You are on page 1of 50

DER ANSCHNITT 

ZEITSCHRIFT FÜR KUNST UND KULTUR IM BERGBAU 

BEIHEFT 9 

The Beginnings of Metallurgy

Proceedings of the International Conference 
„The Beginnings of Metallurgy", 
Bochum 1995

Editors:

Andreas Hauptmann 
Ernst Pernicka 
Thilo Rehren 
Ünsal Yalçin 

Bochum
1999 

The International Symposium „The Beginnings of 
Metallurgy" was supported by the Volkswagen­
Stiftung, Hannover, by Kontron Phystech GmbH, 
Eching/Munich, and by Norddeutsche Affinerie, 
Hamburg.

The publication of the proceedings was supported 
by Deutsches Bergbau­Museum Bochum and 
Vereinigung der Freunde für Kunst und Kultur im 
Bergbau e.V., Bochum. 

Montanhistorische Zeitschrift DER ANSCHNITT. Beiheft 9 
= Veröffentlichungen aus dem Deutschen
Bergbau­Museum, Nr. 84 

Druck 
DZS GmbH Essen 

Die Deutsche Bibliothek ­ CIP­Einheitsaufnahme
The beginnings of metallurgy: proceedings of the International 
Conference The Beginnings of Metallurgy, Bochum 1995 / 
Andreas Hauptmann ... ­ Bochum: Dt. Bergbau­Museum, 1999
(Veröffentlichungen aus dem Deutschen Bergbau­Museum 
Bochum; Nr. 84) (Der Anschnitt: Beiheft: 9) 

ISBN 3­921533­63­5 
The Beginnings of Metallurgy Der Anschnitt, Beiheft 9, 1999 

[p. 67]

Giorgi Leon Kavtaradze

The importance of metallurgical data for 
the formation of a Central Transcaucasian 
chronology 

Archaeology in Georgia, as in other countries, is the science which studies human 
activities in the past and tries to reconstruct this past as comprehensively as possible. 
It was stated that the past is the main thing in our life, everything that exists belongs to 
it (A. France). Indeed, to reconstruct the past, archaeology needs as many ingredients 
based on the full range of technical and natural sciences as life itself is diverse. More 
and more archaeology becomes a meeting field for various sciences. 
As scientific development is easily attainable in the zones of contacts and interactions 
between different sciences, completely new perspectives are opened for archaeology 
through its integration in other sciences. Archaeometallurgy is among the most 
important branches developed in consequence of this qualitative change ­ or better: the 
transformation of archaeology. 

In Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, three laboratories carry out analysis of metal 
artefacts: the State Museum of Georgia, the Metallurgical Institute and the Centre for 
Archaeological Studies. The metal inventory was investigated by Josef Grdzelishvili, 
Ferdinand Tavadze, Tamar Sakvarelidze, Rusudan Bachtadze, Tsisana Abesadze, Tina 
Dvali, Givi Inanishvili, Teimuraz Mudzhiri, Natela Saradzhishvili and others. 

The study of metal and other kinds of artefacts, together with chronological and 
environmental studies, are usually considered as three of the prime areas of modem 
archaeological science. At the same time chronological studies are essentially 
connected with artefact studies. Already in the first half of the 19th century, Christian 
Thomson based the first archaeological periodisation on the kind of substances used 
for the artefacts and classified archaeological material by the chronological order as 
belonging to the Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages. This correlation of time and type of 
material in use was known even to the old Greeks. 

Among all types of artefacts, metal objects in general and tools and weapons in 
particular, are subjected most of all to innovations ­ the development of society is 
considerably connected with their functional abilities. Therefore metallurgical data of 
the ancient societies ­ of one and the same geographical zone ­ have, in contrast to the 
data of other archaeological sources, such as pottery, architecture, burial habits and 
others, which are more apt to indicate the genetical relations, a special importance in 
the establishment of a relative chronology. 

The first and second ..radiocarbon revolutions", the use of the radiocarbon dates for 
the creation of absolute time­scales first and the use of calibrated 14C dates 
afterwards, provoked the separation of the areas dated by the 14C technique ­ the 
northern periphery of the Near East and Europe ­ from the areas with historical 
chronologies, /.e. the Near East. The separation of these two regions from each other 
caused something like a "geological gap" ­ a "fault line" between them (Renfrew 1973: 
104, Figs. 20, 21). The need to fill this gap is an urgent task of the contemporary 
archaeological studies. Besides the further improvement of the geochronological 
methods, it demands an intensive stimulation of the research in the field of relative 
chronology on both parts of the above­mentioned gap, and, as much as it is possible, 
to connect them. 

One of the regions along the ,,fault line" is the Caucasus. Therefore chronological 
problems of this region have paramount importance in the foundation of a general 
Near Eastern ­ East European chronological system; it seems that the Caucasus is an 
important link in the Old World's chronological chain. The inclusion of the Caucasian 
chronological evidence into the common Near Eastern ­ East European chronological 
system must be preceded by the formation of an all­Caucasian chronological scale. 

The Great Caucasian Ridge represents a barrier dividing the Caucasus in two main 
parts: Transcaucasia or the South Caucasus, and the North Caucasus. At the same 
time, the role of the pathes crossing it permits to consider the Caucasus as one and the 
same geo­political zone. Among the Caucasian regions Central Transcaucasia (i.e. 
Eastern Georgia, old Iberia) holds a key position (Fig. 1) ­ it is encircled by all other 
Caucasian regions (Western, Southern and Eastern Transcaucasia, North­Western and 
North­Eastern Caucasus), and therefore it represents a basis for the elaboration of the 
all­Caucasian chronological scale (Figs. 2, 3). [p. 68] 

List of sites: 

1. Alikemektepesi
2. Amiranis Gora
3. Arich
4. ArukhIo/Nakhiduri
5. Arslantepe
6. Baba Dervish
7. Bashkapsaara
8. Berikideebi
9. Chalagan Tepe
10. Dalma Tepe
11. Delisi
12. Didube
13. Dikha Gudzuba
14. Dzagina
15. Gargalar Tepesi
16. Garni
17. Gawra
18. Ghrmakhevistavi
19. Geoy Tepe
20. Gudabertka
21. Guru Dere
22. Gutansar
23. Habuba Kabira
24. Halaf
25. Hassek Höyük
26. Horom
27. llanly Tepe
28. Imiris Gora
29. Ispani
30. Jebel Aruda
31. Karashamb
32. Karaz
33. Karmirberd
34. Khizanaant Gora
35. Khramebi
36. Khramis Didi Gora
37. Kiketi
38. Koreti
39. Kül Tepe
40. Kurban Höyük
41. Kvardzakheti
42. Kvatskhelebi
43. Machara
44. Martqopi
45. Metekhi
46. Misharchai
47. Mokhra Blur
48. Murgul
49. Nakhidrebis Chala
50. Pichori
51. Pulur (Sakyol) 
52. Sagebi 
53. Sagvardzhile 
54. Samsat
55. Satkhe
56. Shomu Tepe
57. Shulaveri
58. Sioni (Aragvi r.)
59. Sioni (Shulaveri r.)
60. Teghut
61. Tell Sotto
62. Tell Qanas
63. Tepecik
64. Tetri Mgvime
65. Toira Tepe
66. Tsartsis Gora
67. Tsitelisopeli
68. Tsopi
69. Tvlepias Tskaro
70. Uch Tepe
71. Ulevari
72. Urbnisi
73. Verin Naver
74. Yanik Tepe
75. Yarim Tepe
76. Zaargash
77. Zeiani
78. Zhinvali
79. Zophkhito
80. Ananauri
81. Ghait Mazi
82. Ghebi
83. Keti
84. Kvemo Sarali
85. Tsikhia Gora
86. Nineveh 87. Taşkun Mevkii 88. Nadarbazevi
89. Irganchai
90. Ozni
91. Kulbakebi2. Medzhvriskhevi
93. Chagar Bazar
94. Hassuna
95. Ust­Jegutinski
96. Bakurtsikhe 
97. Telebi 
98. Sachkhere 
99. Vanadzor
100. Iğdir 

As a background for the map a sketched map was used made by P. Wilski in 1909 (v. 
Lehmann­Haupt 1910). [p. 69]
NORTH­WESTERN  NORTH­
WESTERN  EASTERN 
B.C. AND CENTRAL  EASTERN  ARMENIA AZERBAIJAN
GEORGIA GEORGIA
CAUCASUS CAUCASUS
KAYAKENT­ NOSIRI IV KHOJALI­KEDABEK
LBA STAGE III ­ 
1000 KNOROCHAI  LATE BRONZE 
HIATUS (?) EARLY IRON AGE
CULTURE AGE LCHASHEN 
KOBAN METSAMOR CULTURE
KUBAN CULTURE NOSIRI III LBA STAGE 11

LBA EARLY 
GRAVES
STAGE
STAGE III  TRANSITIONAL  KIKOVAKAN­ MBA STAGE IV
CAUCASIAN  NOSIRI II STAGE TRIAIETI STAGE  <T>
FOOTHIILS C.  MBA PERIOD III OF THE 
CULTURE TRIALETI  MBA STAGE III
NOSIRI I CUITURE
STAGE II
STAGE I NORTH­
MBA PERIOD II SEVAN ­ OZERLIK MBA STAGE II
CAUCASIAN C.
DIKHA 
2000
GUDZUBA
SACHKHERE 
BATIN­KALE­ OCHAMCHIRE 
DAI SAMELE­KLDE I
MACHARA IV  KARMIRBERD 
GINCHI 
SAMELE­KLDE II MBA PERIOD I (TAZAKEND)  MBA STAGE I
CULTURE
CULTURE
NOVOSVOBODNAYA 
STAGE SAMELE­ KLDE 
UST­JEGUTINSK  III ANASEULI II 
MAIKOP STAGE ODISHI

ANASEULI I
UCHTEPE,STEPANAKERT 
BEDENI 
K­A C. STAGE III KHACHENAGET 
CULTURE
K­A C. STAGE II KURGANS, KUC STAGEIII 
& EBA STAGE III
III
CHIRKEY 
(SETTLEMENT)
GEME­TIUBE 
EBA STAGE II KUC STAGE III
UPPER L.
KURA­ARAXES 
GALGALATLI I
CULTURE or KURA­ARAXES CULTURE 
3000  GEME­TIUBE I K­A C. STAGE I
EBA. EBA STAGE  STAGE II
LOWER LAYER
I
3500 LATE 
4000 ENEOLITHIC or 
DIDUBE­KIKETI 
5000
STAGE OF K­A C.
ALIKEMEK TEPESI 
SIONI UPPER LEVELS
(THE SHULAVERI  TEGUT
MESHOKO LOWER  RAVINE) SHULAVERI ­  KIULTEPE I
LAYERS SHULAVERI ­  SHOMU TEPE  SHULAVERI ­ SHOMU 
NALCHIK  SHOMU TEPE  ENEOLITHIC (or  TEPE ENEOLITHIC (or 
CEMETERY ENEOLITHIC (or  NEOLITHIC)  NEOLITHIC) CULTURE
6000
GINCHI LOWER  NEOLITHIC)  CULTURE
LEVEL CULTURE
Fig. 2: Traditional chronological framework for the Eneolithic­Bronze Age cultures of the Caucasus. 

The Early Farming cultures 

The earliest metal artefacts of the Caucasian zone originated from this region ­ 
Central Transcaucasia. They appeared in the layers of the settlements of Shulaveri­
Shomu Tepe culture of Central and Eastern Transcaucasia ­ in sites on the middle flow 
of Kura ­ Khramis Didi Gora and Arukhlo/Nakhiduri I in South­Eastern Georgia and 
Gargalar Tepesi in the western part of Azerbaijan. In the lower levels (VII, VI) of 
Khramis Didi Gora, in a depth of 5.09 m, a semicircular hollow object with pointed 
ends and four beads were found (Kiguradze 1986: 93f.; Menabde et al. 1980: 34) with 
following contents: Cu ­ high, Sn ­ 0.03, Pb ­ 0.001, Ag ­ 0.002, Fe ­ 0.02 and Cu ­ 
high, Sn ­ 0.001, Ag ­ 0.002, Fe ­ 0.01 (Tavadze et al. 1987: 46). In the unstratified 
layers of Arukhlo/Nakhiduri I, an unidentified object of metal plate was detected 
(Dzhavakhishvili et al. 1987: 8). A cylindrical bead made of twisted plate was 
discovered in Gargalar Tepesi (Arazova et al. 1972: 435). According to R. Munchaev, 
it is similar to the beads excavated by him (together with N. Merpert) in the Hassuna 
period levels of Yarim Tepe I, in the Sindzhar [p. 70]

NORTH­
NORTH­WESTERN AND CENTRAL  WESTERN  EASTERN 
B.C. EASTERN  ARMENIA AZERBAIJAN
CAUCASUS GEORGIA GEORGIA
CAUCASUS
KAYAKENT­ EARLY IRON  KHOJALI­
KHOROCHAI AGE KEDABEK 
1000 NOSIRI IV
L CULTURE
KOBAN CULTURE PHASE III
BA
LATE BRONZE 
KUBAN AGE
CULTURE MBA STAGE IV
NOSIRI III PHASE II

PHASE I
PHASE II KIKOVAKAN­
NCC­STAGE III TRIALETI  MBA STAGE III
PHASE I STAGE 
MB 
NOSIRI II SEVAN 
A OZERLIK 
KARMIRBERD 
NCC (CAUCASI­AN FOOTHIILS Cult.)  CULTURE (MBA 
(TAZAKEHD) 
STAGE Il STAGE Il)
2000 CULTURE
E B 
NOSIRI I A

DIKHA 
GUDZUBA I 
BELTINSKI  SACHKHERE 
CEMETERY  OCHAMCHIRE 
GATIN­KALE­ SAMELEKLDE  PHASE III B
DAI I TRIALETI 
GINCHI  MACHARA IV  Cult.
MIDDLE BRONZE 
CULTURE SAMELE  A AGE STAGE I
KLDE II
NORTH­CAUCASIAN Cult. STAGE l

SAMELE 
KLDE III

ANASEULI II 
ODISHI
B STEPANAKERT 
EBA PHASE  K­A Cult. KHACHENAGET 
II STAGE III KURGANS
BEDENI  K­A C. STAGE III
Cult. A  ^
CHIRKEY 
(SETTLEMENT)
3000
GEME­TIUBE  EBA PHASE 
NOVOTITAROVSK.NOVOSVOBODN.  I C
UPPER
STAGE 
UST­JEGUTINSK
MAIKOP STAGE GALGALATLI I  UCH TEPE 
K­A Culi.
GEME­TIUBE I  EBA PHASE  KURGANS
STAGE II
LOWER LAYER I B K­A C. STAGE II
A
K­A Cult. KURA­ARAXES 
STAGE I Cult. STAGE I
4000
LATE 
ENEOLITHIC 
STAGE (K­A C.)
5000 ALIKEMEKTEPESI 
MIDDLE 
UPPER LEVELS
ENEOLITHIC 
(SIONI) TEGUT
MESHOKO LOWER LAYERS
KIUL TEPE I
NALCHIK CEMETERY GINCHI 
LOWER LEVEL
SHULAVERI­ SHULAVERI­
6000 SHOMU TEPE SHOMU TEPE
SHULAVERI­
CULTURE CULTURE
SHOMU TEPE
CULTURE

Fig. 3: Proposed chronological framework for the Eneolithic­Bronze Age cultures of the Caucasus. 
Figs. 2 and 3 were presented at the Soviet ­ American archaeological Symposium held in Tbilisi ­ 
Sighnaghi, Georgia, in September ­ October 1988. 

valley, Iraq (Munchaev 1982; cf. Merpert & Munchaev 1977: 157, Fig. 1.4.) (Fig. 4.1). 
These levels of Yarim Tepe are dated to the first half of the sixth millennium B.C. 
(Porada et al. 1992: vol. l: 81­83; vol. II: 94, Fig. 2). 

All Transcaucasian sites mentioned above belong to the final stage of the Shulaveri­
Shomu Tepe culture according to the periodization by Georgian archaeologists 
(Kiguradze 1986: 100). The dating of Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe culture is based on 
radiocarbon dates. According to the calibrated 14C dates, this culture belongs mainiy 
to the sixth millennium. The 14C dates of this culture are: Shulaveris Gora, 0.2 m, 
5213­4460 cal B.C. (TB­15), 2.4 m, 5677­5330 cal B.C. (TB­16). Repeated analyses 
of the same sample (TB­16) are: TB­72, 5588­5482 cal B.C. and SOAN­1292, 5064­
4832 cal B.C. Shulaveris Gora, 1.6 m, 5621­5522 cal B.C. (LE­1099), 0.1 m, 5416­
5077 cal B.C. (LE­1100); Imiris Gora, from the levels IV­I, 5332­5077 cal B.C. (TB­
27); ArukhIo/Nakhiduri l, upper strata, 5473­5384 cal B.C. (TB­92), level II, 5671­
5584 cal B.C. (TB­277), lower strata, 6007­5886 cal B.C. (TB­300), level VI, 5677­
5585 cal B.C. (TB­309); Khramis Didi Gora, level V, 5560­5386 cal B.C. (LJ­3270), 
middle strata, 5433­5291 [p. 71] cal B.C. (TB­301), 5.4 m, 5446­5342 cal B.C. (TB­
322); Gargalar Tepesi, lower strata, 5200­4944 cal B.C. (LE­1084), lowest stratum, 
5662­5579 cal B.C. (LE­1083); Toira Tepe, 2 m, 5208­4839 cal B.C. (TF­372); Shomu 
Tepe, 1 m, 6413­6221 cal B.C. (LE­631). Calibrated 14C dates partially solve the 
discrepancy between the Near Eastern parallels dated to the seventh­sixth millennia 
and the uncalibrated 14C dates of the Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe culture which were 
largely placed in the fifth millennium (all the dates used here are obtained with one 
sigma, v. Stuiver & Reimer 1993: 215­230). We bear in mind the assumption about the 
special closeness of this culture in all stages of its existence with the Hassuna culture 
on the one hand and with the Umm Dabaghiah­Tell Sotto culture of the Pre­Halafian 
period on the other. 

It seems that the decorations of the Umm­Dabaghiah pottery are not as analogous to 
the ornaments of the Arukhlo/Nakhiduri I, as J. Mellaart thought (Mellaart 1975: 
304), but to the pottery of an earlier site ­ Imiris Gora (cf. Kavtaradze 1981: Table I 
and II). As to some Georgian archaeologists, a similarity can also be observed 
between small figurines of the upper levels of Khramis Didi Gora ­ a site which 
belongs to the final stage of the Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe culture ­ and similar figurines 
which were discovered in the layers of the Hassuna, Samarra and Halaf cultures 
(Glonti et al. 1975: 97). All these Mesopotamian cultures and sites are dated mainly to 
the sixth millennium, and it is obvious that the Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe culture from 
the point of view of typological and chronological data is quite comparable with them 
­ the same stage of their development can be stated without any doubt. 
Although all metal artefacts of the Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe culture originate from the 
building layers of its later stage, it seems possible to consider this culture as mainly 
Early Eneolithic (Chalcolithic) because of the obvious signs ­ observed by some 
specialists ­ the degradation of flint industry and impoverishment of the sets of stone 
tools, together with a lack of certain categories of artefacts, e.g. geometrical 
microliths as a mass series from its layers known up till now as the lowest 
(Chubinishvili & Chelidze 1978: 66; Chelidze 1979: 30). 

We must also take into account the favourable conditions existing in Transcaucasia for 
metallurgical activities. There, in the mountains, accumulations of the products of 
oxidation zone were formed; the layers of copper on the surface could have satisfied 
the needs of early metalworkers. Exactly the southern region of Central Transcaucasia 
is supposed to be the basis of raw material for the development of initial copper 
metallurgy in the Caucasus. 

Although there were requirements available for the development of local 
metalworking, nothing definite can be said about the first steps of metallurgy in the 
Caucasus, and particularly in Central Transcaucasia. It is supposed that metal artefacts 
of the Early Farming culture were made of local arsenic­copper ores, but it is not clear 
how the early metallurgists extracted the ore.

More than thirty years ago, in the Marneuli district, south of Tbilisi, near the village 
of Tsitelisopeli, traces of an ancient working place with lumps of slags and large 
grooved stone hammers were discovered (Lordkipanidze 1989: 104, note 11). These 
objects are quite similar to the well­known hammers (chisels) found in 
Arukhlo/Nakhiduri I, Kül Tepe I and other early sites. Such chisels are thought to have 
been used for the extraction of ore, but an exact dating of this working place cannot be 
considered as finally solved, because similar tools were also characteristic of the 
Kura­Araxes culture of the fourth and third millennia (Chubinishvili 1971: 30; 
Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 1970: 113, Fig. 5, 19). 

Thirty years ago, it was thought that metalworking was introduced into Transcaucasia 
only at the time of the Kura­Araxes culture from the Near East. Today the same 
questions are raised in connection with the Early Farming culture of Transcaucasia. 
We must take into account the metal artefacts of the South Transcaucasian Early 
Farming sites (e.g., Kül Tepe, Teghut etc.) too, which mainly belong to a time rather 
later than the Central and Eastern Transcaucasian Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe culture, and 
because of that there is no sufficient reason to unite it with the latter. 

In Central Transcaucasia, the culture of this period, tentatively referred by us to the 
Middle Eneolithic Age, is represented by Tsopi, Sioni of the Shulaveri ravine, Delisi, 
the lowest level of Berikldeebi, sites of the Aragvi ravine and the Alazani valley. This 
culture is intermediate between the Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe and the earliest materials 
of the Kura­Araxes culture and displays a certain similarity with the preceding and 
subsequent cultures. 

The metal artefacts supposedly of this period were detected in Delisi (northwestern 
part of Tbilisi). They represent bronze pins and an awl which contain, together with 
other elements, up to 4% tin. Apart from the chemical composition of such early 
artefacts dated even by the traditional chronology to the end of the fifth ­ beginning of 
the fourth millennia (Abesadze & Bakhtadze 1987: 51), certain doubts arise 
concerning the circumstances of their discovery. 

Unfortunately we have only one 14C date for this period from Zhinvali in the Aragvi 
ravine, 5206­4807 cal B.C. (TB­326). Therefore, in order to date the Middle 
Eneolithic culture of Central Transcaucasia, an attempt can be made by taking into 
consideration the data from contemporary sites of other parts of Transcaucasia, which 
at the same time are richer in metal inventory. E.g. in the lowest level of Kül Tepe I of 
Nakhichevan, considered as contemporary with the final stage of the Shulaveri­Shomu 
Tepe culture, seven copper artefacts: a small quatrilateral piercer, a rhomboic copper 
plate [p. 72] object (maybe an arrowhead), two beads and three fragments of 
unidentified objects were discovered (Fig. 4.2­5). All of them, except the quatrilateral 
piercer, were found in the depth of 18­17 m and contained an admixture of arsenic; the 
piercer, which apart from arsenic also has nickel (1.6%), was discovered in a depth of 
15.05 m (Abibulaev 1963: 161f, Fig. 4; id. 1982: 78f; Selimkhanov & Torosiyan 1969: 
230). 

It was supposed that because of the absence of nickel­copper deposits in the Caucasus 
this object was imported to Kül Tepe from the Near East (Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 
1970: 120, 129), but nickel is characteris­tic of easternmost Georgian, Kakhetian, 
artefacts of later times (Abesadze 1980: 148). The fact that in the depth of 19 m of Kül 
Tepe l, a pot, typical of the Halaf culture, was found, is usually considered as an 
indication of the connection of the eneolithic population of Transcaucasia with the 
Near East. 

We must underline the fact that in the same lower levels of Kül Tepe l, in a depth of 
16.85­20.84, of all the eneolithic layers between 12.18 and 21.1 m, together with 
Halafian Imports, sherds of the Dalma painted wäre of the Solduz valley of North­
West Iran were found (Munchaev 1975:128f). The Dalma culture undoubtedly is 
contemporary with Ubaid 3 (Voigt 1992: 158, 175), and it seems that the lower levels 
of Kül Tepe l must be dated to the period, when the end of the Halaf culture was 
slightly overlapped with the Early Northern Ubaid, that means to the beginning of the 
fifth millennium. We can consider this date as a terminus post quem for the later 
layers of Kül Tepe l as well as for the Middle Eneolithic period of Transcaucasia, and 
at the same time as a terminus ante quem for the Shulaveri­Shomu Tepe culture or the 
Early Eneolithic. 

The 14C date for Kül Tepe l from a depth of 18.2 m is 4763­4506 cal B.C. (LE­477), 
somewhat later than the 14C date of the Dalma culture ­ 4947­4782 cal B.C. (P­503). 
The stratigraphy of Dalma Tepe is usefui from the point of view of the chronology of 
Transcaucasian sites. As it was observed, if the painted pottery typical of the lower 
levels of this site was represented in the Kül Tepe l and Mil­Karabagh sites, then the 
Impressed Ware, typical of the Late Dalma, was found in llanly Tepe and the sites of 
Misharchai and Guru Dere l in the steppe of Mughan, Azerbaijan (Munchaev 1975: 
128f). At the same time, the Late Dalma Impressed Ware provides a chronological 
link with the Early Siahbid phase in the Kermanshah region and it is not represented 
in the Late Siahbid deposits (Voigt 1992: 158, 175). Sherds of Dalma Impressed Ware 
are also found at the Ubaid sites as Abada and Kheit Qasim in the Hamrin and Yorgan 
Tepe near Kirkuk. On the other hand, at Dalma Tepe sherds characteristic of Tepe 
Gawra XVI (or of the Ubaid 3 period) are represented (Voigt 1992:175). Because of 
that, a dating of the layers of Dalma Tepe and the Transcaucasian sites containing 
Early and Late Dalma Ware in the first half and middle of the fifth millennium B.C., 
can be proposed. 

From East Transcaucasian sites metal artefacts were found in Chalagan Tepe (near 
Agdam) ­ two copper pins in the burials and an awl in a building level 
(Dzhavakhishvili et a/. 1987: 8). The 14C date of this site is 5411 ­5259 cal B.C. (TB­
318). Also in Azerbaijan, in the steppe of Mughan, in Alikemektepesi, a copper bead 
and an awl were found (Dzhavakhishvili et al. 1987: 8). This site is important from the 
chronological point of view, because in the lower levels material comparable to the 
Kül Tepe l was discovered, and in the upper levels pottery of the North Ubaid type, 
similar to the ex­amples found at the Armenian site Teghut (Narimanov 1980: 93, 
102f, 271; cf. Munchaev 1975: 120). This fact has a special importance for defining 
the chronological Position of the Central Transcaucasian Middle Eneolithic because in 
Alikemektepesi, in the upper levels, aside from pottery of the North Ubaid type, 
sherds with combed surface and burnished interior (Narimanov 1980: 78, 208) like the 
pottery from Sioni, and quite un­known in Kül Tepe l, were found. 

Several metal objects were discovered in Teghut, Ararat valley: a knife (Fig. 4.6), a 
drill and two fragments of quadrilateral awls. All of them are made of arsenical 
copper with an admixture of other minor components. The knife contained 5.4% of 
arsenic, a piece of awl 3.6% (Selimkhanov & Mareshal 1966: 145f, Table 3). The fact 
that certain types of copper artefacts, as weapons and tools, had for the time 
concerned a rather high content of arsenic, was considered as an indication of the 
existence of artificial alloys (Gevorkiyan 1980: 37; Narimanov & Dzafarov 1988: 22; 
Kushnareva 1993: 205), but recently it was suggested that in a variety of areas the real 
development of alloying probably only appeared with the use of tin­bronze (Northover 
1989:117). 

The difference of admixtures in the content of the Transcaucasian metal inventory 
usually is explained by various types of ores. For the southern part of Transcaucasia, 
in Opposition to the northern regions, the deposits of Dzhulfa­Zangezur, Madzor and 
Kafan were possibly used (Dzhaparidze 1989: 229). 

In the opinion of some archaeologists, a new ethno­cultural element ­ the group of the 
tribes of the Ubaid culture ­ spread at that time to the Caucasus (cf. Narimanov 1991: 
32). But in this respect we must recall H. Nissen's Suggestion about the explanation of 
the wide distribution of the Ubaid­like pottery with the introduction of the tournette or 
„slow­wheel" for the manufacture of pots (Nissen 1988: 46). We must also take into 
consideration the possibility of an interconnection between the manufacture of the 
highiy fired Ubaid pottery and the real smelting procedure of copper ore, attainable 
only at a temperature higher than 1100 °C (cf. Pernicka 1990: 46, 117). [p. 73]

Fig. 4:1 ­ Copper bead from Yarim Tepe I (Merpert & Munchaev 1977: Fig. 1­4); 2,3,4,5 ­ Copper 
inventory of Kül Tepe I (Munchaev 1982: Table XLII, 19­22); 6 ­ Copper knife from Teghut (ibid: 
Table XLVIII, 11).

At the same time, it seems possible that the Tepe Gawra XI A ­ Amuq F cultural 
complex had hereditary ties, though perhaps not direct ones, with the Transcaucasian 
Middle Eneolithic, particularly with the materials of its later stage, represented e.g. in 
Teghut. Some kind of similarity can be observed in the pottery and figurines between 
Tepe Gawra XI A and Teghut. Beside the rectangular houses, exclusively 
characteristic of Tepe Gawra XII, in the subsequent XI A level also round houses 
appeared (Tobler 1950: Tables VI, VIII), typical of the Early Farming culture of 
Transcaucasia. It is interesting that the population of the XII and XI A levels used in 
Tepe Gawra various types of copper ores. The copper of the later level differs in the 
high content of arsenic together with some other components (nickel etc.) (Tobler 
1950: 212).

As to Western Transcaucasia (i.e. Western Georgia, old Colchis), it is not quite clear 
which copper deposits were used there. The first copper artefacts of this region, hooks 
from Sagvardzhile, ascribed to the Eneolithic period, resemble the forms of bone 
examples. At the same site also a quadrilateral awl, made of pure copper by cold 
forging, was discovered (Lordkipanidze 1989: 67). In the eneolithic level of Tetri 
Mgvime (near Kutaisi) a copper dart or a leaf­like knife, which contained up to 0.7 % 
of arsenic, was found (Abesadze & Bakhtadze:1987: 51). 

The 14C date of Machara IV (Abkhazia) is 4754­4495 cal B.C. (LE­1347). 

In the following Early Bronze Age the Western Transcaucasian metal inventory was 
manufactured already of arsenic­copper alloys. Moulds of axes were discovered in 
Ispani (near Kobuleti) and also in Pichori (near Gali) of the later type; in both sites 
together with other signs of metallurgical activities. 

The Kura­Araxes culture 

The remains comprising the material of the early stage of the Kura­Araxes culture, 
including the Didube­Kiketi and Sioni (the lori river valley)­Gremi groups, referred to 
the Late Eneolithic period of Central Transcaucasia, have an extremely poor metal 
inventory. In Central Transcaucasia the Kura­Araxes culture is presumably dated 
mainly to the fourth millennium, and apart from the Late Eneolithic it comprised the 
first phase of the Early Bronze Age and partially, in the first quarter of the third 
millennium, also the second phase of the same period. 

The best known sites with fixed stratigraphy of the Kura­Araxes culture of Central 
Transcaucasia are Khizanaant Gora, Kvatskhelebi (near Kareli) and Tsikhia Gora 
(near Kaspi) in the central and Amiranis Gora (Akhaltsikhe) in the south­western 
parts of the region. We have a few 14C dates for this period: 3644­3376 cal B.C. (LE­
157) from Kvatskhelebi C 1; 3636­3356 cal B.C. (TB­831) (this date, TB­831, 2900 
±110 B.C., is published with a half­life of 5730 ± 40 year in Makharadze 1994: 61) 
from Tsikhia Gora, level B 2 of the final period of the Kura­Araxes culture of Shida 
Kartli, and 3790­3373 cal B.C. (TB­4) and 3630­3048 cal B.C. (TB­9) from Amiranis 
Gora. The dates from Amiranis Gora are generally in agreement with the 14C date 
received from the lowest layer of the same Kura­Araxes culture in Pulur (Sakyol), 
Eastern Anatolia: 3500­3336 cal B.C. (P­2040). Other dates of the latter site are: level 
IX, 2890­2409 cal B.C. (M­2173), level VIII, 3346­2888 cal B.C. (M­2172), [p. 74] 
level VI, 2866­2203 cal B.C. (M­2171), level V, 3092­2669 cal B.C. (M­2170). It is 
interesting that the earliest „Kura­Araxes" material of Pulur (Sakyol) reveals traits 
typical of Amiranis Gora (Kavtaradze 1983: 89f). 

The more or less contemporary Kül Tepe II 14C date should also be taken into 
consideration: 3766­3543 cal B.C. (LE­163). Recently three dates were received from 
the AMS Facility at the University of Arizona for Satkhs, the site which is situated in 
Dzhavakheti (8 km northeast of Nino Tsminda), i.e. in the southeast direction from 
Amiranis Gora and Kura­Araxes layers of which have ceramic parallels with Mokhra 
Blur (Ararat valley), Kvatskhelebi and Amiranis Gora: 3072­2916 cal B.C. (AA­
7768), 3343­3043 cal B.C. (AA­12853) and 3301­2926 cal B.C. (AA­12854) (Isaak et 
a/. 1994: 26, 28f). One date was obtained from a level associated with Early Bronze 
Age materials of the north­west Armenian site Horom in the Shirak valley: 3371­3136 
cal B.C. (AA­7767) and two dates were from a tomb of the same site: 3341­3048 cal 
B.C. (AA­10191) and 3990­3823 cal B.C. (AA­11130). All three vessels of this tomb 
reveal in the opinion of the excavators relatively early forms of the Kura­Araxes 
culture (Badaljan et al. 1994: 14,Table Illc). 

Special attention must be paid to the first 14C date of Amiranis Gora 3790­3373 cal 
B.C. (TB­4), because it was obtained from the charcoal of the metallurgical workshop 
which belonged to the earliest building horizon of Amiranis Gora (Kushnareva & 
Chubinishvili 1970: 114) (Fig. 5.1). Undoubtedly this fact, together with the other 
data, is an evidence of a division of the metallurgical production in the extractive and 
processing branches. 

It should be also mentioned that two 14C dates were received from the copper 
smelting place in Murgul (near Borçka, the northeasternmost part of modern Turkey), 
immediately south­west of the southwestern part of Central Transcaucasia, that means 
of the region where Amiranis Gora is situated. These dates are: 3338­3037 cal B.C. 
(HD 12679­12254) and 3638­3375 cal B.C. (HD 12680­12234) (Wagner et al. 1989: 
657). In Eastern Anatolia, at Değirmentepe and Norşuntepe, the traces of 
metallurgical activities are dated already by the Chalcolithic period (Esin 1989: 137; 
Hauptmann 1982: 59f; Zwicker 1980: 17). 

In Amiranis Gora an arched kiln of stone had been constructed which contained 
heavily grounded technical charcoal, necessary for achieving high temperatures. The 
supplies of such charcoal, from which abovemen­tioned 14C date stems, were stored 
in a big clay vessel, discovered in the floor level of the same workshop. There were 
also clay tuyeres ­ a real confirmation of the smelting procedure ­ as well as a clay 
mould for a pig (Chubinishvili 1971: 57f) (Fig. 5.2­4). Clay tuyeres were found, too, in 
Kül Tepe II and Misharchai (Makhmudov et al. 1968: 19, Fig. 4,2) (Fig. 5.7). 

A furnace of another type was discovered in Baba­Dervish II, Azerbaijan. There, on 
the periphery of the settlement, three oval pits ­ the foundation of the melting kilns 
with vaults of clay above ­ were found. Two of these furnaces had special openings 
with a ditch ­ an evidence of the technique of blowing (Fig. 5.5). This circumstance is 
confirmed by the fact that there also clay tuyeres were found (Fig. 5.6). Another 
remainder of the smelting process at that site was discovered in the form of 
technological waste ­ slags (Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 1970:114f, Fig. 40; 
Chubinishvili 1971; 102f). 

Slags were also found in Khizanaant Gora, Kül Tepe II and Garni (Armenia). In these 
sites traces of metal on the walls of vessels, ladles, crucibles and moulds of f'ire­proof 
clay for the pouring of the liquid metal were discovered, too (Kushnareva & 
Chubinishvili 1970:114, Fig. 40, 17) (Fig. 6.13). In the building layers of Khizanaant 
Gora, a sickle was found, the forging of which was not finished (Kushnareva & 
Chubinishvili 1970:114). 

In Kvatskhelebi C 1 as well as in Garni, Shengavit, Kül Tepe and Baba­Dervish II 
casting moulds of axes were discovered (Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 1970: Fig. 40, 
3­5, 9) (Fig. 5.8; 6.1­4). The clay moulds to cast special bars in the shape of little 
ingots in Gudabertka (near Gori) and Iğdir (eastern Anatolia) were found (Kushnareva 
& Chubinishvili 1970: Fig. 40,13, 14) (Fig. 6.11,12). 

The main part of the metal inventory of the Kura­Araxes culture was made of 
arsenical copper. The content of arsenic in alloys reaches on average from 2 to 8% 
(Tavadze et al. 1987: 45). The distribution of the lead admixtures in the greater part of 
the copper inventory of this period indicates in the opinion of Georgian 
archaeometallurgists that ores were used which contained natural arsenic admixture. 
Such natural alloys were possibly obtained from polymetallic ores, rich in elements 
(Abesadze & Bakhtadze 1987: 52). In the Caucasus the copper deposits are of the 
polymetallic type which contain from 3 to 10% and more the so­called usefui 
components ­ arsenic, antimony, tin, lead, zinc, iron, nickel, silver etc. Among these 
elements arsenic is mainly associated with copper, which occurs in the territory of 
Central Transcaucasia in the form of realgar and auripigment types (cf. Abesadze & 
Bakhtadze 1987: 52). 

It is supposed that at the time of the Kura­Araxes culture, comparatively easily 
smeltable polymetallic­arsenical ores were used. The metal artefacts of this period did 
not contain sulphur, a fact which possibly indicates the use of the carbonized and 
oxidized upper layers of copper deposits (cf. Rapp 1989:107­110). The spectral 
analyses of the artefacts of the Kura­Araxes culture and their correlation with the 
composition of the copper ores of the Great and Little Caucasus demonstrate that at 
that time metal was gained by the process of straight reduction (Tavadze et al. 1987: 
45). [p. 75]
Fig. 5: 1 ­ Reconstruction of Room III, or copper­melting workshop, of Amiranis Gora (Chubinishvili 
1971: Table XXIV, 1); 
2 ­ Melting kiln of stone (ibid.: Table XXIV, 2); 
3 ­ Inventory of Room III (ibid.: Table XXIV, 4); 
4 ­ Fragment of clay tuyere (ibid.: Table XXIV, 3); 
5 ­ Copper­melting kiln of Baba­Dervish (Makhmudov et al. 1968: Fig. 3); 
6 ­ Clay tuyere from Baba Dervish (ibid.: Fig. 4,1); 
7 ­ Clay tuyere from Misharchai (ibid.: Fig. 4,2); 
8 ­ Mould from Baba Dervish (ibid.: Fig. 4,3). [p. 76]

Together with arsenic, various amounts also of other ore admixtures were transmitted 
in the metal, since the recovery of them was conditioned by the process of smelting. 
Therefore it was supposed that all the content of these admixtures were originally in 
the ore (Abesadze & Bakhtadze 1987: 51 f). But it is quite obvious that ancient 
metallurgists in Transcaucasia were intentionally choosing copper with high or low 
content of arsenic, according to the functional destination of the artefacts; e.g. for 
ornaments from 7 to 22.7%, for tools and weapons much less, otherwise their 
functional abilities would be significanly low (cf. Kushnareva 1993: 235). In this 
connection it is worthwhile to note that the copper inventory of the late fourth 
millennium hoard of Nahal Mishmar (Palestine) with a very high concentration of 
arsenic and antimony is explained by the smelting of selected ores and not of 
artificially manufactured alloys (cf. Pernicka 1990: 48, 50). At the same time, copper 
alloys with an arsenic content ranging from 3 to 10 % are considered as to be gained 
by the direct addition of arsenic (Palmieri et al. 1993: 574). 

It is interesting that the metal artefacts of various functional use do not differ from 
each other by their composition in the Kura­Araxes culture. Such a divergence began 
to exist only in the later part of this period, when some ornaments were manufactured 
out of high arsenic copper, with the content of arsenic exceeding 10 % and up to 20%: 
e.g. biconical beads and a rhomboic pendant from Urbnisi, curl­rings from Dzagina 
(Tavadze et al. 1987: 45; Abesadze & Bakhtadze 1987: 52). In such cases it is possible 
to suppose that arsenic was intentionally added to increase the melting ability of 
copper and to obtain an alloy with a silver­like colour. Some artefacts have high 
amounts of antimony and lead (Tavadze 1987: 45). 

Genuine silver ornaments (pendants, spirals, curl­rings) from the territory of Georgia 
were found in the earliest layers of the advanced stage of Kura­Araxes culture at 
Amiranis Gora and Kvatskhelebi (Dvali 1974: 62). 

In the later period of the Kura­Araxes culture, partially contemporary with the second 
phase of the Early Bronze Age or the Early Kurgan period of Central Transcaucasia, 
together with the primitive types of artefacts rather complicated shapes and of various 
types began to appear in the inventory: flat axes and shaft­hole axes with downward 
directed butts, spearheads, daggers, bayonet­like weapons, chisels, awls, tools for 
farming, sickles, pins with T (crutch)­, loop­ and double­spiral­shaped heads, axe­
adzes, earrings, pendants, bracelets, rings, curl­rings, beads, a diadem (Figs. 6, 7,10) 
(see below). 

From the metallurgical point of view particular interest was given to tools of 
combined type ­ an axe­adze which was uniting a wedge­shaped axe with a long beak 
stretched on the butt. This artefact was found in sites of south­eastern Georgia ­ in the 
region rich in metal deposits. Therefore these artefacts were considered as tools used 
for the obtaining of ore (Lordkipanidze 1991: 50). The clay casting mould for a flat 
axe from the level C of Kvatskhelebi is similar to the axe from Sachkhere and has 
early parallels in Near Eastern and East European sites (Dzhavakhishvili & Glonti 
1962: 58, Table 4, N 489; Kavtaradze 1983: 85). 

It is a widespread view that the metals from the Transcaucasian ore deposits together 
with certain types of metal artefacts were distributed in many regions of the Ancient 
World from the early stages of metallurgical activities. Impulses coming from the 
Transcaucasian metallurgical centre through the northern Caucasus penetrated wide 
territories, from the river Volga to the Dniepr and even farther, reaching the 
Carpathian mountains (Chernykh 1992: 91, 159). In the southern direction metal of 
Transcaucasian provenance was widely distributed in Anatolia and Syria­Palestine. In 
the opinion of archaeometallurgists, the research on Anatolian metallurgy should be 
integrated with the location of both ­ copper ore deposits and arsenic occurences in 
the Caucasian regions (Palmieri et al. 1993: 591). It seems that Caucasian metallic 
ores and metallurgical traditions were used in the Near East at the time when the 
Transcaucasian population, bearers of the Kura­Araxes cultural traditions, were spread 
there (e.g. in Geoy Tepe, north­western Iran (cf. Burton Brown 1951)). They migrated 
in most cases to the south, west, south­west and south­east, from the Transcaucasian 
homeland of this culture, to southern Palestine, central Anatolia and central Iran. 
Along with the pottery, metal, obsidian and characteristic architecture and graves, a 
strong indicator of this culture, a peculiar type of hearth, was distributed in far off 
lands. 

This event chronologically is placed in the early third millennium, but it seems that 
the second half of fourth millennium was the time of initial penetration of certain 
elements of the Transcaucasian Kura­Araxes culture and possibly also that of the 
population ­ bearers of this culture ­ in the northern part of the Near East. 

It was stated that the metal artefacts from the hoard of the East Anatolian Late 
Chalcolithic site of Arslantepe (Malatya) VI A hoard (from A 113 Room of Building 
III) do not belong to the local copper deposits, as they have high arsenic admixtures 
(up to 4 %) and no trace of nickel, but might rather be of a northern provenance 
(Burney 1993: 314f). Besides the tradition of arsenic­bronze metallurgy, the 
northeastern direction is indicated also by twelve poker­butted, leaf­shaped spearheads 
with a cylindroid mid­rib and at the same time containing 1.3­4.3% of arsenic 
(Palmieri 1981: 108f, Fig. 4), found together with nine swords and a quadruple spiral 
piaque of the same hoard. They have dose parallels in the northwestern part of Central 
Transcaucasia by the similar copper spearhead found in Tsartsis Gora (Sachkhere) 
(Kuftin 1949: 74, Table LIX) (Fig. 7.3) [see, p. 79] [p. 77]

Fig. 6:1­46 (Chubinishvili 1971: Table XXV). 1, 29, 31, 35, 40, 41 ­ Kvatskhelebi; 2, 21 ­ Garni; 3, 5, 6, 
20, 32, 34 ­ Kül Tepe II; 4 ­ Shengavit; 7, 8, 22, 30 ­ Amiranis Gora; 9 ­ Mughan; 10 ­ Geoy Tepe; 11 ­ 
Gudabertka; 12 ­ Iğdir; 13 ­ Khizanaant Gora; 14 ­ Kuymri (Leninakan, North­Western Armenia); 15, 
38 ­ Kulbakebi (near Gori); 16 ­ Marneuli (south of Tbilisi); 17 ­ Zemo Avchala (north of Tbilisi); 18 ­ 
Medzhvriskhevi (east of Gori); 19 ­ Karaz; 21 ­ Garni, 23, 27 ­ Dzagina; 24, 25, 46 ­ Koreti; 26 ­ 
Sachkhere; 28 ­ Beshtasheni (Trialeti); 36, 45 ­ Tsartsis Gora; 37 ­ Akhaltsikhe; 39 ­ Trialeti; 42­44 ­ 
Elar (near Erevan). [p. 78] 
Fig. 7: 1, 2 ­ Pins with T­shaped heads from Nacherkezevi (Sachkhere) and Tsartsis Gora (Dzhaparidze 
1961: Table IX, 2,3); ­ Spearhead from Tsartsis Gora (ibid: Table XVI,2); 4 ­ Shaft­hole axes with 
downward directed butts from barrows of Sachkhere (ibid: Table XVI, 3­6); 5 ­ Pin with double­spiral­
shaped head from Koreti (ibid., Table XIX, 1); 6, 12, 15, 16 ­ Daggers from Koreti, Tskhinvali (north of 
Gori) and Nacherkezevi (ibid: Tables XIX, 2, XVI, 12, IX, 5,6); 7, 11,14 ­ Pins with loop­shaped heads 
from Koreti (ibid: Tables IX,5, XIX, 6, 12); 8 ­ Chisel from Sachkhere (ibid: XVI, 8); 9 ­ Flat axe from 
Sachkhere (ibid: Table XVI, 9); 10 ­ Gold ring from Tsartsis Gora (ibid: XVI, 10); 13 ­ Fragment of pin 
from Koreti (ibid: Table XVIII, 1).

[beginning, see, p. 76] [p. 79] which likewise contained no nickel but 4.66% of 
arsenic and 0.30% of antimony (Table 1, no. 21) and which must be dated by the 
period following to the Central Transcaucasian Kura­Araxes or contemporary with its 
latest levels. To the character and typology of the Arslantepe hoard, important 
chronological implications are given for the evaluation of the origin of Anatolian and 
North Syrian metallurgies (Palmieri 1981: 109; Yakar 1985: 276). Some scientists 
believe that metal­work was a major item of trade through Arslantepe (e.g. 
Burney1993: 314). 
It is quite probable that the economical importance of Arslantepe VI A as well as of 
such Late Uruk enclaves and outposts as Hassek Höyük 5, Habuba Kabira­Tell Qanas, 
Jebel Aruda and Tepecik 3 was the reason of their violent destruction by the intruders 
from the north ­ the bearers of the Kura­Araxes culture. This phenomenon has a 
parallel in the western part of central Iran by the destruction of the Late Uruk colony 
in Godin Tepe V, which ceased its existence as the result of the invasion of the Kura­
Araxes population east of the site, in the Hamadan valley, cutting off commercial 
routes to the east. After a short interval of time Godin IV emerged, with the material 
of the Kura­Araxes culture of the Yanik Tepe I type (Weiss & Young Jr. 1975: 15).

It seems that in the second half of the fourth millennium in the northern part of the 
Near East one and the same phenomenon ­ the destruction of the sites, revealing traits 
typical of Late Uruk period by a population of northern provenance, characterized by 
the red­black, hand­made burnished pottery, the high­arsenic copper metallurgy and 
certain types of metal artefacts, the ,,wattle and daub" houses and the particular type 
of hearthes ­ took place.

The intrusive character of the Kura­Araxes culture in this area became quite obvious 
after the exposure of the stratigraphical sequence, documented at Arslantepe, where 
layers containing the material of this culture interrupted the preceding and following 
local development of the horizons with the Reserved­Slip pottery (Palmieri 1985: 
208).

It was emphasized that copper artefacts with a high arsenical content, cast in open and 
two­piece moulds, appeared in the Elâzığ region of Turkey after Kura­Araxes (,,Early 
Transcaucasian") groups became the culturally dominating factor in the Jocal" 
population at the beginning of the Early Bronze Age (Yakar 1985: 276). Besides the 
Red­Black Ware of the East Anatolian type, the Kura­Araxes provenance can also be 
proved by the architectural data of the Arslantepe VI B layers subsequent to the 
Arslantepe VI A: there a double line of postholes was found, indicating the building 
technique typical of the Kura­Araxes culture (Palmieri 1984: 71­78). It is difficult not 
to agree that the appearance of the VI B1 period hut village upon the razed ruins of 
Arslantepe VI A epitomizes the recession of the Late Uruk world almost 
contemporary with the expansion of the Transcaucasian groups (Conti & Persiani 
1993: 406). This fact gives us the very convenient possibility to date the beginning of 
intrusion of the Transcaucasian population in the Malatya­Elâzığ area by the Late 
Uruk period. It is not quite clear if the first appearance of impulses coming from the 
Kura­Araxes culture to the territories south of the Taurus range were also 
contemporary with the Late Uruk period.

At Kurban Hoyuk (Karababa basin, north­west of Urfa, on the left bank of the 
Euphrates), in the Late Chalcolithic VI period, which equates with Tell Judeidah 
(Amuq) phases F­F/G sequence, three fragments of Kura­Araxes pottery (,,Karaz 
Ware") were discovered. They all are diagnostic and consist of a dense brownish clay 
with varying amounts of fine grit and chaff tempering. One of them is uniformly 
black, but two have bichrome surfaces, with orange interior and black exterior (Algaze 
1990: 260, 268, Table 42, G,F,H; Helwing 1996: 75). Also all of them resemble by 
their shape the Kura­Araxes pottery (cf. Sagona 1984: Forms 81, 82 Fig. 36, 2,5,6, 
Form 34 Fig. 21, 6). There are indications of the long existence of the Karaz Ware in 
the neighbourhood of the Karababa region, because in the subsequent Early Bronze 
Age (V and IV) levels of Kurban Höyük a few fragments of the same ware were also 
discovered (Algaze 1990: 289, 333, Table 90, J,K.). These finds agree with the long 
existence of a population of Transcaucasian origin in the regions adjacent to the upper 
flow of the Euphrates. 

Single sherds of Karaz Ware were also found in other Late Uruk sites in this area, in 
the levels of Samsat, ca. 7 km upstream from Kurban Höyük, but on the right bank of 
the river (excavated by Özğüç), and at Jebel Aruda, a mountaintop settlement which 
appears to be an administrative and religious center of Late Uruk settlements of the 
area (D. Surenhagen, pers. comm.). 

A few sherds of 'Karaz Ware' were found in Hassek 5 of the Late Uruk period on the 
left bank of the Euphrates (near Urfa). That these finds of 'Karaz Ware' were not 
accidental, as formerly believed, becomes obvious by the discovery of a red­slipped 
pot with four handles, a typical product of Uruk Ware (Fig. 8,1) next to an ovoid pot 
with a plastic chevron design (Fig. 8.2) in Room 2 of Building 2 from the same level 5 
(Hoh 1981: 5; Behm­Blancke 1983: Fig. 5; id. 1984: 38; Hoh 1984: 68, Table 17, 3, 4; 
Helwing 1996: 74, 87, 92). The colour of the latter varies from dark­grey to brown­
grey and is characteristic of the East Anatolian­Transcaucasian black­burnished 
pottery with the exact parallel at Tepecik 3 (east of Elâzığ, a Late Uruk outpost) (Esin 
1979: Table 57, 6, Table 61, 12; id. 1982: Table 73, 8, Table 74, 11). The plastic 
chevron decorations are typical of the Kura­Araxes pottery (Fig. 8.9,10) (Sagona 1984: 
78). The relief representations of the stag or of its horns on the central part of the 
vessels except that from Tepecik character[p. 80]ize also other Kura­Araxes sites, as 
Geoy Tepe, Pulur (Sakyol), Kvatskhelebi (Fig. 8.12­19 cf. 11) (Sagona 1984: Fig. 122). 
Pots with a rounded body and a slightly flaring high neck were found in Amiranis 
Gora, Nakhidrebis Chala, Ghrmakhevistavi, Keti (Fig. 8.5­8) etc. (Chubinishvili 1971: 
Table XV, 5; Table XVII, 2; Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 1970: Fig. 21, 6; Petrosyan 
1989: Table 30, 4; Kushnareva 1993: Fig. 19, 6; Abramishvili et al. 1980: 70, Table V, 
Fig. 41, 390). In Nakhidrebis Chala and Ghrmakhevistavi the pots were presumably 
with handles. A similar pot, but with a wider, spherical body and decorated with cord 
Impression was found in the Ukraine, in the Mikhailovka l settlement (on Pidpilna, a 
tributary of the lower Dniepr) of the late fourth millennium. This settlement shows 
affinities on the one hand with the Maikop culture of the North Caucasus and with the 
Usatovo barrows near Odessa on the other (Gimbutas 1992: 403f).

It must be emphasized that in Tepecik 3 a similar Uruk type red­slipped pot with four 
handles was also found, together with bevelled rim bowls of Uruk tradition and Early 
Karaz pottery (Behm­Blancke 1983: 167; Behm­Blancke 1984: 38; Hoh 1984: 72). 
The Karaz Ware was common at that site during the following Early Bronze period, as 
well as at Hassek 4, where it obviously represented a part of the spectrum of pottery. 
According to specialists, the metal of Hassek Höyük came from the area located 
between Erzurum and the southern coast of the Black Sea (Schmitt­Strecker et al. 
1992:122).

Arslantepe VI A, Tepecik 3 and Hassek 5 are thought to be contemporary and, like 
Kurban Höyük, roughiy coeval with Habuba Kabira­South (8 km downstream from 
Jebel Aruda). Hence, they must fall somewhere in the middle Hama K levels and the 
transitional Amuq F/G, revealed at Teil al­Judaidah and Çatal Hüyük (Amuq) (Trentin 
1993: 184). Despite the substantial similarity between Arslantepe VI A, Tepecik 3 and 
Hassek 5, the links between Tepecik and Hassek seem to be stronger than those with 
Arslantepe, essentially due to their greater affinities with Habuba Kabira and with the 
south (Frangipane & Palmieri 1987: 298). It is possible that Hassek, Tepecik and 
Habuba Kabira were important members of a foreign enclave and Arslantepe a local 
center of power (Trentin 1993: 197). But in spite of the characteristics of the sites 
mentioned, it seems that the first appearance of the Transcaucasian Kura­Araxes 
culture to the north, as well as to the south of the Tarsus range, must be dated to the 
time of the Late Uruk period.

If we take into account the absolute date of the Late Uruk period, placed in the middle 
of the second half of fourth millennium, the necessity of pushing back the traditional 
low date of the Central Transcaucasian Kura­Araxes culture will be without doubt. 
The dates obtained for the Near Eastern layers, characterized by the appearance of 
Transcaucasian elements, represent a good possibility to date the Kura­Araxes culture 
of Transcaucasia ­ the latter being earlier than the Near Eastern sites with material of 
Kura­Araxes provenance. From the point of view of comparative chronology of 
regional variants of the Kura­Araxes culture, it must be taken into account that the 
material discovered in the oldest Kura­Araxes XI level at Pulur (Sakyol), as it was 
stated above, seems contemporaneous with the middle layers of Amiranis Gora in 
south­western Central Transcaucasia (Kavtaradze 1983: 89f). At the same time Pulur 
(Sakyol) XI has dose parallels with Arslantepe VI B as to the forms and incised 
decorations of pot Stands (Palmieri 1981: 112, Fig. 7,6,8).

As an additional possibility to date the initial penetration of the Kura­Araxes 
population in the Near East, the evidence of the growing Mesopotamian sea 
commerce in the Arabian Gulf of the Jamdat Nasr period can be used. This event 
seems to be caused by changed political circumstances in Eastern Anatolia, Northern 
Syria, Western Iran and the desertion of the Uruk sites in these areas and as a 
consequence the passing of the distribution of traded ores and artefacts to local 
control (Moorey1982:15).

The determination of the chronological position of the Kura­Araxes culture is of a 
paramount importance for the establishment of a common chronological System for 
the Ancient World, considering the intermediary area of distribution of this culture; 
between regions dated by historical chronologies of the Near East, based on the 
literary sources, and regions dated mainly by the use of geochronological methods.

l cannot agree with the point of view that, before receiving the large series of 
radiocarbon dates from the Georgian and the adjacent sites of the Kura­Araxes 
culture, it is premature to consider the reliability of the calibrated 14C dates for this 
culture (Munchaev 1994: 17). First of all, the „widely accepted" absolute chronology 
of the Kura­Araxes culture in the third millennium as well as of the preceeding 
eneolithic culture in the fifth­fourth millennia and of the subsequent Trialeti culture in 
the first part of the second millennium B.C. is based mainly on uncalibrated 
„traditional" radiocarbon dates (Munchaev 1994:16; cf. Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 
1963:16f). This fact makes by itself necessary to re­consider the „widely accepted" 
chronological framework. Also the proposal to re­calculate the 14C dates by the new 
period of half­life, which would make dates 200 years older (Munchaev 1994: 16), has 
any sense from the chronological point of view because of the variations in 
concentration of radiocarbon with time (cf. Kavtaradze 1983:18f).

Secondly, the statement that the calibration curves and tables based on the 
dendroscales of the Californian pine have not still received the füll acknowledgement, 
and that therefore it is better to be refrained from their use (Munchaev 1994: 17), after 
the publication of the calibration curves based on the joint American and Eu[p. 
81]ropean data (the real witnesses of the simultaneous fluctuation of the content of 
carbon­14 in the northern hemisphere), must be considered as completely obsolete. 
The calibration curve officially recommended for the correction of the 14C dates was 
published in the journal Radiocarbon, 1993 (Stuiver & Reimer 1993), but also already 
in 1981, at the symposium in Groningen, the use of the available calibration curves for 
the preliminary correction of 14C dates was suggested (Burleigh 1982: 139).

Thirdly, the fact must be taken into account that, as the data of relative chronology for 
a long time indicated, there was a need to revise the traditional chronological position 
of the Transcaucasian Kura­Araxes culture even independently from the results of 
geochronological studies. I mean the dates obtained for those Near Eastern layers 
which contained the remains of Kura­Araxes provenance (Arslantepe/Malatya, Godin 
Tepe etc.), the cultural ties pointing at the Late Uruk period as to the time of the initial 
distribution of the Kura­Araxes culture or the penetration of its bearers in the Near 
East and the stadial proximity between the Georgian Kura­Araxes and Early Kurgan 
metalworking (and even of some artefacts) and those of the Near East of the Late 
Uruk ­ Early Dynastic periods (Kavtaradze 1983: 85­104, 109­115; id. 1987: 12­15; id. 
1992: 46­50; cf. Munchaev 1994: 17). (Uncertainty caused by different approaches to 
the problems of the chronology of the Palaeometallic Age are in the extreme form 
reflected in some publications concerning the Caucasian archaeology of this period. 
E.g. in two volumes of the ,,Archaeology of Georgia" (published recently in Tbilisi) 
some authors are operating with calibrated 14C dates, others based themselves on the 
uncalibrated ones).

The Kurgan cultures

The second phase of the Early Bronze Age of Central Transcaucasia comprises the 
final levels of the Kura­Araxes culture, including the final layers of level B of 
Kvatskhelebi­Khizanaant Gora, the bulk of the Early Bronze Age material of 
Sachkhere and the latest burials of Amiranis Gora. In this phase, it is possible also to 
include the Early Kurgan culture of Central Transcaucasia, in which two groups are 
distinguishable: The first group, comprising the kurgans (barrows) of the 
Martqopi/Ulevari and Samgori valleys (east of Tbilisi) and the earliest among the so­
called ,,Early Bronze Age kurgans of Trialeti"; the second, chronologically subsequent 
group, represented by the kurgans of the Bedeni plateau (near Trialeti) and the 
Alazani valley (in Kakheti, eastern part of East Georgia), as well as by the later 
kurgans among the early group of Trialeti and later group of Martqopi kurgans with 
pit graves (Dzhaparidze et al. 1980: 40; Dzhaparidze 1994: 75, 77).

This phase seems to be contemporary with the particularly wide diffusion of the Kura­
Araxes culture in the NearEast; thus it should be dated to the first half and the middle 
of the third millennium. Such a date must find corroboration in the typological 
parallels of the metal inventory of this phase (Kavtaradze 1983:109­116).

While the pottery of the first group of kurgans is close to the Kura­Araxes culture, the 
pottery of the second, later group is characterized by the so­called "pearl­like" 
ornaments which is typical of the Novosvobodnaya (Tsarskaya) stage of the North 
Caucasian Maikop culture and Early Bronze Age north­east Iranian sites (Tureng Tepe 
IIIC, Shah Tepe III, Tepe Hissar IIB, Yarim Tepe); two such sherds were found in the 
Late Chalcolithic levels of Alisar (Central Anatolia) (Kavtaradze 1983: 108n.341)

Radiocarbon dates of the first group are: TB­317, Martqopi kurgan no.3, 2279­2050 
cal B.C.; four dates are obtained for the Martqopi kurgan no.4: 2611 ­2457 cal B.C. 
(TB­325), 2035­1934 cal B.C. (LE­2198), 2459­2207 cal B.C. (Bin­291) and 2877­
2405 cal B.C. (GX­9252); two dates of Zeiani (near Sagaredzho) kurgan no.1 are quite 
distinct from each other: 2452­2138 cal B.C. (TB­328) and 3497­3131 cal B.C. (TB­
329); cereals from the settlement layers of Berikldeebi (near Kareli) gave 3692­3547 
cal B.C. (LE­2197). We must take into account also the dates received for the Uch 
Tepe kurgans (in the steppe of Mil, Azerbaijan), 3364­2925 cal B.C. (LE­305) and 
3930­3356 cal B.C. (LE­300). The dates of North Caucasian Ust­Jegutinski graves of 
the post­Maikop period are: 2866­2507 cal B.C. (LE­693), 2615­2468 cal B.C. (LE­
687) and 2464­2284 cal B.C. (LE­692). We have the following 14C dates for the 
second group of the Early Kurgans of Central Transcaucasian Early Bronze Age: 
Alazani valley kurgans, 2566­2458 cal B.C. (TB­243), 2317­2137 cal B.C. (LJ­3271) 
and 2875­2500 cal B.C. (UCLA­?); Khramebi (near Gurdzhaani), 2587­2468 cal B.C. 
(TB­242). The date of the Bedeni kurgan, 1680­1520 cal B.C. (TB­30), seems to be 
anomalous.

In this period most of the artefacts are the result of a complicated production. 
Simultaneous casting with subsequent hot and cold forging was employed. The 
composition of such artefacts contains admixtures ­ determined by excellent smelting 
abilities of alloys used (Tavadze et al. 1987: 47). After the exhaustion of copper rich 
oxide ores, it was necessary to exploit deeper sulfidic deposits, chalcopyrite, which 
required preliminary roasting for the removal of the sulfureous minerals and the 
oxidation of ore. This caused a significant reduction of arsenic in the cast metal. 
Therefore, in the opinion of Georgian archaeometallurgists, the artefacts with high 
arsenic content were won from oxidized arsenic­copper ores, and after the beginning 
of the use of sulfide ores, the ,,soft" copper, smelted from sulfureous minerals, needed 
the admixture of other alloying elements to increase its melting and mechanical 
characteristics (Abesadze & Bakhtadze 1987: 52f). [p. 82]
Fig. 8: 1 ­ Hassek Höyük (Hoh 1984: Fig. 12, 4); 2 ­ Hassek Höyük (ibid.: Fig. 12, 5); 3 ­ Tepecik (Esin 
1979: 61, Fig. 12); 4 ­Tepecik (Esin 1982: 74, Fig. 11); 5 ­ Amiranis Gora (Chubinishvili 1971: Table 
XVII, 2); 6 ­ Nakhidrebis Chala (ibid.: Table XV, 5); 7 ­Keti, grave 5 (Petrosyan 1989: Table 30, 4); 8 ­ 
Amiranis Gora, Level III (Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 1970: Fig. 21, 6); 9 ­Kvatskhelebi (Sagona 
1984: Fig. 1, 3); 10 ­ Samshvilde (southern part of Eastern Georgia) (ibid.: Fig. 40, 2); 11 ­ Geoy Tepe 
K 1 (Chubinishvili 1971: Table XII, 6); 12 ­ Kvatskhelebi (ibid.: Fig. 105, 1); 14 ­ Geoy Tepe K 1 
(Chubinishvili 1971: Table XII, 7); 15 ­ Pulur (Sakyol) (Sagona 1984: Fig. 122, 242); 16 ­ Pulur 
(Sakyol) (ibid.: Fig. 122, 243); Geoy Tepe (ibid.: Fig. 122, 244); 18 ­ Pulur (Sakyol) (ibid.: Fig. 122, 
245); 19 ­ Pulur (Sakyol) (ibid.: 122, 246). [p. 83]

The typical artefacts of this period are various types of pins, earrings, tubes, beads 
(Fig. 6.39,40), bracelets (Fig. 6.27), rings (Fig. 7.10), awls, chisels (Fig. 7.8), sickles, 
arrowheads, "standards", daggers and spearheads (Figs. 6.37,38; 7.3,6,12,15,16), flat 
(Fig. 7.9) as well as shaft­hole axes. The chronological value of the pins of this period 
­ with loop­ (Fig. 7.7,11,14), toggle­ (Fig. 6.30), double­spiral­heads (cf. Sagona 1981, 
152­155) (Figs. 6.28,29,31; 7.5) ­ is rather diffuse. Because of that, only their earliest 
appearances in the various areas of the Near East and the Eastern Mediterranean 
region need to be mentioned.

The pins with loop­shaped heads, formed by drawing out the wire into a loop and 
winding it around the shaft, characteristic of the so­called Cypriot pins, existed in the 
Near Eastern sites from the late Predynastic tombs of Egypt (Negada graves 162, 
1856, 1233, 293, Hemanieh grave 1647, Badari grave 3932, Armant) (Mas­soulard 
1949: 211, 250, Table LXVII, 4), Fara of the Jamdat Nasr period (Klein 1992: 126), 
Sialk IV (Ghirshman 1938: Table XXIX, 1a; Table XCV, s. 1602, a), Taşkun Mevkii 
2B (Helms 1973: 116, Fig. 10,71/17).

The toggle­pins were detected already in Thermi of the Early Bronze Age first period 
(Branigan 1974: 30, 173, Table 15 (1195)), Troy la (Blegen et al. 1950: 43, 86, Fig. 215 
(36­417)), Kusura B (Lamb 1937: 39, Fig. 18,3), Alişar I (Schmidt 1932: 61, Fig. 69, 
b512; cf. Kilian­Dirlmeier 1984: 23), Karataş IV (Warner 1994: 113, 180, 207, Table 
189b (KA 754)), Tarsus of the Early Bronze Age second period (Goldman 1956: 285f, 
296, Fig. 431 (210­221)), Syrian sites of the Nineveh 5 period (Klein 1992: 271, 276), 
Chagar Bazar 5 (Mallowan 1936: 27f., Fig. 8,2 (ME 629), 5 (ME 623), 8 (ME 624); 
Mallowan 1937: 132, Fig. 12,1; Mallowan 1947: 190, 217f., Table XLII, 8, Table LV, 
13, 14 (E­10); cf. Mellink 1970; 248), Tepe Gawra VII (Speiser 1935: 109, 114, Table 
L, 8), and the Royal Graves of Ur (Woolley 1934:239, 310, Table 231, type 4).

The earliest specimens of the double­spiral­headed pins are known, apart from 
Transcaucasian sites, from Sialk IV 1 (Ghirshman 1938: Table XCV, s. 1602, e, Table 
XXIX, 1, b), Hissar IIB (Schmidt 1937: 119, Table XXIX, H 4856), the Turkmenian 
sites of the Namazga IV­III stages ­ Kizil Arvat and the second cemetery of Parkhai 
(Kuzmina 1966: 78, Table XVI, 281 (no. 4); Khiopin 1981: 26). Mundigak II 3 
(Schaffer 1978: 141, Fig. 3.36, no. 6), Tepecik of the Late Uruk period (Klein 1992: 
128,278, Table 127,12), Poliochni (Lemnos) ,,Azzuro" (Bernabò Brea 1964: 591 f., 
Table LXXXVI,e), Chalandriani (Syros) of the Early Cycladic 2 (graves 468 and 469) 
(cf. Kilian­Dirlmeier 1984: 24), and the late Gumelniţa sites of Bulgaria and Rumania 
(Renfrew 1970: 31­33, Figs. 7; 12,6; Todorova et al. 1975: 63f, Table 128,4, Table 
129,6). A double­spiral, also characteristic of this period (Fig. 6.23,24), was found at 
Hissar II (Schmidt 1937: 121, Table XXX, H 2659, H 2982) and Taşkun Mevkii 2A 
(Helms 1973:116,120, Fig. 10,70/4) and a plaque of the quadruple­spiral shape in 
Arslantepe VIA (Palmieri 1981: 110, Fig. 3,5).

The pins with T­, crutch­ or hammer­shaped heads (Fig. 7.1,2,13) have the most 
parallels in East European sites (north Pontic and north Mediterranean regions), but, 
as stated above, weapons and tools are of a higher chronological value, since, because 
of their greater functional possibilities than those of the ornaments, the need of their 
improvement was much more important.

The shaft­hole axes with slightly cut butts and wide blades, except from Kulbakebi, 
Marneuli and Medzhvriskhevi (Fig. 6.15,16,18), were discovered in the Bedeni kurgan 
no. 2, Martqopi kurgan no. 3, Kvemo Sarali (near Marneuli) kurgan no. 9 and 
Nadarbazevi (Tetritsqaro region). Among the shaft­hole axes a peculiar type with a 
long, thin, very curved blade and a narrow tubular shaft­hole blade, found mainly in 
Sachkhere burials, can be distinguished (Fig. 7.4). The shaft­hole axes from the 
Martqopi kurgans nos. 4 and 5 (Abesadze & Saradzhishvili 1989: 49, 53, fig. 15­18; 
Dshaparidse 1995b: 230 (no. 69), 232 (no. 76)) are of an intermediate type between 
the above mentioned two types.

It has been supposed that the diffusion of the technology of casting shaft­hole axes in 
Asia Minor and Western Asia in the Middle Bronze Age was connected with the 
spread of traditions of East European and North Caucasian "pastoralists" (Chernykh 
1992: 300). Without excluding such an explanation concerning one particular type of 
shaft­hole axes, we must at the same time take into consideration the finds of the 
shaft­hole axes in the Near Eastern Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age sites. They are 
known from Susa I, the second half of the fifth millennium, and Tepe Ghabristan, a 
late fourth millennium North Iranian site (Pernicka 1990: 37, Fig. 10, Table 9, 1). 
Shaft­hole axes were discovered also in Khazineh, Susiana (Khusistan, south­western 
Iran) in the layers contemporary with the Early Dynastic period in Mesopotamia 
(Maxwell­Hyslop 1949: 91, 94f, Table XXXIV, 4) and Central Anatolian Early Bronze 
Age site Kalinkaya (De Jesus 1980: 147). A casting mould, presumably of a shaft­hole 
axe, was found in Poliochni ,,Azzuro" (Branigan 1974: 79, 82, Fig. 4 (M89)). It must 
be also taken into account that Transcaucasian axes usually are considered as weapons 
which, more than other copper­bronze artefacts of palaeometallic age, reveal exact and 
close stadial, morphological features common to the whole Transcaucasian region: 
hence this region can be considered as one and the same metalworking center 
(Gogadze 1990: 89).

At the same time, it is quite obvious that small workshops which used ores with 
different chemical compositions sometimes existed in one and the same region, e.g. 
metal artefacts from Kvemo Kartli, southern part of Eastern Georgia, despite their 
morphological similarity [p. 84] contained different chemical elements: the weapons 
from Kvemo Sarali and earlier items from Ghait­mazi (near Marneuli) ­ zinc, but 
artefacts from Nadarbazevi and Bedeni ­ nickel and antimony. The difference of the 
contents among bronze artefacts was also detected in Shida Kartli of the latest stage of 
the Trialeti culture (Abesadze 1974b: 56).

The date of the bayonet­like weapon from Tsartsis Gora (Fig. 6.36) is usually 
connected with the years of reign of the Akkadian king Manishtushu (23th Century) 
or the ruler of Elam Pusur Shushinak (22th Century) because of the existence of 
similar weapons with the inscriptions of their names (Kuftin 1949: 74). We must take 
into account that similar weapons were already discovered in the Royal Graves of Ur 
and they have, like the spearhead from Tsartsis Gora, an octalateral section of the 
foundation of blade (Woolley 1934: 303, Table 227, la (U­7925), Ib (U­7930)). Earlier 
bayonet­like weapons were also found in Transcaucasia itself: at Kül Tepe 
(Nakhichevan) (Fig. 6.34) and the Tvlepias­Tskaro cemetery (ca. 200 m north from 
Kvatskhelebi) (Abibulaev 1982: 161, Table 4, 5; Dzhavakhishvili & Glonti 1962: 43, 
Table XXXVI) (Fig. 6.35). In the C 1 level of Kvatskhelebi a weapon of the same 
bipyramidal shape was found, but made from bone (Dzhavakhishvili & Glonti 1962: 
28f). Local production of this type of weapon in Transcaucasia seems quite possible.

The sickles known from Khizanaant Gora B (Kushnareva & Chubinishvili 1970: Fig. 
42,31) and Amiranis Gora (Fig. 6.22), together with sickles from the other sites of the 
Kura­Araxes culture (Fig. 6.20,21) (Khanzadyan 1964: 94, Fig. 1,3), have more 
developed parallels, e.g. from Tarsus of the second level of Early Bronze Age 
(Goldman 1956: 281). Curved points, possibly from sickles, were found in Tarsus in 
the first level of Early Bronze Age (Goldman 1956: 281).

In the Early Kurgan period metalwork of gold and silver gained importance and 
achieved already a high level. To this period belong golden pins, rings, beads, the 
excellent small figurine of a lion from the Alazani valley kurgan, the necklace, 
presumably with a phallic representation, from Ananauri (northeasternmost part of 
Kakheti, near Lagodekhi) (Dshaparidse 1995a: 71, Fig. 50; cf. the analogous 
representation on the stone­curved door­slab from the Castelluccio rock­cut tomb 
(Early Bronze Age, Sicily) (Bernabò Brea 1957: Table 33). The golden pearls with 
higher middle ribs than those of the Ananauri necklaces are known from Tall 
Munbāqa (northeast from Habuba Kabira, on the opposite, left bank of the Euphrates 
(Wäfler 1974: 36, Fig. 51). (The Ananauri pearls and the analogous pearls of the 
Martqopi necklace of the kurgan no. 4 (Dshaparidse 1995b: 75, Fig. 55) have a 
configuration similar to the head and stem of some maces („Standards" or „sceptres") 
of the Nahal Mishmar hoard (cf. Müller­Karpe 1968: Table 107A), revealing the same 
level of technological sophistication). Silver pins, bracelets, daggers and knives are 
known from Tsartsis Gora and early kurgans of Trialeti. 

For the manufacture of jewellery all the existing methods were already used ­ casting, 
forging, embossing, plating etc. It has been suggested that since the decorations 
applied to the jewellery are repeated on the huge pots and other objects of household, 
they must be products of local craftsmen (Pitskhelauri 1987: 24) (e.g., cf., Fig. 9.13 
and 23). 

Two daggers from Sachkhere (from Tsartsis Gora and Koreti) with decorated hilts 
(Fig. 6.45,46) must be considered as the earliest examples of the artistic 
metalworking. Their blades were forged, but the hilts were cast. The dagger from 
Tsartsis Gora has a flat hilt, decorated with the broken line and wattled relief patterns. 
The other dagger from Koreti has also similar wattled ornamentation, but in the form 
of spiralic tendrils. This decorations of the Sachkhere daggers were obtained by 
casting in wax mould, a sign of the high Standard of metalworking in this period 
(Abesadze et al. 1958: 22). 

On the diadem from the latest burials of uppermost Kvatskhelebi B period the 
representations of birds, deer and astral signs were made by punching on the thin plate 
of copper (Fig. 6.41). The closest analogues to this diadem are a golden diadem from 
the Ur Royal Graves and a silver one from Chalandriani (Kavtaradze 1983: 115). 

The Early Kurgan period in Central Transcaucasia is marked by the introduction of tin 
bronze. However, the chemical­technological analyses of the two stages of this period 
show a considerable difference between them. The bronze artefacts of the first, so­
called „Martqopi­Ulevari stage", except some artefacts of pure copper, are mainly 
manufactured of arsenic­antimony bronzes with a high content of alloying elements. 
The admixture of arsenic in the artefacts from Martqopi kurgans is from 1 to 4.6%, 
lead 0.001­0.5%, iron 0.001­0.6%, zinc 0.001­0.32%, antimony 0.001­0.4%, silver 
0.001­0.03%, nickel 0.001­0.05% (Abesadze & Saradzhisvili 1989: 54, 59f). Only in 
two cases tin bronzes were found there with 3.2 and 6 % of tin with the addition of 
zinc and lead. (Both artefacts, the curl­ring and the standard, were found in the 
Martqopi kurgan no. 3 (Inanishvili 1989:127, note 25; cf. Abesadze & Saradzhishvili 
1989: 54). Another standard with 7.25% Sn is from the Martqopi kurgan no. 5. The 
kurgans nos. 3 and 5 are the latest among the Martqopi kurgans and must be factually 
synchronous with the Bedeni stage (Dzhaparidze 1994: 77; Schillinger 1997: 27). At 
the same time, in A. Schillinger's opinion the earliest tin bronze artefact of 
Transcaucasia is the quatrilateral awl detected in Telebi (on the right bank of the 
Alazani, near Telavi), the East Georgian site of the late Kura­Araxes times, and it 
contained already 11.3% Sn (Schillinger [see, p.86] [p. 85]
Fig. 9: 1­26 ­ Trialeti culture (Müller­Karpe 1980: 896, Table 547). [p. 86]

[beginning, see, p. 84] 1997: 24f). On the other hand, in the artefacts of the second, 
Bedeni­Alazani stage, the content of tin is from 8 to 15%. At that time the metal 
inventory is represented mainly by tin bronze (Inanishvili 1989: 127, note 25. Four 
artefacts from Bakurtsikhe (Eastern Georgia, near Gurdzhaani) kurgans: two 
spearheads, dagger and spike contained 10­13.7% Sn (Abesadze & Saradzhishvili 
1989: 55)).

In the subsequent, so­called Middle Bronze Age Trialeti culture of the „brilliant 
barrows", tin bronze also prevails with the same percentage of tin content (Pitskelauri 
1987: 24) as during the second stage of the Early Kurgan period, its amount in most 
cases fluctuates between 4.30 and 14%. Only few items are without any trace of tin; 
two of them are kettles, one with 9.85% of arsenic and another with 1.5%. In this 
period, except other elements mainly lead (0.2­0.7%), silver (0.05­0.15%), arsenic 
(0.2­0.5%), iron (till 0.12%) and nickel (till 0.03%) were used. Zinc was not detected 
(Abesadze 1974b: 50).

According to the conclusion of Georgian archaeometallurgists, the artefacts of tin 
bronze were made by smelting the local copper ores with the addition of im­ported 
tin. At the same time, in certain cases the import of separate metal objects was 
supposed. It is interesting that in the western part of Georgia twenty deposits with tin 
content were discovered by geologists, but unfortunately without any trace of ancient 
exploitation. Georgian specialists emphasize the fact that tin is genetically connected 
with granitoid intrusions, characteristic of the Caucasus (Abesadze 1980: 148­156; 
Abesadze & Bakhtadze 1987: 54; Abesadze & Saradzhishvili 1989: 58).

Taking the dates of the Early Kurgan culture of Transcaucasia into consideration it 
appears possible to place the beginning and initial stages of the Trialeti culture of the 
„brilliant barrows" in the second half of the third millennium. Even from the point of 
view of stadiality, the culture of the „brilliant barrows" of Trialeti is essentially a 
typical product of the Early Bronze Age of the Near East and its periphery. Numerous 
parallels can be found in the materials dating back to the third millennium for the 
early materials of these kurgans, noted already by B. Kurtin (cf. Kuftin 1941; Gogadze 
1972; Kavtaradze 1983).

The typical trait of the Trialeti Middle Bronze Age kurgans is their poverty of 
weapons. There were only isolated spearheads, rapiers, daggers and knives discovered, 
among them a silver dagger. It must be taken into account that there is no difference 
between weapons and decorations as to their chemical composition (Abesadze 1974b: 
50f). This fact can be considered as an evidence of a simultaneous production of both 
types of artefacts.

The Trialeti kurgans are very rich in gold. An exceptionally high Standard of the 
goldsmith is witnessed by a well­known golden cup with curls and friezes outlined in 
the double filigree and set with turquoises and carnelianes (Fig. 9.13) and by pierced 
silver pins with golden heads set with the same precious stones and granulations (Fig. 
9.8,9). The central piece of agate mounted in gold (Fig. 9.11) of the big golden beads 
is similar to the jewellery of the Ur III period from Uruk (Kuftin 1941: 94, Fig. 98; 
Maxwell­HysIop 1971: 75), but by its shape more similar to the agate pendant from 
the Ur burials of the Akkad period (cf. Woolley 1934: 371 f, Fig. 79; Kavtaradze 1981: 
104f., Table VII). The silver cup from the Trialeti barrow no. 5 decorated with 
mythological scenes (Fig. 9.1) has a recently discovered analogue in the Karashamb 
kurgan of Armenia (on the bank of the Razdan, in the Ararat valley). Both these cups 
are dose to the silver and golden ones of Troy llg by their shape (cf. Schliemann 1885: 
586, 594, no. 840, 841, 858).

From Irganchai, in the western part of Kvemo Kartli, near Dmanisi, recently series of 
14C dates for the various periods of the Trialeti culture were received; for the later 
stage: kurgan no. 1 of Irganchai, 2122­1910 cal B.C. (TB­475), kurgan no. 2, 1932­
1749 cal B.C. (TB­476), kurgan no. 3, 2284­1984 cal B.C. (TB­545), kurgan no. 4, 
1886­1706 cal B.C. (TB­477), kurgan no. 5,1512­1406 cal B.C. (TB­478), kurgan no. 
9,1872­1679 cal B.C. (TB­496), kurgan no. 18, 1678­1208 cal B.C. (TB­548); for an 
earlier stage, the Middle Bronze Age material of which reveals some traits typical 
even of the Bedeni culture: kurgan no. 21, 2132­1951 cal B.C. (TB­546), kurgan no. 
25, 2460­2138 cal B.C. (TB­811), kurgan no. 26, 2200­1934 cal B.C. (TB­812), kurgan 
no. 27, 2856­2409 cal B.C. (TB­817), kurgan no. 28, 2578­2285 cal B.C. (TB­818), 
kurgan no. 30, 2582­2328 cal B.C. (TB­835), kurgan no. 32, 2033­1749 cal B.C. (TB­
834), kurgan no. 37, 3336­3036 cal B.C. (KN­4499). Two dates gained from the II 
kurgan of Aruch (Armenia), typical of the later stage of Trialeti culture: 2112­1772 cal 
B.C. (Bln­2727) and 2032­1890 cal B.C. (Bln­2801). The dates obtained for layer II of 
Dikha Gudzuba in Anaklia, in Western Georgia, which is dated more or less 
contemporary with the Trialeti culture, are: 2273­2044 cal B.C. (TB­274), 2391­2146 
cal B.C. (TB­275) and 2117­1930 cal B.C. CTB­276).

The necessity of the pushing back the Transcaucasian dates was also recently 
demonstrated by the finds of the kurgan of Karashamb. This unique complex (with the 
copious golden, silver and bronze artefacts) of the second group of the kurgans of the 
Trialeti culture has some traits characteristic of the third dynasty of Ur (21th­20th 
centuries B.C.), but at the same time it reveals connections with the earlier Central 
Anatolian culture of the „Royal Tombs" of Alaca Höyük (Golovina 1990: 230; 
Oganesian 1992: 84, 100 note 1).

At the time of the later part of Trialeti culture, mainly in Western Transcaucasia, a 
new type of alloy, namely arsenic­antimony bronze appeared. If tools and weapons 
were made of firmer and better forgeable arsenic and [p. 87] tin bronzes, ceremonial 
and cult inventory were cast from less firm, although easily handled arsenic­antimony 
bronzes which at the same time had a silver­like appearance. Often beads of antimony 
were found. Casting with the wax mould was widely used. Such a development of 
metallurgy was possible because of the existence of local resources.

On the upper stream of the Rioni (the ancient Phasis, the main river of Western 
Georgia) copper and arsenic­antimony deposits (in Zopkhito, Sagebi, Kvardzakheti 
etc.) are known. At the same time, there (near the village of Ghebi, in Racha) were 
found traces of ancient exploitation ­ nearly 100 copper and 30 antimony mining 
places with waste heaps of more than 100 000 tons (Mudzhiri et al. 1987: 235f; 
Kushnareva 1993: 245).

Apparently this is the reason why in Georgia (mostly in the western part) and the 
Northern Caucasus arsenic­antimony bronzes were used so widely in the Middle and 
Late Bronze Ages. Radiocarbon dates of the antimony mines of Racha are: Zopkhito, 
1379­1167 cal B.C. (TB­335) and 1517­1083 cal B.C. (TB­302); Sagebi, 1895­1748 cat 
B.C. (TB­310) and 1882­1698 cal B.C. (TB­334). In the opinion of specialists they 
were exploited from the beginning of the second millennium B.C. (cf. Kushnareva 
1993: 245). The traces of ore melting workshops and ore­threshing stone hammers 
found there were dated to the beginning of the Bronze Age (Abesadze 1980: 27). In 
Ghebi copper ores have 8% of copper. There specimens of antimony ore from a 
mining place situated 6 km from Ghebi contained following elements: I, antimony ­ 
27.26%, lead ­ 0.66%, arsenic ­4.64%, copper ­ 0.11%, iron ­ 2.08%, sulphur ­12.37%; 
II, antimony ­ 40.47%, arsenic ­ 0.56%, lead ­0.87%, iron ­1.90%, sulphur ­ ; III, 
antimony ­ 27.31 %, arsenic ­ 1.41 %, lead ­ 0.87%, iron ­ 5.66%, sulphur ­15.83% 
(Abesadze 1980: 26).

By taking into account the fact of the existence of high antimony copper objects from 
the Early Bronze Age materials of Sachkhere (south of Racha), which are sometimes 
also characterized by a high content of arsenic (Abesadze 1969: Table III­V, NN 76­
117; Kushnareva 1993: 234) (Table I), it seems to be possible to date the initial 
exploitation of such ores already to the early third millennium B.C. For the dating of 
the earliest materials from Sachkhere, importance should be given to the 
abovementioned spearhead found in Tsartsis Gora, as well as to similar spearheads 
discovered in the Late Chalcolithic VI A level of Arslantepe­Malatya.

An awl from Ozni (Kvemo Kartli) containing 2.7 % of antimony and a curl­ring from 
Kvatskhelebi B with 5% of antimony are dated to a rather early time (Abesadze 1969: 
99,101). At the same time, while materials of Dzagina and Kvatskhelebi (Shida Kartli) 
has a high content of antimony in the artefacts from Koreti, of the site from the 
outskirts of Sachkhere, no traces of antimony were detected (Abesadze et al. 1958: 19; 
Abesadze 1969: 102,104).

In North­Western Georgia, Abkhazia, the watershed mountain of the ravines of 
Kodori and Bzyp, 20 ancient copper mining places were discovered (Abesadze 1980: 
35). We have following 14C dates from mine no. 4 of Bashkapsaara: eastern part, 
3015­2148 cat B.C. (LE­4198), northern part, 1518­994 cal B.C. (LE­4197), western 
part, 1750­1318 cal B.C. (LE­4196), central part, 2906­2137 cal B.C. (LE­4199) 
(Kushnareva 1993: 244, 280).

In the territory between Abkhazia and Racha, in mountanous Svaneti, in Zaargash, on 
the upper flow of the Enguri, a polymetallic deposit was discovered which was 
exploited at the times contemporary with the mines of Racha (Chartolani 1988; 
Kushnareva 1993: 245). Svaneti is exeptionally rich in lead­zinc and arsenic ores 
(Abesadze 1980: 28).

In the Middle Bronze Age the cultures of Eastern and Western Georgia (Central and 
Western Transcaucasia) had different metallurgical sources, but it seems that they had 
strong ties. As the consequence of such an interrelationship, tin was spread to Western 
Georgia from the Trialeti culture, but antimony from the western part of Georgia to 
Eastern Georgia (Abesadze 1980: 24). The presence of zinc and lead, beside antimony, 
is typical of the contents of West Georgian bronze artefacts. There, at the same time, 
zinc (till 1.25 %) is detected in arsenic­antimony bronzes of Abkhazia and lead (1.8­
6.3 %) in tin bronze artefacts of Racha and also sometimes in the Trialeti culture (1­
3.5 %, in one case ­ 8.38 %). Because zinc and lead were already found in Kura­
Araxes artefacts of Georgia (1.2­2.5 %), it was supposed that they must represent 
natural admixtures, typical of the copper ores of Georgia (Abesadze 1980: 24).

For the dating of the common Transcaucasian Middle Bronze Age certain importance 
can be given to the obsidian of south Transcaucasian provenance revealed in Tal­i­
Malyan in the Iranian province of Fars in deposits of the Kafteri phase (2100­1800 
B.C.) and determined by the Conservation Analytical Laboratory of the Smithsonian 
Institution. If one part of them was similar to the obsidian used in Alikemektepesi 
(Azerbaijan), another part, coming from the Gutansar complex of Armenia (western 
slope of Gegam), was found in great quantity in the sites of the Ararat valley, i.e.  
south of its "birthplace" ­ the Gegam mountain. At the same time, in the eight kurgans 
of the Karmirberd culture, necklaces were found dated to the time of the Babylonian 
king Samsu­iluna, 1806­1778 B.C. Among the necklaces some consisted of shells of 
sea molluscs which were obtained either at the estuary of the Persian Gulf or on the 
south Iranian coast (cf. Simonyan 1984).

The discovery of the south Transcaucasian obsidian in the southern Iran and of south 
Iranian or south [p. 87] Mesopotamian ornaments in Transcaucasia can be considered 
as the reflection of one and the same phenomenon ­ the existence of trade connections 
between southern Transcaucasia on the one hand and south­western Iran and southern 
Mesopotamia on the other which determines the coexistence of the late Karmirberd 
and early Sevan­Userlik cultures of southern Transcaucasia and of the final part of the 
Trialeti culture in the 18th Century B.C. (Kavtaradze 1992: 51f;cf. Kushnareva 1994: 
117).

The upper date of the Trialeti culture, and together with it the Middle Bronze Age of 
Central Transcaucasia, was assigned to the middle of the fifteenth Century B.C. on the 
basis of the date of the shaft­hole spearhead with a ferrule at the end of the kurgan no. 
15 of Trialeti (Scha­effer 1948: 512) (Fig. 9.15). But since in the Near East shaft­hole 
spearheads seem to have come from the Early Dynastie period (Thomas 1967: 73) and 
the spec­imens with ferrule appear from the end of the third millennium there must be 
a reason to put into doubt the correctness of the above date for the Trialeti spearhead 
and to shift it back, together with the end of the Trialeti culture, to the middle of the 
first half of the second millennium (cf. Kavtaradze 1983: 130­134). The same can be 
stated concerning the Aegean parallels of the seventeenth century B.C. to the silver 
bowl with a cotton­reel handle from the Vanadzor (Kirovakan) kurgan of the Trialeti 
culture because of the existence of a similar bowl in Upper Egypt, among the treasure 
of Tôd, dated back to the time of Amenemhet II (1929­1892 B.C.), Pharaoh of the XII 
Dynasty, and the findings of similar cotton­reel handles in the Anatolian sites of the 
end of the third millennium B.C. (Vandier 1937: 174; Maxwell­Hysiop 1995: 243­245, 
250).

The latest group of Trialeti barrows revealing also some traits peculiar to the Late 
Bronze Age, together with other sites contemporary with them, can be united in the 
latest part of the Middle Bronze Age and dated by the post­Trialeti times ­ 
approximately in the middle of the second millennium B.C. Up to now the only 14C 
date of this period is known from the Metekhi burial (near Kaspi): 1526­1426 cal B.C. 
(TB­31).

Conclusion

The dating of the Transcaucasian metal artefacts and complexes containing them is in 
many cases possible by the consideration of the dates of materials from well­dated 
Near Eastern strata. The chronological conclusions received by this way, that is by 
correlation with the data of other archaeological materials and geochronological 
analyses, represent the decisive factor for the formation of relative and absolute 
chronologies of Central Transcaucasia of the Palaeometallic Age.

Acknowledgements 

l am very much indebted to G. Burger, E. Schalk and E. Pernicka for reading the text 
and giving usefui advices, as well as to K. Kakhiani and A. Paghava for the possibility 
to publish 14C dates of Irganchai. Discussions with E. Pernicka, R. Gläser and D. 
Sürenhagen have been of highiy important value. l would also like to thank B.B. 
Helwing and A. Schillinger for allowing me to cite their theses. l want to express my 
gratitude to the organisers of the very interesting Conference in Bochum and to the 
Volkswagen­Foundation which made my participation possible. [p. 98]
BIBLIOGRAPHY

ABESADZE, T.:
1969 Litonis tsarmoeba Amierkavkasiashi dzv.c. III atastsleulshi (Mtkvar­Araksis kultura), Tbilisi (in 
Georgian).
1974a Kvemo Kartlis qorghanebshi mopovebuli litonis nivtebis kimiuri shedgenilobis shestsaviisatvis. 
In: Samuzeumo eksponatta restavracia, konservacia, teknologia l, Tbilisi, 9­20 (in Georgian).
1974b Trialetis kulturis spilendz­brindznaos metalurgiis istoriisatvis. In: Samuzeumo eksponatta  
restavracia, konservacia, teknologia l, Tbilisi, 27­77 (in Georgian).
1980 Adre da shuabrindzhaos xanis litonis natsarmi Kaxetidan. In: Samuseumo eksponatebis  
restavracia, konservacia, teknologia III, Tbilisi, 135­163 (in Georgian).

ABESADZE, T., BAKHTADZE, R., DVALI, T. & DZHAPARIDZE, O.:
1958 Spilendz­brindzhaos metalurgiis istoriisatvis Sakartveloshi, Tbilisi (in Georgian).

ABESADZE, T. N. & BAKHTADZE, R. A.:
1987 Iz istorii drevneishei metallurgii Gruzii. In: K.M. Pitskhelauri & E. Chernikh (eds.), Kavkaz v  
sisteme paleo­metallicheskikh kultur Evrazii, materialy l simpoziuma ­„Kavkaz v epokhu rannego  
metalla" (Telavi­Signakhi 1983), Tbilisi 51­54 (in Russian).

ABESADZE. T. & SARADZHISVILI, N.:
1989 Kaxetis adreuli xanis qorghanebshi mopovebuli litonis nivtebis kimiuri shedgenilobis 
sescavlisatvis. In: akartvelos saxelmtsipo muzeumis moambe 40­B, Tbilisi (in Georgian).

ABIBULAEV, O.A.:
1963 Nekotorye itogi izucheniya kholma Kül­tepe v Azerbaijane. Sovetskaya Arkheologiya 3, 157­168 
(in Russian). 1982 Eneolit i bronza na territorii Nakhichevanskoi ASSR, Baku (in Russian).

ABRAMISHVILI, R., GIGUASHVILI, N. & KAKHIANI, K.:
1980 Ghrmaxevistavis arkeologiuri dzeglebi, Tbilisi (in Georgian).

ALGAZE, G.:
1990 Period VI: Late Chalcolithic; Period V: The early part of the Early Bronze Age; Period IV: The 
middle­late part of the Early Bronze Age. In: G. Algaze (ed.), Town and country 2­3 (text, plates), 
Chicago, Oriental Institute Publications 110.

ARAZOVA, R.B., MAKHMUDOV, F. R. & NARIMANOV, l. G.:
1972 Eneoliticheskoe poselenie Gargalartepesi. In: Arkhelogicheskie otkritiya za 1971 g., Moscow, 478­
480 (in Russian).

BADALJAN, R., KOHL, P. L, STRONACH, D. & TONIKJAN, A. V.:
1994 Preliminary report of the 1993 excavations at Horom, Armenia. Iran 32, 1 ­22.

BEHM­BLANCKE, M.:
1983 Die Ausgrabungen auf dem Hassek Höyük im Jahre 1982. In: V. Kazı Sonuçlari Toplantisi, 
Istanbul, 163­168, 419­423.
1984 Hassek Höyük 1983. In: VI. Kazı Sonuçlari Toplantisi, lzmir,181­190.

BERNABÒ BREA, L.:
1957 Sicily before the Greeks, London. 
1964 Poliochni città preistorica nell'isola di Lemnos l, Roma. BLEGEN, C.W., CASKEY, J.L, 
RAWSON, M. & SPERLING, J.:
1950 Troy, general introduction, the first and second settlements l, Princeton.

BRANIGAN, K.:
1974 Aegean metalwork of the Early and Middle Bronze Age, Oxford.

BURLEIGH, R.:
1982 Symposium at Groningen, Netherlands. Antiquity 56. 138­139. BURNEY, C.: 1993 Arslantepe as 
a gateway to the highland: a note on periods VI A­VI D. In: M. Frangipane, H. Hauptmann, M. 
Liverani, P. Matthiae & M. Mellink (eds.), Between the Rivers and over the Mountains, Archaeologica  
Anatolica et Mesopotamica Alba Palmieri Dedicata, Rome, 311­317.

BURTON BROWN, T.:
1951 Excavations in Azarbaijan, 1948, London.

CHARTOLANI, S.G.:
1988 Mednye gornorudnye mestorozhdeniya Svanetii. In: Tezisy dokladov: Bashkapsaarskii polevoi  
arkheologicheskii seminar „Mednye rudniki Zapadnogo Kavkaza Ill­l tys. do n.e. i ikh rol v gorno­
metallurgicheskom proizvodstve drevnego naseleniya", Sukhumi (in Russian).

CHELIDZE, L M.:
1979 Orydiya truda eneoliticheskogo poseleniya Arukhlo l. Materialy po Arkheologii Gruzii i Kavkaza  
7,19­31, Tables 4­17 (in Russian).

CHERNYKH, E. N.:
1992 Ancient metallurgy in the USSR, the Early Metal Age, Cambridge.

CHUBINISHVILI.T.N.:
1971 K drevnei istorii Yuznego Kavkaza, Tbilisi (in Russian).

CHUBINISHVILI, T. N. & CHELIDZE, L M.:
1978 K voprosu o nekotorykh priznakakh rannezemledelcheskoi kultury VI­IV tysyacheletii do n.e. 
Matsne, seriya istorii 1, 55­73 (in Russian).

CONTI, A. M. & PERSIANI, C.:
1993 When worlds collide, cultural developments in Eastem Anatolia in the Early Bronze Age. In: M. 
Frangipane, H. Hauptmann, M. Liverani, P. Matthiae & M. Mellink (eds.), Between the Rivers and over  
the Mountains, Archaeologica Anatolica et Mesopotamica Alba Palmieri Dedicata, Rome, 361­413.

DE JESUS, P. S.:
1980 The development of prehistoric mining and metallurgy in Anatolia, BAR Internat. Series 74, 
Oxford.

DSHAPARIDSE, O.:
1995a Die Zeit der frühen Kurgane. In: A. Miron & W. Orthmann (eds.), Unterwegs zum Goldenen  
Vlies, Saarbrücken, 69­72.
1995b Die Kurgane von Martqopi. In: A. Miron & W. Orthmann (eds.), Unterwegs zum Goldenen  
Vlies, Saarbrücken, 73­75.
DVALI, T.:
1974 Vercxlis metalurgiis istoriidan. In: Samuzeumo eksponatebis restavracia, konservacia, teknologia  
II, Tbilisi, 62­73 (in Georgian).

DZHAPARIDZE, O.:
1961 Kartveli tomebis istoriisatvis litonis tsarmoebis adreul sapexurze. Tbilisi (in Georgian).
1989 Na zare etnokulturnoi istorii Kavkaza, Tbilisi (in Russian),
1994 Trialetskaya kultura. In: K.KH. Kushnareva & V.l. Markovin (eds.), Rannyaya i srednyaya bronza  
Kavkaza, Arkheologiya, Moscow (in Russian), 75­92 .

DZHAPARIDZE, 0., KIKVIDZE, l., AVALISHVILI, G. & TSERETELI, A.:
1980 Kaxetis arkeologiuri ekspediciis angarishi (1978­1979 cc.). In: Sakartvelos saxelmtsipo museumis  
arkeologiuri ekspediciebi VII, Tbilisi, 35­41 (in Georgian).

DZHAVAKHISHVILI, A. & GLONTI, L:
1962 Urbnisi l, Tbilisi (in Georgian).

DZHAVAKHISHVILI, A. l., NARIMANOV, l. G. & KIGURADZE, T. V.:
1987 Yuzhnyi Kavkaz v VI­IV tys. do n.e. In: K.N. Pitskhelauri & E.N. Chernikh (eds.), Kavkaz v  
sisteme paleometallicheskikh kultur Evrazii, materialy l simpoziuma ­„Kavkaz v epokhu rannego  
metalla" (Telavi­Signakhi 1983), Tbilisi, 5­9 (in Russian). [p. 99]

ESIN, U.:
1979 Tepecik excavations, 1973. In: Keban Project 1973 activities, Ankara, 97­112, Tables 46­65 
(Middle East Technical University Keban Project Publications, Series l, Nr. 6).
1982 Tepecik Excavations, 1974. In: Keban Project 1974­1975 activities, Ankara, 95­118, Tables 53­78 
(Middle East Technical University Keban Project Publications, Series l, Nr. 7).
1989 An early trading center in Eastern Anatolia. In: Emre et. al., (eds.): Anatolia and the Ancient Near  
East, Studies in Honor of Tahsin Özgüç, Ankara, 135­141.

FRANGIPANE, M. & PALMIERI, A.:
1987 Urbanisation in Perimesopotamian areas, the case of Eastern Anatolia. In: L. Manzanilla (ed.), 
Studies in the Neolithic and Urban revolutions, BAR Internat. Series 349, 295­318, Oxford.

GEVORKIYAN, A. TS.:
1980 Iz istorii drevneishei metallurgii Armyanskogo nagorya. Yerevan.

GHIRSHMAN, R.:
1938 Fouilles de Sialk, près de Kashan 1933, 1934, 1937, l, Paris (Musèe du Louvre ­ Dèpartement des 
antiquités Orientales, serie Archéologique, Tome IV).

GIMBUTAS, M.:
1992 Chronologies of Eastern Europe: Neolithic through Early Bronze Age. In: R.W. Ehrich (ed.), 
Chronologies in Old World Archaeology, Chicago, London, vol. l, 395­406, vol. II, 364­384.

GLONTI, L. l., DZHAVAKHISHVILI, A. l. & KIGURADZE, T. V.:
1975 Antropomorfnye figury Khramis Didi Gora. In: Vestnik Gosudarstvennogo Muzeya Gruzii XXXI­
B, 85­97 (in Russian).
GOGADZE, E.:
1972 Trialetis qorghanuli kulturis pehodizacia da genezisi, Tbilisi (in Georgian).
1990 Nekotorye voprosy izucheniya metallurgicheskogo proizvodstva Yuznogo Kavkaza rannykh 
etapov razvitiya. In: Mezhdistsiplinarnye issledovaniya kulturogeneza i etnogeneza Armyanskogo  
nagorya i sopredelnykh oblastei, Erevan, 89­101, Tables l­lll (in Russian).

GOLDMAN, H.:
1956 Excavations at Gözlü Kule, Tarsus, II, from the Neolithic through the Bronze Age, Phnceton.

GOLOVINA,V.A.:
1990 Drevneishaya metallurgiya starogo sveta, IV sovetsko­amerikanskii simpozium po arkheologii 
(Tbilisi­Signakhi, 28 sentyabrya ­ 5 oktyabrya 1988 g.). Vestnik Drevnei Istorii 2, 225­232 (in Russian). 

HAUPTMANN, H.:
1982 Die Grabungen auf dem Norşuntepe, 1974. In: Keban­Project 1974 ­ 1975 activities, Ankara, 41­
70, Tables 13­52 (Middle East Technical University Keban Project Publications, Series l, Nr. 7).

HELMS, S.:
1973 Taşkun Mevkii 1970­71. Anatolian Studies 23,109­120.

HELWING, B.B.:
1996 Hassek Höyük. Die spätchalkolithische Keramik. Dissertation, Ruprecht­Karl­Universität 
Heidelberg.

HOH, M. R.:
1981 Die Keramik von Hassek Höyük. Istanbuler Mitteilungen 31, 31 ­82.
1984 Die Keramik von Hassek Höyük. Istanbuler Mitteilungen 34, 66­91.

INANISHVILI, G.:
1989 In: O. Lordkipanidze, Nasledie drevnei Gruzii, Tbilisi 127, note 25.

ISAAC, B., KIKODZE, Z., KOHL, P. L, MINDIASHVILI, G., ORDZHONIKIDZE, A. & WHITE, G.: 

1994 Archaeological investigations in Southern Georgia 1993 (Appendix A). Iran 32, 22­29.

KAVTARADZE,G.:
1981 Sakartvelos eneolit­brindzhaos xanis arkeologiuri kulturebis kronologia axali monacemebis  
shukze, Tbilisi (in Georgian). 
1983 K khronologii epokhi eneolita i bronzi Gruzii, Tbilisi (in Russian). 
1987 Nekotorye voprosy khronologii Gruzii epokhi eneolita ­rannei bronzy. In: Pitskhelauri & 
Chernykh (eds.), 10­16 (in Russian). 
1992 Voprosy etnicheskoi istorii Kavkaza i Anatolii i problema khronologii i periodizacii (Vl­l  
tysyacheletiya do n.e.),Tbilisi (in Russian).

KHANZADYAN, E.V.:
1964 O metallurgii drevnebronzovoi epokhi v Armenii. Sovetskaya Arkheologiya 2, 92­101 (in 
Russian).

KHLOPIN, l. N.:
1981 The Early Bronze Age cemetery of Parkhai II, the first two seasons of excavations: 1977­78. In: 
P.L. Kohl (ed.), The Bronze Age civilizations of Central Asia, recent Soviet discoveries, New York, 3­
34.

KIGURADZE, T.:
1986 Neolitische Siedlungen von Kvemo­Kartli, Georgien, München (Materialen zur allgemeinen und 
vergleichenden Archäologie 29).

KILIAN­DIRLMEIER, l.:
1984 Nadeln der frühhelladischen bis archaischen Zeit von der Peloponnes, Prähistorische Bronzefunde 
XIII, 8, München.

KLEIN, H.:
1992 Untersuchung zur Typologie bronzezeitlicher Nadeln in Mesopotamien und Syrien, Saarbrücken 
(Schriften zur Vorderasiatischen Archäologie 4).

KUFTIN, B.A.:
1941 Arkheologicheskie raskopki v Trialeti, Tbilisi (in Russian). 
1949 Arkheologicheskaya marshrutnaya ekspeditsia 1945 goda v Yugo­Osseiyu i Imeretiyu, Tbilisi (in 
Russian).

KUSHNAREVA.K.KH.:
1993 Yuzhnyi Kavkaz v IX­II tys. do n.e., etapy kultumogo razvitiya, Sankt­Petersburg (in Russian).
1994 Karmirberdsxkaya (Tazakendskaya) kultura. In: Kushnareva & Markovin (eds.), 106­117 (in 
Russian).

KUSHNAREVA, K. KH. & CHUBINISHVILI, T. N.:
1963 Istoricheskoe znachenie Yuzhnogo Kavkaza v III tysyacheletii do n.e. Sovetskaya arkheologiya 3, 
10­24 (in Russian). 
1970 Drevnye kultury Yuzhnogo Kavkaza, Leningrad (in Russian).

KUZMINA, E.E.:
1966 Metallicheskie izdeliya eneolita i bronzovoga veka v Srednei Azii, Moscow (Arkheologiya SSSR, 
svod arkheologicheskikh istochnikov B 4­9) (in Russian).

LAMB, W.:
1937 Excavations at Kusura near Afyon Karahisar. Archaeologia 86,1 ­64.

LEHMANN­HAUPT,C.F.:
1910 Armenien einst und jetzt, Bd. l, Berlin.

LORDKIPANIDZE, O.:
1989 Nasledie drevnei Gruzii, Tbilisi (in Russian). 
1991 Archäologie in Georgien, Weinheim.

MAKHARADZE, Z.:
1994 Cixia goris Mtkvar­Araksuli namosaxlari, Tbilisi, (Kavtisxevis arkheologiuri dzeglebi II) (in 
Georgian). [p. 100]

MAKHMUDOV, P.A., MUNCHAEV, R. M. & NARIMANOV, l. G.:
1968 O drevneishei metallurgii Kavkaza. Sovetskaya Arkheologiya 4, 16­26 (in Russian).

MALLOWAN, M.E.L.:
1936 The excavations at Tall Chagar Bazar and an archaeological survey of the Habur region 1934­35. 
Iraq 3, 1 ­86.
1937 The excavations at Tall Chagar Bazar and an archaeological survey of the Habur region, second 
campaign 1936. Iraq 4, 91­185. 
1947 Excavations at Brak and Chagar Bazar. Iraq 9, 1­266, Tables I­LXXXIV.

MASSOULARD, E.:
1949 Préhistoire et protohistoire d'Egypte, Paris (Université de Paris, Travaux et Mémoires de l'lnstitut 
d'Ethnologie 53).

MAXWELL­HYSLOP, K. R.:
1949 Western Asiatic shaft­hole axes. Iraq U, 90­129, Tables XXXVIII­XXXIX.
1971 Western Asiatic jewellery c.3000­612 BC, London. 
1995 A note on the Anatolian connections of the Tod treasure. Anatolian Studies 45, 243­250.

MELLAART, J.:
1975 The Neolithic of the Near East. London.

MELLINK, M.J.:
1970 Excavations at Karataş­Semayük and Elmalı, Lycia, 1969. American Journal of Archaeology 74. 
245­253, Tables 55­61.

MENABDE, M., KIGURADZE, T. & GOTSADZE, E.:
1980 Kvemo­Kartlis ekspediciis (1978­1979 cc.) mushaobis shedegebi. Sakartvelos saxelmtsipo  
muzeumis arkeologiuri ekspediciebi 7, Tbilisi, 19­33 (in Georgian).

MERPERT, H. l. & MUNCHAEV, R. M.:
1977 Drevneishaya metallurgiya Mesopotamii. Sovetskaya Arkheologiya 3, 154­161 (in Russian).

MOOREY, P.R.S.:
1982 The archaeological evidence for metallurgy and related technologies in Mesopotamia c. 5500­
2100 BC. Iraq 44,13­38.

MUDZHIRI, T. P., GOBEDZHISHVILI, G.G., INANISHVILI, G.V. & MAISURADZE.V.G.:
1987 Drevneishye surmyannye rudniki Gruzii i ikh radioaktivnye datirovki. In: Pitskhelauri & Chernikh 
(eds.), 235­236 (in Russian).

MÜLLER­KAPRE, M.:
1968 Handbuch der Vorgeschichte, Bd. 2: Jungsteinzeit, München. 
1980 Handbuch der Vorgeschichte, Bd. 4: Bronzezeit, München.

MUNCHAEV, P.M.:
1975 Kavkaz na zare bronzovogo veka, Moscow (in Russian).
1982 Eneolit Kavkaza. In: Eneolit: Arkheologiya SSSR, Moscow, 93­164 (in Russian).
1994 Kura­Arakskaya kultura. In: K.KH. Kushnareva & V.l. Markovin (eds.), Rannyaya i srednyaya  
bronza Kavkaza, Arkheologiya, Moscow (in Russian), 8­57.
NARIMANOV, I.G.:
1980 Kultura drevneishego zemledelcheskogo skotovodcheskogo naseleniya Azerbaijana, Tbilisi, 
dissertation (Institute of History of Georgia no. 673), unpublished (in Russian).
1991 Ob eneolite Azerbaijana. In: K. Pitskhelauri (ed.), Kavkaz v sisteme paleometallicheskikh kultur  
Evrazii, Tiblisi, 21­33, Tables II­VI (in Russian).

NARIMANOV, l. G. & DZHAFAROV, R. F.:
1988 K istorii drevneishei metallurgii Azerbaijana. In: Tezisy dokladov: Bashkapsaarskii polevoi  
arkheologicheskii seminar „Mednye rudniki Zapadnogo Kavkaza Ill­l tys. do n.e. i ikh rol v gorno­
metallurgicheskom proizvodstve drevnego naseleniya", Sukhumi (in Russian).

NISSEN, H.J.:
1988 The early history of the Ancient Near East 9000­2000 BC, Chicago, London.

NORTHOVER.J.P.:
1989 Properties and use of arsenic­copper alloys. In: A. Hauptmann , E. Permicka & G.A. Wagner 
(eds.), Old World Archaeometallurgy, Der Anschnitt, Beiheft 7, Bochum, 111­118.

OGANESIAN,V.E.: 1992 A silver goblet from Karashamb. Soviel Anthropology and Archaeology 30.4. 
84­102.

PALMIERI, A.:
1981 Excavations at Arslantepe (Malatya). Anatolian Studies 3l,101­119,Tables XIII­XVI.
1984 Excavations at Arslantepe, 1983. In: VI. Kazı Sonuçlari Toplantisi, Izmir, 71 ­78.
1985 Eastern Anatolia and early Mesopotamian urbanization: remarks on changing relations. In: M. 
Liverani et. al., (eds), Studi di Palentologia in Onore di Salvatore M. Puglisi, Rome, 191 ­213. 

PALMIERI, A.M„ SERTOK, K. & CHERNYKH, E.:
1993 From Arslantepe metalwork to arsenical copper technology in Eastern Anatolia. In: M. 
Frangipane, H. Hauptmann, M. Liverani, P. Matthiae & M. Mellink (eds.), Between the Rivers and over 
the Mountains, Archaeologica Anatolica et Mesopotamica Alba Palmieri Dedicata, Rome, 573­599.

PERNICKA, E.:
1990 Gewinnung und Verbreitung der Metalle in prähistorischer Zeit. Jahrb. des Römisch­
Germanischen Zentralmuseum 37, Mainz, 21­129.

PETROSYAN, LA.:
1989 Raskopki pamyatnikov Keti i Voskeaska (Ill­l tys. do n.e), Erevan (in Russian).

PITSKHELAURI, K. N.:
1987 Tsentralnoe Zakavkazie v kontse III i nachale II tys. do n.e. In: Pitskhelauri & Chernikh (eds.), 21 
­26 (in Russian).

PORADA, E., HANSEN, D. P., DURHAM, S. & BABCOCK, S. H.:
1992 The chronology of Mesopotamia, ca. 7000­1600 BC. In: R.W. Ehrich (ed.), Chronologies in Old  
World Archaeology, Chicago, London, vol. l, 77­121, vol. II, 90­124.

RAPP, G., Jr.: 
1989 Determining the origins of sulfide smelting. In: A. Hauptmann , E. Pernicka & G.A. Wagner 
(eds.), Old World Archaeometallurgy, Der Anschnitt, Beiheft 7, Bochum, 107­110.
RENFREW, C.: 
1970 The autonomy of the South­East European Copper Age. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society  
for 1969, New Series 35, 12­47. 
1973 Before civilization, the radiocarbon revolution and prehistoric Europe, London.

SAGONA,A.G.:
1981 Spiral­headed pins: a further note. Tel Aviv 8,152­160. 1984 The Caucasian region in the Early  
Bronze Age, Oxford BAR Internat. Series 214.

SCHAEFFER, C.F.A.:
1948 Stratigraphie comparée et Chronologie de l'Asie Occidentale, London.

SCHAFFER, J. G.:
1978 The later prehistoric periods. In: S.R. Allchin & N. Hammond (eds.), The archaeology in  
Afghanistan from earliest times to the Timurid period, London, 71­186.

SCHILLINGER, A.:
1997 Die früheste Zinnbronze im Schwarzmeerraum. Magisterarbeit, Universität Tübingen.

SCHLIEMANN, H.:
1885 Illios, ville et pays des troyens, Paris. [p. 101]

SCHMIDT, E. F.:
1932 The Alishar Hüyük seasons of 1928 and 1929, part l, Oriental Institute Publications 19, 
Researches in Anatolia 4, Chicago. 
1937 Excavations at Tepe Hissar, Damghan, Philadelphia.

SCHMITT­STRECKER, S., BEGEMANN, F. & PERNICKA, E.:
1992 Chemische Zusammensetzung und Bleiisotopenverhältnisse der Metallfunde vom Hassek Höyük. 
In: M.R. Behm­Blancke (ed.), Hassek Höyük, Naturwissenschaftliche Untersuchungen und lithische  
Industrie, Tübingen, 108­123.

SELIMKHANOV, l. R. & MARESHAL, J.K.:
1966 O rannykh etapakh drevnei metallurgii medi na territorii Evropy i Kavkaza v novykh poniyatii i 
resultatov analiza. In: Doklady i soobshcheniya arkheologov SSSR na VII Mezhdunarodnom kongresse  
doistorikov i protoistorikov, Moscow (in Russian).

SELIMKHANOV, l. R. & TOROSIYAN, R. M.:
1969 Metallograficheskii analiz drevneishikh metallov v Zakavkazie. Sovetskaya Arkheologiya 3, 229­
235 (in Russian).

SIMONYAN.A.E.:
1984 Dva pogrebeniya epokhi srednei bronzy mogilnika Verin­Naver. Sovetekaya Arkheologiya 3, 122­
135 (in Russian).

SPEISER, E.A.:
1935 Excavations at Tepe Gawra l, Philadelphia.

STUIVER, M. & REIMER, P.J.:
1993 Extended 14 C data base and revised calib 3.0 14C age calibration program. Radiocarbon 35, 215­
230.

TAVADZE, F. N., SAKVARELIDZE, T. N. & INANISHVILI, G. V.:
1987 Etapy razvitiya metallurgii v Gruzii. In: K.N. Pitskhelauri & E.N. Chernikkh (eds.), 44­50 (in 
Russian).

THOMAS, H. L:
1967 Near Eastern, Mediterranean and European chronology, Studies in Mediterranean archaeology 
XVII, Lund.

TOBLER, A.J.:
1950 Excavations at Tepe Gawra, Philadelphia.

TODOROVA, KH., IVANOV, ST., VASILIEV, V., KHOPF, M., KVITA, KH. & KOL, G.:
1975 Selitshnata Mogila pri Golyamo Delchevo. Raskopki i prouchvaniya 5, Sofiya (in Bulgarian).

TRENTIN, M. G.:
1993 The early reserved slip wares horizon of the upper Euphrates basin and Western Syria. In: M. 
Frangipane, H. Hauptmann, M. Liverani, P. Matthiae & M. Mellink (eds.), Between the Rivers and over  
the Mountains, Archaeologica Anatolica et Mesopotamica Alba Palmieri Dedicata, Rome, 177­199.

VANDIER, J.:
1937 A propos d'un dépôt de provenance Asiatique trouvé a Tôd.Syna18,174­182.

VOIGT, M. M.:
1992 The chronology of Iran, ca. 8000­2000 BC. In: R.W. Ehrich (ed.), Chronologies in Old World  
Archaeology, Chicago, London, vol. l, 122­178, vol. II, 125­153.

WÄFLER, M.:
1974 Ausgewählte Kleinfunde. In: Mitteilungen der Deutschen Orient­Gesellschaft zu Berlin 106. 36, 
Fig. 51.

WAGNER, G.A­, BEGEMANN, F., EIBNER, C., LUTZ, J., ÖZTUNALI, Ö., PERNICKA, E. & 
SCHMITT­STRECKER, S.:
1989 Archäometallurgische Untersuchungen an Rohstoffquellen des frühen Kupfers Ostanatoliens. 
Jahrb. des Römisch­Germanischen Zentralmuseums 36. Mainz, 637­686, Tables 46­52.

WARNER, J. L:
1994 Elmalı­Karataş II, The Early Bronze Age village of Karataş, Bryn Mawr.

WEISS, H. & YOUNG, T.C., Jr.:
1975 The merchants of Susa, Godin V and plateau lowland relations in the late fourth millennium BC. 
Iran 13.1­17.

WOOLLEY.C.L:
1934 Ur excavations 2, the Royal Cemetery, Oxford.

YAKAR, J.:
1985 The later prehistory of Anatolia, the Late Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age, Oxford, BAR 
Internat. Series 268.

ZWICKER, U.:
1980 Investigations on the extractive metallurgy of Cu/Sb/As ore and excavated smelting products from 
Norşuntepe (Keban) on the upper Euphrates. In: W.A. Oddy (ed.), Aspects of early metallurgy, 13­26, 
British Museum Occasional Paper 17.

For pp. 89­97 see Table 1: in: http://kavtaradze.wetpaint.com/page/Table+1

Chemical composition of some metal artefacts from Central Transcaucasia; 
northwestern part (the region of Sachkhere) nos. 1­54, southwestern part (Meskheti) 
nos. 55­65, north­central part (Shida Kartli) nos. 66­144, south­central part (Kvemo 
Kartli) nos. 145­206, eastern part (Kakheti) nos. 207­240. For the compiling of 
columns, data by Abesadze et at. 1958: 8­19; Dzhaparidze 1961: 197­201; Kushnareva 
& Chubinishvili 1970: 134­135; Abesadze 1969: Tables I­IV; Abesadze 1974a: 19; 
Abesadze 1974b: 66­73; Abesadze 1980: 156,157; Tavadze et al. 1984: 46, were used.

Back:

http://kavtaradze.wetpaint.com/

See, also,

publications2.htm

or

http://www.geocities.com/komblege/kavta.html