Format.
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31 In the Format dialog, do the following:
■ Clear Use default settings.
■ For Units, select Fixed.
■ For Rounding, select 2 decimal places.
■ Click OK twice.
A new view called Space Schedule opens and is located under Schedules/Quantities in the Project
Browser. Notice that only the data for the level 2 spaces displays, sorted according to space
number. You can refer to the minimum number of sprinklers per space data as you place sprinklers
in order to satisfy the design and code requirements. Although you rounded the data to 2 decimal
places, you will want to round all decimals up to the next whole number.
IMPORTANT A schedule in Revit MEP is not only a construction document but also a design tool.
When you change editable entries in the schedule to modify your system, you are actually editing
information in a database of building information. As a result, each change is dynamic and immediately
propagates throughout your project. This digital database information source is the central concept
of Building Information Modeling (BIM).
Next, you place the wet system sprinklers in the level 2 spaces.
32 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
33 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
34 Proceed to the next exercise, Placing Sprinklers on page 406.
In this exercise, you created new views and modified view properties. You then created 2 new pipe types for
the wet and dry fire protection systems and modified their type properties. The conversion settings for both
wet and dry fire protection systems were also configured. Finally, you created a Space Schedule for fire
protection systems. In the next exercise, you place the wet system sprinklers.
Starting the Fire Protection Project | 405
Placing Sprinklers
In this exercise, you place the fire protection wet system sprinklers in the ceilings of the spaces on level 2.
You will use the schedule that you created in the previous exercise to identify the required number of
sprinklers per room. As you place the sprinklers, you will learn various methods to quickly and precisely
place sprinklers into the ceiling plan.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Placing Sprinklers.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection ➤ folder.
Place a sprinkler
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Fire Protection ➤ Ceiling
Plans, and double-click 2 - Ceiling Fire Prot to make it the active view.
2 Enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around Office 201 (located in the upper-left corner of the
building).
After placing the initial sprinkler, you copy and array sprinklers referencing the intersection of
ceiling grids. This action aligns sprinklers so that the piping layout is more efficient.
IMPORTANT The alignment of sprinklers is critical and will affect the conversion or a layout path to
physical piping in later exercises. Sprinklers should either be aligned to each other or sufficiently
separated to allow space for fittings. When there is a small misalignment, the layout path feature will
attempt to create separate piping paths to the sprinklers. When this happens, there is insufficient
space between the 2 branches to place fittings and the conversion will fail.
3 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click Sprinkler.
4 In the Type Selector, select M_Sprinkler-Pendent-Hosted : 15mm Pendent.
5 On the Options Bar, click (Place on Face) to place the sprinkler on the ceiling tile face.
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6 With the view zoomed, place the cursor over the approximate center of the ceiling tile as shown,
and click to place the sprinkler.
7 Click Modify on the Design Bar.
You copy this sprinkler to place the other sprinklers.
Continue placing sprinklers
8 In the drawing area, select the sprinkler that you placed.
The selected sprinkler displays in red.
9 On the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
Notice that a border displays to indicate the copy selection. Also the cursor changes indicating
that the Copy tool is open.
TIP Using the Copy tool is a 2-click process. First specify the start point on the element that you want
to copy and then specify the end point (or destination). You can also enter CO to activate the Copy
tool.
10 On the Options Bar, verify that Constrain and Multiple are cleared, and that Copy is selected.
11 Select the upper-left corner of the ceiling grid, and after the intersection snap displays, click to
specify the copy start point.
Placing Sprinklers | 407
12 Move the cursor diagonally to the lower-right as shown, and after the intersection snap displays,
click to specify the copy end point.
The copy selection border follows the cursor, and listening dimensions display to aid in
placement.
TIP If you have difficulty displaying an intersection snap because of other snaps interfering, you can
enter SI to override all other snaps and display only intersection snaps. Note that snap overrides
deactivate after you make a selection. You can also deactivate snaps in the Snaps dialog (click Settings
menu ➤ Snaps).
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A copy of the sprinkler is immediately placed after you specify the end point. Next, you copy
and array sprinklers in Office 202.
Copy and array sprinklers
13 Zoom out to view the region around Office 201 and Office 202 (Office 202 is located immediately
below Office 201).
14 Select the lower-right sprinkler in Office 201.
15 On the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
16 On the Options Bar, verify Constrain is cleared, Copy is selected, and select Multiple.
This allows you to place multiple copies of an object without reactivating the Copy tool after
each placement.
17 In Office 201, place the cursor over the upper-left ceiling grid intersection immediately above
the sprinkler that you selected, and after the intersection snap displays, click to specify the copy
start point.
Placing Sprinklers | 409
18 Move the cursor down and to the right into Office 202, and after the intersection snap displays,
click to specify the copy end point for the first sprinkler.
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19 Move the cursor directly down, and after the intersection snap displays, click to specify the copy
end point for the second sprinkler.
Placing Sprinklers | 411
The sprinklers are placed.
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20 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Next, you array the other Office 202 sprinklers. Rather than copy and place the rest of the
sprinklers, you can use the Array tool to finish the job. Furthermore, because all of the sprinklers
in Office 202 are equally spaced, it is an ideal situation to use an array.
21 While pressing CTRL, select the 2 sprinklers that you placed in Office 202.
22 On the Edit toolbar, click (Array).
A border displays around the 2 sprinklers.
TIP You can also enter AR to activate the Array tool.
23 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Linear) is selected for a linear array.
■ Clear Group And Associate.
■ Verify that 2 is specified for Number (of arrays).
■ For Move To, select Last.
■ Verify that Constrain is cleared.
Placing Sprinklers | 413
NOTE Similar to the Move or Copy tool, creating an array is a 2-step process. You first specify an
array start point, then you move the cursor to the second or last location (if you have more than 2
arrays), to specify array end point.
24 Move the cursor over the upper-left ceiling grid intersection directly above the upper Office 202
sprinkler, and after the intersection snap displays, click to specify the array start point.
25 Move the cursor to the left along the same horizontal ceiling grid, and after the intersection
snap displays, click to specify the array end point as shown.
An outline follows the cursor to aid in placement.
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The Office 202 sprinklers are placed.
Placing Sprinklers | 415
Next, you place sprinklers in Office 203.
26 Zoom out to view all 3 offices along the left wall.
27 While pressing Ctrl, select both sprinklers in the corner office (Office 201).
28 On the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
A border displays around the selected sprinklers indicating the copy selection.
29 On the Options Bar, clear Multiple.
30 Place the cursor in the center of the selection border, and after the mid point snap displays,
click to specify the copy start point.
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31 Move the cursor directly down along the same vertical ceiling grid and into the center of Office
203, and after the mid point snap displays, click to specify the copy end point.
Placing Sprinklers | 417
NOTE If you have difficulty locating the mid point snap, enter SM to override all other snaps and
display only mid point snaps.
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You have now placed the sprinklers for 3 offices. Next, you place sprinklers in the large common
space, Open 204.
32 Click Modify.
Create multiple sprinkler arrays
33 Zoom in to view Office 203 and part of the adjacent common area, Open 204.
34 Select the lower-right Office 203 sprinkler.
You copy this sprinkler to Open 204 and use it to create a sprinkler array.
35 On the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
36 On the Options Bar, verify that Multiple is cleared.
37 Specify the copy start point at the upper-left ceiling grid intersection directly above the sprinkler.
Placing Sprinklers | 419
38 Move the cursor to the right into Open 204 as shown, and after the intersection snap displays,
click to place the sprinkler.
The Office 203 sprinkler is copied to Open 204.
39 Click Modify.
Next, you array this sprinkler to place multiple sprinklers in the lower section of Open 204. You
could copy sprinklers, but creating an array is quicker.
40 Select the sprinkler that you copied.
41 On the Edit toolbar, click (Array).
42 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Linear) is selected for a linear array.
■ Verify that Group And Associate is cleared.
■ For Number, enter 6 for the number of arrays.
■ For Move To, select 2nd.
■ Verify that Constrain is cleared.
43 Specify the ceiling grid intersection to the upper-right of the sprinkler as the array start point.
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44 Move the cursor along the same horizontal ceiling grid to the right, and after the intersection
snap displays, click to specify the array end point as shown.
The array is created. Zoom out to display the array.
Placing Sprinklers | 421
IMPORTANT When specifying array start and end points make certain that the array is placed
accurately. Any misplacement has a multiplier effect as the array propagates. If you make a mistake
placing the array, undo the step and try again.
Next, you create multiple arrays based on this array.
45 While pressing CTRL, select all the sprinklers except for the far left sprinkler in the Open 204
space.
46 On the Edit toolbar, click (Array).
47 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Linear) is selected for a linear array.
■ Verify that Group And Associate is cleared.
■ For Number, enter 4 for number of arrays.
■ For Move To, verify that 2nd is selected.
■ Verify that Constrain is cleared.
48 Specify the array start point at the ceiling grid intersection directly to the upper-left of the left
sprinkler as shown.
49 Move the cursor directly down along the same vertical ceiling grid, and after the intersection
snap displays, click to specify end point for the second array.
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The arrays are created, and an error message displays informing you that 3 sprinklers do not lie
on the host face (ceiling tiles). Notice that 3 sprinklers are located outside of the building. You
need to remove these sprinklers to resolve the errors.
50 In the Revit MEP 2009 dialog, click Expand.
51 Expand the 3 Warnings, click the check box associated with each warning, and click Delete
Checked to delete the 3 sprinklers.
Sprinkler placement for the lower section of Open 204 is complete
Placing Sprinklers | 423
Next, you place a sprinkler in the Mechanical/Electrical space. Because this space does not have
a ceiling, you will use a non-hosted sprinkler. However, first, you need to load them in the
project.
Load a new sprinkler family
52 Click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load Family.
53 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
54 Open the M_Sprinkler -Upright.rfa file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection folder.
The sprinkler family loads into the project.
IMPORTANT A family contains one or more family types (different sizes, and so on) in the RFA (Revit
Family) file. These family types can be selected in the Type Selector or under Families in the Project
Browser. Families are loaded and saved in the current project (dataset). To modify a family type,
select an instance of the family type in the drawing area, click Edit Family on the Options Bar, and
then to edit the family in the Family Editor.
Place non-hosted sprinklers
55 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Fire Protection ➤ Floor Plans,
and double-click 2 - Fire Prot to make it the active view.
56 Enter ZR, and sketch a zoom region around the Mechanical/Electrical space (located between
the Men’s and the Ladies’ rooms).
57 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click Sprinkler.
58 In the Type Selector, select M_Sprinkler-Upright : 15mm Upright.
59 In the Mechanical/Electrical space, move the cursor to the approximate center of the space, click
to place the sprinkler, and click Modify.
The sprinkler is added to the space at an offset of 0.0. Next you adjust the offset.
60 Right-click the sprinkler, and click Element Properties.
61 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, for Offset, enter 2900 mm.
This specifies an elevation for the sprinkler that makes it visible in the 2 - Ceiling Fire Prot view,
and because this is an upright sprinkler with its connector facing down, it must be positioned
above the piping to which it will be connected.
62 Click OK.
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63 In the Project Browser, double-click 2 - Ceiling Fire Prot, and notice that the sprinkler displays
in the Mechanical/Electrical space.
64 On the Design Bar, click Dimension, and on the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Aligned) is selected
■ For Prefer, select Wall Faces
65 Click the upper wall face, click the center of the sprinkler, then click the wall face of the lower
wall, and move the dimension to the left.
NOTE Click the center of the sprinkler, and when a dot displays click to specify the center. Do not
click the vertical line that displays as the reference.
66 Click to center the sprinkler between the upper and lower wall, as shown.
67 Select the dimension, and press Delete.
Unconstrain the sprinkler when deleting the dimension.
68 Using the same method, center the sprinkler between the right and left walls, then click Modify.
Complete the level 2 sprinkler placement
69 Using the placement methods that you have learned, complete the level 2 sprinkler placement
according to the following criteria and floor plan:
■ Refer to the room schedule to verify the required number of sprinklers for each room. Round
decimals up to the next whole number.
■ Use sprinkler type: M_Sprinkler-Pendent-Plane_Hosted : 15mm Pendent for all rooms.
■ Click to place the sprinklers on ceiling tile faces.
NOTE When placing sprinklers, snap to the ceiling grid intersections rather than entering placement
dimensions. Grid snapping ensures accurate placement.
NOTE Do not place sprinklers in the stairwell or Server Room 215. You will create a Fire Protection
Dry System in Server Room 215 in a later exercise.
Placing Sprinklers | 425
70 In the Project Browser, double-click 2 - Fire Prot.
71 Draw a pick box around the entire model, and click (Filter).
72 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, then select Sprinklers, and on the toolbar, click (Pin)
to prevent further movement of the sprinklers that would cause misalignment.
73 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
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74 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
75 Proceed to the next exercise, Connecting the Sprinklers on page 427.
In this exercise, you placed 2 types of sprinklers using various placement methods and loaded a new sprinkler
family into the project. In the next exercise, you connect the sprinklers both logically by creating a system,
and physically with piping.
Connecting the Sprinklers
In this exercise, you create a wet sprinkler system and add piping to connect the sprinklers that you placed.
A system is the logical connection between system components such as sprinklers. This logical connection
allows Revit MEP to perform various analyses including flow and pressure. You create fire protection systems
by placing sprinklers, and then creating the logical connection between these system components.
After creating the logical connection, you use the Layout Path tools to create the initial layout for the piping.
Then you simplify the layout using tools from the Layout Paths tab on the Design Bar to modify pipe branches
after converting the initial layout to piping. This is the recommended workflow or best practice for systems
creation in Revit MEP.
IMPORTANT All system components are logically connected either by a system that you create or by a default
system. Unlike logical connections (systems), physical connections (piping) are not required for systems designing.
However, piping is necessary to perform calculations that reference the physical pipe geometry such as sizing.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Connecting Sprinklers.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection ➤ folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Fire Protection ➤ Floor Plans,
and double-click 2 - Fire Prot to make it the active view.
2 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the window.
Connecting the Sprinklers | 427
Explore the System Browser
3 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click System Browser.
TIP You can also press F9 (or click Window menu ➤ System Browser) to open or close the System
Browser. If the System Browser does not respond, click in the drawing area to make it active, then
press F9.
4 Expand the Unassigned ➤ Default Fire Protection Wet system to view the level 2 sprinklers that
you placed in the building.
IMPORTANT System components that you place are initially located under a default system category
in the Unassigned folder. This occurs because each system component must be assigned to a system
after it is placed in order to perform calculations such as flow. As you assign sprinklers to systems,
they are moved from the Unassigned folder to their respective assigned system folder.
Keep the System Browser open and refer to it as you create your systems.
Connect sprinklers with a system
5 Draw a pick box (from left to right) around the lower half of the building as shown.
Make certain to include the lower sprinklers in Office 203 and Office 211. You select only half
of the sprinklers on level 2 because it makes connecting the sprinklers more manageable, and
provides more layout path solutions to choose from when creating pipes.
6 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection) to filter the selected elements.
7 In the Filter box, click Check None, select Sprinklers, and click OK.
All sprinklers in the lower half of the building are selected, and display pinned and in red.
Notice that system tools display on the Options Bar.
8 On the Options Bar, click (Create Fire Protection Wet System) to create a fire protection
wet system, and assign the selected sprinklers to it.
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The Fire Protection Wet system is created and listed in the System Browser. The wet system that
logically connects the sprinklers displays in red to indicate that the new system is selected. It
does not indicate a pipe layout path.
In the System Browser, all of the sprinklers in the system have been moved from the Default
Fire Protection Wet folder to the new system folder, named Fire Protection Wet 1, under Fire
Protection Wet in the Piping folder.
Now that the sprinklers are logically connected, you use the System Browser to confirm and
validate the system.
TIP If you click in the drawing area and the red system display clears, place the cursor over a sprinkler,
press Tab, and select the system or select the Fire Protection Wet 1 again in the System Browser.
Confirm and validate the system
9 In the System Browser, expand Piping, right-click Fire Protection Wet, and click Expand to view
the Fire Protection Wet 1 system listing.
10 Double-click the Fire Protection Wet 1 system listing to view the sprinklers.
You can now view the fire protection system hierarchy: the Fire Protection Wet 1 system logically
connects the sprinklers.
11 Right-click Fire Protection Wet 1, and click Select.
The selected fire protection wet system highlights in red indicating the logical connection.
Next, you create piping to physically connect the sprinklers.
Create the initial layout
The Layout Paths tools let you specify a source for the system, select an initial piping layout, and make
preliminary modifications to simplify the piping layout. You also verify the pipe conversion settings that
you configured earlier in this tutorial. Revit MEP uses these settings to convert the preview layout path to
physical piping.
12 With the Fire Protection Wet 1 system selected, click (Layout Path) on the Options Bar.
The Layout Paths tools are activated on the Design Bar and Options Bar, and a piping layout
preview displays.
Connecting the Sprinklers | 429
NOTE The (Layout Path) button is available on the Options Bar whenever a system component
is selected.
13 On the Design Bar, click Solutions, and on the Options Bar, click Settings.
14 In the left pane of the Pipe Conversion Settings dialog, verify that Main is selected.
15 Under System Type: Fire Protection Wet, do the following:
■ For Pipe Type, verify that Pipe Types: Fire Protection Wet is selected.
■ For Offset, verify that 2800.0 is specified.
This offset elevation places the pipe main at 2800 mm above level 2.
16 In the left pane of the Pipe Conversion Settings dialog, select Branch.
17 Verify that the above pipe type and offset settings are the same for Branch.
IMPORTANT The branch offset allows you to automatically create branches that run above or below
the main and other obstacles.
18 Click OK.
19 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Place Base.
20 Zoom in on the stairway at the right side of the model.
21 Move the cursor over the lower-left corner of the stairwell, and click to place the base component
as shown.
The base component provides a source for the fire protection system.
22 On the Options Bar, verify that is specified for D, and for Offset, enter -3650.
When the layout is finished, these settings will convert the base component to a riser that
extends from the bottom of Level 1 up to the connection with the level 2 sprinklers (2800 mm).
23 On the Design Bar, click Solutions, and on the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Network is selected for Solution Type.
■ Click (Previous Solution), and select solution 4.
You can also view possible layout path solutions by pressing the left and right keyboard
arrow keys.
The main piping preview connects to the base component in the stairwell. The layout path
solution displays.
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Next, you modify the selected layout.
Modify the layout
24 You use the Modify tool to customize and simplify the layout. In general, the method for moving
segments in a layout depends on the type of connection between a branch and the main piping:
■ Use (parallel movement control) to move the branch when an (elbow control)
displays at the junction.
■ Move each end separately when either a (tee junction control) or (cross junction
control) displays at the junction. First drag the tee or cross junction control to the desired
location, then drag the (elbow junction control) to merge the piping preview.
On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Modify.
25 Zoom in on the vertical main.
26 Select the vertical layout path segment.
A (parallel movement control) displays.
Connecting the Sprinklers | 431
27 Drag the parallel movement control to the left to a point to the right of the doorway for Office
216, and midway between the sprinklers above the office as shown.
28 Select the horizontal branch pipe to the lower sprinkler in Office 211.
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29 Drag the parallel movement control down until the pipe merges with the horizontal piping to
the left.
30 Select the horizontal branch pipe, feeding the sprinkler in Office 203, as shown.
31 Drag the (tee junction control) down to the intersection with the main piping just below
it.
32 Scroll to the left, select the horizontal branch again, and drag the (elbow junction control)
down to merge it with the horizontal piping below.
The piping for Office 203 is reconnected to the branch in the open area.
Connecting the Sprinklers | 433
33 Zoom in on the 3 offices at the bottom of the model.
34 Select the piping feeding the lower sprinkler in the left office.
Drag the lower branch piping up to merge it with the branch piping, as shown.
So far, you have been using parallel movements to combine piping. Next you combine the
piping for the sprinklers in Office 216 by dragging each end of the pipe separately. In general,
whenever there is a branch feeding a single sprinkler, it is an opportunity to merge the piping
into a shared branch. You can make many of these modifications using the Layout Paths tools.
However, there are situations where you must make modifications outside of the Layout Paths.
35 On the toolbar, click (Thin Lines).
Thin lines make it easier to see the various drag controls when using junction and elbow controls.
36 Select the horizontal branch feeding the lower sprinkler in Office 211.
37 Drag the (tee junction control) up to the intersection of main and the branch above.
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38 Select the horizontal branch again, and drag the (elbow junction control) up to combine
the branch piping.
39 On the Layout Paths tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
The pipe run geometry (main and branches) is created. All of the fittings required to connect
the pipes to the system components are automatically inserted. This pipe run physically connects
the wet system sprinklers for the lower half of level 2.
IMPORTANT Errors may occur when you attempt to create pipe geometry during layout path
conversion or pipe sizing. The most common causes of these errors are that there is insufficient space
to create a pipe or a fitting, or that offset elevations are incorrect. Either relocate the system
components, select a different layout solution, or manually modify the pipe.
Connecting the Sprinklers | 435
Continue combining piping
40 Zoom in on Office 211, draw a pick box to select the piping feeding the lower sprinkler in Office
211, and the sprinkler in the open area, including the cross and transitions from the main
piping, as shown.
41 On the Options Bar, click (Filter).
42 In the Filter dialog, clear Sprinklers, and click OK.
43 Press Delete.
44 Select the horizontal pipe, as shown, right-click the connector at the open end, click draw pipe,
and verify that (Auto Connect) is selected on the Options Bar.
45 Draw the pipe to the right and when the snap below the sprinkler in Office 211 displays, click
to specify the end point, then continue drawing the pipe up to connect the sprinkler.
46 Select the sprinkler that was disconnected in the open area when the piping was deleted, on
the Options Bar, click (Connect Into), and click the horizontal pipe feeding the sprinkler
in Office 211.
47 Drag the open end of the main piping up to connect with the horizontal piping as shown.
436 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
48 Zoom in on the 3 offices at the bottom of the model.
49 Draw a pick box around the horizontal piping and fittings between the sprinklers in Office 216
and the main in Server Room 215, as shown, and press Delete.
50 While pressing Ctrl, select all the piping to the 2 lower sprinklers in Office 214, including the
pipe and the tee as shown.
51 Press Delete.
Reconnect the sprinklers in Office 214 and 216
52 Select the vertical pipe in Office 216, and drag the top connector up to connect with the
horizontal piping in the open area.
53 Select the horizontal pipe in Office 216, and drag the connector to the right to connect with
the vertical pipe as shown.
Connecting the Sprinklers | 437
54 Zoom in on the office in the lower-right corner.
55 On the Design Bar, click Pipe, and do the following:
■ On the Options Bar, verify that (Auto Connect) is selected.
■ Click the horizontal pipe between the left wall of Office 214 and the upper-left sprinkler.
■ Drag the preview down, and press Space to assume the size and elevation of the horizontal
pipe.
■ Continue dragging the preview down until aligned with the 2 lower sprinklers, click to
specify the end point for the pipe, then drag the preview to the connector snap on the
right-most sprinkler, and click to make the connection to the sprinkler.
■ Click Modify.
438 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
■ Select the sprinkler to the left.
■ On the Options Bar, click (Connect Into), and click the horizontal pipe as shown.
Reconnect the piping for Office 214 to the main
56 Zoom in on the open piping above Server Room 215, and on the toolbar click (Trim/Extend).
57 Click each of the open-ended pipes.
Connecting the Sprinklers | 439
An elbow is inserted to complete the connection.
58 Click Modify.
Check pipe connectivity
59 Highlight a pipe in the main for the system, and press Tab twice.
The entire system should be highlighted, indicating connectivity throughout the system.
60 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
61 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
62 Proceed to the next exercise, Completing the Fire Protection Wet System on page 440.
Next, you complete the level 2 wet fire protection system. You add the remaining sprinklers to the current
wet system to logically connect them, and then you create piping to physically connect them.
In this exercise, you created a system to logically connect the sprinklers. You confirmed the system and the
assigned sprinklers in the System Browser. After creating the system, you created piping to physically connect
the sprinklers, checked connectivity, and converted pipe fittings. In the next exercise, you create the dry
fire protection system.
Completing the Fire Protection Wet System
In this exercise, you add the sprinklers in the upper half of the model to the existing wet system.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Completing the Wet System.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection ➤ folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Mechanical ➤ Fire Protection ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click
the 2 - Fire Prot view.
2 Zoom in, and select the tee fitting connecting the main to the upper horizontal branch piping.
440 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
3 Click the plus sign to upgrade the fitting to a cross.
The cross provides an open connector that will serve as a base when laying out the piping for
the sprinklers in the upper half of the model.
4 In the 2 - Fire Prot view, select a pipe segment, fitting, or sprinkler in the current wet system.
System tools display on the Options Bar.
IMPORTANT After system components (sprinklers, air terminals, radiators, mechanical equipment,
and so on) are logically connected by a system, and pipe or duct is created, you can select the pipe
or duct, or a system component to display system tools on the Options Bar. This allows you to modify
the system (logical connection).
5 Click (Edit System) to edit the selected system.
The Edit System toolbar displays providing system editing tools. Notice that the Options Bar
allows you to verify or modify the system name, system equipment, and number of elements
in the system.
NOTE Do not click (Select Equipment for System). You use this tool to add mechanical
equipment that is located upstream in a system, such as VAV boxes, boilers, and AC units.
Completing the Fire Protection Wet System | 441
6 On the Edit System toolbar, click (Add To System).
7 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For System Name, verify that Fire Protection Wet 1 is specified.
■ For System Equipment, verify that None is specified.
■ For Number of Elements, verify that 30 is specified.
■ Select Multiple.
This information reports that there are 30 sprinklers currently connected to the wet system. You
are going to select multiple elements to include into the wet system. Notice that system
components that are not connected to the Fire Protection Wet 1 system display as an underlay
(they are grayed out).
8 Place the cursor outside Office 201 in the upper-left corner of the building.
Notice that the cursor has changed to indicate that Add To System is active.
9 Draw a pick box from upper-left to lower-right around all of the sprinklers that need to be
connected.
Do not worry about including sprinklers that are already connected. You cannot select them.
442 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
The selected sprinklers display in red.
10 NOTE When you use multiple selections, you must click Finish on the Options bar to complete the
selections. This is separate from the Finish for the System Editor.
On the Options Bar, click Finish to finish your selection of the sprinklers being added to the
system.
The sprinklers in the upper half of the building are assigned to the Fire Protection Wet 1 and
no longer display as an underlay. On the Options Bar, Number of Elements now displays as 65
(sprinklers) in the system. You can confirm the sprinkler system assignment in the floor plan
view or in the System Browser.
11 On the Edit System toolbar, click Finish to finish editing the system.
12 Select a sprinkler in the upper half of the model, and on the Options Bar, click (Layout
Paths).
13 On the Layout Paths tab on the Design Bar, verify that Solutions is selected.
14 On the Options Bar, for Solution Type, select Network, solution 1 3, and click Modify.
Completing the Fire Protection Wet System | 443
The layout automatically provides a path from the upper layout to the cross created earlier.
15 Zoom in on the upper left corner of the model.
16 Select the vertical pipe to the lower sprinkler in the corner office (201), and drag the tee junction
control to the intersection to the left as shown.
17 Select the vertical branch again, and drag the elbow junction control to the left to combine the
branch piping as shown.
444 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
18 Scroll to the right and select the branch to the lower-right sprinkler in Office 208.
19 Using the same method, drag each end of the branch to the left to combine it with the piping
to the sprinkler just to above, as shown. The tee junction control will stop at the junction of
the tee from the main piping. Click the tee junction control again and continue the adjustment.
20 On the Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
The piping for the upper half of the model displays.
Completing the Fire Protection Wet System | 445
Check pipe connectivity
21 Highlight the pipe from the riser in the stairwell, and press Tab 3 times.
The entire system should be highlighted, indicating connectivity throughout the system.
22 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
23 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
24 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating the Fire Protection Dry System on page 446.
In this exercise, you added the remaining wet system sprinklers and logically connected them to the existing
system. After creating the system, you created piping to physically connect the sprinklers, and checked
connectivity. In the next exercise, you create the dry fire protection system.
Creating the Fire Protection Dry System
In this exercise, you create a dry fire protection system for Server Room 215. The dry system prevents any
water discharge onto sensitive computer equipment. In an actual dry system, a valve would isolate the dry
system from the wet system, and the pipes for this system would not contain water until a valve opens
enabling water flow through the pipes to the sprinklers in order to extinguish the fire. For this exercise, it
is enough show how the system is created without adding a valve. As with the wet system, you create the
dry system by placing sprinklers, and then you create a system and piping to logically and physically connect
the sprinklers.
446 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Creating the Dry System.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection ➤ folder.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Fire Protection ➤ Floor Plans,
and double-click 2 - Ceiling Fire Prot to make the view active.
Place sprinklers
2 Zoom in to view the 3 spaces at the bottom of the model.
3 Select the lower sprinkler in Office 216.
Be careful to select only the sprinkler. If necessary, press Tab until the sprinkler displays on the
status bar at the lower left corner of the window.
Creating the Fire Protection Dry System | 447
4 On the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
Notice that a border around the selected sprinklers displays indicating the copy selection.
TIP You can also enter CO to activate the Copy tool.
5 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Constrain is cleared.
■ Verify that Copy is selected.
■ Select Multiple to place multiple sprinkler copies in the ceiling.
6 Move the cursor to the upper-left corner directly above the sprinkler, and after the ceiling grid
intersection snap displays, click to specify the copy start point.
7 Move the cursor to the right into Server Room 215, along the same horizontal ceiling grid, click
to specify the copy end point for the first sprinkler, then move the cursor diagonally to the
upper-right, and click to specify the copy end point for the second sprinkler, as shown.
8 Click Modify.
The sprinklers are placed in the ceiling.
448 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
Next, you change the sprinkler type.
Create the dry system
9 While pressing CTRL, select both Server Room 215 sprinklers.
10 In the Type Selector, select M_Sprinkler - Dry - Pendent - Hosted : 15mm Dry Pendent.
11 On the Options Bar, click (Create Fire Protection Dry System) to create the dry system
and assign the sprinklers to it.
The system is created and listed in the System Browser. The dry system that logically connects
the sprinklers displays in red.
Confirm and validate the system
12 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click System Browser.
The System Browser opens.
13 In the System Browser, expand Piping ➤ Fire Protection Dry.
14 Right-click the Fire Protection Dry 1 system category, and click Select
The selected system displays in red.
Create the dry system piping
15 In the Project Browser, double-click 2 - Fire Prot to make it the active view.
16 Zoom in on Server Room 215.
17 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click Pipe.
18 In the Type Selector, select Pipe Types : Fire Protection Dry.
19 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For D: (diameter), verify that 15mm is selected.
■ For Offset, verify that 2800.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Auto Connect is selected.
■ For Slope, enter 0.15.
This creates a slight slope for the dry system pipe run.
Creating the Fire Protection Dry System | 449
20 Click the horizontal pipe directly above the upper-right sprinkler, as shown, to specify a starting
point for the piping
21 Draw the pipe preview straight down to a point even with the lower-left sprinkler, and click.
Do not connect to the upper right sprinkler.
22 Continue to draw the pipe to the left and, when the snap for the lower-left sprinkler displays,
click to connect the pipe.
23 Press ESC to exit the Draw tool.
The pipe passed over but did not connect to the upper-right sprinkler. You can confirm this in
the 3D view or by checking connectivity. Next, you connect the upper sprinkler to the pipe.
450 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
24 In the Project Browser, expand Fire Protection ➤ Floor Plans ➤ 3D Views, and double-click 3D.
25 Right-click an empty area in the drawing area, and click View Properties.
26 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, for Visibility/Graphics Overrides,
click Edit.
27 In the Visibility/Graphics Overrides dialog, on the Model Categories tab, select Show categories
from all disciplines, click All, and clear a check mark from any category.
All categories are cleared.
28 Clear Show categories from all disciplines, click All, select any category, click None, and clear
the Lines category.
All categories are selected except the Lines category.
Click OK twice.
Only the sprinklers and piping are visible in the view.
29 Click View menu ➤ Orient ➤ Southwest, and zoom in on the dry fire protection system, as
shown.
30 Select the unconnected sprinkler.
31 On the Options Bar, click , and select the pipe segment above the sprinkler.
The sprinkler connects into the pipe, and all pipe fittings are automatically added.
32 Zoom the view, and select each pipe segment to verify the slope.
Creating the Fire Protection Dry System | 451
The slope value displays next to the slope control. You can click the slope control to change
the reference end for the slope. To follow good design practice, the pipe is sloped toward the
main for drainage purposes.
Check connectivity and validate pipe geometry
33 Zoom out to display the entire model, highlight a pipe segment in the dry system, and press
TAB 3 times.
The dry system pipe run and the wet system pipe run highlight, indicating that they are
connected.
You have completed the dry fire protection system.
34 You can save the open file if you wish; a new dataset is supplied in the next exercise.
35 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
36 Proceed to the next exercise, Modifying Pipe Diameters on page 452.
In this exercise, you created the fire protection dry system that services Server Room 215. First, you placed
dry system sprinklers. Then, you created the dry system and a pipe run to logically and physically connect
the sprinklers. Additionally, you confirmed the systems in the System Browser, checked pipe connectivity,
and validated the pipe geometry in the 3D view.
Modifying Pipe Diameters
In this exercise, you modify the diameter of the pipes so that the pipes are a better fit with the design
specifications. Because the pipe diameters depend on the number of sprinklers, you also create a sprinkler
schedule to report the number of level 2 sprinklers.
Dataset
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open the m Modifying Pipe Diameters.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection ➤ folder.
452 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
Tile the views
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Fire Protection ➤ 3D views,
and double-click 3D to make the view active.
2 If necessary, click Window menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows.
This closes all windows previously opened during the current design session.
3 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ Fire Protection ➤ Floor Plans,
and double-click 2- Fire Prot to make the view active.
4 Enter WT to tile both windows.
TIP When you tile 2 views, the active view is tiled to the left.
5 Adjust the view in both windows to view the entire fire protection pipe run as shown.
You will work mainly in the floor plan view and validate the pipe geometry in the 3D view.
NOTE It is important to recognize the distinction between sizing and manually changing the diameter,
height, or width. Changing the diameter, width, or height of pipe on the Options Bar is not considered
sizing in Revit MEP. Sizing is performed using the Sizing tool (Sizing dialog) to size the pipe based
on a series of parameters and calculations. The calculated size of a pipe is the result of the Sizing tool
and not the result of a manual change of diameter, width, or height.
Modify the diameter of the fire protection pipe run
6 The majority of the pipe segments service no more than 2 sprinklers, and because the design
specifications require a 25mm diameter for pipes servicing 2 sprinklers, it’s more efficient to
specify 25mm diameter for all pipe runs, and then adjust branches servicing more than 2
sprinklers separately.
In the 2- Fire Prot view, starting at the upper-left corner of the building, draw a pick box around
the entire level 2 fire protection piping.
7 On the Options Bar, click .
8 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Pipe Fittings and Pipes, and click OK.
This selects the entire level 2 pipe run.
Modifying Pipe Diameters | 453
9 Click in the 3D view to make it active, zoom in on the supply pipe in the stairwell, and while
pressing SHIFT, select the supply pipe in the stairwell, the elbow and the horizontal pipe to the
main piping to remove them from the selection.
10 On the Options Bar, for D: (diameter), select 25mm.
All pipes and pipe fittings change to a 25mm diameter except for the supply piping.
11 Select any pipe segment and verify the 25mm diameter on the Options Bar.
12 Place the cursor over a main pipe segment, and press TAB twice.
The entire fire protection pipe run highlights, verifying that it is connected.
454 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
Modify the diameter of the main
13 In the 2 -Fire Prot view, draw a narrow pick box around the main pipe.
NOTE Do not include branch pipe segments. If branch segments are selected, you can SHIFT-select
to remove them from the selection.
TIP If you have difficulty selecting piping segments without moving the linked architectural model,
select the model, and on the toolbar, click (Pin) to prevent the linked model from moving.
Modifying Pipe Diameters | 455
14 With the main selected, while pressing CTRL, draw a pick box around the horizontal main, the
pipe fittings, and the supply pipe.
456 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
The main piping is selected and displays in red.
NOTE If you select sprinklers with the pipes and pipe fittings, use the (Filter) to select only
pipes and pipe fittings.
15 On the Options Bar, for D, select 100mm.
The diameter of the fire protection main piping changes.
16 Double-click the 3D view, and on the View Control Bar, for Detail Level, select Fine, and for
Model Graphics Style, select Shading with Edges.
17 In the 3D view, select the tee connecting the supply piping to the main.
18 On the Options Bar, for D: 150mm.
19 Validate the pipe run geometry, especially around the pipe fittings.
Modify the diameter of branch pipes
20 The number of sprinklers serviced by a branch determines the pipe size used for that branch.
The following table shows the pipe diameter that will be used for each branch in the fire
protection systems.
Pipe Diameter Sprinklers Serviced
25mm 1, 2
32mm 3
40mm 4, 5
50mm 6-10
Modifying Pipe Diameters | 457
21 Click in the 2 - Fire Prot view to make it active.
22 Enter ZR, and draw a zoom region around the lower 3 offices in the building.
Notice that some branch pipe segments service more than 2 sprinklers. You need to change the
diameters of these segments to conform to the requirements.
23 On the View Control Bar, for Detail, select Fine and for Model Graphics Style, select Shading
with Edges.
24 Select the pipe segments and fittings that connect Office 214 and 215 directly to the main as
shown.
Be sure to include the tee at the right end of the pipe run in your selection.
This piping services 6 sprinklers (4 in the corner office, and the 2 dry sprinklers in Office 215).
The specifications requires a diameter of 50mm for this pipe segment.
25 On the Options Bar, for D:, select 50mm.
The pipe diameter is modified.
26 Select the next pipe segment and tee to the right.
This segment services 4 sprinklers.
27 On the Options Bar, for D:, select 40mm.
458 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
Next, you continue to modify the pipe branch.
28 Double-click 3D to make it the active view, zoom in on the piping to Office 216.
It’s easier to select the fitting above the first sprinkler in this branch from a 3D view.
29 Select the pipe and tee that connects the first sprinkler on the branch, and on the Options Bar,
for D: select 40mm.
30 Select the segment and fitting to the remaining sprinklers on this branch, and on the Options
Bar, for D: select 32mm.
Modifying Pipe Diameters | 459
Tag the pipes
31 In the 2 Fire Prot view, zoom in on the branch that you modified in the preceding step.
32 On the Fire Protection tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
33 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that Horizontal is selected.
■ Clear Leader.
■ Click Tags.
34 In the Tag dialog, under Category, for Pipes, verify that M_Pipe Size Tag is loaded.
35 Click OK.
36 Place the cursor over the first pipe segment that connecting the branch to the main, and after
the segment highlights, click to place the tag.
Notice that an outline of the tag displays and follows the cursor for accurate placement.
NOTE Tags are view specific. They display only in the view in which they were placed.
Next, you place a tag and include a leader line.
37 On the Options Bar, select Leader.
38 Place the cursor over the vertical supply pipe in the stairwell, press Tab until the pipe is
highlighted place a tag on the supply pipe in the stairwell.
39 Click the tag to display end controls (blue dots) and horizontal controls (arrows).
40 Drag the horizontal control to the upper-left to relocate the tag.
460 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
Next, you finish modifying the pipe run diameters, and finish placing the pipe tags.
Complete pipe diameter modification and tag placement
41 For more practice use the methods that you learned in this exercise to finish modifying pipe
run diameters according to the following criteria, and finish tagging the pipes.
Pipe Diameter Sprinklers Serviced
25mm 1, 2
32mm 3
40mm 4, 5
50mm 6-10
Modifying Pipe Diameters | 461
42 This completes the Fire Protection tutorial. You can save the open file if you wish.
43 Click File menu ➤ Close.
NOTE Do not overwrite the original dataset.
In this exercise, you used various selection methods to modify the level 2 fire protection pipe run diameters.
You added tags the pipes, allowing you to immediately verify the pipe diameters. The pipe run now complies
with the design criteria. You learned the difference between pipe sizing and manually changing the diameter
of a pipe.
For additional practice, use the methods that you learned and create the level 1 fire protection wet and dry
systems. Use the same system components and parameters as you did for level 2.
In this tutorial, you created a wet and a dry fire protection system. You also learned the difference between
creating rigid physical pipe connections and creating logical systems, and sizing as opposed to manually
modifying a pipe diameter. The completed fire protection system is included in the m Completed Fire
Protection System.rvt file located in the Metric ➤ Fire Protection folder under Training Files. Feel free to
modify the systems or create entirely new fire protection systems. Explore different system designs and
discover the power of Revit MEP.
462 | Chapter 8 Fire Protection Systems
Creating Revit MEP
Content
This tutorial expands your knowledge of the Family Editor by introducing several unique features in Revit MEP. Before
using this tutorial, you should have a working knowledge of Revit MEP and experience with the actual components that
you will be modeling. Revit MEP operation and the behavior of your components depends to a great extent on how you
create specific components.
In this tutorial, you begin by modifying existing families to create new types. After learning to modify an existing family,
you create a new lighting fixture and 2 pipe fittings. In the third lesson, you use the Family Editor to modify and create
tags and annotation symbols.
Revit MEP Content
The primary difference between content for Revit MEP and content for Revit Architecture or Revit Structure is the concept
of connectors. All Revit MEP content requires connectors for to be intelligent Revit MEP components. Components created
without connectors cannot participate in a system topology.
Three disciplines can be assigned to connectors that are added to a family.
■ Duct connectors are associated with ductwork, duct fittings, and other elements that are part of the air handling
systems.
■ Electrical connectors are used for any type of electrical connections, including power, telephone, alarm systems and
others.
■ Pipe connectors are used for piping, pipe fittings, and other components that are meant for transmitting fluids.
NOTE The term fluid does not necessarily limit the use of piping systems to liquids. Steam, medical gases and other non-fluid
materials are often transmitted using piping systems.
The discipline assigned to a connector determines its behavior and the types of systems with which it can interact.
Connectors are primarily logical entities that allow calculating loads within the building. Selecting the correct discipline
is critical to the content working correctly, as after this selection is made, it cannot be changed without first deleting the
connector and adding it again with the correct discipline.
Family Editor
Creating a family requires careful thought, not only for the geometry, but also to understand how the settings in the
Family Editor affect the family. Although the exercises in this tutorial describe settings that are specific to a particular
9
463
mechanical, electrical, or plumbing component, it is important to recognize how components interact to affect the overall
design. For example, the heat released by a light fixture affects the cooling requirements for a space.
There are several ways to create a family with the Family Editor. You can modify an existing component. You can create
a component from scratch. At times, it is easier to modify a component, instead of creating a new one. If you can find a
component that is similar to the family that you want, open it in the Family Editor, modify it as needed, and then load
it into the project. If a family you are creating is very similar to an existing family, you may want to create multiple types
within the existing family instead of creating a new family.
The process you use to create the family will determine how a part flexes as geometric parameters are modified. Finally,
although it may be easier to modify an existing family, there are times when it is best to create a new family instead of
attempting to create a single family with types to address every application.
Modifying Families
In this lesson, you modify existing components to create new types and build custom component families.
Modifying a Fan Family
In this exercise you:
■ Modify an existing family.
■ Define shared parameters.
■ Create formulas for parameters.
■ Place connectors.
■ Map parameters
■ Create multiple types within a family.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Family Editor M_Exhaust Ventilator - Downblast.rfa.
Save a copy of the family
1 Click File ➤ Save As.
2 In the Save As dialog, navigate to a folder of your choice, and save the family as M_Exhaust
Ventilator - Downblast .rfa.
Set project units
3 Click Settings menu ➤ Project Units.
4 In the Project Units dialog, for Discipline, select Electrical, and for Current, click the Format
column.
5 In the Format dialog, for Rounding, select 1 decimal place, and click OK.
6 Click OK to close the Project Units window.
7 Save the family.
464 | Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content
Create Shared Parameters
8 On the Design Bar, click Family Types
9 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
10 In the Parameter Properties dialog, click the Shared parameter option, and click Select.
11 If you have not already created a shared parameter file, you will be prompted to choose a file
from another project or to create a new file.
Click Yes.
12 In the Edit Shared Parameters dialog, and click Create.
13 Browse to a folder, enter a File name (for example, Shared_Parameters) for the shared parameter
file, and click Save.
NOTE The parameter values stored in the shared parameter file will remain after completing this
tutorial. To reuse this tutorial, you must remove the shared parameter text file created in the previous
step.
14 In the Edit Shared Parameters dialog, under Groups, click New.
15 For Name, enter MEP, and click OK.
16 Under Parameters, click New.
17 In the Parameter Properties dialog, specify the following:
■ For Name, enter Motor HP
■ For Discipline, enter Common
■ For Type, enter Text
18 Click OK.
19 Using the same method, create additional shared parameters with the following properties:
Type Discipline Name
Electrical Potential Electrical Voltage
Current Electrical Motor FLA
Power Electrical Power
Integer Common Phase
Number of Poles Electrical Number of Poles
20 Click OK.
Add shared parameters to the Family Type
21 In the Shared Parameters dialog, under Parameters, select Motor FLA, and click OK.
22 In the Parameter Properties dialog, for Group parameter under, select the Electrical Engineering,
select the Type option, and click OK.
The new parameter is added to the Family Types dialog under the Electrical Engineering category.
23 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
24 In the Parameter Properties dialog, select the Shared parameter option, and click Select.
Modifying a Fan Family | 465
25 In the Shared Parameters dialog, for Parameter Group, select MEP, under Parameters, select
Voltage, and click OK.
26 In the Parameter Properties, under Parameter Data, for Group parameter under, select Electrical
Engineering, select the Type option, and click OK.
27 Using the same method, add the following shared parameters to the family type, as defined
below:
Instance/Type Group Parameter
Type Electrical Engineering Phase
Type Electrical Engineering Number of Poles
Type Mechanical Motor HP
Type Electrical Engineering Power
Create a parameter formula to calculate power
28 In the Formula column for Power, enter the following formula:
Voltage * Motor FLA * sqrt(if(Phase = 3, 3, 1))
NOTE Formulas are case sensitive… make sure you use the same case as the names of the parameters
you created.
Create New Family Types
29 Under Family Types, click New.
30 For Name, enter 1/6 HP - 115 V - 1 Ph.
31 Click OK.
32 Specify the following values for the shared parameters in the Family Types dialog:
■ Voltage = 115
■ Phase = 1
■ Number of Poles = 1
■ Motor FLA = 4.4
■ Motor HP = 1/6
The value for Power is calculated from the parameter values specified.
33 Using the same method, create additional Family Types with the following parameter values:
Motor HP Motor FLA Number of Poles Phase Voltage Name
1 8.8 2 1 208 1 HP - 208 V - 1 Ph
2 7.5 3 3 208 2 HP - 208 V - 3 Ph
3 4.8 3 3 460 3 HP - 460 V - 3 Ph
34 Click OK.
35 Save the family.
466 | Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content
Add an electrical connector
36 Electrical connectors are used for a variety of electrical systems, including power, telephone,
alarm systems and others. The electrical connector that you add here will ultimately be used in
a power system. Connections between components in a power system must have connectors
with the same, system type, number of poles and the same voltage specified. See Connectors
on page 555.
Click and drag the View Cube at the upper right corner of the view to spin the ventilator as
shown.
TIP You can also hold the right mouse button, while pressing Shift, and dragging the cursor to spin
a model.
37 On the Design Bar, click Electrical Connector.
38 On the Options Bar, select Power - Balanced, and verify that is selected.
Connectors can be placed on a Face or on a Work Plane. See Connector Placement on page 561.
39 Highlight the narrow face at the base of the fan housing and click to place the connector on
the center of the face.
NOTE If necessary, press Tab to cycle through the active faces until the narrow face at the base of
the fan is highlighted.
40 Click Modify
Modifying a Fan Family | 467
Map Parameter Values to Connector
41 On the Design Bar, click Family Types.
42 In the Family Types dialog, for Name, select 3 HP - 460 V - 3 Ph, and click OK.
43 Select the Electrical connector created in the previous section.
44 On the Options Bar, click .
45 In the Element Properties dialog, for Voltage, click in the = column.
46 In the Associate Family Parameter dialog, select Voltage, and click OK.
47 Using the same method, specify an associated family parameter for the following parameters:
Associated (shared) Parameter Parameter
Number of Poles Number of Poles
Power Apparent Load
48 Under Electrical Loads, for Load Classification, select HVAC.
49 Click OK.
50 Save the family.
Flex the part
51 Click File menu ➤ Open.
52 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
53 Open Metric ➤ Family Editor ➤ m Sample Project.rvt.
54 Click Window menu ➤ M_Exhaust Ventilator - Downblast.rfa to make the family the active
view.
55 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
56 The m Sample Project.rvt displays in the drawing area.
57 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 2 - Mech.
58 On the Mechanical Design Bar, click Mechanical Equipment, and in the Type Selector, select
M_Exhaust Ventilator Downblast : 1/6 HP-115 V-1 Ph.
59 Move the cursor into the drawing area and click to add the M_Exhaust Ventilator Downblast :
1/6 HP-115 V-1 Ph. (The exact location is not important.)
60 Click Modify.
61 Select the fan, and on the Options Bar, click , and observe the values in the Type Parameters
list.
62 For Type, select 1 HP-208V-1 Ph, and again observe the Type Parameter values.
The values should correspond to the values entered when you created the new family types.
63 Click OK.
64 Save the family. (It is not necessary to save the m Sample Project.rvt file.)
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Modifying Fan Powered VAV Box with Electric Heat Family
This exercise demonstrates using various settings on the electrical connector to define a fan powered box
with variable power requirements for electric heat and motor size. It also demonstrates the use of shared
parameters and parameter mapping.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Family Editor ➤ m Sample Project.rvt.
NOTE If you have not already completed the previous exercise, you will need to complete that exercise to create
shared parameters that are used in this exercise. See Modifying a Fan Family on page 464.
Open the family and create parameters
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power.
2 Select the VAV box.
3 On the Options Bar, click Edit Family.
4 Click Yes when prompted to open the family for editing.
5 Click Family Types.
6 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
7 In the Parameter Properties dialog, select the Shared parameter option, and click Select.
8 In the Shared Parameters dialog, for Parameter group, select MEP.
The MEP group was created in the Modifying a Fan Family exercise and the parameters created
in that exercise are listed under Parameters. It this is not the case, go back and complete the
previous Modifying a Fan Family exercise.
9 Click Edit.
10 In the Edit Shared Parameters dialog, for Parameter group, select MEP.
11 Under Parameters, click New.
12 In the Parameter Properties dialog:
■ For Name, enter Apparent Power Phase 1.
Modifying Fan Powered VAV Box with Electric Heat Family | 469
■ For Discipline, select Electrical.
■ For Type, select Power.
13 Using the same method, create the following additional shared parameters as defined below:
Type Discipline Name
Power Electrical Apparent Power Phase 2
Power Electrical Apparent Power Phase 3
Power Electrical Electric Heat Power
Integer Common Motor On Phase
14 Click OK.
15 In the Shared Parameters dialog, select Apparent Power Phase 1, and click OK.
16 In the Parameter Properties dialog, under Parameter Data, for Group parameter under, select
Electrical Engineering, select the Instance option, and click OK.
Apparent Power Phase 1 is added as an instance parameter under the Electrical Engineering
group in the Family Types dialog. Instance parameters have (default) appended to the parameter
name.
17 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
18 In the Parameter Properties dialog, select the Shared parameter option, and click Select.
19 In the Shared Parameters dialog, select Apparent Power Phase 2, and click OK
20 In the Parameter Properties dialog, under Parameter Data, for Group parameter under, select
Electrical Engineering, select the Instance option, and click OK.
21 Using the same method, add the following shared parameters to the family type, as defined
below:
Instance/Type Group parameter under Name
Instance Electrical Engineering Apparent Power Phase 3
Instance Electrical Engineering Electric Heat Power
Type Electrical Engineering Motor FLA
Type Electrical Engineering Motor HP
Instance Electrical Engineering Motor On Phase
Type Electrical Engineering Number of Poles
Type Electrical Engineering Phase
Type Electrical Engineering Voltage
22 In the Family Types dialog, verify that M_Size 2 - 150 mm Inlet is selected for Name.
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23 In the Formula column, specify formulas for the following parameters:
■ For Voltage, enter 480.
■ For Phase, enter 3.
■ For Apparent Power Phase 1, enter Electric Heat Power / 3 + if(Motor On Phase = 1, Motor
FLA * 277 V, 0 VA).
■ For Apparent Power Phase 2, enter Electric Heat Power / 3 + if(Motor On Phase = 2, Motor
FLA * 277 V, 0 VA).
■ For Apparent Power Phase 3, enter Electric Heat Power / 3 + if(Motor On Phase = 3, Motor
FLA * 277 V, 0 VA).
NOTE Formulas are case sensitive. Use the same case for the names in formulas as the names entered
when you created the parameters.
24 Under Electrical Engineering, in the Value column, specify the following parameter values for
the M_Size 2 - 150 mm Inlet VAV:
■ For Number of Poles, enter 3.
■ For Motor On Phase, enter 1.
■ For Motor HP, enter 1/6.
■ For Motor FLA, enter 1.3.
25 Under Family Types, click new.
26 In the Name dialog, enter M_Size 3 - 200mm Inlet, and click OK.
27 In the Family Types dialog, specify the following parameters for the M_Size 3 - 200mm Inlet
type:
■ For Number of Poles, enter 3.
■ For Motor On Phase, enter 1.
■ For Motor HP, enter 1/4.
■ For Motor FLA, enter 2.2.
28 Using the same method, create additional types, and specify the parameters for each size listed
below:
Motor FLA Motor HP Motor On
Phase (Default)
Number of
Poles
Name
2.9 1/3 1 3 M_Size 4 – 250mm Inlet
3.2 1/2 1 3 M_Size 5 – 300mm Inlet
5.4 3/4 1 3 M_Size 6 – 350mm Inlet
29 Click OK to close the Family Types dialog.
30 Save the family as Parallel Fan Powered VAV.rfa.
Place connector and map parameters
31 Click and drag the view cube to spin the model around so you can see the controls box as shown.
Modifying Fan Powered VAV Box with Electric Heat Family | 471
32 On the Design Bar, click Electrical Connector.
33 On the Options Bar, select Power - Unbalanced, and verify that is selected.
34 Highlight the large face on the controls box, and click to add the connector on the face.
35 Click Modify.
36 Select the connector, and on the Options Bar, click .
37 In the Element Properties dialog, specify values for the following parameters:
■ For Number of Poles, click in the column, and in the Associate Family Parameter
dialog, select Number of Poles, and click OK.
■ For Voltage, click in the column, and in the Associate Family Parameter dialog, select
Voltage, and click OK.
■ For Apparent Load Phase 1, click in the column, and in the Associate Family Parameter
dialog, select Apparent Power Phase 1, and click OK.
■ For Apparent Load Phase 2, click in the column, and in the Associate Family Parameter
dialog, select Apparent Power Phase 2, and click OK.
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■ For Apparent Load Phase 3, click in the column, and in the Associate Family Parameter
dialog, select Apparent Power Phase 3, and click OK.
■ For Load Classification, enter HVAC.
■ For System Type, verify that Power - Unbalanced is selected.
38 Click OK to close the Element Properties dialog.
39 Save the family.
Flex the family
40 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
41 If prompted, select Override parameter values of existing types, and click Yes.
The Sample Project is activated in the drawing area.
42 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power.
43 Select the VAV box, and on the Options Bar, click (Create Power Circuit).
44 Click , and on the Options Bar, for Panel, select panel HA.
45 Click Modify.
46 Select the VAV box, and click .
47 Verify that Parallel Fan Powered VAV : M_Size 2 - 150 mm Inlet is selected in the Type Selector.
48 In the Element Properties dialog, specify the following parameters:
■ For Motor On Phase, enter 1.
■ For Electric Heat Power, enter 3000.
49 Click OK.
50 Select panel HA, and on the Options Bar, click (Edit Circuit on Panel).
The loads on phases A, B, and C are 2512, 1000, and 1000, respectively.
51 Click OK.
52 Select the VAV box, and click .
53 In the Element Properties dialog, for Type, select M_Size 6 – 350mm Inlet, and specify the
following parameters:
■ For Motor On Phase, enter 2.
Modifying Fan Powered VAV Box with Electric Heat Family | 473
■ For Electric Heat Power, enter 11000.
54 Click OK.
55 Click Modify.
56 Select panel HA, and on the Options Bar, click .
The loads on phases A, B, and C have updated to 4819, 4027, and 3667, respectively.
57 Click OK.
Specify Flow Configuration for the VAV
58 Click Window menu ➤ M_Parallel Fan Powered VAV.rfa.
59 Use the view cube in the upper right corner of the view to spin the model around so you can
see the air supply connector, as shown.
60 Select the supply air connector, and on the Options Bar, click .
61 In the Element Properties dialog, under Mechanical, verify that Calculated is selected for Flow
Configuration.
When the Flow Configuration for the connector is set to Calculated, the air flow value for
SupplyAirflow is the aggregate air flow for the downstream components.
62 Click OK.
63 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
64 If prompted, select Override parameter values of existing types, and click Yes.
The Sample Project is activated in the drawing area.
Create a supply air system
65 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech.
66 Select the 4 supply air terminals in the left room, and on the Options Bar click (Create
Supply Air System).
67 On the Options Bar, click (Select Equipment for System), and in the drawing area, select
the VAV box.
68 Click (Layout Paths), and click Settings.
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69 In the Duct Conversion Settings dialog, verify the following Main and Branch settings:
Main
■ For Duct Type, verify that Rectangular Duct: Mitered Elbows/Taps is selected.
■ For Offset enter 3750 mm.
Branch
■ For Duct Type, verify that Rectangular Duct: Mitered Elbows/Taps is selected.
■ For Offset enter 3750 mm.
■ For Flex Duct Type, verify that Flex Duct Round : Flex - Round is selected.
■ For Maximum Flex Duct Length, enter 1800 mm.
70 Click OK
71 Verify that Network is selected for Solution Type, click to select layout 6 of 6, and on the
Design Bar, click Finish Layout.
Ductwork is created for the selected solution.
Modifying Fan Powered VAV Box with Electric Heat Family | 475
72 Click Window menu ➤ System Browser.
73 In the System Browser, expand Mechanical (1 systems) ➤ Supply Air ➤ M_Parallel Fan Powered
VAV: M_Size 2 - 150 mm Inlet VAV.
74 Right-click Mechanical Supply Air 1, and select Properties.
75 In the Element Properties dialog, scroll down to Mechanical Airflow, and notice that the
SupplyAirFlow parameter value is 280 L/s.
Because the Flow Configuration for the connector is set to Calculated, the air flow value for
SupplyAirflow is the sum of the air flow for the downstream air terminals—in this case 280 L/s
(4 X 70 L/s).
76 Click OK.
77 Double-click a tag associated with one of the air terminals supplied by the VAV, enter 100, and
press Enter to modify the air flow for the air terminal.
78 Again, right-click Mechanical Supply Air 1, and select Properties.
79 In the Element Properties dialog, scroll down to Mechanical Airflow and notice that the
SupplyAirFlow parameter value is updated to 310 L/s, the new sum of the air flow for the
downstream air terminals.
80 Click OK.
The Preset and System settings for Flow Configuration are used together to allow specifying a
percentage of the system flow to be allocated to each downstream component. This allows
specifying a different portion of the system flow to each downstream subsystem. When Flow
Configuration is set to System the Flow Factor parameter is active. The Flow Factor parameter
is specified as a value between 0 and 1, with the total for all downstream components equal to
1.
For example, a boiler may have its supply preset to 70 L/s (system supply = 70 L/s) and the
connectors at 2 downstream zone valves set to System, but one with 0.4 specified for Flow and
the other with 0.6 specified for Flow. In this case the first downstream zone would receive a
flow of 28 L/s (0.4 X 70 L/s), and the other would receive a flow of 42 L/s (0.6 X 70 L/s). Using
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the combination of Preset and System settings on connectors lets you distribute flow according
to the demands of a particular space.
NOTE Because Flow Factor and Flow Configuration are properties of the connector, all instances of
the family in a project will have the same factor. To create unequal percentages for several downstream
subsystems, you must create 2 additional instance parameters for the component family, and then
map the Flow Factor to the value specified for each instance of the component used in the project.
81 Close the Family and m Sample Project files.
Modifying Electrical Equipment
In this exercise, you modify existing electrical equipment families to create new families, and then you use
the new families in a project. In the first section, you modify a 208V/3Ph panel to create a 240V/3Ph family,
and in the following section you modify a 480V/3Ph primary transformer to create a 480V/1Ph to 240V/1Ph
secondary transformer. The final section demonstrates how to load, insert, and connect components of the
newly created families in a simple project.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Family EditorM_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 208V MCB - Surface.rfa.
Modify an existing panel family
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ 3D Views, and double-click {3D} to make
it the active view.
2 In the drawing area, select the connector.
3 On the Options Bar, click .
4 In the Element Properties dialog, under Electrical - Loads, specify values for the following
parameters:
■ For Number of Poles, enter 2.
■ For Voltage, enter 240.
5 Click OK.
Modifying Electrical Equipment | 477
6 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
7 In the Save As dialog, navigate to a folder of your choice and save the family as M_Lighting and
Appliance Panelboard - 240V MCB - Surface.rfa.
8 Click File menu ➤ Close.
Modify an existing transformer family
9 Click File menu ➤ Open.
10 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
11 Open Metric ➤ Family EditorM_Dry Type Transformers - 480-208-120V - NEMA Type 2.rfa.
12 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Family Types.
13 For Name, select 112.5 kVA.
14 Under Family Types, click Delete.
15 Using the same method, delete all of the remaining types, except for 15 kVA.
Next, you modify an existing family type.
16 In the Family Types dialog, for Name, verify that 15 kVA is selected.
17 Under Electrical, for Primary Number of Poles, enter 2.
18 Click Apply.
Next, you create a new family type.
19 Under Family Types, click New.
20 In the Name dialog, for Name, enter 3 kVA, and click OK.
Notice that the new family type is selected for Name.
21 Under Electrical, verify the following:
■ Primary Voltage is 480.00 V.
■ Primary Number of Poles is 2.
22 Under Dimensions, do the following:
■ For Length, enter 165 mm
■ For Height, enter 265 mm
■ For Width, enter 220
23 Click OK.
24 Click File ➤ Save As.
25 In the Save As dialog, navigate to a folder of your choice and save the family as M_Single Phase
Transformer - 480V Primary.rfa.
26 Click File menu ➤ Close.
In the following sections, you use the modified families in a project.
Load the new panel and transformer families into a project
27 Click File menu ➤ Open.
28 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
29 Open Metric ➤ Family Editor ➤ m Simple Room.rvt.
30 On the Electrical tab of the Design Bar, click Electrical Equipment.
NOTE If the Electrical tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click
Electrical.
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31 On the Options Bar, click Load.
You can also click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load Family.
32 In the Open dialog, navigate to the folder where you saved the new families, then while pressing
CTRL, select M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 240V MCB - Surface.rfa and M_Single Phase
Transformer - 480V Primary.rfa, and click Open.
The new families are loaded into the project.
TIP You can verify that the electrical families were loaded by expanding Families ➤ Electrical Equipment
in the Project Browser.
Test the new electrical equipment in a project
33 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Power ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Power to make it the active view.
34 On the Electrical tab of the Design Bar, click Electrical Equipment.
35 In the Type Selector, select M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 240V MCB - Surface : M_100A.
36 Move the cursor over the wall, and after panel snaps to the inside face of the wall, click to place
the panel on the wall as shown.
NOTE The panel is a wall-hosted family—it can only be placed on a wall.
37 Using the same method, do the following:
■ Place a M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard 480V MLO : 125A panel on the wall to the
right of the first panel.
TIP You can press Spacebar to rotate a family if placement seems difficult.
Modifying Electrical Equipment | 479
■ Place a M_Single Phase Transformer - 480V Primary : 15kVA transformer on the wall between
the panels.
38 Click Modify.
Next, you create a system to logically connect the panels to the transformer.
Create a system
39 Select the M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard 480V MLO : 125A panel.
40 On the Options Bar, for Distribution Sys, select 480/277 Wye.
41 With the panel selected, click .
42 In the Element Properties dialog, under Electrical - Loads, for Panel Name, enter DP, and click
OK.
Create a new distribution system
43 On the Electrical tab of the Design Bar, click Electrical Settings.
You can also click Settings menu ➤ Electrical Settings.
44 In the left pane of the Electrical Settings dialog, select Distribution Systems.
45 Click Add.
A new row is added in the right pane.
46 In the right pane, do the following:
■ For Name, enter 480 Wye.
■ For Phase, verify that Single is selected.
■ For Wires, select 3.
■ For L-L Voltage, select 480.
■ L-G Voltage, select 277.
47 Click OK.
48 In the drawing area, select the Single Phase Transformer,
49 On the Options Bar, click .
50 In the Element Properties dialog, under Electrical - Loads, do the following:
■ For Secondary Distribution System, select 120/240 Single.
■ For Panel Name, enter T-LC.
■ For Distribution System Types, select 480 Wye.
■ Click OK.
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51 In the drawing area, select the transformer.
Notice that 480 Wye is selected for Distribution Sys on the Options Bar. This indicates that the
transformer is associated with that distribution system.
52 With the transformer selected, on the Options Bar, click (Create Power Circuit) to create
a new circuit.
53 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Click (Select a Panel for the Circuit).
■ For Panel, select DP.
The DP panel is logically connected to the transformer
54 Click Modify.
55 Select the M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 240V MCB - Surface : M_100A panel.
56 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For Distribution Sys, select 120/240 Single.
■ Click .
57 In the Element Properties dialog, under Electrical - Loads, for Panel Name, enter LC, and click
OK.
58 Select the M_Lighting and Appliance Panelboard - 240V MCB - Surface : M_100A (LC) panel.
59 On the Options Bar, click to create a new circuit.
60 On the Options Bar, click , and on the Options Bar, for Panel, select T-LC.
This creates a logical circuit between the LC panel to the transformer.
61 Close the Simple Room without saving.
Modifying Electrical Equipment | 481
Modifying a Water Closet
This exercise demonstrates adding piping connectors to a water closet family and setting typical connector
properties for domestic cold water and sanitary systems.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Family EditorM_Commercial - Toilet - Wall Mount Flush Valve.rfa.
1 The toilet is a wall-hosted component, and the extrusion that represents the wall is visible in
the view. However, you will be working at the back of the toilet, so you must hide the wall in
the view.
Select the wall, and on the View Control Bar, click (Temporary Hide/Isolate) ➤ Hide Element.
2 On the View Control Bar, click (Model Graphics Style) ➤ Hidden Line.
3 Use the view cube in the upper right corner of the view to spin the model around so it is oriented
as shown.
4 On the Design Bar, click Pipe Connector.
5 On the Options Bar, for System Type, select Sanitary, and verify that is selected.
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6 Zoom in, and move the cursor over the larger of the 2 round extrusions at the back of the toilet
as shown, highlight the round face, and click to add the connector.
7 Click Modify.
8 Select the connector.
9 If the arrow is pointing in toward the toilet bowl, click so that the connector direction is
pointing away from the bowl.
The arrow indicates the connector direction, not the flow direction. The connector direction
determines the direction from which it will accept connections from other components.
10 Click .
11 In the Element Properties dialog, specify values for the following parameters:
■ For Radius, enter 40 mm.
■ For Flow Direction, select Out.
■ For Flow Configuration, select Fixture Units.
■ Select Allow Slope Adjustments
■ For Fixture Units, enter 4.
12 Click OK.
Modifying a Water Closet | 483
13 Using the same method, add a Domestic Cold Water system Piping Connector, in the location
shown, and click Modify.
14 Select the connector, click to specify connector direction.
15 On the Options Bar, click .
16 In the Element Properties dialog, specify values for the following parameters:
■ For Radius, enter 20 mm.
■ For Flow Direction, select In.
■ Clear Allow Slope Adjustments
■ For Flow Configuration, select Fixture Units.
■ For Fixture Units, enter 2.5.
17 Click OK.
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18 Click File ➤ Save As, and in the Save As dialog, navigate to a folder of your choice and save the
family as M_Toilet - Commercial Wall Mount Flush Valve.rfa.
Modifying a Diffuser Annotation Tag Family
In this exercise, you modify a diffuser tag family to provide a type mark instead of the default instance mark.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Family Editor ➤ m Sample Project.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Ceiling Plans, and
double-click 1 - Ceiling Mech.
2 In the drawing area, select a diffuser tag.
Modifying a Diffuser Annotation Tag Family | 485
3 On the Options Bar, click Edit Family, and click Yes when asked to open the diffuser tag for
editing.
The Family Editor opens.
The diffuser tag is composed of two labels separated by a horizontal line. Each label is associated
with a parameter.
4 Select the top label (1i), and on the Options Bar, click Edit Label.
5 In the Edit Label dialog, under Label Parameters, select Mark, and click (Remove parameter
from label).
6 Under Category Parameters, select Type Mark, and click (Add parameter to label).
7 Click OK.
The sample text changes to 1t.
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8 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
If more than one project is open, in the Load into Projects dialog, select m Sample Project.rvt,
and click OK.
9 When prompted to overwrite the existing Diffuser Tag, click Yes.
The project becomes active and the diffuser tag updates to display the supply air terminal type,
S-1, and the return air diffuser type, R-1.
10 Click File menu ➤ Close as you do not need to save the project.
11 Click File menu ➤ Close again to close the tag family, without saving.
Modifying a Light Fixture Annotation Tag Family
In this exercise, you modify a light fixture tag family to include panel and circuit information.
Dataset:
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
■ Open Metric ➤ Family Editor ➤ m Sample Project.rvt.
Modifying a Light Fixture Annotation Tag Family | 487
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Lighting.
2 In the drawing area, select a light fixture tag.
3 On the Options Bar, click Edit Family, and click Yes when asked to open the light fixture tag
for editing.
The Family Editor opens.
The light fixture tag is composed of a label that is associated with a parameter.
4 In the drawing area, select the 1i label.
5 On the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
6 On the Options Bar, click Multiple.
7 Click the midpoint of the label to specify the copy start point.
8 Move the cursor straight down, and after listening dimensions display, enter 3 mm, and press
Enter to specify the copy end point.
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The label is copied.
9 Repeat the previous steps to create a second copy of the label.
Modifying a Light Fixture Annotation Tag Family | 489
10 Click Modify.
Notice that the bounding box contains only the first label. You need to modify this box.
11 Select the bottom line of the box, and drag it down so that the box contains all 3 labels.
Next, you modify 2 labels.
12 Select the middle label, and on the Options Bar, click Edit Label.
13 In the Edit Label dialog, under Label Parameters, select Type Mark, and click (Remove
parameter from label).
14 Under Category Parameters, select Panel, and click (Add parameter to label).
15 Under Label Parameters, for the Panel parameter, enter PNL in the Sample Value column.
The sample value is the text that identifies this label in the Family Editor.
16 Click OK.
The middle label text changes to PNL and the label is associated with the Panel parameter.
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17 Using the same method, modify the bottom label with the following Edit Label dialog:
■ Under Label Parameters, select Type Mark, and click (Remove parameter from label)
■ Under Category Parameters, select Circuit Number, and click (Add parameter to label).
■ For the Circuit Number parameter, enter CKT in the Sample Value column
The 3 light fixture labels are as shown.
Load the light fixture tag family into a project
18 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
If more than one project is open, in the Load into Projects dialog, select m Sample Project.rvt,
and click OK.
19 If prompted, select Override parameter values of existing types, and click Yes.
The Sample Project is activated in the drawing are, and the light fixture tags update to display
the panel and circuit information.
Modifying a Light Fixture Annotation Tag Family | 491
20 Click File menu ➤ Close as you do not need to save the project.
21 Click File menu ➤ Close again to close the tag family, without saving.
Creating Families
In this lesson you learn how features of the Family Editor allow you to build custom component families.
The process of creating a component family includes the following steps:
1 Select the appropriate family template.
The hosting of a component is defined by the template used when the family is originally created.
Templates also define the type of family (annotation, model, titleblock, or profile). In some cases, the
template also defines characteristics of how the family works, such as linear versus spot lighting
characteristics. You cannot change these characteristics after you have created the family. For example,
you cannot change a linear lighting fixture into a spot lighting fixture.
2 Define sub-categories for the family to aid in controlling visibility of the object.
3 Lay out reference planes to aid in drawing component geometry.
4 Add dimensions to specify parametric component geometry.
5 Add label dimensions to create type or instance parameters.
6 Flex the new model to verify correct component behavior.
7 Specify 2D and 3D geometry display characteristics with sub-category and entity visibility settings.
8 Define family type variations by specifying different parameters.
9 Save the newly-defined family, and then load it into a new project and see how it performs.
Creating a Light Fixture Family
In this exercise you create an ceiling hosted recessed downlight.
There are various light fixture family templates available in Revit MEP. If you expect to render your lighting
designs, it is important that you start your lighting family with one of these templates, as they have reference
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planes that define the location of the light source. For generic (Lighting Fixture*.rft) and linear (Linear
Lighting Fixture*.rft) lighting templates, these planes are Light Source Axis (F/B), Light Source Axis (L/R),
and Light Source Elevation. For spot light templates (Spot Lighting Fixture*.rft), these planes are Light Source
Axis (L/R), Tilt Plane, and Light Source Elevation. Each family has additional parameters depending on
whether it is a linear fixture, a spot fixture, or a generic fixture.
When you use a spot light template, the family will have the additional parameters: Spot Beam Angle, Spot
Spread Angle, Spot Tilt Angle. The Linear template contains a model line representing the light source along
the F/B axis. This can be shortened or lengthened as necessary to model the linear lighting fixture.
Additionally, there are lighting templates for non-hosted, ceiling hosted, and wall hosted objects.
When working in a linked file environment, you may use a non-lighting family template, such as Generic
Model face based.rft. Using this face hosted family provides the ability for the fixture to be hosted by, and
move with, objects in the linked file. Using the generic face hosted and non-hosted lighting fixtures has the
limitation that the hosting geometry cannot be cut.
When creating a lighting family, you can also specify a .ies file. This file contains engineering data that can
be used to calculate the coefficient of utilization of the fixture. The .ies file is not used for rendering. Lighting
manufacturers often allow you to download .ies files from the Web for their fixtures.
Locate IES data file
1 Using Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Autodesk\RME 2009\Training\Imperial\Tutorials\Family Editor, and copy the Ltl9815.ies
file, and paste it into the C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Autodesk\RME
2009\IES folder. (This is the location from which the .ies files are retrieved if Revit MEP is
installed in the default path.)
NOTE If Revit MEP was not installed in the default path, you must determine the correct path to the
IES file as defined by the IESFileLocation parameter in the Revit.ini file (within the
<install_path>\RME2009\Program folder).
Create a new lighting family
2 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Family.
3 In the New dialog, navigate to the Metric Templates folder, select Metric Linear Lighting Fixture
ceiling based.rft, and click Open.
4 Click Settings menu ➤ Family Category and Parameters.
5 Under Family Category, select Lighting Fixtures.
6 Specify the following settings under Family Parameters:
■ Select the Always Vertical option
■ Select Light Source
■ For Part Type, select the Normal option
■ Clear the Shared option
NOTE Family Category and Parameters settings determine the component type and provide a set
of parameters that affect its behavior within Revit MEP. See Part Types on page 565 and Category on
page 563 for a complete list of Revit MEP categories and parameters.
7 Click OK.
8 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Elevations (Elevation 1), and double-click
Front.
Creating a Light Fixture Family | 493
TIP You may want set the scale to 1 : 5 and zoom in very close to create the Solid Form ➤ Solid
Revolve.
9 Select the Light Source Elevation Plane, and drag it up to a point 75 mm above the Basic Ceiling
and Ceiling Plane as shown.
10 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
11 In the Save As dialog, for File name, enter 200mm Open Downlight 42w TRT.rfa, and click OK.
Define the fixture geometry
12 On the Design Bar, click Solid Form ➤ Solid Revolve.
13 On the Sketch tab on the Design Bar, click Lines.
14 On the Options Bar, click , , and Chain, and for Offset, specify 0.0.
15 Zoom in on the Light Source Elevation, and sketch the shape of the fixture as shown.
Start at the Center (Left/Right) vertical reference plane, 125 mm above the Light Source reference
plane, and draw a 100 mm horizontal line to the left of the center, then draw a vertical line
segment down to the ceiling (200 mm), and finish with a 25 mm horizontal line segment to
the left.
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Next you will duplicate the original outline, offset by 1.5 mm to define the thickness of the light fixture
housing.
16 Click Lines.
17 On the Options Bar, click , and for Offset, enter 1.5 mm.
18 Click just above the upper horizontal line to add a line 1.5 mm above the existing line as shown.
19 Using the same method, click just to the left of the vertical line and just above the lower
horizontal line to define the thickness for the fixture as shown.
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NOTE If you have difficulty selecting the short horizontal line at the base, move the cursor over the
line, press Tab to highlight the short line, then click just above the line.
20 On the Design Bar, click Lines.
21 On the Options Bar, click and , clear Chain, and for Offset, enter 0.0.
22 Draw lines to close the outline at the top right and lower left as shown.
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23 Click Modify.
24 On the toolbar, click (Trim), and clean up the inside corner as shown.
25 On the Design Bar, click Axis, and sketch the axis line for the revolve as indicated below by the
dark line.
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The length of the line and its exact location are not important, but make sure it is coincident
with the vertical plane.
26 Click Finish Sketch.
27 Save the family.
Define family and connector properties
28 In the drawing area, select the (yellow) Light Source, and on the Options Bar, click Light Source
Definition.
29 In the Light Source Definition dialog, for Emit from Shape, click (Point), for Light
distribution, click (Photometric Web), and click OK.
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30 On the Design Bar, click Family Types.
31 In the Family Types dialog, specify values for the following parameters:
Under Electrical - Lighting
■ For Calculate Coefficient of Utilization, select true (green check, not grey)
Under Electrical Loads
■ For Apparent Load, enter 44.21 VA
Under Electrical
■ For Lamp, enter CF42TRT
Under Photometrics
■ For Tilt Angle, enter 90
■ For Photometric Web File, click the Value column, click , and select M_Ltl9815.iesin the
file browser
■ For Light Loss Factor, click the Value column, and in the Light Loss Factor dialog, click Simple
for Method, enter 0.85 for Value, and click OK.
■ For Initial Intensity, click the Value column, and in the Initial Intensity dialog, click Luminous
Flux, enter 3200, and click OK.
■ For Initial Color, click the Value column, and in the Initial Color dialog, for Color Preset,
select <Custom>, for Color Temperature, enter 3000 K and click OK.
A fixture’s Coefficient of Utilization may be calculated based on the geometry of the space, or
a static value may be entered. Lighting objects in a space contribute to the room’s Average
Estimated Illumination. This illumination is based on the lumen method using the total lumen
output of the lighting fixtures in the room, and is affected by the following fixture properties:
■ Coefficient of Utilization (Instance)
■ Initial Intensity (Type)
■ Light Loss Factor (Type)
32 Click OK.
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33 In the Project Browser, expand View (All) ➤ 3D Views, and double-click View 1.
34 Use the view cube in the upper right corner of the view to spin the model to view the top of
the fixture.
35 On the Design Bar, click Electrical Connector, and on the Options Bar, select Power - Balanced,
and verify that (Place on Face) is selected.
36 Highlight the face at the top of the fixture, and click to place the connector on the top of the
fixture.
37 Click Modify, select the connector, and click .
38 In the Element Properties dialog, specify values for the following parameters:
■ For Power Factor, enter 0.95
■ For System Type, verify that Power - Balanced is specified
■ For Apparent Load, click in the column, and in the Associated Family Parameter dialog,
select Apparent Load from the list, and click OK.
■ For Voltage, enter 277
■ For Load Classification, enter Lighting
39 Click OK.
40 Save the family
Cut a hole in the ceiling
41 Next you cut a hole in the ceiling. Although the hole is not necessary for construction documents,
it permits light to function as expected in renderings. (Light at the intersection of planes is able
to pass through the ceiling.)
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In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ 3D Views, and double-click View 1.
42 Spin the model to view the bottom of the ceiling.
43 Select the yellow Light Source, and on the View Control Bar, click (Temporary Hide/Isolate),
and select Hide Element.
44 On the Design Bar, click Opening.
45 On the Options Bar, click , and select the 2 arcs that make up the outside edge of the trim
ring as shown.
46 Click Finish Sketch.On the View Control Bar, click
47 On the View Control Bar, click (Temporary Hide/Isolate), and select Reset Temporary
Hide/Isolate.
48 Save the family.
Flex the light fixture
49 Click File menu ➤ Open.
50 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
51 Open Metric ➤ Family Editor ➤ m Simple Room.rvt.
52 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Electrical ➤ Lighting ➤ Ceiling Plans, and
double-click 1 - Ceiling Elec.
The space tag indicates 212 lx and 135 W.
53 Click Window menu ➤ 200 mm Open Downlight 42w TRT.rfa to make the family the active
view.
54 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
The new lighting fixture is loaded into the project.
55 Select the 4 downlights in the room, and in the Type Selector, select 200 mm Open Downlight
42w TRT.rfa.
The lighting level increases to 325 lx, and the wattage increases to 168.
In this exercise, you learned:
■ The basics of how lighting families work
■ How to create a lighting family from a template
■ Where to place IES files for use by lighting families
Creating a Light Fixture Family | 501
Flange Family
In this exercise, you will create a flange connector to model pipe flanges for model coordination. The flange
will be based on a 1 Mpa pressure class slip on flange, and use a Lookup Table to define several sizes for the
flange.
Lookup tables are used to define parameter values in an external .csv file. This lets you specify multiple part
sizes that are based on a table without creating a separate family type for each size. Revit MEP provides a
text_file_lookup function that can be used to read the necessary values from a comma-separated values (.csv)
file. The location of Lookup Table files is defined by the LookupTableLocation parameter in the Revit.ini
file.
The M_Generic 1 Mpa Slip Flange.csv file defines multiple sizes for this flange. When installed in the default
path, Revit MEP looks in C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application Data\Autodesk\RME
2009\LookupTables to retrieve size information. See Lookup Tables on page 562 and CSV File Structure on
page 563.
1 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Family.
2 In the New dialog, navigate to the Metric Templates folder, select Metric Generic Model.rft, and
click OK.
3 Click Settings menu ➤ Family Category and Parameters.
NOTE Family Category and Parameters settings determine the component type and provide a set
of parameters that affect its behavior within Revit MEP. See Part Types on page 565 and Category on
page 563 for a complete list of Revit MEP categories and parameters.
4 Under Family Category, select Pipe Fittings.
5 Specify the following settings under Family Parameters:
■ Clear the Work Plane-Based option.
■ Select the Always Vertical option.
■ For Part Type, select the Transition option.
■ Clear the Shared option.
6 Click OK.
7 Click File ➤ Save, and in the Save As dialog, navigate to a folder of your choice and save the
family as M_Generic 1 Mpa Slip Flange.fla.
8 Using Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Autodesk\RME 2009\Training\Imperial\Tutorials\Family Editor, and copy the M_Generic
1 Mpa Slip Flange.csv file, and paste it into the C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Autodesk\RME 2009\LookupTables folder. (This is the location from which the
LookupTable files are retrieved if Revit MEP is installed in the default path.)
NOTE If Revit MEP was not installed in the default path, you must determine the correct path to the
Lookup Table file as defined by the LookupTableLocation parameter in the Revit.ini file (within the
<install_path>\RME2009\Program folder).
Create parameters
9 Click Family Types.
10 Under Parameters, click Add.
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11 In the Parameter Properties dialog, verify that Family parameter is selected for Parameter Type
and specify the following parameter data:
■ For Name, enter NR
■ For Discipline, select Piping
■ For Type, select Pipe Size
■ For Group parameter under, select Dimensions
■ Select Type
12 Click OK.
13 Using the same method, create Instance parameters named D1, D2, LenA1, LenA2, LenA3, ND,
R1, R2 and specify the following parameters for each one:
■ For Parameter Type, select the Family parameter option
■ For Discipline, select Piping.
■ For Type, select Pipe Size.
■ For Group parameter under, select Dimensions.
■ Select the Instance option
14 In the Family Types dialog, specify values for the following parameters:
■ For NR, enter 150 mm
■ For Lookup Table Name = M_Generic 1 Mpa Slip Flange.csv
■ Click Apply.
15 Specify formulae for the following parameters:
■ ND, enter NR * 2
■ For R1, enter D1 / 2
■ For R2, enter D2 / 2
■ For LenA3, enter LenA2 – LenA1
■ For D1, enter text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, "D1", 0’, ND)
■ For D2, enter text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, "D2", 0’, ND)
■ For LenA1, enter text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, "LenA1", 0’, ND)
■ For LenA2, enter text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, "LenA2", 0’, ND)
16 Click OK.
17 Save the family.
Define work planes
18 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click Ref. Level.
19 Click the scale on the View Control Bar, and select 1 : 5.
20 On the Design Bar, click Ref Plane.
21 On the Options Bar, click , and for Offset, enter 50 mm.
22 Click to the right of the Center (Left/Right) reference plane to add a reference plane 50 mm to
the right of the center line.
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23 Click again to the left of the Center (Left/Right) reference plane to add a reference plane 50 mm
to the left of the center line as shown.
24 Click Modify
25 Select the left plane and, click .
26 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Name, enter Pipe.
27 Using the same method, enter Connector for the Name of the right plane.
28 On the Design Bar, click Dimension, and on the Options Bar, click (Aligned).
29 Create a dimension between the Center (Left/Right) plane and the Connector (right) plane.
30 Create another dimension between the Center (Left/Right) plane and the Pipe (left) plane.
31 Click Modify.
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32 Select the dimension between the Center (Left/Right) plane and right plane (Connector) and
click .
33 In the Element Properties, under Other, click the Value column for Label, click , and select
LenA1 from the list.
34 Using the same method, select the dimension between the left (Pipe) plane and Center (Left/Right)
plane, and label it LenA2.
35 Select the horizontal reference plane and the 3 vertical reference planes.
36 Click .
37 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Is Reference, click the Value column, and
select Not a Reference.
This option disables grips at the intersection of reference planes and specifies that the reference
plane cannot be dimensioned to when you place a family into a project.
38 Click OK.
39 Save the family.
Define geometry
40 Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
41 On the Model Categories tab, click Object Styles, and set the Projection Line weight of each
category to 5.
42 Click OK twice.
43 On the Design Bar, click Model Lines, and on the Options Bar, clear Chain, click and
.
44 Draw a vertical line on both the left (Pipe) and the right (Connector) vertical reference planes.
The length is not important, but be careful to sketch them on the reference planes.
45 Draw a horizontal line on the horizontal plane, between the intersections with the right and
left vertical planes as shown.
46 Click Modify.
47 Select the 3 model lines, and on the Options Bar, click Visibility.
48 In the Family Element Visibility Settings dialog, clear Fine, and click OK.
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NOTE Piping objects generally show as linework in Coarse and Medium view, and in Fine view the
solid model elements are shown. Thus, we shut off the linework in Fine view.
49 With all 3 lines still selected, click .
50 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Reference, click the Value column, and select
Not a Reference.
51 Click OK.
52 On the Design Bar, click Dimension, and on the Options Bar, click .
53 Move the cursor over an endpoint on the left vertical line, press Tab to highlight the endpoint,
and click to specify the endpoint for the dimension.
54 Select the horizontal reference plane, then select the other endpoint, move the cursor to the
left, and click to place the dimension.
55 Click .
56 Using the same method, create dimensions for the right vertical line.
57 On the Design Bar, click Dimension, and on the Options Bar, click .
58 Using the same method, create dimensions for the overall length of each vertical line, from
endpoint to endpoint.
59 Click Modify.
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60 Select the dimension for the overall length of the left line, and on the Options Bar, click
.
61 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Label, click the Value column, and select D2.
62 Using the same method, select the dimension for the right line and label it D1.
Create the first extrusion
63 In the Project Browser, expand Elevations (Elevation 1), and double-click Left.
64 On the Design Bar, click Solid Form ➤ Solid Extrusion.
65 On the Sketch tab on the Design Bar, click Set Work Plane.
66 In the Work Plane dialog, specify Reference Plane : Pipe, and click OK.
67 Click Lines.
68 On the Options Bar, click and , click Radius, and enter 125 mm.
69 Place the circle on the intersection of the horizontal and vertical reference planes.
70 Click Modify.
71 Select the circle, and in the drawing area, click .
72 Select the dimension line, and click .
73 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Label, click the Value column, and select R2.
74 Click OK.
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75 Click Extrusion Properties.
76 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, for Extrusion End, click in the
column.
77 In the Associate Family Parameter dialog, select LenA2, and click OK.
78 Under Graphics, for Visibility/Graphics, click Edit.
79 In the Family Element Visibility Settings dialog, clear Coarse and Medium, and click OK twice.
80 Click Finish Sketch.
Create the second extrusion
81 On the Design Bar, click Solid Form ➤ Solid Extrusion.
82 On the Sketch Editor tab on the Design Bar, click Set Work Plane.
83 In the Work Plane dialog, specify Reference Plane : Center (Left/Right), and click OK.
84 Click Lines.
85 On the Options Bar, click and , click Radius, and enter 250 mm.
86 Place the circle on the intersection of the horizontal and vertical reference planes.
87 Click Modify.
88 Select the circle, and in the drawing area, click .
89 Select the dimension line, and click .
90 In the Element Properties, under Other, for Label, click the Value column, and select R1.
91 Click OK.
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92 Click Extrusion Properties.
93 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, for Extrusion End, click in the
column.
94 In the Associate Family Parameter dialog, select LenA1, and click OK.
95 Under Graphics, for Visibility, click Edit.
96 In the Family Element Visibility Settings dialog, clear Coarse and Medium, and click OK twice.
97 Click Finish Sketch.
98 Save the family.
Add connectors
99 In the Project Browser, expand 3D Views, and double-click View 1.
100 Click the scale on the View Control Bar, and select 1 : 2.
101 On the View Control Bar, click (Model Graphics Style), and select Wireframe to view both
extrusions.
102 Spin the flange to view the face of both extrusions as shown.
103 On the Design Bar, click Pipe Connector.
104 On the Options Bar, verify that is selected, and for System Type, select Fitting.
105 Highlight the large diameter face of the flange, where the 2 extrusions meet.
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106 Click to add the connector.
107 Click Modify.
108 Select the connector, click and, if necessary, to change the direction of flow.
The arrow indicating the connector direction should be pointing toward the smaller diameter
face.
109 With the connector selected, click .
110 In the Element Properties dialog, under Dimensions, for Radius, enter 250 mm, and click OK.
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111 Spin the flange to view the back of the larger extrusion.
112 Click Pipe Connector, and using the same method, add a connector to the larger extrusion.
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113 Click Modify.
114 Select the connector, click and, if necessary, to change the direction of flow.
The arrow indicating the connector direction should be pointing toward the smaller diameter
face.
115 Select the first connector, click Link Connector on the Options Bar, and click the second
connector.
116 Click Modify.
117 Select both connectors, and on the Options Bar, click .
118 In the Element Properties dialog, under Dimensions, for Radius, click in the column.
119 In the Associate Family Parameter dialog, select NR, and click OK twice.
120 Save the family
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family
In this exercise, you create an elbow pipe fitting family. First, you create the physical fitting geometry by
using reference planes and lines, and by defining fitting size parameters. You then create single line geometry
for the elbow, test the fitting geometry, and set the object visibility. After completing the pipe fitting family,
you can use the same method to create a duct fitting family for air systems.
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NOTE Fittings are among the most complex families to create. It is recommended that you methodically follow
the steps and periodically check your work against the exercise. It may take a longer to complete this exercise as
compared to other exercises in this tutorial. Even if you have created parametric families before, creating system
families typically takes more time to complete.
1 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Family.
2 In the New dialog, do the following:
■ For Look in, verify that Metric Templates is selected.
■ Select Metric Generic Model.rft.
■ Click Open.
A new family file is created and new views open.
Configure the elbow pipe fitting family
3 Click Settings menu ➤ Family Category and Parameters.
4 In the Family Category and Parameters dialog, under Family Category, select Pipe Fittings:
5 Under Family Parameters, do the following:
■ Verify that Work Plane-Based is cleared.
■ Verify that Always vertical is selected.
■ For Part Type, select Elbow.
■ Verify that Shared is cleared.
6 Click OK.
7 Click File ➤ Save.
You can also press CTRL+S.
8 In the Save As dialog, navigate to a folder of your choice, and save the family as M_Threaded -
Generic Elbow.
Define reference planes
Reference planes are used to define relationships between the geometric components within the Family
Editor. They are not displayed when the family is used in a building model.
9 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Floor Plans, and double-click Ref. Level to
make it the active view.
10 Maximize the Ref. Level floor plan window.
11 Click Window menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows.
Close Hidden Windows closes all of the hidden windows for a project. However, if you have
other projects open during a session, one window for each open project remains open.
12 Enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the window.
13 On the View Control Bar, click the current scale value, and select 1 : 2.
14 Select the 2 reference planes, and verify that both reference planes have been pinned. If necessary,
on the Edit toolbar, click .
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 513
Pinning prevents accidentally moving the reference planes.
15 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Ref Plane.
16 On the Options Bar, click , and for Offset, enter 25.
17 Click to the left the vertical Center (Left/Right) reference plane to place a new reference line to
the left of the vertical Center (Left/Right) reference plane.
TIP You can identify an object in the drawing area by placing the cursor over the object. A tooltip
and the Status Bar (which is located below the Design Bar) displays the object’s name.
18 Click Modify.
19 Select the left plane, and on the Options Bar, click .
20 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Name, enter Fitting, and click OK.
21 Using the same method, add another vertical plane 50 mm to the left of the left (Fitting) plane,
and in the Element Properties dialog, for Name, enter Coupling.
22 Select the horizontal Center (Front/Back) reference plane.
23 Add new reference plane 50 mm above the Center (Front/Back) reference plane as shown.
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24 Click Modify.
25 Right-click the new reference plane, and click Element Properties.
26 In the Element Properties dialog, for Name, enter Radius, and click OK.
27 Click File menu ➤ Save to save the family.
Create reference lines and dimension them
Reference lines are used to define the basic geometry of the family. They are not displayed when the family
is used in a project. You create reference lines in order to create sweeps for the fitting geometry.
28 On the Design Bar, click Reference Lines.
29 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) is selected.
■ Verify that (Line) is selected.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 515
30 In the drawing area, draw a horizontal line of the approximate length and location as shown.
31 On the Edit toolbar, click (Align).
32 Select the middle vertical reference plane (Fitting), and click the right end of the reference line
to align the right end of the reference line to the Fitting reference plane.
33 Click to lock the end of the reference line to the Fitting plane.
34 Using the same method, align and lock the left end of the reference line to the left vertical
reference plane (Coupling).
35 Align and lock the reference line to the Center (Front/Back) reference plane as shown.
36 Using the same method, draw another reference line to the right of the Center (Left/Right)
reference plane as shown.
37 Align and lock the left end of the right reference line to the Center (Left/Right) reference plane.
38 Align and lock the right reference line to the Center (Front/Back) reference plane as shown.
Next, you draw an arced reference line.
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39 On the Design Bar, click Reference Lines.
40 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) is selected.
■ Select (Arc from center and endpoints).
You may need to click and, select this sketching option from the list.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
41 In the drawing area, click the intersection of the Fitting and the Radius reference planes to
specify the center of the arc.
42 Move the cursor directly down, and after the endpoint snap displays, click the right end of the
left reference line to specify the first endpoint of the arc.
43 Move the cursor to the right to begin drawing the arc, enter 45, and press Enter to specify a 45
degree radius for the arc.
44 Click Modify.
45 Select the arc reference line, and zoom out to view 2 dimension controls ( ).
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NOTE Temporary dimensions have two dimension controls that allow you to convert the temporary
dimension to a permanent dimension. By default, dimensions are temporary—they only display when
selected. The dimension control that is located perpendicular to the line being dimensioned represents
the overall length of that line. The dimension control located near the reference plane represents the
projected length of that line relative to the reference plane.
46 Click the dimension control that controls the overall dimension (located to the lower-right of
the arc).
47 Drag the permanent dimension annotation away from the arc reference line, and adjust the
length of the witness lines as shown.
Next, you draw a diagonal reference line.
48 On the Design Bar, click Reference Lines.
49 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) is selected.
■ Verify that (Line) is selected.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
50 Click the right end of the arced reference line to specify the diagonal reference line start point.
51 Draw a diagonal reference line to extend the arc at a 45 degree angle toward the Radius reference
plane, and click to specify the reference line end point at an approximate line length as shown.
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While drawing the diagonal reference line, the Tangent Extension tooltip may display to indicate
that the diagonal reference line is tangent to the arced reference line.
52 Click Modify.
53 Select the diagonal reference line, zoom the view to display the 2 dimension controls.
54 Using the same method, convert the temporary dimension for the overall length of the diagonal
reference line to a permanent dimension.
55 Drag the dimension line down and to the right to move it out of the way, and clean up the
witness lines as necessary.
56 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
57 In the Type Selector, verify that Linear Dimension Style : Default linear style is selected.
58 On the Options Bar, verify that (Aligned) is selected.
59 Add the following aligned dimensions:
■ Between the Radius and the Center (Front/Back) horizontal reference planes.
■ Between the Coupling and the Fitting vertical reference planes.
■ Between the Fitting and the Center vertical reference planes.
60 With the Dimension tool active, on the Options Bar, click (Angular), and add an angular
dimension between the diagonal reference line and the right horizontal reference line (which
is located below the diagonal reference line).
61 Position the dimension annotations and witness lines as shown.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 519
62 Click File menu ➤ Save to save the family.
Create family parameters and assign them to dimensions
63 On the Design Bar, click Family Types.
64 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
65 In the Parameter Properties dialog, under Parameter Type, verify that Family parameter is selected.
66 Under Parameter Data, do the following:
■ For Name, enter LenA1.
■ For Discipline, select Piping.
■ For Type of Parameter, select Pipe Size.
■ For Group parameter under, select Dimensions.
■ Select Instance to create an Instance Parameter.
67 Click OK.
The new family parameter, LenA1, is listed under Dimensions in the Family Types dialog.
68 Using the same method, create the following family parameters:
In-
stance/Type
Group parameter
under
Type of Parameter Discipline Name
Instance Dimensions Pipe Size Piping LenA2
Instance Dimensions Pipe Size Piping BdyRad
Instance Dimensions Pipe Size Piping CplRad
Instance Dimensions Pipe Size Piping NomDia
Instance Dimensions Pipe Size Piping NomRad
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In-
stance/Type
Group parameter
under
Type of Parameter Discipline Name
Instance Dimensions Angle Common Ang
Next, you specify values and formulae for the family parameters that you added.
69 In the Family Types dialog, specify that following values and formulae:
■ For CplRad, in the Value column, enter 30 mm.
■ For NomRad, in the Value column, enter 50 mm.
■ For LenA2, in the Formula column, enter LenA1 * tan(Ang / 2).
■ NomDia, in the Formula column, enter NomRad * 2.
NOTE When specifying formulae, the calculated length defines the geometry. Fittings must have
their connectors (which you place later in this exercise) on lines that intersect the Center (Left/Right)
and Center (Front/Back) reference planes.
70 Click OK.
71 In the drawing area, select the (left) dimension that is dimensioning the Center (Front/Back)
and Radius reference planes.
72 On the Options Bar, for Label, select the LenA1 family parameter.
The dimension is associated and controlled by the LenA1 family parameter. Notice that the
parameter name displays as part of the dimension annotation.
73 Using the same method, select each dimension and associate it to a family parameter as shown.
NOTE Associate each dimension separately. Do not select multiple dimensions and associate them
to a parameter as this will cause errors.
74 Press CTRL+S.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 521
Use a lookup table file to define multiple sizes
A lookup table file is a CSV (comma separated value) text file that contains pipe size information. Revit MEP
uses this pipe size information to define pipe fitting size after you specify a pipe diameter. Lookup tables are
not used to determine pipe sizes as a result of using the Pipe Sizing tool—these pipe sizes are determined by
various project-specific factors.
75 Using Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Autodesk\RME 2009\Training\Metric\Tutorials\Family Editor, and copy the M_Threaded
Generic Elbow.csv lookup table file, and paste it into the C:\Documents and Settings\All
Users\Application Data\Autodesk\RME 2009\LookupTables folder. This is the default path.
NOTE If Revit MEP was not installed in the default path, you must determine the correct path to the
Lookup Table file as defined by the LookupTableLocation parameter in the Revit.ini file (within the
<install_path>\RME2009\Program folder).
Next, you specify formulae that use the lookup table file to determine pipe size.
76 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Family Types.
77 In the Family Types dialog, in the Value column, for Lookup Table Name, enter M_Threaded
Generic Elbow.csv and click Apply.
78 In the Formula column, enter the following formulae:
■ For LenA1, enter text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, "LenA1", 0, NomDia).
■ For CplRad, enter text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, "CplRad", 0, NomDia).
■ For BdyRad, enter text_file_lookup(Lookup Table Name, "BdyRad", 0, NomDia).
79 Click OK.
The formulae are applied and the dimensions are adjusted.
80 Press CTRL+S to save the family.
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RELATED During fitting creation, if specific pipe sizes that you need are not present in the lookup
table file by default, you can add them according to manufacturers’ specifications. However, you
must save the lookup table file in a plain text format. If the file is saved in a proprietary format, Revit
MEP may not be able to read it and any family type parameter formulae that refer to that lookup
table will most likely return a value of 0 and errors will occur. If you encounter this type of issue, copy
the lookup table data from the problematic lookup table file and paste it into a new text file. Save
the text file with the file name including the .csv file extension and copy it to the LookupTables folder.
Next, you begin creating the fitting geometry.
Create a fitting profile
You create a fitting profile in order to provide a geometrical shape for the sweep extrusion. This sweep uses
the profile and the reference lines to create the elbow fitting geometry.
81 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Family.
82 In the New dialog, select Metric Profile.rft, and click Open.
83 In the Project Browser, verify that the Ref. Level floor plan is the active view.
84 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Lines.
85 In the Type Selector, verify that Profiles is selected.
86 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) is selected.
■ Select (Circle).
You may need to click and select this sketching option from the list.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
87 In the drawing area, draw a circle with any radius in the approximate location as shown.
88 Click Modify.
89 Select the circle, and on the Options Bar, click .
90 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, select Center Mark Visible, and click OK.
The center mark displays allowing you to align the circle to the reference planes.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 523
91 On the Edit toolbar, click (Align).
92 Click the Center (Front/Back) reference plane, and then click the circle center mark to align the
circle horizontally.
93 Click to lock the circle to the horizontally.
94 Using the same method, align and lock the circle vertically.
95 Select the circle, zoom out, and click the dimension control ( ).
The temporary dimension converts to a permanent dimension.
96 Click the dimension value, enter 25 mm, and press ENTER.
97 On the View Control Bar, click the current scale, and select 1 : 2.
98 Zoom in to view the sketch.
99 On the Design Bar, click Family Types.
100 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
101 In the Parameter Properties dialog, under Parameter Data, do the following:
■ For Name, enter Rad.
■ For Discipline, select Piping.
■ For Type of Parameter, select Pipe Size.
■ For Group parameter under, select Dimensions.
■ Verify that the Type option is selected to create a Type parameter.
■ Click OK.
The new family parameter is listed under Dimensions.
Next, you create a new family type.
102 In the Family Types dialog, under Family Types, click New.
103 Name the new family type, Fitting, and click OK.
The new family type is listed in the Name list.
104 Using the same method, create a family type named Coupling.
105 In the Family Types dialog, click OK.
106 In the drawing area, select the dimension.
107 On the Options Bar, for Label, select Rad.
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The dimension is now associated to and controlled by the Rad family parameter. Notice that
the parameter name displays as part of the dimension annotation.
108 Click File ➤ Save, and save the family as M_Threaded Pipe Profile.rfa.
Next, you load the fitting profile into the project.
109 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects to load the M_Threaded Pipe Profile into the
M_Threaded – Generic Elbow family.
Notice that the M_Threaded - Generic Elbow project becomes active.
Associate family parameters to a profile parameter
You associate family parameters to the Rad profile parameter for each family type in order to control the
radius of the elbow fitting geometry. This allows for parametric changes in the fitting geometry to occur.
110 In the Project Browser, expand Families ➤ Profiles ➤ M_Threaded Pipe Profile, right click
Coupling, and click Properties.
111 In the Type Properties dialog, under Dimensions, for Rad, click .
112 In the Associate Family Parameter, under Existing family parameters of compatible type, select
CplRad, and click OK.
113 In the Type Properties dialog, click Apply.
114 For Type, select Fitting.
115 Under Dimensions, for Rad, click .
116 In the Associate Family Parameter, under Existing family parameters of compatible type, select
BdyRad, and click OK twice.
117 Click File menu ➤ Save to save the family.
Next, you create the fitting geometry.
Create sweeps using reference lines
The elbow fitting geometry consists of 2 couplings connected by the fitting body. You create sweeps using
the reference lines as sweep paths to create the fitting geometry. Each sweep is based on the profile that you
created and loaded into the project.
118 In the drawing area, cross-pick (drag from right to left) to select everything in the drawing.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 525
TIP Remember that when you use cross-picking (drag right to left) to select an object, the cross-picking
border only needs to intersect an object in order to select it. The object does not need to be fully
contained within the border. In contrast, an object must be fully contained when using a pick box
(drag left to right).
119 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
120 In the Filter dialog, clear Reference Lines and Reference Planes, and click OK.
121 On the View Control Bar, click Temporary Hide/Isolate ➤ Hide Element.
Only the reference lines and reference planes display.
122 On the Design Bar, click Solid Form ➤ Solid Sweep.
123 On the Sketch tab of the Design Bar, click Pick Path.
124 In the drawing area, select the left horizontal reference line.
125 On the Pick Path tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Path.
126 In the drawing area, click the red dot on the horizontal reference line.
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127 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Select M_Threaded Pipe Profile: Coupling from the profile list.
■ Verify that the X, Y, and Angle options are specified at 0.
128 On the Sketch tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Sweep.
The geometry for the left coupling is created.
Next, you create the geometry for the fitting body.
129 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Solid Form ➤ Solid Sweep.
130 On the Sketch tab of the Design Bar, click Pick Path.
131 In the drawing area, select the arced reference line.
132 On the Pick Path tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Path.
133 In the drawing area, click the red dot on the arced reference line.
134 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Select M_Threaded Pipe Profile: Fitting from the profile list.
■ Verify that the X, Y, and Angle options are specified at 0.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 527
135 On the Sketch tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Sweep.
The geometry for the fitting body is created.
Next, you create the right coupling geometry for the elbow fitting.
136 Using the same method, add a solid sweep, and select M_Threaded Pipe Profile: Coupling from
the profile list to the right reference line to create the geometry for the right coupling.
The elbow fitting geometry is created.
Next, you verify the fitting geometry.
137 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ 3D Views ➤ View1 to make the 3D view
active.
138 With the 3D view active, enter VG.
139 On the Annotation Categories tab of the Visibility Graphics Overrides dialog, clear all annotation
categories, and click OK.
The fitting geometry displays.
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140 While pressing SHIFT and the middle mouse button, drag the cursor to spin the model, and
verify the fitting geometry.
141 In the Project Browser, double-click Floor Plans ➤ Ref. Level to make it the active view.
142 Press CTRL+S to save the family.
Create detail level geometry
Detail level geometry is the geometry that displays when you select a detail level. In Revit MEP, Coarse and
Medium detail levels display pipe and pipe fittings as single line. The Fine detail level displays pipe and pipe
fittings as double line.
In this section, you draw model lines to create the single line fitting geometry. This fitting geometry displays
when the Coarse and Medium detail level settings are used. First, you need to hide some of the geometry
in the family to make it easier to create model lines for the single-line display.
143 In the drawing area, cross-pick (drag from right to left) to select everything in the drawing.
144 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
145 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Other, and click OK.
The 3 sweeps are selected.
146 On the View Control Bar, click Temporary Hide/Isolate ➤ Hide Element.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 529
Only the reference planes and reference lines display.
147 On the Design Bar, click Model Lines.
148 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Fittings is selected.
149 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For Plane, verify that Level : Ref Level is selected.
■ Select (Pick Lines).
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Lock is cleared.
150 In the drawing area, select the left horizontal reference line.
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A model line is created over the reference line.
151 With the model line selected, click to lock the model line to the reference line.
TIP You can identify objects that are located under other objects by placing the cursor over an object
and press Tab. Each time you press Tab, you highlight through the vertical hierarchy of objects (from
top to bottom). A tooltip and the Status Bar display the name of the object.
152 With the Model Lines tool active and using the same method, select the arced reference line to
create an arced model line, and lock the model line to the arced reference line.
153 Click Modify.
154 Select the arced model line to display its temporary dimension.
155 Zoom out, and click the dimension control ( ) that is located at the lower-right.
This converts the overall angle temporary dimension to a permanent dimension.
156 Click Modify.
157 Select the permanent dimension, and on the Options Bar, for Label, select Ang.
This associates the angle dimension of the arced model line to the Ang family parameter.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 531
158 Relocate the dimension annotation, and modify the witness lines as shown.
159 Using the same method, create a diagonal model line by picking the diagonal reference line
(located at the right end of the arced model line).
NOTE Do not lock the diagonal model line. If you lock it, Revit MEP warns you that locking the
alignment would over constrain the sketch.
160 Click Modify.
161 Select the diagonal model line.
162 Using the same method, convert the diagonal model line overall length temporary dimension
to a permanent dimension, and associate it to the LenA1 family parameter.
Next, you dimension the diagonal model line.
163 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Dimension.
164 On the Options Bar, click (Angular).
165 In the Type Selector, verify that Angular Dimension Style : Linear angular style is selected.
166 In the drawing area, click the diagonal model line, then click the Center (Front/Back) reference
plane, and finally move the cursor and click to place the dimension.
NOTE Make certain that you select the model line and not the reference line. If necessary, press Tab
to locate the model line.
167 Click Modify.
168 Using the same method, associate the new angular dimension to the Ang family parameter.
169 Relocate the dimension annotations, and modify the witness lines as shown.
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170 On the View Control Bar, click Temporary Hide/Isolate ➤ Reset Temporary Hide/Isolate.
171 Press CTRL+S.
Next, you flex the part to validate the design.
Flex the part
172 On the Design Bar, click Family Types.
173 In the Family Types dialog, under Dimensions, for Ang, enter 90, and click Apply.
The part flexes to become a 90 degree elbow fitting.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 533
NOTE If the part does not flex and errors occur, this is usually caused by a constraint issue. Check
all constraints and verify that model lines were created and properly constrained.
174 Restore the Ang parameter to 45, and click OK.
Next, you create tick marks.
Add tick marks and dimension them
You create tick marks to indicate the end of the fitting when viewing the fitting in either the Coarse or
Medium (single line) detail level.
175 In the drawing area, cross-pick (drag from right to left) to select everything in view.
176 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
177 In the Filter dialog, clear Lines (Pipe Fitting) and Reference Planes, and click OK.
Everything except for model lines and reference planes are selected. Lines (Pipe Fittings) are the
model lines.
178 On the View Control Bar, click Temporary Hide/Isolate ➤ Hide Element.
Only model lines and reference planes display.
179 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Model Lines.
180 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Fittings is selected.
181 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For Plane, verify that Level : Ref Level is selected.
■ Verify that (Draw) and (Line) are selected.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
182 At the left end of the fitting, draw a model line that is perpendicular and tangent to the end of
the horizontal model line as shown.
Line length is approximate.
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TIP You draw this model line on top of the Coupling reference plane.
183 At the right end of the fitting, draw another model line that is perpendicular and tangent to
the end of the diagonal model line as shown.
Again, length is approximate.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 535
The 2 tick marks are drawn.
Next, you dimension each side of the 2 tick marks.
184 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
185 In the Type Selector, verify that Linear Dimension Style : Linear is selected.
186 On the Options Bar, verify that (Aligned) is selected.
187 On the left end of the fitting, click the Center (Front/Back) reference plane and click the top
end point of the model line (tick mark), then move the cursor to the left and click to place the
dimension.
NOTE You must click the reference plane first to dimension this model line.
The top half of the model line (tick mark) is dimensioned.
188 Using the same method, dimension the bottom half of the left model line.
189 Using the same method, dimension both halves of the right model line (tick mark) by clicking
the diagonal model line first, and then clicking an endpoint of the model line (tick mark).
You place 2 dimensions for the right model line.
190 Click Modify.
191 Select the lower dimension for the left model line, and on the Options Bar, for Label, select
CplRad
This associates that dimension to the CplRad family parameter.
192 Using the same method, associate the other 3 model line dimensions to the CplRad parameter.
NOTE You must associate each dimension separately. You cannot select multiple dimensions and
associate them to a parameter.
The dimension are as shown.
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Next, you create an angular dimension between the diagonal model line and the right model
line tick mark.
193 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Dimension.
194 On the Options Bar, click (Angular).
195 Click the diagonal model line and then click the right model line tick mark, move the cursor
down and click to place the dimension.
196 Click Modify.
197 Select the angular dimension, and lock it to 90 degrees.
You may need to zoom out to locate the lock.
198 Relocate the dimension annotations, and modify the witness lines as shown.
199 On the View Control Bar, click Temporary Hide/Isolate ➤ ,Reset Temporary Hide/Isolate.
200 Press CTRL+S to save the family.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 537
Flex the part
201 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Family Types.
202 In the Family Types dialog, for Ang, enter 90, and for NomRad enter 25 mm, and click Apply.
The elbow fitting flexes into a 90 degree elbow that has a 50 mm diameter.
203 Continue to flex the fitting by changing the Ang and NomRad parameter values.
NOTE If errors occur while flexing the fitting, the NomRad value that you specified required a pipe
diameter that is not included in the lookup table file. You may want to refer to the M_Threaded
Generic Elbow.csv lookup table file for the valid pipe diameters or add new pipe diameters based on
the manufacturers’ specifications.
You created the detail level geometry for the elbow fitting and flexed this geometry to validate
it. Next, you set object visibility.
Specify object visibility
You specify object visibility to determine the type of elbow fitting geometry that displays for each detail
level setting.
204 In the drawing area, cross-pick (drag from right to left) to select everything in the drawing.
205 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
206 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Lines (Pipe Fittings), and click OK.
Only model lines are selected. Next, you specify this single line geometry to a detail level setting.
207 With the model lines selected, on the Options Bar, click Visibility.
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208 In the Family Element Visibility Settings dialog, verify that Coarse and Medium are selected,
clear Fine, and click OK.
This specifies that the single-line fitting geometry will display when only the Coarse and Medium
detail level settings are selected. Next, you specify the 2-line geometry for the Fine detail level
setting.
209 In the drawing area, cross-pick (drag from right to left) to select everything in the drawing.
210 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
211 In the Filter dialog, click None, select Other, and click OK.
Only the 3 sweeps are selected.
212 With the sweeps selected, on the Options Bar, click Visibility.
213 In the Family Element Visibility Settings dialog, clear Coarse and Medium, verify that Fine is
selected, and click OK.
The 2-line fitting geometry will display only when the Fine detail level setting is selected.
214 Press CTRL+S.
Next, you add connectors to the elbow fitting family.
Add connectors
215 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ 3D Views ➤ View1 to make the 3D view
active.
216 In the drawing area, cross-pick (drag from right to left) to select everything in the view.
217 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
218 In the Filter dialog, click None, select Dimensions, and click OK.
219 On the View Control Bar, click Temporary Hide/Isolate ➤ Hide Element.
The fitting displays.
220 Spin the model to view the faces at the ends of the fitting.
221 On the Design Bar, click Pipe Connector.
222 On the Options Bar, select Fitting from the system type list, and verify that (Place on
Face) is selected.
You begin by placing the primary connector.
223 Place the cursor on the edge of the right face of the fitting, and after the edge highlights, click
to place the primary connector.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 539
The primary connector is placed.
You place the primary connector on the right face because this face is on the X-axis. Notice that
crosshairs display indicating that this is the primary connector.
NOTE When you place fitting connectors, the primary connector must be placed on the face that is
on the X-axis. You can verify this by viewing the face in a floor plan view. Unexpected behavior can
result if the primary connector is not properly placed relative to the other connectors, and that if all
connectors are not properly rotated and linked.
224 Using the same method, place a connector on the left face of the fitting.
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225 Click Modify.
Next, you link both connectors.
226 Select the primary connector (indicated by crosshairs).
227 On the Options Bar, click Link Connector, and click the other connector.
The 2 connectors are linked. Next, you specify connector properties.
228 In the drawing area, select the 2 connectors.
The 2 selected connectors display in red.
229 On the Options Bar, select .
230 In the Element Properties dialog, under Instance Parameters, do the following:
■ For System Type, verify that Fitting is selected.
■ For Angle, click , in the Associate Family Parameter dialog, select Ang, and click OK.
■ For Radius, click , in the Associate Family Parameter dialog, select NomRad, and click
OK.
The connector angle constraint and radius dimension are now associated to parameters. This
allows the fitting radius to change after you specify a pipe diameter or perform pipe sizing.
It also allows the fitting angle to change as a result of modifications to the pipe layout. Notice
that values are assigned to both associated parameters, and that these parameters cannot be
edited in the Element Properties dialog.
■ In the Element Properties dialog, click OK.
The connector radii change.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 541
Next, you rotate the connectors.
Rotate connectors
231 In the 3D view, enter ZF to zoom the view to fit the window.
Notice that the connectors are oriented horizontally.
Although the connectors are round, it is the recommended that you rotate them so that they
are oriented vertically.
IMPORTANT Connector rotation is a critical part of connector placement. The connector orientation
determines the correct orientation of the objects that are automatically inserted on the part. Although
this is not as important for round connectors, it is extremely important for rectangular connectors
such as those on rectangular duct fittings. Remember that for rectangular connectors, the rectangular
connector must be oriented so that the width is assigned to the face that is on the X and Y axes. The
height is not on these axes. If rectangular connectors are not rotated properly, the rectangular duct
fitting will be inserted improperly, creating an unexpected result. You may find it easier to rotate
connectors in a 3D view, where the part geometry is clearly visible.
232 Spin the fitting to view the entire primary connector.
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233 Select the connector, and on the Options Bar, click (Rotate).
234 Move the cursor over the model line and to the left of the connector arrow, and after the
intersection snap displays, click to specify the rotation start point.
235 Move the cursor clockwise 90 degrees, and click to specify the rotation end point.
NOTE Do not use the flip arrows to flip the connector with respect to its reference plane. This also
flips the connector arrow. You will learn more about connector arrows in the next section.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 543
The primary connector is rotated and now has a vertical orientation.
236 Using the same method, rotate the secondary connector so that it has a vertical orientation.
237 Press CTRL+S to save the family.
Next, you verify the connector arrow direction.
Verify connector arrow direction
238 In the 3D view, verify that each connector arrow indicates an outward direction from its
connector as shown.
IMPORTANT Connector arrows indicate the direction of a duct or pipe (extrusion) when it is being
created to complete a connection. It does not indicate flow direction. In most instances, a connector
arrow points outward away from the object to which the connector is associated. Otherwise, the
duct or pipe when created will pass through the object geometry instead of away from it. You can
modify the connector arrow direction by selecting the connector and clicking the flip arrows.
239 Press CTRL+S.
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Test the elbow fitting in a project
240 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Project.
NOTE If you click on the Standard toolbar, a new project is created based on the current project
template. This template may not be the Systems-Default_Metric template. The Systems-Default_Metric
template creates views for all system types allowing you to model different systems in one project.
241 In the New Project dialog, do the following:
■ Under Template file, verify that the path points to the Systems-Default_Metric.rte template
file.
■ Under Create New, verify that Project is selected.
■ Click OK.
If the template file path does not point to the Systems-Default_Metric.rte template, then
click Browse, and locate this template file.
TIP You can also set the project template file path for all new projects on the File Locations tab of
the Options dialog (click Settings menu ➤ Options).
Next, you load the threaded elbow family into the new project.
242 Click Window menu ➤ M_Threaded Generic Elbow.rfa - 3D View to switch back to the threaded
coupling family.
243 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
If more than one project is open, select the project that you just created from the Load into
Projects dialog, and click OK.
The elbow family is loaded into the new project and the new project becomes active.
244 In the Project Browser, verify that the 1 - Mech mechanical floor plan is the active view.
This is the default view when a project, based on the systems default template, opens. The
1 - Mech view is located under Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans in the Project Browser. Because
it is associated with the mechanical discipline, both ducts and pipe can be created in the 1 - Mech
view.
245 On the Piping tab of the Design Bar, click Pipe.
NOTE If the Piping tab is not available on the Design Bar, right-click the Design Bar, and click Piping.
Next, you assign the new threaded generic elbow fitting to a pipe type.
246 In the Type Selector, verify that Pipe Types: Standard is selected.
247 On the Options Bar, click .
248 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
249 In the Type Properties dialog, under Mechanical, for Elbow, select M_Threaded – Generic Elbow:
M_Threaded – Generic Elbow, and click OK twice.
250 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ For D: (diameter) select 80 mm.
■ Verify that Auto Connect is selected.
■ Verify that the Offset elevation is specified at 2750.0 mm
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 545
251 In the drawing area, draw some piping, using various angles and offset elevations.
NOTE Remember that if errors occur during fitting insertion, it is usually because the specified pipe
diameter was not in the Threaded Generic Elbow lookup table file.
252 On the View Control Bar, for Detail Level, click Coarse, Medium, and Fine to see how the new
elbow fitting geometry displays in both the floor pan and the 3D views.
You have verified that the threaded elbow fitting was correctly inserted, that the pipe was created
in the correct direction away from the elbow, and that the detail level geometry displayed
properly. Next, you check connectivity.
Check connectivity
253 Place the cursor over the piping, and press Tab to check connectivity.
The piping highlights indicating that it is connected.
254 Click Modify.
Hide shape handles
255 In the Project Browser, double-click the 1 - Mech view to make it the active view.
256 In the drawing area, select an elbow from your test piping layout.
257 Enter ZR, and draw a zoom region around the elbow.
Notice that triangular and dot shape handles display on the elbow along with the 2 connectors.
258 Drag the upper triangular shape handle upward as shown.
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Notice that this shape handle modified the fitting geometry.
Other shape handles can modify aspects of the fitting such as location. These modifications can
violate the design intent of the elbow fitting.
IMPORTANT Shape handles are not used for Revit MEP system families but they display by default
when you create a new family. If shape handles are not hidden and they are inadvertently dragged
during your modeling session, the geometry or placement of the family will be adversely affected.
This can create unexpected results, especially for duct fittings. This is because, unlike pipe fittings,
duct fittings use formulae that reside in the family rather than in an external lookup table file to
determine size. It is highly recommended that you hide all shape handles for Revit MEP families before
using them in a project. To hide the shape handles in a system family, you need to open the family
in the Family Editor and specify the Is Reference instance parameter as Not a Reference for all reference
lines and all reference planes that are used for that family.
259 Press CTRL+Z to undo the modification.
260 Click Window menu ➤ M_Threaded - Generic Elbow.rfa - Floor Plan: Ref. Level to switch to the
elbow family floor plan view.
261 In the drawing area, cross-pick (drag from right to left) to select everything in the drawing,
including reference planes.
262 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
263 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Reference Planes, and click OK.
Creating an Elbow Pipe Fitting Family | 547
Only the reference planes are selected.
264 On the Options Bar, click .
265 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Is Reference, select Not a Reference, and click
OK.
266 Using the same method, specify Not a Reference for all reference lines.
267 Press CTRL+S to save the family.
268 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
If more than one project is open, in the Load into Projects dialog, select the test project in which
you tested the elbow fitting, and click OK.
269 After a message informs you to overwrite the existing version of the threaded generic elbow,
click Override parameter values of existing types, and click Yes.
The test project becomes active.
270 In the 1 - Mech floor plan view, zoom in and select an elbow from your piping layout.
Notice that all shape handles are hidden.
The threaded elbow is ready to be used in a project.
RELATED Although the physical geometry of this fitting is accurate, it is inconsistent with a real-world
threaded elbow in that the connectors on this elbow fitting are on the outer face of the threaded
portion of the fitting. This prevents the pipe from engaging the fitting. You can use the Hidden Line
model graphics style to verify this. If the part were modeled so that the pipe engaged the fitting,
proper performance of Revit MEP would be impacted due to the way hidden lines are calculated and
drawn.
Creating an Annotation Symbol Family
It is likely that you will need to create annotation symbols that are not part of a building model. For example,
a common symbol in MEP drawings is a New to Existing Connection callout. In this exercise, you create
such an annotation.
1 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Annotation Symbol.
2 In the New dialog, select M_Generic Annotation.rft, and click Open.
3 Maximize the window, and in the drawing area, zoom in to view the note (located near the
intersection of the reference planes).
548 | Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content
This note contains key points to remember when creating an annotation family.
4 Select the note and delete it.
5 Enter ZR, and draw a zoom region around the intersection of the 2 reference planes.
Draw lines
6 On the Design Bar, click Lines.
7 In the Type Selector, verify that Generic Annotations is selected.
8 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw), and (Line) are selected.
■ Clear Chain.
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
9 Click the intersection of the 2 reference planes to specify the line start point, move the mouse
to the right, and after listening dimensions appear, enter 3, and press Enter.
This creates a 3 mm line to the right of the intersection. The line is over the reference line.
10 Using the same method, draw 3 more 3 mm lines located above, below, and to the left of the
intersection as shown.
TIP You can also mirror the opposite lines instead of drawing them.
11 In the drawing area, while pressing CTRL, select the 2 reference planes.
12 On the View Control Bar (located at the lower-left under the drawing area), click Temporary
Hide/Isolate ➤ Hide Element.
Creating an Annotation Symbol Family | 549
This hides the reference planes allowing you to better view the lines.
Next, you create the filled regions.
Create filled regions
13 On the toolbar, click (Fine Lines).
14 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Filled Region.
15 On the Sketch tab of the Design, verify that Lines is selected.
16 In the Type Selector, verify that Generic Annotations is selected.
17 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) is selected.
■ Select (Arc from center and endpoints).
You may need to click and, select this sketching option from the list.
■ Click Radius, and enter 2.5 mm.
18 Zoom the view, place the cursor over the intersection of the 4 lines, and after the end point
snap displays, click to specify the center of the arc.
19 Move the cursor directly up and over the end of the upper vertical line, and after the end point
snap displays, click to specify the start point of the arc.
550 | Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content
20 Move the cursor over the right horizontal line, and after the intersection snap displays, click to
specify the end point of the arc.
An arced line is drawn.
21 With the Lines tool active, on the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) and Chain are selected.
■ Click (Line).
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Verify that Radius is cleared.
Creating an Annotation Symbol Family | 551
22 In the drawing area, click the upper end point of the arced line, then click the intersection of
the 4 lines, and finally click the lower end point of the arced line.
A chain of 2 lines is drawn.
23 On the Sketch tab of the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
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This filled region is created.
24 Using the same method, draw a filled region on the opposite lower-left quadrant.
Next, you draw a circle around the 2 filled regions.
25 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Lines.
26 On the Options Bar, do the following:
■ Verify that (Draw) is selected.
■ Click (Circle).
■ For Offset, verify that 0.0 is specified.
■ Click Radius, and verify that 2.5 is specified.
27 In the drawing area, place the cursor over the intersection of the 4 lines, and after the end point
snap displays, click to specify the center of the circle.
28 Click Modify.
Creating an Annotation Symbol Family | 553
29 Click File ➤ Save, and save the family as M_New to Existing.rfa
Test the annotation symbol in a project
30 Click File menu ➤ Open.
31 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click the Training Files icon.
32 Open Metric ➤ Family Editor ➤ m Sample Project.rvt.
33 Click Window menu ➤ M_New to Existing.rfa - Drawing Sheet to switch to the new annotation
symbol family.
34 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
35 In the Project Browser, expand Views (Discipline) ➤ Mechanical ➤ HVAC ➤ Floor Plans, and
double-click 1 - Mech to make it the active view.
36 On the Drafting tab on the Design Bar, click Symbol.
37 In the Type Selector, verify that M_New to Existing is selected.
38 On the Options Bar, click .
39 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
40 In the Type Properties dialog, under Graphics, for Leader Arrowhead, select Arrow Filled 15
Degree, and click OK twice.
41 On the Options Bar, for Number of Leaders, enter 1.
42 In the drawing area, zoom in, and click to place the annotation symbol in the project.
43 Press ESC twice.
Next, you modify the symbol leader.
44 Select the leader to display shape handles.
45 Drag the middle shape handle up to modify the middle of the leader.
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46 Drag the end shape handle to modify the annotation symbol as shown.
47 Select the symbol, and drag the cross-arrows to relocate the symbol.
48 Click File menu ➤ Close. You do not need to save the project.
Revit MEP Family Editor Concepts
A defining feature of Revit MEP content is the concept of connectors. Connectors allow Revit MEP content
to participate in specific systems and facilitate calculations for a variety of parameters.
Connectors
The primary difference between content for Revit MEP and content for Revit Architecture or Revit Structure
is the concept of connectors. All Revit MEP content requires connectors for to be intelligent Revit MEP
components. Components created without connectors cannot participate in a system topology.
Three disciplines can be assigned to connectors that are added to a family.
■ Duct connectors are associated with ductwork, duct fittings, and other elements that are part of the air
handling systems.
■ Electrical connectors are used for any type of electrical connections, including power, telephone, alarm
systems and others.
■ Pipe connectors are used for piping, pipe fittings, and other components that are meant for transmitting
fluids.
The discipline assigned to a connector determines its behavior and the types of systems with which it can
interact. Connectors are primarily logical entities that allow calculating loads within the building.
NOTE The term fluid does not necessarily limit the use of piping systems to liquids. Steam, medical gases and
other non-fluid materials are often transmitted using piping systems.
Selecting the correct discipline is critical to the content working correctly, as after this selection is made, it
cannot be changed without first deleting the connector and adding it again with the correct discipline.
Revit MEP Family Editor Concepts | 555
Connector Properties
The discipline assigned to a connector determines the connector’s properties. The following tables show the
different connector parameters, by property group, for each discipline and a brief description of their
functionality.
Electrical
Constraints
Connector placement method (read only). Edge loop centered
Graphics
Size of the connector display inside the Family Editor. Size on screen
Electrical - Loads
Calculated based on (Apparent Load Phase 3) x (Power
Factor).
True Load Phase 3
Calculated based on (Apparent Load Phase 2) x (Power
Factor).
True Load Phase 2
Calculated based on (Apparent Load Phase 1) x (Power
Factor).
True Load Phase 1
Percentage of power attributed to this connector. Active only
when Power is specified as System Type.
Power Factor
Calculated based on (Voltage) x (Current - Phase 3). Active
only when Balanced Load is False and System Type is Power,
and Number of Poles >2.
Apparent Load Phase 3
Calculated based on (Voltage) x (Current - Phase 2). Active
only when Balanced Load is False and System Type is Power,
and Number of Poles >1.
Apparent Load Phase 2
Calculated based on (Voltage) x (Current - Phase 1). Active
only when Balanced Load is False and System Type is Power.
Apparent Load Phase 1
Calculated based on (Voltage) x (Current). Active only when
Balanced Load is True and System Type is Power.
Apparent Load
The voltage specified on the connector. Active only when
the System Type is Power.
Voltage
Possible values are: Data, Power - Balanced, Power - Unbal-
anced, Telephone, Security, Fire Alarm, Nurse Call, Controls,
Communication.
System Type
556 | Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content
Possible values are: HVAC, Lighting, Power, Other. Load Classification
Possible values are: Lagging, Leading. Power Factor State
Possible values are: 1, 2, or 3. Number of Poles
Identity Data
A unique identifier for a connector in a family (read only). Index
Possible values are: True or False (read only). A single connect-
or of each discipline is allowed to be primary in each family.
Primary Connector
The family’s electrical data that displays in a schedule is de-
rived from the primary connector.
A description of the connector Connector Description
Mechanical (HVAC)
Constraints
Connector placement method (read only) Edge loop centered
Used for adjustable angle families (such as elbows and ad-
justable tees) to push the angle value into the family from
connected components
Angle
Graphics
Size of the connector display inside the Family Editor. Size on screen
Mechanical
Percentage of the system flow attributed to this connector.
Active only when the Flow Configuration is System.
Flow Factor
Active only when the Loss Method is Coefficient. Loss Coefficient
Possible values are: Calculated, Preset, System. Flow Configuration
Possible values are: In, Out, Bidirectional. Flow Direction
Possible values are: Supply, Return, Exhaust, Other, Un-
defined.
System Type
Possible values are: Not Defined, Coefficient, Specific Loss. Loss Method
Mechanical - Airflow
Connectors | 557
Active only when the Loss Method is Specific Loss. Pressure Drop
The amount of air flowing at this connector. Flow
Dimensions
Possible values are: Rectangular or Round. Shape
The height of the connector when the Shape is defined to
be rectangular.
Height
The width of the connector when the Shape is defined to
be rectangular.
Width
The radius of the connector when the Shape is defined to
be round.
Radius
Identity Data
A unique identifier for a connector in a family (read only). Index
Possible values are: True or False (read only). A single con-
nector of each discipline is allowed to be primary in each
Primary Connector
family. The family’s HVAC data that displays in a schedule
is derived from the primary connector.
The index of the linked connector, -1 if none. (read only) Link Connector Index
A description of the connector Connector Description
Mechanical (Piping)
Constraints
Connector placement method (read only). Edge loop centered
Used for adjustable angle families (such as elbows and ad-
justable tees) to push the angle value into the family from
connected components
Angle
Graphics
Size of the connector display inside the Family Editor. Size on screen
Mechanical
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Active only when the System Type is Sanitary, Domestic Hot
Water, or Domestic Cold Water and the Flow Configuration
is Fixture Units.
Fixture Units
K Coefficient (K Factor) is only editable if Loss Method is
specified as “K Coefficient”.
K Coefficient
Percentage of the system flow attributed to this connector.
Active only when the Flow Configuration is System.
Flow Factor
Volumetric flow rate of fluid through connector. Flow
Active only when the Loss Method is Specific Loss Pressure Drop
Possible values are: Calculated, Preset, System. Flow Configuration
Possible values are: In, Out, Bidirectional. Bidirectional is
active only when the Flow Configuration is Calculated.
Flow Direction
Possible values are: Not Defined, K Coefficient from Table, K
Coefficient, Specific Loss.
Loss Method
Possible values are: Checked or unchecked. Allow Slope Adjustments
Possible values are: Undefined, Hydronic Supply, Hydronic
Return, Sanitary, Domestic Cold Water, Domestic Hot Water,
Fire Protection, Other.
System Type
Possible values are: Bell Mouth Inlet or Reducer, Inward Pro-
jecting Pipe, Outlet, Square Edged Inlet. Active only when
the Loss Method is K Coefficient from Table.
K Coefficient Table
Dimensions
The nominal size of the connector. Radius
Identity Data
A unique identifier for a connector in a family (read only). Index
Possible values are: True or False (read only). A single connect-
or of each discipline is allowed to be primary in each family.
Primary Connector
The family’s piping data that displays in a schedule is derived
from the primary connector.
The index of the linked connector, -1 if none. (read only). Link Connector Index
A description of the connector. Connector Description
Connectors | 559
System Types
When a Revit MEP component that is not a member in a system is selected in a building model, the Options
Bar displays create system buttons. The specific buttons depend on the component and the type(s) of
connectors in the family. If there are multiple connectors of the same type and you want to connect to a
specific connector, you can right-click on the connector control to create the appropriate type.
Electrical
When a component with an electrical connector is selected, the Options Bar displays one or more of the
following buttons, which allow you to create a specific electrical system (from left to right: Power, Data,
Telephone, Fire Alarm, Nurse Call, Communication.
Duct
When a component with an Duct connector is selected, the Options Bar displays one or more of the following
buttons, which allow you to create a specific HVAC system (from left to right: Air Supply, Air Return, Exhaust).
Pipe Connector
Pipe connectors are used with hydronic systems, plumbing systems, fire protection systems.
When a component with a hydronic pipe connector is selected, the Options Bar displays one or more of the
following buttons, which allow you to create a specific hydronic piping system (from left to right: Supply,
Return, Other.
When a component with a plumbing (pipe) connector is selected, the Options Bar displays one or more of
the following buttons, which allow you to create a specific electrical system (from left to right: Sanitary,
Domestic Hot Water, Domestic Cold Water, Other).
When a component with a fire protection (pipe) connector is selected, the Options Bar displays one or more
of the following buttons, which allow you to create a specific electrical system (from left to right: Wet
Sprinkler, Dry Sprinkler, Other).
Load Classifications
Revit MEP maintains information about loads associated with the rooms in a project. As devices and
equipment are placed in rooms, Revit MEP keeps track of the loads based on load type: HVAC, Lighting,
Power, Other. The loads associated with the room can be view in the Element Properties for each room, and
displayed in schedules.
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Connector Placement
Connector placement options allow you to specify two basic connector placement methods:
■ Place on Face
This option (Edge loop centered=true) will maintain its point at the center of the edge loop. In most
cases this is the preferable method for placing a connector. Typically the Place on Face option is easier
to use, and is suitable for most cases.
■ Place on Work Plane
This option allows placement of the connector on a selected plane. For many cases it would be possible
to imitate the place on face option by specifying a plane and using dimensions to constrain the connector
to the desired location. However, this method generally requires additional parameters and constraints
to be used effectively.
NOTE Fittings (pipe and duct fittings) expect the instance origin of the family to be the intersection of the
connectors. In most cases for fittings, there is a point on the fitting where all of the connectors (if extended into
the fitting) will collide. Fittings expect this collision to be placed at the original intersection of the Center (Front
/ Back), Center (Left / Right), and Reference Level work planes. For this reason, it is good practice to pin these
reference planes before beginning to build the family. Do this by selecting the reference plane(s) and clicking the
Pin icon on the Edit toolbar.
Connectors | 561
Hosts
Objects that are placed in a model are often hosted by other components. Hosting components include
ceilings, floors, roofs, and walls, as well as lines, and faces. Even components that are not hosted by one of
these components are still hosted by the level on which they reside.
When creating a family from a template, it is important that you consider what type of hosting behavior
you want for the family. For example, you may intuitively think that a new light fixture should be ceiling
hosted. However, there may be cases where you want to use that family in a wall mount configuration, or
even freely suspended. You cannot change the hosting of a family after it is created; the hosting setting is
hard-set based on the template from which the family originated. Plane hosting provides the ability for the
family to be hosted by walls, floors, or ceilings, and provides a high level of flexibility. Plane hosted elements
will even move with their hosting elements through linked models. Non-hosted families are actually hosted
by the level they are inserted on and provide the ability for the element to be placed anywhere. Their height
is defined relative to their level, but there is no association established with elements, linked models or
otherwise.
When using linked files, only face-hosted families will be able to be hosted by the linked file’s geometry.
Templates
As described above, the hosting of an element is defined based on the template that is used when the family
is originally created. Templates also determine the type of family as an annotation family, model family,
titleblock family, or a profile family. In some cases, the template also defines particular characteristics of
how the family works, such as linear versus spot lighting characteristics.
NOTE You cannot change these characteristics once you have created the family. For example, you cannot change
a linear lighting fixture into a spot lighting fixture, or redefine an annotation symbol to be a model element. You
must start the family with the appropriate template.
Lookup Tables
Lookup tables are used to define parameter values in an external .csv file. This lets you specify multiple part
sizes that are based on a table without creating a separate family type for each size. Revit MEP provides a
text_file_lookup function that can be used to read the necessary values from a comma-separated values (.csv)
file. The location of Lookup Table files is defined by the LookupTableLocation parameter in the Revit.ini
file.
The syntax for the text_file_lookup function uses the following format:
result=text_file_lookup(LookupTableName, LookupColumn, DefaultIfNotFound, LookupValue)
Is: Where:
the returned value. result
the name of the CSV file to lookup. LookupTableName
the name of the column from which the result value is to be
returned.
LookupColumn
the value that will be returned if LookupValue is not found. DefaultIfNotFound
562 | Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content
the value to find in the first column of the table. LookupValue
CSV File Structure
The first row of values in the CSV file is for header information, to describe the contents of subsequent
columns. The headers are of the format ParameterName##ParameterType##ParameterUnits
Acceptable parameter types are: NUMBER, LENGTH, AREA, VOLUME, ANGLE, and OTHER
For example, a column may have the following header: TotalArea##AREA##INCHES to represent the total
area in square inches.
The first column in the file contains a description. The Lookup Function processes the information in the
file starting with column 2.
Parameter Mapping
Many properties for objects, such as the depth of an extrusion and the voltage of a connector, can be mapped
(associated) to a family parameter or to a shared parameter to provide flexibility to the family. The associated
parameter can be defined as an instance parameter or a type parameter. Parameters are mapped by clicking
(small button) in the column in the Element Properties dialog for the object. When an object’s parameter
is mapped to another parameter, its Value column cannot be edited.
The example below shows that the Power Factor and Number of Poles parameters are currently not mapped
to a parameter. Their values can be edited directly in the Value column. The Apparent Load Phase 1 and
Voltage parameters are mapped to other parameters, and their values assume the values specified for the
parameters to which they have been mapped.
Category
Revit MEP components fall into general categories (pipe fittings, lighting fixtures, and so on). The Family
Category specified when a family is created determines which Family Parameters are activated. The settings
for these family parameters affect the behavior for the part and identifies the type of component. In Family
Editor, the Family Category and Parameters settings are found in the Settings menu. Depending on the
Family Category and the type of template that the family was derived from (host-based, generic model,
Parameter Mapping | 563
detail component, generic tag, and so on), different Family Parameters apply. The following table lists each
Family Category, and indicates the applicable Family Parameters.
Family Parameter Family Category
Shared Maintain
Annotation
Orientation
Part Type Light
Source
Always Ver-
tical **
Work Plane
Based
X X X X Air Terminals
X X X X X Communications Devices
X X X X X Data Devices
X X X X Duct Accessories
X X X X Duct Fittings
X X X X Electrical Equipment
X X X X X Electrical Fixtures
X X X X X Fire Alarm Devices
X X X Generic Models
X X X X X Lighting Devices
X X X X X Lighting Fixtures
X X X X Mechanical Equipment
X X X X Nurse Call Devices
X X X X Pipe Accessories
X X X X Pipe Fittings
X X X X X Plumbing Fixtures
X X X X X Security Devices
X X X X Sprinklers
X X X X X Telephone Devices
Family Parameters
■ Light Source: See Light Source on page 565.
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■ Part Type: See Part Types on page 565.
■ Maintain Annotation Orientation: Use this option when the family has a nested annotation family, as
is the case with receptacles and switches.
Light Source
A light source is the part of a lighting fixture that emits light (such as a light bulb). In general, each lighting
fixture family has one light source. To create a lighting fixture that uses multiple light sources (such as a
chandelier or a set of track lights), create a nested family.
When light source is selected in the Family Category and Parameters dialog, you can specify the shape of
the light element (point, line, rectangle, circle), and the light distribution (spherical, hemispherical, spot,
or photometric web). You can also define photometric characteristics, such as Light Loss Factor, Initial
Intensity, and Initial Color Control. In a project, you can adjust the position and brightness of each light
source to achieve the desired lighting effects.
Part Types
The Part Type parameter provides additional subclassification of a family category, and determines the
behavior for the parts in the family. The part type serves 2 functions:
■ To only allow replacing a particular part with a similar part in a building project. Generally the Type
Selector allows you to replace a family of one category with any other family of the same category.
However, there are times when this is not appropriate. For example, for fittings it would not be valid to
replace a cross with a transition. So there is a level of filtering built into the Type Selector for Revit MEP.
■ To determine the part type family. The ASHRAE Duct Fitting database is integrated with Revit MEP. This
allows calculating fitting losses based on a loss table. To accurately look up the correct fitting in the
database, the part type must be defined.
If a family category provides a Part Type parameter, the Part Type values available depends on the family
category. The following table shows which part types apply to which family categories:
Part Types Family Categories
Damper, Duct Mounted Equipment, Elbow, Entry, Exit,
Equipment, Fan and System Interaction, Hood, Junction,
Obstruction, Transition, Undefined, Valve
Air Terminals, Duct Accessories, Duct Fittings, Mechanical
Equipment, Pipe Accessories, Pipe Fittings, Plumbing Fixture
Normal, Panelboard, Transformer, Switchboard, Data Panel,
Switch Junction Box
Communication Devices, Data Devices, Electrical Equipment,
Electrical Fixtures, Fire Alarm Devices, Lighting Devices,
Lighting Fixtures, Nurse Call Devices, Security Devices, Tele-
phone Devices
■ Damper: Used to control flow volume.
■ Duct Mounted Equipment: Smoke detectors, steam generators
■ Elbow: A bend or elbow type fitting
■ Entry: Point at which fluid enters the system: louvers, grills, grates
■ Exit: Point at which fluid leaves the system
Light Source | 565
■ Equipment: Generic equipment
■ Fan and System Interaction AHUs, inline fans
■ Hood: Kitchen, lab or other exhaust hoods
■ Junction: Intersection of 3 or more segments (tee, cross, wye)
■ Obstruction: Anything that causes a pressure drop, such as an inline filter
■ Transition: Shape or size change
■ Undefined: No specific functionality
■ Valve: Valves and similar accessories
■ Data Panel: Panels used to connect devices with connectors of System Type Data, Telephone, Security,
Fire Alarm, Nurse Call, Controls, and Communication.
■ Normal: Devices such as receptacles, fire alarm components, and light fixtures.
■ Panelboard: Used to connect devices/equipment with connectors with a System Type value of Power
and to generate branch circuit type schedules.
■ Switch: Control device such as a switch where wiring is typically not drawn through the devices. As
indicated in the image, the automatically generated wiring branches to the switch.
■ Junction Box: Wire management devices through which wiring is generally drawn through the device.
As indicated in the image, the automatically generated wiring branches through the junction box.
■ Switchboard: Used to connect devices/equipment with connectors with a System Type value of Power
and to generate branch circuit type schedules.
■ Transformer: Used to interconnect Panelboards and/or Switchboards of differing voltages.
566 | Chapter 9 Creating Revit MEP Content
Documenting Your
Projects
In this section of the tutorials, you learn to create construction documentation in Revit MEP 2009. We wish to thank
BNIM Architects, a Kansas city based architectural firm for providing their Freighthouse Flats renovation project to use
for the tutorial datasets in this section.
Located in Kansas City’s popular Crossroads Arts District, the Freighthouse Flats project is an exciting renovation of an
historic three-story warehouse into new urban luxury loft living spaces. BNIM Architects was selected to convert the
existing building into a 22-unit condominium featuring concrete floors, lofty ceilings, balconies, and a roof garden. As
the building is slated to receive historic tax credits, the existing building shell will be maintained and restored. The
additional 4th floor and non-historic north facade will be modernized to include a 4th floor penthouse, exterior fire stairs,
and north facing balconies for the 2nd and 3rd floor units.
NOTE For training purposes, slight modifications to the building design have been made.
567
568
Adding Views and Sheets
to a Project
In this tutorial, you begin the construction documentation for the Freighthouse Flats project. You learn to:
■ Create new project views, including plan, elevation, section, and detail views
■ Modify the appearance of tags and other annotation on plans
■ Set visibility and graphic controls in views to produce different presentation effects
■ Create projects sheets that contain project views
Creating Views
In this lesson, you learn how to create views from a building model. You learn how to create new views
from existing views, how to create section and elevation views, and how to create views from callouts that
you place in other views.
Duplicating Plan Views
In this exercise, you create new plan views of the building model by copying existing views and then
modifying the copied views. You duplicate the Level 1 and Level 2 floor plans to create Level 1 and Level 2
furniture plans. You also duplicate the project site plan to create a vicinity plan.
10
569
Level 1 Furniture Plan created from the Level 1 floor plan
Vicinity Plan created from the Site plan
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating
Views.rvt.
Duplicate the Level 1 floor plan to create a Level 1 furniture plan
1 In the Project Browser, expand Floor Plans, and right-click Level 1 ➤ Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
570 | Chapter 10 Adding Views and Sheets to a Project
2 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, right-click Copy of Level 1 ➤ Rename.
3 In the Rename View dialog, enter Level 1 Furniture Plan, and click OK.
4 In the Project Browser, double-click Level 1 Furniture Plan.
Use an alternate method of view duplication to create a Level 2 furniture plan
5 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, select Level 2.
6 Click View menu ➤ Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
7 In the Project Browser, right-click Copy of Level 2 ➤ Rename.
8 In the Rename View dialog, enter Level 2 Furniture Plan, and click OK.
9 In the Project Browser, double-click Level 2 Furniture Plan.
Duplicating Plan Views | 571
Duplicate a view and change the scale as required
10 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, right-click Site ➤ Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
11 Under Floor Plans, right-click Copy of Site ➤ Rename.
12 In the Rename View dialog, enter Vicinity Plan, and click OK.
13 In the Project Browser, double-click Vicinity Plan.
14 On the View Control Bar, click the current scale, and click 1: 1000.
Next, hide the display of the elevation markers in the view.
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15 Select the body of the south elevation marker.
16 Right-click, and click Hide in view ➤ Category.
All of the elevation markers on the plan are hidden.
17 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
18 Save the file as Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating Views_in_progress.rvt.
Creating Elevation and Section Views
In this exercise, you create an additional section and elevation view of the building model.
Creating Elevation and Section Views | 573
South East elevation view
Section view
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating
Views_in_progress.rvt.
Add an elevation marker to the Level 1 floor plan
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
2 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Elevation.
3 In the Type Selector, select Elevation: Building Elevation.
4 On the Options Bar, for Scale, select 1:100.
5 Specify a point in the drawing in front of the angular wall to place an elevation marker.
NOTE Elevation markers are context sensitive and will automatically try to align parallel to model
geometry.
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Modify the elevation extents
6 On the Design Bar, click Modify, and select the head of the elevation marker that you just placed.
7 Select and drag the upper horizontal line of the elevation until it extends past the upper-left
corner of the building.
8 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Creating Elevation and Section Views | 575
Rename and view the new elevation
9 In the Project Browser, under Elevations (Building Elevation), right-click Elevation 1-a ➤ Rename.
10 In the Rename View dialog, enter South East, and click OK.
11 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, double-click South East.
Draw a section line on the Level 1 floor plan
12 In the Project Browser, under Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
13 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Section.
14 In the Type Selector, select Section: Building Section.
15 On the Options Bar, for Scale, select 1:100.
16 Draw a section line through the building:
■ Specify a point above the top wall of the building between grid lines 2 and 3.
■ Move the cursor down, and specify the section line endpoint between the endpoints of grid
lines 2 and 3.
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Modify the section line
17 Click the blue arrows below the section line head to reverse the direction in which the section
is cut through the building.
18 Select the blue triangular grips on the left side of the section extents, and move them to just
outside of the left side of the building.
Creating Elevation and Section Views | 577
19 Click the blue arrows below the section tail twice to cycle through the section tail options and
add a section head to the section line endpoint.
20 Add a jog to the section line:
■ On the Options Bar, click Split Segment.
■ Click the midpoint of the section line, drag it to the right (keeping it below the split) until
it cuts through the stair, and click to place it.
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21 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
View the new section
22 In the Project Browser, expand Sections (Building Section), and double-click Section 1.
23 On the View Control Bar, click Detail Level: Coarse ➤ Medium.
24 Select gridline F, select the blue break mark that displays under the grid bubble, and drag the
top segment of gridline F to the right, using the blue circular drag grip.
Creating Elevation and Section Views | 579
25 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
26 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Creating Callout Views
In this exercise, you create new views: an enlarged stair plan view and a detail view. To create each view,
you draw a callout around the geometry in another view to specify the contents of each new callout view.
Stair callout on the Level 1 floor plan
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Resulting callout view - Enlarged Stair Plan
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating
Views_in_progress.rvt.
Create a floor plan callout
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
2 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Callout.
3 In the Type Selector, select Floor Plan.
4 On the Options Bar, for Scale, select 1:50.
5 Draw the callout around the large stairs in the center of the plan:
■ Click to specify a point to the upper-right of the stair.
■ Move the cursor to the lower-left of the stair, and click to specify a point to complete the
callout.
Creating Callout Views | 581
6 Modify the callout leader:
■ On the Design Bar, click Modify, and select the callout boundary.
■ Select the grip on the leader line that is closest to the callout head, and move it to the left
side of the callout boundary.
■ Select the middle grip, and drag it down slightly to create a jog in the leader line.
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7 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
8 In the Project Browser under Floor Plans, right-click Callout of Level 1 ➤ Rename.
9 In the Rename View dialog, enter Enlarged Stair Plan, and click OK.
Open the callout view
10 Double-click the callout head.
The Enlarged Stair Plan view displays.
Create a detail view callout
11 In the Project Browser, under Sections (Building Sections), double-click Section 1.
12 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Callout.
13 In the Type Selector, select Detail View: Detail.
14 On the Options Bar, for Scale, select 1:50.
15 Create the callout:
■ Zoom in to the upper-left corner of the building, and click to specify a point above and to
the right of the roof overhang.
Creating Callout Views | 583
■ Move the cursor diagonally down, and click to specify a point to the left and below the roof
overhang.
16 Modify the callout leader as shown.
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17 In the Project Browser, expand Detail Views (Details), and right-click Detail 0 ➤ Rename.
18 In the Rename View dialog, enter Roof Overhang Detail, and click OK.
Open the detail callout view
19 In the Project Browser, under Detail Views (Details), double-click Roof Overhang Detail.
20 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Creating Callout Views | 585
Modifying View Tag Appearance
In this exercise, you modify the appearance of tags in a view so that they conform to office CAD standards.
You change the appearance of the section mark head, the elevation markers, and the callout head and
boundary that you placed in previous exercises.
Existing stair callout head and boundary
Modified stair callout head and boundary
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating
Views_in_progress.rvt.
Modify the section mark head
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
2 Click File menu ➤ Open.
3 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, open Metric\Families\Annotations,
select Custom-Section Head.rfa, and click Open.
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The new section mark head that you want to apply to either endpoint of the section line displays.
4 On the Design Bar, click Load into Project.
5 In the Load into Projects dialog, select the current project, clear any others, and click OK.
The Custom-Section Head family is now loaded in the project, and can be applied to the section
line.
6 Click Settings menu ➤ View Tags ➤ Section Tags.
7 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
8 In the Name dialog, enter Section Head – Custom, Section Tail – Filled, and click OK.
9 In the Type Properties dialog, for Section Head, select Custom-Section Head: Section Head –
Open, and click OK.
10 On the floor plan, select the section line, and click .
11 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
12 For Section Tag, select Section Head - Custom, Section Tail - Filled, and click OK twice.
Modify the line weight of the section line and mark
13 Click Settings menu ➤ Object Styles.
14 In the Object Styles dialog, click the Annotation Objects tab.
15 Under Category, scroll to Section Line.
16 Click in the Line Weight/Projection field, and select 3.
17 Under Category, scroll to Section Marks.
18 Click in the Line Weight/Projection field, and select 2.
19 Click OK.
On the floor plan, notice the updated section marks that display at each endpoint of the section
line.
Modify the shape and weight of the elevation markers
20 Click Settings menu ➤ View Tags ➤ Elevation Tags.
21 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
22 In the Name dialog, enter 12.5mm Square, and click OK.
Modifying View Tag Appearance | 587
23 In the Type Properties dialog, under Graphics:
■ For Shape, select Square.
■ For Line Weight, select 3.
■ For Dimensions ➤ Width, enter 12.5 mm.
■ Click OK.
24 Select an elevation marker in the drawing, and on the Options Bar, click .
25 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
26 In the Type Properties dialog, for Elevation Tag, select 12.5mm Square.
27 Click OK twice.
On the floor plan, notice the square elevation markers that display.
Modify the callout head
28 Click File menu ➤ Open.
29 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, open Metric\Families\Annotations,
select Custom-Callout Head.rfa, and click Open.
The new callout head that you want to apply to the callout displays.
30 On the Design Bar, click Load into Project.
31 In the Load into Projects dialog, select the current project, clear all others, and click OK.
32 Click Settings menu ➤ View Tags ➤ Callout Tags.
33 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
34 In the Name dialog, enter Custom – Callout Head w/ 6mm Corner Radius, and click OK.
35 In the Type Properties dialog:
■ For Callout Head, select Custom – Callout Head: Callout Head.
■ For Corner Radius, enter 6 mm.
■ Click OK.
36 In the drawing, select the callout, and on the Options Bar, click .
37 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
38 In the Type Properties dialog, for Callout Tag, select Custom – Callout Head w/ 6mm Corner
Radius.
39 Click OK twice.
40 Press ESC.
The custom callout head displays on the floor plan.
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Modify the callout boundary
41 Click Settings menu ➤ Object Styles.
42 In the Objects Styles dialog, click the Annotation Objects tab.
43 Under Category, scroll down to Callout Boundary.
44 Click in the Line Weight/Projection field, and select 7.
45 For Line Pattern, select Dash.
46 Under Category, expand Callout Boundary.
47 Select Callout Leader Line.
48 Click in the Line Weight/Projection field, and select 4.
49 Click OK.
The new callout boundary displays on the floor plan.
50 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Setting Visibility and Graphics Options in Views
In this lesson, you learn how to control the visibility and graphic characteristics of elements in views. You
learn to create view templates, view regions, filters, masking regions, and visual overrides.
Setting Visibility and Graphics Options in Views | 589
Creating a View Template
In this exercise, you create presentation views that feature elevations of the building. To accomplish this,
you create a view template containing specific presentation quality visibility settings, and apply it to multiple
elevation views. View templates provide an easy way to transfer visibility settings to multiple drawings.
Presentation view
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-VG.rvt.
Set a crop region for the view
1 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, and double-click East.
2 On the View Control Bar, click (Show Crop Region).
3 Select the outer crop region that displays around the view.
The crop region displays as red, and features blue triangular grips and break marks.
4 Select and move the blue triangular grips to resize the crop region as shown.
5 On the View Control Bar, click (Hide Crop Region).
6 On the View Toolbar, click Zoom to Fit.
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Create and apply a view template to an elevation drawing
7 On the View Control bar, click Detail Level: Coarse ➤ Medium.
8 Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
9 In the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, under Visibility, clear Entourage.
10 Click the Annotation Categories tab.
11 Under Visibility, clear:
■ Callouts
■ Elevations
■ Grids
■ Levels
■ Sections
12 Click OK.
Callouts, elevation markers, grids, levels, and section lines are now hidden in the view.
13 On the View Control bar, click Shadows Off ➤ Shadows On.
Creating a View Template | 591
14 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, right-click East, and click Create View Template From
View.
15 In the New View Template dialog, enter Black and White Presentation Elevation, and click OK.
16 In the View Templates dialog, click OK.
17 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, double-click North.
18 In the Project Browser, right-click North, and click Apply View Template.
19 In the Select View Template dialog, select Black and White Presentation Elevation, click Apply,
and click OK.
20 Using the same method, edit the crop region as before.
The settings in the view template create a presentation-quality elevation view.
21 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
22 Save the file as Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-VG_in_progress.rvt.
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View Range and Plan Regions
In this exercise, you modify the view range and create view plan regions to adjust the display of elements
in the building Penthouse and Roof Plan. You want to display the exterior roof terraces from Level 4 on the
penthouse and roof plan, and the exterior area on the south side of the building, as this structure has not
yet been documented in any of the views.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-VG_in_progress.rvt.
Adjust the view range of the Penthouse plan
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Penthouse.
2 In the Project Browser, select Penthouse, right-click, and click Properties.
3 In the Element Properties dialog, under Extents, for View Range, click Edit.
4 In the View Range dialog:
■ Under Primary Range, for Bottom, select Level Below (Level 4).
■ Under View Depth, for Level, select Level Below (Level 4).
■ Click OK twice.
NOTE The Penthouse plan now shows the level below to provide additional context to the view.
View Range and Plan Regions | 593
Adjust the view range of the Roof plan
5 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Roof Plan.
6 In the Project Browser, select Roof Plan, right-click, and click Properties.
7 In the Element Properties dialog, under Extents, for View Range, click Edit.
8 In the View Range dialog:
■ Under Primary Range, for Bottom, select Level 4.
■ Under View Depth, for Level, select Level 4.
■ Click OK twice.
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Create a plan region to show exterior space on the south side of the building
9 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Plan Region.
NOTE A Plan Region allows you to modify the view range of a specified area defined by the extents
of the Plan Region.
10 On the Design Bar, click Lines.
11 On the Options Bar, click (Rectangle).
12 Sketch a plan region:
■ In the left corner of the building, select the left endpoint of the outer wall.
■ Move you cursor diagonally, and select the endpoint the gridline shown below.
13 On the Design Bar, click Region Properties.
14 In the Element Properties dialog, under Extents, for View Range, click Edit.
15 In the View Range dialog:
■ Under Primary Range, for Bottom, select Unlimited.
■ Under View Depth, for Level, select Unlimited.
■ Click OK twice.
16 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
View Range and Plan Regions | 595
17 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
18 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Using Filters to Control Visibility
In this exercise, you visually audit the drawing to make sure the fire-rated walls are placed correctly. You
use a filter to quickly apply visual changes to the walls based on defined parameters, in this case, the fire
rating of the walls. After you apply the filter, the fire-rated walls on the floor plan display with a solid red
fill.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-VG_in_progress.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, under Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
2 Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
3 In the Visibility/Graphics dialog, click the Filters tab.
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4 At the bottom of the Visibility/Graphics dialog, click Edit/New.
5 In the Filters dialog, under Filters, click (New).
6 In the Filter Name dialog, enter Rated Walls, and click OK.
7 In the Filters dialog, under Categories, select Walls.
8 Under Filter Rules:
■ For Filter by, select Fire Rating.
■ Select contains.
■ Enter Hr.
9 Click OK.
10 On the Filter tab, click Add.
11 Select Rated Walls, and click OK.
12 On the Filter tab, for Rated Walls, under Projection/Surface, click Override under Patterns.
13 In the Fill Pattern Graphics dialog, for Color, click <No Override>.
You click the current color value to open the Color dialog, and apply a color.
14 In the Color dialog, under Basic colors, select the red color, and click OK.
15 In the Fill Pattern Graphics dialog, for Pattern, select Solid Fill.
16 Click OK.
17 Using the same method, apply the red solid fill override to Cut Patterns as well.
18 In the Visibility/Graphics Overrides dialog, click OK.
19 Remove the filter:
■ Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
■ On the Filters tab of the Visibility Graphics dialog, click Remove, and click OK.
The fire-rated walls now display without the solid red fill. The Rated Walls filter can be reapplied
to the drawing at any time, but the overrides associated with the filter must be reapplied as well.
Using Filters to Control Visibility | 597
20 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Masking Portions of a View
In this exercise, you obscure geometry in portions of a view. To accomplish this, you use masking regions
that you sketch over the areas that you want to hide.
Masking regions sketched over the upper corners of a view
Unit plan view with upper corners masked
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Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-VG_in_progress.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, right-click Level 1 ➤ Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
2 Select Copy of Level 1, right-click, and click Rename.
3 In the Rename View dialog, enter Unit 18 Plan – Level 1, and click OK.
4 On the View Control Bar, click Show Crop Region.
5 On the View menu, click Zoom ➤ Zoom to Fit.
6 Modify the crop region to get close to the desired view at the bottom left, as shown.
7 On the View menu, click Zoom ➤ Zoom to Fit.
8 Select the crop region, and adjust the view again until it displays as shown.
9 On the View Control Bar, click Show Crop Region ➤ Hide Crop Region.
Use a masking region to hide additional model geometry that does not need to be shown
10 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Masking Region.
11 In the Type Selector, select Invisible lines.
NOTE This specifies the line type for the border of the masking region.
Masking Portions of a View | 599
12 On the Options Bar, click (Rectangle).
13 Sketch 2 masking regions as shown.
14 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
15 View the effects of the masking regions on the floor plan.
16 Click File menu ➤ Save.
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Working with Visual Overrides
In this exercise, you create a presentation plan of one of the residential units on the Level 1 floor plan, and
apply different visual overrides to create presentation effects. You create poche for the walls and you hide
and modify the display of certain elements on the presentation plan.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-VG_in_progress.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, right-click Unit 18 Plan - Level 1, and click Duplicate
View ➤ Duplicate with Detailing.
NOTE Duplicate with Detailing is selected so that the masking regions are retained in the new view.
2 Select the Copy of Unit 18 Plan – Level 1, right-click, and click Rename.
3 In the Rename View dialog, enter Presentation Unit 18 Plan – Level 1, and click OK.
4 On the View Control Bar, click the current scale, and click 1: 50.
Create poche for walls
5 Select the diagonal bottom wall, right-click, and click Override Graphics in View ➤ By Category.
6 In the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, under Visibility, select Walls.
7 Under Cut, click in the Patterns field, and click Override.
8 In the Fill Pattern Graphics dialog, under Pattern Overrides, for Color, click <No Override> to
apply a color.
9 On the left side of the Color dialog, click black, and click OK.
10 In the Fill Pattern Graphics dialog, for Pattern, select Solid fill.
11 Click OK twice.
Working with Visual Overrides | 601
Set the visibility and graphics of other categories in the view
12 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
13 Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
14 In the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, under Visibility, clear Floors.
15 Click the Annotation Categories tab.
16 Under Visibility, clear Grids, and click OK.
Hide elements in the view by category
17 Select the lamp on the table on the floor plan as shown.
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18 Right-click, and click Hide in View ➤ Category.
19 Select 1 of the chairs around the long table on the floor plan as shown.
Working with Visual Overrides | 603
20 Right-click, and click Override Graphics in View ➤ By Category.
By using the previous method to make the selection, the Visibility/Graphics dialog opens to the
category of the object (Furniture) selected by default.
21 Under Projection/Surface, under Lines, click Override.
22 In the Line Graphics dialog, for Color, click <No Override> to apply a color.
23 In the Color dialog, click a purple color, and click OK.
24 In the Line Graphics dialog, for Pattern, select Dash.
25 Click OK twice.
Modify visibility and graphics by element
26 On the floor plan, select the sofa, right-click, and click Override Graphics in View ➤ By Element.
27 In the View-Specific Element Graphics dialog, click Projection Lines.
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28 For Color, click By Category Override.
29 In the Color dialog, select a bright green color, and click OK twice.
30 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Reveal hidden elements in a view
31 On the View Control Bar, click .
The lighting fixtures and grid lines that you hid previously display in a dark red color.
32 Select one of the lamps, right-click, and click Unhide in view ➤ Category.
Working with Visual Overrides | 605
33 On the View Control Bar, click .
34 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Creating Drawing Sheets in a Project
In this lesson, you learn how to create sheets within a Revit MEP project, how to add views to the sheets,
and how to make changes to the building model from a view on a sheet.
Creating Drawing Sheets
In this exercise, you create project drawing sheets that report the project information in the sheet titleblocks.
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
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■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats- Creating
Sheets.rvt.
Create a project sheet
1 On View tab of the Design Bar, click Sheet.
TIP If the View tab is not displayed in the Design Bar, right-click, and click View.
2 In the Select a Titleblock dialog, select A0 metric, and click OK.
A title block and drawing borders are displayed on the drawing sheet.
The title block that you selected is a family that has already been loaded into the project. The
text fields in the titleblock family (shown below) contain labels that associate the project
information parameters with the appropriate text fields.
Creating Drawing Sheets | 607
NOTE The vertical time and date stamp in the lower-right corner of the sheet view automatically
updates every time the project file is saved.
3 In the Project Browser, expand Sheets (all).
The new sheet is displayed in the Project Browser with the name A102 - Unnamed.
Change the sheet name and number
4 On the Design Bar, click Modify, and select the title block.
5 When the title block highlights, on the Options Bar, click (Properties).
6 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data:
■ For Sheet Name, enter Site Plan.
■ For Sheet Number, enter A101.
■ Click OK.
7 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
8 Zoom in to the lower-right corner of the title block.
Site Plan displays in the title block as the sheet name and is appended to the sheet name in the
Project Browser. The Sheet Number has been updated to display A101.
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Display additional project information in the sheet title block
9 Click Settings menu ➤ Project Information.
10 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Project Address, click Edit.
11 In the Edit Text dialog, enter the following address:
■ 123 Main Street
■ Anytown, MA 12345
12 Click OK.
13 In the Element Properties dialog, continue to add project information:
■ For Project Issue Date, enter 15 May, 2009.
■ For Project Status, enter For Approval.
■ For Client Name, enter J. Smith.
■ For Project Name, enter Freighthouse Flats.
■ For Project Number, enter 2009-1.
14 Click OK.
The new project information displays in the titleblock.
NOTE Text size is determined within the sheet family.
Creating Drawing Sheets | 609
Create a floor plan sheet
15 In the Project Browser, right-click Sheets (all) ➤ New Sheet.
16 In the Select a Titleblock dialog, select A0 metric, and click OK.
17 In the Project Browser, select the new sheet name, right-click, and click Rename.
18 In the Sheet Title dialog, for Name, enter Floor Plan, and click OK.
Create additional sheets
19 Using the same method as you did in the previous steps, create the following new project sheets:
■ A103 - Layout Plan
■ A104 - Elevations
■ A105 - Elevations
■ A106 - Elevations
■ A107 - Sections
■ A108 - Stairs
In the following exercise, you add views to these sheets.
20 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
21 Save the file as Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating Sheets_in_progress.rvt, and click Save.
Adding Views to Sheets
In this exercise, you add views to the sheets that you created in the previous exercise.
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Training File
■ Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating
Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Drag the Level 1 floor plan onto a sheet to create a floor plan
1 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click A102 - Floor Plan.
2 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, select Level 1, and drag it to the sheet.
3 Move the cursor to position the lower-right corner of the view in the lower-right corner of the
sheet, and click to place the view.
The border of the view displays as red to indicate that you can reposition it on the sheet.
4 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
The red border around the view no longer displays.
Add elevation views to the A104-Elevation sheet
5 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click A104 - Elevations.
6 In the Project Browser, under Elevations (Building Elevation), drag East to the upper-right corner
of the sheet, and click to place it.
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7 Drag the North elevation to the lower-right corner of the sheet, align it with the East elevation,
and click to place it.
8 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Add the Building Section view to the A107-Sections sheet
9 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click A107 - Sections.
10 Under Sections (Building Sections), drag Building Section to the upper-right corner of the sheet,
and click to place it.
11 Under Detail Views (Detail), drag Roof Overhang Detail to the left of the Building Section view
on the sheet, and click to place it.
12 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
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Change the scale of the detail view
13 Select the Roof Overhang Detail on the sheet, and on the Options Bar, click .
14 In the Element Properties dialog, for View Scale, select 1:5, and click OK.
15 Drag the view to reposition it next to the Building Section view.
Notice the title bar also needs to be resized.
16 Select title bar, and use the blue endpoint grips to resize it so that it spans the length of the
view.
NOTE If you find it difficult to select the left grip on the title bar, zoom in to the grip, move the
cursor over it, and press TAB until it highlights.
Adding Views to Sheets | 613
Create a sheet with stair and stair detail views
17 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click A108 - Stairs.
18 Under Floor Plans, drag Enlarged Stair Plan to the upper-right corner of the sheet, and click to
place it.
19 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
View updated annotation on referenced views
20 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
21 Zoom to the stair callout.
Notice that the callout tag has been automatically updated to reference the correct sheet.
22 Zoom in to the section line heads and the east and north elevation markers, and notice they
also reference the correct sheet numbers.
23 Click File menu ➤ Save.
614 | Chapter 10 Adding Views and Sheets to a Project
Modifying the Building Model from a Sheet View
In this exercise, you learn how to modify a building model directly from the drawing sheets that you created
from its views. In order to do this, you must first activate the view on the sheet, and then make changes
and deactivate the view.
Training File
■ Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating
Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Change the roof elevation
1 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click A107 - Sections.
2 Select the building section view, right-click, and click Activate View.
3 At the right end of the Roof level line, zoom in to the name and elevation of the level.
4 Double-click the Roof elevation height, enter 16700 mm, and press ENTER.
5 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Modifying the Building Model from a Sheet View | 615
6 Right-click, and click Deactivate View.
7 In the Project Browser, under Elevations (Building Elevation), double-click North.
Notice that the Roof Plan elevation has been updated.
8 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Creating and Modifying a Title Sheet
In this exercise, you create a title sheet for your drawing set. After you create the sheet, you create a perspective
view of the building and place it on the sheet. You modify the view to hide the view title, as it is not necessary
to display it on the title sheet.
Training File
■ Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Creating
Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
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Create a new sheet
1 In the Project Browser, right-click Sheets (all) ➤ New Sheet.
2 In the Select a Titleblock dialog, select A0 metric, and click OK.
3 In the Project Browser, select the new sheet name, right-click, and click Properties.
4 In the Element Properties dialog:
■ For Sheet Number, enter T.
■ For Sheet Name, enter Title Sheet.
■ Click OK.
Create a view of the building to place on the title sheet
5 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
6 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Camera.
7 Place the camera as shown.
The camera view displays.
Creating and Modifying a Title Sheet | 617
8 On the Options Bar, click .
9 In the Element Properties dialog:
■ Under Extents, select Far Clip Active.
■ For Far Clip Offset, enter 100000 mm.
■ Under Camera, for Eye Elevation, enter 18000 mm.
■ For Target Elevation, enter 1500 mm.
■ Click OK.
10 Select the crop region and adjust the view to fit the building.
11 On the View Control Bar, click Shadows off ➤ Shadows on.
12 On the View Control Bar, click Show Crop Region ➤ Hide Crop Region.
13 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click T - Title Sheet.
14 Under 3D Views, drag 3D View 1 onto the sheet, and click to place it in the center of the sheet.
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15 With the view selected, on the Options Bar, click Size.
16 In the Crop Region Size dialog:
■ Under Change, select Scale (locked proportions).
■ Under Model Crop Size, for Height, enter 635 mm.
■ Click Apply, and then click OK.
17 Reposition the view on the title sheet.
Remove the title bar on the view
18 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
19 Select the view on the sheet, and on the Options Bar, click .
20 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
21 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
22 In the Name dialog, enter Viewport/no title mark, and click OK.
23 In the Type Properties dialog, under Graphics, for Show title, select No.
24 Click OK twice.
25 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
The title bar no longer displays on the sheet.
Creating and Modifying a Title Sheet | 619
26 Click File menu ➤ Save, and close the exercise file.
620 | Chapter 10 Adding Views and Sheets to a Project
Tagging and Scheduling
In this tutorial, you learn how to tag rooms and other components of floor plans, such as doors and windows. You also
learn to create different types of schedules, such as room and window schedules, in your Revit MEP 2009 projects.
Tagging Objects
In this lesson, you learn how to use some of the annotation features included in Revit MEP. You learn how
to
■ Sequentially tag rooms on a floor plan
■ Tag doors and windows
■ Modify tag placement and mark text
■ Tag other objects, such as furniture
Sequentially Placing and Tagging Rooms
In this exercise, you sequentially place and tag the rooms on the floor plan. Because of the open style floor
plan, you need to create room separation lines to define the rooms to be tagged. The Room command with
the Tag on placement option selected allows you to place and tag rooms with one command.
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Tagging
Objects.rvt.
Add room separations
1 In the Project Browser, expand Floor Plans, and double-click Unit 18 Plan - Level 1.
11
621
2 Zoom in to the upper area of the floor plan.
3 On the Room and Area tab of the Design Bar, click Room Separation.
Adding room separation lines breaks up an open space to make it easier to add rooms.
NOTE If the Room and Area tab of the Design Bar is not active, right-click in the Design Bar, and
click Room and Area.
4 Click the endpoint of the short horizontal wall on the left, move the cursor to the right, and
click the opposite wall to create a horizontal room separation dividing the kitchen from the
dining area (top area of the drawing), as shown:
5 Using the same method, create a vertical separation to divide the kitchen from the entry area
on the right, as shown:
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6 Using the same method, create a horizontal separation above the stair to divide the dining area
from the living area.
7 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Load room tag annotation family
8 Click Settings menu ➤ Annotations ➤ Loaded Tags.
9 In the Tags dialog, click Load.
Sequentially Placing and Tagging Rooms | 623
10 In the left pane of the Load Family dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\Families\Annotations\M_Room Tag.rfa.
11 In the Tags dialog, click OK.
Tag rooms sequentially
12 On the Room and Area tab of the Design Bar, click Room.
13 On the Options Bar, verify that Tag on placement is selected.
14 For Offset, type 2400 mm.
15 Move the cursor to the room at the upper right of the plan view, and click to place the room
and tag.
The crosshair graphic represents the room area being tagged, and the rectangle contains the
room tag.
16 On the Design Bar, click Modify, and select the room tag.
The room tag number displays in blue, indicating that it can be edited.
17 Zoom in on the tag number, click it, type U18-1, and press ENTER.
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18 Click the room text label, type Entry, and press ENTER.
19 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
20 Place another room and tag:
■ On the Design Bar, click Room.
■ Move the cursor into the room to the left of the one previously tagged.
■ Align the tags by moving the cursor until a dashed green line displays between the placed
tag and the one that displays at the tip of the cursor.
■ Click to place the new room and tag.
NOTE The second tag that you place displays the sequential number U18-2. Sequential letters
are also supported.
21 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
22 Click the room text label, type Kitchen, and press ENTER.
23 Using the same method, place rooms and tags, and edit the tags as shown (Toilet, Dining, and
Living):
Sequentially Placing and Tagging Rooms | 625
Hide the room separations
24 Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
25 In the Visibility/Graphics Overrides dialog, on the Model Categories tab, expand Lines, clear
Room Separation, and click OK.
Tag rooms on upper level
26 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Unit 18 Plan - Level 2.
27 On the Design Bar, click Room Tag.
The rooms are already placed, but they need to be tagged.
28 Starting with the Balcony (area near the stair), and moving clockwise, click to place a room tag
in each of the 5 rooms.
29 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
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30 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
31 Save the file as Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Tagging Objects_in_progress.rvt.
Tagging Doors and Windows
In this exercise, you learn how to place door and window tags. You learn how to add tags to the floor plan
and how to simultaneously tag multiple untagged doors and windows.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Tagging
Objects_in_progress.rvt.
Tag Level 1 doors
1 If necessary, in the Project Browser, expand Floor Plans, and double-click Unit 18 Plan - Level
1.
2 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
3 On the Options Bar, clear Leader.
4 Select 5 doors in the upper area of the floor plan:
■ Entry door
■ Kitchen pantry door
■ Pocket door in toilet
■ Closet door in dining room
Tagging Doors and Windows | 627
■ Closet door in living room
5 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
6 Click the door tag for the entry door, type U18-1, and press ENTER.
NOTE The tag symbol and text size are determined by the tag family.
7 Select the kitchen pantry door to the left, and on the Options Bar, click (Element
Properties).
8 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identify Data, for Mark, type U18-2, and click OK.
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9 Using one of the methods you just learned, rename the other 3 door tags to match the
corresponding room tags.
10 Select the tag for the pocket door on the right, and drag it down to center it in the doorway.
11 Select the tag for the closet door and move it to the right of the door.
Tagging Doors and Windows | 629
Tag Level 2 doors
12 In the Project Browser, double-click Unit 18 Plan - Level 2.
13 On the Design Bar, click Tag All Not Tagged.
14 In the Tag All Not Tagged dialog, verify that All objects in current view is selected.
15 Under Category, select Door Tags, and click OK.
16 Move the door tags to center them in the doorway.
17 Edit the numbers of the door tags as shown:
Place window tags
18 In the Project Browser, expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
19 Click Settings menu ➤ Annotations ➤ Loaded Tags.
20 In the Tags dialog, click Load.
21 In the left pane of the Load Family dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\Families\Annotations\M_Window Tag.rfa.
22 In the Tags dialog, click OK.
23 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Tag All Not Tagged.
24 In the Tag All Not Tagged dialog, select Window Tags, and click OK.
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25 Zoom to the lower-right area of the drawing to view the window tags.
26 Under Floor Plans, double-click Level 2.
27 Zoom to the drawing extents.
28 Using the same method, tag all untagged windows.
29 Save the file.
Tagging Other Objects
In this exercise, you learn how to tag furniture objects, and modify the tag placement and display.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Tagging
Objects_in_progress.rvt.
Add furniture tags
1 In the Project Browser, expand Floor Plans, and double-click Unit 18 Plan - Level 1.
2 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
3 On the Options Bar, select Leader.
4 Select a dining room chair.
5 At the confirmation prompt, click Yes to load a tag.
6 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\Families\Annotations\M_Furniture Tag.rfa.
7 Select each of the chairs and the table to place tags; select the edge to which the leader connects.
Tagging Other Objects | 631
8 Select the furniture in the living room.
9 Click Modify.
Modify tag placement
10 Zoom to the dining table.
Notice that the chair and table tags overlap.
11 Select the tag for the table, and drag it above the chair tag.
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12 Click the elbow control, and drag it up to form an angled leader.
13 Optionally, modify the position of the chair tags to move them closer to the chairs.
14 Click Modify.
15 Select the tag for the table (TBL-1), and on the Options Bar, clear Leader.
16 Drag the table tag to the center of the table, and on the Design Bar, click Modify.
Tag furniture on Level 2
17 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Unit 18 Plan - Level 2.
18 On the Design Bar, click Tag All Not Tagged, select M_Furniture Tag : Standard, and click OK.
All furniture in the floor plan is tagged.
Tagging Other Objects | 633
Change tag style
19 Draw a selection box around the top area of the drawing to select the furniture.
20 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
21 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Furniture Tags, and click OK.
22 In the Type Selector, select Furniture Tag: Boxed, and click Modify.
23 Save the file.
Defining Schedules and Color Diagrams
In this lesson, you learn to add schedules. You also learn to add schedule keys to a project by creating a
room schedule and room color diagram. Schedule keys allow you to define common items that can be used
by multiple objects within a schedule.
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Creating a Window Schedule
In this exercise, you create a window schedule for the building model shown below.
You begin by creating a window instance schedule; that is, a schedule that lists every window in the building.
Creating a Window Schedule | 635
You then select a window in the instance schedule and use the Show command to locate it in a view of the
building model.
Next, you group and sort the windows in the instance schedule. Finally, you change the window instance
schedule to a type schedule, in which windows are listed by window type.
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color Diagrams.rvt.
Create a window schedule
1 In the Project Browser, expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
2 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Schedule/Quantities.
TIP If the View tab of the Design Bar is not active, right-click in the Design Bar, and click View.
3 In the New Schedule dialog, under Category, select Windows.
4 For Name, type Building Window Schedule, and click OK.
Define the fields to display as columns in the window schedule
5 In the Schedule Properties dialog, click the Fields tab.
6 Under Available fields, select Comments and click Add.
The Comments field is moved under Scheduled fields.
7 Using the same method, add the following fields to the schedule:
■ Count
■ Height
■ Level
■ Type Mark
636 | Chapter 11 Tagging and Scheduling
■ Width
8 Under Scheduled fields, order the fields as shown in the following illustration by selecting them
and clicking Move Up or Move Down.
9 Click OK.
A schedule is created that contains every window in the building model.
Select a window in the schedule and locate it in the building model
10 Select a cell in the window schedule with the C14 Type Mark, and on the Options Bar, click
Show.
If no open view shows the selected element, you are prompted to open one that does.
11 If the confirmation dialog displays, click OK to search through relevant views of the building
model.
Creating a Window Schedule | 637
The window that corresponds to the information in the schedule row is displayed in a relevant
view of the building model.
12 In the Show Element(s) in View dialog, click Close.
NOTE By clicking Show, you can display other views of the building model that include the selected
window. However, in large building models with many views, this can be a time-consuming process.
13 In the Project Browser, expand Schedules/Quantities, and double-click Building Window Schedule
to redisplay the window instance schedule.
Group and sort the window schedule by type mark
14 In the drawing area, right-click the schedule, and click View Properties.
15 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Sorting/Grouping, click Edit.
16 On the Sorting/Grouping tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, for Sort by, select Type Mark
17 Click OK twice.
The window schedule is displayed, sorted by type mark.
Change type mark from the schedule
18 In the window schedule, change the Type Mark in the first row from 19 to A, and press ENTER.
19 Click OK to confirm that you want to change the type mark for all windows of this type.
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The type mark is changed to A and the schedule is resorted.
Change the schedule from an instance schedule to a type schedule
20 Right-click on the schedule, and click View Properties.
21 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Sorting/Grouping, click Edit.
22 In the Schedule Properties dialog, clear Itemize every instance.
23 Click OK twice.
The window type schedule is displayed.
24 Change the Type Mark for the other window types, so that the types are sequentially named
from A to H, as shown:
25 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 2.
26 Zoom to the lower area of the floor plan to see that the window tags have changed.
27 Click File menu ➤ Save As, and save the exercise file as m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color
Diagrams_in_progress.rvt.
Creating a Window Schedule | 639
Adding Project Parameters to a Window Schedule
In this lesson, you add schedule columns for parameters that are not standard for the scheduled object. In
this case, you want to add columns to the window schedule to describe the detail where head, jamb, and
sill conditions for a window can be found. These parameters cannot be shared with other projects and,
unlike shared parameters, you cannot use them to tag objects.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color
Diagrams_in_progress.rvt.
Create project parameters
1 In the Project Browser, expand Schedules/Quantities, and double-click Building Window Schedule.
2 Click Settings menu ➤ Project Parameters.
3 In the Project Parameters dialog, click Add to create the new parameter.
4 In the Parameter Properties dialog:
■ Under Categories, select Windows to associate the parameter with the Windows category.
■ Under Parameter Data, for Name, type Head Detail.
■ For Group parameter under, select Construction.
■ Select Type.
5 Click OK.
The new project parameter Head Detail is displayed in the Project Parameters dialog.
6 Using the same method, create 2 more window parameters: Jamb Detail and Sill Detail.
7 In the Project Parameter dialog, click OK.
Add project parameters to the schedule
8 In the Project Browser, right-click Building Window Schedule, and click Properties.
9 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Fields, click Edit.
10 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, under Available fields, select the following
fields, and click Add to add them to the schedule in order:
■ Head Detail
■ Jamb Detail
■ Sill Detail
11 Use the Move Up control to move the new parameters up in the list, so that they are listed before
Comments.
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12 Click OK twice.
Group headers in the schedule
13 In the schedule, select Head Detail, Jamb Detail, and Sill Detail.
TIP To select all 3 headers, click in the Head Detail header, and without releasing the left mouse
button, move the cursor over the Jamb Detail and Sill Detail headers.
14 On the Options Bar, click Group.
15 In the grouping field above the detail headers in the schedule, type Window Details.
16 You can add values for the new project parameters directly in the schedule. For example, under
Type Mark A, for Head Detail, type 1/A107; for Jamb Detail, type 2/A107; and for Sill Detail,
type 3/A107.
17 Save the file.
Adding Project Parameters to a Window Schedule | 641
Creating a Unit-Based Door Schedule with a Filter
In this exercise, you create a unit-based door schedule and use a filter to limit the selection of doors to a
single unit. You then hide the column used for the filter, and place the unit-based door schedule on a sheet
with the unit plans.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color
Diagrams_in_progress.rvt.
View Level 1 of the building
1 In the Project Browser, expand Floor Plans, and double-click Unit 18 Plan - Level 1.
Create a new door schedule for Unit 18
2 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Schedule/Quantities.
3 In the New Schedule dialog:
■ Under Category, select Doors.
■ Under Name, type Unit 18 - Door Schedule.
■ Verify that Schedule building components is selected.
■ For Phase, verify that Phase 1 is selected.
4 Click OK.
5 In the Schedule Properties dialog, click the Fields tab.
6 Under Available fields, select the following fields, and click Add to add them to the schedule in
order:
■ Count
■ Family and Type
■ Head Height
■ Sill Height
■ Width
■ Mark
7 Click the Filter tab, and specify the following values for Filter by:
■ Select Mark in the first field.
■ Select contains in the second field.
■ Type U18 in the third field.
This filter checks each door in the project to see which unit it is associated with, and produces
a schedule that includes only the doors in Unit 18.
8 Click the Sorting/Grouping tab, and specify the following options:
■ For Sort by, select Family and Type.
■ Clear Itemize every instance (to group the like door types into one row).
9 Click the Formatting tab.
10 Under Fields, select Mark.
11 Under Field formatting, select Hidden field, and click OK.
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The schedule includes the count and type for doors in Unit 18 only. The Mark field is used to
filter the entries in the schedule, but is not included as a column in the schedule.
Place the schedule on a sheet
12 In the Project Browser, expand Sheets (all), and double-click A102 - Unit 18.
13 In the Project Browser, click Unit 18 - Door Schedule, and drag it to the sheet.
14 Click to place the schedule in the upper left corner of the sheet.
15 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
16 Zoom in to see the details of the door schedule.
Modify the width of a schedule column on the sheet
17 Select the door schedule on the sheet.
18 Select the control at the top of the schedule for the Family and Type column and drag it to the
right to expand the column width.
The wider column makes it easier to read the door descriptions.
Creating a Unit-Based Door Schedule with a Filter | 643
19 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
20 Save the file.
Creating a Room Schedule
In this exercise, you create a room schedule for the first floor plan. You also add programmed rooms to the
schedule for the public spaces in the building.
NOTE In some cases in this tutorial, partial schedules are shown for illustration purposes.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color
Diagrams_in_progress.rvt.
Create a room schedule
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
Notice that several rooms have been defined in the floor plan.
2 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Schedule/Quantities.
TIP If the View tab of the Design Bar is not active, right-click in the Design Bar, and click View.
3 In the New Schedule dialog, under Category, select Rooms, and click OK.
Select the fields to display as columns in the room schedule
4 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, under Available fields, select Number, and
click Add.
The Number field is moved under Scheduled fields.
5 Using the same method, add the following fields to the schedule in order:
■ Name
■ Level
■ Area
6 Click the Appearance tab.
7 Under Text, to the right of Header text, select Bold.
8 Click OK.
NOTE The Appearance settings only take effect when the schedule is placed on a drawing sheet.
The bold header is not noticeable until you place the schedule on a drawing sheet.
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Add new rooms to the schedule
9 On the Options Bar, next to Rows, click New.
A new row is displayed at the bottom of the schedule. The room Number is U17-46, and the
Level and Area values are displayed as Not Placed because the room is not placed in the floor
plan.
10 Edit the number to be 101.
11 Using the same method, add 5 more rooms.
The rooms are displayed at the bottom of the list and numbered sequentially, 101-106.
12 Edit the room names in the schedule:
■ In the schedule, for room 101, for Name, type Building Entry, and press ENTER.
■ For 102, type Storage, and press ENTER.
■ For 103, type Corridor, and press ENTER.
■ For 104, select Corridor.
■ For 105, select Storage.
Creating a Room Schedule | 645
■ For 106, type Stair, and press ENTER.
13 Save the file.
Scheduling Rooms from a Program List
In this exercise, you add room separation lines, place rooms from a program list, and modify room names.
You also change the bounding behavior of walls in the storage areas of the plan.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color
Diagrams_in_progress.rvt.
Specify style for room separation lines
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
2 Click View menu ➤ Visibility/Graphics.
3 Change the display of room separation lines:
■ On the Model Categories tab of the Visibility/Graphics dialog, under Visibility, expand Lines.
■ For Room Separation, under Projection/Surface, click the Lines field.
■ In the Lines field, click Override.
■ In the Line Graphics dialog, click the Color field.
■ Under Custom colors, click the bright green swatch, and click OK.
■ For Weight, select 9.
4 Click OK twice.
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Add room separation lines
5 Zoom in to the center of the building.
6 On the Room and Area tab of the Design Bar, click Room Separation.
7 Click to add 2 room separation lines in the corridor at the right side of the drawing. First, draw
the horizontal line.
8 Draw a vertical separation line from the wall endpoint to the new corridor separation line.
9 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Place rooms from a program list
10 On the Design Bar, click Room.
Scheduling Rooms from a Program List | 647
Placed rooms are indicated with a crosshair graphic in the drawing.
11 On the Options Bar, for Room, select 101 Building Entry.
12 Click to place the room in the newly defined entry area (lower right).
13 On the Options Bar, for Room, select 102 Storage.
14 For Offset, type 2400 mm.
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15 Click to place the room in the area to the left of Building Entry.
16 Using the same method, place the following rooms, as shown:
■ Place 103 in the space above room 101.
■ Place 104 in the space to the left of 103.
■ Place 105 in the lower space to the left of the kitchen.
■ Place 106 in the space with the stairs (to the left of room 105).
17 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Change the room bounding behavior of walls
18 In the Project Browser, under Schedules/Quantities, double-click Room Schedule.
Notice the area values for the Storage rooms in the schedule. These values will change after you
change the room bounding behavior of walls in the storage areas.
19 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1, and zoom in to the Corridor.
20 While pressing CTRL, select the 3 small walls (in or adjacent to the storage areas), as shown:
Scheduling Rooms from a Program List | 649
21 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
22 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, clear Room Bounding, and click OK.
23 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
24 Open the Room Schedule.
Notice that the area for the storage rooms has increased as a result of the change in the room
bounding behavior of the walls.
Create key schedule
25 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Schedule/Quantities.
26 In the New Schedule dialog, under Category, select Rooms.
27 Select Schedule keys, and click OK.
28 In the Schedule Properties dialog, under Available fields, while pressing CTRL, select Base Finish,
Floor Finish, and Wall Finish, and click Add.
29 Click OK to create the new room style schedule.
The Room Style Schedule displays without data.
30 On the Options Bar, for Rows, click New.
31 For Key Name, type Units, and for all 3 finishes, type As Selected.
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32 Using the same method, add 2 more key names: Service and Public.
33 In the Project Browser, under Schedules/Quantities, right-click Room Schedule, and click
Properties.
34 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Fields, click Edit.
35 In the Schedule Properties dialog, for Available fields, select Room Style, and click Add.
36 Click OK twice.
37 Open the Room Schedule.
The Room Style column is added to the Room Schedule.
38 Under U17-8, for Room Style, select Units.
Specify the Room Style for Level 1 rooms
39 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 1.
40 Zoom to the drawing extents.
41 Draw a selection box around floor plan.
42 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
43 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Rooms, and click OK.
All rooms are selected in the floor plan.
44 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
45 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Room Style, select Units, and click
OK.
Scheduling Rooms from a Program List | 651
46 Open the Room Schedule.
Notice that the Room Style is Units for all rooms on Level 1.
47 Edit the Room Style for rooms 101 through 106:
■ For rooms 101, 103, 104, and 106, select Public.
■ For rooms 102 and 105, select Service.
All rooms on Level 1 now have the room style defined. The Room Style specification will be
used later to determine color fill in a room color diagram.
48 Save the file.
Creating a Room Color Diagram
In this exercise, you create a room color scheme (based on the type of the rooms in the floor plan), and
apply it to the Level 1 view. You also edit the colors used in the color scheme and modify the properties of
the color scheme legend.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color
Diagrams_in_progress.rvt.
Create a room color scheme
1 In the Project Browser, under Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
2 Click Settings menu ➤ Color Fill Schemes.
3 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, click (Duplicate).
4 In the New color scheme dialog, for Name, type Room Type, and click OK.
5 For Title, type Room Type.
6 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, for Color, select Room Style.
7 Because you are creating a new color scheme, at the warning prompt, click OK.
8 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, click OK.
9 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, right-click Level 1, and click Properties.
10 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, click the Color Scheme field.
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11 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, under Schemes, select Room Type, and click OK.
12 In the Element Properties dialog, for Visibility/Graphics Overrides, click Edit.
13 In the Visibility/Graphics Overrides dialog, under Visibility, expand Lines, and clear Room
Separation.
14 Click OK twice.
Add a color scheme legend
15 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Color Scheme Legend.
When you move the cursor over the drawing area, a legend displays at the tip of the cursor.
16 Click in the lower right of the drawing area to place the legend.
17 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Change the fill colors applied to the rooms
18 In the drawing area, select the color legend.
19 On the Options Bar, click Edit Color Scheme.
20 In the Edit Color Scheme dialog, in the first row of the Scheme Definition table (none), clear
Visible.
21 In the second row of the table (Public), click the value in the Color column.
Creating a Room Color Diagram | 653
22 In the Color dialog, under Custom color, select blue, and click OK.
23 Using the same method, change the colors for Service and Units to cyan and gray, respectively.
24 Click OK.
Specify properties for the legend colors and title
25 With the legend still selected, on the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
26 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
27 In the Type Properties dialog, under Graphics, for Swatch Width, type 25 mm.
28 Under Title Text, for Size, type 5 mm.
29 Click OK twice.
30 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
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Create a section color diagram
31 In the Project Browser, under Sections, double-click Building Section.
NOTE In order for color fills to be displayed in section, volume computations must be enabled from
Settings menu ➤ Area and Volume Computations. Calculation of room volumes can affect project
performance.
Turn on the visibility of rooms in the building section view
32 In the Project Browser, under Sections, right-click Building Section, and select Properties.
33 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, for Visibility/Graphics Overrides, click Edit.
34 On the Model Categories tab of the Visibility/Graphic Overrides dialog, under Visibility, select
Rooms.
35 Click OK twice.
Place the color scheme legend on the section
36 On the Room and Area tab of the Design Bar, click Color Scheme Legend.
As you move the cursor over the drawing area, the legend displays at the tip of the cursor.
37 Click to place the legend on the drawing.
38 In the Choose Space Type and Color Scheme dialog, for Color Scheme, select Room Type, and
click OK.
39 Using the grip at the bottom of the legend, position the legend horizontally across the bottom
of the section view.
Creating a Room Color Diagram | 655
40 Draw a selection box around the entire drawing.
41 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
42 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Rooms, and click OK.
Assign all rooms the Units room style
43 On the Options Bar, click .
44 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Room Style, select Units, and click
OK.
45 While pressing CTRL, select all the rooms in the stairwell, and the room to the right of the stair
on level 1 (Corridor 104).
46 Click .
47 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Room Style, select Public, and click
OK.
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Assign the penthouse room the service room style
48 Select the penthouse, and click .
49 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Room Style, select Service, and click
OK.
Add suites as a new room style in the Room Style Schedule
50 In the Project Browser, under Schedules/Quantities, double-click Room Style Schedule.
51 On the Options Bar, for Rows, click New.
52 In the Room Style Schedule, under Key Name for the new row, type Suites.
Assign the Suites room style to all rooms on levels 3 and 4
53 Open the Building Section.
54 While pressing CTRL, select all the rooms on levels 3 and 4, excluding the stairwell spaces.
TIP You may need to use TAB to select the room in the upper right with the entertainment center.
Creating a Room Color Diagram | 657
55 Click .
56 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Room Style, select Suites, and click
OK.
A new Suites key is added to the color scheme legend.
Use volume calculations to control color fills
57 Click Settings menu ➤ Area and Volume Computations.
58 In the Area and Volume Computations dialog, under Volume Computations, select Areas and
Volumes.
59 Under Room Area Computation, verify that At wall finish is selected, and click OK.
The color fill will extend to the roof, but not beyond it.
Change room heights
60 In the drawing area, select the room on the left side of the top floor.
61 Drag the top Control grip above the bounding roof.
The color fill extends to the roof.
62 Repeat this process for all rooms that are bounded by the sloping roof: the remaining suites and
the public stairs on the top floor.
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Assign the correct heights to the rooms on the first level
63 On the first level, select the stairwell room, and click .
64 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, for Upper Limit, select Loft.
65 For Limit Offset, type 0.0.
66 Click OK.
67 On the first level, select the public room next to the stairs (Corridor 104), the dining room, and
the living room.
68 Click .
69 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, for Upper Limit, select Level 2.
70 For Limit Offset, type -254 mm.
71 Click OK.
72 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Creating a Room Color Diagram | 659
73 Save the file.
Creating a Material Takeoff
In this exercise, you have already determined the roof configuration for the building. You learn to change
the roof family type and create a material takeoff schedule for the roofing materials. You then add formulas
to the material takeoff to produce cost estimates.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Color
Diagrams_in_progress.rvt.
Create a material takeoff
1 In the Project Browser, under 3D Views, double-click {3D}.
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2 Zoom in to the roof area of the building.
3 While pressing CTRL, select the roof of the building and the smaller roof for the elevator
penthouse.
4 In the Type Selector, select Basic Roof : Wood Joist - Insulation on Plywood Deck - EPDM.
5 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
6 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Material Takeoff.
7 In the New Material Takeoff dialog, under Category, select Roofs, and click OK.
8 On the Fields tab of the Material Takeoff Properties dialog, under Available fields, click Family
and Type, and click Add.
9 Using the same method, add Material: Description and Material: Area to the Scheduled fields.
10 On the Sorting/Grouping tab:
■ For Sort by, select Family and Type.
■ For Then by, select Material: Description.
■ Select Grand totals.
■ Clear Itemize every instance.
Creating a Material Takeoff | 661
11 On the Formatting tab:
■ Under Fields, select Material: Area.
■ Under Field formatting, select Calculate totals.
12 Click OK.
The Roof Material Takeoff Schedule displays.
13 Expand the column widths to see all of the information.
TIP Double-click the column dividers to expand the columns to fit the text.
Add cost information and a formula to calculate estimated cost
14 In the Project Browser, right-click Roof Material Takeoff, and click Properties.
15 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Fields, click Edit.
16 In the Material Takeoff Properties dialog, under Available fields, select Material: Cost, and click
Add.
17 Click Calculated Value.
18 In the Calculated Value dialog, for Name, type Estimated Cost.
19 For Type, select Currency.
20 For Formula, type Material: Area*Material: Cost /(1000mm^2).
The /(1000mm^2) is required to remove the formatting of the fields so that the cost estimate
value can be calculated.
21 Click OK.
22 In the Material Takeoff Properties dialog, click the Formatting tab, and under Fields, click
Estimated Cost.
23 For Field formatting, select Calculate totals, and click OK twice.
24 In the Roof Material Takeoff, for Material: Cost, type the following values:
Material: Cost Material: Description
16 EPDM
13.40 Plywood
50.80 Rigid Insulation
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Material: Cost Material: Description
5.35 Wood Joist
The Estimated cost is calculated.
Add currency formatting to the schedule
25 Click Settings menu ➤ Project Units.
26 In the Project Units dialog, for Currency, click the Format value.
27 In the Format dialog, for Rounding, verify that 2 decimal places is selected.
28 For Unit symbol, select $.
29 Select Use digit grouping.
Digit grouping, which inserts commas after every three digits, can be used for any number-based
parameter, not just for currency.
30 Click OK twice.
The cost fields are formatted correctly.
31 Save the file.
Scheduling Shared Parameters
In this lesson, you learn how to use shared parameters to define additional parameters that are not included
in predefined instance and type parameters, either within family components or within the project template.
These shared parameters can be added to any family, regardless of category, and are defined and stored in
an external file, ensuring consistency across families and projects. Their values may also be aggregated and
reported within Revit MEP multi-category schedules.
An example of the use of shared parameters is the need to add specific parameters to a family component
for scheduling and tagging when those parameters are not present by default. This lesson demonstrates the
solution for this situation and covers the process of setting up shared parameters, adding the shared parameters
to a family, creating a generic tag to tag the family, and reporting the shared parameters.
In this lesson, you create an exiting plan for the building. You draw a travel path line, tag the line, and
schedule the total distance of each path. Adding shared parameters to a family allows you to create a tag
and schedule to track this specific information.
Creating a Shared Parameter File
In this exercise, you create a shared parameter file.
Scheduling Shared Parameters | 663
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Shared
Parameters.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Exiting Plan-Level 1.
2 Click File menu ➤ Shared Parameters.
3 In the Edit Shared Parameters dialog, click Create.
4 In the left pane of the Create Shared Parameter File dialog, click Training Files, for File name,
type OfficeStandardsParameters.txt, and click Save.
NOTE Shared parameter files are typically stored at a network location for use in all projects.
5 In the Edit Shared Parameters dialog, under Groups, click New.
6 In the New Parameter Group dialog, for Name, type Exiting, and click OK.
7 Under Parameters, click New.
8 In the Parameter Properties dialog, for Name, type Path ID, and click OK.
9 Under Parameters, click New.
10 In the Parameter Properties dialog, for Name, type Travel Distance, for Type of Parameter, select
Length.
11 Click OK twice.
12 Click File menu ➤ Save As, and save the exercise file as m_Freighthouse_Flats-Shared
Parameters_in_progress.rvt.
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Adding Shared Parameters to a Family
In this exercise, you add the shared parameters you created to a family file. You then create a generic tag to
tag the family.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Shared
Parameters_in_progress.rvt.
1 Click File menu ➤ Open.
2 In the Left pane of the Open dialog, Click Training Files, and open
Metric\Families\Annotations\M_Travel Line.rfa.
3 On the Design Bar, click Family Types.
The Family Types dialog displays the parameters that are currently available for this family
category.
4 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
5 In the Parameter Properties dialog, under Parameter Type, select Shared parameter, and click
Select.
6 In the Shared Parameters dialog, verify that Parameter group is Exiting and that Path ID is
selected, and click OK.
7 In the Parameter Properties dialog, under Parameter Data, for Group parameter under, select
Constraints.
8 Select Instance, and click OK.
9 In the Family Types dialog, under Parameters, click Add.
10 Using the same method, add Travel Distance as a shared parameter, group it under Dimensions,
and select Instance.
11 Click OK.
12 In the Family Types dialog, under Dimensions, for Travel Distance Formula, following the equals
symbol (=), type Length.
13 Click Apply, and click OK.
14 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
If you have multiple projects open, the Load into Projects dialog displays for you to select the
project, otherwise the family loads into the current project.
15 If necessary, in the Load into Projects dialog, select m_Freighthouse_Flats-Shared
Parameters_in_progress.rvt, and click OK.
Create a tag using shared parameters
16 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Annotation Symbol.
Adding Shared Parameters to a Family | 665
17 In the left pane of the New Annotation Symbol dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\Templates\M_Generic Tag.rft.
18 Zoom in to the intersection of the reference planes.
19 On the Design Bar, click Label.
20 Click the intersection of the reference planes.
21 In the Edit Label dialog, click (Add Parameter).
22 In the Parameter Properties dialog, click Select.
23 In the Shared Parameters dialog, under Parameters, select Travel Distance.
24 Click OK twice.
25 In the Edit Label dialog, under Category Parameters, select Travel Distance, click (Add
parameter(s) to label), and click OK.
26 On the Design Bar, click Label.
27 Click above the intersection of the reference planes, and use the same method to select the Path
ID parameter.
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28 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
29 In the drawing window, select Path ID, and move it down, so that it is positioned just above
Travel Distance.
30 Select the Note in the upper left area of the drawing window, and press DELETE.
31 Click File ➤ Save As.
32 In the Save As dialog, for File Name, type M_Travel Distance Tag.rfa, and click Save.
33 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
34 On the Load into Projects dialog, verify that m_Freighthouse_Flats-Shared
Parameters_in_Progress.rvt is selected, and click OK.
35 Save the file.
Adding Shared Parameters to a Family | 667
Placing,Tagging, and Scheduling a Family with Shared Parameters
In this exercise, you place the travel line family in the Level 1 and Level 2 exiting plans. You then tag the
travel lines and give them a path ID. After the lines are tagged, you create a schedule that totals the travel
distances in each exiting plan for each path ID.
Training File
Continue using the training file you saved in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Schedules-Shared
Parameters_in_progress.rvt.
Create Level 1 exiting travel path
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Exiting Plan - Level 1.
2 Zoom in to the corridor.
3 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Component.
4 On the Options Bar, select Chain.
5 Specify a start point for the path at the left end of the corridor as shown.
6 Move the cursor to the right, and click in the center of the corridor, above the exterior door as
shown.
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7 Move the cursor down, through the door, and click outside of the building.
8 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
9 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
10 On the Options Bar, clear Leader.
11 Select each of the travel path lines.
12 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
13 While pressing CTRL, select the 2 dashed travel lines, and click (Element Properties).
14 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, for Path ID, type 1-1, and click OK.
Create Level 2 exiting travel path
15 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double click Exiting Plan - Level 2.
16 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Component.
17 On the Options Bar, verify that Chain is selected.
18 Click in the horizontal corridor below the door on the right side of the floor plan, move the
cursor near the right corner, and click to specify the first segment of the path as shown.
Placing,Tagging, and Scheduling a Family with Shared Parameters | 669
19 Move the cursor up through the door, and click.
20 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
21 On the Design Bar, click Component.
22 Click at the starting point of the previous path, move the cursor to the left, and click above the
door to the stair.
23 Move the cursor down, and click in the stair.
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24 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
25 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
26 Select each of the travel path lines.
27 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
28 While pressing CTRL, select the 2 dashed travel lines for the left exit path, and click .
29 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, for Path ID, type 2-1, and click OK.
30 Using the same method, specify the Path ID for the right exit path to 2-2.
Create a schedule to total the paths on each plan
31 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Schedule/Quantities.
32 In the New Schedule dialog, under Category, verify that <Multi-Category> is selected.
33 For Name, type Level 1 Exit Distance, and click OK.
Placing,Tagging, and Scheduling a Family with Shared Parameters | 671
34 On the Fields tab of the Schedule Properties dialog, under Available fields, while pressing CTRL,
select Path ID and Travel Distance, and click Add.
35 Click the Filter tab.
36 For Filter by, in the first field, select Path ID; in the second field, select contains; and in the third
field, type 1-.
37 Click the Sorting/Grouping tab.
38 For Sort by, select Path ID.
39 Clear Itemize every instance.
40 Click the Formatting tab.
41 Under Fields, select Travel Distance, and under Field formatting, select Calculate totals.
42 Click OK.
The Level 1 Exit Distance schedule displays.
43 In the Project Browser, under Schedules/Quantities, right-click Level 1 Exit Distance, and click
Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate.
44 In the Project Browser, right-click Copy of Level 1 Exit Distance, and click Rename.
45 In the Rename View dialog, type Level 2 Exit Distance, and click OK.
46 In the Project Browser, right-click Level 2 Exit Distance, and click Properties.
47 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Filter, click Edit.
48 In the Schedule Properties dialog, for Filter by, in the third field, type 2-.
49 Click OK twice.
The Level 2 Exit Distance schedule displays.
50 Save the file.
Scheduling Uniformat Assembly Codes
In this lesson, you schedule Uniformat Assembly Codes as they are applied to Revit MEP components.
Scheduling Uniformat Assembly Codes and Descriptions
In this exercise, you create a wall schedule that includes columns for the Uniformat Assembly Codes and
assembly descriptions of the scheduled walls.
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Uni-Format.rvt.
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Create a wall schedule
1 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Schedule/Quantities.
TIP If the View tab of the Design Bar is not active, right-click the Design Bar, and click View.
2 In the New Schedule dialog, under Categories, select Walls, and click OK.
3 In the Schedule Properties dialog, click the Fields tab.
4 Under Available fields, select the following fields, and click Add to add them to the schedule in
order:
■ Area
■ Volume
■ Width
■ Length
■ Assembly Code
■ Assembly Description
5 Click OK to complete the schedule.
Assign an assembly code to a wall type in the project
6 In the Project Browser, expand Families ➤ Walls ➤ Basic Wall, right-click Generic - 152 mm,
and click Properties.
7 In the Type Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Assembly Code, click the Value field, and
click .
8 In the Choose Assembly Code dialog, expand C - Interiors ➤ C10 - Interior Construction ➤ C1010
- Partitions ➤ C1010100 - Fixed Partitions, and select C1010145 - Partitions - Drywall w/ Metal
Stud.
9 Click OK twice.
10 In the schedule, expand the Assembly Description column to see the description.
Scheduling Uniformat Assembly Codes and Descriptions | 673
11 Close the exercise file.
Exporting Project Information with ODBC
In this lesson, you learn how to export project information to an ODBC (Open DataBase Connectivity)
compatible database.
Exporting Schedule Information to Microsoft Access
In this exercise, you learn how to export project information into a Microsoft
®
Access 2000 database. The
process that you use to export the database is similar for any other ODBC-compliant database.
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Uni-Format.rvt.
1 On the File menu, click Export ➤ ODBC Database.
2 In the Select Data Source dialog, click the File Data Source tab.
3 Click New.
4 In the Create New Data Source dialog, select the Microsoft Access Driver (*.mdb), and click Next.
5 Type RevitDSN for the name of the file data source, and click Next.
6 Click Finish.
7 In the ODBC Microsoft Access Setup dialog, under Database, click Create.
8 In the New Database dialog, for Database Name, type Revit_Project.mdb.
9 Under Directories, select a location for the database file, and click OK to create the database.
10 When the confirmation dialog displays, click OK.
11 Click OK 3 times.
12 Open the database in Microsoft Access.
NOTE Depending on your version of Microsoft Access, the database display may be different than
that shown.
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Revit MEP creates 2 tables for the following categories of elements (see below): one that lists all
of the element instances in a project and one that lists all of the element types in a project.
Additionally, tables that list instances only are created for levels and rooms because these
categories do not have types.
A unique element ID is used to identify exported elements, so that each table of elements includes
an Id column. Elements IDs are also used to establish relationships between elements in different
tables. For example, instance tables include a TypeId column containing the ID of the instance’s
type, and some instance tables include a RoomId column containing the ID of the room that
the instance is in.
In addition to the tables for instances and types in a category, a table is also created for each
key schedule in a project, as long as the category is one of the categories that Revit MEP exports.
The exported columns are the same as the columns in the key schedule, in addition to the Id
column. Each key schedule gives elements in its category a new parameter, which is used for
choosing one of the keys from the key schedule. These parameters are also exported and contain
the ID of the key element.
One final table is also exported: Assembly Codes. This table contains one row for each Uniformat
Assembly Code. The columns of the table are Assembly Code and Assembly Description. The
table of types includes an Assembly Code column that references the Assembly Codes table.
13 Close the exercise file.
Exporting Schedule Information to Microsoft Access | 675
676
Annotating and
Dimensioning
In this tutorial, you learn how to change the base elevation of a project, and how to annotate and dimension your Revit
MEP 2009 projects.
Changing the Base Elevation of a Project
In this lesson, you learn how to relocate the base elevation of a project, as the base elevation of most projects
is rarely at 0 mm. You can change the base elevation without changing the elevation value of every other
level in the project, or you can change the base elevation and add its value to the levels above it. You
accomplish this in Revit MEP by defining levels as either project or shared levels.
12
677
Project levels report elevation relative to other levels in the project
678 | Chapter 12 Annotating and Dimensioning
Shared levels report elevation relative to the base height
Relocating a Project
In this exercise, you relocate the base elevation of a building from 0 m to 10000 m. After you define the
building levels as shared and relocate the project, the height of the elevations above Level 1 report height
relative to Level 1.
Relocating a Project | 679
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open m_Freighthouse_Flats-Anno_Dim.rvt.
Define Level 1 as a shared level
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Elevations (Building Elevation), and
double-click South.
Level 1 displays an elevation value of 0 mm. The levels in the project are not shared, so changing
the height Level 1 would change it only in relation to the other levels in the project.
680 | Chapter 12 Annotating and Dimensioning
2 Select the Level 1 line to display it as red.
3 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
4 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
In order for the levels to report height relative to the new base elevation after the project is
relocated, you must set the Elevation Base parameter to Shared. If you did that now, the parameter
for all the levels in the project would change. However, to better demonstrate how shared levels
work, only the Elevation Base parameter of Level 1 is shared at this time, and you create a new
shared level type for only Level 1.
5 In the Type Properties dialog:
■ Click Duplicate.
■ In the Name dialog, type 8 mm Head - Shared Elevation, and click OK.
■ Under Constraints, for Elevation Base, select Shared.
6 Click OK twice.
Relocate the project
7 Click Tools menu ➤ Project Position/Orientation ➤ Relocate this Project.
8 Select the Level 1 line.
By selecting the Level 1 line, you specify the point (0 mm) from which you want to relocate the
project.
9 Move the cursor above the elevation line, type 10000 mm, and press ENTER.
By typing 10000 mm in this step, you specify the new location of the project.
10 On the View menu, click Zoom ➤ Zoom All To Fit.
The south elevation is displayed. The base elevation now reads 10000 mm. The elevation of the
other levels remains the same.
Relocating a Project | 681
Define the remaining project levels as shared
11 Select the Loft level line.
12 In the Type Selector, select Level : 8 mm Head - Shared Elevation.
13 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
The reported value of the Loft level changes to take the new base elevation value into
consideration.
14 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, double-click North.
The changes in elevation have propagated to this view, as well as other views of the building
model.
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15 Define the remaining levels as shared:
■ While pressing CTRL, select Levels 2-4, the Penthouse level, and the Roof Plan level.
■ In the Type Selector, select Level : 8 mm Head - Shared Elevation.
■ On the Design Bar, click Modify.
All the building levels now report elevations relative to the base elevation.
Relocating a Project | 683
16 If you want to save your changes, click File menu ➤ Save As, and save the exercise file with a
unique name.
17 Proceed to the next lesson, Dimensioning on page 684.
Dimensioning
In this lesson, you learn how to create permanent dimensions to control and document your building
models. In Revit MEP, there are 2 types of dimensions: temporary and permanent. Temporary dimensions
display automatically when you create and insert components. Permanent dimensions must be explicitly
created, except when you sketch profiles to complete families. In this case, permanent dimensions are created
automatically, although you must turn on their visibility to view them.
Creating Dimensions
In this exercise, you learn how to use dimensioning tools and constraints in Revit MEP to dimension and
space planter boxes on the north side of the building. You place linear, multi-segmented, radial, and angular
dimensions, and learn to work with dimensioning constraints to control placement of elements in the
model.
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Linear and multi-segmented dimensions
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Anno_Dim.rvt
Place an overall linear dimension
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
2 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Dimension.
The default dimensioning options display on the Options Bar. By default, dimensions are aligned,
snap to wall centerlines, and are created by selecting individual reference points.
3 Move the cursor over the curtain wall on the top left side of the view, and when a blue dashed
line displays along the left side of the curtain wall, select it.
Creating Dimensions | 685
4 Move the cursor over the curtain wall on the top right side of the view, and when a blue dashed
line displays along the right side of the curtain wall, select it.
5 Move the cursor above the view, and click to place the dimension.
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6 Click the lock that displays on the dimension string to lock the dimension.
The lock displays as locked, indicating that you cannot change the distance between the curtain
walls without first unlocking the dimension. Only aligned and angular permanent dimensions
can be constrained in this way.
7 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Place a multi-segmented dimension
8 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
9 Select the left side of the left curtain wall as you did in a previous step, and move the cursor
over the left endpoint of the first planter to the right.
10 Press TAB until the left endpoint of the planter displays, and select it.
11 Using the same method, select the right endpoint of the planter.
Creating Dimensions | 687
12 On the Options Bar, for Prefer, select Wall Faces.
13 Move the cursor to the planter on the right, and select its left exterior face.
14 Move the cursor to the right, and continue to select the endpoints and faces of the planters.
15 After you select the reference points on the final planter, select the right side of the curtain wall.
16 Move the cursor up, above the plan view of the building, but below the first dimension that
you placed, and click to place the multi-segmented dimension.
Make the dimension segments equal to space the planters at equal distances
17 With the multi-segmented dimension selected, click to make all the dimension segments
equal and reposition the planters equal distances apart from one another.
18 On the Basics tab, click Modify.
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Create a baseline dimension style
19 Select the dimension string, and on the Options Bar, click .
20 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
21 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
22 In the Name dialog, enter Linear - 2.5 mm Arial - Baseline, and click OK.
23 In the Type Properties dialog, under Graphics, for Dimension String Type, select Baseline.
Create an ordinate dimension style
24 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
25 In the Name dialog, enter Linear - 2.5 mm Arial - Ordinate, and click OK.
26 In the Type Properties dialog, for Dimension String Type, select Ordinate.
27 Click OK twice.
View and apply the new dimension styles
28 Zoom in to the dimension string.
The dimensions start from 0 mm and increase moving away from the origin.
29 Select the dimension string, and in the Type Selector, select Linear - 2.5 mm Arial - Baseline.
The dimensions are stacked and measure from the same baseline.
Creating Dimensions | 689
30 In the Type Selector, select Linear - 2.5 mm Arial to return to the original dimension style.
Add text below a permanent dimension
You can add supplemental text above, below, to the left, or to the right of a permanent dimension value.
31 Click the dimension value to which you want to add text, for example . The Dimension
Text dialog displays.
32 In the Dimension Text dialog, under Dimension Value, verify that Use Actual Value is selected.
33 Under Text Fields, for Below, enter Planter.
34 Click OK.
35 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Place a radial dimension with a Typ. suffix
36 Zoom to the planter between grid lines 3 and 4.
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37 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
38 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Radial).
■ For Prefer, select Wall faces.
39 Move the cursor over the left exterior curved face of the planter until it highlights, and select
it.
40 Move the cursor outside the wall, and specify a point to place the dimension.
41 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Modify.
42 Select the radial dimension.
43 Select the blue square grip that displays under the dimension value and drag it slightly up and
to the right.
44 With the dimension still selected, click the dimension text.
45 In the Dimension Text dialog, for Suffix, type Typ., and click OK.
46 On the Basics tab, click Modify.
Creating Dimensions | 691
Place an angular dimension
47 Zoom to the planter near grid line 5.
48 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Dimension.
49 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Angular).
■ For Prefer, verify that Wall faces is selected.
50 Select the horizontal line.
This line is the edge of a mass that represents the neighboring building.
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51 Select the left exterior face of the planter.
52 Move the cursor to the left to resize the dimension arc, and click to place the dimension.
53 On the Basics tab, click Modify.
54 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Automatic Wall Dimensions on page 693.
Creating Automatic Wall Dimensions
In this exercise, you learn to automatically dimension a linear wall and its openings (windows) on the Level
3 floor plan of the building. When you dimension the wall, you select only the wall, instead of the wall and
each individual opening reference point. This automatic dimensioning option provides a convenient way
to quickly dimension walls with multiple openings.
Creating Automatic Wall Dimensions | 693
Automatic wall dimension
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Anno_Dim.rvt
Open the Level 3 floor plan view
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 3.
You will dimension the short bottom horizontal wall that includes 3 windows.
Select automatic dimensioning options
2 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Dimension.
3 On the Options Bar:
■ For Prefer, select Wall centerlines.
■ For Pick, select Entire Walls.
■ Click Options.
4 In the Auto Dimension Options dialog:
■ Under Select references, select Openings, and select Widths.
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■ Click OK.
These options ensure that the wall dimension includes the openings, and that the opening
widths are referenced in the overall dimension string.
Place the dimension
5 Select the bottom exterior wall.
6 Move the cursor down below the plan view, and click to place the automatic dimension string.
7 On the Basics tab, click Modify.
8 Proceed to the next exercise, Controlling Witness Lines on page 695.
Controlling Witness Lines
In this exercise, you learn to override dimension witness line settings as you place dimensions, and learn
how to change the location of witness lines after you place dimensions.
When you place dimensions, you specify their origin on the Options Bar. However, in some cases, you may
need to override their settings on an instance basis. For example, for a multi-segmented dimension, you
may want to locate the two outermost witness lines on the exterior face of each wall, where the witness lines
referring to interior walls would be located on the centerline of each wall.
Training File
Controlling Witness Lines | 695
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Anno_Dim.rvt
Override default dimension witness lines
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
2 Zoom to the planter on which you placed a radial dimension.
3 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Dimension.
4 On the Options Bar:
■ For Prefer, verify Wall centerlines is selected.
■ For Pick, select Individual References.
5 Move the cursor over the left side of the planter.
6 Press TAB to cycle through the selection options until the left face of the planter highlights, and
select it.
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7 Using the same method, select the right edge of the planter, move the cursor down, and click
to place the dimension.
8 Move the cursor over the bottom of the planter on which you placed the angular dimension.
9 Press TAB until the bottom left endpoint is highlighted, and select it.
10 Using the same method, select the bottom right endpoint.
11 Move the cursor down, and specify a point to place the dimension.
Controlling Witness Lines | 697
Dimension the partition walls to centerlines
12 On the Basics tab, click Dimension.
13 On the Options Bar, for Prefer, select Wall centerlines.
14 Move the cursor over the left partition wall in the top left corner of the plan, and when the wall
centerline highlights, select it.
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15 Moving the cursor to the right, select the centerline of each of the 6 remaining partition walls,
and click to place the dimension.
16 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Adjust the witness line location on the end dimensions to align them to the faces of wall
17 Select the dimension that you just placed, and zoom in on the right end of the dimension.
18 While pressing SHIFT, select the green grip that displays in the middle of the tick mark, and drag
the dimension down the wall.
Controlling Witness Lines | 699
19 Release SHIFT, select the top blue grip and drag it up to create a witness line gap.
20 Click the blue middle grip, drag it to the right, and press TAB until the dimension aligns with
the outer face of the partition wall.
21 Zoom to the partition wall on the left side of the plan, and using the same methods, create a
witness line gap and align the dimension to the outer left face of the wall.
22 On the Basics tab, click Modify.
23 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating an Office Standard Dimension Type from Existing
Dimensions on page 700.
Creating an Office Standard Dimension Type from Existing Dimensions
In this exercise, you learn how to duplicate the dimension family type of dimension on the floor plan and
then modify its parameters to create an office standard dimension style. After you create the new family
type, you change the dimension tick mark, text font, and text size parameters to create dimensions that
better conform to your office standards.
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Angular and linear dimensions with office standard
text and arrows
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Anno_Dim.rvt
Duplicate an existing dimension type
1 On the Level 1 floor plan, zoom to the planter between grid lines 3 and 4, and select the lower
dimension.
2 Click (Element Properties).
3 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
4 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
5 In the Name dialog, type Office Standard, and click OK.
Modify the parameters of the new Office Standard type
6 In the Type Properties dialog:
■ Under Graphics, for Tick Mark, select Arrow 30 Degree.
■ Under Text, for Text Size, type 3.2 mm.
Creating an Office Standard Dimension Type from Existing Dimensions | 701
■ For Text Font, select CityBlueprint.
NOTE Fonts that are available in this list are the Windows fonts installed on your system. If
CityBlueprint does not display in the list, select another font.
■ Click OK twice.
7 On the Basics tab, click Modify.
The dimension that you selected previously now displays the new Office Standard family type.
8 Move the cursor to the planter on the right, and select the bottom dimension.
9 In the Type Selector, select Linear Dimension Style: Office Standard.
10 On the Basics tab, click Modify.
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11 Using the same method, select the angular dimension on the planter, create a new angular
dimension type, and modify it to use the office standard parameters.
12 Proceed to the next lesson, Creating Text Annotation on page 703.
Creating Text Annotation
In this lesson, you add text notes on the Level 1 floor plan of the building. You create a new office standard
text note type by duplicating the family type of a note on the floor plan. You learn how to change the text
font and size of text notes, and how to add leaders to the text notes.
Creating Text Annotation | 703
Adding Text Notes to the Floor Plan
In this exercise, you add text notes to the Level 1 floor plan.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Anno_Dim.rvt
Add a text note
1 On the Level 1 floor plan, zoom to the planter near grid line 5.
2 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Text.
3 On the Options Bar, for Leader, click (None).
4 Move the cursor above grid line 4, but below the upper dimension string, and click and drag to
create a text box.
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5 In the text box, type EXISTING BUILDING.
Create a new text note family type by duplicating the existing type
6 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
7 Select the text box, and click .
8 In the Element Properties dialog box, click Edit/New.
9 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
10 In the Name dialog box, type 6 mm Arial Notes, and click OK.
11 Under Text, for Text Size, type 6 mm, and click OK.
12 In the Element Properties dialog, under Graphics, select Arc Leaders, and click OK.
Adding Text Notes to the Floor Plan | 705
You may have to move the text box to avoid overlapping other elements on the floor plan. If
so, select and drag the top left blue symbol to relocate the text box.
Create a text box with leaders
13 On the Design Bar, click Text.
14 Create another text box to the right of grid line 4, and type Planting Bed.
15 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
16 Select the Planting Bed text box.
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17 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Add Right Arc Leader).
A downward pointing leader displays on the right side of the Planting Bed text box.
■ Click (Add Left Arc Leader).
Another leader displays on the left side of the Planting Bed text box.
Reposition the leaders
18 Select the blue grip at the end of the right leader, and drag it down to point to the bottom of
the planter.
19 Select the blue grip at the end of the left leader, and drag it down to point to the bottom of the
planter.
20 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
21 Select the Planting Bed text box to select both the text and leaders, and click .
22 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
23 In the Type Properties dialog:
■ Click Rename.
■ In the Rename dialog, for New, type Standard Notes, and click OK.
■ Under Text, for Text Font, select CityBlueprint.
■ Under Graphics, for Leader Arrowhead, select Arrow 30 Degree.
■ Click OK twice.
24 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Adding Text Notes to the Floor Plan | 707
Add another note using the Standard Note type
25 On the Design Bar, click Text.
26 In the Type Selector, select Text: Standard Notes.
27 On the Options Bar, for Leader, click (Arc).
28 Click the inside bottom face of the rounded planter near grid line 3.
29 Move the cursor up and to the right, over the Planting Bed text.
30 When blue dashed lines that indicate it is aligned with the Planting Bed text, click to place the
text box.
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31 Click in the text box, and type 457 mm Conc. Wall, and click Modify.
32 If you want to save your changes, click File menu ➤ Save As, and save the exercise file with a
unique name.
33 Close the exercise file without saving your changes.
Adding Text Notes to the Floor Plan | 709
710
Detailing
In this tutorial, you learn how to create details in Revit MEP 2009. You can detail directly in a view of the building
information model, using detail components to represent materials like lumber, plywood, and metal studs. These
components display at the required scale. For a detail that you do not want to associate with the model, like a standard
door header condition, you use a separate drafting view in which to create the detail. The "drafted" detail that you create
is not parametrically linked to the building model.
Creating a Detail from a Building Model
In this lesson, you detail the roof overhang of a project building.
In order to detail from the building model, you must define the view in which you want to create a detail.
You define that view by creating a callout view within a section view. In the callout view, you trace over
the building model geometry, add detail components, and then complete the detail by adding break lines
and text notes.
13
711
Detailing the View
In this exercise, you detail the view of the roof edge. You load detail components, and use the model as an
underlay for the detail. After you add components, you add notes and dimensions to the detail view.
The detail components that you add to the view are two-dimensional family objects. They are also view
specific, which means that all detail components, as well as detail lines, region objects, and insulation objects,
that you add to the view are visible only in this view.
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Display a detail view
1 In the upper left corner of the building model, double-click the detail callout head.
The roof overhang detail displays.
2 Click View menu ➤ View Properties.
3 In the Element Properties dialog, for Graphics ➤ Display Model, select As underlay, and click
OK.
Load and place a detail component
4 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
5 In the alert dialog, click Yes to load a Detail Items family.
6 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, navigate to
Metric\Families\m_Corrugated Metal.rfa, and click Open.
7 In the drawing area, click in the space below the roof overhang to place the component. Exact
location is not important.
712 | Chapter 13 Detailing
8 Delete the component.
You load and place the component so that it is in the project to use in a repeating detail.
Place a repeating detail
9 On the Design Bar, click Repeating Detail.
10 On the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
11 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
12 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
13 In the Name dialog, enter Corrugated Metal Siding, and click OK.
14 In the Type Properties dialog, for Pattern ➤ Detail, select Corrugated Metal.
15 For Spacing, enter 406.5mm.
16 Click OK twice.
17 In the drawing area, click the bottom of the exterior wall to select the start point.
18 Move the cursor up to generate the graphics for the repeating detail. Specify a point high enough
so the siding reaches the underside of the roof overhang.
NOTE The detail component endpoint may not coincide with the geometry extents.
19 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Detailing the View | 713
20 Move the component end point:
■ Select the corrugated metal component, and on the Edit toolbar, click (Move).
■ Select the endpoint of the geometry of the corrugated metal component as the move start
point.
■ Select the bottom edge of the roof joist as the move end point.
■ Click Modify.
Add lumber detail components
21 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
22 On the Options Bar, click Load.
23 In the left pane of the Load Family dialog, click Training Files, navigate to Metric\Families\Detail
Components\Div 06-Wood and Plastic\06100-Rough
Carpentry\06160-Sheathing\M_Plywood-Section.rfa, and click Open.
24 In the Type Selector, verify that M_Plywood-Section 19mm is selected.
25 Place the plywood component to the right of the metal component as shown in the following
illustration.
TIP You may need to use the Move command to adjust the position of the plywood.
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Because you still have several components to load, you load them as a group from a single file.
Load components as a group
26 Click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load File as Group.
27 In the left pane of the Load File as Group dialog, click Training Files, navigate to
Metric\Families\Detail Components\m_Roof Edge Components.rvt, and click Open.
28 In the Duplicate Types dialog, click OK.
29 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
30 In the Type Selector, select M_Nominal Cut Lumber-Section : 50 x 150mm Nominal.
31 To properly orient the component, press SPACEBAR 3 times.
32 Click the top right corner of the plywood to select the insertion point.
33 In the Type Selector, select M_Nominal Cut Lumber-Section : 50 x 200mm Nominal, and place
it in the detail view as shown.
Detailing the View | 715
Add wallboard detail component
34 In the Type Selector, select M_Gypsum Wallboard-Section : 16mm.
35 On the Options Bar, select Chain.
36 Place the wallboard component as shown.
37 Click Modify.
38 Select the horizontal segment, click the Flip instance arrows, and click Modify.
The wallboard segment is now on the underside of the roof joist.
NOTE You can also press SPACEBAR as you place the component to flip the justification.
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Add insulation
39 On the Design Bar, click Insulation.
40 On the Options Bar:
■ For Width, enter 140mm.
■ For Offset, select to near side.
41 Place 2 segments of insulation, as shown.
42 Click Modify.
43 Move the upper segment:
■ Select the upper segment of insulation, and on the Edit toolbar, click (Move).
■ Select the left midpoint of the 50 x 200mm component as the move start point.
■ Select the right midpoint of the 50 x 200mm component as the move end point.
■ Click Modify.
Add lumber components
44 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
Detailing the View | 717
45 In the Type Selector, select M_Nominal Cut Lumber-Section : 50 x 300mm Nominal.
46 Click to place the component at the lower left corner of the roof overhang as shown.
47 In the Type Selector, select M_Plywood-Section : 19mm.
48 Place the component directly above the 50 x 200mm component, as shown.
Add rigid insulation
49 In the Type Selector, select M_Rigid Insulation-Section : 63mm.
50 Add the insulation above the plywood you just placed, and lock the component.
51 Click Modify.
52 Proceed to the next exercise, Adding Detail Lines on page 718.
Adding Detail Lines
In this exercise, you add lines to your detail. Like detail components, they are view specific, meaning they
display only in this view.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Add detail lines
1 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
2 In the Type Selector, select Thin Lines.
3 Sketch a detail line from the lower right corner of the 50 x 300mm component to the lower left
corner of the 50 x 200mm component.
718 | Chapter 13 Detailing
4 Click Modify.
5 Select the vertical plywood component; drag the endpoint up to the top of the 50 x 200mm
component.
Add offset lines
6 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
7 In the Type Selector, select Thin Lines.
8 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Pick Lines).
■ For Offset, enter 10mm, and press ENTER.
9 Select the lines at the top of the 50 x 300mm component and the roof joist, as shown.
Trim and extend the lines as necessary to get the desired result.
10 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
11 In the Type Selector, select Medium Lines.
12 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Pick Lines).
■ For Offset, enter 10mm, and press ENTER.
13 Add detail lines around the 50 x 300mm component, as shown.
Adding Detail Lines | 719
Draw detail lines
14 On the Options Bar, click (Draw), and clear Chain.
15 Draw a small diagonal line at the bottom left corner of the 50 x 300mm component, as shown.
16 On the Options Bar, select Chain, and draw the detail lines as shown.
17 Draw a horizontal line as shown.
720 | Chapter 13 Detailing
18 In the Type Selector, select Thin Lines.
19 Zoom in to the area where the roof joist and the corrugated metal component abut; draw the
detail lines as shown.
20 Move the top horizontal line down so that it overlays the Penthouse level line.
Modify display properties
21 In the drawing area, select the Penthouse level line, right-click, and click Hide in view ➤ Elements.
22 In the Project Browser, under Views ➤ Detail Views (Detail), right-click Roof Overhang Detail,
and click Properties.
23 In the Element Properties dialog, for Graphics ➤ Display Model, select Do not display, and click
OK.
When you turn the display model off, the model elements such as walls and floors no longer
display in this view. What remains are the detail components and lines that you added.
24 On the View Control Bar, click ➤ Hide Crop Region.
Add a vapor barrier
25 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
26 In the Type Selector, select Vapor Barrier.
27 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Pick Lines).
■ For Offset, enter 10mm, and press ENTER.
28 Select the interior edge of the vertical segment of gypsum wallboard, and then select the interior
edge of the horizontal segment.
Adding Detail Lines | 721
29 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
30 In the Type Selector, select M_Break Line.
31 Add break lines at the bottom and the right of the detail.
TIP To rotate the break line as you place it, press SPACEBAR as necessary.
32 Click Modify.
33 If a break line does not completely mask the portion of the detail that it is intended to mask,
select the break line and use the shape handle grips to modify it.
34 Proceed to the next exercise, Adding Text Notes on page 722.
Adding Text Notes
In this exercise, you add text notes to complete the detail.
Training File
722 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Add text notes to the detail
1 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Text.
2 On the Options Bar, click (Arc) to create an arced leader.
3 Add the leaders and notes as shown:
■ Click in the detail to specify the location of the arrow.
■ Click again to specify the location of the text box.
■ Enter the text.
■ Click in the drawing area to end the text insertion command.
Add a dimension to the detail
4 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
5 Click the left outer edge of the 50 x 300mm component, click the left edge of the corrugated
metal component, and click to place the dimension.
6 Click Modify.
Adding Text Notes | 723
7 Select the dimension line, and click the dimension text.
8 In the Dimension Text dialog, under Text Fields, for Suffix, enter Typ., and click OK.
9 Click File menu ➤ Save, and save the exercise file.
10 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Detail Components on page 724.
Creating Detail Components
In this exercise, you modify the previously drawn detail so that you can annotate it with keynotes rather
than text notes.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Create a duplicate drawing
1 In the Project Browser, under Views (all) ➤ Detail Views (Detail), click Roof Overhang Detail,
right-click, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate with Detailing.
2 Select Copy of Roof Overhang Detail, right-click, and click Rename.
3 In the Rename View dialog, enter Roof Overhang Detail - Keynotes, and click OK.
Remove text notes
4 In the drawing area, select a text note, right-click, click Select All Instances, and press DELETE.
Convert detail lines to components
5 Use a window to select the entire roof detail; on the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
6 In the Filter dialog, clear Detail Items and Dimensions, and click OK.
The selected lines need to be replaced with detail components in order for them to accept a
keynote.
724 | Chapter 13 Detailing
7 Click Modify.
8 Zoom in to the metal coping; while pressing CTRL, select all the coping linework.
You can also select all the linework by highlighting a segment, pressing TAB, and selecting the
chain.
9 Click Edit menu ➤ Copy to Clipboard.
10 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Family.
11 In the left pane of the New Family dialog, click Training Files, navigate to
Metric\Templates\Metric Detail Component.rft, and click Open.
12 Click Edit menu ➤ Paste from Clipboard.
13 Click the intersection of the reference planes to place the linework.
14 Click Modify.
15 Use a window to select all linework; in the Type Selector, select Medium Lines.
16 Click Modify.
17 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
Creating Detail Components | 725
18 In the Save As dialog, navigate to your preferred location; for File name, enter Roof Edge, and
click Save.
Add components to the detail
19 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
The component family is now part of the roof overhang detail, and the component can be
placed in the detail.
NOTE If the Roof Overhang Detail - Keynotes view is not the open view, double-click it in the Project
Browser.
20 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
21 To place the component, click the bottom left endpoint of the metal coping.
22 Click Modify.
23 Using a window, select the coping.
While pressing SHIFT, deselect any extraneous lines that are also selected.
24 On the Options Bar, click .
25 In the Filter dialog, clear Detail Items, and click OK.
The original linework remains selected.
26 Press DELETE.
The underlying linework is deleted and the detail component remains in the drawing.
27 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
28 On the Options Bar, click Load.
29 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, navigate to Metric\Families\Detail
Components\m_Metal Fascia w_Drip Edge.rfa, and click Open.
30 In the drawing area, click on the upper end point of the drip edge to place the component.
31 Using the same method used previously, delete the underlying linework.
32 Proceed to the next exercise, Adding Keynotes on page 726.
Adding Keynotes
In this exercise, you place keynotes on objects, and add keynote data to components that do not have data
associated with them.
Training File
726 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Add keynotes to components
1 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Keynote ➤ Element.
2 In the alert dialog, click Yes to load a Keynote Tag family to the project.
3 In the left pane of the Load Family dialog, click Training Files, navigate to
Metric\Families\Annotations\M_Keynote Tag.rfa, and click Open.
4 Add the tag:
■ In the drawing area, select the rigid insulation as the object to tag.
■ Click to place the leader arm.
■ Click the rigid insulation on the roof to place the tag.
■ In the Keynotes dialog, navigate to 07000 ➤ 07200 ➤ 07210 ➤ 07210.B5, 63mm Rigid
Insulation, and click OK.
5 Tag additional components:
■ For the plywood decking, use keynote 06160.D11, 19mm Plywood.
■ For the metal coping, use keynote 07645.C1, Roof Edge4.
6 Click Modify.
Assign keynote parameter to a component
7 In the drawing area, select the metal fascia with drip edge, and click (Element Properties).
8 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
Adding Keynotes | 727
9 In the Type Properties dialog, for Identity Data ➤ Keynote, click in the Value column, and click
.
10 In the Keynotes dialog, navigate to 07645.F1, FasciaProfile_1.
11 Click OK 3 times.
12 On the Design Bar, click Keynote ➤ Element.
13 Tag components:
■ Tag the metal fascia with drip edge.
Because you defined the keynote parameter as part of the component properties, the keynote
is automatically read when you place the tag.
■ For the 50 x 300, use keynote 06110.I1.
■ For the 50 x 200, use keynote 06110.G1.
■ For the 50 x 150, use keynote 06110.F1.
■ For the 19mm Plywood Siding, use keynote 06160.D11.
■ For the 2 instances of the 16mm Gypsum Wallboard, use keynote 09250.D1.
14 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
15 In the Type Selector, select Corrugated Metal.
16 Place an instance of the component directly on top of the bottom segment of the corrugated
metal repeating component.
You do this in order to keynote the component; a repeating detail cannot be keynoted.
17 Keynote the component, using keynote 07460.A8, 22mm Corrugated Steel - 20 Ga.
18 Save the file.
19 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating Line-based Detail Components on page 728.
Creating Line-based Detail Components
In this exercise, you convert detail lines to detail components so that you can add keynotes to them.
728 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Create a detail component
1 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Family.
2 In the left pane of the New Family dialog, click Training Files, navigate to
Metric\Templates\Metric Detail Component line based.rft, and click Open.
3 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Lines.
4 In the Type Selector, select Medium Lines.
5 In the drawing area, select the left end point of the reference line, and select the right end point.
6 Lock the line, and click Modify.
7 Click File menu ➤ Save As.
8 In the Save As dialog, navigate to your preferred location; for File name, enter m_Medium Line
Detail Component, and click Save.
9 On the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
Convert detail lines to components
10 In the drawing area, select the horizontal line under the roof overhang as shown.
11 Press DELETE.
12 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
The deleted line needs to be replaced with a detail component in order for it to accept a keynote.
13 In the Type Selector, select Medium Line Detail Component.
14 Add the component in the location of the previously deleted horizontal line.
15 Click Modify.
16 Select the component, and click (Element Properties).
17 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
18 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
19 In the Name dialog, enter Prefinished Metal Soffit Panel.
20 Click OK 3 times.
Load line-based detail components
21 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
22 On the Options Bar, click Load.
23 In the left pane of the Load Family dialog, click Training Files, navigate to Metric\Families\Detail
Components.
24 While pressing CTRL, select m_Hidden Line Detail Component, m_Invisible Line Detail
Component, and m_Light Line Detail Component, and click Open.
Creating Line-based Detail Components | 729
25 Next, you create line-based detail components for other line weights (light, invisible, and hidden)
used in the view. You add the components to the project and keynote them.
Add light line components
26 Zoom to the roof overhang.
27 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
28 In the Type Selector, select m_Light Line Detail Component.
29 In the drawing area, click the end points of the long detail line above the roof.
30 Click Modify.
31 Select the component, and click .
32 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
33 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
34 In the Name dialog, enter EPDM Membrane, and click OK.
35 In the Type Properties dialog, for Identity Data ➤ Keynote, click in the Value column, and click
.
36 In the Keynotes dialog, navigate to 07000 ➤ 07500 ➤ 07530 ➤ 07530.A1, Single-Ply Membrane
Roofing.
37 Click OK 3 times.
38 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
39 Add the Light Line Detail Component to the underside of the overhang.
40 Click Modify.
41 Select the component just added, and click .
42 Using the same method used previously, name the component 50 x 200 Framing, and assign it
keynote 06110.G1.
43 Zoom to the repeating component.
44 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
45 Click the upper end of the repeating detail, and click the lower end at the break line.
46 Click Modify.
47 Select the component, and click .
48 Using the same method used previously, name the component Air Barrier, and assign it keynote
07260.A5.
49 With the component selected, on the Edit toolbar, click (Move).
50 Move the air barrier to the right, against the 19mm plywood.
730 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Add a vapor barrier component
51 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
52 In the Type Selector, select m_Hidden Line Detail Component.
53 On the Options Bar, select Chain.
54 Create the component by drawing over the vertical and horizontal dashed detail lines that
represent the vapor barrier.
55 Click Modify.
56 Delete both dashed detail lines, leaving the detail component lines.
57 Select the vertical hidden line component, and click .
Creating Line-based Detail Components | 731
58 Using the method used previously, name the component Vapor Barrier, and assign it keynote
07260.A4.
Add keynotes
59 Zoom to the drawing extents.
60 On the Design Bar, click Keynote ➤ Element.
61 In the drawing area, add keynotes for the EPDM Membrane, Air Barrier, 50 x 200 Framing, and
Vapor Barrier.
Create an invisible line component
62 Click Window menu ➤ m_Medium Line Detail Component.rfa.
63 In the drawing area, select the component; in the Type Selector, select Invisible Lines.
64 Save the file as m_Invisible Line Detail Component.rfa.
65 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
66 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
67 In the Type Selector, select m_Invisible Line Detail Component.
68 In the drawing area, draw a line in the center of the large vertical segment of insulation.
732 | Chapter 13 Detailing
69 Select the component, and click .
70 Using the method used previously, name the component Batt Insul., and assign it keynote
07210.A4.
71 In the drawing area, add a keynote for the component.
72 Save the file.
73 Proceed to the next exercise, Modifying a Keynote Database on page 733.
Modifying a Keynote Database
In this exercise, you add keynote information for a detail component to the database text file. You are then
able to assign the keynote to the component in the drawing.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Add information to the text file
1 In Windows Explorer, navigate to Documents and Settings\All Users\Application
Data\Autodesk\RAC 2008\Training\Metric, and double-click m_Example_RevitKeynotes.txt.
The database file opens in a text editor.
2 Add keynote information for the metal soffit:
■ Position the cursor at the end of the line that begins with 07460.A9, and press ENTER.
■ Enter 07463.A1, and press TAB.
■ Enter Pre-Finished Metal Soffit, and press TAB.
■ Enter 07460.
3 In the text editor, click File menu ➤ Save, and close the text editor.
Update keynote settings
4 In Revit MEP, click Settings menu ➤ Keynoting.
5 In the Keynoting Settings dialog, under Keynote Table, click Browse.
Modifying a Keynote Database | 733
6 In the Browse for Keynote File dialog, navigate to m_Example_RevitKeynotes.txt, and click Open.
7 In the Keynoting Settings dialog, under Path Type, select Absolute, and click OK.
Work with keynotes
8 On the Design Bar, click Keynote ➤ Element.
9 In the drawing area, select the metal soffit (horizontal line under the overhang); click to place
the leader, and click to place the note.
10 In the Keynotes dialog, navigate to 07463.A1, and click OK.
11 Click Modify.
12 Apply various keynote styles:
■ In the drawing area, select all the keynotes.
■ In the Type Selector, select M_Keynote Tag : Keynote Number.
Each keynote displays as a simple number.
■ Select Keynote Tag : Keynote Text.
The descriptive text for each keynote displays.
■ Change the keynote style back to the boxed number type.
13 Click Modify.
14 Save the file.
Creating a Drafted Detail
In this lesson, you learn how to create a drafted detail. Drafted details are created in drafting views and are
not directly based on building model geometry. These details do not update with changes to the building
model, as there is no parametric linkage to any building model components.
You can create details in drafting views when you do not need to create callout views from the building
model. You can create drafted details using the drafting tools in Revit MEP or by importing details from an
existing detail library. After you create a drafting view, you can reference it within the model and place it
on a sheet.
734 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Importing a Detail into a Drafting View
In this exercise, you place an existing detail in a new drafting view to create a drafted detail. The detail that
you import is in DWG format.
Training File
Use the training file you used in a previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Create a new drafting view
1 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Drafting View.
2 In the New Drafting View dialog, for Scale, select 1 : 5, and click OK.
Import a complete detail in DWG format
3 Click File menu ➤ Import/Link ➤ CAD Formats.
4 In the Import/Link CAD Formats dialog:
■ In the left pane, click Training Files.
■ Navigate to Metric\m_Roof Edge Detail.dwg.
■ For Colors, select Black and White.
■ For Positioning, verify that Auto - Center to Center is selected.
■ Click Open.
5 Enter zf to zoom to the detail.
The detail is imported as an import symbol.
6 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all) ➤ Drafting Views (Detail), right-click Drafting 1, and
click Rename.
7 In the Rename View dialog, enter EPDM Metal Coping, and click OK.
8 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating a Reference Callout on page 735.
Creating a Reference Callout
In this exercise, you create a callout in the section view of the building model to reference the metal coping
detail that you previously imported.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Importing a Detail into a Drafting View | 735
Create the callout view
1 In the Project Browser, under Views (all) ➤ Detail Views (Detail), double-click Roof Overhang
Detail to open it in the drawing area.
2 On the View tab of the Design Bar, click Callout.
3 On the Options Bar, select Reference other view, and select Drafting View: EPDM Metal Coping.
4 Add the callout bubble by dragging a rectangular bubble around the metal coping.
5 Click Modify.
6 Select the callout, and use the callout grips to move the callout head.
Modify detail view properties
7 In the Project Browser, right-click EPDM Metal Coping, and click Properties.
8 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
9 In the Type Properties dialog, click Rename.
10 In the Rename dialog, for New, enter Detail - No Reference, and click OK.
11 In the Type Properties dialog, for Graphics ➤ Reference Label, delete the existing value.
12 Click OK twice.
The callout head no longer displays a reference label.
736 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Display the reference view
13 On the Design Bar, click Modify, and double-click the callout.
The metal coping detail that you imported previously displays.
Add the drafting view to a sheet
14 In the Project Browser, under Views (all) ➤ Sheets (all), double-click A105 - Elev./Sect./Det.
15 Under Drafting Views (Detail - No Reference), drag EPDM Metal Coping onto the sheet.
16 Click on the sheet above the Roof Overhang Detail to place the drafting view.
17 Click Window menu ➤ Detail View: Roof Overhang Detail.
The callout is updated with the sheet information.
18 Save the file.
19 Proceed to the next exercise, Creating a Detail in a Drafting View on page 737
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View
In this exercise, you create a door head condition in the new drafting view. There is no existing DWG file
for this door detail. Modeling elements at this level of detail may be time consuming and can reduce the
overall performance of the product, so you use Revit MEP tools to draft the detail.
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 737
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise, m_Freighthouse_Flats-Detailing.rvt.
Create a drafting view
1 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Drafting View.
2 In the New Drafting View dialog, for Name, enter Header @ Sliding Door, and click OK.
3 On the View Control Bar, verify that the scale is 1 : 5.
Add a detail component
4 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
5 In the Type Selector, select M_Nominal Cut Lumber-Section : 50 x 150mm Nominal.
6 Click in the drawing area to place 2 instances as shown.
Press SPACEBAR to rotate the component as you place it.
Create a filled region
7 On the Design Bar, click Filled Region.
You sketch filled regions to represent gypsum wall board.
8 On the Sketch tab of the Design Bar, click Region Properties.
9 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
10 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
11 In the Name dialog, enter Gyp. Board, and click OK.
12 In the Type Properties dialog, for Graphics ➤ Fill Pattern, click .
13 In the Fill Patterns dialog, for Name, select Gypsum-Plaster.
14 Click OK 3 times.
738 | Chapter 13 Detailing
15 Draw the region:
■ On the Options Bar, click .
■ Select the lower left corner of the 50 x 150 lumber as the start point.
■ Draw a rectangle as shown.
16 Select the left edge of the region, select the width dimension, and enter 20.5mm.
17 Click Modify.
18 While pressing CTRL, select the left and bottom edges of the region.
19 In the Type Selector, select Wide Lines.
20 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
Mirror the region
21 Select the filled region, and on the Edit toolbar, click (Mirror).
22 On the Options Bar, click (Draw).
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 739
23 Draw the mirror line:
■ Select the midpoint of the upper 50 x 150 as the start point.
■ Move the cursor up, and click above the top of the region as the end point.
24 Select the mirrored region, and drag the bottom up to just below the top of the upper 50 x 150.
25 Click Modify.
Add wood filled regions
26 On the Design Bar, click Filled Region.
27 On the Sketch tab of the Design Bar, click Region Properties.
28 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
29 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate.
30 In the Name dialog, enter Wood - Finish, and click OK.
31 In the Type Properties dialog, for Graphics ➤ Fill Pattern, click .
32 In the Fill Patterns dialog, for Name, select Wood - Finish.
33 Click OK 3 times.
740 | Chapter 13 Detailing
34 Draw the region:
■ On the Options Bar, click (Rectangle).
■ Select the lower left corner of the left gypsum board region as the start point.
■ Draw a rectangle as shown; verify that the thickness is 19mm.
35 Select all the linework for the wood region; in the Type Selector, select Medium Lines.
36 Align the wood region to the 50 x 150:
■ On the Tools toolbar, click (Align).
■ Select the right edge of the lower 50 x 150, and select the right edge of the wood region.
37 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
38 On the Design Bar, click Filled Region.
39 In the Type Selector, select Medium Lines.
40 On the Options Bar, click .
41 Beginning at the lower right of the wood region, sketch the new region as shown; verify that
the width is 19mm and the height is 63.5mm.
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 741
42 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
Add a reference plane
43 On the Design Bar, click Ref Plane.
44 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Pick Lines).
■ For Offset, enter 6mm, and press ENTER.
45 Select the top of the vertical wood region to place the reference plane above it.
You use the reference plane as an alignment reference for the gypsum board region above it.
46 On the Tools toolbar, click (Align).
47 Click the reference plane, and click the bottom of the gypsum board region.
48 Click Modify.
Add a door panel
49 On the Design Bar, click Filled Region.
50 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Pick Lines).
■ For Offset, enter 10mm, and press ENTER.
51 Select the left edge of the horizontal wood region.
742 | Chapter 13 Detailing
52 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Draw).
■ For Offset, enter 0, and press ENTER.
■ Select Chain.
53 Draw the door panel outline:
■ Click the top endpoint of the offset line.
■ Move the cursor left 25mm, and click to select the point.
■ Move the cursor down 305mm, and click to select the point.
■ Move the cursor right 25mm, and click to select the point.
54 On the Tools toolbar, click (Trim/Extend).
55 Select the small vertical line of the door panel sketch, and select the bottom horizontal line.
56 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 743
Add detail lines for mounting/sliding hardware
57 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
58 In the Type Selector, select Medium Lines.
59 On the Options Bar:
■ Click (Pick Lines).
■ For Offset, enter 3mm, and press ENTER.
60 Select the left, top, and right edges of the door panel region.
61 Click Modify.
62 Select the left detail line, select the height dimension, enter 76.2mm, and press ENTER.
63 Repeat for the right detail line.
Add mounting/sliding hardware
64 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
65 On the Options Bar, click Load.
66 In the left pane of the Load Family dialog, click Training Files, navigate to Metric\Families\Detail
Components\Div 05-Metals\05090-Metal Fastenings\M_A307 Bolts-Side.rfa, and click Open.
67 Add the bolt to the right side of the lower wood region as shown.
TIP Press the SPACEBAR as necessary to rotate the bolt to the correct orientation.
68 Click Modify.
69 Select the bolt; drag the left shape handle until the nut is against the detail line.
744 | Chapter 13 Detailing
70 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
71 On the Options Bar, click Load.
72 In the left pane of the Load Family dialog, click Training Files, navigate to Metric\Families\Detail
Components\Div 05-Metals\05090-Metal Fastenings\M_Expansion Bolts-Side.rfa, and click
Open.
73 Add the component to the left side of the lower 50 x 150.
NOTE Exact sizes and positioning are not critical when creating the remainder of the detail; use the
images as a guide.
74 Select the expansion bolt; drag the right shape handle until the bolt end is just past the midpoint
of the 50 x 150.
Add detail lines
75 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
76 In the Type Selector, select Wide Lines.
77 Draw a line at the base of the bolt head as shown.
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 745
78 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
79 In the Type Selector, select Thin Lines.
80 On the Options Bar, click .
81 Draw the rectangle to the left of the wide line as shown.
82 Select the rectangle, and on the Edit toolbar, click (Mirror).
83 Select the wide detail line as the axis of reflection.
84 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
85 On the Options Bar, click .
86 Draw a small rectangle between the mirrored rectangles as shown.
87 Click Modify.
746 | Chapter 13 Detailing
88 Select the detail line to the left of the lower wood region; drag the top end above the mirrored
rectangles as shown.
89 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
90 In the Type Selector, select Medium Lines.
91 Draw a small line from the midpoint of the left mirrored rectangle to the left, as shown.
Do not extend the line to the vertical detail line.
92 Select the line, and on the Edit toolbar, click (Mirror).
93 Select the wide detail line as the axis of reflection.
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 747
94 Select the mirrored line on the right, select the length dimension, enter 3mm, and press ENTER.
95 On the Design Bar, click Detail Lines.
96 Beginning at the end of the 3mm line, draw a line up to the height of the other detail line.
97 On the Options Bar, click .
98 Click the end of the detail line on the left, and click to place the arc as shown.
99 Click Modify.
Add two break lines
100 Zoom to the drawing extents.
101 On the Design Bar, click Detail Component.
102 In the Type Selector, select M_Break Line.
103 Add two break lines as shown.
TIP Rotate and move the break lines as necessary to adjust the masking elements.
748 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Add dimensions
104 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
105 In the drawing area, select the left edge of the horizontal wood region, and select the right edge
of the adjoining vertical region.
106 Click to place the dimension, and click Modify.
107 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
108 In the Type Selector, select Linear Dimension Style : Linear 2.5mm Arial.
109 Add a multi-segment dimension line as shown, and click Modify.
110 Select the dimension line; using the Drag Text grip, drag the text for the smaller dimension.
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 749
Add dimension overrides to represent different wall types
111 Select the wall dimension, and then click the dimension text.
112 In the Dimension Text dialog, under Dimension Value, select Replace With Text, and enter
Varies.
113 Under Text Fields, for Below, enter See Schedule.
114 Click OK.
Add dimension strings based on the wall type
115 On the Design Bar, click Dimension.
116 In the Type Selector select Linear Dimension Style: Detail Linear - 2.5mmArial.
117 Click to place additional dimensions on the wall as shown.
118 Select Modify to end the command.
Add dimension overrides to represent different wall types.
119 Select the topmost of the 3 wall dimensions, and click the dimension text.
120 In the Dimension Text dialog, under Dimension Value, select Replace With Text, and enter 175
mm @ Type A.
750 | Chapter 13 Detailing
121 Click OK.
122 Repeat this process for the next 2 dimensions:
■ Enter 200 mm @ Type B.
■ Enter 225 mm @ Type C.
123 Click OK.
Add text notes to complete the detail
124 On the Design Bar, click Text.
125 In the Options Bar, click to create an arced leader.
126 In the drawing area, select the gypsum board region on the left, and click to place the text.
127 Enter Gyp. Board, and click Modify.
128 Select the note, and on the Options Bar, click (Add Right Arc Leader).
129 Drag the end of the new leader to the other gypsum board region.
130 Add leaders and text notes to the detail as shown.
Creating a Detail in a Drafting View | 751
131 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
132 Save the file.
752 | Chapter 13 Detailing
Finishing the Sheets
In this tutorial, you perform tasks to provide finishing touches on your project documentation, including:
■ Creating a note block that contains typical construction notes
■ Creating a drawing list that is automatically populated based on filter selections
■ Creating the 2 most common types of legends produced for construction: annotation legends and building component
legends
■ Tracking and documenting revisions in the project
■ Importing resources (images and text) from other applications into project sheets
Using Note Blocks
In this lesson, you create a typical note block to annotate repairs and renovations to the exterior of the
building.
Creating a Note Block
In this exercise, you add typical construction notes to sheets and then create a note block to expose the note
text. The note block can be used to schedule parameters assigned to a generic annotation family.
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-
Finishing-Sheets.rvt.
Load a generic annotation family
1 In the Project Browser, expand Elevations (Building Elevation), and double-click East.
14
753
2 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Symbol.
3 Click Yes to load a generic annotation family into the project.
4 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\Families\Annotations\Sheet Keynote - Hexagon.rfa.
5 On the Options Bar, for Number of Leaders, type 1.
6 Click in the drawing area to the right of the building to place a hexagon tag.
7 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
8 Select the keynote, and drag the endpoint of the leader to position it on the right front door.
754 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
9 Drag the midpoint of the leader to position it as shown:
Create annotation marks for items requiring notes
10 With the tag selected, on the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
11 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, for Text, type Seal existing doors and
insulate, and click OK.
12 On the Edit toolbar, click (Copy).
13 Select the tag, and click above the tag to place the copy.
Creating a Note Block | 755
14 With the copy selected, on the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
15 For Text, type Repair existing door surround. Contact Historic Preservation District official for
specific requirements.
16 For Tag, type B.
17 Click OK.
18 Using the same method, make another copy of the tag and place it on the left side of the building.
19 With the tag selected, on the Edit toolbar, click (Mirror), and on the Options Bar, clear
Copy.
20 To create a vertical mirror image of the tag so the leader points toward the building, position
the cursor over the hexagon tag until a vertical bar displays, and click.
756 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
21 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
22 Optionally, using the table as a reference, and moving counter-clockwise, continue tagging the
building as shown in the following illustration:
Text Tag
Seal existing doors and insulate. A
Repair existing door surround. Contact Histor-
ic Preservation District official for specific re-
quirements.
B
Clean and repair stone parapet cap as re-
quired.
C
Clean and repair existing stone trim as re-
quired.
D
Remove all existing windows. Clean opening
and repair as required for new window install-
ation.
E
Clean exterior brick wall. Tuckpoint as re-
quired.
F
Clean existing concrete loading dock. Repair
as required.
G
Creating a Note Block | 757
Text Tag
Saw cut existing brick wall. Clean cut and
repair wall as required.
H
Create, format, and place a note block on a sheet
23 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Note Block.
24 In the New Note Block dialog, for Note block name, type Exterior Construction Notes, and click
OK.
25 Specify values in the Note Block Properties dialog:
■ On the Fields tab, under Available fields, select Tag, and click Add.
■ Select Text, and click Add.
■ On the Sorting/Grouping tab, for Sort by, select Tag.
■ On the Formatting tab, for Heading, type Mark, and for Alignment, select Center.
■ On the Appearance tab, for Header text, verify that Arial is selected, for the value, type 6
mm, and select Bold.
26 Click OK.
The Exterior Construction Notes block displays.
27 In the column header (text), type Description.
28 In the Project Browser, expand Sheets (all), and double-click A103 - Elevations.
29 In the Project Browser, expand Schedules/Quantities, select Exterior Construction Notes, and
drag it to the sheet.
30 Click to place the block in the upper left corner of the sheet, and drag the right column control
to expand the column to display the note text.
758 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
31 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
32 Zoom in to see the note block.
33 Save the file as Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Using Drawing Lists
In this lesson, you quickly create a drawing list that is automatically generated from the drawings available
in the project.
Creating a Drawing List
In this exercise, you create an automatically populated drawing list for placement on the title sheet of the
project.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-
Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click T - Title Sheet.
Using Drawing Lists | 759
2 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Drawing List.
3 Specify values in the Drawing List Properties dialog:
■ On the Fields tab, under Available fields, select Sheet Number, and click Add.
■ Select Sheet Name, and click Add.
■ On the Filter tab, for Filter by, in the first field, select Sheet Number, in the second field,
select does not equal, and in the third field, type T.
■ On the Sorting/Grouping tab, for Sort by, select Sheet Number.
4 Click OK.
The drawing list displays.
5 In the list title field, change Drawing List to Sheet Index.
6 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click T - Title Sheet.
7 In the Project Browser, expand Schedules/Quantities, select Sheet Index, and drag it to the sheet.
8 Click to place it on the sheet in the lower right corner, and expand the right column to
accommodate the text.
760 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
9 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
10 Zoom in to the drawing list.
11 Save the file.
Using Legends
Legends provide a way to display a list of the various building components and annotations used in a project.
The two most common types of legends produced for construction documents are annotation legends and
building component legends.
Annotation legends are made up of components (such as section markers and door tags) that are paired with
text that identifies them. On construction documents, annotation legends are often referred to as symbol
legends.
Building component legends list and identify components such as walls, windows, doors, and door frames.
On construction documents, building component legends are often called schedules (wall type schedule,
door frame schedule, and so on).
NOTE A component that is placed in a legend does not count as an additional instance of the component in the
Revit MEP building model, and thus is not added to the number of instances of that component listed on a schedule
or note block.
Creating a Symbol Legend
In this exercise, you create a legend view and add symbols and text to it. For the text, you use a text type
you create by duplicating an existing text type and modifying the type properties. Finally, you add the
completed symbol legend to multiple sheets for easy reference.
Training File
Using Legends | 761
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson, Metric\m_Freighthouse_Flats-
Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Create a legend view
1 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Legend.
2 In the New Legend View dialog, for Name, type Typical Symbol Legend, and click OK.
Add symbols to the legend
3 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Symbol.
4 Add the following symbols to the legend view, selecting each from the Type Selector and placing
it in the legend as shown.
■ Custom-Section Head: Section Head - Open
■ Level Head - Circle
■ M_Door Tag
■ M_Window Tag
■ Sheet Keynote - Hexagon : Tag
Create a text type
5 On the Design Bar, click Text.
Because the text size for the symbol legend is not available in the Type Selector, you create a
text type with the necessary size. You do this by duplicating the standard text type and modifying
the type properties.
6 On the Options Bar, click .
7 In the Element Properties dialog, click Edit/New.
8 In the Type Properties dialog, click Duplicate, for Name, type Legend Text, and click OK.
9 For Text Font, select Arial.
10 For Text Size, type 3mm, and click OK twice.
762 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Add text to the legend
11 In the Type Selector, verify that Text : Legend Text is selected, and for Leader, verify that
is selected.
12 Click to the right of the first symbol to specify the text start point.
13 Type Detail Callout for the text note.
14 Working from the top down, type the following text for the remaining symbols in the legend:
■ Level Indicator
■ Door Tag
■ Window Tag
■ Sheet Keynote
Place the symbol legend on a sheet
15 In the Project Browser, expand Sheets (all), and double-click A101 - Site Plan/Floor Plan.
16 In the Project Browser, expand Legends, click Typical Symbol Legend, drag it to the lower right
corner of the sheet, and click to place it.
Creating a Symbol Legend | 763
17 In the Type Selector, select Viewport : No Titlemark.
18 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
The symbol legend is added to the project sheet.
19 In the Project Browser, under Sheets, double-click A102 - Unit 18.
20 Drag Typical Symbol Legend to the lower right corner of the sheet, and click to place it.
21 In the Type Selector, select Viewport : No Titlemark.
22 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
A legend view is unlike any other view and can be placed onto multiple sheets for reference
where required.
23 Save the file.
764 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Creating a Component Legend
In this exercise, you create a building component legend for the wall types in the building model. You use
the text type that you created in a previous exercise to create annotations that identify the material used in
each wall component. You then add the completed legend to a project sheet.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Create a legend view
1 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Legend.
2 In the New Legend View dialog, for Name, type 4th Floor Wall Types.
3 For Scale, select 1 : 50, and click OK.
Add components to the legend
4 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Legend Component.
5 On the View Control Bar, select Medium for Detail Level.
6 On the Options Bar:
■ For Family, select Walls: Basic Wall: 4th Floor Balcony Divider.
■ For View, select Section.
■ For Host length, type 900 mm, and press ENTER.
7 Click near the top left of the drawing area to specify the insertion point for the wall.
8 Click directly below the first wall to place a second wall.
Creating a Component Legend | 765
9 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
10 Select the second wall, and on the Options Bar, for Family, select Walls : Basic wall : 4th Floor
Exterior.
Add titles to the legend components
11 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Text.
12 In the Type Selector, verify that Text : Legend Text is selected.
13 On the Options Bar, for Leader, click to add text without a leader.
14 Click below the upper wall component to specify the start point for the text, and type Wall Type
1 Patio Divider.
NOTE Press ENTER to force the text to start on the next line, for example to force a line break between
''Wall Type 1'' and ''Patio Divider.''
15 Click below the lower wall and type Wall Type 2 Exterior Wall.
766 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Add text to the legend
16 On the Options Bar, click to add text with a single-segment leader.
17 Click the right side of the Wall Type 1 component to specify the leader start point.
18 Click to the right of the wall to end the leader and specify the text start point.
19 Type the following text, pressing ENTER between component descriptions, and click Modify on
the Design Bar: 33mm Decking 50x100 Stud 33mm Decking.
The text note with leader is added to the legend.
20 Use the following illustration as a guide for entering the text annotations on the lower wall
component.
Place the legend on a sheet
21 In the Project Browser, right-click Sheets (all), and click New Sheet.
22 In the Select a Titleblock dialog, click OK to accept the default titleblock.
23 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, select Level 4, and drag it to the new sheet.
24 Click to place the floor plan on the right side of the sheet.
Creating a Component Legend | 767
25 In the Project Browser, under Legends, select 4th Floor Wall Types, drag it onto the sheet, and
click to place it in the upper left corner of the sheet.
26 On the Design Bar, click Modify to end the command.
The floor plan and legend are added to the new sheet.
Tile views in the drawing window
27 In the Project Browser, double-click 4th Floor Wall Types.
28 Click Window menu ➤ Close Hidden Windows.
29 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 4.
30 Click Window menu ➤ Tile.
The open drawings are both visible, allowing you to select a component type in one drawing
and then apply the type in the second drawing.
768 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Match a component type
31 On the Tools toolbar, click (Match Type).
32 In the 4th Floor Wall Types Legend view, select the Wall Type 2 component.
Notice that the eyedropper changes to filled, indicating that it captured the wall type properties.
33 In the floor plan view, zoom to the lower right area of the floor plan including the patio divider
wall.
34 Select the patio divider wall.
35 On the View Control Bar, select Detail Level: Medium.
Changing the detail level displays the hatching for each material of the wall component. The
wall type in the floor plan matches wall type 2 from the Wall Type Legend.
Creating a Component Legend | 769
36 Optionally, click if you do not want to save the change to the wall type.
37 Save the file.
Using Revision Tracking
Revit MEP provides tools that enable you to track revisions to your project. You can create a sequence of
revisions, and you can draw revision clouds around elements in your project that have changed. You can
use revision tags to notate the revision clouds, and can then display the revisions in schedules that appear
in the titleblock of each project sheet.
Setting Up a Revision Table
There are likely to be changes to your construction documents after you have issued the original set of
documents for bid or after you have received a signed contract. These changes can be due to owner requests,
contractor inquiries, unanticipated changes in construction conditions, or changes in building material
availability. In this exercise, you open a revision table in which you can add rows that represent a sequence
of revisions. Using the table, you can specify the numbering method for revisions in a project, and you can
add data such as release date and description to each revision.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Specify a revision numbering method
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 4.
770 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
2 Click Settings menu ➤ Revisions.
3 On the right side of the Sheet Issues/Revisions dialog, for Numbering, verify that Per Project is
selected.
When you use this option, the revisions are numbered according to the sequence of revisions
in the Revisions dialog. For example, if the active revision is number 1, all tags and schedules
display the numeral 1. If you select Per Sheet, the revisions are numbered according to the
sequence in which they are added to a sheet.
Add a revision to the project
4 For Date, type a date.
This is the date the revisions are sent out for review.
5 For Description, type Relocate 4th floor partition dividing walls.
In general, revision descriptions should be comprehensive, yet as concise as possible.
6 Verify that Issued is cleared.
When Issued is selected, the revision is locked and issued to the field.
7 Under Show, verify that Cloud and Tag is selected.
If Visible is not selected, any revision cloud you draw to indicate this particular revision is not
visible in the view in which you create it. In most instances, you would turn off visibility only
after a revision was issued.
Setting Up a Revision Table | 771
8 Click OK.
9 Save the file.
Sketching Revision Clouds
In this exercise, you make changes to the project floor plan, and then indicate the changes graphically with
a revision cloud. Revision clouds have read-only properties, including revision number and revision date,
which are inherited from the revision table you created for the project.
You can sketch revision clouds in all views except 3D views, but each cloud is visible only in the view in
which it is sketched. You can draw multiple revision clouds for each revision.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Modify a wall
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 4.
2 Zoom in to the left area of the drawing to see the 4th Floor Balcony Divider.
3 Select the divider.
4 On the Edit toolbar, click (Move).
5 Select the divider, move the cursor up, and click to reposition the divider closer to the upper
wall.
6 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
772 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Add a revision cloud
7 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Revision Cloud.
Revit MEP is now in sketch mode.
NOTE To turn off snaps when drawing a revision cloud, click Settings menu ➤ Snaps. In the Snaps
dialog, select Snaps Off, and click OK.
8 In the drawing area, click near the partition you moved, and move the cursor clockwise to create
a segment of the revision cloud.
9 Click to end that segment and begin a new segment.
10 Continue adding segments until the cloud encompasses the area that you changed.
11 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
The revision cloud is displayed around the modified partition.
Sketching Revision Clouds | 773
Modify revision cloud style
12 Select the revision cloud.
13 Click Settings menu ➤ Object Styles.
14 In the Object Styles dialog, click the Annotation Objects tab.
15 Under the Revision Clouds category, for Line Weight, select 6.
16 Click OK.
17 Save the file.
Tagging Revision Clouds
In this exercise, you load a revision tag into the project, and then apply the tag to the revision cloud in the
current drawing. The tag number that is displayed in the drawing is based on the numbering method you
specified when you set up the revision table in a previous exercise.
Training File
774 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Load a revision tag
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 4.
2 Zoom in to the area with the revision cloud.
3 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
4 On the Options Bar, click Tags.
5 In the Tags dialog, scroll down to Revision Clouds.
Because there are no tags loaded for revision clouds, you need to add one.
6 Click Load.
7 In the left pane of the dialog, click Training Files, and open
Metric\Families\Annotations\M_Revision Tag.rfa.
8 In the Tags dialog, notice that M_Revision Tag is the loaded tag for Revision Clouds; click OK.
Tag a revision cloud
9 On the Options Bar, select Leader.
10 In the drawing area, position the cursor just outside the revision cloud to the left.
If the cursor is just inside the cloud, the tag is displayed inside the cloud.
11 Click to place the tag.
The tag displays the revision number of the cloud. The number is based on the numbering
method you specified when you set up the revision table. Because you chose to number by
project, and because the revision is the first in the project, the cloud is tagged as number 1.
12 Save the file.
Working with Revisions
In this exercise, you view a sheet on which you place a revised view. You then issue a revision, which creates
a record of the revision and locks it from further changes. Because a real-world project can undergo several
revisions before it is completed, you create additional revisions in the revision table.
Training File
Working with Revisions | 775
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
View the revision schedule on a sheet
1 In the Project Browser, under Sheets, double-click A107 - Unnamed.
2 Zoom to the revision schedule in the sheet titleblock.
The information you added to the revision table in a previous exercise is displayed in the revision
schedule.
After you make the necessary changes to the project and add the revised views to a sheet, you
prevent further changes to the revision. You do this by issuing the revision.
Issue a revision
3 Click Settings menu ➤ Revisions.
4 For the Sequence 1 revision, select Issued, and click OK.
NOTE After you issue a revision, you can no longer modify it. You cannot add revision clouds to the
revision in the drawing area, nor can you edit the sketch of the existing clouds.
Create additional revisions
5 Click Settings menu ➤ Revisions.
Your project may have several revisions before it is completed. You can continue to add revisions.
6 In the Sheet Issues/Revisions dialog, click Add.
A new row is added below the existing rows in the revision table.
7 For Description, type Modify Paving Area, and enter a date for the revision.
8 Add another revision row, with the description Relocate Door, and enter a date.
9 Click OK.
776 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Change revision scheme from numeric to alphabetic
You place the new revisions on a sheet, and then specify the revision table sequence to alphabetic.
10 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 4.
11 On the Drafting tab, select Revision Cloud.
12 In the drawing area, click to add a revision clouds.
13 Click Finish Sketch.
Apply revisions to revision clouds
14 In the drawing area, select the revision cloud.
15 On the Options Bar, for Revision, select Seq. 2 - Modify Paving Area.
16 Add another revision cloud as shown.
17 Using the same method learned previously, apply Seq. 3 - Relocate Door to the revision cloud.
Tag the revision clouds
18 On the Drafting tab, select Tag ➤ By Category.
19 To add tags, in the drawing area, click outside each of the two revision clouds you just drew.
20 On the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click A107 - Unnamed.
21 Zoom in to the revision schedule in the titleblock.
Information for all tagged revisions displays in the schedule.
Working with Revisions | 777
Change the sequencing of revision to use alpha characters
22 Click Settings menu ➤ Revisions.
23 In the Sheet Issues/Revisions dialog:
■ For Sequence 1, clear Issued.
You do this so that the revision can be changed. You want to change the numbering value
from numeric to alphabetic for all sequences.
■ For each revision, for Numbering, select Alphabetic.
■ Click Options.
You can modify the sequence of characters used for the alphabetic numbering scheme.
24 In the Sequence Options dialog, for Sequence, delete the first 3 characters.
25 Click OK twice.
The revision schedule now uses alphabetic characters, beginning with "D".
Edit the titleblock family
The revision schedule is part of the titleblock family. In order to make formatting changes (appearance,
height, and rotation) to the revision schedule, you edit the titleblock family.
26 In the drawing area, select the titleblock.
778 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
27 On the Options Bar, click Edit Family.
28 In the alert dialog, click Yes, and then zoom in to the revision schedule.
Modify the revision schedule properties
29 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all) ➤ Schedules, right-click Revision Schedule, and click
Properties.
30 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Appearance, click Edit.
31 In the Revision Properties dialog, on the Appearance tab:
■ Under Graphics, for Build Schedule, select Bottom-up.
■ Select Grid lines.
Grid lines will now be dynamically added as the revision schedule is built.
■ Select Outline, and select Wide Lines for the outline type.
■ Clear Blank row before data.
32 Click OK twice.
Relocate revision schedule
You relocate the revision schedule to the bottom of the revision area, and delete the schedule lines because
the table will be dynamically built.
33 Select the schedule header, and drag it above the schedule area.
34 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
35 Select the existing schedule lines, and press DELETE.
36 Drag the header to the bottom of the revision schedule area.
Reload the titleblock family into the project
Because you changed the titleblock family, all sheets that use this titleblock in the project will be affected.
37 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
38 In the Reload Family dialog, click Yes.
Working with Revisions | 779
The revision schedule is now shown in a bottom-up format.
Rotate revision schedule to display it vertically
39 Using the same method learned previously, open the titleblock family for editing.
40 Select the revision schedule header, and on the Options Bar, for Rotation on Sheet, select 90°
Counterclockwise.
41 Drag the header to the right side of the titleblock.
Modify the properties of the revision schedule
42 In the Project Browser, right-click Revision Schedule, and click Properties.
43 In the Element Properties dialog, under Other, for Formatting, click Edit.
44 On the Formatting tab of the Revision Properties dialog, for Heading, enter Rev..
45 On the Appearance tab, for Height, select User defined.
When the height property is variable, the schedule continues to add rows as revisions are created.
With a user-defined height, the schedule is restricted to a specific size, and the most current
revisions display in the available rows.
46 Click OK twice.
Use grip editing to resize the revision schedule
47 In the drawing area, select the revision schedule.
48 Click the circular grip and drag it so that the schedule fills the revision area.
780 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Load revised schedule into the project
49 On the Family tab of the Design Bar, click Load into Projects.
50 In the Reload Family dialog, click Yes.
The modified revision schedule displays on the project sheet.
51 Save the file.
Importing from Other Applications
In this lesson, you learn to import information (such as images, text, and spreadsheets) from other applications
into a project.
Importing from Other Applications | 781
Importing Image Files
In this exercise, you import a logo image in JPG format into a project, and place it on a sheet.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous lesson,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, under Sheets, double-click T - Title Sheet.
2 Click File menu ➤ Import/Link ➤ Image.
3 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Common\Freighthouse
Logo.JPG.
4 Click in the upper right area of the sheet to place the logo.
5 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
6 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Importing Text Documents
In this exercise, you import text from another application using a cut and paste function to populate a text
object on a sheet.
Training File
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
Create a text element on the title sheet
1 In the Project Browser, under Sheets, double-click T - Title Sheet.
2 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Text.
3 On the Options Bar, for Leader, click to add text without a leader.
4 Click and drag to place a text box on the right side of the sheet.
782 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Copy the text
5 Open the Training Files\Common\Bidding Statement.doc text file in another window.
6 Select the text.
7 Click Edit menu ➤ Copy.
Paste the text on the sheet
8 In the Revit MEP window, with the new text box still selected, click Edit menu ➤ Paste from
Clipboard.
The text is pasted into the new text box on the sheet.
9 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
10 Zoom in to view the pasted text.
NOTE Some formatting may be required after the text is placed in Revit MEP.
11 Save the file.
Importing Spreadsheets
In this exercise, you have existing information in a spreadsheet format and would like to use it in the project.
The only way to do this is to convert the spreadsheet file to a raster format (JPG or BMP) and import it as
an image.
Training File
Importing Spreadsheets | 783
Continue to use the training file you used in the previous exercise,
m_Freighthouse_Flats-Finishing-Sheets_in_progress.rvt.
1 In the Project Browser, under Sheets, double-click A102 - Unit 18.
2 Open the Microsoft Excel worksheet, Training Files\Common\Lighting Fixtures.xls.
NOTE You need to print/export the spreadsheet to a raster format. This process may vary from system
to system. This exercise demonstrates a common method.
3 In Microsoft Excel, click File menu ➤ Print.
4 Under Printer, for Name, select the document writer.
5 Click OK.
6 In the left pane of the Save the file as dialog, click Desktop, for File name, type Fixture
Schedule.mdi, and click Save.
Now that you have the worksheet in a raster format, you could use a screen capture utility to
save the worksheet in BMP or JPG format. This step has been completed for you, and saved as
Fixture Schedule.JPG.
7 In the Revit MEP window, click File menu ➤ Import/Link ➤ Image.
8 In the left pane of the Import Image dialog, click Training Files, and open Common\Fixture
Schedule.JPG.
9 Click to place the image on the sheet.
10 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
11 Zoom in to see the Fixture Schedule.
12 Save the file.
784 | Chapter 14 Finishing the Sheets
Using Dependent Views
In this tutorial, you work with a large project for a bird sanctuary.
The drawings include the aviary and observation area of the site, as well as a large lab building.
The large floor plan, or footprint, for the sanctuary will not fit onto a plotted sheet as one plan. To effectively document
this project, you break up the plan into sections, called dependent views.
15
785
Dependent view of lab building
Dependent view of aviary and observation platforms
Dependent views can be placed on sheets for documentation purposes.
786 | Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views
Using Dependent Views in Documentation
In this lesson, you
■ Create split dependent views of a large floor plan and elevation
■ Annotate the primary view to indicate where the view is split and to provide links to the dependent
views
■ Apply the specifications of the dependent views to other views in the project
■ Add dependent views to sheets for documentation
Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views
In this exercise, you
■ Create split dependent views of a large floor plan view
■ Add a matchline to the primary view to indicate where the view is split
■ Place dependent views on sheets
■ Add view references to the primary view to link to dependent views
■ Apply dependent view specifications to other views
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Dependent_Views.rvt
Using Dependent Views in Documentation | 787
Create dependent views
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 2.
2 In the Project Browser, right-click Level 2, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate as a Dependent.
The dependent view opens.
3 In the Project Browser, under Level 2, right-click Dependent on Level 2, and click Rename.
4 In the Rename View dialog, for Name, enter Level 2 - Aviary, and click OK.
5 Click in the drawing area, and on the Zoom flyout of the View toolbar, click Zoom To Fit.
6 In the drawing area, select the crop region.
The following image shows a plan view with the model and annotation crop regions visible.
The annotation crop is the exterior crop region, and the model crop is the interior crop region.
7 Select the inside (model crop) control on the right and drag it toward the center of the view to
crop out the lab building.
788 | Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views
8 Click the inside control on the bottom and drag it up, confining the view to the upper-left area
of the drawing (the aviary).
9 On the View Control Bar, click (Hide Crop Region).
Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views | 789
10 Click in the drawing area, and on the Zoom flyout, click Zoom To Fit.
11 In the Project Browser, right-click Level 2, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate as a Dependent.
12 In the Project Browser, right-click Dependent on Level 2, and click Rename.
13 In the Rename View dialog, for Name, enter Level 2 - Labs, and click OK.
14 Click in the drawing area, and on the Zoom flyout, click Zoom To Fit.
15 Select the crop region.
16 Use the inside controls to crop the view to the lower-right building (the labs).
17 Select the outside control on the left and drag it to the left to reveal the notes.
790 | Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views
The outside controls adjust the annotation crop region.
18 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
19 On the View Control Bar, click (Hide Crop Region).
20 Click in the drawing area, and on the Zoom flyout, click Zoom To Fit.
Add matchline to indicate split view
21 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 2.
22 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Matchline.
Matchlines are annotation lines that you add to a view to indicate where a view is split for
dependent views.
23 Draw the matchline by specifying the following points:
■ Click above and to the right of the intersection of the lab building and the aviary. (Align
with the second column of lab cubicles.)
Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views | 791
■ Move the cursor down and click just above the lab building.
■ Click above the left corner of the lab building.
■ Click just below the lower intersection of the lab building and the aviary.
■ Move the cursor left about 4800 mm, and click.
24 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
792 | Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views
25 Click Settings menu ➤ Object Styles.
26 In the Object Styles dialog, click the Annotation Objects tab.
27 Under Matchline, for Line Weight, select 9.
28 For Line Pattern, select Double Dash, and click OK.
Create sheets and place dependent views
29 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Sheet.
30 In the Select a Titleblock dialog, click OK to accept the default titleblock.
31 In the Project Browser, expand Sheets, right-click A101 - Unnamed, and click Rename.
32 In the Sheet Title dialog, for Name, enter Level 2 Aviary, and click OK.
33 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, click Level 2 - Aviary, and drag it onto the sheet.
34 Click to place the view in the center of the sheet.
Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views | 793
35 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
36 Use the same method to create another sheet, rename the sheet Level 2 Labs, and place the Level
2 - Labs dependent view on the sheet.
Add reference annotations to sheets
37 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 2.
38 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click View Reference.
You add view references near the matchline to annotate and link to the dependent views.
39 On the Options Bar, for Target view, verify that Floor Plan: Level 2 - Aviary is selected.
40 Click to the left of the top of the matchline.
794 | Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views
The Sheet number of the dependent view displays to the left of the matchline.
41 On the Options Bar, for Target view, select Floor Plan: Level 2 - Labs.
42 Click to the right of the top of the matchline.
43 Use the same method to add View References above (A101) and below (A102) the lower-left end
of the matchline.
NOTE Double-clicking a view reference opens the dependent view that it references.
44 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
45 On the Zoom flyout, click Zoom To Fit.
Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views | 795
46 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Level 2 - Aviary.
47 On the View Control Bar, click (Show Crop Region).
48 Select the crop region, click the far right control, and drag it slightly to the right to expand the
annotation region so you can see the view reference.
NOTE View references display in all views except for the view that it is referencing. Notice that the
view reference for the aviary does not display in the aviary dependent view.
49 If, after modifying the annotation crop region, the tags for Cubicles 3 and 14 display, select the
room tag for Cubicle 3 (upper-right room tag) in the annotation area, right-click, and click Hide
in view ➤ Elements.
796 | Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views
50 Use the same method to hide Cubicle 14 (directly below Cubicle 3), leaving 4 rooms visible in
the view.
51 On the View Control Bar, click (Hide Crop Region).
Apply dependent view settings to other plans
52 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, right-click Level 2, and click Apply Dependent Views.
After you have set up dependent view configuration for one view, you can apply the view and
crop region specifications to parallel views of the same scale.
53 In the Select Views dialog, select all views in the list, and click OK.
New dependent views display in the Project Browser under the primary view, but are not placed
on sheets.
54 In the Project Browser, expand Level 1, and double-click Dependent (2) on Level 1.
55 On the Zoom flyout, click Zoom To Fit.
Notice that the matchline and crop regions from Level 2 are applied to Level 1.
56 Double-click Dependent on Level 1.
Using Dependent Views for Floor Plan Views | 797
57 On the Zoom flyout, click Zoom To Fit.
Using Dependent Views for Elevation Views
In this exercise, you
■ Create dependent split views of an elevation view
■ Annotate the primary view to indicate where the view is split
■ Place dependent views on a sheet
■ Add view references to the primary view to link to dependent views
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Dependent_Views.rvt
Create dependent views
1 In the Project Browser, expand Elevations (Building Elevation), and double-click South Elevation.
The matchline is already placed in the view.
2 In the Project Browser, right-click South Elevation, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate as a
Dependent.
798 | Chapter 15 Using Dependent Views
The dependent view opens.
3 In the Project Browser, expand South Elevation, right-click Dependent on South Elevation, and
click Rename.
4 In the Rename View dialog, for Name, enter South Elevation - Left, and click OK.
5 In the drawing area, select the Crop Region.
6 Select the inside crop region control on the right, and drag it toward the center of the view,
cropping the view to the aviary.
7 On the View Control Bar, click (Hide Crop Region).
8 In the Project Browser, right-click South Elevation, and click Duplicate View ➤ Duplicate as a
Dependent.
9 In the Project Browser, right-click Dependent on South Elevation, and click Rename.
10 In the Rename View dialog, for Name, enter South Elevation - Right, and click OK.
11 Select the crop region.
12 Select the inside crop region control on the left, and drag it toward the center of the drawing,
cropping the view to the lab building.
Using Dependent Views for Elevation Views | 799
13 On the View Control Bar, click (Hide Crop Region).
Create a sheet and place both dependent views on the sheet
14 Click View menu ➤ New ➤ Sheet.
15 In the Select a Titleblock dialog, click OK to accept the default titleblock.
16 In the Project Browser, under Sheets, right-click A103 Unnamed, and click Rename.
17 In the Sheet Title dialog, for Name, enter South Elevation, and click OK.
18 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, click South Elevation - Left, and drag it onto the sheet.
19 Click to place the elevation view at the top of the sheet.
20 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, click South Elevation - Right, and drag it onto the
sheet.
21 Click to place the elevation view at the bottom of the sheet.
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22 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
23 In the Project Browser, under Elevations, double-click South Elevation.
24 On the Views tab of the Design Bar, click View Reference.
25 On the Options Bar, for Target view, verify that Elevation: South Elevation - Left is selected.
26 Click to the left of the top of the matchline at the center of the elevation.
27 Click to the left of the bottom of the matchline.
28 On the Options Bar, for Target view, select Elevation: South Elevation - Right.
29 Click to the right of the top and the bottom of the matchline.
Using Dependent Views for Elevation Views | 801
30 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
31 In the Project Browser, under Sheets (all), double-click A103 - South Elevation.
NOTE If the view references are not visible, you can modify the annotation region for the dependent
view from the sheet. Right-click the view, and click Activate View. Select the crop region, and use the
annotation crop controls to modify it.
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Using Advanced Features
803
804
Grouping
Using the grouping functionality in Revit
®
Architecture 2009, you can create reusable entities that represent layouts
common to many building projects. By grouping objects, you not only simplify their placement, you also simplify the
modification process. For example, when you make changes to a single instance of a model group, all instances in the
building model are updated, and all new instances that you place contain the modifications.
You can also nest groups within other groups. In this tutorial, you create a model group for a typical kitchen, and then
you nest the kitchen in a 2 bedroom condominium unit group. Modifications to the nested group are automatically
included in the host group.
Saving a group to a library gives you the ability to share the group with other team members working on the same project,
or with those working on a different project. This functionality ensures consistency within and across projects. It also
gives all those with access to the library the ability to load any group from the library into their project drawing. Because
existing groups can be duplicated and then customized for another purpose, creating a library of groups for your office
can reduce the amount of work needed to create, place, and modify repetitive units.
Creating, Modifying, and Nesting Groups
In this lesson, you learn how to use model groups to collect related elements to simplify placement of
repetitive units. Examples of the types of units for which groups are intended include condominium units,
hotel rooms, and typical office layouts.
After you create a model group, you can place instances of the group in the building model using various
methods. You can also update all instances of a group in the building model by editing a single instance of
the group and saving the changes.
In another exercise, you add the new model group to a previously created group. The new group is considered
nested within the host group, and is contained in every instance of the host group that you place in the
building model. When you make changes to a nested group, the host group is also updated automatically.
Creating and Placing a Group
In this exercise, you create a model group for a typical kitchen for a condominium unit. You create the group
by selecting drawing objects and grouping them as a single entity.
In this exercise, you place 2 new instances of the kitchen group in the floor plan. You mirror one instance
of the group, and rotate the other instance to modify the layout position.
16
805
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Metric\m_Groups-Condominium.rvt.
NOTE You may need to scroll the left pane to see the Training Files folder.
Create a group for the typical kitchen layout
1 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click First Floor.
2 Click in the drawing area, enter ZR, and zoom to the kitchen in the upper-left area of the floor
plan.
806 | Chapter 16 Grouping
3 Draw a selection box (lower-right corner to upper-left corner) around the kitchen.
4 On the Edit toolbar, click (Group).
5 In the Create Model Group dialog, enter Typical Kitchen, and click OK.
The objects are now grouped and can be placed in the drawing as a single entity.
Creating and Placing a Group | 807
Change the origin point for the group
6 In the drawing area, select the center control for the group origin, and drag it to the upper-right
corner of the kitchen.
7 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
8 Click View menu ➤ Zoom ➤ Zoom To Fit.
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Place instances of the group
9 In the Project Browser, under Groups, expand Model, right-click Typical Kitchen, and click
Create Instance.
10 Zoom to the center of the floor plan, and click the upper-left corner of the lower unit to place
the kitchen group.
11 Click in the upper-right corner of the stairwell to place a second instance.
12 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
13 Select the first instance of the Typical Kitchen group that you just placed.
Creating and Placing a Group | 809
14 On the Edit toolbar, click (Mirror).
15 On the Options Bar, clear Copy.
16 Select the adjacent wall near the sink as the axis of reflection.
The kitchen is now positioned correctly in the floor plan.
NOTE If the kitchen is not placed exactly as shown in the following image, select the group and use
the arrow keys on your keyboard to make any minor adjustments.
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17 Select the kitchen in the stairwell, and on the Edit toolbar, click (Rotate).
18 Click in the drawing area to the left of the kitchen.
19 Click above the right area of the kitchen to rotate the placement.
Creating and Placing a Group | 811
NOTE If the kitchen is not placed exactly as shown in the following images, select the group and
use the arrow keys on your keyboard to make any minor adjustments.
20 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
21 Click View menu ➤ Zoom ➤ Zoom To Fit.
You should now have three instances of the Typical Kitchen group in your model: one with the
original orientation, one mirrored, and one rotated, as shown.
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Save the training file
22 On the File menu, click Save As.
23 Navigate to your preferred directory, name the file m_Groups-Condominium_in_progress.rvt,
and click Save.
Modifying a Group
In this exercise, you make changes to an instance of a group. When you finish editing, all instances of the
same group in the drawing are updated.
Training File
Continue using the training file saved at the end of the previous exercise,
m_Groups-Condominium_in_progress.rvt.
Modify visibility of elements in a group
1 Zoom in to the kitchen on the right above the stair.
2 Move the cursor over the wall to the left of the kitchen, press TAB to highlight the wall, and
click to select it.
Modifying a Group | 813
3 Click (Group Member. Click icon to exclude in this group instance.).
This element remains in the group but is not visible in the project view for this group instance.
NOTE To display an excluded element, select the element, and click (Restore excluded group
member to group instance.).
4 Move the cursor over the door, press TAB, and click to select the door.
5 Click (Group Member. Click icon to exclude in this group instance.).
6 Move the cursor over the horizontal wall, press TAB, and click to select the wall.
7 Click (Group Member. Click icon to exclude in this group instance.).
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8 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Add elements for a unique condition
9 On the Basics tab of the Design Bar, click Wall.
10 In the Type Selector, select Basic Wall : Generic - 127mm.
11 Click at the endpoint of the short vertical wall in the kitchen entrance, move the cursor to the
left, and click to draw a horizontal wall that extends to the left vertical wall.
12 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
13 On the Design Bar, click Door.
14 In the Type Selector, select Bifold-4 Panel : 1220 x 2134mm.
15 On the Options Bar, clear Tag on Placement.
16 Click in the new wall on the left and on the right to place 2 sets of folding doors for a closet.
Modifying a Group | 815
17 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
18 Click View menu ➤ Zoom ➤ Zoom To Fit.
Modify geometry of a group and have changes display in all group instances
19 Zoom in to the kitchen in the left area of the floor plan.
20 Select the Typical Kitchen group.
21 On the Options Bar, click Edit Group.
In edit group mode, the background color of the drawing area is pale yellow, and the group
editor toolbar initially displays in the upper left corner. The elements in this instance of the
group remain displayed in their object style. All other elements in the model are grayed out.
22 On the Modelling tab of the Design Bar, select Opening ➤ Wall Opening.
23 In the drawing area, select the vertical wall to the left of the long counter top.
24 Click near the bottom corner of the wall, move the cursor up, and click near the top corner of
the wall to create an opening.
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25 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
26 Select the opening, and on the Options Bar, click (Element Properties).
27 In the Element Properties dialog, under Constraints, for Unconnected Height, enter 2134.
28 For Base Offset, enter 1000, and click OK.
29 On the group editor toolbar, click Finish.
All instances of the Typical Kitchen are updated to reflect the change.
30 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Nesting Groups
In this exercise, you add the Typical Kitchen group, created in an earlier lesson, and the wall and folding
doors for the closet, to the 2 Bedroom Unit group. The kitchen group is then nested within the 2 bedroom
unit group, which acts as the host. When you nest the kitchen in the 2 bedroom unit, all instances of the
host group are updated to contain the nested group.
Nesting Groups | 817
Training File
Continue using the training file saved at the end of the previous exercise,
m_Groups-Condominium_in_progress.rvt.
Add elements to an existing group
1 If necessary, in the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click First Floor.
2 Select the 2 Bedroom Unit group in the top area of the floor plan.
3 On the Options Bar, click Edit Group.
4 On the group editor toolbar, click (Add to Group).
5 In the drawing area, select the Typical Kitchen group.
818 | Chapter 16 Grouping
6 Press TAB, select the wall between the folding doors, and each of the bifold doors.
7 On the group editor toolbar, click Finish.
8 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Second Floor.
9 Select the 2 bedroom group.
Notice that the Typical Kitchen and pantry are nested within the 2 bedroom group.
Nesting Groups | 819
10 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Working with Detail Groups
In this lesson, you work with groups in order to use them in the most efficient manner within and across
projects. Detail groups are created when you group view-specific elements, such as text, and filled regions.
You create a detail group in the First Floor plan and add the group to the Second Floor plan of the building
model.
Attached detail groups are created when you group view-specific elements that are associated with a specific
model group, such as door and window tags. In the next exercise, you add door tags to a group, and create
an attached detail group containing the tags. You work with the attached detail group in a different way
than you had previously worked with host and nested groups because attached detail groups require more
manual manipulation.
Creating a Detail Group
In this exercise, you sketch and annotate a rectangular filled region that represents an area of tiled flooring
in front of the elevators in the building model. You then save the region and the text note as a detail group.
You can add the detail group to other views of the building model.
Training File
Continue using the training file saved at the end of the previous exercise,
m_Groups-Condominium_in_progress.rvt.
Draw a filled region
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click First Floor.
2 Zoom in to the stair area in the center of the floor plan.
820 | Chapter 16 Grouping
3 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Filled Region.
4 On the Options Bar, click to draw a rectangular region.
5 Click the upper-right endpoint below the elevators as the start point of the rectangle.
6 Move the cursor down and to the left, and select a point below the left elevator.
7 On the Design Bar, click Finish Sketch.
A rectangular region with a diagonal cross hatch pattern is added in front of the elevator doors.
Creating a Detail Group | 821
Add a text note
8 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Text.
9 On the Options Bar, click to add an arc leader.
10 Click in the filled region to specify the leader start point.
11 Click below the filled region to end the leader and specify the text start point.
12 Enter Tile, and on the Design Bar, click Modify.
The text note with arc leader is added to the building model.
Create a detail group
13 Press and hold CTRL, and select the text note and the filled region.
14 On the Edit toolbar, click (Group).
15 In the Create Detail Group dialog, enter Elevator Lobby Tile, and click OK.
16 In the drawing area, select the instance of the Elevator lobby tile group.
17 Move the origin of the group to the corner of the elevator shaft, as shown.
822 | Chapter 16 Grouping
18 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Add a group instance to a different view
19 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Second Floor.
20 In the Project Browser, under Groups, expand Detail, right-click Elevator Lobby Tile, and click
Create Instance.
21 In the drawing area, click to place the detail group in front of the elevators.
22 On the Design Bar, click Modify
23 Click View menu ➤ Zoom ➤ Zoom To Fit.
24 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Using Attached Detail Groups
In this exercise, you add door tags to the 2 Bedroom Unit group, and then use the door tags to create an
attached detail group. Because the detail group contains variables, it cannot be added to a group in the same
Using Attached Detail Groups | 823
manner that a drawing component can be added; you must manually attach it to each instance of the 2
Bedroom Unit group.
Training File
Continue using the training file saved at the end of the previous exercise,
m_Groups-Condominium_in_progress.rvt.
Place door tags
1 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click First Floor.
2 On the Drafting tab of the Design Bar, click Tag ➤ By Category.
3 On the Options Bar, clear Leader.
4 Place door tags (10 total) in the original instance of the 2 Bedroom Unit, as shown.
NOTE Your door tag numbers may be different.
5 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
Create an attached detail group
6 In the drawing area, draw a selection box (lower-right corner to upper-left corner) around the
right area of the floor plan including the door tags.
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7 On the Options Bar, click (Filter Selection).
8 In the Filter dialog, click Check None, select Door Tags, and click OK.
9 On the Edit toolbar, click (Group).
10 In the Create Model Group and Attached Detail Group dialog, for Attached Detail Group Name,
enter 2 Bedroom Door Tags, and click OK.
11 In the Project Browser, expand Groups\Model\2 Bedroom Unit, and view that Floor Plan: 2
Bedroom Door Tags is attached.
Place a detail group in another group instance
12 In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click Second Floor.
Using Attached Detail Groups | 825
13 Select the model group 2 Bedroom Unit.
14 On the Options Bar, click Place Detail.
15 In the Attached Detail Group Placement dialog, select Floor Plan: 2 Bedroom Door Tags, and
click OK.
Door Tags are placed on the Second Floor instance of the 2 Bedroom Unit group.
NOTE Component instance numbering is sequential; therefore, the doors are numbered based upon
the order in which you placed each group.
16 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
17 Click File menu ➤ Save.
Saving and Loading Groups
In this lesson, you save a typical condominium layout to a library where it can be accessed by other team
members for use in other projects. When you load the group from the library into a new project, you can
then work with it in the context of the new project. You also convert the group instance to a linked file to
replace the group with an alternative unit layout.
Saving and Loading Groups
In this exercise, you save a group to a library so that you can use the group in a new project. This enables
you to create a library of groups that can be shared with other team members and used on multiple projects.
Using groups from a library ensures consistency and increases productivity for projects that reuse similar
typical layouts for repetitive units.
Training File
826 | Chapter 16 Grouping
Continue using the training file saved at the end of the previous exercise,
m_Groups-Condominium_in_progress.rvt.
Save a group to a library
1 In the Project Browser, under Groups\Model, right-click 2 Bedroom Unit, and click Save Group.
2 In the left pane of the Save Group dialog, click Desktop.
3 For File name, verify that Same as group name is selected, and click Save.
You can save a group as a Revit project file (RVT) if you are working in a project, or a Revit family
file (RFA) if you are working in the Family Editor. In this case, the file is saved as a Revit project
file (RVT).
Load the group in a new project
4 Click File menu ➤ New ➤ Project.
5 In the New Project dialog, accept the default template file, for Create new, verify that Project is
selected, and click OK.
6 Click File menu ➤ Load from Library ➤ Load File as Group.
7 In the Load File as Group dialog, browse to the Desktop, select 2 Bedroom Unit.rvt, and click
Open.
8 In the Duplicate Types dialog, click OK.
A warning dialog displays, explaining that duplicate types were found and the types from the
new project will be used.
Place an instance of the loaded group
9 In the Project Browser, expand Groups, and expand Model.
10 Right-click 2 Bedroom Unit, and click Create Instance.
11 Click in the drawing area to place the group instance.
12 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
13 Zoom in to the 2 Bedroom Unit group.
Saving and Loading Groups | 827
Convert group instance to a linked file
14 Select the group, and on the Options Bar, click Link.
15 In the Convert Group to Link dialog, click Use Existing.
When a group is converted to a link, either the selected group can be used to make a new linked
file, or the group instance can be replaced with an existing linked file.
16 In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Common\c_2 Bedroom
Unit-Alternate.rvt.
17 On the Design Bar, click Modify.
18 In the Project Browser, expand Revit Links.
The 2 Bedroom Unit-Alternate.rvt file is added as a link to the project.
Convert the linked model to a group
19 In the drawing area, select the linked Revit model.
20 On the Options Bar, click Bind.
21 In the Bind Link Options dialog, verify that Attached Details is selected only, and click OK.
22 In the Duplicate Types dialog, click OK.
23 In the confirmation dialog, click Yes to replace the existing Typical Kitchen group with the
alternate Typical Kitchen group.
24 In the message dialog, click Remove Link.
This message indicates that all instances of the linked model will be deleted from the project,
but the linked model file will still be loaded in the project. You can remove the linked file from
the project by clicking Remove Link, or you can remove it at a later time from the Manage Links
dialog.
25 The linked file is converted to a new model group stored in the project, and the link is removed.
26 Close the file with or without saving it.
828 | Chapter 16 Grouping
Sharing Projects
When working with large building projects, architects commonly work in teams with each person assigned to a specific
functional area. This involves simultaneously working on and saving different portions of the project at the same time,
called Worksharing. In this tutorial, you learn how to use Worksharing to divide a project into worksets so multiple users
can access the project and have all their changes coordinated by Revit MEP 2009.
You can enable Worksharing for any project. A workset is a collection of building elements, such as walls, doors, floors,
stairs, and so on. Only one user can edit each workset at a given time. All other team members can view this workset;
however, they cannot make changes to it. This prevents possible conflicts within the project. If you need to modify an
element that belongs to a workset that someone else is actively working on, you can borrow that element without requiring
the workset owner to relinquish control of the entire workset.
Using Worksharing, team members adding and changing elements in worksets can save their work to a local file on the
network or their own hard drive and publish work to a central file whenever they choose. They can update their local
files at any time in order to see the changes other team members have published.
Overview
Sharing a project for the first time
To share a project, you must first enable Worksharing. The first time you activate worksets within a project,
a dialog displays allowing you to set up the initial sharing of the project. After the project is shared, each
building element in the project is contained in exactly one workset. You can change the workset assignment
of any modeling element within the property dialog for that element.
Working in a shared project
In a shared project, you can only make changes to the worksets that are editable by you. To make a workset
editable, go to the Worksets dialog, select the desired workset, and click Editable. Each workset can only be
editable by one user at a time. If you only need to modify a single element within a workset that someone
else has checked out, use Element Borrowing.
When you are working on a shared project, you specify an active workset. Any new model elements are
automatically assigned to the active workset. Elements specific to a view, such as annotations and dimensions,
are automatically assigned to the view workset of the current view.
17
829
Increasing performance using selective open
When opening a Worksharing-enabled project, you can select which worksets are open or closed. Elements
in closed worksets are not read from disk until they are required. This reduces the time it takes to open the
file and the amount of memory it uses. You can close or open worksets at any time using the Worksets
dialog. You can improve the display-related performance of Revit MEP by opening only those worksets
required for your work.
In the lessons and exercises that follow, you learn some of the strategies that maximize your use of worksets.
You gain valuable practical experience setting up a project for worksets and working within that project.
Using Worksharing in a Project
In this lesson, you learn the fundamentals of Worksharing. This includes how to plan and execute the use
of worksets in a project in order to maximize project and team performance. After learning the fundamentals,
you enable Worksharing within a project and set up the initial workset environment. In the next exercise,
you learn how to work as an individual with the central and local project files. You then learn how to work
within a Worksharing-enabled project with multiple users and borrow particular elements from other users.
Understanding Worksharing Fundamentals
In this conceptual exercise, you learn the fundamentals of Worksharing application. You learn what to
consider before enabling and using Worksharing. You learn the basic steps of project sharing as well as tips
for dealing with common workplace scenarios.
When planning a Worksharing-enabled project
The decisions you make when sharing a project and setting up its worksets can have long-lasting effects on
the project team. When setting up Worksharing, you should take several considerations into account:
General Considerations:
■ Project size
■ Team size
■ Team member roles
■ Default workset visibility
You can maximize long-term project performance more easily if you plan Worksharing appropriately and
use the feature correctly. Establishing practical policies on how all team members access and create new
worksets in the project will maintain performance for existing users and ease the process of introducing new
team members to the project.
Project size
The size of your building may affect the way you decide to segment the worksets for your team. Unlike
AutoCAD Xrefs, you do not need to make separate worksets for each floor of the building. Instead, you
should separate the project into worksets that allow team members to work without interfering with
each other. In a multi-story structure, you could create separate worksets for a set of building elements
that will only appear on one floor, such as a tenant interior. If the project floor plan is so large that you
need to split it with match lines to fit it on sheets, you may want to create separate worksets for each
portion.
Team size
830 | Chapter 17 Sharing Projects
You should take into consideration the size of the project team at the time you enable Worksharing. You
should have at least one workset for each person, not including the Project Standards, Shared Levels and
Grids, and View worksets. In most projects, greater subdivision improves workflow by reducing interference
between team members. Experience has shown that, for a typical project, the optimum number of
worksets is approximately four for each team member.
Team member roles
Typically, designers work in teams, with each assigned a specific functional task. By subdividing the
project based on these task roles, each team member has control over a portion of the design. A typical
scenario for a multi-story commercial building is shown in the following illustration. Notice that the
workset names refer to functional roles.
TIP As new team members create new worksets for their own use, make sure visibility defaults are set
appropriately.
Default workset visibility
After a project has been shared, a Worksets tab displays on the Visibility/Graphics dialog. On this tab,
you control workset visibility on a per view basis. If you are sure that the elements of a particular workset
should not appear in a view, you can turn off the visibility of that workset within that view. This allows
Revit MEP to display the view faster because computing time is not spent figuring out if the element
belongs to a workset that should be displayed.
When you create a new workset, you decide whether or not the elements in that workset are visible by
default in each view. Regardless of the default setting, you can change the visibility setting in the
Visibility/Graphics dialog. Long-term performance is improved if new worksets are not visible by default
unless they need to be. Team size usually increases as the project progresses from the design stage to the
documentation stage. As new members create worksets for their own use, the worksets they add often
do not need to be visible by default.
Conceptual stages of project sharing
The following steps explain the basic stages of project sharing.
Step 1: Start the project with one user
One user starts to work on the project. This project file should incorporate as many office/project standards
as possible and it should include many of the families required by the project. The building model should
also reach a reasonable point of development before you enable Worksharing.
Step 2:Activate Worksharing
After the building model is ready for multiple user access, the project coordinator should enable Worksharing.
Step 3: Create additional worksets
After enabling Worksharing, the project coordinator should create the additional worksets required by the
team. When creating the new worksets, remember to create worksets for functional roles and properly assign
default visibility.
Understanding Worksharing Fundamentals | 831
Step 4: Subdivide the building model into worksets
After you have created the initial worksets, you must assign building model elements to their respective
workset. For example, if a workset named Interior was created, you would want to assign the interior walls
and other interior components to that workset.
Step 5: Create the central file
The first time you save a project after Worksharing has been enabled, the file is saved as the central file. The
central file coordinates and propagates the changes of each user and keeps track of which worksets are
available. Therefore, it is essential that you save the central file to a location accessible to all team members.
Generally, the central file is not a file that a team member would open and work in directly.
Step 6: Create local files
Each team member creates a local file that makes it possible to check out worksets and work on their respective
portion of the building model. When finished or at regular intervals, each user saves their changes back to
the central file where the changes can be propagated to all team members. You create a local file by opening
the central file and using “Save As” to create a local copy of the central file. Local files are user-specific and
can only be accessed by the users that created them.
Step 7: Open worksets
Whenever you open a central or local file, you have the option to choose which worksets to open. This is
called “Selective Open.” When opening a Worksharing-enabled project, you can shorten the time required
to open the file by selecting to open only the worksets required to complete your assigned tasks.
Step 8: Check out worksets from the central file
When you “check out” a workset, you make that workset editable by you. This gives you the right to make
changes to the elements in the workset and to add to the workset. There is no limit to the number of worksets
you can have editable at one time. However, no other users can make modifications to any elements in
those worksets until you check them back into the central file.
Step 9:Work on the project
Work on the project, within the local file, proceeds as usual. As you work, new building elements are assigned
to the workset that is active at the moment. On the Options Bar, you can select which workset is active. You
can make a workset active only if it is editable by you.
Step 10: Saving your changes
As you work on the project throughout the day, you should save the file locally and to the central file at
regular intervals. When you save locally (to your local file), your changes are saved; however, they are not
propagated to the rest of the team. When you save to the central file, your changes propagate to the entire
team. When you save to the central file, you should relinquish any worksets that you no longer need. This
makes them available to other team members. Any changes that other users have made to the building
model become visible to you after you save to the central file or when you select Reload Latest.
Step 11: Closing a local file
At the end of a work session, you should save to the central file and relinquish control of all worksets that
you set as editable. After saving to the central file, you should then save to your local file. This ensures that
your local file is synchronized with the central file.
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Tips and common scenarios
1 When working on a Worksharing-enabled project, you can still work remotely as an individual
and as a team. The tips discussed below provide useful information for working creatively with
worksets.
Taking your computer to a remote location with the project
2 You do not need to have access to the central file in order to work on the project. You can work
on the project from a remote location by doing the following:
■ Before leaving the office and disconnecting from the networked access to the central file,
make any required worksets editable, save to the central file, and then save the local file.
■ When working remotely, you work no differently then you would in the office. You can
modify any elements in an editable workset and all new elements are added to the active
workset. You can also add new elements to any View or Project Standards workset even if
they are not editable.
If you realize that you need to modify elements in a workset that you did not make editable
before going remote, you can make the workset Editable at Risk. In this situation, you will not
be able to save your changes back to the central file if another user has changed the same workset
and already published those changes back to the central file. In this instance, if you know who
checked out the required workset, you may want to phone them and make arrangements rather
than waste valuable work time. If you choose Editable at Risk and the owner of the at-risk workset
has already published their files to the central file, you will not only lose the changes to that
workset, you will lose the changes you made to all your worksets. If the owner of the at-risk
workset agrees to relinquish editability of the contested workset, you can save your changes
back to the central file but then the other owner loses all their work.
Since making a workset Editable at Risk carries a high risk that work will be lost, you should use
it only when:
■ You do not intend to save your changes back to the central file, or
■ You are very confident that no other user will make that workset editable in your absence.
If you have a colleague who is in the office with access to the central file, you may want to
request that someone start a session of Revit MEP, change the username to your name under
Settings ➤ Options, and make that workset editable. This will guarantee that no other user
can make it editable during the remainder of your absence.
WARNING You should avoid editing a workset “at risk” whenever possible.
Multiple users working remotely
3 Users can work remotely provided the remote users have high-speed network access to the central
file; for instance, using VPN. Alternatively, a user can transfer a local file to someone with
network access who can then publish the changes back to the central file, reload the latest
changes from the central file, and transfer the updated local file back to the remote user.
Remote rendering
4 While rendering remotely is supported, it is not recommended unless you understand the
implications for the rest of the team. If you intend to render the building model while away
from the office, you will probably be changing material definitions and other project settings.
To do this, you should check out the Materials workset. This means that other team members
will not be able to change any materials while you have the Materials workset checked out.
In this conceptual exercise, you learned what to consider before enabling Worksharing. You learned the
basic steps of project sharing as well as tips for dealing with common workplace scenarios.
Understanding Worksharing Fundamentals | 833
In the next exercise, you enable Worksharing in a project and set up some initial worksets.
Enabling Worksharing and Setting Up Worksets
In this exercise, you enable Worksharing within an existing project. You subdivide the project into worksets
and save the project as the "Central File."
Training File
■ Click File menu ➤ Open.
■ In the left pane of the Open dialog, click Training Files, and open Common\c_Worksets.rvt.
Enable Worksharing
1 On the File menu, click Worksets.
A confirmation dialog displays indicating that you are about to enable Worksharing. It also
informs you that existing elements in your project move to a default workset.
2 Click OK to accept the default workset names.
The Worksets dialog displays.
Notice that all worksets are open and editable by you.
Your username displays as the present owner.
TIP You can change your username by selecting Options under the Settings menu. You cannot
change your username with an unsaved Worksharing-enabled project open. Do not change your
username during this exercise unless explicitly instructed to do so.
3 In the Worksets dialog, under Show, select:
■ Families
■ Project Standards
■ Views
4 Scroll down the list of workset names, and notice all are editable by you.
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When you enable worksharing, Revit MEP creates new worksets and moves project elements
and settings into the new worksets:
■ Families: Loaded families in the project move into separate worksets.
■ Project Standards: All project-wide settings defined from the Settings menu move to Project
Standards worksets.
■ Views: Each view moves into a separate View workset. For example, Floor Plan Level 1 view
moves into a workset called View: "Floor Plan Level 1".
5 Under Show, clear Families, Project Standards, and Views.
Only User-Created worksets should display.
In this simple training project, a small number of team members are working on the building
model. For training purposes, imagine four users including yourself. The project must be
subdivided in such a way as to reflect the tasks of each user. In this case, one user is assigned to
the development of the exterior, another is assigned the interior layout, a third team member
is assigned furniture placement, and the remainder of the team must work on wall section
details.
Therefore, you must create worksets that allow each team member to work independently.
Creating new worksets
6 In the Worksets dialog, click New.
7 Enter the name Interior Layout.
Notice that Visible by default in all views is checked. Because the interior walls appear in many
views, it is better to make them visible by default.
8 Click OK.
The next workset you create is for the furniture layout. Because furniture should only be visible
in specific views, you should turn off Visible by default in all views. This improves performance
since fewer components need to be generated in each view.
9 Click New.
10 Enter Furniture Layout, clear Visible by default in all views, and click OK.
The final new workset is for the exterior shell of the building model. Rather than create a new
workset for these elements, you can rename the default workset, currently named Workset1.
11 In the Worksets dialog, select Workset1.
12 Click Rename.
13 In the Rename dialog, type the name Exterior Shell, and click OK
You have created the required worksets for each team member working on this project. The
next step is to assign elements within the building model to specific worksets. This is why all
worksets are editable immediately after you enable worksets.
14 In the Worksets dialog, click OK.
When you initially activate Worksharing, all building model elements are placed into Workset1
by default. Because you renamed Workset1 to Exterior Shell, all building model elements are
assigned to that workset. In this training file, furniture components have not been added to the
building model and therefore do not need to be moved to the respective workset. You do,
however, need to reassign the interior elements to the Interior Layout workset.
Subdividing the project into worksets
15 In the Project Browser, expand Views (all), expand Floor Plans, and double-click Level 1.
16 In the drawing area, select any of the exterior walls of the building model.
Enabling Worksharing and Setting Up Worksets | 835
17 On the Options Bar, click .
18 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, notice that the Workset parameter is set
to Exterior Shell.
19 Click OK.
20 Select one of the interior walls.
21 On the Options Bar, click .
22 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, select Interior Layout for Workset, and
click OK.
23 Select all of the interior elements, including the interior doors, stairs, and walls.
The easiest way to do this is to drag a pick box beginning inside the lower right corner and up
to the upper left corner.
TIP You can also hold CTRL down to select multiple elements. Hold Shift down to deselect an element.
24 On the Options Bar, click .
25 In the Element Properties dialog, under Identity Data, select Interior Layout for Workset, and
click OK.
You can verify that all in