You are on page 1of 7

Current Issue

Contributors
Reconstruction
 
 5.3 ﴾Summer 2005﴿ 
Past Issues
R e t u r n   t o   Contents » 
Call for Papers
Editorial Board
 
Submissions
Search Whistler ’s Fog and the Aesthetics of Place / Bruce Janz 
A b s t r a c t :  The concept of place has usually been understood as either a phenomenological, 
epistemological, or ethical category. An understanding of place as aesthetic or rhetorical, on 
the other hand, tends to focus on the widely varied uses of the concept. First, I sketch out the 
wide range of uses of place, that have been drawn from writings on the concept. These uses are 
not definitions of place, but rather functions that the term performs. Place stands in for other 
ideas, and allows access to different aspects of human experience. Second, I will draw from this 
range of uses some ideas about the aesthetics of place, that is, the ways in which the picture 
that has been painted of the state of place research produces some surprising results. Finally, 
I will try to address some objections to or limitations of the idea of place. 

At present, people see fogs, not because there are fogs, but because poets and 
painters have taught them the mysterious loveliness of such effects. There may have 
been fogs for centuries in London. I dare say there were. But no one saw them, and so 
we do not know anything about them. They did not exist till art had invented them. 
﴾ O s c a r   W i l d e ﴿   [ 1]  

[ T ] h e r e   w a s   n o   f o g   i n   L o n d o n   b e f o r e   W h i s t l e r   p a i n t e d   i t .   ﴾ E r n s t   G o m b r i c h ﴿   [ 2]  

< 1 >   I s   p l a c e   a n   a e s t h e t i c   c o n c e p t ?   I n   m u c h   o f   t h e   v a s t   w r i t i n g   o n   t h e   n a t u r e   o f   p l a c e   [ 3] ,   t h e  
concept has largely been viewed as either ontological, epistemological, or ethical. Most 
phenomenologists ﴾and a great deal of writing on place is phenomenological﴿ view it as 
o n t o l o g i c a l ,   e v e n   g i v i n g   i t   a   k i n d   o f   p r i o r i t y   o v e r   t h e   m o r e   m e t a p h y s i c a l   “space ”  in human 
experience ﴾as does, for instance, Edward Casey﴿. Those who think of place in symbolic or 
structural terms tend to make it epistemological. It is a kind of knowledge ﴾or site of 
knowledge﴿, and knowledge of place means knowledge of the symbolic structures in which shared 
meaning is encoded. And, its ethical status is pervasive  ­ ­   it stands as a kind of original 
good, a rough analogue of Rousseau ’s   “nature ”,   f o r   m a n y   w r i t e r s .   A t t e n d i n g   t o   p l a c e   m e a n s  
attending to what is good, wholesome, life ­ a f f i r m i n g ,   o r   c o r r e c t .  

<2> These are useful approaches. But what difference would it make if place was aesthetic, or if 
we aestheticized place? Primarily, it would mean that representation becomes the central issue 
f o r   p l a c e .   A s   w i t h   W h i s t l e r ’s   L o n d o n   f o g ,   t h e r e   i s   n o   f o g   w i t h o u t   i t s   r e p r e s e n t a t i o n s .   T h e  
metaphysical question of the existence of fog is beside the point; Wilde is arguing that fog did 
n o t   “f i t ”  i n t o   t h e   m e n t a l   c a n v a s   o f   L o n d o n   u n t i l   s o m e o n e   p u t   i t   i n t o   t h e   l i t e r a l   c a n v a s .   F o g  
came to mean something in London, and as such is made available aesthetically rather than 
metaphysically. The same seems to be true of place, at several levels. Places are made available 
inasmuch as they are included in meaningful discourse the way that the London fog was included. 
But also, the concept of place itself has become meaningful in recent years across a wide range 
o f   d i s c i p l i n e s ,   a n d   a s   s u c h   h a s   b e e n   “painted ”  i n   t o   o u r   i n t e l l e c t u a l   c a n v a s .   I t   h a s   b e c o m e  
meaningful. I am interested in both senses. 

< 3 >   I   h a v e   b e e n   a v o i d i n g   m a k i n g   t h e   b a l d   c l a i m   t h a t   “p l a c e   i s   a n   a e s t h e t i c   c o n c e p t ”.   T h a t   c l a i m  
itself is one of certitude and exclusion, metaphysical by nature. I am more interested in a way 
of painting the landscape of place ­ use. Like Whistler, I want to make certain aspects of place 
available, even as I believe the concept of place makes certain aspects of human experience 
available, and as some places themselves are made available in their representations. There is 
no point in speculating about place apart from its representations; yet, place is also not 
simply reducible to concepts. This is something Henri Lefebvre understood in his discussion of 
space  ­ ­   p l a c e   ﴾ t o   u s e   a   w o r d   h e   a v o i d s ﴿   i s   n o t   j u s t   p e r c e i v e d   o r   p h y s i c a l   s p a c e ,   n o r   i s   i t   t h e  
representations of space ﴾conceptualized space﴿; it is representational space, "space as 
d i r e c t l y   l i v e d   t h r o u g h   i t s   a s s o c i a t e d   i m a g e s   a n d   s y m b o l s "   [ 4] .   B u t   L e f e b v r e   s t o p p e d   s h o r t   o f  
considering the range of uses of place as generative.

<4> What must be realized, to have an aesthetics of place, is that the idea of place is as much 
a window on its intentions of use as it is a descriptor of an aspect of human experience. The 
concept does work, it accomplishes something, and that accomplishment is different for different 
people. Indeed, the term is so malleable, yet so fecund, that it is pressed into service for a 
wide variety of reasons, some of them contradictory to each other ﴾or even internally 
contradictory﴿. If our goal is to determine the meaning of place in some metaphysical manner, to 
nail down just what it is we are talking about before we go out and ask what qualifies as a 
p l a c e ,   w e   w i l l   b e   f r u s t r a t e d .   “Place ”  s u f f e r s   n o t   f r o m   t o o   f e w   m e a n i n g s ,   b u t   f r o m   f a r   t o o   m a n y .  
Rather than sifting through those meanings to find the most relevant to a particular occasion, I 
am more interested in thinking about what this overdetermination might suggest for the pictures 
of place that scholars and writers are trying to paint. In short, I am more interested in the 
place of place, in the range of its uses, and in the ways that those uses, taken together, 
produce interesting and unexpected results. It is remarkable that very little has been done on 
its range of uses and what that range implies, despite the thousands of papers and books that 
have been published on the idea of place or which use the idea as a significant conceptual tool. 
Most writers either simply take a stand on the version of place they are using ﴾or, more often, 
simply make unspoken assumptions about it﴿, or regard the profusion of versions of place as 
something to be simplified or overcome. I would like to argue that this profusion is a strength 
of the idea, and that taking it seriously makes for a rich canvas and a wide ­ ranging palette. 

<5> My goal here is straightforward. First, I will sketch out the wide range of uses of place, 
that have been drawn from writings on the concept. These uses are not definitions of place, but 
rather functions that the term performs ﴾although, depending on how much of a pragmatist one is, 
charting uses might be functionally equivalent to definitions﴿. Place stands in for other ideas, 
and allows access to different aspects of human experience. This first section is not intended 
as a literature overview, so while in some cases I will make specific citations to identify the 
sources, in other cases the uses will be widespread enough that I expect the use will be readily 
recognizable. Second, I will draw from this range of uses some ideas about the aesthetics of 
place, that is, the ways in which the picture that has been painted of the state of place 
research produces some surprising results. Finally, I will try to address some objections to or 
l i m i t a t i o n s   o f   t h e   i d e a   o f   p l a c e .   I   a m   h o p i n g   t h a t ,   a s   w i t h   W h i s t l e r ’s   ﴾ a n d   W i l d e ’s ﴿   L o n d o n   f o g ,  
the meaningful construction of place will be made available. I also hope that those who go out 
to use the concept of place as a theoretical tool or phenomenological lens will themselves be 
charting uses might be functionally equivalent to definitions﴿. Place stands in for other ideas, 
and allows access to different aspects of human experience. This first section is not intended 
as a literature overview, so while in some cases I will make specific citations to identify the 
sources, in other cases the uses will be widespread enough that I expect the use will be readily 
recognizable. Second, I will draw from this range of uses some ideas about the aesthetics of 
place, that is, the ways in which the picture that has been painted of the state of place 
research produces some surprising results. Finally, I will try to address some objections to or 
l i m i t a t i o n s   o f   t h e   i d e a   o f   p l a c e .   I   a m   h o p i n g   t h a t ,   a s   w i t h   W h i s t l e r ’s   ﴾ a n d   W i l d e ’s ﴿   L o n d o n   f o g ,  
the meaningful construction of place will be made available. I also hope that those who go out 
to use the concept of place as a theoretical tool or phenomenological lens will themselves be 
able to paint pictures that construct place in a new and meaningful way ﴾without, of course, 
just making everything more foggy﴿. 

A. Seeing Fog: A Survey of Uses of Place 

<6> I have divided 21 uses of place into three categories. Categorizing is a form of 
spatialization ﴾mapping, to be precise﴿, and I am not unaware of the irony of using a spatial 
a p p r o a c h   t o   t h i n k   a b o u t   p l a c e .   “P l a c e   a n d   p a r t i c u l a r i t y ”  a d d r e s s e s   t h e   p e r v a s i v e   s e n s e   o f   p l a c e ,  
which is to try to identify some specific experience, object, or feature as key to determining 
p l a c e .   R e l a t e d   t o   t h i s   i s   t h e   g e n e r a l   i m p u l s e   t o   r e s i s t   c o n c e p t u a l   u n i v e r s a l i z a t i o n .   “Place and 
r e l a t i o n   o r   c o n t e x t ”  d e a l s   m a i n l y   w i t h   s u b j e c t / o b j e c t   r e l a t i o n s .   “Place and meaning ”  groups 
together senses of place that try to connect human significance with geography or origin. Each 
category is necessarily loose, and is meant only to provide an initial conceptual mapping. Of 
course, each of the 21 uses of place contain within them shades of difference ﴾in some cases, 
the variations are vast and nuanced﴿, and so each use is itself a category.

1. Place and Particularity 

<7>  a .   P l a c e   a s   S p a t i a l   L o c a t i o n:   P l a c e   i s   s o m e t i m e s   t h o u g h t   o f   a s   t h e   c o o r d i n a t e s   o n   a   m a p ,   o r  
in modernist modes of understanding space, place becomes secondary to and derivative of space. 
Finding one ’s   p l a c e   o n   a   g l o b a l   p o s i t i o n i n g   s y s t e m ,   f o r   i n s t a n c e ,   m e a n s   t h e   p r i o r   i d e n t i f i c a t i o n  
of abstract lines of longitude and latitude. In this use place, then, becomes evidence of a 
prior discourse about space. Some, however, argue that place is at least equal to space ﴾that 
i s ,   p l a c e   d o e s   n o t   “f o l l o w ”  s p a c e   b y   b e i n g   a n   i n f e r e n c e   o f   i t ﴿ ,   a n d   p e r h a p s   ﴾ e . g . ,   E d w a r d   C a s e y ﴿  
place is even prior to space. 

<8>  b .   P l a c e   a s   t h e   I m m e d i a t e ,   C o n c r e t e ,   o r   P r e s e n t:   P l a c e   o f t e n   r e f e r s   t o   w h a t   i s   n e a r   m e   o r  
those with whom I identify ﴾and as such, is also a relational notion of place﴿. To talk about 
place can mean to talk about the directly experienced or sensed, the empirically available. Some 
writers of place emphasize that place is prior to conceptualization or language. Place can be 
understood not just as the immediate, but as the present, the lens through which all else is 
seen and the ordering principle for time and space. 

<9>  c .   P l a c e   a s   E x c l u s i v i t y:   A n c i e n t   a n d   m e d i a e v a l   t h i n k e r s   r e g a r d e d   p l a c e   a s   a   c l a i m   o n   a   p a r t  
of space, usually defined by a material object. Objects always exist in a place, and part of 
that existence means that they have exclusive claim on whatever place they are in. For Descartes 
the fundamental feature of one of the two primary substances is that it is extended, which means 
that it takes up space and denies other objects claim on that space while it is there. It does 
mean that place is associated with what is not ﴾and perhaps cannot be﴿ thought, since thought 
requires universals. And yet, as Aristotle recognized, place is not an integral part of the 
object, since it is abandoned the minute the object moves in space. 

<10>  d .   P l a c e   a s   t h e   U n i q u e:   T h e   t e r m   “g e n i u s   l o c i ”  e v o l v e d   f r o m   r e f e r r i n g   t o   n y m p h s ,   d r y a d s ,  
a n d   o t h e r   p l a c e ­ r e l a t e d   s p i r i t s ,   a n d   e v e n t u a l l y   b e c a m e   t h e   “s p i r i t   o f   t h e   p l a c e ”,   t h a t   i s ,   t h e  
unique features of a place that call forth a response. Even without this reification of place, 
one might argue that a fundamental use of the concept of place is to designate the features of 
something that are utterly like nothing else, that past the fact that it takes up a specific 
space, it also has other characteristics unlike any other place. Much romantic work on place 
imagined this uniqueness, and geomantic techniques such as feng shui or ley lines also assume 
that the uniqueness of place is available given the proper training and intuitive insight. 

<11>  e .   P l a c e   a s   S t a t i c ,   F i x e d ,   U n c h a n g i n g ,   P e r m a n e n t:   F o r   A r i s t o t l e   ﴾ P h y s i c s  I V ﴿ ,   p l a c e   w a s  
s t a t i c ,   w h e r e   t h i n g s   w e r e   “a t   r e s t . ”  M o t i o n   c o u l d   b e   e x p l a i n e d   a s   t h e   s t r i v i n g   o f   t h i n g s   t o  
their natural place of rest. More recently, people use the term to refer to what resists change, 
p a r t i c u l a r l y   m o d e r n i z a t i o n .   “T h e   i d e a   o f   p l a c e   a s   w e   o n c e   k n e w   i t   h a s   c h a n g e d   i n   t h a t   t h e  
emphasis now lies not in permanent structures but those things ﴾ex roads﴿ that allow for an 
i n c r e a s i n g l y   g l o b a l i z e d   w o r l d   t o   m o v e ”  [ 5] .  

<12>  f .   P l a c e   a s   C h a o t i c ,   C o m p l e x ,   I m p e r m a n e n t:   B a r r y   L o p e z   i n   A r c t i c   D r e a m s  a r g u e s   t h a t   “Place 
is collectively made up of the conglomeration of many different elements within this 
l o c a l e ”  [ 6] .   I t   i s   n o t   e a s i l y   g r a s p a b l e ,   a n d   i n d e e d   m a y   r u n   a h e a d   o f   o u r   a b i l i t y   t o  
conceptualize it. Place disrupts the orderliness of space by saying that some places ﴾even this 
particular place﴿ must be taken seriously; it is not interchangeable with another. As well, 
place can also resist the tendency to homogenize culture. The chaos, then, can be a creative 
one, in which difference is maintained. 

<13>  g .   P l a c e   a s   E m b o d i m e n t:   E m b o d i m e n t   i s   m o r e   t h a n   j u s t   p h y s i c a l i t y ,   i t   i s   t h e   r e c o g n i t i o n  
that the place we are in is made possible by the specific sensory way we understand the world. 
T h i s   s e n s e   o f   p l a c e   c a n   b e   r e p r e s e n t a t i o n a l   a s   w e l l   a s   l i t e r a l   –  one ’s   b o d y   c a n   c o d e   o r  
represent one ’s   p l a c e   i n   a   s o c i a l   o r d e r   o r   h i e r a r c h y .   T h i s   m i g h t   b e   i n t e n t i o n a l   ﴾ t h r o u g h  
m o d i f i c a t i o n ,   c l o t h i n g ,   e t c . ﴿   o r   u n i n t e n t i o n a l / u n r e f l e c t i v e .   T h i s   m a k e s   “v i r t u a l ”  space 
ambiguous as a place, and is consequently the focus of much discussion. A good example is Nancy 
M a i r s   a u t o b i o g r a p h i c a l   a c c o u n t   o f   h e r   l i f e   f r o m   i n s i d e   “the bonehouse ”  o r   t h e   b o d y   a s   a   p l a c e  
f r o m   w h e r e   h e r   s t o r y   c a n   b e   t o l d   [ 7] .  

2.  Place and Relation or Context 

<14>  a .   P l a c e   a s   t h e   L o c a l:   P l a c e   o f t e n   r e f e r s   t o   w h a t   i s   n e a r   m e   o r   t h o s e   w i t h   w h o m   I   i d e n t i f y .  
R a t h e r   t h a n   r e f e r r i n g   t o   a   d i s c r e t e   “t h i n g ”,   p l a c e   m a y   b e   t h o u g h t   o f   a s   a   c o n t i n u u m ,   w i t h  
“c l o s e r ”  and  “f u r t h e r ”.   T h e   l o c a l   a l s o   c o m e s   w i t h   m e t a p h o r i c a l   i m p l i c a t i o n s   –  i t   i s   n o t   s i m p l y  
p r o x i m i t y ,   b u t   e m o t i o n a l   o r   m e a n i n g f u l   n e a r n e s s .   L u c y   L i p p a r d ,   i n   T h e   L u r e   o f   t h e   L o c a l  [ 8] ,  
does not see the local as just proximity, but about the aspects of the proximate which endure, 
for good reasons, and which speak of intimate human relations rather than bureaucratic or 
technological relations. 

<15>  b .   P l a c e   a s   N a t u r e   o r   L a n d s c a p e:   T h e r e   i s   a n   a l m o s t   R o u s s e a u i a n   s e n s e   o f   a u t h e n t i c i t y   a n d  
primordiality which is tied to Nature, which makes all other places derivative, and in many 
cases, alienating. Some writers regard nature as the quintessential place, the place which draws 
o u t   a   “t r u e r ”  s e l f   o r   s u b j e c t i v i t y .   W i l d e r n e s s   i s   s o m e t i m e s   s e e n   i n   t h i s   w a y ,   a s   a   n e c e s s a r y  
place for the true human self ﴾e.g., Thoreau﴿. Landscape is nature viewed or nature experienced. 
It could be considered to be place created, as a landscape painter makes nature into a place. 

<16>  c .   P l a c e   a s   R e l a t i o n:   L o c k e   t h o u g h t   o f   p l a c e   a s   t h e   r e l a t i o n   ﴾ d i s t a n c e   a n d   a t t a c h m e n t ﴿  
b e t w e e n   d i s c r e t e   o b j e c t s   –  a   “chessboard on a ship ”  i s   i n   t h e   s a m e   p l a c e ,   e v e n   t h o u g h   t h e   s h i p  
<15>  b .   P l a c e   a s   N a t u r e   o r   L a n d s c a p e:   T h e r e   i s   a n   a l m o s t   R o u s s e a u i a n   s e n s e   o f   a u t h e n t i c i t y   a n d  
primordiality which is tied to Nature, which makes all other places derivative, and in many 
cases, alienating. Some writers regard nature as the quintessential place, the place which draws 
o u t   a   “t r u e r ”  s e l f   o r   s u b j e c t i v i t y .   W i l d e r n e s s   i s   s o m e t i m e s   s e e n   i n   t h i s   w a y ,   a s   a   n e c e s s a r y  
place for the true human self ﴾e.g., Thoreau﴿. Landscape is nature viewed or nature experienced. 
It could be considered to be place created, as a landscape painter makes nature into a place. 

<16>  c .   P l a c e   a s   R e l a t i o n:   L o c k e   t h o u g h t   o f   p l a c e   a s   t h e   r e l a t i o n   ﴾ d i s t a n c e   a n d   a t t a c h m e n t ﴿  
b e t w e e n   d i s c r e t e   o b j e c t s   –  a   “chessboard on a ship ”  i s   i n   t h e   s a m e   p l a c e ,   e v e n   t h o u g h   t h e   s h i p  
i s   m o v i n g   [ 9] .   S i m i l a r l y ,   p l a c e   m a y   d e s i g n a t e   t h e   c o n t i n u i t y   o f   r e l a t i o n s h i p s   b e t w e e n   p e o p l e ,  
even though the social space of those people may change. The relation may be rhizomatic, as 
Deleuze and Guattari suggest; that is, the place may in fact not be geographically anchored, but 
may be a range of activity. Or, it may be a mutual reference point, which would suggest that the 
place is not something that a single person could lay claim to.

<17> Place is also the context of social relations, reciprocity, and/or symbolic constructions. 
In some cases place has been a term of resistance, preferring the layered, complex, 
heterogenous, and multi ­ perspectival over the monocultural. Phenomenologically, place may be 
t h o u g h t   o f   a s   “between ”  s u b j e c t   a n d   o b j e c t .    

<18>  d .   P l a c e   a s   M e d i a t i o n:   I t   i s   t h e   “common­ place ”  i n   c o m m u n i t a r i a n   p o l i t i c s ,   t h e   p l a c e   o f   t h e  


m e e t i n g   o f   b o t h   p e o p l e   a n d   m i n d s .   P l a c e   “p r o v i d e s   t h e   s p a c e s   e s s e n t i a l   t o   a s s o c i a t i o n   a n d  
m e d i a t i o n   a n d   i t   r e p r e s e n t s   a   c i t y   t o   i t s   i n h a b i t a n t s ”  [ 10] .   P l a c e   i s ,   f o r   s o m e ,   e q u i v a l e n t   t o  
culture ﴾as opposed to nature﴿. 

<19>  e .   P l a c e   a s   a   T e r m   o f   O p p o s i t i o n:   P l a c e   i s   o f t e n   o p p o s i t i o n a l ,   s o m e t i m e s   t o   d i s c i p l i n a r y  
methods or structures ﴾perceived as alienating or as insufficiently able to access human 
meaning﴿, or modernity ﴾perceived as overly concerned with structural components at the expense 
of individual experience﴿, or even post ­ modernity ﴾perceived as too willing to frolic in the 
free ­ p l a y   o f   s i g n i f i e r s ,   a n d   n o t   s u f f i c i e n t l y   i n t e r e s t e d   i n   a n y t h i n g   t h a t   m i g h t   m a t t e r   t o  
someone﴿. It is disruptive of received ways of understanding the world or even of other places. 
P l a c e   r e s i s t s   t h e   h o m o g e n i z a t i o n   o f   c u l t u r e .   “N e w   s p a c e s   o f   r e s i s t a n c e   a r e   b e i n g   o p e n e d   u p ,  
where our  ‘place ’  ﴾ i n   a l l   i t s   m e a n i n g s ﴿   i s   c o n s i d e r e d   f u n d a m e n t a l l y   i m p o r t a n t   t o   o u r  
perspective, our location in the world, and our right and ability to challenge dominant 
d i s c o u r s e s   o f   p o w e r ”  [ 11] .  

<20>  f .   P l a c e   a s   O t h e r:   F o r   s o m e   t h i n k e r s ,   p l a c e s   m u s t   r e s i s t   t o t a l   s u b s u m p t i o n   u n d e r   t h e   s e l f .  
Place must bear a sense of foreignness. Place must not be immediately or intuitively known ﴾and 
thus be completely brought into or identified with the self﴿, but rather it should let itself be 
s h o w n   f o r t h .   I t   s t a n d s   a t   a   d i s t a n c e   f r o m   t h e   s e l f   [ 12] .  

3.  Place and Meaning 

< 2 1 >   a .   P l a c e   a s   t h e   P e r s o n a l l y   o r   C o m m u n a l l y   S i g n i f i c a n t:   P l a c e   p o i n t s   t o   “w h a t   w e   a r e   l o y a l  
t o ”,   “what we care about ”,   o r   “w h a t   m a t t e r s . ”  This sense of meaning may be expressed as 
subjectivity ﴾vs. objectivity﴿ or habit﴾us﴿ ﴾vs. space as the reflexive or known﴿. It may point 
t o   a   p e r s o n a l   s e n s e   o f   f r e e d o m ,   o v e r   a g a i n s t   a   “s p a t i a l i z a t i o n ”  w h i c h   l o c k s   a   p e r s o n   i n t o  
external causes. Places, for many, are tied to the stories that can be told about them, or that 
they evoke. So, place may in some cases be the site ﴾or more properly, situation﴿ of personal 
meaning, or for others the cause of personal meaning, or for others the precondition of personal 
meaning. 

<22> Given this sense, it may even be possible to have place without space: 

“U s i n g   t h e   e x a m p l e   o f   L a m b d a M O O ,   t h e   o n l i n e   e n v i r o n m e n t ,   t h e y   e x p l o r e   t h e   p o s s i b i l i t y  
o f   a   p l a c e   w i t h o u t   a   s p a c e .   T h e   L a m d a M O O   h a s   m e a n i n g s   f o r   i t s   u s e r s   –  sometimes quite 
r i c h   a n d   d e e p   o n e s .   Y e t   i t   d i d   n o t   e x i s t   p h y s i c a l l y   i n   s p a c e   –  i t   t o o k   “place ”  o n l y   i n  
t h e   o u t p u t s   o f   a   c o m p u t e r .   T h i s   w a s   a   p l a c e   w i t h o u t   a   s p a c e . ”  [ 13]  

This significance may or may not be recognized, or may or may not be created by the subject. 
Many people speak of a  “s e n s e   o f   p l a c e ”,   w h i c h   s u g g e s t s   t h a t   s o m e   c a n   r e c o g n i z e   o r   f e e l   t h e  
“placeness ”  o f   ﴾ a ﴿   p l a c e ,   t h a t   i s ,   i t s   s i g n i f i c a n c e   a s   a   p l a c e   r a t h e r   t h a n   a s   a n   i n t e r c h a n g e a b l e  
aspect of space.

<23>  b .   P l a c e   a s   I d e n t i t y:   M a n y   u s e s   o f   “place ”  a r e   r e a l l y   a b o u t   p e r s o n a l ,   c o m m u n i t y ,   r e g i o n a l ,  
or national identity. This identity can be understood either as accruing from place in a 
relatively linear or causal manner, or more commonly that the construction of place is also the 
construction of self, so that place and identity need to be approached dialectically or 
reciprocally. Regionalism, in particular, has been a popular way of linking place and identity, 
as regions seem less constructed by mechanisms of state formation and more by the practices of 
p e o p l e .   T h e   s e n s e   o f   i d e n t i t y   i s   r e i n f o r c e d   b y   c o n s i d e r i n g   t h e   “l i m i n a l ”  o r   b o r d e r l i n e   “places ”,  
t h e   e v e n t s   i n   a   p e r s o n ’s   l i f e   o f   t r a n s i t i o n   o r   c h a n g e   o r   m o v e m e n t   f r o m   o n e   r o l e   t o   a n o t h e r .  
There is disruption here, a contradiction between the identity maintained and the identity 
e x c h a n g e d .   O n   t h e   o t h e r   h a n d ,   f o r   s o m e   p l a c e   m e a n s   i n d i g e n e i t y   [ 14] .  

<24>  c .   P l a c e   a s   H o m e:   H o m e   i s   i n ­ h a b i t e d ,   t h e   l i v e d   p l a c e   m a d e   l i v a b l e   ﴾ a n d   e x p r e s s e d   a s  
livable﴿ by the habits we bring. There is a reciprocal relationship between ourselves and the 
p l a c e s   t h a t   w e   “dwell ”.   I n   o t h e r   w o r d s ,   j u s t   a s   w e   t r a n s f o r m   o u r   e n v i r o n m e n t   i n t o   “home”  a t   t h e  
s a m e   t i m e   o u r   e n v i r o n m e n t   s e r v e s   t o   c r e a t e   u s   a s   w e l l   [ 15] .  

< 2 5 >   T r u e   p l a c e ,   t h e n ,   h a s   s o m e   f e a t u r e s   o f   “home”  t o   i t ,   f o r   s o m e   p e o p l e ,   a n d   t h e   e x t e n t   t o  


which we are  “un­ homed”  ﴾ u n h e i m l i c h,   t o   u s e   a   H e i d e g g e r i a n   t e r m ﴿   i s   t h e   e x t e n t   t o   w h i c h   w e   a r e  
a l s o   “d i s ­ placed ”.   W e   m u s t ,   t o   u s e   a n o t h e r   o f   H e i d e g g e r ’s   t e r m s ,   d w e l l ,   a n d   f i n d   w h a t   i t   m e a n s  
t o   d w e l l   [ 16] .  

<26>  d .   P l a c e   a s   F e e l i n g   o r   M o o d:   F o r   s o m e ,   p l a c e   i s   “f e e l i n g   m e a s u r e d   i n   o n e ’s muscles and 
bones. ”  P l a c e   m a y   c a u s e   t h i s   f e e l i n g ,   o r   m a y   s i m p l y   b e   i n d i c a t e d   b y   t h i s   f e e l i n g ,   b u t   i n   e i t h e r  
case place is attached to a long or short term psychological state. It might be that one simply 
h a s   a   f e e l i n g   a b o u t   p l a c e ,   a n d   t h e r e   i s   n o   f u r t h e r   d e f i n i t i o n .   F o r   i n s t a n c e ,   i n   P a u l   G r u c h o w ’s  
T h e   N e c e s s i t y   o f   E m p t y   P l a c e s  [ 17] ,   p l a c e   a s   a   c o n c e p t   i s   n e v e r   r e a l l y   e x p l o r e d   b u t   r a t h e r   t h e  
reader gets the feel of place as experiential. Place may be an immediate, pre ­ conceptual 
experience, and its knowledge then is intuitive rather than discursive. 

<27> Place may also evoke feeling, a subtly different understanding than place being feeling. 
“Place attachment ”,   f o r   i n s t a n c e ,   d e s i g n a t e s   t h e   f e e l i n g s   p e o p l e   h a v e   a b o u t   t h e i r   p l a c e s .    

<28> And, finally, place might communicate or represent feeling. Writers and cinematographers 
have long known that a well ­ represented place can be a character in the story. For example, we 
are prepared to understand narrative difference through the visual differences between the 
forests of Rivendell, Lothlorien and Fangorn Forest in the movie adaptation of  L o r d   o f   t h e  
R i n g s.   T h e   p l a c e ,   e v e n   w i t h o u t   a c t i o n   o r   d i a l o g u e ,   t e l l s   s o m e   o f   t h e   s t o r y ,   o r   a t   l e a s t   p r e p a r e s  
<27> Place may also evoke feeling, a subtly different understanding than place being feeling. 
“Place attachment ”,   f o r   i n s t a n c e ,   d e s i g n a t e s   t h e   f e e l i n g s   p e o p l e   h a v e   a b o u t   t h e i r   p l a c e s .    

<28> And, finally, place might communicate or represent feeling. Writers and cinematographers 
have long known that a well ­ represented place can be a character in the story. For example, we 
are prepared to understand narrative difference through the visual differences between the 
forests of Rivendell, Lothlorien and Fangorn Forest in the movie adaptation of  L o r d   o f   t h e  
R i n g s.   T h e   p l a c e ,   e v e n   w i t h o u t   a c t i o n   o r   d i a l o g u e ,   t e l l s   s o m e   o f   t h e   s t o r y ,   o r   a t   l e a s t   p r e p a r e s  
us for the kind of action or life that is possible in these places. 

<29>  e .   P l a c e   a s   t h e   S o c i a l   o r   I n t e n t i o n a l:   P l a c e   i s   n o t   o n l y   g e o g r a p h i c a l   l o c a t i o n ,   b u t   a l s o  
what happens. One geographical point may be several places; one place may have several 
l o c a t i o n s .   P l a c e s   m a y   “quote ”  o r   r e f e r   t o   o t h e r   p l a c e s   ﴾ “l i t t l e   I t a l y ”,   “Chinatown ”﴿ .   P l a c e   a l s o  
seems to be inextricably linked to social roles, and with the shattering of these traditional 
r o l e s   c o m e s   t h e   p r o f o u n d   s e n s e   o f   “placelessness ”  [ 18] .  

<30>  f .   P l a c e   a s   S y m b o l i c   O r d e r:   P l a c e   i s   s p a c e   i n v e s t e d   w i t h   s y m b o l i c   m e a n i n g .   M i c h e l   d e  
C e r t e a u   r e f e r s   t o   s p a c e   a s   “p r a c t i c e d   p l a c e ”,   o r   p l a c e   t h a t   h a s   h a d   t h e   m e a n i n g   o f   p r a c t i c e s  
imposed upon it. A street is a place that becomes a space when people walk on it and use it 
[ 19] .   P l a c e   i s   c u l t u r e   –  t h e   e a r t h   i s   “t e r r a   i n c o g n i t a ”,   e m p t y   s p a c e ,   u n t i l   c u l t u r e   ﴾ o r   i n   s o m e  
cases, a particular culture﴿ places its imprint. Culture may be the difference between the 
“place ”  o f   a n i m a l s ,   w h i c h   w e   c a l l   t h e i r   h a b i t a t ,   a n d   t h e   p l a c e   o f   h u m a n s ,   a n d   t o   t h e   e x t e n t   t h a t  
w e   a r e   w i l l i n g   t o   s e e   s y m b o l i c   o r d e r   i n   t h e   a n i m a l   w o r l d   ﴾ t h r o u g h   b i o ­   or zoo ­ s e m i o t i c s ﴿ ,   w e   m a y  
a l s o   s p e a k   o f   t h e m   a s   h a v i n g   p l a c e .   O t h e r   p l a n e t s   a r e   “no­ place ”  u n t i l   t h e y   a t   l e a s t   c a n   b e  
described, and perhaps until there is a human imprint that leaves an indication of symbolic 
order. To this extent, the moon is a place in a way that Pluto is not. 

<31>  g .   P l a c e   a s   T i m e:   T h e   w a y s   i n   w h i c h   p l a c e   b e c o m e s   t i m e   i s   e x t e n s i v e .   P l a c e   c a n   i m p l y  
recovery of the past, experience of the present, and anticipation of the future. Place often 
evokes references to the passing of time, to the difference that the place represents in 
different times, and to the necessity of memory in establishing a place. It can encode time in a 
fairly static or controlled form, as in a monument or memorial, or in a more fluid form, such as 
that made available in tradition. It can take the form of nostalgia or romanticism ﴾the place 
marks a particular past time, one that was preferable in some way﴿. History may be encoded in 
p l a c e :   “P l a c e   i s   s i g n i f i c a n t   i n   t h a t ,   f o r   t h e   A p a c h e ,   h i s t o r y   i s   c o n c e p t u a l i z e d   s p a t i a l l y ”  [ 20] .  
“F o r   t h e   F o i ,   p l a c e   i s   t h e   m o r e   t a n g i b l e   e x p r e s s i o n   o f   t e m p o r a l i t y   w h i c h   c a n   b e   e x p r e s s e d  
t hr o u g h   p o e t ic   im a g e s ”  [ 21]   .    

< 3 2 >   h .   P l a c e   a s   T r a n s c e n d e n c e   o r   M y t h o l o g y :  P l a c e   h a s   b e e n   e x p e r i e n c e d   a s   a   v o i c e ,   a   h e a l e r ,  
and a mystical guide. Among some religious thinkers, place becomes immanence or incarnation, the 
s p i r i t   m a d e   f l e s h   d w e l l i n g   a m o n g   u s .   “P l a c e   i s   s i g n i f i c a n t   i n   t h a t   G o d   m a d e   e n t r y   i n t o   t i m e   a n d  
s p a c e   ﴾ t h e   c o m b i n a t i o n   o f   w h i c h   c o n s t i t u t e s   p l a c e ﴿   w i t h   H i s   i n c a r n a t i o n   i n t o   C h r i s t ”  [ 22] .   A n d  
groups such as the Pintupi in Australia hold that the songlines, discernable to those who have 
the proper relationship to the land, stretch not only over geography but through time, back to 
t h e   c r e a t i o n   o f   t h e   w o r l d   [ 23] .  

B. Sketching Fog: Notes about the Uses of Place 

< 3 3 >   P l a c e   i s   p a r a d o x i c a l   i n   i t s   u s e s .   W r i t e r s   w a n t   t o   h a v e   p l a c e   d o   c o n t r a d i c t o r y   w o r k   –  h a r d l y  
anyone means to limit their application of the notion of place to only one of the senses I have 
listed here. This is not a bad thing; in fact, place is characterized by productive tension, the 
tendency to try to capture place using senses which are mutually contradictory, or which are 
mutually circular ﴾i.e., one requires the other to be true first﴿. Ultimately, place tries to 
approximate something which is both internal and external, both causal and caused, both held as 
d e e p l y   f e l t   “content ”  a n d   a s   s t r u c t u r i n g   “form ”.   S o ,   i t   s h o u l d   n o t   b e   a   s u r p r i s e   t h a t  
applications of place end up working on the edges of concepts, rather than at the core of them.

<34> Some of the tensions of place become evident as soon as we start to compare items on the 
list of uses of place. In many uses, it is clear that place serves to access or express an 
aspect of subject experience that has been lost. Many of the uses of place stand as indictments 
of existing modes of investigation of subjectivity, and existing social conditions. Yet, even 
these resisting uses exist in tension: 

l If the loss of subjectivity is described by a loss of individuality ﴾a dissipated 
spatialization﴿, then place becomes the place of the individual, the solid rock on which 
one stands. If, on the other hand, the loss of subjectivity is the loss of community and 
connection ﴾that is, the alienation and meaninglessness of hyper ­ individuality﴿, then place 
becomes the small ­ s c a l e   h u m a n   c o n n e c t i o n s   t h a t   b r i n g   b a c k   m e a n i n g .    
l If the threat is the oversimplification of life, then place is the chaotic and complex; if 
it is the overcomplexification of life, then place is the simple.  
l Many writers equate place with rootedness, yet some versions of place are rhizomatic ﴾to 
use Deleuze and Guattari ’s   c o n t r a s t ﴿ ,   t h a t   i s ,   o n e   “dwells by moving ”  r a t h e r   t h a n   b y  
remaining static.  
l P l a c e ,   f o r   s o m e ,   i s   m e d i a t i o n ,   t h e   “i n ­ between ”  s p a c e   b e t w e e n   s e l f   a n d   w o r l d ,   b e t w e e n  
indivuduals; for others, place is the poles that make connection possible.  
l For some, nature is a place, indeed, the quintessential place; for others, it is ﴾as the 
p o e t   D o n   M c K a y   p u t   i t ﴿ ,   “o t h e r w i s e   t h a n   p l a c e ”.   P l a c e   i s   “n a t u r e   t o   w h i c h   h i s t o r y   h a s  
happened ”,   a n d   a s   s u c h   i s   n o t   n a t u r e   a n y m o r e .    
l P l a c e   i s   f o r   s o m e   p e o p l e   t h a t   w h i c h   i s   c l o s e s t   t o   u s ;   f o r   o t h e r s ,   i t   i s   t h e   “o t h e r ”.   On one 
hand it can be that which is intuitive and immediate; on the other, it can be that which is 
foreign and in need of disciplined investigation.  
l A n d ,   i f   p l a c e   i s   i d e n t i t y ,   t h a t   s u g g e s t s   a   k i n d   o f   c e n t r a l i t y ,   a   “home”  f o r   t h e   s e l f ;   b u t  
i f   p l a c e   i s   i n   t r a n s i t i o n ,   i t   f i n d s   i t s e l f   u n ­ h o m e d ,   l i m i n a l ,   a l w a y s   a t   t h e   e d g e ,   homo 
v i a t o r.   T h e r e   i s   a n   a n t i c i p a t i o n   o f   a   h o m e   t h a t   o n e   h a s   n e v e r   h a d ,   a n d   a   d e f i n i t i o n   o f   s e l f  
in terms of that imagined place. Place, then, lies not behind but in front.  

<35> Contrasts and tensions, indeed, paradoxes, could be multiplied. The wide variation of uses 
becomes apparent as one looks at writers on place, and their attempts to identify exactly what 
it is that they are dealing with. Definitions abound. For example, it is not always clear 
whether place is the cause of subjectivity, or the effect. For some, this question is simply 
ignored; yet, one or the other is assumed as a person either talks about the effects of the 
place on the person, or the way that a person might be discovered or uncovered through the place
﴾s﴿ they find significant. 

<36> And, there is another tension, if we imagine that place is an aesthetic production. Arjun 
Appandurai explains: 

the problem of space in anthropology, [which is] the problem of place, that is, the 
problem of the culturally defined locations to which ethnographies refer. Such named 
locations, which often come to be identified with the groups that inhabit them, 
constitute the landscape of anthropology, in which the privileged locus is the often 
unnamed location of the ethnographer. Ethnography thus reflects the circumstantial 
﴾s﴿ they find significant. 

<36> And, there is another tension, if we imagine that place is an aesthetic production. Arjun 
Appandurai explains: 

the problem of space in anthropology, [which is] the problem of place, that is, the 
problem of the culturally defined locations to which ethnographies refer. Such named 
locations, which often come to be identified with the groups that inhabit them, 
constitute the landscape of anthropology, in which the privileged locus is the often 
unnamed location of the ethnographer. Ethnography thus reflects the circumstantial 
encounter of the voluntarily displaced anthropologist and the involuntarily localized 
“o t h e r . ”  [ 24]  

Appandurai points to yet another paradox of place, that we are both inside and outside of place, 
b o t h   o u r   o w n   p l a c e   a n d   t h e   p l a c e   o f   t h e   s u b j e c t   o f   r e s e a r c h .   T h e r e   i s   a   “c i r c u m s t a n t i a l  
encounter ”  i n   w h i c h   o n e   p a r t y   h a s   c o n t r o l   o v e r   p l a c e   ﴾ i . e . ,   h a s   b e c o m e   v o l u n t a r i l y   d i s p l a c e d ﴿ ,  
while the other must remain in place for the research to have any meaning. If it is the place 
that the ethnographer is researching, not simply the artifacts or customs and rituals, then the 
s u b j e c t   m u s t   m a i n t a i n   s o m e   a c c e s s   t o   t h a t   p l a c e   a n d   n o t   “move around. ”   

<3 7 >   A p p a n d u r a i   r a i s e s   a   c o u p l e   o f   v e r y   i n t e r e s t i n g   i s s u e s .   O n e   i s   t h e   i s s u e   o f   c o n t r o l ,   n o t  
over space but place, that is necessary for research to happen. There is a requirement of 
displacement for the researcher, and a requirement ﴾or assumption﴿ of emplacement for the 
s u b j e c t .   T h e   o t h e r   i s   t h e   i d e a   o f   t h e   p l a c e   o f   t h e   r e s e a r c h   i t s e l f .   W h a t   i s   t h e   p l a c e   o f   “place ” 
in anthropology? The place of place in a discipline, and the ability of the discipline to 
reflect on its own place in relation to other disciplines and to its objects of study is as much 
about place as is the tie that someone might feel to a literal place. There are identities at 
stake, habits, insiders and outsiders, and even forms of materiality that make the intellectual 
place what it is. 

<38> Even the reflection on the rhetoric of place, then, is an aesthetic production. It is not 
j u s t   t h e   s c i e n t i f i c   “reading ”  o f   a n   e x t e r n a l   g i v e n .   T h i s   m e a n s   t h a t   o u r   t a l k   a b o u t   p l a c e   m u s t  
not just map the kinds of places there are out there, the way that we might classify paintings 
according to the kinds of subject matter they portray. Much more interesting ﴾to continue the 
analogy﴿ is what the act of painting itself uncovers. How were the choices made for framing the 
place, for including ﴾for example﴿ the fog of London? What made that significant? It is the same 
question as Appandurai ’s ,   f o r   i t   a s k s   a b o u t   t h e   p l a c e   o f   t h e   r e s e a r c h e r / p a i n t e r ,   n o t   j u s t   t h e  
place that is being depicted. And yet, that place is not available to us without considering the 
kind of place London is, with fog or without. 

<39> What do we make of these tensions? It would be tempting to say that the tensions just 
reflect the different preoccupations of different writers, and are really of no consequence. 
Place is a concept that focusses the hopes of many people, and we should expect that these hopes 
are different. That is probably true, yet I think there is more here. I think that part of the 
appeal of place is precisely the tensions which it makes possible.

<40> And it is this productive tension that is best understood as aesthetic, in the sense that 
it makes possible the rhetorical and persuasive representation of place. The place that is 
captured and described in every detail is also the place that is lost. Only in the paradoxical 
tensions can we hope to make available the place which is before us. It is, perhaps, like other 
paradoxes that have been part of Western thought; for example: "God is an infinite sphere whose 
c i r c u m f e r e n c e   i s   e v e r y w h e r e   a n d   w h o s e   c e n t e r   i s   n o w h e r e "   [ 25] .   P e r h a p s   i t   i s   n o t   G o d   f o r   w h o m  
the circumference is everywhere and the centre is nowhere, but lived place. If everything is at 
the circumference, everything is at the boundary. Another implication of thinking of different 
versions of place in productive tension is that place becomes an edge, boundary, or threshold. 
It is at the edge of methodological approaches and different or competing uses. The difficulty 
o f   d e f i n i n g   p l a c e   a t t e s t s   t o   i t s   b e i n g   “on the edge ”  o f   e s s e n c e s .   I t   i s   a t   t h e   b o r d e r   o f   t h e  
subjective and objective, which is probably why phenomenology has been so interested in place. 
S p a c e   is   b o u n d e d ,   wh il e   p la c e  i s b ou n d a ry .  P l a ces  b eco m e  av ai l a bl e  w hen  t he  e dge s  bec om e  
apparent  –  g e o g r a p h i c a l   e d g e s ,   t e m p o r a l   e d g e s .   P a u l   V i r i l i o   a p p l i e s   t h i s   c i r c u m f e r e n c e / c e n t e r  
quotation in a very different manner. He speaks of the globalized, digitally connected world as 
“a   s o r t   o f   o m n i p o l i t a n   p e r i p h e r y   w h o s e   c e n t r e   w i l l   b e   n o w h e r e   a n d   c i r c u m f e r e n c e  
everywhere ”  [ 26] .   I n   a   c e r t a i n   s e n s e ,   t h i s   i s   t h e   o p p o s i t e   o f   p l a c e ,   b u t   i t   s u g g e s t s   t h e  
productive paradoxicality of the situation, that is, that place can both be about edges, but 
also about the end of edges. 

<41> Various other thinkers could be fruitfully explored in these terms. Liminality itself has a 
h o s t   o f   u s e s ,   i n c l u d i n g   s o m e   e x p l i c i t l y   r e l a t e d   t o   s p a c e   [ 27] .   F o u c a u l t ’s   h e t e r o t o p i a   [ 28]   a n d  
Soja ’s   T h i r d s p a c e   [ 29]   a r e   b o t h   e x a m p l e s   o f   a t t e m p t s   t o   a c c e s s   e d g e s .   B u t   p e r h a p s   m o s t   u s e f u l   i s  
N i c h o l a s   E n t r i k i n ’s   T h e   B e t w e e n n e s s   o f   P l a c e  [ 30] ,   w h i c h   a r g u e s   t h a t   t h e   e d g e s   o f   p l a c e ,   r a t h e r  
than the centre, defines the place in modernity. The primary edge is between particularizing and 
universalizing discourse about place, which comes with subjectifying and objectifying 
discourses. 

C. The Dangers of Fog 

<42> The standard objection to aestheticism is that it introduces relativism. After all, if 
representation is integral to place, what kind of analytic tool could it possibly be? We could 
not use the concept to ground empirical research in any way. It seems that it becomes a concept 
more suited to literature than to either the social sciences or to philosophy. 

<43> One of the results of relativism is the inability to discuss place as anything other than 
an uninterpretable given. What can one say, for instance, to someone whose experience and 
representation of place is limited to nostalgic or romantic depictions ﴾for example, the 
overwrought landscapes of Thomas Kinkade﴿? Can one say no more than that this is not my 
experience? Are we left with versions of place which are simply a matter of personal taste? Does 
my depiction of my place amount to the same thing as my choice of painting that I would hang on 
my wall?

<44> To simply regard place as aesthetic in a simplistic manner opens the door to regarding 
one ’s   o w n   r e p r e s e n t a t i o n s   a s   s e d u c t i v e   a n d   i r r e f u t a b l e .   T h e r e   a r e   p l e n t y   o f   e x a m p l e s   o f   a n  
a e s t h e t i c i z e d   v e r s i o n   o f   p l a c e   s e r v i n g   a s   t h e   p r e t e x t   f o r   a g g r e s s i v e   n a t i o n a l i s m .   T h e   N a z i   “B l u t  
und Boden”  i d e o l o g y   i s   o n l y   t h e   m o s t   e x t r e m e   a e s t h e t i c i z a t i o n   o f   p l a c e   t h a t   l e n t   a   m y t h o l o g i c a l  
impetus to geographical entitlement. Equally troubling are the myths of geographical entitlement 
t h a t   u n d e r g i r d   t h e   r e p r e h e n s i b l e   e u p h e m i s m   o f   “e t h n i c   c l e a n s i n g ”.   W e   m i g h t   a l s o   s e e   o t h e r  
nationalist myths such as the myth of the Wild West in the United States, or some of the myths 
surrounding Zionism, as having constructed a pretext for geographical entitlement. 

<45> Even with increasing suspicion toward modernism, and the attempt to recover voices 
marginalized by its universalizing tendencies, place may not be up to the task of actually 
explicating those voices. Roberto Dainotto, for example, argues that place ﴾understood in this 
c as e   a s   “region ”﴿   m y s t i f i e s   r a t h e r   t h a n   u n c o v e r s   m a r g i n a l i z e d   i d e n t i t y   e v e n   a s   i t   a t t e m p t s   t o  
g r o u n d   t h a t   i d e n t i t y   a f t e r   t h e   f a i l u r e   o f   m o d e r n i s t   c o n c e p t s   s u c h   a s   n a t i o n a l i s m   [ 31] .  

<46> Does place as an aesthetic concept ultimately fail, then, merely disguising latent desire 
surrounding Zionism, as having constructed a pretext for geographical entitlement. 

<45> Even with increasing suspicion toward modernism, and the attempt to recover voices 
marginalized by its universalizing tendencies, place may not be up to the task of actually 
explicating those voices. Roberto Dainotto, for example, argues that place ﴾understood in this 
c as e   a s   “region ”﴿   m y s t i f i e s   r a t h e r   t h a n   u n c o v e r s   m a r g i n a l i z e d   i d e n t i t y   e v e n   a s   i t   a t t e m p t s   t o  
g r o u n d   t h a t   i d e n t i t y   a f t e r   t h e   f a i l u r e   o f   m o d e r n i s t   c o n c e p t s   s u c h   a s   n a t i o n a l i s m   [ 31] .  

<46> Does place as an aesthetic concept ultimately fail, then, merely disguising latent desire 
or coercion? This is an ever present possibility, but I do not think it is a necessity. 
H e i d e g g e r ,   i n   “The Question Concerning Technology ”,   q u o t e s   H o l d e r l i n   a s   s a y i n g  

But where danger is, grows  
T h e   s a v i n g   p o w e r   a l s o   [ 32] .  

I t   i s   s i g n i f i c a n t   t h a t   h e   a l s o   i n c l u d e s   t h e   l i n e   “. . . p o e t i c a l l y   d w e l l s   m a n   u p o n   t h i s   e a r t h . ” 
Heidegger is interested in place here, specifically ﴾poetic﴿ dwelling, and one need not 
necessarily subscribe to his version of dwelling to recognize that a concept like place may be a 
two ­ e d g e d   s w o r d .   I f   w e   s u p p o s e   t h a t   o u r   t a s k   i s   t o   d e f i n e   p l a c e   i n   s o m e   e s s e n t i a l i s t   m a n n e r ,   o r  
turn it into a tool or methodological component in some overall disciplinary structure, we have 
tamed it. We can certainly use it that way, but what we have lost is its ability to give access 
to the less articulable aspects of human experience. Place, finally, shows us as we are, 
individually and collectively, as researchers and as inhabitants of a society. 

<47> The problem comes when we are not aware of what the concept of place is meant to 
accomplish. Is it serving to undergird colonizing impulses? Is it protecting tradition, with all 
the positive and negative implications that has? Is it demarcating the other ﴾even literally, 
t e l l i n g   u s   w h o   l i v e s   “o n   t h e   o t h e r   s i d e   o f   t h e   t r a c k s ”﴿ .   I s   i t   c o n s t r u c t i n g   a   f u t u r e   ﴾ o r  
necessitating one﴿, and whose future is it? Is it establishing a canon? Defining a methodology 
or object of study? Allowing commercial or corporate interests a point of access to a community? 
What does place do? It is only in finding the contradictory impulses and uses that we can move 
t h e   p e r v a s i v e   c o n c e p t   o f   p l a c e   f r o m   m e r e l y   b e i n g   a n o t h e r   u s e f u l   t o o l   i n   t h e   a c a d e m i c ’s   t o o l b o x ,  
and both allow it to challenge academic assumptions and give access to lifeworlds.

Endnotes 

[ 1 ]   O s c a r   W i l d e ,   “The Decay of Lying ”  i n   T h e   C o l l e c t e d   W o r k s   o f   O s c a r   W i l d e.   W a r e ,   U K :  
Wordsworth Editions, 1997: 793. I would like to thank Keith Harder for useful discussion about 
a s p e c t s   o f   t h i s   p a p e r ,   i n c l u d i n g   t h e   t i t l e   r e f e r e n c e .   [ ^]  

[ 2 ]   E r n s t   G o m b r i c h ,   A r t   a n d   I l l u s i o n :   A   S t u d y   i n   t h e   P s y c h o l o g y   o f   P i c t o r i a l   R e p r e s e n t a t i o n.  
Princeton University Press, 1969: 324. [ ^]  

[3 ] To get a sense of the sheer range of scholarship on place, see my Research on Place and 
Space website, at < http://pegasus.cc.ucf.edu/~janzb/place/ >   [ ^]  

[ 4 ]   H e n r i   L e f e b v r e ,   T h e   P r o d u c t i o n   o f   S p a c e.   B l a c k w e l l ,   1 9 9 1 :   3 9 .   [ ^ ]  

[ 5 ]   J .   B .   J a c k s o n ,   A   S e n s e   o f   P l a c e ,   A   S e n s e   o f   T i m e.   N e w   H a v e n :   Y a l e   U n i v e r s i t y   P r e s s ,   1 9 9 4 .  
[ ^]  

[ 6 ]   B a r r y   L o p e z ,   A r c t i c   D r e a m s :   I m a g i n a t i o n   a n d   D e s i r e   i n   a   N o r t h e r n   L a n d s c a p e. New York: Random 
House, 1986. [ ^]  

[ 7 ]   N a n c y   M a i r s ,   Remembering the Bone House: An Erotics of Place and Space.  New York: Harper & 
Row, 1989; Beacon Press, 1995. [ ^ ]  

[ 8 ]   L u c y   L i p p a r d ,   T h e   L u r e   o f   t h e   L o c a l :   S e n s e s   o f   P l a c e   i n   a   M u l t i c e n t e r e d   S o c i e t y.   N e w   Y o r k :  
The New Press, 1997. [ ^ ]  

[9 ] John Locke. "Book II, Chapter XIII: Complex Ideas of Simple Modes, and First, of the Simple 
M o d e s   o f   t h e   I d e a   o f   S p a c e "   i n   An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Prometheus Books, 1994. 
[ ^]  

[10 ]   L e e   C a r a g a t a ,   " N e w   M e a n i n g s   o f   P l a c e :   T h e   P l a c e   o f   t h e   P o o r   a n d   t h e   L o s s   o f   P l a c e   a s   a  
Center of Mediation" in Andrew Light & Jonathan Smith, eds,  Philosophies of Place: Philosophy 
a n d   G e o g r a p h y   I I I .  L a n h a m :   R o w m a n   a n d   L i t t l e f i e l d ,   1 9 9 9 .   [ ^ ]  

[11 ]   M i c h a e l   K e i t h   &   S t e v e   P i l e ,   P l a c e   a n d   t h e   P o l i t i c s   o f   I d e n t i t y.   N e w   Y o r k :   R o u t l e d g e ,   1 9 9 3 :  
6 .   [ ^]  

[12 ]   S e e   J a n e   H o w a r t h ,   “I n   P r a i s e   o f   B a c k y a r d s :   T o w a r d   a   P h e n o m e n o l o g y   o f   P l a c e . ” 
<http://www.lancs.ac.uk/users/philosophy/resources%20rtf%20filesn%20praise%20of%20backyards.pdf >  
[ ^]  

[13 ]   B a r r y   B r o w n ,   “Geographies of Technology: Some Comments on Place, Space and Technology. ” 
<http://www.fxpal.com/ConferencesWorkshops/ECSCW2001/brown.doc >   [ ^ ]  

[14 ]   D a v i d   W e l c h m a n   G e g e o ,   " C u l t u r a l   R u p t u r e   a n d   I n d i g e n e i t y :   T h e   C h a l l e n g e   o f   ﴾ R e ﴿ v i s i o n i n g  
" P l a c e "   i n   t h e   P a c i f i c . "   T h e   C o n t e m p o r a r y   P a c i f i c  1 3 : 2   ﴾ F a l l   2 0 0 1 ﴿ :   4 9 1 ­ 5 0 7 .   [ ^ ]  

[15 ]   R o b e r t   S a c k ,   Homo Geographicus: A Framework for Action, Awareness and Moral Concern.   J o h n s  
Hopkins Press 1997. [ ^]  

[16 ]   M a r t i n   H e i d e g g e r ,   " B u i l d i n g   D w e l l i n g   T h i n k i n g "   i n   H e i d e g g e r ,   P o e t r y ,   L a n g u a g e ,   T h o u g h t.  


Trans. A. Hofstadter. New York: Harper & Row, 1971. [ ^]  

[17 ]   P a u l   G r u c h o w ,   T h e   N e c e s s i t y   o f   E m p t y   P l a c e s.   N e w   Y o r k :   S t .   M a r t i n ' s   P r e s s ,   1 9 8 5 .   [ ^ ]  

[18 ]   T h i s   i s   t h e   a r g u m e n t   i n   J o s h u a   M e y r o w i t z ,   N o   S e n s e   o f   P l a c e :   T h e   I m p a c t   o f   E l e c t r o n i c   M e d i a  
o n   S o c i a l   B e h a v i o u r.   O x f o r d :   O x f o r d   U n i v e r s i t y   P r e s s ,   1 9 8 5 .   [ ^ ]  

[19 ]   M i c h e l   d e   C e r t e a u ,   T h e   P r a c t i c e   o f   E v e r y d a y   L i f e.   B e r k e l e y :   U n i v e r s i t y   o f   C a l i f o r n i a   P r e s s ,  
1984: 117. [ ^]  

[20 ]   K e i t h   B a s s o ,   " W i s d o m   S i t s   i n   P l a c e s :   N o t e s   o n   a   W e s t e r n   A p a c h e   L a n d s c a p e . "   S t e v e n   F e l d   a n d  


K e i t h   H .   B a s s o ,   S e n s e s   o f   P l a c e .  S a n t a   F e ,   N M :   S c h o o l   o f   A m e r i c a n   R e s e a r c h   P r e s s ,   1 9 9 6 .   [ ^ ]  

[21 ]   J a m e s   W e in e r ,   The Empty Place: Poetry, Space, and Being among the Foi of Papua New Guinea.  
Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991. [ ^]  

[22 ]   G e o f f r e y   L i l b u r n e ,   A   S e n s e   o f   P l a c e :   A   C h r i s t i a n   T h e o l o g y   o f   t h e   L a n d.   N a s h v i l l e :   A b i n g d o n  
1984: 117. [ ^]  

[20 ]   K e i t h   B a s s o ,   " W i s d o m   S i t s   i n   P l a c e s :   N o t e s   o n   a   W e s t e r n   A p a c h e   L a n d s c a p e . "   S t e v e n   F e l d   a n d  


K e i t h   H .   B a s s o ,   S e n s e s   o f   P l a c e .  S a n t a   F e ,   N M :   S c h o o l   o f   A m e r i c a n   R e s e a r c h   P r e s s ,   1 9 9 6 .   [ ^ ]  

[21 ]   J a m e s   W e in e r ,   The Empty Place: Poetry, Space, and Being among the Foi of Papua New Guinea.  
Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991. [ ^]  

[22 ]   G e o f f r e y   L i l b u r n e ,   A   S e n s e   o f   P l a c e :   A   C h r i s t i a n   T h e o l o g y   o f   t h e   L a n d.   N a s h v i l l e :   A b i n g d o n  
Press, 1989. [ ^]  

[23 ]   S e e   B r u c e   C h a t w i n ,   T h e   S o n g l i n e s.   P e n g u i n ,   1 9 8 7 ;   F r e d   M y e r s .   P i n t u p i   C o u n t r y ,   P i n t u p i   S e l f :  
S e n t i m e n t ,   P l a c e ,   a n d   P o l i t i c s   A m o n g   W e s t e r n   D e s e r t   A b o r i g i n e s.   B e r k e l e y :   U n i v e r s i t y   o f  
C a l i f o r n i a   P r e s s ,   1 9 9 1 .   [ ^]  

[24 ]   A r j u n   A p p a n d u r a i ,   “P l a c e   a n d   V o i c e   i n   A n t h r o p o l o g i c a l   T h e o r y ”  C u l t u r a l   A n t h r o p o l o g y  3 : 1  
﴾ 1 9 8 8 ﴿ :   1 6 .   [ ^]  

[25 ]   V a r i o u s l y   a s c r i b e d   t o   t h e   H e r m e t i c   p h i l o s o p h e r s ,   A l a n   o f   L i l l e ,   N i c h o l a s   o f   C u s a ,   P a s c a l ,  
and Emerson. This quotation has not only been ascribed to several people, it has also been used 
n o t   o n l y   o f   G o d ,   b u t   o f   f e a r ,   t h e   s e l f ,   a n d   t h e   u n i v e r s e   a s   w e l l .   [ ^]  

[26 ]   P a u l   V i r i l i o ,   T h e   A r t   o f   t h e   M o t o r .  M i n n e a p o l i s :   U n i v e r s i t y   o f   M i n n e s o t a   P r e s s ,   1 9 9 5 :   3 6 .  
[ ^]  

[27 ]   N i g e l   R a p p o r t   &   J o a n n a   O v e r i n g ,   S o c i a l   a n d   C u l t u r a l   A n t h r o p o l o g y :   T h e   K e y   C o n c e p t s.  
Routledge, 2000: 229 ­ 2 3 6 .   [ ^ ]  

[28 ]   M i c h e l   F o u c a u l t ,   " O f   O t h e r   S p a c e s "   D i a c r i t i c s  1 6   ﴾ S p r i n g   1 9 8 6 ﴿ :   2 2 ­ 2 7 .   S e e   a l s o   L e a c h ,  


N e i l .   R e t h i n k i n g   A r c h i t e c t u r e :   A   R e a d e r   i n   C u l t u r a l   T h e o r y.   R o u t l e d g e ,   1 9 9 7 :   3 5 0 ­ 3 5 6 .   [ ^ ]  

[29 ]   E d w a r d   S o j a ,   T h i r d s p a c e.   O x f o r d :   B l a c k w e l l :   1 9 9 6 .   [ ^ ]  

[30 ]   N i c h o l a s   J .   E n t r i k i n , ,   The Betweenness of Place: Towards A Geography Of Modernity. 
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991. [ ^]  

[31 ]   R o b e r t o   D a i n o t t o ,   P l a c e   i n   L i t e r a t u r e :   R e g i o n s ,   C u l t u r e s ,   C o m m u n i t i e s.   C o r n e l l   U n i v e r s i t y  
P r e s s ,   2 0 0 0 :   3 f f .   [ ^]  

[32 ]   M a r t i n   H e i d e g g e r ,   “The Question Concerning Technology ”  i n   T h e   Q u e s t i o n   C o n c e r n i n g  
Technology and Other Essays.   N e w   Y o r k :   H a r p e r   &   R o w ,   1 9 7 7 :   3 4 .   [ ^ ]  

 
ISSN: 1547 ­ 4 3 4 8 .   A l l   m a t e r i a l   c o n t a i n e d   w i t h i n   t h i s   s i t e   i s   c o p y r i g h t e d   b y   t h e   i d e n t i f i e d  
a u t h o r .   I f   n o   a u t h o r   i s   i d e n t i f i e d   i n   r e l a t i o n   t o   c o n t e n t ,   t h a t   c o n t e n t   i s   ©  R e c o n s t r u c t i o n ,  
2002 ­ 2005.