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CONCORDIA WELFARE AND EDUCATION FOUNDATION-THAILAND

2013-2014
Authored by: Ms. Oratai (Dang) Thaweesin

CWEF-Thailand Annual Report

For July 2013-June 2014



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CWEF-Thailand Annual Report
For July 2013-June 2014
Background
Concordia Welfare and Education Foundation Thailand (CWEFT) was founded by
Lutheran Church Missouri Synod missionaries in 1988. CWEFT was established to
minister to the needs of underprivileged children throughout Thailand. We are
fully registered with the Department of Labor, the Public Welfare Department and
the Ministry of the Interior.

CWEFT helps to improve the lives and long term outlook for children through
education and other services. We believe education to be the path out of poverty and
a gateway to opportunities for a better life.

CWEFT provide a wide variety of programs and activities designed to help people in
various situations of need. These include clean water, shelter, food, emergency
assistance, dormitories, scholarships for children to be able to attend schools,
training and seminars, daycare facilities and others. CWEFT helps to strengthen
and broaden the outreach activities of the local partners through its mercy
ministries in the surrounding communities.

Goal
To share education opportunities in order to build a world of thriving communities,
serving, inspiring light and hope in others.

CWEFT emphasizes four major areas in its projects: education; community
development; hygiene and basic health care; and emergency relief for those affected
by natural disasters.











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1. Education
CWEFT encourages and helps to establish
early childhood centers in urban and rural
slum communities to provide assistance to
working parents and guardians, as well as
provide children with quality care during
their preschool years and after school care
thereafter. These daycare centers encourage
children; develop their imagination and
creativity through art, music, languages and
computer skills. Scholarships are provided for
needy children in remote areas. Also, CWEFT works with hostels for children and
youth from different ethnic hill tribes, orphans and homeless children. CWEFT also
conducts a program for the elderly, which includes basic health care, wellness
training and care, as well as activities to build relationships within the persons
family and community to prevent depression.

2. Community Development
Community development is aimed at changing the lives of local residents through
volunteer support. Volunteers are encouraged
to help share their knowledge, get involved in
renovating schools and church buildings and
libraries, developing clean water projects and
supporting a revolving fund to promote
occupations as a way to improve the
community standard. In addition, this
program has helped integrate local indigenous
knowledge to create income and to support
local residents as they pursue a self-sufficient economy. By encouraging this type of
development, communities become more self-reliant, while at the same time
becoming able to help others.

3. Community Health
CWEFT facilitates health and wellness
trainings for community leaders and local
villagers to help provide an awareness of basic
health and disease prevention. Community
leaders are taught to record information,
preserve local knowledge and share knowledge


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of modern health care and treatments. This includes training village health
workers in the use of basic medical equipment and natural treatments with the
long-term goal of becoming a self-supporting community clinic.

4. Emergency Relief and Development
CWEFT aims to help victims of natural disasters in many ways, while placing an
emphasis on assisting affected students, schools and churches, whenever possible.
CWEFT acknowledges that the government should be the first organization to
provide emergency relief. However, CWEFT is willing to work alongside local
partners and government organizations to help people or communities that are
affected by disasters. The goal is to find way to help people help themselves and
become self-sufficient with their input, so they can continue their lives.

CWEFTs Program

1. Concordia Day Care and Slum Community Center, Bangkok
The Concordia Day Care Center (CDCC) is a child care center for at-risk children in
the slum community near the Bang Na expressway in Bangkok. The objective of
the CDCC is to bring the love of Jesus to the children who live in the slum
community and attend the center.









The CDCC provides a safe environment for children to grow and develop in a loving
atmosphere. As with slum communities around the world, the Bang Na slums are
rife with serious social problems which include poverty, drug and substance abuse
and trafficking, and prostitution. Nearly all of the children in the Bang Na slum
community are directly affected by one or more of these social ills. Through the
programming of the CDCC, not only are the youngest children given a safe and
secure environment, but also they are shown and taught about the love of Jesus,
which is the primary motivator for the CDCC program.


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Since 1990 the CDCC has provided educational and medical services for at-risk
school children, in addition to providing a safe haven for at-risk pre-school children.

Children in the Bang Na slum are at risk for a variety of reasons. These include:
abandonment because of extreme poverty, death from malnutrition, social and
intellectual deprivation and emotional issues due to a lack of closeness with
caregivers.










The CDCC provides the children with nutritious food, a safe area in which to play,
basic hygiene and medical care, as well as a preschool education that prepares them
for primary school. After they complete the preschool program at the CDCC, the
children often continue to spend time at the day care after school and on weekends.
They know that they are welcome at anytime to continue to be surrounded by loving
and nurturing caregivers and friends. In addition to child care, referrals for
further counseling or follow-up are provided on a case by case basis for children
with issues that exceed the capabilities of the CDCC.

What We Have Accomplished this Year

We continued using the early childhood center
to help children and parents daily.
Through the Concordia Day Care and Slum
Community Center, this year we helped 150
children from Monday-Friday, 27 children in
the weekend classes and 28 children from the
school break program. We also helped 23
children who are undernourished to improve
their condition by providing, milk, vitamins


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and nutritious food packages. With the children who live in the slum and are 1-2
years old, we worked with their parents and grandparents regarding hygiene and
basic health training to help them in the area of holistic health care.

We prepared children and educated their parents about the value of education and
how important it is for the children to stay healthy and to continue studying
through the early childhood program and to attend school with good support from
their parents. Ideally this will continue until they are able to finish high school or
technical college.








This year 16 children from CDCC were prepared and went to public primary school
with proper legal document. The CWEFT staff helped them re-apply to the
government, since they lost birth certificates, house registrations and other
important documents during the fire that destroyed much of the Bang Na slum
community some years ago.

We are open and willing to work with volunteers.








They always give a warm welcome to volunteers who want to use their gifts and
talents to arrange activities to help the children. This year, we worked with 250
students from four international schools to do service learning activities at CDCC.
Also, every Saturday volunteers from International Church of Bangkok came to
help us teach some classes. It was a good opportunity for us to work with them, to
share about who we are and what we are doing and to inform them of our needs
regarding this ministry.

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This year, we are increasing the number of partners
working with the CDCC program and volunteers
opportunities. Some of these include members of
International Church of Bangkok, Concordia
Lutheran Church pastors and members, Lutheran
organizations in Thailand and the U.S.A. and local
Christians. Also, CWEFT administrators attended
some of their church services and events, so we
could meet with pastors, church members and other
people to do presentations about the CWEFT and CDCC ministries.

We did volunteer programs and built relationships with people in the surrounding
community by sharing resources with them. We directly impacted 1,590 community
residents surrounding the CDCC.










2. Concordia Children Home, Chiangmai

In 2006, CWEFT began to work with the Hmong of the northern mountains, which
were introduced to us by Dr. Fungchatou Lo from the Hmong Mission Society in the
U.S.A. This ministry allows us to work daily with many children who are in the
rural areas that are so extremely poor, most of them cannot access basic education,
health care or systematic career training. Some have no proper legal documents,
since they are refugees, minorities and immigrants in Thailand.

Some of their communities are in red zones where many drugs are trafficked
through their communities. They are hill tribe farmer who work with their hands
to make enough income to take care their families. Their life is in mountain
communities that have only dirt roads. The government primary schools provide
just the simple bamboo buildings with a few education materials from grades 1-6, so


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they can learn to speak and read Thai to communicate with government officers and
others.

In 2006, Concordia Welfare and Education Foundation Thailand began supporting
the original Hmong Student Hostel, which was established by Mr. Prajurk
Phosiripattannaon, a local Hmong leader. He personally experienced living in a
hostel, when he stayed at a Buddhists temple and Islamic temple while he studied
in Bangkok. He knows how hard it was for him to keep his faith, but economic
hardship gave him no choice.

Mr. Prajurkknows in his heart that God called him to serve with the hostel
children. He stepped down from community leader , give up his career and moved
to live in the city with his family, so he can care for these children. He had no
stipend or support from any organization at that time, only income from his wifes
work to support him and the ministry, but he took the call. He ran the ministry
without financial support.

We visited with him and heard his story. CWEFTs board decided to partner with
him, as CWEFT always seeks opportunities to work with local leaders who have a

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commitment to help poor children. We started with little support, brought
volunteers to work side by side with him. Then we agree to changed the hostel from
a private hostel to a legally registered hostel through CWEFT in 2009.

Finally, CWEFT hopes that in the end this center will develop multiple people to
place into this hostel. We also hope that it can be a training center to practice life
skills with those children who are lost and who suffer from economic hardship or
drug trafficking.

What we have accomplished this year

In early 2012 CWEFT learned that the hostel needed to relocate immediately, as
the land it was renting was being sold. In response to this need for the hostel to find
a new location, coupled with CWEFTs own need to expand its facilities in Northern
Thailand to better accommodate the growing human care effort in the area, with
Gods blessing we finally bought land in Chiangmai. This new site was developed as
the permanent home of the Hmong Student Hostel. Due to the larger size and
location of the new land, CWEFT has implemented a three-year development plan,
which includes (in addition to hostel) a guest house, retail/office facilities and large
area dedicated to self-sustaining and income-generating agricultural projects.
In March, 2013 the building construction was finished. In April Mr. Prajurk and
students moved to stay at the new site.


In June 2014, we formally opened the home as the Concordia Student Hostel under
CWEFT. Since it was CWEFTs team, Mr. Prajurk, students and their parents
helped develop self-sustaining projects, such as planting seeds to grow the
vegetables near the fence for the students food bank, building a bamboo segment
fence and front gate to prevent strangers from coming in, joining with Logos Farms
in Doi Saket, Chiangmai for training and introducing self-sustaining Aquaponics
vegetable production and learning how to make fruit and juice drinks.




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Later we were learn how to raise black chickens and built a chicken house to collect
eggs and meat for the center. All that training helped to build the capacity of the
students and project manager, so practice life skills while they stay with us. Now
we are applying the aquaponic system to raise fish and using the water from the
fish farm to grow vegetables without using chemicals.



This past year the Concordia Children Hostel helped 21 students. They came from
Mae Sa Mai District, which is a link for us with the Hmong local church network
from the U.S.A. About 60% of these students are children of church members and
40% are some of their neighbors who want to get further education in the city.
Unfortunately they dont have any relatives to care for them. Their parents are
willing to cover the cost of some of their education supplies, living expenses of 700

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baht per month for food and shelter at CLLC, also they help their kids to keep
Hmong culture even though they live in the city.

From Monday through Friday the students rotate to help in the kitchen and clean
the house every morning and evening. During the day they go to a school in the
area. They come back from school around 5:00 p.m. and help prepare dinner.

On Wednesdays they have a small group study together. Besides that, if any other
activities come up, then the caretaker helps to arrange for the students to get
involved with some community events or get involved at the center to develop self-
sufficient projects there with him.

CWEFT invited local leader representatives, to teach the students about Christian
morals and ethics.



CWEFT invited 17 students from the Hmong Student Hostel in Mae Rim to join the
TCLC youth camp in March, 2014.

CWEFT also coordinated with other volunteers, who are interested in helping those
students with Mr. Prajurk by teaching the students English in the evening or


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cooking, clearing and others classes on Saturdays, so they can develop while they
stay there.

In January 4-22, 2015 Mr. David Karkan, former
volunteer from the USA, will visit Thailand again to
learn more what else they can do to help the Concordia
Children Home improve their hostel, also help to impact
with CWEFT ministry in Thailand. After he retires
from his work in the U.S.A. Every year he will come to
Thailand and spent 2-3 months to volunteer to help
those children about electric and technical skills for their career training.

The total budget for the Concordia Student Center is 13,000 USD per year, which
includes utilities, food for students, building and equipment maintenance, school
supplies, travel costs and allowance to the school. Locally we raised 5,000 USD per
year and we depend on outside sources for about 8,000 USD per year. Finally, we
hope to get about 2,000 USD per year income from the agriculture products from
the self-sufficient projects.

Project 3: Concordia Mannaporn Student Center, Chiangrai

In October, 2012, CWEFT start to work with hill tribe hostel in Chiang Rai
Province in northern Thailand. CWEFT has been involved with three other hostel
projects in the north and we are excited about the opportunity to continue to reach
disadvantaged and at-risk youth at this new site.

Mr. ThardonNgonkham, church members of Pastor Sompong Harmpradit, is
married to a Lahu hill tribe woman and was familiar with his wifes culture, as well
as the condition in the remote Lahu villages. Drug trafficking is a big problem in
the community and many parents are imprisoned because of their involvement,
leaving their children to stay with relatives with limited supervision. In addition,
due to the limited employment opportunities in the remote villages, many parents
are forced to move to urban areas to find work. They often leave their children with
relatives in the village, while they are gone. Consequently, many children were not
attending school and had limited opportunities for their futures.

To address this issue, Thardons father-in-law, Me. Apichai Rachamekul, a Lahu,
used his own land to build a temporary hostel for these at-risk children. His goal
was to provide them with much needed physical and spiritual support. As a

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result of this initial project all of the 17 students at the hostel attended public
schools while living at the hostel, which provided them with food, clothing and
shelter in a loving Christian environment.


CWEFT is excited about the opportunities for partnership in doing outreach and
human care at the new Lahu youth hostel, which is the fourth hill tribe hostel
project that CWEFT is involved with. At the Lahu hostel in Chiangrai, a local
family will continue to oversee the project. CWEFTs work at the hostel projects
includes training the children, youth, their families and other community members
in organic agriculture. Many families in the area use excessive amounts of chemical
fertilizer, which leads to a variety of health concerns.

CWEFT also organizes camps during school breaks and community service projects,
provides scholarships, support for startup costs on self-sustaining agricultural
projects and assorted vocational training programs.

What we have accomplished this year

This year we helped to support and care for 17 students, most of whom dont live
with both of their parents. Some of their parents are in prison and their relatives
cant help them to care for their children. All the children went to the public school
in the area, which is supported by the government, so we didnt have to pay any
tuition. But still there were some expenses for education supplies, school uniforms,
shoes and personal allowance for the students.

Some of the parents helped by giving 2,000 Baht per term. For parents who werent
able to pay, we asked them to help by donating a 50-kilogram sack of rice each term
to the childrens home. The main expenses for this project are for electricity, water,
food, travel expenses for the children to go to school each day and for students to


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visit their hometown during the school break, home supplies and some equipment to
use at the center.

We thank God that this year some missionary families in Chiangmai helped to
build a permanent building for the girls and boys hostels and the care takers house.
In the past, every two or three years we needed to rebuild or replace the bamboo
buildings and leaf roofs.

Normally, CWEFT helps to raise about 300 USD per month for Manaporn
Childrens Home to pay for monthly utilities, food for students, school supplies,
maintenance, travel and medical care. If any extra funds come in for this project,
then we use them to help build a self-sufficient project at the center. These projects
include food, pigs, chicken project, well projects and equipment that are needed in
the long term.

Mr. Apichai and his family are very committed to helping these children physically
and spiritually. All of the students in this home have become Christians. After
school the children take a bath, then eat a group dinner, share the responsibilities
for cleaning the table, have a devotion and then do their homework.

CWEFTs team will visit 2-3 times each year to follow
up, hear the needs and get updates from Mr. Apichai
and the students. Occasionally CWEFTs team will
travel to students hometowns to visit some of their
family members to learn about their family situation.
Every month we communicate by phone and letter.


In September, 2013, CWEFT provided seed funds for
a pig project, so they could build a food project to
feed students. The pastor, families members and
some students used their labor to build a pig house,
then they bought 3 baby pigs to start,
so they can help to raise meat to sell
or eat at the center. The cost of the
seed project was about 15,000 Baht.



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In October, 2013, we helped to develop the front area of the
student building to be a study area, so the children can do
homework there rather than in their rooms all the time.
We bought supplies to make the roof, floors, chairs and
tables at a cost of about 25,000 baht.


On December 21, 2013, CWEFTs team visited Manaporn hostel to join hands with
them to arrange a special Christmas event in the surrounding community. About
100 children and 50 adults came to the event.










April is summer time in Thailand and most of the
wells dry up if the wells are not deep enough.
This hostel has the same problem. Although we
have limited funding, we need to buy city water
for the hostel. This is quite expensive for us, as
we are outside the main community. We prayed
that God would provide a fund for us to dig the
well deeper.

We thank you the Lutheran Rise Christ in Springfield, Ohio, provided some gifts to
finish the well project. We also were able to provide a pump and tank for Manaporn
Childrens Home, so we could have enough clean water at the hostel. The cost
including labor for digging the well, buying the tank, pump and pipe, installation in
the rest room, kitchen and washing area was about 37,000 Baht. (1,250 USD).

With the new school term, 10 students applied to our program. Please include
Pastor Apichai, his family, the children and CWEFTs team in your prayers.




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Project 4: Concordia Light Student Center, in Chiangrai

Mr. Chumee Sangsin, friends of some of pastor in the USA, invited us to visit the
Light Hostel project, which is run by his friend. CWEFT took the invitation to visit
the project and to learn about the leaders vision and ministry. His vision is to set
up a hostel for disadvantaged children and to prepare young leaders, who can go
back to share the Good News with their people.

The hostel takes in children 7-16 years old. Most of
the children in this hostel are orphans. Some of their
parents died because of involvement in drug
trafficking and some parents are in prison. The
village is underdeveloped and in a very dilapidated
condition. The villagers are poor and are hired to
cultivate vegetables, which they sell in the hill tribe
market to traders or those renting space in the
market. The villagers are hired and paid on a daily
basis. Some children become victims and have to deliver drugs for adults, while
some are forced to use the drugs themselves.
Most of the villagers are animists. The area surrounding the village is considered a
Red Area due to drug problems while incidents of suicide also occur. Families live
in the Self Development Community under the Department of Social Welfare. In
some areas drugs are stored in the village. As a result, a number of villagers are
arrested every day.

Currently, there are 8 children at the hostel. CWEFT saw this as an opportunity to
partner with the Akha community to help these needy children.




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What we have accomplished this year

CWEFT provided monthly support of about 200 USD per month for the first year
during our time to work on some agreement with the caretaker regarding the vision
and policy. We also drafted a MOU, so we can agree on the principles of what our
partnership will be like.

We want to help the needy children to have opportunities for further study. We are
interested in building the capacity and self-sufficiency of the hostel, so they can
continue to less dependence on outside funding. We hope that we can develop the
relationship further, introduce them to more people, network.

In August, 2013, CWEFT partnered with the
Thai-Japanese Ladies Group from Bangkok to
run the day camp for 2 hostels (Light and
Manaporn Children Home) to host the camp in
Chiang Rai. We provided lunch, supplies to run
the camp and the ladies led the activities and
compared Japanese culture and Thai culture, so
show what we can and cant do, as we are
children. We also provided some cooking
supplies, sport equipment and 2 guitars to donate
to both children home.

CWEFTs team shared about the treatment, care
and prevention of Dengue Fever. They also
donated two guitars, sports equipment and
household supplies for two childrens homes.

CWEFT also signed a MOU with Light Hostels
caretaker and his family. Currently they care for eight students.

CWEFT provided 10,000 Baht in seed money for a
chicken project. We took Mr. Pawn to learn about Lahu
and Akha community in the area, especially how they
build self sufficiency to support their family and hostel.
We hope that this will be an encouragement for him to
continue the ministry as CWEFT is willing to partner
with him to develop it.


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On December 21, 2014, we conducted a Christmas
event with the caretaker and his family. We invited
the childrens friends from the school to celebrate
Christmas. About 50 students and 15 adults came
to the event and learn about the true meaning of
Christmas.


Project 5 : Community Health Training

Concordia Welfare and Education Foundation Thailand
has been working in cooperation with Lutherans in
Medical Mission (LIMM) to coordinate and develop CHE
programs in northern Thailand. The goal is to help build
sustainable health-related support for the people and
community in the region.

The goals of the project were to empower Hmong residents
through CHE trainings, build the capacity of the local people
to develop a Community Health Education program that
will share the love of God to the community residents and
improve the health of the community.

The Hmong of Thailand, including the Hmong in the Baan KhunHuayKlai and
Baan Mae Sai Mai villages where the CHE projects were held, are mostly farmers
who grow enough rice and vegetables to feed their families and then plant
additional corn, mangoes, roses or other produce/flowers to earn their living.
Additionally, when the rainy season ends, they will travel to markets in the nearest
city to sell their distinct handmade crafts Their average annual income is 50,000-
80,000 baht per family (about $1,540-$2,460).




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The Hmong typically have many children. Some of these children help their family
with the farm, while others are sent to stay at government or Christian hostels in
city centers to get further education. When the children are sent away to go to
school, the other village residents are left on their own to continue farming in the
remote mountain areas.

The nearest hospital is 100-150 kilometers (62-93 miles) from their villages, with
the winding dirt roads to the villages in poor condition. There is no public
transportation, so they must provide their own transportation, which usually is by
pickup truck or motorcycle. In addition, their Thai language is limited, particularly
among older residents, making any trip to the doctor or elsewhere difficult.

As part of their farming, the Hmong have traditionally used generous amounts of
chemical fertilizers on their fruits and vegetables without knowing the dangers of
doing so. They didnt realize the danger of not properly protecting themselves by
wearing protective clothing, gloves and masks.

In addition, there is little knowledge of good nutrition and self care, combined with
high levels of stress. There are high rates of certain diseases in the villages,
because of the prolonged exposure to dangerous chemicals, poor nutrition and high
stress levels. Some of these diseases include certain cancers, respiratory diseases,
stroke, diabetes, high cholesterol, gout and mental health issues.
CHE trainings have helped community residents to better care for their family
members and others in need in their villages. The trainings focused on hygiene,
health care, nutrition, mental health, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, baby
diarrhea, digestive issues and respiratory disease. Specifically, participants learned
about symptoms, how to watch for certain indicators and how to record their
findings and share them with local health care staff or doctors. These skills are
particularly important for villagers to be able to identify situations which require
immediate care and transfer to local health care facilities. They also need to know
how to best care for and protect their children, the elderly and other residents from
preventable illnesses, while monitoring other non-emergency health conditions.
While saving on travel costs for unnecessary trips to the hospital, the trainings also
have provided life-saving knowledge and expertise in enabling residents to take
charge of their health and well-being. Through these trainings more and more
residents have come to better understand holistic health care for prevention, while
making changes to their eating habits, increasing exercise and helping other area
communities with their health and wellness needs.



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What we have accomplished this year

Ms. Oratai (Dang) Thaweesin, CWEFT Executive Director met with Dr.Somrak
Shuvanitchawong, the chairperson of Thai Family Link Association, on August 13,
2013 to discuss CHE training for September 2013. Prior to this meeting, it was
found that many residents suffered from mental health issues and the number of
people admitted at the hospital was increasing rapidly. District health officials
noticed these issues and contacted the community leader to look for a way to use
some sort of community health training to teach the people how to care for those
who are ill, but not in need of hospitalization.

As a result of this need, CWEFT in cooperation with local church leaders and
partners reached out to local experts to address the issues. This led to the meeting
with Thai Family Link, which is an association with experience in mental health
issues. After the meeting between CWEFT and Thai Family Link, it was agreed
that the two organizations would help with future CHE trainings to best address
mental health issues in the Hmong communities.

On September 16-18, 2013, CWEFT partnered with Thai Family Link Association.
Ms. Kruawon Tiengtom and Ms. Darastella Sreesangkom led a CHE training in the
Hmong village of Khun Huay Klai in Chiang Rai province. Mr.Pongsak, former
headman of the village welcomed the team to his home first and then led them to
the local church where the training took place.

The training itself began with an introduction about the meaning of good health,
including physical, mental and spiritual health. There was a discussion about how
families function and men and womens roles in families. The discussion also
included how residents manage their problems, who they talk to and what causes
stress.










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Time was provided for individuals to share about any family members that
currently suffer from mental illness and how they are dealing with it.

The CHE trainers then shared about depressionwhat the symptoms are and how
residents can encourage family members to share and talk about how they are
feeling. The training covered techniques for helping them to deal with stress or
depression, including knowing when to seek treatment from a doctor. Medical
treatment can help manage the attitude of those suffering from depression and
greatly improve their quality of life.

The issue of suicide also was addressed, particularly knowing the warning signs
and other ways to help, along with when to seek immediate medical attention in
serious cases.

Ways to improve family communication also were discussed as a means of avoiding
miss-communication and maximizing the effectiveness of any help provided.

Fourteen people attended this CHE training, which included women and one young
couple. Everyone was between 15-40 years old, most have small children at home,
while three women had children who were over 30 years old. One woman was not
Hmong, but had recently married a Hmong man from the community. All
participants were very interested in the topics addressed at the training. Some of
the older participants had a little trouble with the language, as the training was
conducted in Thai, but the younger participants helped with translation into Hmong
and everyone was able to understand the entirety of the training.

In addition to the residents who attended, Mr. Pongsak and the local church board
also joined the training and so were able to better understand the issues in their
community and to discuss ways to address them. The participants said that in
general women are more stressed than men, because they must make many
adjustments when getting marriedadjusting to his family (Hmong women stay
with their husbands family after marriage) and any other changes in community
daily life that goes along with that. In addition, Hmong culture traditionally allows
for men to take on multiple wives, if they are able to support them. But many
women prefer to adopt a more modern approach to marriage with the husband
having only one wife.

All of these factors, combined with the rigors of daily life in a remote mountaintop
farming community, lead to high stress levels for many residents. A few


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participants also indicated their family members suffered from mental health
issues. There were cases in this community where wives had committed suicide as
a result of unaddressed, high levels of stress and depression. In these more extreme
cases, there were elevated issues between the wife and the husbands family, as well
as problems with lack of privacy, drinking and feeling overwhelmed with no
support.

This was the first time for many of the residents to talk about these serious cases in
their community. It was helpful for them to do so, as it made them aware of the
reality of the problem and the very serious results that can occur if the situation is
not recognized or is misunderstood and left untreated.

As a result of the training the church decided to begin a couples ministry to reach
out to married couples who may need support for any reason. The group is open to
all other residents as well, if they also have any sort of need. It is hoped that
through this ministry the church will be able to encourage and pray for those in
need, while also working with residents to identify and address any physical or
mental health issues.

Residents also are interested in learning about chemical-free farming techniques.
CWEFT will do follow-up with related organizations and hopes to be able to
coordinate future trainings in this area for the community. Participants also
reviewed topics from previous trainings, including checking blood pressure, diabetes
detection and others. As a result of previous CHE trainings, residents continue to
work with local government officials in areas of health and wellness. They have
selected local health volunteers in their communities to list with nearby health care
facilities. To conclude the training, Thai Family Link shared pamphlets about
mental health, CDs and other materials with the church, so the community will
have resources on hand when they need them.

Ms. SangchanTasu from CWEFTs team and two
local leaders joined the CHE-TOT 1 training in
Thai Vision at the River Training Center on
January 20-24,2014. This training helped local
Thai staff and local leaders to gain more skill and
techniques in how to develop a community health
program for people living around their community.



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On June 1-8, 2014 CWEFT led a community
health seminar about dental health care. We
shared about how the health of the teeth and
gums is related to the health of the whole person,
just as the well-being of a person relates to the
health of the entire community. Early care is
what makes the dentists work unnecessary and
this is the care that each person gives to his or
her own teeth or what a mother does to protect
her childrens teeth.

We helped train nine church members, 21 parents of children at the early childhood
center and 57 children in the community early childhood center at Baan Mae Sa
Mai, Mae Rim, Chiang Mai.

Also another 12 adults and 6 teachers with 83 students at a primary school in Baan
Khun Hua Khai in Chiang Rai. We are very thankful to Ms. Kelly McDonald, a
nurse who has a community health background, and Dr. Connor Ware a dental
doctor from the USA for volunteering to help us with this project.

From the training we found that the elderly people in the Hmong hill tribe never
have toothbrushes and never learned how to take care of their teeth. Those who age
in above 65 often have teeth that still are in good condition, except for some small
cavities, because they still eat their traditional foods which have little sugar. This
training is the first time in their live that they can learn from a professional dentist
and nurse.

The students from Grade 1-6 all have lots of cavities and need to see a dentist to
take care of the problem. Only 10% of the students learned how to care for their
teeth from the school. None of their parents showed them how to do it.



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The community residents members, who went through the training promised that
they will share their knowledge with their grandchildren and their families. The
mothers were more concerned about their cooking and hygiene in their families.

The young mothers who can read and write Thai well will help the older people
translate the information into the Hmong language, so they will understand too.
Winds and young mothers were included. They got lots of support from the men,
who did the farm work so their wives or mothers could attend the training with us.

A resident community trainer will continue to do blood pressure and weight checks
once a month, when they hold the community meetings. They will share about
nutrition, how to care and watch what they eat and how to keep their blood
pressure stable. They will include activities about dental care too.

Normally about 23-30 people show up and ask for blood checks. Some women went
through the health training six times with us within the past two years. They
gained a lot of knowledge and are confident to tell other people about what they
learned. They also are confident in running the community health clinic.

This training really empowered the women to get involved more in their families
and communities. The church members who joined the CHE training have met
together at the pastors house once a week to do Bible study, pray and encourage
each other about health and life problems. In the past they met only on Sundays.
Now they have started to visit people in their communities who are sick too.

Project 6. Community Development

CWEFT facilitates health and wellness trainings for community leaders and local
villagers to help provide an awareness of basic health and disease prevention.
Community leaders are taught to record information, preserve local knowledge and
share knowledge of modern health care and treatments. This includes training
village health workers in the use of basic medical equipment and natural
treatments with the long-term goal of becoming a self-supporting community clinic

What we have accomplished this year

On October 10, 2013, CWEFT provided the funds
for Mr. Chowee, a community leader to develop a
Black Chicken. First he bought 30 Black Hens and

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built a temporary house for them to see how the project would work. He has
finished the long term hen house. The hens have begun to have 7-15 eggs each day
that become babies. Now he has more than a 100 chicks to raise.

Mr. Chowee started a pig farm in addition to raising the chickens. He started with
4 pigs and now has 24 pigs. He hopes to have more than 40-50 pigs within the next
6 months. CWEFT saw his commitment and hopes to support a second part of the
project with a pig farm that he will start with his members. He will bring someone
to train them and provide some funding to support food for the pigs for 6 months,
until his church can grow the pigs to sell and then they will continue to take care of
it on their own.

As Promise Lutheran church interest to help the abandon children near my their
community, so they invited CWEFTs team to visit and find way to help them to
build sufficient. Pastor Niran allow to use his home, to care for those children. From
April 22-24, 2014, the CWEFT team met with Mr. Niran and three key leaders and
joined the Aquaponics training to learn about this garden technology.. The training
included actually building a small floating raft for the aquaponics system, principles
of constructing a concrete ring media bed, types of plants and fish that can be
grown, productive methods of planting seeds, productive methods of transferring
seedlings to media beds or floating rafts, harvesting grown plants, safe washing, in
ground vegetable growing system using fish water as the fertilizer, details of
materials needed for small construction, pest problems and the advantages of
water-grown vegetables. As CWEFT are mostly working with the hill tribe pastors,
leaders and students, this kind of training fits well with us and the locations where
we work. Through this project LCMS and CWEFT have been able to build the
strength of the young local leader, so they can better serve their members and serve
out to the people in their communities.

Directly 20 people are being help and indirectly about 100 students and 1,500
people from two communities will benefit from this project.




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Project 7. Teacher Training

On June 7, 2012 Mr. Dennis Denow, a CWEFT board representative, went to the
opening of the Concordia Hostel Center in Mae Rim, Chiang Mai. There he met Mr.
PrasobsukViphataphum, who is the principal of BawrirakSuksaChiangmai School
in DoiSaket, Chiang Mai and learned about the schools needs. Mr. Prasobsuk is
interested in improving his school and other local Christian schools and has been
looking for a partner to train the teachers.

As Mr. Dennis is a professional church worker in education with the LCMS and he
is one of CWEFTs board members, this teacher training allows CWEFT to help
strengthen the school and teachers, so they can better serve the students and
community. While these mercy ministries help with various needs in the
surrounding communities, the pastors and church members proclaim the Gospel to
those who are being helped.

BawrirakSuksaChiangmai School is registered under the Bawrirak Foundation.
This Foundation also owns the Ban Sarnfun Orphanage that helps abandoned
children. Currently the orphanage is caring for 28 children.

The BawrirakSuksaChiangmai School was started with the intention of inviting
children from Christian orphanages and hostels to attend, so the children can
continue to grow in faith and be influenced by Christian teachers daily. The school
now has 50 students coming from orphanages and hostels and 12 students are
coming from the community where the school is located. Mr. Prasobsuk is working
to improve the school quality and teaching level, so that more families living near
the school will be interested in sending their children to study there. They also will
learn about God and His love for them.

What we have accomplished this year

On August 2-3, 2013, Mr. Dennis Denow from CWEFTs board and Ms. Dang
Thaweesin, the Executive Director of CWEFT, did a survey trip to Chiangmai to
meet with the BawrirakSuksaChiangmai School founder, the school board, the
principal, teachers, students and the foreigner volunteer teachers to learn about the
schools vision, goals, method of teaching and the community where they serve.


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Many opportunities and doors are open for CWEFT to develop relationships and
start working here with our new Christian partner in the target area near a TCLC
church.

On May 10, 2014, Mr. Dennis conducted the first teacher training workshop. The
school has several foreign volunteer teachers who teach only in English. The
workshop was conducted in both Thai and English and Ms. Dang Thaweesin served
as the interpreter. The workshop topics included classroom management, creating a
positive learning environment and the success cycle. These sessions helped the
teachers understand the Western teaching philosophy and methods and the idea
that the teacher is the key to the students success and is responsible for teaching in
ways that will help the students learn.


At first it seemed that the teachers didnt see the point. They said that they already
did so many things to make a difference in their classes. The Asia teaching style is
different. The teacher is the center of sharing information through their lectures. If
students ask questions the teacher might consider them to be trouble makers in the
class. But, by the end of the first training the teachers began to change their
altitude and to learn the new methods of teaching.

On June 7, 2014 Mr. Dennis conducted the second
teacher training workshop about the importance of
different learning styles, the differences between
left-brain and right-brain thinking, 8 types of
intelligences and left and right brain teaching
methods. The training is helping the teachers to
know that each student is different and students
can learn best when they can use their preferred
learning style.



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The teachers are realizing that they need to observe and help their students
improve and for the students to share information with their parents to be involved
in helping them to improve too. Near the end of the training, Mr. Dennis asked the
teachers to practice what they had learned by preparing teaching plans and trying
to apply the different methods of teaching to hit both groups of left and right brain
students. Most of the teachers did it well. This is the reward back to us that
teachers understand it and will apply it in their classes.

Through this project we helped 9 Thai teachers, 3 foreigner volunteer teachers with
indirect benefits for 87 students and 250 others (parents and family members of the
students). Mr. Prasobsuks goal is to develop this Christian school into a top quality,
bi-lingual school. Mr. Prasobsuk has a vision to use this school to provide good
education for many poor families and students.

For several years Mr. Prasobsuk has been struggling to know how to improve his
school. When he met Mr. Dennis Denow, he was confident that this was Gods
answer to his prayers. Mr. Prasobsuk asked Mr. Dennis to help train the teachers
and to offer advice on how to improve the quality of the school. During the two
teacher training workshops and through other conversations with Mr. Dennis, Mr.
Prasobsuk began to see a new way of approaching education. As he learned more
about a student-centered approach, he came to believe that this philosophy fits very
well with a Christian school and that it offered something special that the
government schools dont offer.

As a result, Mr. Prasobsuk is working on new ideas for developing his school. Hes
excited about making adjustments to the teaching methods, the approach to student
assessment and the relationships between teachers and students. Mr. Prasobsuk
also is developing opportunities to build relationships with other Christian schools
in the area and sharing the training and new ideas with them. Mr. Prasobsuk is
looking forward to organizing more teacher training workshops with CWEFT in the
coming months.

From the training and discussions we found that the schools in Thailand need to
make many changes to their education philosophy. To raise the quality of education
in Thailand, new teaching methods are needed and the schools need to focus on
developing the students in many ways, not just giving them information to
memorize. I believe that some of these changes can begin more easily in Christian
schools than in government schools. Im confident that these new education ideas

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will help the Christian schools to be more attractive to many Thai families. This is
a good area for CWEFT to focus time and energy during the next fiscal year.

Project 8. Scholarships

Scholarships is one of the projects that CWEFT focuses on to support the children
and students that are in our program or from the local church members or in the
target community that we are working with. This project especially focuses on
those families who have financial problems, but the children are committed to
continuing their education, working part time or are showing a commitment to
bring their knowledge back to develop a ministry. They value education as the way
out of poverty with good support from their families and pastors or local churches,
so this person can impact other peoples lives.

What we have accomplished this year

First case: Preecha Saeyang.

Mr. Preecha is a Hmong student who comes from family that
has a limited income, as his mother has small children to care
for and his father rents his van for transportation or
sightseeing. During the low tourist season, his father works on
construction or picks fruits to sell at the wholesale markets.

Preechas family has 4 children. Preecha is the oldest son. As a Hmong man, the
oldest son has many responsibilities to help his family bring income. Many times
he misses school to travel with his dad to help drive the van, if someone hires them
for a long distance trip. This limits his time for studying.

Mr. Timothy and Dawn Horswill met Preecha and learned more about his problems.
They still is in need for his school allowance, payment for his lodging and education
supplies.

They decided to offer an extra scholarship for him, so he can spend his time
studying, rather than having to drive a van to earn income. The main purpose is to
use some funds to study English, so he can communicate with teams in the future.
The amount that is left over can be used for his personal allowance for his study.



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In May, 2013, Mr. Timothy and Mrs. Dawn Horswill signed the contract with
CWEFT and agreed to support Mr. Preecha Saeyang. CWEFT received the transfer
of funds on June 14, 2014. The total amount was 1,800 USD. We agreed to provide
150 USD per month that he can use for studying English, field trips for Tourism
and Hotel classes and monthly allowance for him. This allows him to continue his
full time study at the ChiangmaiRajabhat University for the fourth year to
complete his university classes and improve his English skill. We transferred the
funds to Mr. PreechaSaeyangs account for July, 2013 March, 2014.

Mr. Preecha used the scholarship to study at the N.L.L.C English center near his
university and the price is cheaper than the YMCA classes. The course is English
conversation for 120 hours at a cost of 8,000 Baht (267 USD). The class meets on
Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays after school and last for two hours
each day. Some of the funds are used to pay for rent of a room to stay with his
classmate. It costs about 2,200 Baht (75 USD) per month, which includes water,
but not electricity. It is a convenient walk to school. From October 2013 until
March 2014 Preecha used his allowance to get training with a hotel in Chiangmai,
so he can complete his study.

The CWEFT Executive Director visited Preecha in August and November, 2013,
while I worked in Chiangmai. To catch up, I went to visit his apartment and the
language school. In March 2014 I met him at the TCLC youth camp in Chiangmai.
From time to time, Ms. SangchanTasu, CWEFTs staff calls and chats to find out
how he is doing.

Now Preecha has finished his study. The support that he received for the last year
of his studies meant so much to him, allowed Preecha to finish his studies and begin
his career. Now he is able to support his two brothers for their studies and to take
care of his own life and move on. He still is involved with hostel evangelism at
Hmong Hostel in Nam by leading the activities once a month.

Second case: Ms. Vanida from Grace Student Hostel.
Mr. Sati Guntatient is one of the key leaders at Grace
Student Hostel in Chiang Mai. Since 2011 one student
from the hostel finished high school and would like to
continue her study at the college. She comes from a poor
family and her father already passed away. She is
committed to work with children. She knows the value of
the hostel and the big impact it made in her life.

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Mr. Sati, Project manager of the Grace Hostel wrote to us and asked CWEFT to find
a way to provide a scholarship for her, since she is a potential leader to continue
running the hostel ministry in the future. We got the funds for her scholarship.
Now she is in the third year of the Bible College.

Every weekend she travels back to the hostel and teaches there to help the children
who stay there. We provide about 26,000 Baht per year for her tuition at the
College. Some of the church members help her for her monthly allowance to go to
school. During the school break she works a part time job to earn some income.


Interesting Stories from Children and Volunteers

DollayaDaengmesri (nickname: Kratai) was born
on October 24, 2009. She has two older brothers and
one older sister. Her first brother is seventeen years
old. Her second brother is ten years old and studies in
grade 4. Her sister is in kindergarten at
Roongreungschool. Kratai lives in a slum community
near the Bangna Expressway. Kratais parents are
very poor. They have inconsistent income and struggle
to have enough to survive.

The slum where Kratai lives is a source of many illegal drugs. Kratai is very thin
and malnourished, because her family doesnt take good care of her.Kratai has been
coming to the CDCC since June 2012. She has received training for pre-school
readiness, morality and discipline. She has developed physically, emotionally,
socially and intellectually. The CDCC staff always encourage Kratai to eat
healthfully.

Kratai is a cheerful girl. She can adapt and plays well with her friends. Kratai
comes to the CDCC every day. Now she can write without having to connect the
dots. She has started to memorize and learn from songs, reading and listening.
She can color within the lines and likes to use many colors.





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MontidaSijunpong (nickname: Nuay) and
MontichaSijunpong (nickname: Noon) are twins who
were born on August 17, 1999. They are in grade 8 at
Bangnanai School. They live in the slum community near
the Bangna Expressway, which is close to the CDCC.
They live with their father, NirinSijunpong, who is a
motorcycle service man, and their mother,
RatchanokSijunpong, who works in a factory.

Nuay and Noons parents are poor. They barely earn enough money to support
their family. Their mother has to work very hard to take care of the family and to
provide for the childrens education. Sometimes their grandmother has to take care
of the children, because their mother has to work long hours.

The slum is not a good place for Nuay and Noon to live. The air is bad, the area is
not very safe and the children can be misled into doing bad things. Noon and Nuay
are good and hardworking children. Their parents trust the teachers at the CDCC.
The children are tutored after school to review their homework. The extra classes
are English, computer, guitar and arts. Both children attended the Christmas
celebration. They enjoy singing, dancing and were in the Christmas play. Noon
and Nuay are obedient to their teachers and other adults. They pay attention to
their studies and love to research information. Even though their family is poor,
they are studious. They help other people and they are very smart. They dream of
getting higher education. If they can take care of themselves, they can help others.
They have the ability to help their family and others in the community get out of
poverty. Already they can live on their own.

They want to be teachers in the future. The reason is because teachers are role
models. Teachers are respected. Teachers help children become good citizens. If
they have mentors, they can make their dreams come true.


Mrs. Yoshi Russell, foreign volunteer. It wasnt long after
moving to Thailand that my husband and I know we were sent
here for a reason. After only a few short weeks we found
Concordia Day Care and Slum Community Center. During the
week I was blessed to be able to volunteer with the younger
kids and show them things that we take for granted, like
throwing a pizza party; making green eggs and ham while

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reading the book; making sushi; playing different sports; baking cookies (and the
children being hesitant to try them- I know the feeling all to well!); playing
dictionary and singing and dancing; receiving love and knowledge; and allowing
Christ into our minds and hearts.

On the weekends my husband and I both volunteer with the older children. They
are amazing! Over a period of time each of them has grown to trust us. They all
have a story and they all have scars. But, thanks to Concord Day Care and Slum
Community Center, they all have a fighting chance at a good future. They are eager
to learn and eager to explore outside their comfort zones. It has been an amazing
experience teaching them English, while they teach both of us about love and
happiness.

KhunMaew (Project Manager) has shown us the slums. The heartbreaking, yet full
of life shacks that these children live in. they all are so joyful for what Concordia
center has done for them. I, too, along with my husband and cannot thank
Concordia enough for their diligence in spreading Gods message and allowing these
children the right every child should have: an opportunity to shine through Gods
light.












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