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Name: ___________________________________________ Mr.

Sean Kullman
Understanding
Shakespeares
Language:
A study packet
Avaunt ye, thou unspeaking sot, thou most credulous
lackey, and pigeon-liver breeder of fools!
Contents: Page Number:
Puzzle of the Day 2
Puzzle of the Day 3
Notes: Word Arrangement
Sha!es"eare #$ne %nter"retat$on &'(
Puzzle of the Day: )ranslat$ng Sha!es"eare*s #anguage +
,lossary -
Sha!es"earean %nsults .
Sha!es"eare*s Sonnets /0'//
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PUZZLE OF THE DAY: Why are these
names and phrases grouped together?
(Hint: it might help to say them aloud.)
Tickey Donnelly
Forgo the fortune.
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Renee Austin
Charles Coulter
Jamie Henry
Aiden Leddy
Edward Palka
Kerri Raimo
Matthew Reiter
Lonely sapling
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Jessica Cargan
Mariah Frazier
Run the course fine horse.
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OK. Now where do these names fit in? Do
any of them need to be in a category by
themselves?
Ian deGrouchy
Oludunmade Ologunde
Gabrielle Rodriquez
Yoo Shim
Kyle Yerger
If we call Gabrielle Rodriquez Gabby
Rodriquez, does she now have a group?
Why wouldnt Ian deGrouchy be in the
same group as Jessica Cargan?
Which category is the most common? Why
do you think that is?
Hanna Bech
Athan Blaine
Casey Hirst
Allen Kouch
Fifty feet.
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PUZZLE OF THE DAY: Put these inverted sentences in "normal" order.
(SUBJECT VERB OBJECT)
(VERB OBJECT ADJECTIVE)
1. "If this be known to you."
2. "Gone she is."
3. "If she in chains of magic were not bound."
4. "To my unfolding lend your prosperous ear."
5. "My Desdemona must I leave to thee."
6. "What say'st thou?"
7. "What from the cape can you discern at sea?"
8. "The ship is here put in."
9. "Look you to the guard tonight."
10. "When this advice is free I give and honest."
11. "When devils will the blackest sins put on"
12. "These letters give, Iago, to the pilot."
13. "the souls of all my tribe defend from jealousy."
14. "I humbly do beseech you of your pardon/ For too much loving you."
15. "If after every tempest comes such calms"
Notes: Reading Shakespeare's Plays: Word Arrangement
Language
1efore you start to read Sha!es"eare2s "lays3 you 4$ll 4ant to ta!e a loo! at some of the
language uses that m$ght stand $n your 4ay of understand$ng the s5r$"t. %n h$s 6oo!3 Unlocking
Shakespeare's Language3 7andal 7o6$nson 6rea!s the language 6arr$ers $nto three ma$n
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5ategor$es: Sha!es"eare2s 8nusual Arrangements of Words3 Sha!es"eare2s )rou6lesome
9m$ss$ons : Words Not ;u$te 9ur 94n.
Unusual Word Arrangements
Many of my students ha<e as!ed me $f "eo"le really s"o!e the 4ay they do $n Sha!es"eare2s
"lays. )he ans4er $s no. Sha!es"eare 4rote the 4ay he d$d for "oet$5 and dramat$5 "ur"oses.
)here are many reasons 4hy he d$d th$s''to 5reate a s"e5$f$5 "oet$5 rhythm3 to em"has$ze a
5erta$n 4ord3 to g$<e a 5hara5ter a s"e5$f$5 s"ee5h "attern3 et5. #et2s ta!e a loo! at a great
e=am"le from 7o6$nson2s Unlocking Shakespeare's Language.
% ate the sand4$5h.
% the sand4$5h ate.
Ate the sand4$5h %.
Ate % the sand4$5h.
)he sand4$5h % ate.
)he sand4$5h ate %.
7o6$nson sho4s us that these four 4ords 5an 5reate s$= un$>ue senten5es that 5arry the same
mean$ng. When you are read$ng Sha!es"eare2s "lays3 loo! for th$s ty"e of unusual 4ord
arrangement. #o5ate the su6?e5t3 <er63 and the o6?e5t of the senten5e. Not$5e that the o6?e5t of
the senten5e $s often "la5ed at the 6eg$nn$ng @the sand4$5hA $n front of the <er6 @ateA and su6?e5t
@%A. 7earrange the 4ords $n the order that ma!es the most sense to you @% ate the sand4$5hA. )h$s
4$ll 6e one of your f$rst ste"s $n ma!$ng sense of Sha!es"eare2s language.
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Shakespeare Line Interpretation Part !
D%7BC)%9NS: Wr$te the mean$ng of ea5h of the follo4$ng >uotes $n your o4n 4ords.
/. What*s gone and 4hat*s "ast hel" should 6e "ast gr$ef.
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2. )here $s noth$ng e$ther good or 6ad 6ut th$n!$ng ma!es $t so.
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3. )o 6e honest3 as th$s 4orld goes3 $s to 6e one man "$5!ed out of ten thousand.
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. Assume a <$rtue3 $f you ha<e $t not.
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&. Although the last3 not least.
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(. Noth$ng 4$ll 5ome of noth$ng.
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+. )he e<$l that men do l$<es after themD the good $s oft*$nterred 4$th the$r 6ones.
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-. Ne$ther a 6orro4er nor a lender 6eD for loan oft loses 6oth $tself and fr$end.
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.. And all my fortunes at thy foot %*ll layD And follo4 thee my lord throughout the 4orld.
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Shakespeare Line Interpretation Part "
D%7BC)%9NS: Wr$te the mean$ng of ea5h of the follo4$ng >uotes $n your o4n 4ords.
/. What*s $n a nameE )hat 4h$5h 4e 5all a rose
1y any other name 4ould smell as s4eet.F
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2. GHor you and % are "ast our dan5$ng days.F
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3. GDreams are the 5h$ldren of an $dle 6ra$n.F
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. GWhat great ones do the less 4$ll "rattle of.F
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&. GF9 ho4 6$tter a th$ng $t $s to loo! $nto ha""$ness through another man*s eyesIF
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(. G%t $s a 4$se father that !no4s h$s o4n 5h$ld.F
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+. GS"ea! lo4 $f you s"ea! lo<e.F
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-. GJou taught me languageD and my "rof$t on*t $s % !no4 ho4 to 5urse.F
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.. G)h$ngs 4$thout all remedy 4ould 6e 4$thout regardD What*s done $s done.F
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PUZZLE OF THE DAY: Translating Shakespeares Language
Translate the following sentences from Shakespeare's Language to Modern Language:
- Prithee, let us repair post-haste to yonder tavern for a pot of sack and some capon.
- Yon wench seems in a choler. Her humour hath been thus sith days of yore.
- I'faith, the caitiff hath been justly punished for cozening divers townsfolk.
- Yon jade hath not the worth of a groat, so it is bootless to parley further.
- Con this page for divers conceits.
Translate the following sentences from Modern Language to Shakespeare's Language:
- Honestly, I think your face has the look of a worn-out horse.
- Go away! I've had enough of this quarrelling between you two.
- Honestly, I cannot drink this unpleasant wine.
- Let's make our way to the pub and have a talk about this terrible business immediately.
- I suspect you've got some terrible burden on your mind. It's pointless to worry over it.
- That wretched coward has cheated you. I would be inclined to testify how he has treated
you in a harmful manner.
GLOSSARY:
Avaunt - go away!
Betimes - soon
Bootless - useless
Caitiff - cowardly wretch
Capon - chicken
Choler - irritable temper
Con - study; to know
Conceit - idea
Cozen - cheat
Divers - various
Drab - an immoral person; a slut
Entreat - beg, plead
E're - before
Enow - enough
Fain - inclined to
Fardel - burden
Fell - terrible
Forsooth - truly, honestly
Groat - a small coin
Humour - mood
Husbandry - maintenance
Ifaith - honestly (literally, "in faith")
Jade - worn out horse
Jakes - lavatory; toilet
Lest - unless
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Methinks - I think
Naught - nothing
Noisome - harmful
O'er - over
Parley - talk
Pate - head
Prithee - I beg you
Quaff - drink
Repair - make your way to
Riggish - playful
Rude - rough
Sack - wine
Sith - since or because
Taper - candle
Varlet - low class rogue
Visage - face
Welkin - young woman
Yore - ago or time gone
Zounds! - God's wounds! (a curse)
Lief - prefer ( I had as lief)
Glossary Continued
a#kno$n: a4are.
agni%e: a5!no4ledge.
anters: 5a<es.
a patient list: the l$m$ts of "at$en5e
bark: a small sh$"
betimes: at on5e.
bootless: uselessD <a$nly.
#aiti&&: 4ret5h @term of endearmentA.
#allet: 4hore.
#ertes: assuredly. @for 5ertes means Kfor
5erta$nKA
#loset: 6edroom
#ollied: dar!ened.
#ompliment e'tern: out4ard a""earan5e
#ontinuate: un$nterru"ted.
#ourt o& guard: head>uarters
#o%en: 5heat
#rossed: o""osed
#rush a #up: a 5ommon 5ollo>u$al e="ress$on
$n Bl$za6ethan Bngl$sh 5om"ara6le to K5ra5!
o"en a 6ottle
#ry you mer#y: 6eg your "ardon
da$s: ?a5!da4s3 or fools
denotement: 5areful o6ser<at$on
dilate: tell fully
do my duties: <o$5e my loyalty
en#a(e: h$de
en#ha&ed: angry
endues: 6r$ngs
engluts: de<ours
ensteeped: su6merged
en(y: hatredD mal$5e.
en$heel: en5om"ass
&at: am$a6le and sat$sf$ed.
&opped: du"ed
&ordid: destroyed
&rie%e: rough 5loth
gauntlet: armored glo<e flung do4n as a
5hallenge
grise: degree
groundlings: the "oorer and less 5r$t$5al
se5t$on of the aud$en5e 4ho stood $n the "$t
guttered: ?agged
hea(e the gorge: <om$t
horned man's: 5u5!old2s @a man 4hose 4$fe
5heats on h$mA
house$i(es: huss$es
import: 5on5ern
indign: un4orthy
ingra&t: ha6$tual
lo$n: ras5al
ma%%ard: head
might not but: must
moo: more
)oor: someone of Afr$5an des5entD dar!
mountebanks: >ua5! med$5$ne
odd*e(en: 6et4een n$ght and day
out o& $arrant: un?ust$f$a6leD unfa$r
plume up: grat$fy
portan#e: 6eha<$or
pra#ti#ing upon: "lott$ng aga$nst
puddled: mudd$edD d$rt$ed
put on: $n5$te
rank garb: gross manner
seel: 6l$nd3 5lose
sel&*bounty: $nherent goodness
se+uestration: se"arat$on
s$ag*bellied: loose'6ell$ed
trimmed: dressed u"
unbend: rela=
unbitted: un5ontrolled
unhoused: unrestra$ned
unpro(ide: unsettle
yerked: sta66ed
thee, thou, thy: J98
thine: J987S
mays't: may
o$es't: o4ns
$hilst: 4h$le
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gull: de5e$<e and tr$5!
No$ you #an make your o$n Shakespearean insults-
)o ma!e a Sha!es"earean $nsult3 5om6$ne a 4ord or "hrase from ea5h of the f$<e 5olumns.
Hor e=am"le: A4ay % say3 thou artless 6eetle'headed 6ladderI
Column / Column 2 Column 3 Column Column &
A4ay % say
1athe thyself
1e not deaf
1ehold thy m$rror
1e4are my st$ng
Clean th$ne ears
Dr$n! u" e$sel
Bat a 5ro5od$le
Bat my !n$5!ers
H$e u"on thee
Horsooth say %
,et thee gone
,et thee hen5e
,ro4 uns$ghtly 4arts
Lear me no4
Lear th$s "o= alert
%2ll see thee hang2d
K$ss my 5od"$e5e
#ead a"es $n hell
Meth$n!s you st$n!s
My f$nger $n th$ne eye
GPhu$FD % say
7emo<e th$ne ass hen5e
7es$gn not thy day g$g
S$t thee on a s"$t
Sorro4 on thee
S4$m 4$th lee5hes
)hou dost $ntrude
)hy mother 4ears armor
)r$" on thy s4ord
)une thy lute
Why3 ho4 no4 "utz
W$"e thy ugly fa5e
thou artless
6a4dy
6eslu66er$ng
6ootless
5an!erous
5hurl$sh
5louted
5ra<en
dron$ng
fa4n$ng
fool'6orn
frothy
goat$sh
gor6ell$ed
$ll'nurtured
$m"ert$nent
$n5ura6le
$nfe5t$ous
loggerheaded
lum"$sh
mangled
"aun5hy
"u!$ng
"uny
>uall$ng
ran!
ree!y
rogu$sh
rum"'fed
rutt$sh
sau5y
s"ongy
surly
totter$ng
unmuzzled
<a$n
<enomed
4ar"ed
addle"ated
6ase'5ourt
6at'fo4l$ng
6eef'4$tted
6eetle'headed
6o$l'6ra$ned
5la""er'5la4ed
5lay'6ra$ned
5ommon'
!$ss$ng
5roo!'"ated
d$smal'
dream$ng
d$zzy'eyed
elf's!$nned
fly'6$tten
folly'fallen
fool'6orn
foul'"ra5t$5$ng
guts'gr$"$ng
half'fa5ed
hasty'4$tted
hedge'6orn
hell'hated
$dle'headed
$ll'6reed$ng
$ll'nurtured
!notty'"ated
mad'6ra$ned
m$l!'l$<ered
motley'm$nded
on$on'eyed
"o='mar!ed
reel$ng'r$"e
rough'he4n
rude'gro4$ng
rum"'fed
s4ag'6ell$ed
a""le'?ohn
6aggage
6arna5le
6ladder
6oar'"$g
6ug6ear
5lot"ole
5o=5om6
5od"$e5e
death'to!en
dotard
fla"'dragon
fla='4en5h
flea
fl$rt'g$ll
foot'l$5!er
gudgeon
haggard
hedge'"$g
horn'6east
hugger'mugger
?olthead
!na<e
le4dster
lout
maggot'"$e
measle
m$nno4
n$t
nut'hoo!
"$gnut
"um"$on
rats6ane
rudes6y
s5ut
s!a$nsmate
strum"et
<arlot
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4ay4ard
4ret5hed
toad's"otted
4eather'6$tten
<assal
4agta$l
S.NN/0 "1
When $n d$sgra5e 4$th fortune and men2s eyes3
% all alone 6e4ee" my out5ast state3
And trou6le deaf Lea<en 4$th my 6ootless 5r$es3
And loo! u"on myself3 and 5urse my fate3
W$sh$ng me l$!e to one more r$5h $n ho"e3
Heatur2d l$!e h$m3 l$!e h$m 4$th fr$ends "ossess2d3
Des$r$ng th$s man2s art3 and that man2s s5o"e3
W$th 4hat % most en?oy 5ontented least:
Jet $n these thoughts myself almost des"$s$ng3
La"ly % th$n! on thee3''and then my state
@#$!e to the lar! at 6rea! of day ar$s$ng
Hrom sullen earthA s$ngs hymns at hea<en2s gateD
Hor thy s4eet lo<e remem6er2d su5h 4ealth 6r$ngs
)hat then % s5orn to 5hange my state 4$th !$ngs2.
S.NN/0 !!2
#et me not to the marr$age of true m$nds
Adm$t $m"ed$ments. #o<e $s not lo<e
Wh$5h alters 4hen $t alterat$on f$nds3
9r 6ends 4$th the remo<er to remo<e:
9 noI $t $s an e<er'f$=ed mar!
)hat loo!s on tem"ests and $s ne<er sha!enD
%t $s the star to e<ery 4ander$ng 6ar!3
Whose 4orth2s un!no4n3 although h$s he$ght 6e ta!en.
#o<e2s not )$me2s fool3 though rosy l$"s and 5hee!s
W$th$n h$s 6end$ng s$5!le2s 5om"ass 5ome:
#o<e alters not 4$th h$s 6r$ef hours and 4ee!s3
1ut 6ears $t out e<en to the edge of doom.
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%f th$s 6e error and u"on me "ro<ed3
% ne<er 4r$t3 nor no man e<er lo<ed.
S.NN/0 !3
Shall % 5om"are thee to a summer2s dayE
)hou art more lo<ely and more tem"erate:
7ough 4$nds do sha!e the darl$ng 6uds of May3
And summer2s lease hath all too short a date:
Somet$me too hot the eye of hea<en sh$nes3
And often $s h$s gold 5om"le=$on d$mmed3
And e<ery fa$r from fa$r somet$me de5l$nes3
1y 5han5e3 or nature2s 5hang$ng 5ourse untr$mmed:
1ut thy eternal summer shall not fade3
Nor lose "ossess$on of that fa$r thou o42st3
Nor shall death 6rag thou 4ander2st $n h$s shade3
When $n eternal l$nes to t$me thou gro42st3
So long as men 5an 6reathe3 or eyes 5an see3
So long l$<es th$s3 and th$s g$<es l$fe to thee.
S.NN/0 4"
93 lest the 4orld should tas! you to re5$te
What mer$t l$<ed $n me3 that you should lo<e
After my death3 dear lo<e3 forget me >u$te3
Hor you $n me 5an noth$ng 4orthy "ro<eD
8nless you 4ould de<$se some <$rtuous l$e3
)o do more for me than m$ne o4n desert3
And hang more "ra$se u"on de5eased %
)han n$ggard truth 4ould 4$ll$ngly $m"art:
93 lest your true lo<e may seem false $n th$s3
)hat you for lo<e s"ea! 4ell of me untrue3
My name 6e 6ur$ed 4here my 6ody $s3
And l$<e no more to shame nor me nor you.
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Hor % am shamed 6y that 4h$5h % 6r$ng forth3
And so should you3 to lo<e th$ngs noth$ng 4orth.
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