You are on page 1of 2

Date: Dec.

 23, 2009  
Microsoft vs. Europe and the Law 

First you have a company that has really not grown or broken new ground in 4 years – Microsoft. 
Want proof? Count the number of employees, or read the reviews of its products, or simply watch it 
lose market share to Apple and Linux‐based machines. 

Second you have companies – like the man who invented the wiper delay on your car who took 15 
years to beat Ford who stole his invention – companies that are determined that the almighty Microsoft 
needs to pay for programs and inventions it stole. 

And third you have governments who want to enforce anti‐trust laws – anti‐trust laws that originated 
in the United States of America with Teddy Roosevelt and that we, because of corrupt lobbying forces, 
seem reluctant to enforce any more (think healthcare, gas pricing, and airlines, for starters). 

Microsoft has been ordered by a European court of appeals to adhere to the first ruling against it for 
patent and code infringement in versions of Word 2003 and 2007. What does this mean? Microsoft is 
prohibited from selling any more copies of the programs in Europe. Period. Oh, and it has to pay a $290 
million fine. Of course, Microsoft is already claiming that the “little used feature” will be removed 
forthwith so it can sell those products and the much‐anticipated Word 2010 now being released in beta 
versions. “Therefore, we expect to have copies of Microsoft Word 2007 and Office 2007, with this 
feature removed, available for US sale and distribution by the injunction date," it said.  

Who sued them? A small Canadian company called i4i. This small company tried, but failed, to get a 
US court to adhere to the injunction. As I said, justice, anti‐trust justice, is dead in America. If you are 
rich, if you are powerful, as Microsoft is, you can control the law. 

And that brings us to the other Microsoft problem: Internet access. Microsoft has lost so many times 
in European courts (and by extension of those cases in America) that it finally allowed you to have 
Microsoft as your operating system but also allows you to use Mozilla, Safari or any other Internet 
browser you want to run. But in Europe, they are still pursuing the matter. Why? Because all the 
Microsoft programs require you to have Internet Explorer on your computer for updates – and Internet 
Explorer by Microsoft needs updating for security reasons almost daily. In other words, you can put 
another program on your computer, that you own and operate, but Microsoft will control how you use 
your computer. In addition, Internet Explorer gathers information… 
All of which brings me to the point here. Just as AT&T was an almost‐monopoly that over‐stayed 
their welcome in Washington and was broken up, so too Microsoft has overstayed their welcome in 
Europe already. Europe does not have the mechanism to break Microsoft up, but it can and seems 
determined to insist Microsoft plays fairly and in accord with the law. Microsoft will increasingly find it 
hard to have one company practice in Europe and one in the US. In addition to which there is real hatred 
for the company and its products even by those who use them (as I do). I lament the passing of the 
company that made computer use easier in favor of one that seeks to control our use of this 
indispensible machine. Perhaps it will take more punishment of the company by existing laws to make 
Microsoft realize that their customer relations that created a great company has been discarded in favor 
of a rapacious monster that no one can abide.