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Dan Lungescu, PhD, assistant professor

,
Irina Salanță, PhD, assistant professor
2014-2015
Management
Part I: Introduction
Ch. 1. Manager’s job
Course outline
Part I: Introduction
Part II: Planning
Part III: Organizing
Part IV: Leading
Part V: Controlling
Management
Part I outline
Part I: Introduction
Ch. 1. Manager’s job
Ch. 2. The evolution of management
Ch. 3. Organizational environments
Ch. 4. Social responsibility and ethics
Management
Learning objectives
After studying this chapter, you should:
 Define management and other related concepts.
 Explain the four functions of management.
 Identify the major elements in the management process.
 Describe the major roles that managers have in
organizations.
 Describe the common work methods that managers use.
 Delineate the major skills needed by managers.
 Describe how managerial jobs differ according to
hierarchical level and responsibility area.
Chapter 1 outline
A. What is management?
B. The functions of management
C. The management process
D. Managerial roles
E. Manager’s work
F. Managerial job types
… what?
A. What is management?
Outline » A. What is management?
To handle, to be in charge of, to control, to administer.
To manage
Administering the activity of one organization/division.
Management
The process of achieving organizational goals...
… by engaging in the four functions of…
… planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.
Management
examples…
A group of people working together in a structured fashion to attain
a set of goals.
Organization
What is management? (2)
Outline » A. What is management? (2)
The process of leading and directing all or part of an organization
(often a business) through the deployment and manipulation of
resources.
Management
Human, financial, material, information.
Organization resources
 The act of managing something.
 The group of top managers of an organization.
 People in charge of running of business.
Management: different meanings
Etymology
Outline » A. What is management? » Etymology
manus (hand) + agere (to drive/act)
» manumagere (to drive by hand » to handle)
Latin
maneggiare (to handle, especially a horse)
Italian
mesnagement » ménagement (care)
Old French
Classical definitions
Outline » A. What is management? » Classical definitions
Management: “Knowing exactly what you want
people to do, and then seeing that they do it in the
best and cheapest way.”
Frederick Winslow Taylor [1856-1915]
“To manage is to forecast and plan, to organize, to
command, to coordinate and to control.”
Henri Fayol [1841-1925]
Manager
Outline » A. What is management? » Manager
Someone who has a measure of control over any of the following:
 time;
 workloads;
 decisions;
 technology;
 equipment;
 money;
 standards;
 meetings;
 other people.
Manager
Someone whose primary activities are a part of the management
process.
Manager
Supervisor
Outline » A. What is management? » Supervisor
super (over) + visor (to see) » supervisor (overseer)
Latin
To oversee one or more of the list of things in the previous slide: to
inspect and monitor them.
Supervisor’s job
Not only to inspect and monitor things, but also to make
predictions, to plan ahead, to decide how things will change and
develop.
Managing is wider
The supervisor is often mainly concerned with the present.
The manager is concerned with future, present and past.
Major difference: viewpoints
Leader
Outline » A. What is management? » Leader
Someone who sets direction in an effort and influences people to
followthat direction.
Leader
 Sets direction by developing a clear vision and mission, and
conducting planning that determines the goals needed to
achieve the vision and mission.
 Motivates by using a variety of methods: facilitation, coaching,
mentoring, directing, delegating etc.
A leader
MANAGING = planning + organizing + LEADING + controlling.
“Managers do things right; leaders do the right things.”
B. The functions of management
Outline » B. The functions of management
1 2
4 3
The functions of management (2)
Outline » B. The functions of management (2)
Setting goals and deciding howbest to achieve them.
Planning
Allocating and arranging human and nonhuman resources so that
plans can be carried out successfully.
Organizing
Influencing others to engage in the work behaviors necessary to
reach organizational goals.
Leading
Regulating organizational activities so that actual performance
conforms to expected organizational standards and goals.
Controlling
The functions of management: example
Outline » B. The functions of management » Example
I want to pass that damn management exam.
God, I have to spend my next 6 days learning…
OK, till then no beer, no football, no girlfriend.
Ehhh… I mean no beer, no football.
I call all my friends and tell them I’m not
available 6 days from now. Turn my mobile off.
Put all the books and papers on my desk. Engage
mom in preparing coffee every 6 A.M.
When hungry, I yell and mom is bringing me my
meal. When too warm in my room, I command
my father to turn on the air conditioning. Lost a
paper? One colleague is solving the problem.
My exam is tomorrow. I’m suppose to be
learning – no beer, no football. But I learnt
already all the chapters and I made my
recapitulation. So… let it be beer! Go CFR!
Planning
Organizing
Leading
Controlling
inputs outputs
C. The management process
Outline » C. The management process
transformation
goals
human
resources
financial
resources
physical
resources
information
resources
manager
P O L C
D. Managerial roles
Outline » D. Managerial roles
An organized set of behaviors associated with a particular office or
position.
Role
1. Entrepreneur
2. Disturbance
handler
3. Resource
allocator
4. Negotiator
I. Decisional
roles
1. Monitor
2. Disseminator
3. Spokesperson
II. Informational
roles
1. Figurehead
2. Leader
3. Liaison
III. Interpersonal
roles
Henry Mintzberg [b. 1939]
I. Decisional roles
Outline » D. Managerial roles » I. Decisional roles
Acts as initiator, designer, and encourager of change and innovation.
Entrepreneur
Takes corrective action when organization faces important,
unexpected difficulties.
Disturbance handler
Distributes resources of all types, including time, funding,
equipment, and human resources.
Resource allocator
Represents the organization in major negotiations affecting the
manager’s area of responsibility.
Negotiator
II. Informational roles
Outline » D. Managerial roles » II. Informational roles
Seeks internal and external information about issues that can affect
organization.
Monitor
Transmits information internally that is obtained from either
internal or external sources.
Disseminator
Transmits information about the organization to outsiders.
Spokesperson
III. Interpersonal roles
Outline » D. Managerial roles » III. Interpersonal roles
Performs symbolic duties of a legal or social nature.
Figurehead
Builds relationships with subordinates and communicates with,
motivates, and coaches them.
Leader
Maintains networks of contacts outside work unit who provide help
and information.
Liaison
E. Manager’s work
Outline » E. Manager’s work
Manager’s work methods:
 Unrelenting pace.
 Brevity, variety, and fragmentation.
 Oral contacts and networks.
Henry Mintzberg
Management as ART
 Experience.
 Personal skills: charisma,
flair, wit, intuition.
 Empirical management.
Management as SCIENCE
 Governed by rules and
principles.
 Scientific methods, tools
and approach.
Art is needed, science is indispensable.
Managerial knowledge and skills
Outline » E. Manager’s work » Managerial knowledge and skills
Information about:
 An industry and its technology.
 Company policies and practices.
 Company goals and plans.
 Company culture.
 The personalities of key organization members.
 Important suppliers and customers.
Knowledge base
The ability to engage in a set of behaviors that are functionally
related to one another and that lead to a desired performance level
in a given area.
Skill
Key management skills
Outline » E. Manager’s work » Managerial knowledge and skills » Key management skills
Reflect both an understanding of and a proficiency in a specialized
field.
Technical skills
Associated with a manager’s ability to work well with others, both
as a member of a group and as a leader (who gets things done
through others).
Human skills
Related to the ability to visualize the organization as a whole,
discern interrelationships among organizational parts, and
understand how the organization fits into the wider context of the
industry, community, and world.
Conceptual skills
F. Managerial job types
Outline » F. Managerial job types
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Arias of management
Top
managers
Middle
managers
First-line
managers
I. Hierarchical levels
Outline » F. Managerial job types » I. Hierarchical levels
Managers at the very top levels of the hierarchy who are ultimately
responsible for the entire organization.
Top managers
Managers beneath the top levels of the hierarchy who are directly
responsible for the work of managers at lower levels.
Middle managers
Managers at the lowest level of the hierarchy who are directly
responsible for the work of operating (non-managerial) employees.
First-line managers
Hierarchy and management functions
Outline » F. Managerial job types » I. Hierarchical levels » Hierarchy and management functions
planning organizing leading controlling
first-line
middle
top
Hierarchy and management skills
Outline » F. Managerial job types » I. Hierarchical levels » Hierarchy and management skills
technical human conceptual
first-line
middle
top
II. Arias of management
Outline » F. Managerial job types » II. Areas of management
Primarily concerned with getting the products into the hand of clients.
Marketing managers
Deal primarily with an organization’s financial resources.
Financial managers
Primarily concerned with creating organization’s products and services.
Operations managers
Concerned with hiring, maintaining, and discharging employees.
Human resource managers
Not associated with any particular management specialty.
Administrative managers (general managers)
Other management specialties than those already described.
Other kinds of managers