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Berkeley DB XML
Product Marketing Plan

Contents
Contents...........................................................................................................................................................1
Document Objectives......................................................................................................................................1
Methodology....................................................................................................................................................2
Market Overview............................................................................................................................................2
Market Penetration.............................................................................................................................2
Typical Applications..........................................................................................................................3
Product Positioning........................................................................................................................................4
Target Markets...............................................................................................................................................5
Target Market Strategy.......................................................................................................................5
Customer Types...................................................................................................................5
Traditional Berkeley DB developers..................................................................................................6
Core Messages.....................................................................................................................6
Value Proposition.................................................................................................................6
EAI Cache and B2B applications.......................................................................................................8
Core Messages...................................................................................................................10
Value Proposition...............................................................................................................10
Pharmaceutical Vertical...................................................................................................................11
Embedded Applications...................................................................................................................11
Product Vision...............................................................................................................................................11
Features and Benefits...................................................................................................................................12
Product Description......................................................................................................................................12
Distribution Plan...........................................................................................................................................13
Legal...............................................................................................................................................................13
Naming...........................................................................................................................................................13
Pricing............................................................................................................................................................13

Document Objectives
The purpose of this document is to provide a specific and detailed plan for identifying and
developing the markets for Berkeley DB XML:

The document will contain:

• Information about the target technical and business buyer, including a summary
of product features and customer requirements.

• A list of markets in which that business problem matters.

• General product messaging.

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• Unresolved issues that must be resolved before launch. These issues are
highlighted.

• Marketing strategies including PR and advertising plans.

This document will not provide:

• a roadmap for future features (contained in the Market Requirements Document)

• an explanation of the technical features of the product (contained in the User


Documentation).

Methodology
Given that Berkeley DB XML is a first-generation product addressing an emerging market
demand, and given that Sleepycat is a small company with a small number of XML
customers, access to primary data is extremely limited. The beta program should assist
in obtaining additional primary data through in-depth conversations with customers and
prospects. Much of our current primary data at this point is purely anecdotal.

This document represents a detailed analysis of secondary sources: analyst reports,


various web sites, and competitive products.

Market Overview

XML is rapidly becoming a preferred method for describing data within and between
applications. Its distinct advantage is that it is both highly portable and flexible. A
standards body (W3C) has established standards to create a stable lingua franca,
however developers still retain unlimited freedom to extend the language as needed for
specific applications. XML is particularly useful for data being shared across the World
Wide Web, thus it is seen as a preferred alternative to HTML.

In short, XML is a preferred data description language for interconnected devices that
share data – or some day expect to share data.

Market Penetration
If market penetration can be measured in terms of the number of developers using that
language, or in terms of number of applications with that language, XML is still quite a
nascent language. Nearly every large software manufacturers has embraced XML in
some large initiative, including vendors such as Microsoft, Sun, IBM and Oracle.

However, several factors have restricted the reach of XML:

1) While several XML standards (such as XML 1.0) are appearing to stabilize, many
other standards remain volatile (such as the query interface Xpath).
2) Further adding to the instability, many large vendors offer alternative flavors of XML
in order to dilute standardization. Unlike Java, there is no single dominant proponent
of the language. Microsoft, especially, believes XML is a threat to the ubiquity of the
Windows, and thus it co-opts XML with every new release.

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3) XML adds a layer of infrastructure onto data, and this layer adds weight to the
transportation infrastructure and reduces performance.
4) Just as XML began to become popular, the IT/dot-com crash has stymied investment
in new technologies.

Thus, a critical success factor will be education. Selling directly, most of our customers
will know as much or more than we do. However, selling indirectly, we have already
noticed a need to educate the sales force on the general XML marketplace.

Typical Applications
While XML is extremely generic and is used in a variety of applications, most analysts
believe three general application horizontals will be first to realize the benefits of XML:
Enterprise Application Integration (EAI), Business-to-Business (B2B) commerce, and
Content Management (CM). Below are samples of each of these types of applications:

EAI: Over the years, Charles Schwab has acquired several smaller firms. Since each
aquired firm had i’s own trading-desk application, in order to stay compliant with the SEC
rules, the IT department needed to consolidate the trades made by each of these
applications into a single repository. Unfortunately, the applications do not communicate
with the same databases nor do they describe or commit the trades in exactly the same
way. Moreover, any proposed solution had to fit with long-term strategy of a single
company-wide standard application.

To meet these transportation and standardization challenges, Schwab has chosen to use
XML. After each trade is committed and stored locally, a copy of that trade is transformed
into XML and sent to a large Oracle database. This solution solves many problems: XML
provides a standardized format for the data, thus, the data can be generically stored.
Moreover, future applications can build on this same generic data format, thus allowing
for a phased approach to the company-wide standard application.

A more detailed example can be found in the description of the EAI Cache.

Need a better web services model.

B2B: Today, while most large organizations use finance and supply-chain applications,
the data used in these applications often originates from paper. For example, the paper
invoice is still the most common way to bill a customer for a product sold. In larger
organizations, huge expenses are incurred simply through the human error found in
transferring the data on the invoice into the financial application. Thus, many companies
are partnering with their suppliers to use XML to create standardized electronic invoices.

A more detailed example can be found in the description of the B2B.

Content Management: Analysts estimate that more than 80% of corporate data
exists in documents stored outside of a centralized, accessible data store. In some
organizations, such a law-offices and advertising firms, the content inside of these
documents are critically important to the efficient operation of the company. Analysts
estimate that billions of dollars are lost each year as knowledge-workers recreate
information that already exists somewhere else in the organization. Content Management
applications allow these organizations to create, share and store documents to

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maximizing the utility of the information generated within the company. Because the file
formats of these applications cannot be standardized, XML is used to provide the
necessary “meta data” for managing any formatted-document.

Product Positioning
Even given limited data, we nonetheless expect a majority of Berkeley DB XML
customers will be developers who are unaware of any options for XML data storage
beyond the file system. However, this strategy presents several problems for the
developer, which become even more vexing with scale: reliable transactions, recovery,
and, especially, the capability to quickly locate individual elements within documents
(through indexing). Berkeley DB XML provides all of these capabilities, as do most of the
other solutions on the market.

Berkeley DB XML has two distinctive attributes: it is a “built-in” database, and it will be
perceived as “open source” because of the full access to source code. For these
reasons, it is completely different than any other option on the market.

If customers search the market for XML storage alternatives, they should soon encounter
a distinction between “native” and “non native” XML data storage. Because the unlimited
flexibility offered in the hierarchies of XML, XML documents do not easily fit within
Relational tables. Thus, RDBMS require documents be parsed or broken into composite
elements. Recomposing these documents can be problematic. Moreover, changes to the
DTD (which are common in XML applications) are very difficult to implement in Relational
tables. Native storage allows documents to be stored in tact, and changes to the schema
are relatively easy to propagate. Non-native vendors such as Oracle are spending
significant amounts to confuse the market and remove the import of this distinction.

The market is saturated with many native XML Client/Server options and few of these
competitors are making much money. This is for several reasons. First, the customer
problems, application types, vendor offerings, and vendor product strategies are all
extremely variant and changing; this lack of stability prevents a true “market awareness”
from developing. Thus, it may be that these vendors are not providing much value for the
price they charge. Ipedo, for instance, has branched out into providing portions of a
complete XML-document repository solution, including many content management
functions. Progress, having swallowed eXcelon, is embedding that product in its web
sevices/messaging product and abandoning the stand-alone business altogether.

Second, customers with an XML storage problem may not self-identify themselves as
needing an XML database, and especially not a stand-alone client server device. Rather,
the customer tends to identify with a more comprehensive problem. When Charles
Schwab looked to consolidate several disparate trading applications, it looked to (EAI)
technologies because it had an EAI problem, even though it was XML that was a primary
tool used to consolidate the data and allow the applications to work together. Even after
they had suddenly realized the database(s) were not XML-friendly, they still did not self-
identify themselves as requiring an XML database, perhaps because they didn’t know
that such a thing would exist. This may be true for the entire myriad of typical XML
applications: from the legal research company looking to manage large collections of
legal briefs, or a pharmaceutical company looking to create an internal mechanism to
manage the complex regulatory documentation processes.

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Lastly, open source customers have the option of the Apache Xindiche product. While
Berkeley DB XML does provide some feature advantages over this product, its main
benefit is that it can be used in proprietary applications.

To summarize,

Competitor Critical Berkeley DB XML Advantages


File Systems transactions, recovery, indexing, granular and fast search capabilities

RDBMS Native XML support keeps the XML document intact, allows flexibility
in schema changes, speed/scale
Object XML Solid company, reliability, granular searching capabilities
databases
Apache Xerces commercial product

More competitive positioning is available in the additional document titled “competitive


worksheet” in the XML file.

Target Markets

Target Market Strategy


For a variety of reasons that will be discussed in the paragraphs below, Sleepycat should
employ a phased, prioritized strategy in marketing Berkeley DB XML to specific markets.

Phase 1 will be the beta period. The primary goal of this period will be to test and validate
the product and market strategies and to establish customer success in individual
markets. For reasons to be discussed in detail below, the first priority during this period
will be existing Berkeley DB customers, closely followed by customers in specific verticals
in this order: Phamacuticals/bioinfomatics, Enterprise Integration/Web Services, and
Health Care. However, of course, Sleepycat will not turn down customer interest from
other verticals.

Phase 2, or launch, will employ a concentrated effort to exploit and expand markets in
those specific verticals. Revenue-bearing customers will have a much higher priority than
open-source users. A principal goal of this product is to expand Sleepycat’s market
reach.

In its current condition, Berkeley DB XML is not a good fit for Content Management
applications. While the analyst group “the451” has positioned Berkeley DB XML as an
ideal product in the growing (but ever elusive) market for managing unstructured data
(such as Word Documents, XML files, emails and the like), Berkeley DB XML is but a
small piece in a much larger jumble of products and services necessary to meet that
market need. Content-management features may detract Sleepycat from its primary
focus on its core target markets, and it will not help it to gain RDBMS converts. Thus, it
may be better to wait for Sleepycat to be pulled into this market.

Customer Types
For the purposes of the document, we define three customer types:

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1. The “executive” is a high-level manager of the company who is looking for a


strategic, company-wide, long-term solution to particularly vexing problems. This
buyer is looking for integrated solutions, not piece-meal products, and holds
control over entire budgets. While this individual may be technical, her rationale
for purchasing a product will always be based on high-level business benefits.
2. The “project manager” is a mid-tier manager who has a specific business
objectives and a tactical implementation in mind. He may be interested in piece-
meal products if it suits his need, and is often responsible for the business and
technical comparisons of the alternatives.
3. The “developer” is the implementer of the project and is very interested in the
technical merits of the product.

Traditional Berkeley DB developers


Many initial customers for Berkeley DB XML will be from Sleepycat’s primary base of
support: knowledgeable programmers who prefer to control as many of the application
layers as possible, thus preferring open-source to closed-source. For the most part, these
programmers know the benefits (and limitations) of embedded databases, and are merely
looking to combine the benefits of Berkeley DB with the benefits of XML. Many of these
programmers have had early exposure to Berkeley DB, and they generally identify with
(and promote) the Berkeley DB brand as easy to use, reliable, and (possibly) scalable.
The Berkeley DB XML product has been designed with these programmers in mind and
through their involvement in alpha and beta. It will be essential to fulfill the needs and
expectations of this traditional target customer: the Berkeley DB brand is the primary
driver of revenue for Sleepycat, and thus it should be preserved at all costs.

Core Messages
Core messages for these customers include the following:
• The Berkeley DB XML product has been designed for – and with
assistance from – these core Berkeley DB developers.
• All the benefits of Berkeley DB (full source code access, speed, stability,
reliability, and scalability) are provided in the Berkeley DB XML.
• Applications that use Berkeley DB XML are much easier to deploy and
maintain than any other database, native-XML or RDBMS

It is essential to establish a base of support in this market, and to ensure that no portion
of the Berkeley DB brand is compromised by the introduction of this product. In other
words, the product must be just as reliable, scalable, fast and standards-based as the
established Berkeley DB product. The primary purpose of the Beta test will be to affirm
the Berkeley DB brand.

Value Proposition
For these customers, the value proposition will be (each highlighted term is described
below):

To provide the knowledgeable open-source developer community with


the only fast, reliable, and scalable built-in XML database.

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Briefly speaking, the target market is the “open source developer community,” the target
customer is a knowledgeable developer, the primary benefit to this customer is a fast,
reliable and scalable XML database, the target application being any application requiring
embedded storage of data-centric XML, and the competitive advantages (or distinctions)
are the embedded and open-source qualities of the product.

knowledgeable:
Given Sleepycat’s limited marketing resources, the marketing strategy will likely remain
reactive as opposed to proactive (i.e. lead-generation, advertising, etc). Thus, most initial
customers will be somewhat knowledgeable about Berkeley DB and/or XML before
coming to Sleepycat. Moreover, many customers may have some preexisting familiarity
with Berkeley DB through their though use or involvement with other open source
products and/or through their University coursework.

Because of this limited marketing position, the first marketing strategy for Berkeley DB
XML should be to leverage the existing Berkeley DB brand within the open-source
community. Members of this community tend to be informed, since knowledge-sharing is
a key reason for the existence of the community.

Last, because reliability is a precious component of the Berkeley DB and Sleepycat


brands, Sleepycat cannot afford too many high-touch customers – especially initially. As
with Berkeley DB, these first customers will have to work through many of their own
support issues -- often being more expert on particular product nuances than Sleepycat’s
crack engineering team. Customers will need to know and/or be willing to teach
themselves the nuances of such things as proper schema development and appropriate
indexing techniques. Sleepycat will provide limited documentation and no training to
these initial customers.

open-source
Sleepycat currently appeals to developers who wish to have control over the various
components of their application. The prime Sleepycat customer will rather create his own
data stores from scratch rather than rely on the faults and limitations of Oracle; it is likely
that the “home grown” implementation will be Berkeley DB XML’s primary competitor.

Open Source also describes a customer who is willing to use freely-distributed open-
source products (such as Linux) – even when the application will remain proprietary.
Customers who see open source products as inherently unstable are not in our target
market.

While some Open Source developers will freely use and distribute this product, these
applications help test and market the product. The gamble is that a sufficient number will
want to use this product in proprietary software ventures.

developer
At least initially, the XML product will be marketed to application developers. Sleepycat
promotes this sales cycle by offering a free download for prototyping, which often results
in post-production business negotiations. Even though the business benefits (price, ease-
of-use, maintainability) are strong, the primary thrust of the initial Sleepycat marketing
effort will be aimed at developers and technical issues.

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community
The open-source developer community fits every sense of the word (self-identifying,
highly-communicative, and loosely organized). Moreover, they are easily accessible
through fast media (email and the web).

the only
While Berkeley DB XML may be compared to other data stores, it is highly distinctive in
two important ways: because it is embedded and open-source. While it may be compared
to other vendors, there are no other competitive embedded, open-source XML products
on the market.

fast, reliable, and scalable


Given limited customer feedback, these three seem to be the most important benefits for
Berkeley DB XML deployments. We can substitute many others including highly-
available, robust, distributed, easy-to-deploy, native XML, rapid-development, easy-to-
use, transactional, recoverable, easy-to-maintain or performant. Three “themes” is
preferable to any other number. The only term which is too risky is “mission critical” since
the product is probably not ready for mission-critical applications, and is not likely to be
put into those types of applications.

Scalable is a very important value, since many customers will likely come to Sleepycat
because they have reached the limits of their current XML system (typically file-based).
Every other solution on the market will claim scalability.

Speed (“fast”) is also critically important, since it provides a strong distinction from typical
RDBMS vendors. RDBMS vendors can provide scale, but speed in accessing and
manipulating XML data is extremely difficult.

Reliability plays into the relative age of the other products in the field. While it does not
make a clear distinction with Software AG (the largest and oldest XML data store
vendor), it does connote a value over the rest of the field of XML data-store vendors.

built-in
The primary marketing challenge of this product (as with all Sleepycat products) will be
demonstrating the benefits of embedded over client/server. These first customers should
be knowledgeable of those differences before engaging us. Taking the term “built-in”
reflects the current Sleepycat branding strategy.

database
Though the term XML database has become hackneyed, we should strive to imbue it with
the commonly-accepted database features of transactions, indexes and data recovery.
These are all strong differentiators for Berkeley DB XML, and it provides an excellent
opportunity to contrast simple “Data Storage” with the more complex “Database.”

EAI Cache and B2B applications

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Because of the current dearth of truly effective XML repositories (especially among
traditional RDBMS offerings), Berkeley DB XML provides Sleepycat with an opportunity
to expand its markets beyond its traditional base of support. Given effective marketing, it
may be possible to convert RDBMS customers to Berkeley DB XML on specific XML
projects. This strategy has some commensurate risk, may require some investment in
marketing to be effective, and can only be explored once it is known the product does not
violate any tenants
of the exiting
brand.

A good first
application target
market may be the
EAI space, and in
particular in
providing unique
functionality as an
“EAI Cache.” Note
that the Charles
Schwab example
above solve some
of the problems
while introducing
others. Most
critically, once the
trade data has
been consolidated into the large RDBMS, the XML data must be parsed and removed. It
then becomes impossible to query or retrieve the XML documents. If other applications
wish to re-use those XML documents, it becomes very difficult to reassemble the original
document. Moreover, there may be a time delay in sending processed trades to the
centralized repository; a log-jam may occur on the wire to the repository.

Both problems can be solved by deploying Berkeley DB XML as the initial repository.
Because Berkeley DB XML is an embedded database, it will provide extremely fast
updates -- thus precluding any data logjams. Moreover, the data can be retrieved in its
original XML format.
Last, this solution
does not prevent the
business from
running all of its
usual RDBMS tools
and business
intelligence
applications against
the RDBMS.

Similar to this idea is


using the Berkeley
DB XML as an initial
repository for
messages from any

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non-proprietary message format. Some EAI developers are looking to using XML as a
messaging service, and Berkeley DB XML may be a great way to solve storage issues
that may surface with those developers.

Business-to-Business applications may have the specific need to store XML data in its
native format. Many companies have a legal requirement to keep certain documents, like
invoices, in their native format, yet still would like to be able to perform granular quenries
over elements in those documents.

Core Messages
The target customer type in these market segments will be the developer. Thus, many of
the same core messages will apply. However, because this audience may not be familiar
with the advantages of embedded vs. relational, we will need to apply a higher-level
messaging include the following:
• Extremely fast and completely transactional (recoverable) XML
Database.
• Complete source code; free development license.
• Proven reliability through hundreds of deployments in fortune 500
applications.

Value Proposition
For these customers, the value proposition will be (each highlighted term is described
below):

To provide application developers and EAI/b2b vendors with a built-in way to have
reliable, fast and maintenance-free XML data storage.

Briefly speaking, the target market is EAI applications and vendors, the target customers
are application developers and EAI vendors, the primary benefits to this customer are
reliability, and maintenance-free storage, the target application being EAI applications
using XML, and the competitive advantage (or distinction) is the embedded quality of the
product, thus fast, scalable and maintenance-free storage.

application developers
This means large IT departments at places like Charles Schwab. These customers will be
monetized because it is likely they will have another instance of Berkeley DB running
somewhere in the organization.

EAI/b2b vendors
Our primary target will be the large vendors who play in this space. Many large software
and hardware vendors see the EAI space as both a threat and an opportunity. EAI is an
opportunity to consolidate applications/platforms become the standard within an
Enterprise; it’s a threat if your company isn’t the vendor selected. Sun, IBM and BEA
have large EAI initiatives, each of which is a good fit for Berkeley DB XML. However, the
space is filled with hundreds of tools and services, any of which will see value in
embeddable XML data storage.

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Reliable, fast and maintenance-free


When managing many moving parts, application developers and vendors are keenly
interested in the maintenance and reliability of those parts.

Data storage
In this space, we want to be aware of the interoperability of our database with larger
Relational Vendors. We do not want to be perceived as a threat to their hegemony in
these large IT shops. Moreover, the term “Database” tend to imply client/server, which is
a liability to breaking into these markets.

Pharmaceutical Vertical
Sleepycat marketing will likely remain reaction-based, thus concentrating resources on
reacting to customers that seek out a solution rather than proactively generating demand.
However, if Sleepycat wants to establish market momentum in a specific vertical, it
should have little difficulty penetrating the pharmaceutical / bioinformatics marketplace.

We see two types of “developers” in this space. As an example of customer need, many
biologists, chemists and geneticists are attempting to develop their own applications for
managing their complex XML data. The primary problem they face is one of granular
searching capabilities. In order to develop systems for search and retrieval of the XML
documents, they are often use simple-to-learn scripting languages like Perl and Tcl

The beta period will give us much greater insight into the messaging and positioning for
this market.

Embedded Applications
Embedded applications in small devices are increasing seeing the value of XML;
Berkeley DB XML can exploit any opportunity where the need for XML data storage and
small-footprint converge. Embedded Service Partners has a few ideas. The beta period
will give us much greater insight into the messaging and positioning for this market.

Product Vision

Version 2.0 should be concentrated on ensuring the XML product is as reliable, scalable
and fast as its progenitor and is a hearty competitor to the XML data store products
currently on the market in the specific market verticals we identify during this version 1.0
period.

Version 2.0 must address all of the ease-of-use issues identified in the alpha and beta
plans, and in particular,

.NET, SOAP support, Java XML API, and PeRL XML API issues should all be evaluated
for better ease-of-use.

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Features and Benefits

Built-in. Unlike any other product on the market, this product acts as a service inside of
the existing application. It does not require any additional hardware, and is one less part
to worry about maintaining. This means speed unmatched by any other database, XML
or not.

Realiability. Built on the Berkeley DB which has 12 years of service in 200,000,000


deployments, including many mission-critical fortune-500 applications.

Complete Source Code. Developers can see exactly what they are getting and modify it
if they need. This means low maintenance.

Native XML. Unlike with traditional RDBMS offerings, XML documents do not need to be
parsed, mapped, converted, or dissected in any way, thus they can be returned exactly
as presented and without the performance overhead associated with the conversion to
some proprietary format.

Java and C++ APIs. The platform independence of Java meshes well with the portability
of XML, and that makes it a popular combination. But it integrated just as easily into C++
applications. Many other languages are also supported, such as Per, Tcl, Ruby and
Python.

Typical database functionality. transactional support, multi-user read-write, high-


availability recoverability and roll-over, as well as many other standard database features
are available with the XML option.

Scalability. Berkeley DB performs even with a load of 254 Terabytes of data, or many
thousands of simultaneous users. By some estimates, more than half of the top 1000
websites use Berkeley DB. After years of heavy use by thousands (if not hundreds of
thousands) of developers, Berkeley DB is probably one of the most reliable, scalable,
mission-critical software packages ever developed.

A choice in indexing. Developers can decide which tags (or any element, for that
matter) they want to index, then choose from a several of indexing strategies that will
provide the best granularity and speed for the expected queries. A smart cost-based
query optimizer can also be tuned for best results. All this means extremely fast
retrievals.

XML and non-XML in the same database. This allows developers the ability to mix and
match data as best suits the application.

Product Description

The product runs on the latest version of Berkeley DB, and will run with any option (DS,
CDS, TDS, HA). However, the product will only be sold with the DTS and HA options.

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Three download packages are available. The first is a source only release for Unix
systems, the second is a source only release for Win32 systems, and the third is a binary
release for Win32 systems. Both source packages contain full source code,
documentation, and build scripts for all platforms. The binary release contains pre-built
libraries, public header files, and full documentation.

Source Tar/GZip: ftp://ftp.sleepycat.com/hidden/dbxml-1.0.11.tar.gz (2.4MB)

Source Zip : ftp://ftp.sleepycat.com/hidden/dbxml-1.0.11.zip (4.1MB)

Binary Win32 : ftp://ftp.sleepycat.com/hidden/dbxml-1.0.11-win32.zip (3.5MB)

Distribution Plan
Anyone may download the product by providing a valid email address on the webform.
Instructions are then sent to that email address. The web form also captures voluntary
information, which helps us identify and contact potential customers.

Customers may purchase the product directly from Sleepycat, or through Embedded
Solutions Partners.

Legal
The product will be distribution under the same conditions and restrictions of the current
licensing agreement.

PeRL licenscing will become more common with Berkeley DB XML. We may want to take
another look at this policy.

Naming
The product will be called Berkeley DB XML, and it will not be truncated in any way. All
three words should be used in all instances. It is important to keep the capitalization
consistent with this example.

This name conveys several things. It imparts the brand identification with Berkeley DB,
and follows those branding conventions. And it describes its function.

When it launches, it should be called version number 2.0.

Pricing
We will offer two pricing models: buyout and site license. The prices for license fees and
Annual Maintenance for each model are as follows.

Server License Fee: Server License AM Fee:


$15,000 per server $10,000 + 20% of Site License Fee (annually)

Buyout Fee: Buyout AM Fee:

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$200,000 $40,000 (annually)

We are only offering XML with TDS at this time. Should someone express real interest in
XML with HA, we’ll handle it on a case by case basis for the time being. We will not offer
XML with DS or CDS.

The per-server model is substantively different than the per-site model that we use for all
other products. The terms of the license agreement are still the same (free unlimited use
within one geographic location as defined by the post office). However, pricing becomes
in effect for all servers when even one installation is outside of the primary location. This
pricing scheme should allow us to be more comparable to other XML vendor offerings
(server pricing to server pricing, rather than server pricing to site pricing) and should
recoup appropriate value from customers using Berkeley DB XML to replace an existing
RDBMS installation.

These prices are subject to change once we have customer feedback and more market
data. These prices are valid as of 4/9/03.

Andrew Hawthorn page 14 of 14 Version 2.0

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