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Petroliam Nasional Berhad, Malaysia

PP 2986/01/2010(023290)
2/2009
ADDING VALUE TO THE NATION’S
PETROLEUM RESOURCE
ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY
RACING AHEAD WITH
MOTORSPORTS
MELAKA
REFINERY
CONTENTS
I N THI S I SSUE OF NADA PETRONAS
4
10 16
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20
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12
Melaka Refinery
Adding value to the nation’s
petroleum resource
Racing Ahead with Motorsports
PETRONAS’ beneficial
involvement in motorsports
examined.
A Week in Sudan
Getting to know Sudan with
PETRONAS Carigali
A Commitment to Care
PETRONAS staff find fulfillment in
helping others.
Corporate Roundup
Important milestones and events in
the world of PETRONAS.
Enhanced Oil Recovery
Taking EOR offshore
cover story
pictorial
technology
focus
community
editorial note
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The Editor
Nada PETRONAS
Corporate Communications Department
Level 70, Tower 1, PETRONAS Twin Towers
Kuala Lumpur City Centre, 50080 Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia
On the cover of this issue is the PETRONAS Melaka Refnery, which is
one of the corporation’s three refneries. Te Melaka Refnery’s operational
excellence will continue to enable PETRONAS to add higher value to the
crude oil chain.
We also discuss how the Group is developing the remaining domestic
oil resources using Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques and how
PETRONAS is aiming to develop a competitive advantage in ofshore EOR.
Te history and value behind PETRONAS’ involvement in motorsports are
also examined.
A heart-warming pictorial on PETRONAS Carigali Sdn Bhd’s involvement
with the Sudanese community and our story on volunteerism seek to inspire
readers to see the good we all can do to bring hope in these challenging times.
Nada Editorial Team
Petroliam Nasional Berhad, Malaysia
PP 2986/01/2010(023290)
RIDINGTHE PERFECT STORM
PETRONAS’ RESPONSE TO THE GLOBAL FINANCIAL CRISIS
ENHANCEDOIL RECOVERY
EXTENDING THE LIFE OF MALAYSIA’S OIL FIELDS
MUCH ADO ABOUT
MOTORSPORTS
MELAKA
REFINERY
LAUNCH
Cover: An aerial view of PETRONAS’ Melaka Refinery
Complex by the Straits of Melaka, with the storage tank
area in the foreground.
Nada PETRONAS is the corporate newsletter of the
PETRONAS Group of Companies published quarterly
by the Corporate Communications Department of
the Legal and Corporate Affairs Division. Opinions
expressed in the newsletter do not necessarily reflect
the official views of PETRONAS and its Group of
Companies.
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© 2009 PETROLIAM NASIONAL BERHAD (PETRONAS)
All rights reserved. PETRONAS makes no representation or
warranty, whether express or implied, as to the accuracy or
completeness of the facts presented. PETRONAS disclaims
responsibility from any liability arising out of reliance on
the contents of this publication.
ADDING VALUE TO THE BUSINESS
cover story
4
MELAKA REFI NERY
The Melaka Refinery is an integral component of PETRONAS’ strategy of
integration and adding value through its downstream operations in crude oil
refining, base oil production, lubricant blending and marketing, increasing the
value of each barrel of crude oil to the nation.
MELAKA REFINERY
THE 926-acre Melaka Refnery Complex was constructed
to meet Malaysia’s growing needs for refned petroleum
products and began operations in 1994 as PETRONAS’
second refnery, the frst being the Kertih refnery
in Terengganu. Te Melaka Refnery’s maximum
demonstrated production rate of 265,000 barrels per day
(bpd) is larger than that of PETRONAS’ Kertih refnery and
larger than the Shell and Esso refneries in Port Dickson.
With this production capacity, the Melaka Refnery
supplies about 30 per cent of Malaysia’s petroleum product
needs, exemplifying the importance of the Melaka Refnery
to the nation. As a complex refnery able to ‘crack’ heavier
oil, the operations of the PETRONAS Second Refnery
2 (PSR-2) enables the Melaka Refnery to refne heavier
imported crude. Tis provides PETRONAS with greater
fexibility in sourcing crude oil.
Te Melaka Group III base oil plant (MG3) is the newest
addition to the Melaka Refnery. Coming onstream in 2008
5 MELAKA REFI NERY
Te Melaka Refnery sprawls over
926 acres on the Melaka coastline.
Te complex includes two refnery
trains, the newly-constructed
MG3 base oil plant, storage tanks
storing crude, refned products
and fre water, a jetty complex
that juts out into the Straits of
Melaka, a cogeneration plant that
provides electricity, and several
other processing facilities nestled
amongst the buildings.
MELAKA REFINERY
with a production capacity of 6,500 bpd, the MG3 plant is
one of only 10 such plants in the world. Built to produce top-
tier Group III base oils, the MG3 was the fnal building block
to make the Melaka Refnery a fully-integrated refnery
complex. PETRONAS Group III base oils are marketed by
PETRONAS Base Oil (M) Sdn Bhd under the brand name
ETRO to leading lube makers worldwide.
Adding value for the nation
Te Melaka Refnery is an indispensable link in the Malaysian
oil and gas industry. By supplying 30 per cent of the nation’s
petroleum product needs, and with the capacity to supply up
to 42 per cent should the occasion arise, the Melaka Refnery
is the primary refnery in Malaysia. As such, it stands at the
forefront of energy security for the nation.
Te Melaka Refnery also plays an integral role in adding
value to the nation’s oil resources. Trough its refning
activities, lube blending and now base oil production, each
barrel of oil that passes through the Melaka Refnery is
substantially increased in value. When considering that a
single barrel of crude oil can be increased in value several
hundred per cent when it is refned into fully synthetic
lubricant, the value-add of the Melaka Refnery becomes
apparent. Te revenue to the nation has increased signifcantly
through the value-add from crude oil processing activities.
PETRONAS SECOND REFINERY 1
(PSR-1)
Te Melaka Refnery began operations with the
PSR-1 train, a sweet hydroskimming refnery
producing liquefed petroleum gas, motor
gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, low sulphur waxy
residue, and fuel gas for both domestic and
export markets. PSR-1 has a design capacity
of 100,000 bpd but a maximum demonstrated
production rate of 125,000 bpd. PSR-1 is owned
by PETRONAS and is operated by PETRONAS
Penapisan (Melaka) Sdn Bhd (PP(M)SB), a
wholly owned subsidiary of PETRONAS .
PETRONAS SECOND REFINERY 2
(PSR-2)
PETRONAS expanded the Melaka Refnery
with the addition of PSR-2 in 1998 to meet rising
requirements. PSR-2 is owned by the Malaysian
Refning Company Sdn Bhd (MRCSB), a joint
venture company between PETRONAS (53%)
and ConocoPhillips (47%), and is also operated
by PP(M)SB.
PSR-2 is designed to process sour crude
with higher sulphur content. Te feedstock
for PSR-2 is sourced globally, with the main
sources being the Middle East. PSR-2 has a
design capacity of 100,000 bpd but a maximum
demonstrated production rate of 140,000 bpd,
with units ranging from major crude and vacuum
distillation units, a catalytic reformer unit, a
hydrocracker, naphta and diesel hydrotreater
units, and a sulphur recovery and delayed coker
unit. In addition to the product range produced
by PSR-1, PSR-2 produces ultra low sulphur
diesel, fuel oil, asphalt and coke, and a range of
gas oils.
6
MELAKA REFI NERY
To be the Best Refinery in the Asia Pacific
Region
Te Melaka Refnery’s aspiration is to be ‘Te Best Refnery
in the Asia Pacifc Region’. In that regard, the staf of the
Melaka Refnery have been working diligently towards
achieving the objective of becoming a centre of excellence
in 2011/2012.
Being the best refnery in the Asia Pacifc Region would
entail a level of operational excellence that surpasses that
of the competitors. For that reason, the Melaka Refnery’s
two refnery trains, PSR-1 and PSR-2, undergo a biennial
benchmarking exercise conducted by Solomon Associates.
Te Solomon Benchmark is an industry standard in
benchmarking exercises. Solomon Associates collates its
benchmarks by taking into account performance in various
sectors for a given industry.
In the most recent benchmarking exercise, PSR-1
achieved 99.7 and PSR-2 achieved 97.3 on the Solomon
Benchmark for refnery utilisation, which were higher than
the benchmark positions of 95.9 and 92.9 respectively.
Tere have been other milestones on this quest. Te
earliest came when the Chemical Industries Council of
Malaysia recognised fve PETRONAS subsidiary companies
including PP(M)SB for excellence in various categories
during the 2005 Responsible Care Awards held in August
2006.
Another milestone was achieved in February 2007,
when PP(M)SB took home the “2006 Excellence Award for
Occupational Safety and Health (Gold Award) for Large
Industry – Petroleum/Gas/Chemical Category”, which was
awarded by the National Council for Occupational Safety
and Health.
PP(M)SB operators
checking equipment
in the plant.
Maintenance is a core
competency of
PP(M)SB and is
carried out regularly.
BEING THE BEST REFINERY IN THE ASIA
PACIFIC REGION WOULD ENTAIL A LEVEL
OF OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE THAT
SURPASSES THAT OF THE COMPETITORS.
In November 2007, when PP(M)SB won the Prime
Minister’s Hibiscus Award for exceptional achievement and
best overall performance for 2006/2007.
PP(M)SB earned the award due to its energy and waste
management policies and facilities, including the co-
generation plant, which produces energy efciently, and the
Energy and Loss Management System, Carbon Footprint
Management System and Waste Management Programme.
Te real efect of the award, however, was the raising of
Melaka Refnery’s profle in the environmental arena and
it marked yet another milestone in its quest to be the best
refnery in the Asia Pacifc region.
Superior-quality product development
Technological development provides the necessary edge
to gain an advantage in the marketplace, and the Melaka
Refnery has been active in developing higher quality
products for the Malaysian and international marketplace.
Apart from the capability to produce base oils, the
development of sulphur-free diesel (SFD), which is a type of
diesel that contains less than 10 parts per million of sulphur
and fetches a high premium, has added to Melaka Refnery’s
track record.
Tis milestone was followed by the inaugural shipment
of SFD in June 2007 from the PSR-2, an afrmation that
the Melaka Refnery has the technical capability to produce
high-quality diesel and market it efectively.
Te development of SFD also enables PETRONAS to
meet California Air Resource Board regulations, thereby
facilitating its penetration into the lucrative European and
American markets.
7 MELAKA REFI NERY
Energy Efficiency Initiatives
Beginning in 2004, Melaka Refnery took
the necessary steps to improve on energy
efciency in order to surpass the benchmark
industrial standard for energy consumption
(the Solomon Benchmarking Energy Intensity
Index). Te refnery undertook a broad range
of projects to improve efciency as part of the
Energy Loss Management System initiative. Te
initiative was designed to reduce the refnery’s
fuel consumption and reduce energy losses
throughout the refning process.
Improvements were made to the refnery’s
furnaces and heat exchangers, which reduced
the quantity of fuel required to operate a plant.
Energy was also saved through the installation
of a co-generation plant to supply the refnery
with electricity and steam. Compared to a
conventional plant, a co-generation plant
requires less fuel to produce the same amount of
power and steam. Energy loss reduction was also
achieved by modifying the faring control system
to minimise the need for faring. In addition,
improvements to the insulation of steam
pipelines and optimisation of steam generation
and usage resulted in less energy wastage.
As a result of these eforts, Melaka Refnery’s
PSR-1 is now ranked within the First Quartile of
the Solomon Benchmarking Energy Intensity
Index.
The Multi-Product Pipeline: Malaysia’s
petroleum products distribution backbone
Te Multi-Product Pipeline, or MPP, is a petroleum products
distribution pipeline that runs 130 km from the Melaka
Refnery through the Shell and Esso refneries in Port
Dickson, and on to the Kuala Lumpur International Airport
before its fnal destination – the Klang Valley Distribution
Terminal (KVDT) in Putrajaya. From there, road tankers
distribute the petroleum products to the various retail
stations. Te MPP pushes through 300 million litres of
gasoline and 130 million litres of diesel per month.
Te MPP has greatly reduced the need for road tankers
to run up and down Peninsular Malaysia to distribute
petroleum products, contributing to safer distribution
operations. Te MPP is operated by PETRONAS Dagangan
Berhad (PDB), while the KVDT is operated by PS Pipeline
Sdn Bhd, a joint venture between PDB and Shell (M) Trading
Sdn Bhd.
For export of petroleum products, the Melaka Refnery
is also equipped with its own 1.5 km long jetty, which has
seven berths, and a Single Point Mooring facility that can
also handle up to 2.3 million barrels of imported crude at
a time.
Refinery types & the Nelson
Complexity Factor
Basically, there are three types of refneries. Tey
are:
• Topping Refneries: Tese are the smallest
and least complex, and are limited in the
products they can produce due to their lack
of sophistication. Usually, they comprise
only an atmospheric distillation tower and
vacuum distillation tower, and are dependant
on the quality of feedstock.
• Hydroskimming Refneries: Tese are
more complex than topping refneries
and can modify gasoline octane levels and
lower sulpher levels in diesel. PSR-1 is a
hydroskimming refnery.
• Complex Refneries: Tese are the ‘big boys’
of the refnery industry. Able to process
heavier crude, these refneries are capable of
producing more valuable, lighter petroleum
products, such as automobile gasoline. Not
dependent on quality of feedstock, PSR-2 is a
complex refnery.
Te Nelson Complexity Index was developed
by Wilbur L Nelson in the 1960s and measures
secondary conversion capacity in comparison to
the primary distillation capacity of any refnery.
Basically, the higher the number, the more
complex is the refnery. PSR-1 has a rating of 3.9,
with PSR-2 rated at 9.7.
9 MELAKA REFI NERY
Nurturing talent for continuous excellence
PETRONAS has always emphasised the importance of
capability-building and invests substantially in programmes
to sustain the industry’s human capital needs. PP(M)SB
follows in the footsteps of parent company PETRONAS’
commitment to develop human talent through the creation
of Technical Professionals (TPs) and Technical Trade
Specialists (TTS). Te programme allows talented and
highly-skilled engineers and plant operators to focus on
growing in their felds of expertise and to become content
specialists of the knowledge and skills required within the
organisation.
PP(M)SB has trained TPs and TTS in various engineering
and laboratory disciplines. To date, about 50 TPs and TTS
have been developed in the space of two years, and have
displaced the need to hire external contractors for certain
tasks, in addition to the obvious advantages of keeping such
expertise in-house.
Trough PETRONAS’ Accelerated Capability
Development Programme, junior engineers are coached
by the TPs and given hands-on opportunities to develop
and fne-tune their technical capabilities. Tis structured
approach will ensure that all engineers have a thorough
grounding in all areas of their work, allowing them to
continuously deliver operational excellence.
Te TPs are currently researching the potential for the
Melaka Refnery to process a wider variety of crudes.
The future for the Melaka Refinery
Te PSR-2 Revamp Project is scheduled for completion
at the end of 2009. When completed, PSR-2 will have a
capacity of 170,000 bpd.
Te Melaka Refnery looks set to remain as the primary
refnery in Malaysia and continue to work towards being the
Best Refnery in the Asia Pacifc Region.
PP(M)SB staf busy at work - a
maintenance worker (top) and
control room staf (below)
ensure the smooth operation
of the Melaka Refnery
PETRONAS HAS ALWAYS EMPHASISED THE IMPORTANCE
OF CAPABILITY-BUILDING AND INVESTS SUBSTANTIALLY
IN PROGRAMMES TO SUSTAIN THE INDUSTRY’S HUMAN
CAPITAL NEEDS.
10 A WEEK I N SUDAN
A WEEK IN SUDAN
Working in the Sudanese oil and gas industry has its share of challenges, brought about
by the difficult terrain and remote locations of the oil fields. But with these challenges
come opportunities as well. These include experiencing firsthand the sights, sounds
and smells of rural Sudan with its unspoilt natural beauty, making new friends from a
different culture, as well as the privilege to help a country develop and grow. PETRONAS
teams may travel miles across the Sudan in pursuit of their tasks, but they are also
creating smiles in their wake, as shown by the pictures in this spread.
6
PETRONAS staf engaging with a
group of Sudanese villagers.
11
Our Ofce Complex in
Khartoum.
1 A woman expresses joy the way
only mothers can upon seeing her
son’s graduation from Universiti
Teknologi PETRONAS.
1
6 7 8
pictorial
11 A WEEK I N SUDAN
10
Villagers waiting to see the
doctor at the community clinic
provided by PETRONAS’ joint
venture operations in collaboration
with the Ministry of Health.
2
Flags tell a tale of partnership
between Sudan and Malaysia.
5
From across the land came these
secondary school students, participants
of the annual PETRONAS Debate and
Quiz Trophy 2008 in Khartoum. For
many of them, it was their frst time on a
plane or out of their village.
7
Sudanese and Malaysian staf
at a Hari Raya Aidilftri open house
held at the PETRONAS Sudan Ofce
Complex in Khartoum.
4
A team of PETRONAS Carigali
personnel stuck in a fash food on
the access road to an operations
site. All in a day’s work in Sudan…
3
Children quenching their thirst
at a water pump installed by one
of PETRONAS’ joint ventures in
Sudan.
8
Graduates from the Khartoum
Vocational Training Centre (KVTC)
proudly clutching their certifcates
before embarking on careers with
PETRONAS.
9
Not a common sight elsewhere
… a road blocked by wildlife, in this
case, a fock of Marabou Stork in
Southern Sudan.
2
4
9 10 11
3
5
technology
With more oil reservoirs around the world entering into advanced
stages of depletion amid a heightened level of awareness of the
importance of energy security, the scramble is now on for non-
conventional extraction techniques to sustain the world’s supply
of crude oil.
OIL RECOVERY
ENHANCED
Te Dulang oil rig is located
approximately 130 km of the
coast of Peninsular Malaysia.
Te Dulang oil feld currently
utilises water-alternate-gas
EOR processes.
12 EOR
THE discovery rate for new oilfelds
has dropped signifcantly, and with it,
the likelihood of discovering another
superfeld, such as those in the Middle East
or Central America.
In Malaysia, the search for oil is
now moving farther into deepwater
areas, while existing oil fields are in an
advanced stage of depletion. Recovery
factors average around 35 per cent, which
is lower in comparison with some other
countries that have been more aggressive
in producing resources from their felds.
Contingency plans to extend the life
of Malaysia’s reserves include prospecting
overseas, which PETRONAS continues
to undertake through its subsidiary
PETRONAS Carigali Sdn Bhd.
However, Malaysia’s oil felds are not
entirely drained of their reserves yet. Tere
are still sizable reserves lef to extract.
The question is how this is to be done.
One of the answers lies in Enhanced Oil
Recovery (EOR) techniques.
PETRONAS conducts EOR projects,
which are currently in 11 ofshore felds,
including the Baram, Baronia, Bokor,
Dulang, Guntong and Tapis felds. Based
on initial screening studies, 80 per cent of
Malaysia’s oil felds are technically suitable
for EOR.
Te EOR processes commonly used by
13 EOR
PETRONAS are gas fooding, specifcally
water-alternate-gas (immiscible or
miscible) and chemical fooding. Gas
fooding - utilising hydrocarbon gas or
CO
2
as the injection fuid - has been found
to be most suitable for Malaysia’s felds.
PETRONAS is looking to extract CO
2

from high CO
2
gas felds, estimated at
more than 10 trillion cubic feet, for use
as injection fuid. It is also conducting
research into an EOR technique that
utilises microbes, called Microbial
Enhanced Oil Recovery or MEOR.
Many of the EOR projects undertaken
by PETRONAS are conducted in
conjunction with its Production Sharing
Contract (PSC) partners. For instance, to
further develop the Tapis feld ofshore
Terengganu through EOR techniques,
PETRONAS and ExxonMobil Exploration
and Production (M) Inc, will jointly
implement a water-alternate-gas scheme
in the Tapis feld.
Te estimated additional oil recovery
for that particular feld alone is over 100
million barrels, extending the feld’s life for
at least another 25 years, providing added
impetus to the importance of developing
EOR.
Embarking on an EOR project requires
a series of evaluations to understand a feld’s
behaviour. A reservoir model is built
around data collected during a developed
feld’s frst few years of operation, collating
information on the feld’s behaviour
and characteristics. From an analysis
of this model, PETRONAS engineers
evaluate when EOR techniques should be
implemented.
Te potential of EOR extends beyond
lengthening the lives of Malaysia’s oil
felds. Te EOR techniques utilised by
technology
14 EOR
PETRONAS IS CONFIDENT THAT THE OPERATIONAL
AND PROCESS KNOWLEDGE GAINED THROUGH
THE ADAPTATION OF LAND-BASED TECHNOLOGY
TO A MARINE ENVIRONMENT HAS PROVIDED IT
WITH THE OPTION TO CONSIDER POSITIONING
ITSELF AS A LEADING EOR PLAYER IN THE
INDUSTRY, WITH EXPERTISE IN OFFSHORE EOR
PROCESSES, AS OPPOSED TO OTHER PLAYERS
WHO ARE MAINLY ONSHORE
14 EOR
15 EOR
feld showed a potential increase of up to
24 per cent of recoverable oil. Te Angsi
pilot project also created history by being
the world’s frst ofshore application of
chemical EOR in a high temperature
reservoir.
Te oil and gas industry is competitive,
and with dwindling yields around the world,
EOR will prove to be a vital technology in
the near future. PETRONAS is excited
about EOR, as it will maximise the yield of
Malaysia’s felds and position PETRONAS
as a leading EOR player.
Tis development is opening up new
opportunities for business expansion
overseas and adding a new dimension to
the oil and gas industry in Malaysia.
Recovery stages of an oil field
Te average oil feld will go through three
recovery stages during its lifetime.
Primary Recovery Stage: In this stage,
underground pressure generated naturally forces
the oil to the surface. Recovery factor during the
primary recovery stage is typically fve to 15 per
cent.
Secondary Recovery Stage: Te secondary
recovery stage involves the application of
external energy to generate pressure in the
reservoir. Tese include water injection and natural
gas re-injection, or a combination of both.
Pumps and gas lifs may also be applied to help
improve recovery efciency. On average, the
recovery factor afer primary and secondary oil
recovery operations is between 30 and 50 per
cent.
Tertiary Recovery Stage: When secondary
recovery techniques are no longer sufcient
to extract oil, EOR techniques, such as those
utilised by PETRONAS, can be applied to extract
an additional fve to 15 per cent more crude
from a feld.
PETRONAS are existing technologies
and processes used by other EOR players.
While the technology is not new, the
application has mostly been onshore. As
Malaysia’s oil felds are located mostly
ofshore, the know-how of operating
an EOR project ofshore needed to be
developed. In that regard, PETRONAS
has taken the adaptation of onshore EOR
techniques for ofshore use to the next
level.
PETRONAS is confdent that the
operational and process knowledge gained
through the adaptation of land-based
technology to a marine environment
has provided it with the option to consider
positioning itself as a leading EOR player
in the industry, with expertise in ofshore
EOR processes, as opposed to other
players who are mainly onshore.
PETRONAS is now going at full speed
in pursuing the implementation of EOR
projects. Te Angsi feld located ofshore
Terengganu, for instance, yielded
encouraging results from pilot tests.
Subjected to chemical EOR, the Angsi
16 MUCH ADO ABOUT MOTORSPORTS
RACING AHEAD WITH
MOTORSPORTS
MOTORSPORTS IN THE MALAYSIAN CONTEXT HAS BECOME
SYNONYMOUS WITH PETRONAS. OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS,
MALAYSIANS HAVE GOTTEN USED TO SEEING THE PETRONAS
NAME AND LOGO EMBLAZONED ON RACE AND RALLY
CARS, MOTORBIKES, AND ON SPONSORSHIP BANNERS
WORLDWIDE. THE PETRONAS NAME IS A VISIBLE SYMBOL
OF CORPORATE MALAYSIA CARRIED INTO THE RACING
WORLD, THE PETRONAS LOGO STANDING TALL AMONG
THE GLOBAL BRANDS THAT COMPRISE THE BIG BOYS OF
MOTORSPORTS.
17 MUCH ADO ABOUT MOTORSPORTS
RACING AHEAD WITH
MOTORSPORTS
TECHNOLOGICAL innovation is the lifeblood
of any oil and gas company, just as engine oil is the
lifeblood of the internal combustion engine. Lubricants
in general play pivotal roles in modern forms of
transportation, from automobiles to trains, to aircraf.
Similarly, technological innovation plays a pivotal role
in keeping an oil and gas company ahead of the curve
and to remain cost-competitive.
Technological innovation is one of the reasons
why PETRONAS decided to venture into motorsports.
However, PETRONAS’ involvement in motorsports
has its roots in marketing and branding objectives,
and this is where the company has reaped its biggest
benefts. It was motorsports – Formula One (F1) in
particular - that popularised the PETRONAS name
overseas.
PETRONAS is committed to continuing its
involvement in motorsports and is looking ahead to
greater achievements in this area.
PETRONAS in motorsports – a brief history
Te success of PETRONAS in motorsports is a source of pride for
many Malaysians, but not many are familiar with PETRONAS’
journey in this area.
PETRONAS’ motorsports story began in the late 1980s when
the search for an appropriate way to market its growing lubricants
business was underway. Te pairing of PETRONAS with
motorsports checked all the necessary boxes and the decision was
made to sponsor a Malaysian rally team in 1988.
Te rest, as people say, is history.
When PETRONAS expanded overseas in the 1990s, the
company’s brand and logo were carried into the general public’s
consciousness through motorsports. Te concept worked on every
level. Te international exposure enjoyed by PETRONAS brought
the corporate logo and brand into the homes of spectators and
the general public the world over.
It was in the mid-1990s that PETRONAS got involved in F1
racing, the most visible the company had ever been at the time.
PETRONAS partnered with the then Red Bull-Sauber-Ford F1
Team in 1995 and received Grand Prix rights in 1999, propelling
Malaysia into the league of F1 host nations as a destination for
international motorsports, as well as boosting PETRONAS’
corporate image. In 2006, PETRONAS partnered with the BMW-
Sauber F1 Team, a collaboration that has taken PETRONAS to the
next level.
focus
18 MUCH ADO ABOUT MOTORSPORTS
The technology of motorsports
PETRONAS’ involvement in motorsports provided the
impetus for further development of its oil business products
– fuels and lubricants – to a level higher than if the company
had continued its research and development (R&D) eforts
within the confnes of a laboratory. Te real world application
of its products in high-output race engines, which are able to
hit redlines far higher than passenger cars while generating
extreme heat, has provided PETRONAS with the best test-bed
for its products. In addition, the development of capabilities
in the area of automotive, fuel and lubricant development
has formed the core of PETRONAS R&D, resulting in the
recognised PETRONAS range of products used in vehicles
throughout Malaysia.
When PETRONAS entered into a partnership with
the Sauber F1 team in 1995, the company’s involvement in
motorsports stepped up to the next level. Trough the signing
of an eight-year technology transfer programme with the
Sauber team, F1 proved to be the ultimate laboratory, providing
real world application of PETRONAS’ products in an even
more extreme environment than conventional motorsports.
Utilising this opportunity, PETRONAS engineers were able to
successfully develop, formulate, test and apply the technology
that went into the development of the fully synthetic
PETRONAS SYNTIUM engine lubricant and the Primax F1
fuel, which was also used to power the Sauber PETRONAS F1
cars.
Te SYNTIUM range of lubricants has also benefted from
R&D programmes for the touring car and endurance teams, as
well as the PETRONAS Adventure Team, known for its long-
distance expeditions through extreme weather and terrain, as
well as high altitudes.
Additionally, the Sauber PETRONAS Engineering
programme has provided PETRONAS engineers the perfect
platform to test and further develop the SPRINTA range of
engine oils, designed for two and four-stroke motorcycle
engines.
Te technologically intensive nature of motorsports has
contributed signifcantly to the nurturing and enhancement
of technological capabilities within the PETRONAS Group.
PETRONAS engineers have gained extensive knowledge and
experience from their involvement in motorsports and have
ploughed the same back into the company, which has proven
useful in the advancement of technology for the Malaysian oil
and gas industry.
Trough PETRONAS’ motorsports experience,
PETRONAS has gained a reputation as a company at the
forefront of technological advancement.
Brand PETRONAS
Brand Malaysia. This is a concept introduced by the
Malaysian government as a means of giving Malaysian products
an identity of their own, much like how Japanese, German and
American products are identified with their own unique
values stemming from their commitment to reliability, quality
and design. Complementing the Brand Malaysia initiative are
Malaysian companies that have made their names synonymous
with certain qualities. PETRONAS is such a company. Trough
its involvement with motorsports, perhaps the biggest
beneft the company has gained is its brand recognition, which
now extends overseas. Tis vindicates the idea behind the
venture into motorsports to brand and market PETRONAS’
lubricants in the international market.
Through its involvement in F1, PETRONAS’ reputation
has grown in stature, in that PETRONAS earned a level of
recognition and respect from the international motorsports
community, which no amount of advertising could have
achieved on its own.
In 2006, PETRONAS extended its 11-year association
with Sauber and took on a premium partnership role with the
BMW Sauber F1 team. Due to the stature of BMW – a global
powerhouse of a brand – PETRONAS has risen further in
visibility and worldwide positioning. BMW’s inclusion in the
partnership has been estimated to have increased media value
fvefold.
Tis increase in international visibility and reputation has
moved PETRONAS closer to realising its aims of exploring
other markets. For example, PETRONAS launched the
SYNTIUM brand lubricants in the Japanese market, parallel
with its use for the BMW Z4M Coupe in the 2007 Super
Taikyu Endurance Series in Japan.
However, the ultimate result of PETRONAS’ success in
the motorsports arena is the promotion of Malaysia itself as a
brand. At a time when the country is quickly developing
but remains generally on the periphery of global awareness,
PETRONAS, together with a handful of other Malaysian
companies, continues to bring Brand Malaysia to the world’s
attention.
19 MUCH ADO ABOUT MOTORSPORTS
1 Malaysia has generated substantial tourism revenue from hosting F1 races.
2 Street Smarts: Te F1 experience is brought to Malaysians who are unable to attend F1 races. Tis outreach programme is held as a way of
broadening the reach and impact of F1 in Malaysia.
3 PETRONAS and Sauber engineers working together in a laboratory in Switzerland during the eight-year Technical Transfer Programme
4 Fariqe Hairuman (2nd from right), triumphantly lifs his trophy upon winning the Asian Touring Car Championship in 2007.
For the latest news on PETRONAS’ racing teams, visit www.petmos.com.my
Nurturing local motorsports talent
Karamjit Singh, Hairol Azmi, Shahrul Nizam, Kuan Meng
Heng, Shahrol Yuzy – these are names familiar to every
Malaysian motorsports enthusiast. At the same time, they
would draw an association with PETRONAS, as these talents
have been nurtured with assistance from PETRONAS.
Trough partnerships with Malaysian motorsports teams –
whether two or four-wheel, on or of-road, racing or touring
– PETRONAS has helped nurture local talents and elevated
Malaysian motorsports to an international level. New talents
continue to emerge: Ahmad Fuad Baharudin, Md Zamri Baba
and Azlan Shah Kamaruzaman in the Asian Grand Prix; and
Fariqe Hairuman, the frst Malaysian to win the Asian Touring
Car Championship.
2 1
Racing ahead
Te partnerships that PETRONAS has established with the
world of motorsports over the years are bearing fruit in terms
of the company’s lubricants business. PETRONAS is working
closely together with manufacturers in supplying Syntium
lubricants to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) and
is already doing so with BMW in Malaysia. Its support of two-
wheel racing has also seen the company formalise a tie-up to
supply PETRONAS Sprinta motorcycle lubricants to Yamaha’s
distributors in Indonesia, Malaysia and Tailand.
In April 2009, PETRONAS went on to sign a three-year
agreement with Yamaha Motor to become ofcial sponsors
and premium partners of Fiat Yamaha. PETRONAS branding
will be seen on the liveries and bike of reigning MotoGP world
champion Valentino Rossi!
3 4
20 A COMMI TMENT TO CARE
community
THERE IS A GREAT NEED NOWADAYS FOR VOLUNTEERS TO DEDICATE
THEIR TIME TO HELP OTHERS. THE ADVENT OF THE NEW CENTURY HAS
BROUGHT ITS SHARE OF NATURAL DISASTERS, FROM TSUNAMIS TO
EARTHQUAKES, FROM FLOODS TO LANDSLIDES. WE ARE ALSO WITNESS
TO MANMADE DISASTERS, INCLUDING THE ENDLESS CONFLICTS AND
WARS THAT MAR OUR HISTORY. BOTH NATURE AND MAN SEEM TO
ENJOY THROWING TEMPER TANTRUMS FROM TIME TO TIME, WITH
DEVASTATING CONSEQUENCES FOR THOSE CAUGHT IN THE CROSSFIRE.
CARE
THE devastation to the environment and loss of life caused
by these natural and unexpected occurrences have been
widespread and painful, but as the saying goes, when the
chips are down, people are at their best. Among the stories
of heroism and selfessness that have emerged from the
ruins of these disaster sites are stories of those who gave of
themselves by way of lending their time, sometimes even at
the cost of risking their lives.
In today’s fast-paced modern society, the typical
executive does not have much time for volunteerism. With
the additional demands of family and other obligations, it is
hardly surprising that volunteerism ofen fnds itself on the
backburner for so many working professionals nationwide.
Additionally, the challenges posed by logistics and resources
tend to prevent most from volunteering to do some good for
society in their free time.
Fortunately, PETRONAS has programmes in place that
make it possible for employees to volunteer their time while
still maintaining their jobs. We feature in these pages the
PETRONAS Volunteer Opportunity Programme (PVOP)
and the Young Professionals Club (YPC) of PETRONAS
Carigali Sdn Bhd.
The PVOP: One route to volunteerism
Te PVOP was ofcially launched on 1 April 2005 as a platform
to develop a pool of employee-volunteers who are keen on
contributing their time, skills and experience in meaningful
ways through community relations activities. Trough the
PVOP, employees are sponsored and trained, so that they may
volunteer their services in disaster zones.
Te sponsorship extends to the cost of transportation and
the necessary funds to support the volunteer, and the training
encompasses preparing the volunteer for what he or she would
face at the disaster zone, and what would be required to make
a diference. Te PVOP also fosters long-term relationships and
enhances mutually-benefcial partnerships with communities
wherever PETRONAS operates.
A COMMITMENT TO
Since the PVOP programme was inaugurated, PVOP volunteers have seen action in disaster zones
in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Pakistan, Philippines, Sudan and Vietnam.
PVOP volunteers do what they do because they believe that helping others is reward in itself.
According to them, their lives have been enriched from their experiences, making them more humble
and appreciative of what they have at home.
Khalid B Dato Haji Akil, a project coordinator with KLCC Projeks Sdn Bhd and a PVOP volunteer,
signed up with the PVOP afer he heard of the devastating
tsunami that hit Aceh, Indonesia. However, he was not chosen
for Aceh but ended up being chosen to go to the island of Nias
for two weeks afer the 2006 earthquake. He was tasked with
building a hospital there.
“When I frst saw the level of destruction, I cried,” said Khalid.
Te people there were so poor. It made me grateful for everything
I have back home. It also made me more determined to complete my mission.”
Khalid’s task of building a hospital turned out to be a bigger task than originally expected. “When I
got there, I realised just how much needed to be done. Two weeks were not enough. When I returned, I
talked to management and explained the situation, and I was allowed stay for three months! I was lucky
that PETRONAS’ management was so supportive.”
“Te people were so appreciative of what we’ve done. It made me proud to be a Malaysian and an
employee of PETRONAS. God has given me good health, wealth, knowledge and skills. It’s time I shared
what I have with others,” Khalid proclaimed, adding, “I want to thank the company for giving me the
opportunities to help others.”
Khalid’s belief that resources and talents are God-given and, hence, must be shared or given back
21 A COMMI TMENT TO CARE
“When you volunteer,
it’s not important what
your status is or from
which family you come
from. What’s important
is that you’re able to
contribute.”

to the community with the same energy that is
used in searching and drilling for oil, is shared by
other PVOP volunteers.
Ramli B Mohamad, from Corporate
Security Division, also signed up for the
PVOP programme. Ramli was chosen for the
earthquake relief mission in Pakistan in 2005
to help out with the logistics of aid, including
the distribution of tents and blankets to victims
of the tragedy. His team comprised seven
members, all from PETRONAS.
Refecting on the experience, Ramli said,
“Sometimes we are so caught up in our own
selfsh pursuits that we forget about being
humble. Being humble is important. By helping
others and being involved in humanitarian work,
a person can learn humility.”
He added, “When you volunteer, it’s not
important what your status is or which family
you come from. What is important is that you
are able to contribute.”
Being surrounded by so much poverty and
devastation made Ramli much more appreciative
of his family and his home. “I realised how
well taken care of my family is. We live in a
comfortable and peaceful environment. I have a
good job where I can support them. I’m grateful
for everything that I have.”
Ramli also believes that by joining a
programme like PVOP, one gets the chance to
network. “Many of us sit behind our computers
all day. Some of us hardly know the people in our
own department! But through a programme like
PVOP, we can network, get to know other people
and expand our circle of friends.”
“When I first saw the
level of destruction,
I cried.”
Khalid B Dato Haji Akil
Ramli B Mohamad
A COMMITMENT TO
“God has given me good health
and I live in a peaceful country.
This is the time for us to come out
from our comfort zones and help
others who are less fortunate than
we are. This is how we can show
our appreciation for what we have
been given.”
Lee Pei Lee
Sarawak
Jogjakarta
Pakistan
22 A COMMI TMENT TO CARE
PETRONAS VOLUNTEERS
IN ACTION AROUND
THE WORLD
Aceh
Johor
a tough job. Expect the worst. If you’re well prepared, you’ll
come out of it, unscathed. Always remember that when we
come home, we become better persons.”
Lee notes that PVOP is successful because it facilitates
greater participation in volunteer activities. “If I were
registered with an external
volunteer programme, it
would be harder for me to get
time of from work. But with
PVOP, since it’s an initiative by
PETRONAS, I can continue my
interest in volunteer activities
without too much difculty.”
Wi t h t h e o n g o i n g
commitment by PETRONAS’
management , PVOP wi l l
continue to thrive and give more
employees like Khalid, Ramli
and Lee the chance to fnd their
calling in volunteerism.
One objective of the scheme is to encourage leadership
qualities that are key to PETRONAS’ growth and future. Tis
aspiration becomes even more meaningful when staf can
develop themselves while bringing about positive change at
various levels in society.
Lee Pei Lee, now the Head Nurse
with the Emergency and Primary
Care Department at Prince Court
Medical Centre, says that volunteering
during an emergency can change one’s
perspective on life. She remembers
being assigned to Legaspi in the
Philippines afer the tragic landslide in
December 2006.
Lee was attached to a MERCY medical team made up
of four people - a doctor, a medical assistant, a nurse and
a logistics person. Teir mission was to help contain the
spread of infectious disease.
Lee believes that the psycho-social training she received
under the PVOP scheme helped her deal with the stress
of being at the heart of the scene of tragedy. Looking
back, despite the trauma, the experience has made her
a stronger person and appreciative of the good life at
home in Malaysia. “God has given me good health and I
live in a peaceful country. Tis is the time for us to come
out from our comfort zones and help others who are
less fortunate than we are. Tis is how we can show our
appreciation for what we have been given.”
Her advice to volunteers is that they should prepare
themselves fully before going on a humanitarian mission. “It’s
AND ANOTHER WAY –
THE YOUNG
PROFESSIONALS
CLUB THE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS CLUB, OR YPC, FOUND ITS SEEDS IN
THE YOUNG PETRONAS EXECUTIVES’ DESIRE TO HELP OTHERS AND DO SOMETHING POSITIVE
FOR THE COMMUNITY, WHETHER LOCALLY OR ABROAD. THE YPC ALSO HOPES TO BREAK DOWN
BARRIERS BETWEEN THE GENERAL PUBLIC AND ITS MEMBERS, TO SHOW TO THE WORLD THAT AN
EXECUTIVE’S CAREER IS ALL THE MORE MEANINGFUL WHEN COMBINED WITH SOCIAL WORK.
Suhana Sidik
YPC pioneer
“Our members are very supportive
and very motivated. All of them
would take the initiative in doing
things. It’s with their support and
dedication that YPC has been able
to grow to what it is now.”
Farid Wahid`
23 A COMMI TMENT TO CSR
THE YPC was initiated and driven by
PETRONAS executives themselves, arising from
a suggestion by management that they form a
networking club that contributes their skills to
society without expecting reward.
Tanks to the combined eforts of management and
the founding members, the YPC has been involved
with community work around the country,
reaching out to the people through activities such
as blood donation drives, helping out orphanages
and giving career talks at schools, among others.
PETRONAS Carigali Sdn Bhd’s YPC pioneer
Suhana Sidik, a planning engineer and former
President of PETRONAS
Carigali’s Development
Division’s YPC
(DDYPC), says there
are so many young
professionals around
her who are passionate
about doing community
work.
“Te people in
YPC are passionate
individuals who believe
in giving back to society.
Tey are willing to set
aside their time to reach out to those who are less
fortunate,” she says. “When you do community
work, it makes you feel humble. You become more
appreciative of what you have. Sometimes, we may
take things for granted and we forget that there are
many others out there who have less.”
It is also through volunteering in community
work that many members are able to meet and
support other like-minded colleagues. “I feel happy
when I’m out there giving back to society. Our
members feel the same. Tat is what drives us. Tat
fuels our passion. It adds value to our lives. We are
reaching out and making a diference,” Suhana says.
Similar to the PVOP, the YPC also serves as
a networking platform. Te YPC has organised
family day events and sport activities for its members,
for instance, as a means for bringing people
together. “I think it’s funny that some people
can work in the same company and, yet, hardly
know each other. Trough YPC activities, they
can network, meet new people and forge new
friendships,” Suhana explains.
“In addition, we have invited young leaders in
our company to give talks
about how they get where they
are now. Tey give tips and
share the insights that they
have gathered in their careers.
All of that is important and
useful for our members,”
Suhana adds.
Te YPC has also
organised talks on values to
reinforce the PETRONAS
Shared Values of Loyalty,
Integrity, Professionalism and
Cohesiveness.
Tere are now several YPCs in PETRONAS’
regional ofces and some subsidiaries, all run by
young executives with a passion for what they do.
Meanwhile, echoing Suhana is Farid Wahid,
President of DDYPC, who says, “Our members are
very supportive and very motivated. All of them
would take the initiative in doing things. It’s with
their support and dedication that YPC has been
able to grow to what it is now.”
24 CORPORATE ROUNDUP
CORPORATE
ROUNDUP
per day (mtpd) or 1.7 million metric tons per year of 99.85
per cent Grade AA commercial methanol. It consumes 120
million standard cubic feet per day (mmscfd) of associated
gas from the Kikeh feld as feed gas and an additional 30
mmscfd of associated gas as fuel gas from the Erb West and
Samarang felds.
Combined with the 2,000 mtpd production from PMLSB
Plant 1, PMLSB is the largest methanol producer in South
East Asia and one of the largest in the world.
KERTIH PLASTIC PARK ATTRACTS
RM145 MILLION IN INVESTMENTS
OPEN FOR BUSINESS:
PETRONAS hits milestone with
opening of MegaMethanol Plant
PETRONAS Methanol (Labuan) Sdn Bhd (PMLSB)’s
MegaMethanol Plant achieved a signifcant milestone on
the attainment of 100 per cent nameplate capacity on 4
May 2009.
Te frst drop of methanol was produced on 31
December 2008, followed by the production of US
Federal Spec Grade AA commercial methanol on 19
January 2009.
Te MegaMethanol Plant, also called PMLSB Plant 2,
celebrated its maiden methanol cargo delivery on 1 April
2009. Te product will be marketed domestically as well
as to the growing markets in South East Asia, North East
Asia and India.
Construction of the PMLSB Plant 2 started in May
2006 and achieved Ready for Start-Up status in November
2008. Te plant is capable of producing 5,000 metric tons
THREE plastic product manufacturers have invested a total of
RM145 million in the Kertih Plastics Park (KPP), launched on
2 December 2008 by then Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah
Ahmad Badawi.
Te three manufacturers are: (i) Hi-Essence Cable Sdn Bhd,
a wire and cable manufacturer, which is investing RM85 million;
(ii) Latenfeld Pipe Industries Sdn Bhd, with investments of
RM40 million; and (iii) FMD Polypipes Industry Sdn Bhd, a
plastic pipe manufacturer, with investments of RM20 million.
KPP is located in the East Coast Economic Region and is
being developed with the objective of promoting downstream
investments in the plastics and plastic-related industries in
synergy with the nearby Kertih Integrated Petrochemical
Complex. KPP targets RM2 billion in investments and the
creation of approximately 7,000 jobs.
25 CORPORATE ROUNDUP
PETRONAS SUBSIDIARY
ACQUIRES MARATHON
OIL IRELAND LTD
PETRONAS’ subsidiary, Star Energy Group, has acquired
Marathon Oil Ireland Ltd, the Irish unit of Marathon Oil
Corporation, in a deal worth USD180 million (RM628
million), on 17 December 2008.
Among the assets of Marathon Oil Ireland Ltd are a 100
per cent operated interest in the Kinsale Head Area, a 86.5
per cent interest in the Seven Heads feld and a 100 per cent
interest in the company’s gas storage business.
Star Energy Group will retain all 61 of Marathon
Oil Ireland Ltd’s employees as part of the deal.
MLNG MARKS IMPORTANT
MILESTONE
PETRONAS subsidiary Malaysia LNG Sdn Bhd (MLNG)
marked an important milestone in its operating history when it
successfully delivered its 6,000th cargo of Liquefed Natural
Gas (LNG) to Korea Gas Corporation. Te historic cargo,
carried onboard the Puteri Delima Satu tanker, lef Bintulu
port on 28 January 2008 and arrived at its destination, the
Tong Yeong Terminal, South Korea, six days later on 3 February
2009.
MLNG achieved two other signifcant milestones last
year when it celebrated the 25th anniversary of its frst
LNG shipment in January 2008, followed by MLNG’s 30th
anniversary of incorporation in June 2008.
TURKMEN STUDENTS GRADUATE
FROM UTP
EIGHT Turkmen students of Universiti Teknologi Petronas
(UTP) graduated at a ceremony held at the President Hotel in
Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, on 18 January 2009. Te Turkmen
students were studying at UTP as part of PETRONAS’
philosophy of developing human capital throughout the
various countries in which it operates.
Te Turkmen students were conferred with their
degrees by Datuk Dr Zainal Abidin Haji Kasim, Rector
of UTP, accompanied by His Excellency Yagshygeldy
Kakayev, Director of the State Agency for Management
and Use of Hydrocarbon Resources, and Mr Guvanch
Agajanov, Chairman of Block 1 Turkmenistan Management
Committee. Representatives from the State Agency, Ministry
of Education, and proud parents and relatives of the UTP
graduates, were also present.
To date, 41 Turkmen students have graduated from UTP,
with 44 Turkmen students currently studying there.
Following the convocation ceremony, 45 Turkmen
trainee technicians who had successfully completed
PETRONAS Carigali (Turkmenistan) Sdn Bhd’s Technician
Training Programme in December 2008 received their
graduation certifcates at a separate graduation ceremony.
Te technicians received their certifcates from Datuk Dr
Rosti Saruwono, then Vice President of Education Division,
PETRONAS, accompanied by His Excellency Yagshygeldy
Kakayev and En Mohamad Zazali Salim, General Manager
of Institut Teknologi Petroleum PETRONAS (INSTEP).
During his opening remarks, Datuk Dr Rosti noted
that PETRONAS was still actively building capabilities
and recruiting talent to support domestic and international
operations and businesses despite the global fnancial crisis.
Te 45 technicians underwent a training programme
that lasted for 27 months, with the frst year conducted
in Turkmenistan and the second year at INSTEP. Te
trainees then underwent a six-month on-the-job training
at various PETRONAS Operating Units in Malaysia.
Another activity that took place in Turkmenistan was
the opening of PETRONAS’ new ofce premises on 17
January 2009. Marked by a simple ceremony, the opening
was attended by PETRONAS staf and representatives from
Malaysian companies in Turkmenistan.
26 CORPORATE ROUNDUP
ON 10 March 2009, PETRONAS, together with the
Vietnamese newspaper Tieu Nien Tien Phong, launched
the ‘Discovering Our World with PETRONAS’ contest for
Vietnamese secondary school students at the To Hoang
Secondary School in Hanoi. Te competition, aimed at
nurturing interest in natural science and promoting the
spirit of teamwork among school children, runs from
March to July 2009.
Te contest is part of a series inaugurated in 2006, in
conjunction with the celebration of PETRONAS’ 15th
anniversary in Vietnam. Te number of participants has
increased signifcantly to nearly 440,000 school children
in 2008 - from both big cities like Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh
City and remote areas such as Cao Bang and Dong Tap
province.
Te Grand Prize winners in 2008 were awarded a
study tour to Kuala Lumpur, which included a visit to the
PETROSAINS Science Discovery Centre, the PETRONAS
Twin Towers, and other historical and educational places
of interest.
Te launch ceremony was attended by HE Mr Nguyen
Vinh Hien, Deputy Minister of Education and Training,
Vietnam; Prof Dr Nguyen Lan Dzung, Head of the Jury
Board, Member of National Assembly; En Awang Othman
Awang Jaya, Country Manager of PETRONAS Vietnam
Representative Ofce; ofcials from the Ministry of
Education and Training; members of the Ho Chi Minh
Youth Union and the media; teachers and nearly 1,000
pupils from the To Hoang School.
Speaking at the launch ceremony, HE Mr Nguyen
Vinh Hien said that the ‘Discovering Our World with
PETRONAS’ contest would encourage creativity among
the children and the discovery of their surrounding world.
It is in line with his Ministry’s slogan “Study well, teaching
well”.
“Students will learn about the natural environment
from school and will have the curiosity to discover why the
natural environment is such as it is,” he added.
“The ‘Discovering Our World with PETRONAS’ contest
will encourage creativity among the children and the
discovery of their surrounding world”
MOU FOR ACADEMIC CHAIR
SPONSORSHIP IN DRILLING
TECHNOLOGY
UNIVERSITI Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP) marked
an important milestone in its quest to attain academic
and research and development (R&D) excellence
with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding
(MoU) with Transocean International, a leading
ofshore drilling services provider with specialisation
in deepwater drilling. Te MoU will enable UTP to
accelerate its capability in deepwater technology, which
is an R&D focus area for UTP.
Te MoU, signed on 24 February 2009 at the
Malaysian Petroleum Club, Kuala Lumpur, includes
the establishment of a Drilling Technology Chair at
UTP, assistance from Transocean in the provision of
expertise to support UTP’s academic delivery through
the adjunct lecturer programme, and industrial
placements for UTP students and staf.
Te signing ceremony was attended by Dato’ Udani
bin Dato’ Seri Mohamed Daud, Director of Transocean
Drilling Sdn Bhd; Datuk Dr Rosti Saruwono, then Vice
President of Education Division, PETRONAS; Datuk Dr
Zainal Abidin Haji Kasim, Rector of UTP; Mr Robert
Long, Chief Executive Ofcer of Transocean Ltd, USA;
and senior ofcials from Transocean, PETRONAS and
UTP.
VIETNAMESE STUDENTS DISCOVER
THE WORLD WITH PETRONAS
RETIREMENTS
Datuk (Dr) Abdul Rahim
Hj Hashim
Having retired from PETRONAS on
31 December 2008 as Vice President of
the Research & Technology Division,
Datuk Rahim will be continuing his
good work in advancing the nation’s oil
and gas industry by taking up a full time
position as President of the Malaysian
Gas Association.
27 CORPORATE ROUNDUP
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Mr Colin Wong Hee Huing
Appointed as Vice President,
efective from 1 January 2009,
Mr Wong heads the Research &
Technology Division and joined the
Management Committee on the date
of his appointment. Prior to this, Mr
Wong was the Managing Director/
Chief Executive Ofcer (MD/CEO)
of PETRONAS Penapisan (Melaka)
Sdn Bhd.
Datuk Ainon Marziah Wahi
Datuk Ainon had been with PETRONAS’
Human Resource Management Division
for over 20 years, retiring on 31 March
2009 as its Vice President. Datuk Anuar
Ahmad assumes the role from his
previous position as Vice President of Oil
Business.
Nada PETRONAS wishes PETRONAS’
cherished colleagues the best in their
future undertakings.
Pn Juniwati
Rahmat Hussin
Appointed as Vice President,
efective from 1 March 2009,
Pn Juniwati heads the Education
Division. She is also a member of
the Management Committee, as
at the date of appointment. Prior to
her appointment, Pn Juniwati was
the CEO of Dewan Filharmonik
PETRONAS.
En Md Arif Mahmood
Appointed as Vice President,
efective 1 March 2009, En Md Arif
is responsible for the Oil Business
efective from his date of appointment,
and becomes a member of the
Management Committee at the same
time. He was formerly the MD/CEO
of Asean Bintulu Fertilizer Sdn Bhd.
En Amir Hamzah Azizan
Appointed as President/CEO of
MISC Berhad on 1 January 2009,
En Amir joined MISC in 2000 and
was MISC’s General Manager of
Corporate Planning Services. In
2004, he was the Regional Business
Director (Africa, Americas, Europe
and Federated Soviet Union) of MISC
before assuming his role as President
and CEO of MISC’s subsidiary AET
Ltd in 2005.
Datuk Dr Rosti Saruwono
Among his major contributions to
PETRONAS, Datuk Dr Rosti led the
team that spearheaded the development
of Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS,
eventually becoming its frst Rector in
1997. He retired from PETRONAS on 28
February 2009 as Vice President of the
Education Division.