You are on page 1of 6

GL 2383  EXAMINING THE VALUE OF ROTARY CORING   MARCH 09 

  IN GROUND INVESTIGATION  
[1] 
 
1.0 ‐ INTRODUCTION
Rotary  coring  is  an  important  tool  for  looking 
at  sub‐surface  geology  in  an  intact  manner. 
One  of  the  main  uses  of  rotary  coring  is  in 
ground  investigation  during  construction 
projects;  undisturbed  samples  can  be 
extracted  for  direct  analysis  by  geologists. 
Rotary  coring  can  also  be  applied  to  almost 
any type of geology. 
Rotary drilling is, by definition, any process of 
drilling  by  which  a  rotational  movement  is 
used to drive the drilling action.  
The  aim  of  this  report  is  to  assess  the 
importance of the role that rotary coring plays 
in a ground investigation. This will be done by 
looking  at  the  drilling  methods,  and  the 
circumstances in which they are preferential. 
TYPES OF SAMPLE
The  two  types  of  sample  extracted  from  a 
borehole are disturbed and undisturbed.  
Disturbed  samples  (e.g.  rock  chippings  on  a 
rotary  rock  roller)  do  not  maintain  the 
structural  features  of  a  rock,  nor  do  they 
display the ground characteristics well.  
Undisturbed  samples  are  where  the  rock  or 
sediment  is  extracted  more  or  less  intact. 
Undisturbed  samples  can  be  obtained  using  a 
U100  tool  on  a  percussive  rig,  or  by  using 
coring  methods  with  rotary,  or  sonic 
techniques.  This  will  be  talked  about  in 
further detail later in this report.  
2.0 ‐ METHODS OF BORING
There  are  many  methods  that  can  be  used  to 
create  boreholes  and  extract  samples  of  sub‐
surface  rock;  the  main  boring  methods  are 
light percussive, rotary, sonic and auger. Each 
of  these  drilling  methods  have  benefits  and 
disadvantages  in  certain  situations,  such  as 
different geology. These will now be looked at 
in more detail. 
LIGHT PERCUSSIVE DRILLING 
Light  percussive  drilling  is  where  the  drilling 
power comes from the falling of a cutting tool 
from  a  height.  This  is  driven  by  gravity  and  is 
therefore  one  of  the  cheapest  methods 
available. The light percussive rig is robust and 
has  many  attachments  to  work  its  way 
through a variety of material.  
ROTARY DRILLING & CORING 
Rotary coring, as previously mentioned, is the 
drilling of rock by the rotational movement of 
a drill bit.  There are a variety of drill bits, and 
a  variety  of  driving  methods  (top  driven  or 
chuck  driven)  available,  and  these  will  be 
discussed later.   
SONIC DRILLING 
Sonic  drilling  is  an  expensive  and  relatively 
new  drilling  method.  This  method  uses  the 
resonant  properties  of  rock  types  to  advance 
a  cutting  tool  into  the  ground.  Different 
materials have differing resonant frequencies, 
and so these can be tuned to reach their best 
penetration  rate  with  different  beds.  The 
main  benefit  of  this  type  of  drilling  is  that  it 
doesn’t  require  the  use  of  a  flush  (like  rotary 
boring  does)  and  so  samples  will  not  be 
contaminated with drilling mud or other fluid.   
AUGERS 
Augers  also  use  rotation  as  the  drilling 
method,  however  unlike  rotary  drilling  the 
material  is  just  pulled  up  to  the  surface  (like 
an  Archimedes  screw).  Augers  are  typically 
hand  driven,  although  can  be  mechanically 
driven for deeper holes.  

GL 2383  EXAMINING THE VALUE OF ROTARY CORING   MARCH 09 
  IN GROUND INVESTIGATION  
[2] 
 
Table 1 – Geology and Suitable Drilling Methods (Elson, 1999) 
Drilling Method 
H
a
n
d
 
A
u
g
e
r
 
L
i
g
h
t
 
P
e
r
c
u
s
s
i
v
e
 
R
o
t
a
r
y
 
R
o
t
a
r
y
 
P
e
r
c
u
s
s
i
v
e
 
Gravel 
U
n
c
o
n
s
o
l
i
d
a
t
e
d
 
F
o
r
m
a
t
i
o
n
s
 
X  ?  X  ? 
Sand   ?   ? 
Silt   ?   ? 
Clay    slow   slow 
Sand (with 
pebbles or 
boulders) 
X  ?  X  ? 
Shale  Low‐Med 
Strength 
X    slow 
Sandstone  X    
Limestone 
Med‐High 
Strength 
X  slow   
Igneous  X  slow  X  
Metamorphic  X  v slow  X  
Rocks with fractures  X    
Key:    = Acceptable   ? = Danger of hole collapsing X = 
GEOLOGY AND DRILL TYPE – SPEED
AND SUITABILITY
Due  to  the  different  mechanical  properties  of 
rock,  and  their  differing  levels  of  hardness, 
certain  drilling  methods  are  best  confined  to 
certain  types  of  geology.  Table  1  shows  the 
drilling  methods  and  their  suitability  to  rock 
types.  
Light  percussive  methods  are  able  to  be  used 
in  most  rock  types;  however  in  harder,  more 
consolidated  rock,  and  in  cohesive  sediments 
such  as  clays,  the  progress  can  be  very  slow. 
In  these  instances,  although  rotary  coring  is 
more  expensive,  you  may  get  a  better 
penetration rate saving you time. Also money 
can  be  saved  in  this  instance,  as  drillers  will 
charge  extra  for  slow  penetration  rate  (such 
as  using  a  stubber  to  get  through  stiff  clays 
with the percussion method).  
Rotary drilling is a useful tool on both low and 
medium  strength  rocks  (as  well  as  in  certain 
types  of  unconsolidated  rock).  The  main 
downfall rotary methods have is that they are 
unsuitable  on  gravel,  and  there  is  a  risk  of 
broken drill bits on horizons of this type.   
It  should  also  be  noted  that  in  igneous  and 
metamorphic  rock,  a  mixture  of  percussive 
and  rotary  techniques  may  be  used  to  gain 
penetration. However, coring cannot be taken 
with this method. 
DRILLING TYPES AND THEIR
IMPLICATIONS
COST 
There  are  two  types  of  cost  involved  with 
drilling;  the  mobilisation  cost,  and  then  the 
costs  built  up  while  drilling.  The  mobilisation 
cost is what you are charged for the drill being 
brought to the site and setup.  
The  costs  involved  with  the  actual 
boring/coring  is  usually  charged  by  meterage, 
although  additional  costs    may  be  specified 
for  time  wasted  (not  drilling),  and  for  slow 
advance  such  as  boring  igneous  rocks  with 
percussion, or bludgeoning through hard clays 
with a clay stubber.  
Percussion  and  augers 
are  by  far  the  cheapest 
options for drilling; this is 
because  they  are  simple 
and it is easy to maintain 
the  equipment.  Also  it  is 
likely  that  percussive 
methods  will  be  more 
available  and  therefore 
be cheaper.  
Rotary  (especially  with 
use  of  a  diamond  drill 
bit)  is  much  more 
expensive  than 
percussion;  drill  bits  can 
become  worn  down,  drill 
rods  (the  Kelly)  can  snap 
and  more  experience  is 
GL 2383  EXAMINING THE VALUE OF ROTARY CORING   MARCH 09 
  IN GROUND INVESTIGATION  
[3] 
 
Table 2 – Cost Example of rotary and cable percussive  
(Binns, 1998) 
Cost Type 
Rotary Coring 
(£) 
Cable 
Percussive  
(£) †
1
 
Mobilisation  1250  300 
Setup and Dismantling 
in position 
95  35 
D
r
i
l
l
i
n
g
 
D
e
p
t
h
 
0‐10m  48/m  16/m 
10‐20m  51/m  18/m 
20‐30m  54/m  22/m 
30‐40m  57/m  28/m 
40‐50m  60/m  35/m 
Core Box  15 (each)  n/a 
 
These costs were only accurate at a past date and are provided solely as an 
example for comparison. The rotary coring prices are based on a Geobor S 
wireline drilling system, using plastic liners and a polymer flush. 
needed  to  use  the  machine. 
The  price  difference  makes 
percussion boring preferential if 
it  suits  the  requirements  and  is 
feasible.  Table  2  shows  a 
comparison  of  prices  between 
percussive  and  rotary 
techniques. 
Sonic  drilling  is  the  most 
expensive  out  of  the  discussed 
drilling  methods,  this  is  mainly 
used  where  excellent  core 
quality  is  needed,  and  where 
contamination  of  your  sample 
(from  drilling  mud/water)  is  a 
major concern.  
DEPTH REACHABLE 
Table  3  shows  the  approximated  maximum 
depths  of  each  of  the  drilling  methods.  These 
show  that  rotary  coring  is  a  useful  tool  for 
reaching  depth,  where  other  methods  simply 
can’t.  
Augers  have  very  shallow penetration  (due  to 
their  limited  length),  and  percussive  methods 
can  only  reach  up  to  approximately  120m. 
This limit  (on percussive) is because the more 
consolidated a rock gets the harder it is to cut 
into. This means they are only useful up to (or 
for shallow penetration) into bedrock.  
It should be noted that more than one drilling 
method  can  be  applied  to  a  borehole.  This 
means  that  percussive  methods  can  be  used 
through  soft  sediment  as  it  is  cheaper 
(assuming  you  do  not  need  the  higher  quality 
of  core),  and  then  a  switch  to  rotary  coring 
can take place when you reach bedrock.  
DRILLING ADVANCE 
Table  3  also  shows  the  average  advance  per 
hour of the drilling methods. Out of the three 
main  drilling  methods  percussive  has  the 
quickest advance, although this is dependable 
on geology and ground conditions. Rotary and 
sonic are slower, however as mentioned later, 
gives you a better sample quality.  
CORE QUALITY 
Out  of  the  methods  discussed  the  ones  that 
can  obtain  a  core  are  percussive,  rotary  and 
sonic techniques.  
Percussive  core  is  taken  with  a  U100  tool  (for 
an  undisturbed  sample)  and  is  generally  of  a 
lesser quality than the alternatives; this is due 
to  the  use  of  hammering.  The  expansion  of 
soft  sediments  during  the  boring  can  also 
change  some  of  their  characteristics.  Other 
sources  of  sample  disturbance  are  the  use  of 
plastic  core  liners  and  the  width  of  the  core 
barrel  wall.  Non‐continuous  sampling  may 
occur, causing further disturbance.  
Plastic  core  liners  are  used  to  lower  the  cost 
by making it  possible to reuse core barrels. In 
percussive  setups  this  can  reduce  quality  as 
you are increasing the size of the sample tube 
wall,  which  lowers  the  area  ratio.  Also  in 
harder  sediments  it  may  necessary  to  use  a 
GL 2383  EXAMINING THE VALUE OF ROTARY CORING   MARCH 09 
  IN GROUND INVESTIGATION  
[4] 
 
Table 3 – Drilling Types; reach speed and quality (Don, 2005) 
Drilling Type
Advance 
per hour 
(m) †
2
 
Approximate 
Maximum 
Depth (m) 
Core 
Quality 
Augers 
Not 
specified 
45  No core 
Percussive  25  120  Medium 
Rotary 
Not 
specified 
300  No core 
Diamond  
Rotary 
Coring 
2‐6  >3000  High  
Sonic  1.6 – 6.6 †
3
  >210  V. High 
 

1
 
– This cost is not accurate to date and is provided solely as an 
   example for comparison. 


– Advance is dependent on ground conditions and strength. 


– Calculated from data given on average advance in a 12 hour  
  shift with a 4 inch core.
thicker  walled  core  barrel  so  that  it  doesn’t 
break,  this  too  lowers  the  area  ratio  and 
reduces core quality. 
Rotary  coring  (including  diamond  coring) 
allows  a  better  core  quality  then  percussive 
methods;  this  is  because  there  is  less 
disturbance  from  the  cutting,  and  from  the 
use of continuous sampling. 
Continuous  sampling  is  where  there  is  no 
break  made  in  the  column  as  the  core  is 
taken.  For  example  a  percussive  sample  will 
have  been  taken  over  a  number  of  blows, 
cutting  off  the  sample  between  each  hit.  A 
rotary  core  will  be  cut  as  a  whole  column, 
leaving  features  intact  and  reducing 
disturbance.  
Sonic  coring  provides  by  far  the  best  sample 
quality;  it  returns  a  continuous  sample  and 
has less chance of sample contamination. This 
is  because  the  method  does  not  require  the 
use of a flush, such as drill muds or water, and 
so  the  sample  is  not  contaminated  by  these 
outside fluids.  
DRILLING AT AN ANGLE
Rotary coring has the advantage for drilling at 
angles;  this  is  because  percussive 
methods  are  limited  to  going 
straight  down  (as  they  are 
powered  by  gravity),  and  sonic 
coring is much more expensive.  
Although this is an advantage, one 
problem  associated  with  this  is 
that  stabilizers  and  reamers  need 
to  be  used  to  keep  the  borehole 
from  deviating  away  from  its 
desired  path.  A  deviated  hole 
could  mean  you  miss  what  you 
wanted to drill, and can break drill 
rods by drill whip.  
3.0 ‐ ROTARY CORING IN SOFT
SOILS
Most  ground  investigation  is  done  at  quite  a 
shallow depth (in borehole standards), and so 
to  meet  your  requirements  you  may  only 
need  to  go  through  soft  soil  or  sediment.  For 
example  in  the  London  Basin,  there  is  over 
100m of soil before you reach bedrock.  
Cable  percussive  boreholes  are  the  usual 
preference in soft ground, however in geology 
that  has  variations  in  strength,  hardness  or 
texture,  rotary  coring  would  be  a  better 
choice. 
Also  as  previously  mentioned,  continuous 
samples  obtained  from  rotary  methods  are 
less disturbed. 
4.0 ‐ ROTARY CORING METHODS
AND EQUIPMENT, AND THEIR
ASSOCIATED ADVANTAGES
There  are  two  main  types  of  rotary  drilling 
used  in  site  investigation;  diamond  coring, 
and  dual  rotary.  These  have  similar 
equipment,  and  a  diagram  of  a  chuck  driven 
diamond core rig is shown in figure 1.  
GL 2383  EXAMINING THE VALUE OF ROTARY CORING   MARCH 09 
  IN GROUND INVESTIGATION  
[5] 
 
Figure 1 – Chuck Driven Rotary Drill  
(Barbara, 1995)
THE FLUSH
A flush is the circulation of a medium through 
the  borehole  that  is  to  serve  three  main 
purposes; to provide support to the borehole, 
to  act  as  lubrication  between  the  drill  bit  and 
the  rock,  and  to  cool  the  drill  bit  to  prevent 
heat damage.  
There  are  many  types  of  flush  that  can  be 
used,  air  or  clean  water  being  the  most 
common.  Drilling  mud  (bentonite  clay)  or  oil 
are  also  frequently  used  to  add  viscosity  for 
more support of the walls.  
Adding  anti‐swelling  agents  to  the  flush 
reduces  the  swelling  in  certain  clays;  this  can 
prevent  the  deformation  caused  by  the 
sample  expanding  in  the  barrel.  Anti‐swelling 
agents  also  prevent  the  drill  bit  becoming 
stuck  by  the  expansion  of  clays  around  the 
drill string.  
Chemicals  can  be  added  to  the  flush  in  small 
amounts  to  create  polymer  flushes.  These 
chemicals  aid  the  quality  of  the  core  as  they 
can  make  it  (as  well  as  the  borehole  walls) 
impermeable.  This  cuts  contamination  of 
water  from  different  levels,  and  moisture 
content  is  less  likely  to  be  lost  from  the 
sample. 
Flushes  can  also  generate  a  fallback  for  the 
core  sample;  that  is,  if  the  core  is 
damaged or compromised in any way, the 
chippings  collected  as  the  flush  is  filtered 
can be used to identify rock strata. 
Along  with  possibly  contaminating  the 
sample,  a  disadvantage  to  using  a  flush  is 
that  the  flow  caused  by  it  can  erode  the 
core  or  borehole  walls,  although  this  can 
be  prevented  by  using  a  high  viscosity 
flush to lower the pressure. 
The  choice of flush is based on the risk  of 
the  borehole  collapsing,  the  medium 
being  drilled,  and  any  adverse  reactions  that 
may  take  place  with  rocks  (e.g.  some  clays 
swell with the addition of water). 
THE CORE BARREL
Core  barrels  for  rotary  drilling  systems  can 
vary  in  lengths  of  up  to  3m.  However,  the 
longer the length the great the chance of core 
loss,  especially  in  soft  or  granular  soils,  or  in 
heavily fissured strata (Binns, 1998).  
Disturbance  to  the  core  sample  can  occur  if 
the  drill  advances  further  then  the  barrel 
length. This is because of compression caused 
from  the  core  being  trapped.  To  ensure  this 
doesn’t  occur  the  drill  should  never  be  let  to 
do this. 
There  are  two  main  types  of  core  barrel; 
conventional and wire‐line.  
THE CONVENTIONAL CORE BARREL 
The  conventional  core  barrel  requires  the 
lifting  of  the  entire  drilling  rig  (the  rods  and 
the  bit)  to  the  surface  in  order  to  obtain  the 
core.  This  method  has  the  advantage  of  the 
drill  bit  being  able  to  be  inspected  each  time 
the  drill  is  raised,  however  the  raising  costs 
time  and  thus  money.  Also  due  to  weight 
issues this method can restrict the core size at 
depth.   
GL 2383  EXAMINING THE VALUE OF ROTARY CORING   MARCH 09 
  IN GROUND INVESTIGATION  
[6] 
 
Figure 2 – Wireline Core Barrel  
(Clayton et al, 1995)
 
Figure 1 showing the wireline log system based on 
the Longyear NQ‐3 wireline drilling system. Note that 
the outer barrel extends to the surface. 
THE WIRELINE DRILL SYSTEM 
The  wireline  coring  system  works  by  the  use 
of  a  retrievable  inner  barrel,  within  a  fixed 
outer barrel. When the core is complete it can 
be  winched  to  the  surface  through  the  rods 
and  a  new  barrel  sent  down  in  its  place.  This 
saves time raising the system. This equipment 
however  is  expensive  and  as  the  drill  is  wider 
to  accommodate  the  outer  barrel;  on  more 
shallow holes a conventional system would be 
more  appropriate.    Figure  2  shows  a  diagram 
of the wireline barrel.  
AMOUNT OF RECOVERY
According  to  Binns  (1998),  approximately  a 
95%  recovery  can  be  reached  in  cohesive  or 
granular  soils  and  weak  rocks.  But  in  gravel 
horizons this amount is greatly reduced.  
As  mentioned  earlier,  rotary  coring  allows 
continuous  logs  to  be  made  (with  no  breaks 
for  hard  geology).  This  gives  you  a  wider 
option  when  choosing  your  sampling,  and 
means features are less likely to be missed.  
5.0 ‐ CASE STUDY 1: QUEEN
STREET, CARDIFF, 1987
In Binns (1998), one of the examples of where 
rotary coring was used was at Queen Street in 
Cardiff,  UK.  The  geology  drilled  through  was 
dense,  fine  to  coarse  gravel,  where  there 
were  occasional  boulder  horizons  in  a  silty‐
sand matrix. They used conventional diamond 
drilling  techniques  with  no  liner  and  a  light 
polymer flush.  
They  commented  that  their  recovery  was 
between  73  and  100%,  and  that  if  they  had 
used light percussion then the majority of the 
matrix  would  have  been  washed  away. 
However  they  did  say  the  sample  quality  was 
poor  for  testing  in‐situ  fabrics  and  strength 
deformation testing. 
6.0 ‐ CONCLUSION
Rotary  coring  is  a  useful  tool  for  extracting 
high  quality  cores  without  the  price 
associated  with  sonic  coring.  In  harder 
horizons,  even  in  soft  sediment,  it  may  be 
beneficial  to  use  rotary  coring  to  maintain  a 
productive speed. 
Rotary  coring  also  comes  without  the  shallow 
limitations  of  percussive  or  auger  methods, 
and  is  more  time  effective  as  you  get  deeper 
(using  a  wireline  system).    Also  as  rotary 
methods can be used at any angle, it proves a 
useful tool in an urban environment (or where 
geology  makes  a  drilling  angle  preferential 
such as in steeply dipping strata).  
As  mentioned,  the  use  of  a  flush  with  rotary 
coring  has  many  benefits  including  borehole 
stability  and  water‐tightening  the  hole  (with 
polymer flushes). 
Rotary may be expensive and is ineffective on 
gravels, but if used appropriately is one of the 
most  important  tools  of  a  ground 
investigation.