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User Guide for Campus Manager
Software Release 5.2
CiscoWorks
Text Part Number: OL-18011-01

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User Guide for Campus Manager 5.2
1998-2009 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

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C O N T E N T S
Notices xix
OpenSSL/Open SSL Project i-xix
License Issues i-xix
Preface xxiii
Audience i-xxiii
Conventions i-xxiii
Product Documentation i-xxiv
Related Documentation i-xxiv
Additional Information Online i-xxv
Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines i-xxv
CHAP T E R 1 About Campus Manager 1-1
Campus Manager Applications 1-1
CHAP T E R 2 Whats New in Campus Manager 5.2 2-1
New Features in This Release 2-1
CHAP T E R 3 Getting Started With Campus Manager 3-1
Logging Into CiscoWorks 3-1
Before Using Campus Manager 3-2
Starting Campus Manager Applications 3-2
Understanding the User Interface 3-4
Campus Manager Process and Dependent Processes 3-7
Viewing and Maintaining Log File Details 3-8
Error Messages 3-10
CHAP T E R 4 Integrating Campus Manager With CiscoWorks Common Services 4-1
CiscoWorks LMS Portal Integration 4-1
Understanding Common Services ACS Integration 4-3
Understanding DCR Integration 4-4
Data Collection and DCR 4-4
Handling DCR Events 4-5

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Understanding Object Grouping Services Integration 4-5
Understanding Device Center Integration 4-6
Understanding Software Center Integration 4-6
Understanding License Integration 4-7
CHAP T E R 5 Administering Campus Manager 5-1
Understanding Campus Manager Administration 5-1
Using Daemon Manager 5-3
Restarting Daemon Manager on Solaris 5-3
Restarting Daemon Manager on Windows 5-4
Selective Backup and Restore 5-4
Viewing Campus Manager Home Page 5-7
Using Campus Manager Data Collection Administration 5-12
Viewing Summary of Data Collection Settings 5-12
Modifying SNMP Timeouts and Retries 5-13
Device Management 5-15
Mode and Policy Settings 5-15
Manually Including Devices to Data Collection 5-19
Manually Excluding Devices from Data Collection 5-20
Using Advanced Search in CM Device Selector 5-22
Usage Notes 5-22
Scheduling Data Collection 5-23
Device Poller 5-24
Configuring Topology Settings 5-26
Restricted Topology View 5-26
Configuring DFM Polling 5-26
Understanding Groups 5-27
System Defined Groups 5-28
User Defined Groups 5-29
Overview of Subnet Based Groups 5-29
Rules Editor 5-30
Example of Rule 5-32
Using Groups 5-34
Creating Groups 5-34
Modifying Groups 5-40
Viewing Group Details 5-40
Deleting a Group 5-40
Recomputing Group Membership 5-41
Using Administration Reports 5-41

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Analyzing ANI Server 5-41
Viewing Data Collection Metrics 5-41
Viewing Data Collection Details 5-42
Viewing List of Devices Supported 5-43
Using Other Admin Settings 5-44
Configuring Discrepancy Reporting and Syslog Message Generation 5-44
Purging Reports J obs and Archived Reports 5-45
Setting RME Credentials 5-46
Setting Debugging Options 5-47
Setting up Debugging Options for Data Collection 5-48
Setting up Debugging Options for Configuration and Reports 5-50
Setting Debugging Options for Device Groups 5-51
Setting Debugging Options for Topology 5-51
Using Campus Manager J ob Browser 5-53
Administration Command Line Interface 5-54
Configuration Settings for SNMPv3 Devices 5-57
Starting Campus Manager Applications 5-59
Security 5-59
CHAP T E R 6 Generating Reports 6-1
Using the Reports J ob Browser 6-1
Using the Report Generator 6-4
Viewing Archived Reports 6-5
Purging Reports J obs and Archived Reports 6-6
CHAP T E R 7 Tracking Users 7-1
Understanding User Tracking 7-1
Understanding Network and Campus Manager Dependencies 7-5
Using User Tracking Administration 7-5
Viewing Acquisition Information 7-6
Interpreting Acquisition Information 7-7
Configuring User Tracking Acquisition Actions 7-8
Using User and Host Acquisition 7-9
Modifying Acquisition Settings 7-9
Configuring Rogue MAC List 7-17
Modifying Acquisition Schedule 7-20
Modifying Ping Sweep Options 7-21
Configuring Subnet Acquisition 7-22

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Modifying Delete Interval 7-23
Configuring Trunk for End Host Discovery 7-23
Specifying Purge Policy 7-25
Specifying Domain Name Display 7-25
Importing Information on End Host Users 7-26
Understanding Dynamic Updates 7-26
Viewing Dynamic Updates Process Status 7-30
Enabling SNMP Traps on Switch Ports 7-30
SNMP MAC Notification Listener 7-32
Configuring SNMP Trap Listener 7-32
HPOV as Primary Listener 7-33
DFM as Primary Listener 7-34
Configuring Dynamic User Tracking 7-36
Debugging Options 7-38
Debugging Options for User Tracking Server 7-39
Debugging Dynamic Updates 7-40
Debugging Options for User Tracking Reports 7-43
Dynamic User Tracking Console 7-43
Understanding User Tracking Reports 7-44
Using User Tracking Reports 7-45
Viewing Quick Reports 7-46
Operator Values and Date Formats for Last Seen Column 7-47
Exporting and Printing Reports 7-48
Viewing Report J obs List 7-49
Viewing J ob Details 7-50
Stopping J obs 7-51
Deleting J obs 7-51
Using Report Generator 7-51
Viewing Duplicates Report 7-52
Interpreting Duplicate Reports 7-53
Viewing End Hosts Reports 7-55
Interpreting End Host Reports 7-55
Interpreting Active End Hosts Report 7-59
Viewing IP Phones Reports 7-61
Interpreting IP Phones Reports 7-62
Viewing MAC Reports 7-63
Interpreting MAC Reports 7-65
Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports 7-66
Interpreting Switch Port Capacity Report 7-71

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Interpreting Switch Port Usage Reports 7-71
Interpreting Summary Report for Switch Ports 7-72
Understanding History Report 7-72
Viewing History Reports for Switch Port Utilization 7-73
Interpreting History Reports for Switch Ports 7-74
History Reports Based on Filters 7-74
Interpreting End Host History Reports 7-75
Using Custom Reports 7-76
Viewing List of Custom Reports 7-76
Creating Custom Reports 7-76
Editing Custom Reports 7-78
Copying Custom Reports 7-78
Deleting Custom Reports 7-78
Using Custom Layouts 7-79
Viewing List of Custom Layouts 7-79
Creating Custom Layouts 7-79
Editing Custom Layouts 7-80
Copying Custom Layouts 7-80
Deleting Custom Layouts 7-81
Using Archived Reports 7-81
Viewing Archived Reports List 7-81
Viewing Reports 7-82
Deleting Archived Reports 7-84
Integrating CiscoWorks WLSE 7-84
Viewing Reports on Wireless Clients 7-84
Interpreting Reports on Wireless Clients 7-85
User Tracking Command Line Interface 7-86
Exporting Switch Port Usage Report 7-89
Importing User Tracking Data 7-91
Using Lookup Analyzer Utility 7-91
Understanding UTLite 7-93
Installing UTLite Script on Active Directory 7-95
Installing UTLite Script on Windows 7-96
Installing UTLite Script on NDS 7-97
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From Windows 7-98
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From Active Directory 7-98
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From NDS 7-98
User Tracking Utility 7-99
Understanding UTU 1.1.1 7-99

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Definitions 7-100
Hardware and Software Requirements for UTU 1.1.1 7-100
Downloading UTU 1.1.1 7-100
Installing UTU 1.1.1 7-101
Accessing UTU 1.1.1 7-102
Configuring UTU 1.1.1 7-103
Searching for Users or Hosts 7-103
Using Search Patterns 7-106
Uninstalling UTU 1.1.1 7-106
Upgrading to UTU 1.1.1 7-107
Re-installing UTU 7-107
User Tracking Debugger Utility 7-108
Understanding Debugger Utility 7-108
Using Debugger Utility 7-108
CHAP T E R 8 Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations 8-1
Understanding Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations 8-1
Interpreting Discrepancies 8-2
Trunking Related Discrepancies 8-2
Trunk Negotiation Across VTP Boundary 8-3
Native VLANs Mismatch 8-4
Trunk VLANs Mismatch 8-4
Trunk VLAN Protocol Mismatch 8-4
VLAN-VTP Related Discrepancies 8-5
VTP Disconnected Domain 8-5
No VTP Server in Domain with at least One VTP Client 8-5
Link Related Discrepancies 8-6
Link Duplex Mismatch 8-6
Link Speed Mismatch 8-8
Link Trunk/NonTrunk Mismatch 8-9
Port Related Discrepancy 8-10
Port is in Error Disabled State 8-10
Device Related Discrepancy 8-11
Devices With Duplicate SysName 8-11
Spanning Tree Related Discrepancy 8-11
Port Fast Enabled on Trunk Port 8-11
Interpreting Best Practices Deviations 8-12
Channel Ports Related Best Practices Deviations 8-13
Non-channel Port in Desirable Mode 8-13

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Channel Port in Auto Mode 8-14
Spanning Tree Related Best Practices Deviations 8-15
BPDU Filter Disabled on Access Ports 8-16
BPDU-Guard Disabled on Access Ports 8-17
BackboneFast Disabled in Switch 8-18
UplinkFast not Enabled 8-20
Loop Guard and Port Fast Enabled on Ports 8-22
Trunk Ports Related Best Practices Deviations 8-23
Non-trunk Ports in Desirable Mode 8-23
Trunk Ports in Auto Mode 8-25
VLAN Related Best Practices Deviations 8-25
VLAN Index Conflict 8-25
VLAN Name Conflict 8-26
Link Ports Related Best Practice Deviation 8-26
UDLD Disabled on Link Ports 8-27
Access Ports Related Best Practice Deviation 8-28
CDP Enabled on Access Ports 8-28
Cisco Catalyst 6000 Devices Related Best Practice Deviation 8-29
High Availability not Operational 8-29
Viewing Discrepancy Reports 8-30
Understanding Discrepancy Reports 8-32
Viewing Details on Discrepancies 8-33
Fixing Discrepancies 8-34
Viewing Best Practices Deviations Reports 8-36
Understanding Best Practices Deviations Reports 8-38
Viewing Details on Best Practices Deviations 8-39
Fixing Best Practices Deviations 8-40
Customizing Discrepancies Reporting and Syslog Generation 8-42
CHAP T E R 9 Using Topology Services 9-1
Understanding Topology Services 9-2
Starting Topology Services 9-3
Using Topology Services Legend 9-5
Understanding Topology Services Main Window 9-12
Understanding Tree View 9-13
Using Topology Services Main Window 9-14
Navigating in Main Window 9-14
Understanding the Status Bar 9-16
Using Find in Main Window 9-17

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Understanding Network Topology Views 9-17
Navigating in Network Topology Views 9-18
Connecting Securely to Devices From Clients 9-20
For Microsoft Windows Clients 9-20
For Solaris Clients 9-21
Displaying Network Views 9-22
Using Panner to View Topology Maps 9-22
Using Network Views 9-23
Customizing Network Topology Views 9-25
Saving Network Topology View Layouts 9-25
Deleting Devices From Network View 9-26
Changing Network Topology View Layouts 9-26
Starting CiscoWorks Applications From Topology Views 9-26
Modifying DFM Alert Settings 9-34
Modifying Network View Features 9-35
Changing Network Topology View Properties for One User Role 9-36
Changing Network Topology View Properties for All Users 9-37
Setting Background Images for Topology Views 9-38
Understanding Cluster Switches 9-40
Displaying Cluster Switches 9-40
Using Topology Filters 9-41
Enabling RMON to Measure Bandwidth Utilization 9-47
Modifying the Parameters 9-48
Enabling RMON on All Ports in Selected Devices 9-49
Enabling RMON on Selected Ports in Selected Devices 9-50
Disabling RMON 9-51
Customizing Bandwidth Utilization Filters 9-51
Highlighting Filtered Devices 9-52
Using Find in Network Topology Views 9-52
Understanding Summary View 9-53
Highlighting Devices From Summary View 9-53
Interpreting Summary Information 9-53
Interpreting Network View Summary Information 9-54
Interpreting Unconnected Device View Summary Information 9-54
Upgrading Network Topology Views 9-55
N-Hop View Portlet 9-56
Using Microsoft Visio With Topology Views 9-59
Downloading the Cisco Visio Stencil File 9-60
Exporting Network Topology Views to Visio 9-60

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Working With Links 9-61
Interpreting Link Tooltips 9-61
Displaying Link Attributes 9-61
Interpreting Link Attributes 9-62
Displaying Aggregate Link Attributes 9-62
Interpreting Aggregate Link Attributes 9-63
Time Domain Reflectometry Reports 9-63
Understanding Time Domain Reflectometry 9-63
Using Time Domain Reflectometry Reports 9-64
Running TDR Test for a Link 9-64
Running TDR Test For a Port 9-66
Working With Devices 9-67
Performing Data Collection for Devices 9-67
Interpreting Device Tooltips 9-68
Displaying Device Labels 9-68
Interpreting Device Labels 9-68
Clearing Device Labels 9-68
Displaying Device Attributes 9-69
Viewing End Host Report 9-69
Viewing Switch Port Report 9-69
Interpreting Device Attributes 9-69
Displaying Port Attributes 9-70
Interpreting Port Attributes 9-70
Setting Preferred Management Addresses 9-71
Starting CiscoView 9-72
Starting Telnet 9-73
Starting Device Center 9-74
Working With MLS Devices 9-74
Displaying MLS Reports 9-75
Interpreting MLS Reports 9-75
Working With Application Servers 9-76
Displaying Device Service Modules 9-77
Displaying Service Attributes 9-78
Interpreting Service Attributes 9-79
Displaying Campus Reports 9-79
Monitoring Protocol Filter by Port 9-80
Understanding Protocol Filtering 9-80
Displaying Protocol Filter Information 9-81
Viewing Data Collection Metrics 9-81

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Topology Groups 9-82
Understanding Topology Groups 9-82
Interpreting Topology Groups Summary Information 9-83
Hierarchical Maps 9-83
Understanding Hierarchical Maps 9-83
Viewing Hierarchical Maps 9-84
Topology Services Menu Reference 9-85
Topology Services Main Window Menu Reference 9-85
Network Topology View Menu Reference 9-87
Supported Protocols 9-91
Inter-Switch Link (ISL) Protocol 9-91
IEEE 802.1Q 9-92
CHAP T E R 10 Managing VLANs and VTP 10-1
Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN) 10-2
Advantages of VLANs 10-2
Simplification of Adds, Moves, and Changes 10-2
Controlled Broadcast Activity 10-2
Workgroup and Network Security 10-3
VLAN Components 10-3
Using VLANs 10-4
Configuring VLANs 10-4
Selecting Devices or Entities 10-5
Creating VLANs 10-6
Assigning Ports to VLANs 10-7
Advanced Filter 10-9
Disallowing VLAN on Trunks 10-10
Understanding VLAN Creation Summary 10-11
Deleting VLANs 10-12
Moving Affected Ports to New VLAN 10-13
Understanding VLAN Deletion Summary 10-14
Creating Ethernet VLANs 10-15
Ethernet VLANs 10-15
Creating Ethernet VLANs 10-15
Interpreting VLAN Summary Information 10-15
Displaying VLAN Reports 10-16
Interpreting VLAN Reports 10-18
Understanding Private VLAN 10-18
Types of Private VLAN Ports 10-18

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Promiscuous Ports 10-19
PVLAN Host Ports 10-19
PVLAN Trunk Ports 10-19
Using Private VLAN 10-19
Creating PVLAN 10-20
Creating Primary VLAN 10-21
Creating Secondary VLAN and Associating to Primary VLAN 10-22
Associating Ports to Secondary VLAN 10-22
Configuring Promiscuous Ports 10-23
Deleting PVLAN 10-24
Understanding Inter-VLAN Routing 10-25
Using Inter-VLAN Routing 10-25
Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing on RSM, MSFC, L2/L3 Devices 10-26
Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing on External Routers 10-27
VLAN Trunking Protocol 10-28
VTP Domains 10-29
Components of VTP Domains 10-30
Understanding VLAN Trunking Protocol Version 3 10-30
Support for VTP Version 3 in Campus Manager 10-30
Using VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) 10-32
Displaying VTP Reports 10-33
Interpreting VTP Reports 10-33
Using VTP Views 10-34
Understanding Trunking 10-35
Trunking Considerations 10-35
Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP) 10-35
Trunk Encapsulation 10-36
Trunk Characteristics 10-36
Encapsulation Types 10-37
Creating Trunk 10-37
Modifying Trunk Attributes 10-39
EtherChannel 10-41
Understanding EtherChannel 10-41
Using EtherChannel 10-41
Configuring EtherChannel 10-41
VLAN Port Assignment 10-42
Understanding VLAN Port Assignment 10-43
Starting VLAN Port Assignment 10-43
Using VLAN Port Assignment 10-44

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Configuring Trunk Attributes 10-45
Displaying Attribute Summaries 10-46
Displaying Port Attributes 10-46
Interpreting Port Attributes Report 10-47
Displaying Device Attributes 10-48
Interpreting Device Attributes Report 10-48
Displaying Trunk Attributes 10-49
Interpreting Trunk Attributes 10-49
Usage Scenarios for Managing VLANs 10-50
Configuring PVLANs in External Demilitarized Zone 10-50
Prerequisites 10-50
Reproducing Scenario 10-51
Verifying Configuration 10-51
CHAP T E R 11 Managing Network Spanning Trees 11-1
Understanding Spanning Tree Protocol 11-1
Per VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol 11-2
Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol 11-2
Multiple Instance Spanning Tree Protocol 11-3
Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports 11-3
Spanning Tree Reports: Optimal Root Recommendation Report 11-4
Interpreting Optimal Root Recommendation 11-5
Spanning Tree Reports: Number of Instances Recommendation Report 11-6
Interpreting Number of Instances Recommendation 11-6
Spanning Tree Reports: Instance Reduction Recommendation Report 11-7
Interpreting Instance Reduction Recommendation 11-8
Spanning Tree Reports: VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation Report 11-8
Interpreting VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation 11-9
Spanning Tree Reports: STP Visualizer 11-10
Interpreting STP Visualizer 11-12
STP Visualizer Notes 11-12
Generating Reports and Configuring STP on the Network 11-13
Reporting and Configuring PVST Port 11-13
Reporting and Configuring MST Port 11-17
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Port 11-21
Reporting and Configuring PVST Device 11-25
Reporting and Configuring MST Device 11-28
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Device 11-32
Reporting and Configuring MST Instance 11-36

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Reporting and Configuring MISTP Instance 11-37
Reporting and Configuring PVST Trunk 11-38
Reporting and Configuring MST Trunk 11-40
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Trunk 11-42
Spanning Tree Filters 11-44
STP Inconsistency 11-44
Viewing STP Loop Inconsistency 11-44
Viewing STP PVID Inconsistency 11-45
Viewing STP Root Inconsistency 11-45
Viewing STP Type Inconsistency 11-45
STP Filters in Switch Cloud View 11-45
Spanning Tree 11-46
Viewing Spanning Tree per IEEE 802.1s Instance 11-46
Viewing Spanning Tree per Cisco MISTP Instances 11-46
Viewing VLANs in Switch Clouds 11-47
CHAP T E R 12 Support for IPv6 12-1
Understanding IPv6 Support in Campus Manager 12-1
Viewing IPv6 Addresses Report 12-2
Interpreting IPv6 Addresses Report 12-3
CHAP T E R 13 Data Extraction Engine 13-1
Overview of Data Extraction Engine 13-1
The cmexport Command 13-2
Running cmexport Command 13-3
cmexport Arguments and Options 13-3
Mandatory Arguments 13-4
Optional Arguments 13-4
Function-Specific Options 13-5
Displaying Help 13-5
Uses of cmexport 13-5
cmexport User Tracking 13-6
Mandatory Arguments 13-7
Accessing Help 13-9
cmexport Topology Command 13-9
Mandatory Arguments 13-10
Accessing Help 13-11
cmexport Discrepancy Command 13-12

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Mandatory Arguments 13-12
Accessing Help 13-13
cmexport Manpage 13-14
Command Line Syntax 13-14
Arguments and Options 13-15
Mandatory Arguments 13-15
Function-Specific Options 13-16
Accessing Help 13-16
DEE Developers Reference 13-16
Schema for User Tracking Data 13-17
User Tracking Schema for Switch Data 13-18
User Tracking Schema for Phone Data 13-19
User Tracking Schema for Subnet Data 13-19
Schema for Topology Data 13-20
Schema for Discrepancy Data 13-21
Using Servlet to Export Data from Campus Manager 13-22
CHAP T E R 14 Virtual Network Manager 14-1
Understanding Virtual Network Manager Workflow 14-2
Virtual Network Manager Features 14-3
Key Acronyms, Terms and Definitions 14-4
Using VNM Features 14-5
Advantages of Virtual Network Manager 14-6
Getting Started with Virtual Network Manager 14-6
Launching Virtual Network Manager 14-6
Starting VNM Application 14-7
Navigating VNM 14-8
Using VNM Home Page 14-9
VRF Collection Status 14-10
VRF Readiness Information 14-11
Recently Completed Jobs 14-11
VRF List 14-12
Show Details 14-13
Virtual Network Manager Tasks 14-13
Configuring VRF 14-14
Create VRF 14-14
Interface Mapping to VRF 14-17
Routing Protocol Configuration 14-22
Summary of VRFs to be Configured 14-24

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Editing VRF 14-26
Edit VRF 14-27
Interface Mapping to VRF in Edit VRF 14-28
Routing Protocol Configuration in Edit VRF 14-31
Summary of Edit VRF 14-33
Extending VRF 14-34
Extend VRF 14-35
Interface Mapping to VRF in Extend VRF 14-37
Routing Protocol Configuration in Extend VRF 14-40
Summary of Extend VRF 14-41
Deleting VRF 14-43
Delete VRF - Select Devices 14-44
Delete VRF - Summary 14-45
Edge VLAN Configuration 14-46
Select Devices for Edge VLAN Configuration 14-47
VLAN to VRF Mapping 14-48
Edge VLAN Configuration Summary 14-52
Administering Virtual Network Manager 14-54
Understanding VNM Administration 14-54
Using VNM Administration 14-55
Using VRF Collector Settings 14-55
Scheduling VRF Collector 14-55
Modifying VNM SNMP Timeouts and Retries 14-57
Setting VNM Debugging Options 14-58
VNM Server Debugging Settings 14-58
VRF Collector Debugging Settings 14-59
VNM Client Debugging Settings 14-59
VNM Utility Debugging Settings 14-60
Using Purge Settings 14-61
Purging VNM Reports J obs and Archived Reports 14-61
Topology 14-61
Using Topology in VNM 14-61
Generating Reports 14-62
Using the VNM J ob Browser 14-62
Using the VNM Report Generator 14-65
Readiness Report 14-66
Interpreting VRF Readiness Report 14-67
VRF Report 14-69
Device Based VRF Report 14-69

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Interpreting Device Based VRF Report 14-70
VRF Based Report 14-72
Interpreting VRF Based Report 14-73
Viewing VNM Archived Reports 14-75
Troubleshooting 14-76
Ping or Traceroute 14-76
Show Results 14-79
CHAP T E R 15 Troubleshooting and FAQs 15-1
Troubleshooting 15-1
User Tracking 15-1
Topology Services 15-3
Troubleshooting Time Domain Reflectometry Reports 15-3
VLAN Port Assignment 15-4
FAQs 15-5
Device Management 15-5
User Tracking 15-6
Data Extraction Engine 15-9
Virtual Network Manager 15-10
AP P E NDI X A Commands to Enable MAC Notification Traps on Devices A-1
Overview of Dynamic Updates A-1
Configuring Switches With MAC Notification Commands A-1
Device Operating System Version-Specific Commands A-2
List of Commands to Enable MAC Notification Traps on Devices A-3
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Notices
The following notices pertain to this software license:
OpenSSL/Open SSL Project
This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit
(http://www.openssl.org/).
This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
This product includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
License Issues
The OpenSSL toolkit stays under a dual license, i.e. both the conditions of the OpenSSL License and the
original SSLeay license apply to the toolkit. See below for the actual license texts. Actually both licenses
are BSD-style Open Source licenses. In case of any license issues related to OpenSSL please contact
openssl-core@openssl.org.
OpenSSL License:
Copyright 1998-2007 The OpenSSL Project. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided
that the following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions,
and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the
distribution.
3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display the following
acknowledgment: This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the
OpenSSL Toolkit (http://www.openssl.org/).
4. The names OpenSSL Toolkit and OpenSSL Project must not be used to endorse or promote
products derived from this software without prior written permission. For written permission, please
contact openssl-core@openssl.org.

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Notices
OpenSSL/Open SSL Project
5. Products derived from this software may not be called OpenSSL nor may OpenSSL appear in
their names without prior written permission of the OpenSSL Project.
6. Redistributions of any form whatsoever must retain the following acknowledgment:
This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit
(http://www.openssl.org/).
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE OpenSSL PROJ ECT AS IS' AND ANY EXPRESSED
OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE OpenSSL PROJ ECT OR ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE
LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF
SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS
INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN
CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE)
ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com). This product
includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
Original SSLeay License:
Copyright 1995-1998 Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com). All rights reserved.
This package is an SSL implementation written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
The implementation was written so as to conform with Netscapes SSL.
This library is free for commercial and non-commercial use as long as the following conditions are
adhered to. The following conditions apply to all code found in this distribution, be it the RC4, RSA,
lhash, DES, etc., code; not just the SSL code. The SSL documentation included with this distribution is
covered by the same copyright terms except that the holder is Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
Copyright remains Eric Youngs, and as such any Copyright notices in the code are not to be removed.
If this package is used in a product, Eric Young should be given attribution as the author of the parts of
the library used. This can be in the form of a textual message at program startup or in documentation
(online or textual) provided with the package.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided
that the following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and
the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display the following
acknowledgement:
This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com).
The word cryptographic can be left out if the routines from the library being used are not
cryptography-related.
4. If you include any Windows specific code (or a derivative thereof) from the apps directory
(application code) you must include an acknowledgement: This product includes software written
by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).

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Notices
OpenSSL/Open SSL Project
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY ERIC YOUNG AS IS AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO
EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY
THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT
(INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
The license and distribution terms for any publicly available version or derivative of this code cannot be
changed. i.e. this code cannot simply be copied and put under another distribution license [including the
GNU Public License].

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Notices
OpenSSL/Open SSL Project

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Preface
This manual describes CiscoWorks Campus Manager 5.2 and provides instructions for using it.
Audience
This document is for anyone who installs, configures, verifies, and uses Campus Manager 5.2. Network
administrators or operators should have the following skills:
Basic Windows system administrator skills
Basic network management skills
Basic Internet browser skill
Conventions
This document uses the following conventions:
Note Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not covered in the
publication.
Item Convention
Commands and keywords boldface font
Variables for which you supply values italic font
Displayed session and system information screen font
Information you enter boldface screen font
Variables you enter italic screen font
Menu items and button names boldface font
Selecting a menu item in paragraphs Option > Network Preferences
Selecting a menu item in tables Option >Network Preferences

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Preface
Product Documentation
Caution Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment
damage or loss of data.
Product Documentation
Note We sometimes update the printed and electronic documentation after original publication. Therefore,
you should also review the documentation on Cisco.com for any updates.
Table 1 describes the product documentation that is available.
Related Documentation
Note We sometimes update the printed and electronic documentation after original publication. Therefore,
you should also review the documentation on Cisco.com for any updates.
Table 1 Product Documentation
Document Title Available Formats
User Guide for Campus Manager 5.2 PDF on the product DVD.
On Cisco.com at:
http://cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/cscowor
k/ps563/products_user_guide_list.html
Context-sensitive online help Select an option from the navigation tree, then
click Help.
Click the Help button in the dialog box.

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Additional Information Online
Table 2 lists the additional documentation that is available.
Additional Information Online
Service Packs (SP) contains updated files necessary for the latest device support and fixes to known
problems that are not available in Campus Manager 5.2. If you are a registered user, you can download
SP for Campus Manager from:
http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/cw2000-campus
Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security
Guidelines
For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback,
security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly
Whats New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical
documentation, at:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html
Subscribe to the Whats New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed
and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free
service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0.
Table 2 Related Documentation
Document Title Available Formats
Installing and Getting Started With
CiscoWorks LAN Management
Solution 3.2
PDF on the product DVD.
PDF on the Documentation CD.
On Cisco.com:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/cscowork/ps2425/
prod_installation_guides_list.html
Data Migration Guide for LAN
Management Solution 3.2
PDF on the product DVD.
PDF on the Documentation CD.
On Cisco.com:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/cscowork/ps2425/
prod_installation_guides_list.html
User Guide for CiscoWorks
Common Services 3.3
PDF on the product DVD.
PDF on the Documentation CD.
On Cisco.com at:
http://cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/cscowork/ps3996/produ
cts_user_guide_list.html

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Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines
C H A P T E R

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About Campus Manager
Campus Manager is an integral component of CiscoWorks LAN Management Solution. As an enterprise
solution to network management, Campus Manager provides a suite of web-based network management
tools that enable administrators to obtain various types of graphical views of their network topology and
end-user information.
It also reports network inconsistencies, anomalies, and configuration errors in the discovered network.
Campus Manager provides advanced capabilities to manage Spanning-Tree protocols, and a user
friendly interface for creating, modifying, or deleting VLANs, LANEs, or assigning switch ports to
VLANs.
Campus Manager is based on a client-server architecture that connects multiple web-based clients to a
server on the network.
Campus Manager Applications
Campus Manager applications provide tools for configuring, managing, understanding, and visualizing
the complex physical and logical Layer 2 infrastructure.
The applications in Campus Manager and what they allow you to do, are given below:
Application Allows you to
Topology Services Manage, view, and monitor the physical and logical services on
your network.
For more details, see, Chapter 9, Using Topology Services.
User Tracking Locate and display data about users and hosts in the network,
including wireless users. Dynamic Updates provides the details
without any time delay.
For more details, see Chapter 7, Tracking Users.
Managing VLANs and VTP Assign VLAN to ports, display VLAN ports, or configure trunk
ports, Create PVLAN, Delete PVLAN, Configure Promiscuous
Ports.
For more details, see Chapter 10, Managing VLANs and VTP.

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Chapter 1 About Campus Manager
Campus Manager Applications
Discrepancies and Best Practices
Deviations Reporting
View the discrepancies and best practices deviations in your
network. This lets you resolve discrepancies and best practice
deviations.
For more details, see Chapter 8, Discrepancies and
Best Practices Deviations.
Virtual Network Manager Allows you to pre-provision, provision and monitor Virtual
Routing and Forwarding-Lite (VRF-Lite) technology. VRF-Lite
supports multiple virtual routing instances using a single routing
device used to virtualize networks span across enterprise
network.
For more details, see Chapter 14, Virtual Network Manager.
Application Allows you to
C H A P T E R

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Whats New in Campus Manager 5.2
New Features in This Release
The following are the new features and enhancements available in Campus Manager 5.2:
Virtual Network Manager
Support for IPv6
Port and Module Configuration
Reclaim Unused Up/Unused Down Report
Selective Backup and Restore
Rogue MAC Enhancement
Open Database Schema Support
Virtual Network Manager
Virtual Network Manager (VNM) is an application that works in conjunction with Campus Manager
(CM), and Resource Manager Essentials (RME).
Virtual Network Manager generates VRF Readiness Report to provide information on the VRF readiness
that help administrators identify the devices with hardware and software support available, in contrast
to the required support to configure VRF.
Virtual Network Manager application is used to perform VRF configurations in an enterprise network.
You can perform the VRF Configurations using the following configuration workflows: Create, Edit,
Extend, and Delete VRF. You can assign multiple VLANs to a single VRF instance using the Edge
VLAN Configuration workflow.
For details, see Virtual Network Manager.
Support for IPv6
IPv6 support in Campus Manager includes the following network scenarios:
Devices that may have IPv6 configured on their interfaces. These devices must have at least one
IPv4 interface. Devices are managed using IPv4.
Hosts running IPv6 are supported in the User Tracking application.
For details, see Support for IPv6.

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Chapter 2 Whats New in Campus Manager 5.2
New Features in This Release
Port and Module Configuration
The Port and Module Configuration is a feature provided by Resource Manager Essentials (RME). RME
uses port data to provide the port and module configuration feature.
Campus Manager gets updated with the port configuration data while the Data Collection process is
executed. In this release, the port configuration details collected by Campus Manager is forwarded to
RME, which is stored in the database of RME.
Reclaim Unused Up/Unused Down Report
This report displays both Link and Access ports that are used at least once but have not been used for a
specific number of days. This report is an enhancement of UT Reclaim reports of Campus Manager 5.2.
Campus Manager 5.2 uses the data from Data Collection to retrieve the free up/down Link and Access
Ports to generate reports. While running the Data Collection process, the timestamp information specific
to the Data Collection is added to the ports.
For details, see Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports.
Selective Backup and Restore
You can selectively Backup and Restore the configuration files and specific tables in data bases.
You can also back up the schema, stored procedures, and tables that are specified in the configuration
file of Campus Manager. Applications will ensure that the selected tables include all dependent tables
for proper functioning as a part of Restore.
For all tables that are not specified in the configuration file of Campus Manager, blank tables are created
so that Campus Manager can function properly. Selective backup and restore allows you to restore the
settings that are similar to the settings provided by normal backup.
For details, see Selective Backup and Restore.
Rogue MAC Enhancement
As an enhancement, the Rogue MAC feature is enhanced with filters in the following reports: Quick
Reports, End Host Reports, Active End Host Reports, IP Phone Reports and Custom Reports. The
enhanced filters in the report operate on the column that you have selected and fetch records that contain
the user input value.
The pattern field that allows you to search patterns for the MAC Address column, is enhanced to include
the following separators: dot (.) or colon (:). You can also search the patterns for MAC Addresses
without any separators.
For details, see Viewing Quick Reports.
Open Database Schema Support
LMS 3.2 supports exposing few database views and definitions.
You can access the created views using the database access methods such as J DBC and ODBC, from a
local or remote server. To enable the access to applications database, you must run the dbaccess.pl
utility from the command line.
See the Open Database Schema Support for LAN Management Solution 3.2 document for more
information on exposed database views and definitions.
Note We sometimes update the documentation after original publication. Therefore, you should also review
the documentation on Cisco.com for any updates.
C H A P T E R

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3
Getting Started With Campus Manager
This chapter tells you how to get started with Campus Manager. The sections in this chapter are:
Logging Into CiscoWorks
Before Using Campus Manager
Starting Campus Manager Applications
Understanding the User Interface
Campus Manager Process and Dependent Processes
Viewing and Maintaining Log File Details
Error Messages
Logging Into CiscoWorks
You must log into CiscoWorks server to access Campus Manager. If you are logging into CiscoWorks
server for the first time, you can use admin, which is the reserved username and password.
CiscoWorks UserModes
To prevent unauthenticated access to the CiscoWorks Server, CiscoWorks applications, and data,
Common Services provides features for managing security. You can specify the user authentication
mode using the AAA Mode Setup.
CiscoWorks Common Services supports two modes of user authentication and authorization:
ACS modeAccess Control Server (ACS) provides authentication and authorization services in
this mode. To use this mode, you must install Cisco Secure ACS on your network.
Non ACS modeCiscoWorks Server provides authentication and authorization services in this
mode.
CiscoWorks Common Services, set to default, uses CiscoWorks Server authentication (Non ACS), to
authenticate users and authorize them to access CiscoWorks Common Services applications.
The CiscoWorks Server authentication scheme has five roles. You cannot change these roles, or the
privileges assigned to those roles. The following is the list of privileges, sorted from the least privileged
to the most privileged:
Help Desk
Approver
Network Operator

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Chapter 3 Getting Started With Campus Manager
Before Using Campus Manager
Network Administrator
System Administrator
You can also use Cisco Secure ACS to provide user authentication and authorization. Cisco Secure ACS
allows you to create custom roles and privileges, so that you can customize Common Services client
applications.
You can use Cisco Secure ACS to provide a more secure environment. Cisco Secure ACS allows you to
define the roles for accessing a subset of devices.You can also decide on the applications that would
function on the selected set of devices.
If you configure Common Services to use non ACS modes for authentication, CiscoWorks Server
provides authorization services.
In ACS mode, the privileges you have depend on the ACS role assigned to you. See Campus Manager
ACS Help for complete details on roles and privileges in Campus Manager.
Before Using Campus Manager
You must ensure that you have a valid license before you start using Campus Manager. For License
information, see Installing and Getting Started with CiscoWorks LAN Management Solution 3.2.
Campus Manager determines the devices, which are to be managed, through Data Collection filters or
the auto-manage function. The auto-manage function, automatically manages the devices, where all the
devices in Device and Credential Repository are added into Campus Manager as managed devices.
You can also restrict the configuration to use a subset of the devices in DCR to be managed by Campus
Manager, based on the devices in an IP address range or a VTP Domain.
Devices that have been deleted from DCR continue to be managed by Campus Manager if Data
Collection or User Tracking Acquisition are in progress.
The licence is validated while launching different applications of Campus Manager like Topology
services. If the license is expired or invalid, you are prompted to obtain a valid license.
Starting Campus Manager Applications
The Campus Manager applications are:
Application Allows you to
User Tracking Locate and display data about users and hosts in the network, including
wireless users. Dynamic Updates provides details without any time
delay. (To access User Tracking, select Campus Manager > User
Tracking)
For more details, see Chapter 7, Tracking Users.
Topology Services Manage, view, and monitor the physical and logical services on your
network.
(To access Topology Services, select Campus Manager >
Visualization. The Topology Services page appears. Click Launch
Topology Services)
For more details, see, Chapter 9, Using Topology Services.

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Chapter 3 Getting Started With Campus Manager
Starting Campus Manager Applications
Campus Manager with Java Web Start Technology
Campus Manager uses J ava Web Start Technology to launch the user interface (UI) for Topology
Services.
You are prompted to install J ava Web Start, the first time you start these applications. You can download
and install it on the client machine, using the installation screens that are displayed. The next time you
start the application, it automatically uses this J ava Web Start.
Managing VLANs and VTP Assign VLAN to ports, display VLAN ports, or configure trunk ports,
Create PVLAN, Delete PVLAN, Configure Promiscuous Ports. (To
access User Tracking, select Campus Manager > Configuration)
For more details, see Chapter 10, Managing VLANs and VTP.
Discrepancies and Best
Practices Deviations
Reporting
View the Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations in your network.
Fix some Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations. (To access
Reports, select Campus Manager > Reports)
For more details, see Chapter 8, Discrepancies and Best Practices
Deviations.
Managing Campus
Manager J obs
View the status of all Campus Manager J obs including User Tracking
jobs and Campus Manager reports. (To access Campus Manager J obs,
select Campus Manager > Job Management)
For more details, see Chapter 5, Administering Campus Manager.
Configuring VLANs,
PVLANs and Trunk
Configure and manage VLANs, PVLANs, Trunk, and also assign ports
to VLANs. (To access Configuration, select Campus Manager >
Configuration)
For more details, see Chapter 10, Managing VLANs and VTP.
Administrating Campus
Manager
Administer Data Collection and User Tracking Major Acquisition
processes. (To access Administration, select Campus Manager >
Administration)
For more details, see Chapter 5, Administering Campus Manager.
Application Allows you to

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Chapter 3 Getting Started With Campus Manager
Understanding the User Interface
Understanding the User Interface
Campus Manager 5.2 provides a single User Interface (UI) for various applications such as Topology
Services.
All pages in Campus Manager have a Toggle icon as explained in Table 3-1.
Table 3-1 Icon Description
Icon Name Description
Toggle To switch between the Full Screen view and the Normal view of the
application page.
Full Screen view Displays only the application configuration
area.
Normal view Displays the Table of Contents, Application tabs
along with the Configuration area.
By default, the Normal view is displayed.
Configuration
Icon
Used as a Configuration Icon in the Routing Protocol Configuration
page in the Create, Edit and Extend VRF workflows.
Used as an Edge Interface Configuration Icon in the VLAN to VRF
Mapping page in the Edge VLAN Configuration workflow.
Interface
Status as UP
Displays the interface status as up in the VLAN to VRF Mapping page
in the Edge VLAN Configuration workflow.
Interface
Status as
DOWN
Displays the interface status as down in the VLAN to VRF Mapping
page in the Edge VLAN Configuration workflow.
Existing
VLAN Icon
Icon is used to view the VLANs existing on the corresponding
interface. You can use the icon in the VLAN to VRF Mapping page in
the Edge VLAN Configuration workflow.

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Understanding the User Interface
The applications are grouped in the UI as provided in Table 3-2.
Table 3-2 Grouping of Applications and Tasks in User Interface
Tabs Applications and Features
Home Campus Manager Home
User Tracking
Reports Report J obs
Report Generator
Custom Reports
Custom Layouts
Archives
Acquisition Actions
Visualization Topology Services
RMON Configuration
Configuration
VLAN Configuration
PVLAN Configuration Create PVLAN
Delete PVLAN
Configure Promiscuous Port
VLAN Port Assignment
Trunk Configuration Create Trunk
Modify Trunk Attributes
Reports
Report J obs
Report Generator Campus Manager Reports
Best Practices Deviations
Device Attributes
Discrepancies
Port Attributes
VLAN
Report Archives
Job Management Campus Manager J ob Browser
Administration
Dashboard
Data Collection SNMP Timeouts and Retries
Device Management
Mode And Policy Settings
Include Devices
Exclude Devices

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Chapter 3 Getting Started With Campus Manager
Understanding the User Interface
Schedule Data Collection
Device Poller
User Tracking Acquisition
Acquisition Settings
Schedule Acquisition
Ping Sweep
Configure Subnet Acquisition
Delete Interval
Configure Trunk For End Hosts Discovery
Reports
User Tracking Purge Policy
Domain Name Display
End Host Table Import
Dynamic Updates
Device Trap Configuration
Trap Listener Configuration
Debugging Options
Dynamic User Tracking
Dynamic User Tracking Console
User Tracking Reports
Groups
Other Admin Settings Discrepancies
Purge Settings
RME Server Credentials
Reports
Debugging Options Data Collection
Configuration and Reports
Device Groups
Topology
User Tracking Server
User Tracking Reports
Dynamic User Tracking
Table 3-2 Grouping of Applications and Tasks in User Interface (continued)
Tabs Applications and Features

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Chapter 3 Getting Started With Campus Manager
Campus Manager Process and Dependent Processes
Campus Manager Process and Dependent Processes
The following table lists the Campus Manager processes and their dependency processes.
If you stop or restart any of these processes you must stop and restart their dependency processes. See
for the list of dependent processes.
You can stop and restart the process using Common Services > Admin > Process
Table 3-3 List of Campus Manager and Dependent Processes
Process Name
Dependency
(Sequential) Description Log File
ANIDbEngine None System service: Database
engine for Campus
Manager
None
ANIServer EDS
ANIDbEngine
System service: Collects
device information for
Campus Manager
ani.log
CampusOGSServer CmfDbMonitor
EssMonitor
DCRServer
CMFOGSServer
System service: Provides
Grouping services for
Campus Manager
CampusOGSServer.log
MACUHIC EssMonitor
ANIDbEngine
System service: Receives
and processes SNMP
traps for Dynamic UT
macuhic.log
UTLITE EssMonitor
ANIDbEngine
System service: Receives
and processes the
UTLITE data
utlite.log
UTMajorAcquisitio
n
ANIServer UTMajor Acquisition is a
transient process. System
service: Collects end
hosts information.
ut.log
UTManager EssMonitor
ANIDbEngine
DCRServer
System service: Queries
external system for
Dynamic UT
utm.log
VNMServer ANIDbEngine System service: Handles
VNM Services like
configuration, VNM
collector job scheduling
Vnmserver.log
WlseUHIC ANIDbEngine System service: Collects
information from Wlse
Device
wlseuhic.log

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Chapter 3 Getting Started With Campus Manager
Viewing and Maintaining Log File Details
Viewing and Maintaining Log File Details
Each Campus Manager module writes log files within the NMSROOT/log folder. Table 3-4 lists the name
of the log file, Campus Manager module for which log file is written, the location in Windows where log
files is stored, the location in Solaris where log files is stored and the purpose of the log file.
Table 3-4 List of Campus Manager Log File Details
Log File Module
Location in
Windows Location in Solaris Purpose
ani.log Data Collection NMSROOT/log/ani.
log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/ani.log
Debugs Data
Collection
process.
AniServer.log ANIServer NMSROOT/log/AN
IServer.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/dmgtd.log
Debugs
ANIServer
process
Campus.log Campus
Manager
Configuration
and reports
NMSROOT/log/Ca
mpus.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/Campus.log
Debugs
Configuration
and reports
screen of
Campus
Manager
CampusOGSSer
ver.log
Campus
OGSServer
NMSROOT/log/Ca
mpusOGSServer.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/CampusOGSSer
ver.log
Debugs Campus
OGSServer
process
CampusOGSCli
ent.log
Campus OGS
client
NMSROOT/log/Ca
mpusOGSClient.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/CampusOGSClie
nt.log
Debugs
OGSClient
campusportal.lo
g
Campus Portal NMSROOT/log/ca
mpusportla.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/campusportal.lo
g
Debugs the
portlets like
qtopo and CM
portlets of
Campus portal.
Cmapps.log User Tracking
UI
NMSROOT/log/Cm
apps.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/Cmpapps.log
Debugs all the
UI pages for
User Tracking
macuhic.log MACUHIC NMSROOT/log/ma
cuhic.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/macuhic.log
Debugs
MACUHIC
process for
Dynamic UT
ut.log User Tracking NMSROOT/log/ut.l
og
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/ut.log
Debugs the User
Tracking module
utlite.log UTLITE NMSROOT/log/utlit
e.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/utlite.log.log
Debugs UTLite
Server.
UTMajorAcquis
ition.log
User Tracking NMSROOT/log/
UTMajorAcquisitio
n.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/dmgtd.log
Debugs
UTMajorAcquisi
tion process.

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Viewing and Maintaining Log File Details
utm.log UTManager NMSROOT/log/
Utm.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/utm.log
Debugs
UTManager
process of
Dynamic UT
Vnmclient.log VNM UI NMSROOT/log/
Vnmclient.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/Vnmclient.log
Debugs VNM UI
Vnmcollector.lo
g
VNM Collector NMSROOT/log/Vn
mCollector.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/Vnmcollector.lo
g
Debugs
VNMCollector
process.
VNMDeviceSel
ector.log
VNM Device
selector
NMSROOT/log/Vn
mDeviceSelector.lo
g
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/VNMDeviceSele
ctor.log
Debugs the
device selector
provided by
VNM.
Vnmserver.log VNM Server NMSROOT/log/Vn
merver.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/l
og/Vnmserver.log
Debugs
VNMServer
process
Vnmutils.log VNM UI and
Server
NMSROOT/log/Vn
mutils.log
/var/adm/CSCOpx/
Vnmutils.log
Debugs utility
classes used by
VNM client and
server.
Table 3-4 List of Campus Manager Log File Details (continued)
Log File Module
Location in
Windows Location in Solaris Purpose

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Error Messages
Error Messages
Table 3-5 lists the error messages, with the probable cause due to which the error has occurred. The table
also provides the possible action to be taken for the error message.
Table 3-5 Error Messages for Campus Manager
Error Message Probable Cause Possible Action
Assign Edge VLAN to VRF workflow
You have not selected any
devices from the Device Selector
page.
When no device is selected in the
Device Selector.
Select one or more devices to
perform Edge VLAN VRF
Mapping.
You should make some changes
to the VLAN to VRF Interface
Mapping page before
continuing.
When you click Next without
making any changes in the
Interface Mapping to VRF page
in create VRF, edit VRF, and
extend VRF workflow.
You should make some changes
to the VLAN to VRF Interface
Mapping page before
continuing.
Cannot connect to the CSTM
backend process.
The Application is not able to
connect to CSTM backend
process.
Check whether the daemons are
up and running
You cannot configure the
devices (display names) because
they are being used by
configuration workflows and
locked.
If few devices that you have
selected is locked or used by
some other user.
Wait until they are free.
Or
Ensure that the devices are not
used by configuration workflows
and free the devices from the
Resource Browser page. To
access this, select CS > Admin >
Resource Browser.
You cannot configure the
devices (display names) because
they are being used by other
users and locked.
If all the devices that you have
selected is locked or used by
some other user.
Wait until they are free
Or
Ensure that the devices are not
used by other users and free the
devices from the Resource
Browser page. To access this,
select CS > Admin > Resource
Browser.
You have entered an invalid IP
Address. Enter a valid IP
Address.
You have entered an invalid IP
Address.
Enter a valid IP Address.
You have entered an invalid
Subnet Mask. Enter a valid
Subnet Mask.
You have entered an invalid
Subnet Mask.
Enter a valid Subnet Mask.
You have entered an invalid
VLAN ID. Enter a valid VLAN
ID.
You have entered an invalid
VLAN ID.
Enter a valid VLAN ID.

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Error Messages
You have entered an invalid
VLAN Name. Enter a valid
VLAN Name.
You have entered an invalid
VLAN Name
Enter a valid VLAN Name.
You have entered an invalid
Route Distinguisher (RD).
You have entered an invalid
Route Distinguisher.
Enter the RD value in the format
A: B; where A takes numerical
values (1 to 9999) or IP Address
and B takes numerical values.
RD value entered must be unique
to a VRF.
An error occurred while creating
a job because the following
processes might be down: J RM,
ConfigMgmtServer or
CTMJ rmServer.
When VNM is unable to create a
job used to configure VRF on
devices
Check the processes status in
Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart the
daemon manager and try again.
Upon clicking Finish, the
commands displayed in the
Summary page, will be deployed
to the selected devices.
The Summary page displays the
commands that will be deployed
to the devices for the following
workflows: Create VRF, Edit
VRF, Extend VRF, Delete VRF
and Assign Edge VLAN.
You can edit the commands in
the previous page by clicking
Back
Or
You can exit out the workflow by
clicking Cancel.
Cannot connect to the CTM
backend process.
VNM is unable to connect to the
CTM backend process.
Check the VNMServer status
from Common Services >
Server > Admin > Processes. If
the process is down, restart the
daemon manager and try again.
J ob for configuration
deployment is successfully
created. Refer J ob Id.
Appears after the completion of
a configuration workflow.
Click the J ob Id to view the
status of the job.
Troubleshooting VRF - Server side
An error occurred while getting
the source devices from the
server because the
ANIDbEngine might be down.
While fetching the list of source
devices from the server,
ANIDbEngine might be down.
Check the ANIDbEngine status
in Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart it and try
again.
An error occurred while getting
the source devices from the
server because the
ANIDbEngine might be down.
While fetching the list of
destination devices from the
server, ANIDbEngine might be
down.
Check the ANIDbEngine status
in Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart it and try
again.
An error occurred while getting
the VRF from the server because
the ANIDbEngine might be
down.
While fetching the list of VRFs
from the server, ANIDbEngine
might be down.
Check the ANIDbEngine status
in Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart it and try
again.
Table 3-5 Error Messages for Campus Manager
Error Message Probable Cause Possible Action

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Error Messages
An error occurred while getting
the source interfaces from the
server because the
ANIDbEngine might be down.
While fetching the list of source
interfaces from the server,
ANIDbEngine might be down.
Check the ANIDbEngine status
in Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart it and try
again.
An error occurred while getting
the destination interfaces from
the server because the
ANIDbEngine might be down.
While fetching the list of
destination interfaces from the
server, ANIDbEngine might be
down.
Check the ANIDbEngine status
in Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart it and try
again.
An error occurred while
retrieving the commands from
the server.
An error occurred while getting
the list of commands from the
server.
None
Unable to connect to the device
since it is not supported in RME.
When the device is not supported
in RME.
None
RME database has failed
because the RMEDBEngine
might be down. Cannot get the
output for the Ping or Traceroute
operation.
While executing the command,
if the DB fails in RME.
Check the status of
RMEDBEngine in Common
Services > Server > Admin >
Processes. If the process is
down, restart it and try again.
Cannot get the output for the
selected devices after connecting
to them using Ping or
Traceroute. This is because these
devices are not managed by
RME.
The selected device is not
managed by RME.
None
Cannot use Ping or Traceroute to
connect to the device because it
is not supported by RME.
The selected device is not
supported by RME.
None
An error occurred while running
the command in RME because
the RMEExtnService or
RMEDBEngine processes might
be down.
An error occurred while
executing the command in RME.
Check the status of
RMEDBEngine in Common
Services > Server > Admin >
Processes. If the process is
down, restart it and try again.
Select the VRF to proceed with
VRF troubleshooting.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting a VRF.
Select the VRF and click View
Command or Ping.
Select the source device to
proceed with VRF
troubleshooting.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
source device.
Select the source device and
click View Command or Ping.
Select the destination device to
proceed with VRF
troubleshooting.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
destination device.
Select the destination device and
click View Command or Ping.
Select the destination interface
to proceed with VRF
troubleshooting.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
source interface.
Select the destination device and
click View Command or Ping.
Table 3-5 Error Messages for Campus Manager
Error Message Probable Cause Possible Action

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Error Messages
Select the source interface to
proceed with VRF
troubleshooting.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
source interface.
Select the destination device and
click View Command or Ping.
An error occurred while getting
the command from the server.
An error occurred while getting
the command from the server.
Try again.
An error occurred while getting
the output for Ping or Traceroute
from the server because the
RMEExtnService or
RMEDBEngine processes might
be down.
An error occurred while getting
the output from the server.
Check the ANIDbEngine status
in Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart it and try
again.
The DCR ID of the device is
negative.
DCR ID of the device entered is
negative.
Enter the positive DCR ID
Troubleshooting VRF - Client side
An error occurred while getting
the devices from the server.
While getting a list of source or
destination devices from the
server.
Try again.
An error occurred while getting
the VRFs from the server.
While getting a list of VRFs
from the server.
Try again.
An error occurred while getting
the Source interfaces from the
server.
While getting a list of source
interfaces from the server.
Try again.
An error occurred while getting
the Destination interfaces from
the server.
While getting a list of
destination interfaces from the
server.
Try again.
Select a Source device before
attempting to troubleshoot VRF.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
source device.
Select the source device and
click View Command or Ping.
Select a VRF before attempting
to troubleshoot VRF.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the VRF.
Select the VRF and click View
Command or Ping.
Select a Destination device
before attempting to
troubleshoot VRF.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
destination device.
Select the destination device and
click View Command or Ping.
Select the Source interface
before attempting to
troubleshoot VRF.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
source interface.
Select the source interface and
click View Command or Ping.
Select the Destination interface
before attempting to
troubleshoot VRF.
If you click View Command or
Ping without selecting the
destination interface.
Select the destination interface
and click View Command or
Ping.
Select the Source interface
before attempting to
troubleshoot VRF
If you select the Bidirectional
Ping option and click View
Command or Ping without
selecting the source interface.
Select the Source interface and
click View Command or Ping.
Table 3-5 Error Messages for Campus Manager
Error Message Probable Cause Possible Action

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Error Messages
An error occurred while
retrieving the commands from
the server.
An error occurred while
retrieving the commands from
the server.
Try again
An error occurred while getting
the output for Ping or Traceroute
from the server.
An error occurred while getting
the output from the server.
Check the ANIDbEngine status
in Common Services > Server >
Admin > Processes. If the
process is down, restart it and try
again.
An internal error occurred. An
error occurred while getting the
output for Ping or Traceroute
from the server.
A general error has occurred. Try again.
Table 3-5 Error Messages for Campus Manager
Error Message Probable Cause Possible Action
C H A P T E R

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4
Integrating Campus Manager With
CiscoWorks Common Services
This chapter details the various CiscoWorks Common Services features that are integrated with Campus
Manager. The features given in this chapter are:
CiscoWorks LMS Portal Integration
Understanding Common Services ACS Integration
Understanding DCR Integration
Understanding Object Grouping Services Integration
Understanding Device Center Integration
Understanding Software Center Integration
Understanding License Integration
CiscoWorks LMS Portal Integration
CiscoWorks LMS Portal is the first page that appears when you log into CiscoWorks Server. The user
interface, that is the LMS Portal, allows you to launch the LMS applications and it provides top-level
navigation for the frequently used functions in these applications. You can launch Campus Manager
from CiscoWorks LMS Portal.
CiscoWorks LMS Portal uses portlets to provide important statistics and details of Campus Manager.
Portlets are the basic user interface components that are managed and displayed in the CM View.
For more information, see the User Guide for CiscoWorks LMS Portal 1.2.

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CiscoWorks LMS Portal Integration
Table 4-1 describes the CM Portlets in CiscoWorks LMS Portal.
The data in the portlets are shown as tables or graphs, based on the type of data. The data available in
the portlet gets refreshed according to the CiscoWorks LMS Portal application configuration.
For more information on CM portlets, see User Guide for CiscoWorks LMS Portal 1.2.
Table 4-1 CM Portlets in CiscoWorks LMS Portal
Portlet Description
Campus Manager Provides navigation path to individual CM modules
CM N-Hop View HTML-based feature. It displays the N-Hop view from a specified
device. You can use it to view a limited set of devices.
CM Discrepancies Displays the type and count of discrepancies, such as network
inconsistencies, anomalies, and misconfigurations in the
discovered network.
It also gives a description of the discrepancy, the impact it has on
the network, and ways to resolve it.
CM User Tracking Summary Displays the count of the following MAC Addresses: Rogue
MAC, New MAC, and Dormant MAC.
It also gives a summary of the last User Tracking information
such as the number of end hosts and active end hosts.
CM Best Practices Deviation Displays the deviations from normal or recommended practices in
a network. It also provides information on each of the Best
Practice Deviations reported in Campus Manager.
It also gives a description of the Best Practice Deviation. It
includes the impact, if any, that the deviation has on the network,
and ways to resolve this deviation.
CM Data Collection Summary Displays the details of the operations performed. The details
displayed are the date and time at which the operation was last
completed, and the result of the operation.
It also displays the type of the operation, the last completed date
and time of the operation, and the result of the operation in
Collection Data Summary.
CM Workflow Demo Displays the demos of the most frequently used workflows in
Campus Manager application.

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Understanding Common Services ACS Integration
Understanding Common Services ACS Integration
Common Services 3.3 (CS) Access Control Server (ACS) model provides six standard roles:
Help Desk
Approver
Network Operator
Network Administrator
System Administrator
Super Admin
Campus Manager application features are mapped to CS User Roles. Campus Manager integrates CS 3.3
ACS model to provide granular role definitions.
Campus Manager application features are defined as a set of tasks. For a list of Campus Manager tasks,
see Common Services Permission Report. (Common Services > Server > Reports > Permission
Report)
In the CS mode, you can perform any operation on the device view as well as perform any operation on
all the devices, if authorized for the corresponding tasks.
In the ACS mode, you can view the devices. However, you are not allowed to perform a task for which
you have no authorization. If you try to perform the task, Campus Manager displays an error message.
For example, in the ACS mode, when you launch Topology Services window, you can view all the
devices. All the devices includes devices whose groups you have not mapped to in the ACS server.
However, if you select a task that is related to configuration or IP change management on a device that
you are not authorized to work on, an error message appears.
The following case applies when you select Per Network Device Group as the mode of authorization in
the ACS server.
Suppose you (with Network Admin role in Common Services) are authorized to perform the following
tasks in the ACS mode. Let us assume that the same tasks are applicable to a user with Network Admin
Role in Common Services.
View_topo
View_vpa
View_ut
View_Reports
View_AniAnalysis
Config_Vlan
Config_VlanPort
Config_UT
Config_MgmtIP
Discover_TopoDevices
Discover_UTEndHosts
Export_data

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Understanding DCR Integration
In ACS, assume that you are assigned to a device group with devices ip1, ip2, and ip3. You are not
assigned to another device group that contains the devices ip4, ip5, and ip6.
If you launch Topology Services, you can view all the devices in the Topology Map window.
If you right-click and select Change Management IP Address, and the Change Management IP
Address dialog box is launched since you are authorized for the task Config_MgmtIP. You can perform
the task.
If you right-click and select Delete Device, an authorization error appears because you are not
authorized for the task, Delete_device.
Understanding DCR Integration
Device and Credential Repository (DCR) is a set of tables that stores device information and their
credentials. DCRServer, a Common Services component, is a process.
Managing devices and end hosts in Campus Manager is a two-step process:
Data Collection
Data Collection runs as a daemon. It fetches data from devices and computes topology and network
discrepancies.
User Tracking Major Acquisition
User Tracking Major Acquisition is a transient process initiated by the Campus Manager Server. It
discovers end hosts and IP phones in the network.
This section contains:
Data Collection and DCR
Handling DCR Events
Data Collection and DCR
After fetching device details from DCR, Campus Manager needs to perform Data Collection to manage
devices. Campus Manager Server does Data Collection, at scheduled intervals.
For Data Collection, the server:
1. Gets the list of devices and their credentials from DCR.
2. Polls these devices.
3. Fetches information that is required for topology computation, reporting network discrepancies, and
for various reports and device configurations.
Earlier, Data Collection process supported the collection for ports less than or equal to 150K in a
network. In this release, Campus Manager supports the collection of ports up to 250K.
Note the following about Data Collection:
If the credentials in DCR are incorrect, the devices are reported as unreachable in Campus Manager.
For Data Collection, the credentials are not fetched from discoverysnmp.conf.
It is not mandatory that Data Collection be done for all devices in DCR. You can choose or restrict
the devices to be managed by Campus Manager, using the IP Address.
Devices in DCR can be managed by Campus Manager in Auto mode or Manual mode.

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Understanding Object Grouping Services Integration
Auto mode is the default option, where devices in DCR are automatically managed in Campus
Manager Data Collection. You can specify the filter policies based on IP Addresses to exclude or
include devices in Data Collection. You can also manually add or delete devices.
Manual mode policies are not applicable. You have to manually add or delete devices and only those
devices will be taken for Data Collection.
For complete details on Device Management, see Device Management.
Campus Manager places the port data collected by Data Collection into the database of Resource
Manager Essentials (RME). The data placed in the database is used by Port and Module
Configuration feature of RME.
For more information on how the data is used by Port and Module Configuration, see User Guide
for Resource Manager Essentials 4.3
Handling DCR Events
Data Collection Server gets the list of devices and credentials from DCR during every Data Collection.
It is possible that other applications also, add new devices or update attributes of devices in DCR.
DCRServer provides an event mechanism to inform the applications about these changes. For Campus
Manager to be in synchronization with DCR, Data Collection Server listens to update and delete events
from DCR.
When Data Collection Server receives an update event for a device or a set of devices, it synchronizes
the credential information for them.
When Data Collection Server receives a Delete event for a set of devices, it deletes the devices from
Campus Manager database. All Campus Manager views reflect this change immediately.
Whenever there is a change in Management IP address in Campus Manager, the Data Collection Server
sends an event to DCRServer. DCRServer updates the Management IP address attribute accordingly.
Understanding Object Grouping Services Integration
The Groups feature in Common Services helps you to group devices managed by CiscoWorks
applications. It helps in creating, managing, and sharing groups of devices. The groups created using this
feature, are shared across applications. You can also view the groups created in applications from
Common Services.

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Understanding Device Center Integration
Understanding Device Center Integration
Device Center provides a one-stop place where you can see a summary for a device as well as the various
tools, reports, and tasks that you can perform on a selected device. Device Center helps you access
device-centric features and information from a single location.
After launching Device Center, you can invoke many tools on the selected device from a single location.
The various features in Device Center come from the CiscoWorks applications installed on the server.
The device details related to Campus Manager that are available in the various sections are:
Summary
Device IP Address
Device Type
CDP Neighbors
Reports
Device Attributes Report
Port Attributes Report
Switch Port Report Recently Down
Switch Port Report Reclaim Unused Up Ports
Switch Port Report Reclaim Unused Down Ports
Switch Port Report Switch Port Capacity
Switch Port Report Switch Port Summary
UT End Host Report
VLAN Report
Understanding Software Center Integration
Campus Manager releases Service Packs (SP) every three months and these updates are available
through Cisco.com. Campus Manager integrates with Software Center, also known as Package Support
Updater (PSU), and uses its download service.
You can check the latest SP available for Campus Manager and download it, if required, using Software
Center.

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Understanding License Integration
Understanding License Integration
Campus Manager uses the Common Services licensing framework for licensing. Licensing is based on
the number of devices. Devices managed by Campus Manager are determined during Data Collection.
The license is validated while you are launching different applications of Campus Manager such as
Topology Services. If the license has expired or is invalid, you are prompted to obtain a valid license.
The following are the Use Case scenarios for Campus Manager based on the Common Services licensing
framework:
Behavior Before License Expiration (Nagging)
Behavior When License Period Expires
Impact of Licensing Device Limit.
Behavior Before License Expiration (Nagging)
This behavior applies to all users:
A Nag message appears 10 days before a license expires.
A message appears before expiration of license and when the device limit is crossed.
When you add devices, you are warned if the device count is close to the configured limit (10% of
limit or 100 whichever is lower).
A message appears if the device limit is crossed. However, it allows you to add a further 10% of the
license limit or 100 devices, whichever is lower.
Behavior When License Period Expires
This behavior applies to all users:
Campus Manager displays the License Expired page after the license expires.
User Tracking CLI and Data Extraction Engine (DEE) checks expiry and stops after displaying the
License Expired message.
User Tracking does not allow any scheduled jobs in the system.
Backup and Restore processes backup and restore the license file. The behavior is consistent with
the bundle-level behavior.
Impact of Licensing Device Limit.
A network might have more devices than what is allowed by the product specific license. In such cases,
Campus Manager manages only the number of devices allowed by the license.
For example, consider a network that has 1000 devices. Assume that the license is only for 300 devices.
In this case, Common Services discovers all 1000 devices and stores the credentials in Device and
Credential Repository. Campus Manager manages only the first 330 devices (10% of the allowed
license limit) in DCR. However, you are prompted to upgrade the license.
Since Data Collection is done on a partial set of devices, it is possible that some of the devices are placed
under Topology Services Unconnected Views.
In this case, you have to either upgrade to the unrestricted version of the license or apply the IP Address
filters in order to manage only the devices within the current license limit.
You can apply filters to manage devices in Auto mode of Device Management. You can also manually
exclude devices from Campus Manager. For complete details, see Device Management.

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Understanding License Integration
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Administering Campus Manager
Network administrators can perform administrative tasks on Campus Manager applications using the
Administration module. This chapter contains:
Understanding Campus Manager Administration
Viewing Campus Manager Home Page
Using Campus Manager Data Collection Administration
Configuring Topology Settings
Understanding Groups
Using Administration Reports
Using Other Admin Settings
Setting Debugging Options
Using Campus Manager J ob Browser
Administration Command Line Interface
Security
Understanding Campus Manager Administration
There are two main processes in Campus Manager:
Data Collection
Fetches the device list from DCR and collects the following data from the network:
Ports available in a device
VLANs in the network or device
Subnets in the network
Discrepancies in the network
Neighbor data for each device
Details about STP running in the network

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Understanding Campus Manager Administration
User Tracking Major Acquisition
Collects information about the end hosts and IP phones in the network. For more details on User
Tracking, see Understanding User Tracking.
The data collected by the above processes is used by Campus Manager to generate reports about the
network.
This section explains:
Using Daemon Manager
Selective Backup and Restore
Note The Device Discovery process that was available in the previous versions of Campus Manager is now
moved to Common Services. For more details see the User Guide for Common Services.
You can do the following settings from Campus Manager Administration:
Data Collection Settings
Specify the time period at which SNMP queries time out, and the number of retries that can be
done by Campus Manager before it stops querying the device.
Schedule the time intervals at which Data Collection runs.
Include or exclude devices for Data Collection by setting appropriate filters.
For details, see Viewing Summary of Data Collection Settings.
Configuring Topology Settings
Set Topology Maps to display only the devices that you are authorized to view.
Configure DFM Poller to display DFM alert information in Topology maps.
For details, see Configuring Topology Settings.
User Tracking Settings
Configure various options based on which data on end-hosts and IP phones in the network are
collected. For details see, Using User Tracking Administration.
Group Management
Create Device groups that can be shared by a set of users. These groups allow you to view a subset
of the entire network.
For details, see Understanding Groups.
Launch Administration Reports
Launch and view reports on:
Analysis of the ANI Server
Data Collection metrics
List of devices supported
For details, see Using Administration Reports
Other Admin Settings:
Discrepancy Configuration
Customize the Discrepancies Report to display only those discrepancies that you want to be
notified about.

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Understanding Campus Manager Administration
Specify the discrepancies for which you need to generate Syslog messages
For details, see Understanding Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations.
RME Server Credentials
Enter the credentials of the RME Server that you need to access, to invoke CiscoWorks CLI
commands from a remote client.
For details, see Setting RME Credentials.
Set Purge Policies
Configure Purge settings for jobs or report archives For details, see Purging Reports J obs and
Archived Reports.
Set Debugging options
Enable debugging for the various applications in Campus Manager. For details, see Setting
Debugging Options
Using Daemon Manager
The daemon manager provides the following services:
Maintains the startup dependencies among processes.
Starts and stops processes based on their dependency relationships.
Restarts processes if an abnormal termination is detected.
Monitors the status of processes.
The daemon manager is useful if there are applications that have long-running processes that must be
monitored and restarted. It is also used to start processes in a dependency sequence, and to start transient
jobs.
This section explains:
Restarting Daemon Manager on Solaris
Restarting Daemon Manager on Windows
Restarting Daemon Manager on Solaris
To restart daemon manager on Solaris:
Step 1 Log in as root.
Step 2 Enter the following to stop the daemon manager:
/etc/init.d/dmgtd stop
Step 3 Enter the following to start the daemon manager:
/etc/init.d/dmgtd start

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Restarting Daemon Manager on Windows
To restart daemon manager on Windows:
Step 1 Go to the command prompt.
Step 2 Enter the following to stop the daemon manager:
net stop crmdmgtd
Step 3 Enter the following to start the daemon manager:
net start crmdmgtd
Note Do not start the daemon manager immediately after you stop it. The ports used by daemon manager will
be in use for a while even after the daemon manager is stopped. Wait for sometime before you start the
daemon manager.
If the system resources are less than the required resources to install the application, restarting daemon
manager displays warning messages that are recorded in log file.
Log file for Solaris is /var/adm/CSCOpx/log/dmgtd.log
Log file for Windows is NMSROOT\log\syslog.log
Selective Backup and Restore
You can selectively back up files from the LMS 3.2 Server and restore them only on this LMS 3.2 Server.
You can also selectively back up and restore the configuration files and specific tables in databases.
You can also backup the schema, stored procedures, and select tables specified in the configuration file
of Campus Manager. The selected tables include all dependent table for proper functioning, as a part of
Restore.
For tables that are not specified in the configuration file of Campus Manager, blank tables are created
so that Campus Manager can function properly.
You can restore the settings similar to a normal backup with no data or little data. You can restore the
settings, using the CLI function on Windows and Solaris. Only configurable files and data from the
database will be backed up as part of a selective backup.
This section contains:
Files used for backup
Backing up Using CLI
Backing up View
Selective Backup
Normal Backup

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Files used for backup
For selective backup, the following two files are used:
Config file: Systemfile.txt: The Systemfile.txt contains information about the configuration files
that includes configuration settings. The Systemfile.txt is located at:
Windows: NMSROOT/backup/manifest/ani/Systemfile.txt.
Solaris: /opt/CSCOpx/backup/manifest/campus/Systemfile.txt.
where, NMSROOT CiscoWorks installed directory
DB file: Dbtablesfile.txt: The Dbtablesfile.txt is located at:
Windows: NMSROOT/backup/manifest/campus/database/Dbtablesfile.txt
Solaris: /opt/CSCOpx/backup/manifest/campus/database/Dbtablesfile.txt
where, NMSROOT CiscoWorks installed directory
The Dbtablesfile.txt contains a list of the following tables:
ManualDevices The ManualDevices table includes the entries of the devices manually
included and excluded.
devicestopoll The devicestopoll table includes the entries of critical devices. Critical devices
are the devices in your network that are polled at specified intervals.
DbVersion The DbVersion table includes the version and the date on which database is
installed.
VNMVRF The VNMVRF table includes the VRFs discovered by VNM.
Backing up Using CLI
To back up data, using only CLI on Windows and Solaris:
On Windows, run:
NMSROOT\bin\perl NMSROOT\bin\backup.pl -dest=BackupDirectory [-system]
[-log=LogFile] [-email=E-mail][-gen=Num_Generations]
On Solaris, run:
/opt/CSCOpx/bin/perl /opt/CSCOpx/bin/backup.pl -dest=BackupDirectory [-system]
[-log=LogFile] [-email=E-mail] [-gen=Num_Generations]
where,
NMSROOT CiscoWorks installed directory
-dest=BackupDirectoryDirectory where the backed up data to be stored.
-systemCommand line option that allows you to back up only the selected system configurations
from all applications instead of backing up the complete database.
-log=LogFile Log file name that contains the details of the backup.
-gen=Num_GenerationsMaximum number of backup generations to be retained in the backup
directory.
Backing up View
If you backup a view, it cannot be restored. To get the latest view details, you need to freshly install a
view by invoking:
NMSROOT/bin/perl NMSROOT/bin/dbaccess.pl install

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As a prerequisite to installing a view, you must run Data Collection and User Tracking.
Normal Backup
In case of normal backup, to backup a view, you need to freshly install a view by invoking:
NMSROOT/bin/perl NMSROOT/bin/dbaccess.pl install.
As a prerequisite to installing a view, you must run Data Collection and User Tracking.
If you modify various Network Topology View features and take a backup of Topo Map Preferences.
The topo map views that are backed up cannot be restored because the map views are dynamically
generated.
The following data is backed up when you run a backup from the user interface or from CLI without
entering the -system option:
SNMP Settings
CM Homepage Settings
Data Collection Scheduled Details
User Defined Groups
RME Credentials
Data Purge Settings
Trap Configuration Settings
Custom Reports and Layouts
Topo Map Preferences - This is applicable for Upgrade only.
MAC Detection Settings
VNM Settings, J obs and Archives - VNM Settings, J obs and Archives are migrated only when you
restore data from LMS 3.2.
Device Details
Port and VLAN Details
Campus J obs and Archives
User Tracking J obs and Archives
Note All Scheduled jobs which are yet to be run will be backed up.
Selective Backup
When you run a backup from CLI with -system option, all the above-mentioned data gets backed up
except:
Device Details
Port and VLAN Details
Campus Archives, User Tracking Archives and VNM Archives
Discovery Settings will be migrated for LMS 3.0 or lower versions.
After the completion of selective backup and restore, you must run Data collection before executing
VNM workflows.

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Note If you enter DSN:ani:NONE in the Dbtablesfile.txt, the database will not be backed up.

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Viewing Campus Manager Home Page
Viewing Campus Manager Home Page
The Campus Manager Home Page is the first page that appears when you start Campus Manager.
From this homepage you can :
View the status of the various processes running in Campus Manager
For details, see System Status
View the count of Discrepancies and Best Practise Deviations available in the network and launch
reports on them.
For details, see Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations
Launch Recently Completed User Tracking J obs
For details, see Recently Completed J obs
Access frequently used features in the application and launch various reports.
For details, see Campus Manager Tasks and Reports
You can use the Refresh icon to refresh the homepage manually and get a live status of the applications.
By default, the page refreshes every 45 seconds. Select the Auto Refresh check box to refresh the page
automatically.
The information displayed on the homepage depends on the role assigned to you for the feature.
System Status
Table 5-1 describes the fields in the System Status table.
Table 5-1 Fields in System Status Table
Field Description
Operation Campus Manager processesData Collection, User Tracking
Acquisition
Last Completion Time Date and time when the operation was last completed.
Result Click on the respective hyperlinks to get reports on Data Collection,
and User Tracking Reports.
Status Status of the OperationRunning or Idle
Action Click on the respective hyperlinks to start Data Collection, or User
Tracking Acquisition.
Data Collection: Displays a confirmation message from where
you can choose to run Data Collection only for new devices or
for all devices.
After selecting the required option, click OK to run Data
Collection.
User Tracking Acquisition: Displays a confirmation message.
Click OK to start User Tracking Acquisition.

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Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations
Campus Manager provides reports on discrepancies, such as network inconsistencies and anomalies or
misconfiguration in the discovered network.
Best Practices Deviations are variations from the normal or recommended practices in a network.
The Campus Manager Home Page displays the total number of Discrepancies and Best Practise
Deviations present in the network. When you click on the total number, the relevant report is launched.
For more information, see Understanding Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations.
Recently Completed Jobs
The Recently Completed J obs table displays the following details of jobs that were completed recently:
J ob ID
J ob Type
Description
Status
Completed At
Each J ob ID is displayed as a hyperlink. You can launch the report by clicking the hyperlink.
If there are more than eight jobs, a link named More is displayed at the bottom right of the table. Click
More >> to launch the Campus Manager J ob Browser page.
Campus Manager Tasks and Reports
The Campus Manager homepage provides hyperlinks to the following tasks and reports:
Tasks Description
Application Setup Tasks
Data Collection Settings Displays the Data Collection Settings page. Here, you can configure
various settings that define the scope of Data Collection in your
network.
For more information see Viewing Summary of Data Collection
Settings.
User Tracking Acquisition
Settings
Displays the Campus User Tracking Acquisition Settings page. Here
you can configure various settings that define the scope of User
Tracking Acquisition.
For more information, see Using User Tracking Administration.
Discrepancy Settings Displays the Network Discrepancies page from where you can
customize the Network Discrepancies report.
For more information, see Understanding Discrepancies and
Best Practices Deviations.
Device Group Management Displays the Group Management page from where you can manage
groups.
For more information, see Understanding Groups.

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Device Trap Configuration Displays the Device Trap Configuration page, from where you can
configure Cisco switches for sending SNMPv1/SNMPv2 MAC
Notification Traps.
For more information, see Enabling SNMP Traps on Switch Ports.
Trap Listener Configuration Displays the Trap Listener Configuration page, from where you can
configure either Campus Manager or DFM or HPOV to listen to
SNMP traps sent by devices.
For more information, see Configuring SNMP Trap Listener.
Trunk Configuration Displays the Trunk Configuration page, from where you can
configure trunk link between devices.
For more information, see Creating Trunk.
Operational Tasks
Topology Services Launches the Campus Manager Topology Services window.
VLAN Port Assignment Launches the Campus Manager VLAN Port Assignment window.
Device Reports
Device Attributes Report Displays the Report Generator from where you can generate and view
Device Attributes Report. The report gives information about the
devices in your network.
For more information, see Displaying Device Attributes.
Port Attributes Report Displays the Report Generator from where you can generate and view
Port Attributes Report. The report gives complete information about
the ports in the devices such as Port Name, type, Speed, Duplex mode
etc.
For more information, see Displaying Port Attributes.
VLAN Report Displays the Report Generator from where you can generate and view
VLAN Report. The report gives complete information about the
VLANs existing in your network such as, VLAN ID, VLAN Type
Status etc.
For more information, see Displaying VLAN Reports.
User Tracking Reports
End Host/IP Phone Report Displays the User Tracking Quick Reports page from where you can
generate different types of End Host and IP Phones Report.
For more information, see Viewing End Hosts Reports and Viewing
IP Phones Reports.
Wireless Report Displays the User Tracking Report Generator from where you can
generate and view reports on the wireless devices connected to your
network.
For more information, see Viewing Reports on Wireless Clients.
Tasks Description

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End Host History Report Displays the User Tracking Report Generator from where you can
generate and view reports on end host history.
This report gives information about the user logged in to the host, the
date and time in which it was connected or disconnected to and from
a port etc.
For more information, see History Reports Based on Filters.
MAC Reports Displays the User Tracking Report Generator from you can generate
reports on new MACs, Rogue MACs and dormant MACs in the
network.
For more information, see Viewing MAC Reports.
Tasks Description

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Network Reports
Best Practice Deviation Report Displays the Report Generator from where you can generate and view
reports on Best Practice Deviations in the network. You can view
Acknowledged as well as Unacknowledged deviations.
For more information, see Viewing Best Practices Deviations
Reports.
Discrepancies Report Displays the Report Generator from where you can generate and view
reports on discrepancies present in the network. You can view
Acknowledged as well as Unacknowledged discrepancies.
For more information, see Viewing Discrepancy Reports.
Advanced Reports
Switch Port Capacity Report Lists switches that crossed utilization threshold limits, along with the
value of percentage port utilization.
For details see, Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports.
Switch Port Summary Report Gives the number of Connected, Free, and Free down ports in each
switch.
For details see, Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports.
Reclaim Unused Down Ports
Report
Lists administratively down ports, which are not connected to any
end host or device.
For details see, Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports.
Reclaim Unused Up Ports
Report
Lists administratively up ports, which are not connected to any end
host or device. For details see, Understanding Switch Port Usage
Reports.
Switch Port Utilization History
Report
History Report for Switch Port Utilization helps you to view the log
in and log out of end hosts for the selected devices.
For details, see Understanding History Report.
Duplicate IP Report Displays the Report Generator page from where you can generate
Duplicate IP Report.
For more information, see Viewing Duplicates Report
Duplicate MAC Report Displays the Report Generator page from where you can generate the
Duplicate MAC Report.
For more information, see Viewing Duplicates Report
Duplicate MAC and VLAN
Report
Displays the Report Generator page from where you can generate the
Duplicate MAC and VLAN Report.
For more information, see Viewing Duplicates Report
Ports with Multiple MAC
Report
Displays the Report Generator page from where you can generate
report for Ports with Multiple MAC.
For more information, see Viewing Duplicates Report
Tasks Description

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Using Campus Manager Data Collection Administration
You must run Data Collection for Campus Manager to manage devices. Using the Administration
module of Campus Manager, you can:
View the summary of Data Collection settings. For details, see Viewing Summary of Data
Collection Settings.
Modify SNMP Timeouts and Retries. For details, see Modifying SNMP Timeouts and Retries.
Specify Data Collection filters. For details, see Device Management.
Schedule Data Collection. For details, see Scheduling Data Collection.
Configure Polling options. For more details, see Device Poller.
Specify the Data Collection debugging options. For details, see Setting up Debugging Options for
Data Collection.
You can click the Go to Campus Administration hyperlink from any screen to go to the Campus
Administration dashboard.
Viewing Summary of Data Collection Settings
You can view a summary of the Data Collection settings in this page.
To view summary:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Data Collection.
The summary of Data Collection Settings appears.
Table 5-2 describes the fields that appear in the Data Collection Settings dialog box.

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Modifying SNMP Timeouts and Retries
You can modify the SNMP timeouts and retries when Data Collection fails for a particular device with
SNMP timeout exceptions.
The SNMP fallback methodology applicable for Data Collection, UT Acquisition, and Dynamic UT is
as follows:
If you have configured a device with SNMP v2 or v1 settings in DCR, then the device is initially
queried with SNMP v2 by Campus Manager. If the query fails, CM will query the device with SNMP
v1.
If you have configured a device with SNMPv3 settings in DCR, then the device is queried with
SNMP v3. However, if the query fails, the same device will not be queried with SNMP v2 or v1.
Table 5-2 Data Collection Settings
Field Description
Type of Polling Polling can be done for all devices or a critical set of devices. Clicking View
Details for this option takes you to the Device Poller, where you set the type
of polling.
For more information, see Device Poller
Device Management
Mode
Devices can be managed in the Auto mode or Manual mode. Clicking View
Details for this option launches the Mode and Policy Settings page, where
you can do the required settings.
For more information, see Device Management.
Poll Interval Periodicity for polling the network. Polling Interval is in the format
HH:MM:SS, where HH is the hour; MM is the minutes; SS is the seconds.
Polling checks whether the devices managed by Campus Manager are SNMP
reachable, and if the interfaces in the devices are up or down.
The default poll interval is 2 hours. You can change this value in Campus
Manager > Administration > Data Collection > Device Poller page.
Data Collection
Schedule
Data Collection fetches the device list from DCR and collects the following
data from the network:
Ports available in a device
VLANs present in the network/ device
Subnets in the network
Discrepancies in the network
Neighbor data for each device
Details about STP running in the network
Click View Details to view the Data Collection Schedule details. You can
add a new schedule and edit or delete existing schedules.

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To modify SNMP timeouts and retries:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Data Collection > SNMP Timeouts and Retries.
The SNMP Timeouts and Retries dialog box appears.
Step 2 Modify the SNMP settings as given in Table 5-3.
Step 3 Click Add to add SNMP settings.
Step 4 Select a row and either:
Click Edit to edit the timeouts and retries values.
Or
Click Delete to delete the timeouts and retries values.
Click OK to save the changes or click Cancel to exit.
Step 5 Click Apply.
Table 5-3 Modify Data Collection SNMP Timeouts and Retries
Field Description
Target Denotes the Target device.
You should enter IPv4 or IPv6 address of the target device in this field.
You can also use wildcard characters or range of numbers to specify the
target device.
For example, you can enter 10.[77-78].*.* or ABCD:EF12:*:*:*:*:[3A-BB]
as the target device
Timeouts Time period after which the query times out.
This also indicates the time interval between the request and the first initial
response from the device.
The SNMP response may be slow for remote devices. If your network has
remote devices connected over a slow link, configure a higher value for
time-out.
If Time out is increased, discovery time could also increase. Enter the value
in seconds. The allowed range is 0-60.
For every retry, the timeout value is doubled.
For example, If the timeout is 10 seconds and retries 4:
Campus Manager waits for 10 seconds for response for the first try, 20
seconds for the second retry, 40 seconds for the third retry and 80 seconds
for the fourth retry.
150 seconds (10+20+40+80) is the total time lapse after which Campus
Manager stops querying the device.
Retries Number of attempts made to query the device. The allowed range is 0-8.

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Device Management
There are two modes of managing devices in Campus Manager namely Auto mode and Manual mode.
Auto Mode
This is the default option, where devices in DCR are automatically managed in Campus Manager Data
Collection. You can specify the filter policies based on device groups to include devices in data
collection. In addition to these, you can also manually add or delete devices.
For more details on mode and policy settings, see Mode and Policy Settings.
Manual Mode
In this mode policies are not applicable. You must manually add or delete devices and only those devices
will be taken for Data Collection.
For more details on manual mode, see:
Manually Including Devices to Data Collection.
Manually Excluding Devices from Data Collection
Mode and Policy Settings
You can control the mode in which Data Collection runs as well as specify filters as follows:
Enable Auto Mode
Specifying Auto Allocation Rules
Enable Auto Mode
This option is selected by default. This indicates that Campus Manager Data Collection happens in the
Auto mode. This mode works in tandem with the Manual mode policies. When you deselect this,
Campus switches to the Manual mode of Data Collection and all filters set in the Auto mode are dropped.
Specifying Auto Allocation Rules
In Auto mode you can either manage all devices or manage devices in groups.
There are two types of groups available:
System Defined groups
System defined groups are automatically created, based on the information in DCR.
User Defined Groups
You can create User Defined groups based on your requirement. For example, if you want to manage
only devices with the IP address 10.77.*.* in Campus Manager:
Create a group in Common Services for the devices with the IP Adress 10.77.[0-255].[0-255],
say CM_Subnet77.
Include that group in Campus Manager Auto mode settings.
Run Data Collection.
Now the devices with the IP address 10.77.*.* will be managed in Campus Manager.
For more details on Group Creation, see the User Guide for Common Services 3.3.

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To combine Auto mode policies with Manual mode, see:
Manually Including Devices to Data Collection
Manually Excluding Devices from Data Collection
To set Auto Allocation rules:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Data Collection > Device Management >
Mode And Policy Settings.
The Auto Allocation Settings dialog box appears.
Step 2 Select either:
Manage All Devices
This setting indicates that all devices in DCR will be managed by Campus Manager (as per the
license limit). If you select this, skip Step 3.
Manage by Groups
This setting indicates that only the devices belonging to the selected groups will be managed by
Campus Manager.
Step 3 Select the individual groups that are to be managed by Campus Manager.
Step 4 Click Apply.
If you selected Manage All Devices, the settings will be applied. All devices will be managed in Campus
Manager in the next Data Collection. Skip Step 5.
If you selected Manage by Groups, the Auto Allocation Summary window appears with the information,
as explained inTable 5-4:
.
Table 5-4 Data Collection Filters
Field Description
Number of devices currently
managed
Number of devices currently managed in Campus Manager.
Number of new devices after
this rule change
Number of devices that will be added to Campus Manager, after the
settings are applied. Clicking on the number launches the device list.
For the Manage by Groups setting:
If a device has different display names, the same IP address, and
belongs to two different groups, it is listed twice in the report.
Number of devices that will be
deleted after this rule change
Number of devices that will be deleted from Campus Manager, after
the settings are applied. If you click on the number, it launches the
list of devices marked for deletion.
For the Manage by Groups setting:
If a device has different display names, the same IP address, and
belongs to two different groups, it is listed twice in the report.
Total number of devices after
this rule change
Total number of device that will be managed in Campus Manager
after the settings are applied.
This is the sum/difference of already managed devices and the
devices added/deleted from the rule change.

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Step 5 Click OK to save the settings or Cancel to cancel the changes.
The rules set come into effect only in the next Data collection cycle.
Example
Consider the following scenario:
The following devices are managed in Campus Manager:
10.77.209.60
10.77.209.59
10.77.210.7
To understand the device count in the Auto Allocation Summary window, assume the following:
You have created a user-defined group in Common Services, which consists of the devices in the
range 10.77.209.*, say LAB1.
You have changed the mode to Manage by groups in Mode and Policy Settings page and have
included only the group LAB1.
DCR has the following devices in the range 10.77.209.*:
10.77.209.60
10.77.209.59
10.77.209.53
10.77.209.54
10.77.209.55
You have manually included the device 10.77.210.6 to be managed in Campus Manager.
You have manually excluded the device 10.77.209.55, so that it is not managed in Campus Manager.
Now the details of Auto Allocation Summary are:
Number of devices currently managed: 3 (10.77.209.60, 10.77.209.59, 10.77. 210.7)
Number of new devices after this rule change: 3 (10.77.209.53, 10.77.209.54, 10.77.210.6)
Number of devices that will be deleted after this rule change: 1 (10.77.210.7)
Current license limit Maximum number of devices that you can manage as per the LMS
license you have purchased. For more details on this, see Installing
and Getting Started guide published at
http://cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/cscowork/ps2425/prod_installa
tion_guides_list.html
Run Data Collection
Immediately after applying the
settings
Runs Data Collection immediately after applying the settings.
Table 5-4 Data Collection Filters (continued)
Field Description

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10.77.210.7 will not be managed after the rule change since it does not belong to the group LAB
1 and is not manually included.
Total number of devices after the rule change: 5 (10.77.209.60, 10.77.209.59, 10.77.209.53,
10.77.209.54, 10.77.210.6)
Points to be noted:
When a group is removed from Common Services, the change is immediately reflected in the Auto
Allocation Settings s screen, but the devices that belonged to this group will be managed in Campus
Manager and shown in Topology maps until you perform Data Collection.
When a new device is added to a group, deleted from a group or moved to another group, the changes
will be reflected in Campus Manager only in the next Data Collection cycle.
When you migrate from an older version of Campus Manager to the current version, all the IP based
filters from the older version are automatically converted into a single group with the predefined
name Migrated_From_CM_Filters.
This group will be selected automatically as an Auto mode setting. This conversion will happen
immediately after migration, during ANIServer startup.
If the filter migration fails due to any issues, the filter value will be saved as comment (preceded
with #symbol) in the ANIServer.properties file.
When the DCR mode changes in the Campus Manager server as follows:
Master mode to Slave mode
Standalone mode to Slave mode
All Auto and Manual mode policies will be deleted. Data Collection will be triggered on Manual
mode and will delete all previously managed devices from the Campus Manager database. You have
to set new policies and run Data Collection again to manage devices in Campus Manager.
When the DCR mode changes in the Campus Manager server as follows:
Standalone mode to Master mode
Master mode to Standalone mode
Slave mode to Standalone mode
Slave mode to Master mode
Auto Allocation mode is preserved.
When Campus Manager server is integrated with ACS server, only authorized devices are shown in
Campus Manager pages.
But in the mode and policy settings page, when you click on "Number of new Devices after the rule
change link" in the summary page, both authorized and unauthorized devices are listed if you have
included unauthorized devices for managing in Campus.
After you run Data collection, only the authorized devices are shown in Campus Manager.

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Manually Including Devices to Data Collection
The Device Selector in Include devices page displays the list of devices not managed by Campus
Manager, but present in DCR. From this list you can select and add devices that need to be managed by
Campus Manager.
This Manual mode of including devices can work along with the Auto mode or can work independently.
This implies:
You can manually include devices even when you are in Auto management mode. Whereas if you
are in Manual mode, Auto mode policies are not applicable.
If you switch from Auto mode to Manual mode, the Auto mode policies will not be retained.
However, the devices that are already managed will be included in future Data Collections.
The list of devices included manually is given preference over the policies set through Auto mode.
For example, If you set a Data Collection filter to exclude the devices belonging to the address range
10.77.*.* or 10.77.[0-255].[0-255], but manually add 10.77.2.1, this device will be included in the
consecutive Data Collection cycle.
The policies that you set in Auto and Manual mode will come into effect only during the next Data
Collection cycle.
Click Show Included Devices, to see the list of manually included devices in this cycle.
To manually include devices:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager >Administration >Data Collection >Device Management >
Include Devices.
The Include Devices page is launched. The Device Selector in this page has two groups:
All devices and Device Type Groups. If you have configured User defined groups, it is displayed here.
Step 2 Select the list of devices from the groups.
The devices that are already being managed by Campus Manager will not be present in the Add list.
Step 3 Click Include.
These devices will be included in the next Data Collection process.
Note Any changes you make here will come into effect only in the next Data collection cycle.

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Manually Included Devices Report
This report gives the details of devices that are manually included from Campus.
To view the report:
Step 1 Go to
Campus Manager >Administration >Data Collection >Device Management >Include Devices
Step 2 Click Show Included Devices.
The report displays information as described in Table 5-5:
To exclude a device from the Included list, select the device and click Exclude.
To get more clarity on Device Management, see FAQs.
Manually Excluding Devices from Data Collection
You can manually exclude devices from the list of devices managed by Campus Manager. The Device
Selector in the Exclude page will list the devices that are currently managed in Campus Manager and the
manually included devices.
This manual mode of excluding devices can work with Auto mode or independently. This implies:
You can manually exclude devices even when you are in Auto management mode. Whereas if you
are in Manual Mode, Auto mode policies are not applicable
If you switch from Auto mode to Manual mode, the Auto mode policies will not be retained.
However, the devices that are already managed will be included in future Data Collections.
The list of devices excluded manually are given preference over the policies set through Auto mode.
For example, If you set a Data Collection filter to include the devices belonging to the address range
10.77.*.* or 10.77.[0-255].[0-255], but manually exclude 10.77.1.3, the device 10.77.1.3 will be
excluded in the Data Collection process.
The changes made in Auto and Manual mode will come into effect only during the next Data
Collection cycle.
Click Show Excluded Devices to see the list of manually excluded devices in this cycle.
Table 5-5 Manually Included Devices Report
Field Description
IP Address IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 address) of the device.
Device Name Name of the device.
Management State Indicates whether the device is currently managed in Campus.

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To manually exclude devices:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager >Administration >Data Collection >Device Management >
Exclude Devices.
The Exclude Devices page is displayed with the following groups:
All Devices
Device Type Groups
User Defined Groups (If any)
Step 2 Select the devices from the list which you want to remove.
Step 3 Click Exclude.
These devices will be excluded from the list of devices managed by Campus Manager.
Note Any changes you make here will come into effect only in the next Data collection cycle
Manually Excluded Devices Report
This report gives the details of devices that you manually excluded from Campus Manager.
To view the report:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager >Administration >Data Collection >Device Management >
Exclude Devices.
The Exclude Devices page is launched.
Step 2 Click Show Excluded Devices.
The report displays information as given in Table 5-6:
To include a device from the Excluded list, choose the device and click Include.
For more information on Device Management, see FAQs.
Table 5-6 Manually Excluded Devices Report
Field Description
IP Address IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address) of the device.
Device Name Name of the device.

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Using Advanced Search in CM Device Selector
You can use the Advanced Search icon to specify a set of rules for advanced search. Advanced search is
based on the Grouping Services attributes of Grouping Services Server of Campus Manager. In the
Advanced Search dialog box, you can create rules to search for devices.Figure shows the Advanced
Search dialog box.
The dialog box contains the following fields and buttons as mentioned in Table 5-7
Usage Notes
The following are the usage notes for Advanced Search:
If you have not selected any device nodes, then advanced search is applied only for All Devices
node.
You can either enter the rules directly in the Rule Text field, or select the components of the rule
from the Rule Expression fields, and form a rule.
Each rule expression contains the following:
object type.variable operator value
Object TypeThe type of object (device) that is used to form a group.
VariableDevice attributes, based on which you can define the group. See the Rules Editor.
OperatorOperator to be used in the rule. The list of possible operators changes based on the
Variable selected.
ValueValue of the rule expression. The possible values depend upon the variable and operator
selected. Depending on the operator selected, the value may be free-form text or a list of values.
Table 5-7 CM Advanced Search Dialog Box
Field Description
Device Name Name of the device.
Object Type Type of object (device) that is used to form a group.
Variable Device attributes based on which you can define the
group. See Rules Editor.
Operator Operator to be used in the rule. The list of possible
operators changes based on the Variable selected.
Value The value of the rule expression. The possible values
depend upon the variable and operator selected.
Depending on the operator selected, the value may be
free-form text or list of values.
The wildcard characters are not supported.
Add Rule
Expression
Used to add the rule expression to the group rules.
Rule Text Displays the rule.
Check Syntax Verifies that the rule syntax is correct. Use this button if
you have entered the rules manually.
Search Used to search for devices based on the defined rule.

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If you are entering the rule expressions manually, the rule expression must follow this syntax:
object type.variable operator value
If you are entering more than one rule expression, you must enter logical operators OR, AND or
EXCLUDE after every rule expression.
You must use Check Syntax button only when you add a rule manually or when you modify a rule
expressions in the Rule Text.
The advanced search operation is not case-sensitive.
To delete the rules in the Rule Text box, select the complete rule including the logical operator and
press the Delete key on your keyboard.
If you want to perform a new search, click Clear All before selecting any new devices.
For information on the rules used to perform advanced search, refer Rules Editor.
Scheduling Data Collection
To schedule data collection:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Data Collection > Schedule Data Collection.
The Data Collection Schedule dialog box appears.
Step 2 Modify the data collection settings as described in Table 5-8.
Select a schedule and click Edit to edit the schedule.
Select a schedule and click Delete to delete the schedule.
Click Add to add a new schedule.
Step 3 Click OK to save the changes or click Cancel to exit.
Table 5-8 Data Collection Schedule Settings
Field Description Usage Notes
Schedule
Days, Hour, Min Days on which and the time at
which data collection is
scheduled.
The optimum data collection schedule depends
on the size of the network and the frequency of
network changes.
The default data collection schedule is every 4
hours, on the 4-hour mark, daily: 04.00, 08.00,
12.00, 16.00, 20.00, 24.00 Note that time is in
the 24-hour format.
Recurrence
Pattern
Select the days of the week on
which data collection is to be
scheduled.
This field is available only when you are adding
or editing a schedule.

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Best Practices
Be cautious while scheduling Data Collection:
Data Collection consumes significant resources on the network management system.
Use the Polling option to see the device and link status without running data collection. For more
details on polling see, Device Poller
Device Poller
Campus Manager polls the entire network for device and link status periodically.This feature allows you
to:
Configure the time interval at which the network is polled.
Poll only a critical set of devices.
Use this option to see the device and link status without running Data Collection.
Since Data Collection consumes significant system resources, you can simply poll the network and
view the device and link status in Topology maps.
Adding Critical Devices to the Device Poller
To add a device to the Critical Devices list from Topology Map:
Step 1 Launch a Topology map.
Step 2 Right click a device and select Add device to Critical Poller.
To add a device to the Critical Devices list from N-Hop View Portlet:
Step 1 Launch N-Hop View Portlet.
Step 2 Go to the configuration screen and select Poll devices.
For complete details on N-Hop view portlet, see N-Hop View Portlet.
Caution If the critical set of devices is more than 30, the amount of traffic generated as part of polling cycle will
use a large of bandwidth.
To configure Device Poller:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Data Collection > Device Poller.
The Device Poller screen is displayed.
Step 2 Configure the device poller options as specified in Table 5-9.

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Step 3 Click Apply to save the configuration.
Table 5-9 Device Poller Options
Field Description Usage Notes
Polling Details
All Devices Specifies that all devices in the network will
be polled at the specified interval.
By default the whole network is polled every 2
hours.
Critical Devices Specifies that only critical devices in the
network will be polled at the specified
interval.
You can configure this option when you need to
poll a few devices in the network more frequently.
By default the critical devices are polled every
five minutes.
Time Interval Time interval at which the specified devices
are polled periodically.
The time interval is added to the completion
time of Data Collection.
For example, you have configured the
following:
Data Collection is scheduled to run at
07:00 hours
Time interval is set to 4 hours.
If Data Collection completes at 08:00 hours,
the next polling will happen at 12:00 hours
(8 +4).
Configure this option to change the interval from
the default value.
Show Devices For Critical Devices:
Displays the list of critical devices in the
network.
Thefollowing information about the Critical
Devices is displayed:
IP Address
DeviceName
You can choose any device and click Delete to
remove it from the Critical Device poller list.
For All Devices:
Launches the Data Collection metrics report.
Thefollowing information about the devices in the
network is displayed:
IP Address
DeviceName
DeviceType
Neighbors

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Configuring Topology Settings
Configuring Topology Settings
You can configure the following Topology Settings:
Restrict Topology Maps to display only authorized devices, when Campus Manager is set to ACS
mode. For details, see Restricted Topology View.
Configure Campus Manager to fetch alert information from DFM, and display it in Topology Maps.
For details, see Configuring DFM Polling.
Restricted Topology View
Topology Maps display all the devices discovered by Campus Manager. When Campus Manager is
integrated with the ACS server, you can set Topology Maps to display only the devices you are
authorized to view. To do that:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Topology > Restricted Topology View.
The configuration screen is displayed.
Step 2 Check Display Only the Authorized devices in Topology Maps.
This option is enabled only when Campus Manager is integrated with the ACS server.
Step 3 Click Apply.
Topology Maps display only the devices you are authorized to view. If Topology Services is already
launched, close it and relaunch for the change to take effect.
Points to be Noted
If you change the management IP address of an authorized device:
It becomes an unauthorized device.
The device is not shown in Topology maps in the consecutive relaunches.
When the changed IP address is given as root in N-hop view portlet, it results in an error.
To avoid the above mentioned issues, you must maintain the same management IP address for the device
in Topology Services and in the ACS server.
Configuring DFM Polling
To display DFM information in Topology Maps and N-Hop view portlet, you have to enable polling as
follows:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Topology > DFM Poller Settings.
The configuration screen is displayed.
Step 2 Check Poll DFM Server for alerts.
If you try to apply the settings when DFM is not installed on a local or remote server, you will get an
error message indicating the same.
If DFM is installed, the list of DFM servers detected is displayed above this check-box.

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You can enable this option, only if:
DFM is installed in the local CiscoWorks server or on a remote CiscoWorks server in the master
slave mode.
AND
Campus Manager has detected the DFM server.
If DFM is installed after running Data Collection, either run Data Collection or restart ANI Server before
enabling the above setting.
Step 3 Set the time interval at which the polling should occur.
DFM updates the latest alert information every 6 minutes. So the time interval can be a value between
six minutes and fifty nine minutes, fifty nine seconds.
Step 4 Click Apply.
The settings are saved to the server and polling starts within six minutes of the configuration.
In addition to this, you can restrict the type of DFM alert displayed in your machine. For example you
can choose to display only critical alerts in Topology maps. To do that, see Modifying DFM Alert
Settings.
To restrict the type of alerts displayed in N-hop view Portlet, see Configuring the Portlet.
The alert information fetched from DFM can be launched from Topology Maps and N-Hop view portlet,
by right clicking on the required device. For details, see Starting CiscoWorks Applications From
Topology Views.
Understanding Groups
A Group can be thought of as a convenience view that allows you to view a subset of the entire network
based on the group rule defined while creating the view.
These views, which are subsets of the Layer 2 views, can be accessed by a user or a set of users. These
custom views are generated using a Campus Manager feature called Grouping Services that helps to
manage groups of devices.
Grouping Services determines the membership of a group by interpreting and applying the rule
associated with the group.
Hence, Topology Groups allows you to:
Identify and view a set of objects corresponding to a view.
Create and manage views.
Define convenience views which are a subset of the Layer 2 map.
This section explains:
System Defined Groups
User Defined Groups
Overview of Subnet Based Groups
Rules Editor
Using Groups

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Concept of a Group
A group is a named set of devices. The group is characterized by a set of properties such as a name,
description, type, access permission, and so on. Most importantly, a group has an associated rule. The
rule determines the membership of a group, which may change whenever the rule is evaluated.
Groups manage subgroups in a hierarchical organization. Two predefined top level Parent groups are
available when you install Campus Manager:
System Defined Groups
User Defined Groups
These groups are provided to categorize devices at your site, and each of these contains a list of all the
devices in the Campus Manager Database.
The groups under Administration > Groups and that under Topology Services > Topology Groups
follow the same hierarchy.
After you create a group through Administration > Groups, you must reopen the Topology Services to
view the changes.
If you have appropriate permissions, you can create subgroups under groups. Hence, each Child group
is a subgroup of a Parent group.
Note the following:
The membership of a Child group will be a subset of its immediate Parent group.
Changes in the properties of a Parent groupName, Rule, Evaluation Type, Access Permissions,
impact all Child groups under it.
When you remove a group, all Child groups under it are also removed.
When a user is removed from the Campus Manager list of users, the groups created by the user are
not removed.
System Defined Groups
A System Defined Group is a top-level container for standard groups that are accessible to and used by
most Campus Manager users. These groups are pre-defined by Campus Manager.
The predefined sub-groups under System Defined Groups are:
All Unreachable Devices which contains set of all devices that are not reachable by Campus
Manager.
Subnet Based Groups which contains sub folders representing subnets (one folder per subnet)
discovered in the network. Each folder contains the devices corresponding to those subnets.
These subnet folders are of the form: subnet subnet mask
eg: 10.77.209.48 255.255.255.240
You cannot:
Change system defined groups
Create any subgroups under system defined groups.
Based on your requirements, you can create customized groups under User Defined Groups.

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User Defined Groups
User Defined Groups is a top-level container where individual Campus Manager users can create their
own groups. Typically, the groups under User Defined Groups would be used and accessible to the user
who created the group, and perhaps a small group of additional users, or these groups may be transient
in nature.
For example, if J oe Smith wants to create a group that contains all devices where he is the System
Contact, and he uses the following rule to form this group:
Device.SystemContact equals "Joe Smith" OR
Device.SystemContact equals "jsmith"
Dynamic Group
A dynamic group is a group for which the membership list is always up-to-date.
Whenever you view a dynamic group, it always displays the latest group membership list.
Static Group
A static group is a group for which the membership is refreshed only when you explicitly request it.
Between re-evaluations, the Group Server stores the membership list and group definition of the static
group.
Overview of Subnet Based Groups
Subnet based groups are automatically created when devices are managed. These are a part of System
defined groups. You cannot create, edit or delete them.
Subnet based groups help you work on smaller subsets of devices that are logically grouped. They are
automatically deleted when all the devices in a subnet are deleted.
This topic covers:
Accessing Subnet Based Groups
Understanding Subnet Based Groups
Creating Groups Based on Subnet
Accessing Subnet Based Groups
To access Subnet based groups go to Campus Manager > Administration > Groups.
This displays the Group Management page. The Group Selector field displays two groups, System
Defined Groups and User Defined Groups. The Subnet Based Groups are created under System Defined
Groups.

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Understanding Subnet Based Groups
The Subnet based groups use the following name format:
Subnet -- Subnet Mask.
The rule expression for Subnet Based Groups has the following components:
Class.attribute operator "value"
For example,
Device.IP.Subnet equals "172.20.104.192" AND Device.IP.SubnetMask equals "255.255.255.240"
The rule above will select all devices of subnet 172.20.104.192 and subnet mask 255.255.255.240.
Creating Groups Based on Subnet
When you need to create subnet based groups as per network requirements, you can do it under User
defined groups.
For example, the following rules might be used to create two groups based on the IP address subnet:
Device.IP.Subnet equals "172.29.252.32"
Device.IP.Subnet equals "172.29.252.64"
The examples provided here are simple. However, the Grouping Service allows arbitrarily complex rules
to be formed by combining rule expressions with AND, OR or the EXCLUDE operators. This gives the
administrator the power and flexibility to create view partitions tailored to the needs of their site.
Rules Editor
Every group is defined by a set of rules. You may select an item from the drop down menus, enter a rule
in the free-form Rule Text area, or use a combination of the two.
A rule set contains a Boolean combination of individual rule expressions. A rule expression is made of
the following components:
Object Type
Variable
Operator
IP Address Range Operator
Value
Object Type
The type of devices which form the group. Rules are evaluated on the list of devices discovered. Campus
Manager supports only one object type:
Device
Variable
Any of the attributes of a device. Table 5-10 gives details on the available variables:

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Operator
The operator used in forming a rule. The following operators are available:
equals
contains
When the variable DiscoveryStatus is used, equals is the only operator is available.
When the all the variables, the following operators are available:
equals
contains
startswith
endswith
When the variable is equal to IPAddress or IP.SubnetMask or IPv6.Subnet or IPv6.SubnetMask, the
following operators are available:
equals
contains
startswith
endswith
range
IP Address Range Operator
The range operator enables you to group the devices of the specified range of IP Addresses. You can
select the range operator only for the IPAddress variable. You should enter the range of IP Addresses in
the Value field, to create a group rule based on IP Address ranges.
When you enter the IP Address range in the text field, you should:
Specify the range with permissible values for one or more octets in the IP Address.
The minimum limit in the range is 0 and the maximum limit is 255.
Table 5-10 Device Attribute Description
Attributes Description
DiscoveryStatus Status of the Data Collection process.
Hostname Name of the device.
ImageVersion Software version running on the device.
IP.Subnet IP address of the device with the subnet to which it belongs.
IP.SubnetMask Subnet mask address of the device.
IPAddress IP Address of the device.
SysName Name of the device as configured by the Administrator.
SysObjectID SysObjectID of the device as configured by the Administrator.
SystemContact Contact for the device details as entered by the Administrator.
SystemLocation Location of the device as entered by the Administrator.

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Use the hyphen character (-) as a separator between the numbers within a range.
Specify the range of IP Addresses within the [and] characters to create a group rule.
For example, you can enter 10.10.10.[0-255] or 10.10.[0-255].[0-255] in the Value field.
You should not:
Enter numbers lesser than 0 and greater than 255 in the IP Address range.
Enter any other characters other than the range separator (-).
Enter the value of highest limit in the range as less than the value of smallest limit number. For
example, you should not enter 10.10.10.[8-4].
Value
A free flow operand forming the last part of the rule.
When the variable DiscoveryStatus is used, only the following values are available:
Never_Reachable
Reachable
Currently_Unreachable
Example of Rule
Let us consider a scenario where you need to define a rule for a set of devices in the State Street Campus.
Campus Manager has devices at two locations: Bldg 1 Devices and Bldg 2 Devices.
In this scenario, we will create rules for the System Defined Groups and the User Defined Groups.
This section contains:
Rule for a System Defined Group
Rule for a User Defined Group
Composite Rule
Rule for Include Devices
Rule for Exclude Devices
Rule for a System Defined Group
To create a System Defined Group whose member devices are located in Bldg. 1 Devices, the group
rule is:
Device.SystemLocation equals "Bldg 1 Devices"
where
Variable is SystemLocation
Operator is equals
Value is Bldg 1 Devices
Similarly, to create a System Defined Group whose member device IP addresses is 172.20.121.10,
the group rule is:
Device.IpAddress equals "172.20.121.10"
In addition you can use the contains operator to match a value anywhere in the attribute:
Device.IPddress contains "10"

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The above rule, will match devices with IP address like 172.20.10.3, 172.25.3.101 etc.
To group all devices whose IP Addresses are within the range 10.10.0.0 to 10.10.50.255, the group
rule is:
Device.IPAddress range 10.10.[0-50].[0-255]
Rule for a User Defined Group
To create an User Defined group whose member devices have a common system contact person, J Smith
Devices, the group rule is:
Device.SystemContact equals "J Smith Devices"
Composite Rule
Composite rule contain more than one rule expression separated by a Boolean operator.
The Boolean Operators OR, AND, or EXCLUDE appear in the Rules:Create dialog box only when you
have entered at least one rule expression.
When the composite rule has more than two simple rule expressions, you can adjust priorities among the
expressions using opening and closing parenthesis.
In the above example, to create a group whose member devices are labelled Lab Test Setup, have a
common system contact person, J Smith Devices, the composite rule is:
Device.DeviceLabel equals "Lab Test Setup" AND
Device.SystemContact equals "J Smith Devices"
Rule for Include Devices
Simple Rule for Include Devices contains a common parameter: CMF:DCR:Device. The Device
Management filters the devices based on the rule you have specified in the Defined Advanced Search
Rules dialog box.
For example, the rule type:
:CMF:DCR:Device.DisplayName equals "joe"
will select the device with the DisplayName joe.
Rule for Exclude Devices
Simple Rule for Exclude Devices contains a common parameter: Device.The Device Management
filters the devices based on the rule you have specified in the Defined Advanced Search Rules dialog
box.
For example, the rule type:
Device.HostName equals "Saturn"
will filter the Devices with common host name, Saturn.
For more information on creating groups, refer Creating Rules for Groups.

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Using Groups
The main tasks that you can perform using groups are:
Creating Groups
Modifying Groups
Viewing Group Details
Deleting a Group
Recomputing Group Membership
All actions begin from the Topology Groups administration page, unless otherwise specified.
Access control to groups is controlled on a username basis.
By default, read permission is granted to System Defined Groups, and read write and evaluate
permissions are granted to User Defined Groups.
The User Defined Groups folder is meant to hold a users private group and/or groups that are more
transient in nature.
Creating Groups
You can create groups under System Defined Groups and User Defined Groups. To create Groups, you
must select Campus Manager > Administration > Groups. Creating Groups involves:
Creating Group Properties
Creating Rules for Groups
Creating Memberships

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Creating Group Properties
Access to group creation is based on permission levels. You can create groups under User Defined
Groups.
By default, only the CiscoWorks admin user can create groups under System Defined Groups. However,
the admin user can modify the access permission to the System Defined Group to enable edit privilege
(that is, create permission) to other Campus Manager user names.
To create Group Properties:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Groups.
The Group Management window appears.
Step 2 Click Create.
The Properties: Create window opens.
Step 3 Enter details as explained in Table 5-11:
Table 5-11 Creating Properties Field Description
Field Usage Notes
Group Name The group name should be unique within the Parent group. However,
it need not be so across groups. The same group name cannot be used
in the same group hierarchy.
Copy Attributes from Group 1. Click Select Group to copy attributes from a previously selected
defined group.
The Replicate Attributes dialog box appears.
2. Select the devices from the Replicate Attributes dialog box.
3. Click OK to select the devices or click Cancel to exit.
Parent Group 1. Click Change Parent to change the Parent group under which you
want to define the group.
2. Select the devices from the Select Parent window.
3. Click OK to select the devices or click Cancel to exit.
Description You can enter a detailed description of the group identifying its
characteristics in this field.

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Step 4 Click Next.
The Rules window appears. To enter the details in the Rules: Create dialog box, see Creating Rules for
Groups.
Creating Rules for Groups
After entering the details for creating properties for the Group, you must create rules for the Group. To
create rules for the Group, either you must use the parameters specified, or manually enter the rule text.
To create rules using parameters:
Step 1 Enter details for Rule Expression, in the Rules Window.
Membership Update Select a membership update mode.
AutomaticThe membership of the group is automatically
recomputed each time the group is invoked.
Only upon user requestThe membership of the group is
recomputed only when an explicit request is made, using the
Refresh option.
If you select Automatic, the group will be a Dynamic group.
If you select Only Upon User Request, the group will be a Static
group.
Visibility Scope Select the mode of visibility.
Private
Public
Table 5-11 Creating Properties Field Description (continued)
Field Usage Notes

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Table 5-12 describes the fields in the Rule Expression area.
Table 5-12 Rules: Create Field Description
Field Description
Select the Boolean expression.
OR
AND
EXCLUDE
The Boolean Operators OR, AND, or EXCLUDE appear in the Rules:Create
dialog box only when you have entered at least one rule expression.
For an example of Composite rule using boolean operatots, see Composite
Rule.
Object Type The type of devices that form the group. Rules are evaluated on the list of
devices discovered.
Campus Manager supports only one object type:Device
Variable Attribute of a device. The available variables are:
DiscoveryStatus
HostName
ImageVersion
IP Subnet
IP SubnetMask
IPAddress
IPv6 Subnet
IPv6 SubnetMask
SysName
SysObjectID
SystemContact
SystemLocation
For more details, see Rules Editor.

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Step 2 Click Add Rule Expression.
The Rule Text field shows the rule you are creating.
You can also enter the rules directly in the Rule Text field.
To see an example of a rule, see Example of Rule.
Step 3 Click Check Syntax to validate the rules syntax entered.
Step 4 Click View Parent Rules to view rules defined for the Parent Groups.
Step 5 Click Next to create Memberships to specify the devices available to the group.
For entering details for creating Memberships, see Creating Memberships.
Creating Memberships
You can create memberships to specify the devices available to the group. The devices appear in
Available Objects From Parent Group or Objects Matching Membership Criteria, based on the properties
and rules you specified in the previous steps.
Available Objects From Parent Group is the set of objects in the Parent group not selected by the Child
groups rule.
To add the selected devices from the Available Objects From Parent Group list to the Objects Matching
Membership Criteria list:
Step 1 Select one or more IP addresses of the devices from the Available Objects From Parent Group list on the
left pane.
Step 2 Click Add.
The devices appear in Objects Matching Membership Criteria list, based on the properties and rules you
specified in the previous steps.
Operator Operator used in forming a rule.
For a variable equal to DiscoveryStatus, the only available Operator
variables is equals.
For all the variables, the available Operator variables are:
equals
contains
startswith
endswith
Apart from the operator variables listed above, for variable equal to
IPAddress or IP.SubnetMask or IPv6.Subnet or IPv6.SubnetMask, an extra
Operator variables range is added.
For more details, see Operator.
Value Enter the desired value for the variable you have selected.
Table 5-12 Rules: Create Field Description (continued)
Field Description

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Understanding Groups
If you want to remove devices from the Objects Matching Membership Criteria list, select the device
from the list of Objects Matching Membership Criteria, and click Remove.
Step 3 Click Next to view the summary of the details of the newly created group.
Table 5-13 describes the entries in the Summary: Create table.
Step 4 Click either:
Finish to create the group,
or
Cancel to exit the wizard and go back to the Group Management window.
Membership Update
The membership of a group is governed by the rule associated with a group. The changes in the
membership is reflected in the Network Topology View of the group. To view a topology view, select
Campus Manager > Topology Views.
Moreover, while groups with evaluation type Automatic have membership that is current, groups with
evaluation type Only Upon User Request retain the membership at creation time or on subsequent
re-evaluation.
Two modes of membership updates are available:
Automatic
The membership of a group is recomputed automatically after every Data Collection.
If the node or view has been displayed, you must close all of Topology Services and re-open it to
display the revised group membership.
Only Upon User Request
The membership of the group is recomputed only when an explicit request is made, using the Refresh
option. For more information on the Refresh option, see Recomputing Group Membership.
Table 5-13 Create Group Summary Entry Description
Entry Description
Group Name Name of the group.
Parent Group Name of the Parent group.
Description Description for the group.
Membership Update Automatic or Only Upon User Request.
If you had selected Automatic, the group will be a Dynamic group.
If you had selected Only Upon User Request, the group will be a
Static group.
Rules Rule you entered for the group.
Visibility Scope Visibility scope that you selected.

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Understanding Groups
Modifying Groups
You can modify most attributes of a group in the Edit mode, except the Parent group.
To modify groups:
Step 1 Select a group, and click Edit.
You can modify the Group Name, Description, and Membership Update Type.
Step 2 Click Next.
To modify group rule, edit the rule either using the Rule Expression fields or edit the rule in the
Rule Text field and click Next.
To add or remove devices from the Objects in Group, click Add or Remove, as appropriate and click
Next.
To modify access permissions, select the access levels in the Permission field and click Next.
Step 3 Click Finish to save the modified groups.
Viewing Group Details
To view the attributes of a group:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Groups.
Step 2 Select a group.
Group information is displayed in the right window.
To view detailed attributes for the group, click Details.
To view the rules attributes of the Parent group, click View Parent Rules.
To view the list of devices in the group, click Membership Details.
Deleting a Group
You can delete a group and all Child groups under it.
To delete a group:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Groups.
The Group Management window appears.
Step 2 Select a group.
Step 3 Click Delete to remove the group.
Step 4 Click Yes to confirm.
The selected group is deleted.

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Using Administration Reports
Recomputing Group Membership
You can re-evaluate and re-apply the rules of a group to recompute the membership of groups.
To recompute group membership:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Groups.
Step 2 Select a group.
Step 3 Select Refresh to recompute the membership of the group.
Step 4 Click Yes to confirm.
The group membership is recomputed.
Using Administration Reports
You can view an analysis of the ANI Server, details of devices discovered, Data Collection metrics, and
list of devices supported using the Reports tab of Campus Manager Administration window.
Analyzing ANI Server
You can analyze the ANI server for its performance using the Analyze ANI Server option in the Reports
tab of Campus Manager Administration window.
To analyze the ANI server:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Reports.
The Reports dialog box appears with a list of reports that you can generate.
Step 2 Choose Analyze ANI Server and click Generate Report.
The ANI Server details appear.
Viewing Data Collection Metrics
Data Collection Metrics report gives you details about the duration of each Data Collection and the count
of devices for which data was collected.
To view the Data Collection metrics:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Reports.
The Reports dialog box appears with a list of reports that you can generate.
Step 2 Choose Data Collection Metrics.

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Using Administration Reports
Step 3 Enter the number of Data Collection cycles for which data is to be archived and click Apply.
The Data Collection cycles will be removed from the metrics report only after the next Data Collection.
It is not mandatory to set this property, whenever you launch the report.
Step 4 Click Generate Report.
The Data Collection metrics appear.
Table 5-14 describes the columns of the Data Collection Metrics report.
Viewing Data Collection Details
You can launch this report from:
Campus Manager Home page
See Table 5-15 for the description of this report.
Data Collection Metrics Report
The Data Collection Metrics report displays the total number of Devices, the number of New
Devices, and the number of Deleted Devices for which data was collected during the Data Collection
cycle.
You can click on the hyperlink in the above mentioned fields to view the Data Collection Details
page.
See Table 5-15 for the description of this report.
Table 5-14 Data Collection Metrics
Field Description
Start Time Time at which Data Collection was started.
Percent Complete Percentage of Data Collection that has been completed.
End Time Time at which Data Collection was completed.
Total Time Total time taken for Data Collection.
Total Devices Total number of devices from which data was collected. When you click
on the hyperlink, the Data Collection Detail page appears.
New Devices Number of devices from which data was collected. When you click on the
hyperlink, the Data Collection Detail page appears.
Devices Deleted Number of devices that were deleted. When you click on the hyperlink,
the Data Collection Details page appears.
Devices Per Hour Number of devices in each hour for which data was collected.
Objects Per Hour Number of objects in each hour for which data was collected.

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Using Administration Reports
Viewing List of Devices Supported
You can view the icon, name and object ID of the supported devices using the Device Support option.
This list does not indicate whether you have these devices in your network.
To view the devices supported:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Reports.
The Reports dialog box appears with a list of reports that you can generate.
Step 2 Select Device Support and click Generate Report.
The details of supported devices appear.
Table 5-16 describes the columns of the Devices Supported report.
Table 5-15 Data Collection Detail
Field Description
IPAddress IP address (IPv4 or IPv6 address) of the device for which data
is collected
HostName DNS name of the device
DeviceName DCR display name of the device
DeviceType Type of the device for which data is collected - the device
family it belongs to.
Neighbors Host names of the neighboring devices
Table 5-16 Devices Supported Report
Field Description
Icon Icon of the device.
Name Name of the device.
OID sysobject ID of the device.

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Using Other Admin Settings
Using Other Admin Settings
The following Administrative settings can be done from this page:
Discrepancies
At the end of Data Collection, Campus Manager computes the Discrepancies & Best Practice
Deviations present in the network. You can configure Campus Manager to:
Receive Syslog messages for the required Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations.
Include only the required Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations in reports, for which you
need complete details.
For details, see Configuring Discrepancy Reporting and Syslog Message Generation.
Purge Settings
You can configure purging interval for Campus Manager Report J obs and Archives.
For details, see Purging Reports J obs and Archived Reports.
RME Server Credentials
Campus Manager uses the CLI framework (cwcli) of Resource Manager Essentials (RME) for the
following functionalities:
Fixing discrepancies and best practices deviations
Enabling MAC notification traps
Inter-VLAN Routing
To invoke the CWCLI commands from a remote client, you need to provide the credentials of the
RME Server that you need to access.
For details, see Setting RME Credentials
Configuring Discrepancy Reporting and Syslog Message Generation
You can customize the Discrepancy Report and the Best Practice Deviation Report to display only those
discrepancies about which you want to be notified.
To customize the reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Discrepancies, from the LMS Portal.
Alternatively, if you are in Campus Manager Administration page, click Other Admin Settings and
choose Discrepancies from the Table of Contents (TOC).
The discrepancies page appears. You can view the list of Network discrepancies, and Discrepancies
configured to send Syslog messages by clicking the corresponding View Details link.
Step 2 Click Configure to do the required configuration.
The Configuring Network Discrepancies page appears.
To include a Discrepancy or Best Practice Deviation in the Report, check the box next to it.
Checking all the boxes results in a report displaying all Discrepancies/Best Practice Deviations in
the network.
To exclude a Discrepancy or Best Practice Deviation from the corresponding report, uncheck the
box.

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Using Other Admin Settings
Step 3 Select Configure Syslog to receive Syslog messages for the selected Discrepancies and Best Practice
Deviations.
Step 4 Click Next.
The list of selected Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations appears.
Step 5 Select Send Syslogs and enter the name of the server in the Syslog Server field.
Step 6 Click Next.
A summary of the selected Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations appears.
Step 7 Click Finish.
You can use the filters to display Discrepancy/Best Practice Deviation reports for specific devices, link
or network types. This makes it easy to find a particular Discrepancy/Best Practice Deviation for a
particular type.
You can use more than one filter at the same time, but results will vary.
If you select more than one filter in the same top-level category, Boolean OR is used.
For example, if you select Duplex, Speed under Link, any link or port that fulfils at least one filter
criteria will be displayed in the report.
If you select more than one filter from different top-level categories, Boolean AND is used.
For example, if you select both a Link type and a Port type filter from the discrepancy filter, any
link that fulfils both filter criteria will appear in the report.
Purging Reports Jobs and Archived Reports
You can purge jobs or report archives in Campus Manager. By default, purging is disabled.
To enable the Purge option for report jobs and archives:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Purge Settings.
Alternatively, if you are in Campus Manager Administration page, click Other Admin Settings tab and
choose Purge Settings from the Table of Contents (TOC).
The Report Settings dialog box appears. You can specify the Purge Policy for archives or jobs here.
Step 2 Check the Purge Archives Older Than to specify the number of days, or weeks, or months to purge
archives.
For instance, if you select 44 days, Campus Manager purges archives that are older than 44 days.
Step 3 Check the Purge Jobs Older Than to specify the number of days, or weeks, or months to purge jobs.
For instance, if you select 2 weeks, Campus Manager purges jobs that are older than 2 weeks.
Step 4 Click Save.

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Using Other Admin Settings
Setting RME Credentials
Campus Manager uses the CLI framework (cwcli) of Resource Manager Essentials (RME) for the
following functionalities:
Fixing discrepancies and best practices deviations
Enabling MAC notification traps
Inter-VLAN Routing
CLI framework (cwcli) is a Command-Line Interface (CLI). CLI framework (cwcli) offers remote access
facilities that allow you to invoke cwcli commands from the client in the same way as they run on the
RME server.
To invoke the CWCLI commands from a remote client, you must enter the credentials of the RME Server
that you need to access.
For more details on CWCLI, see the section, cwcli Framework in the User Guide for Resource Manager
Essentials 4.3.
CWCLI feature uses various protocols to configure devices. Details of this is available in the help page
for RME > Admin> Config Mgmt > Transport Settings, and in the User Guide for Resource Manager
Essentials 4.3.
To set RME credentials:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > RME Server Credentials.
Alternatively, if you are in Campus Manager Administration page, click Other Admin Settings tab and
select RME Server Credentials from the Table of Contents (TOC).
The RME Credentials dialog box appears.
Step 2 Enter details in the RME Credentials dialog box.
Table 5-17 describes the fields in the RME Credentials dialog box.
If you have specified https as the server protocol, make sure that the Peer Server Certificate is properly
imported. Peer Server Certificate is mandatory for communication between CiscoWorks servers in SSL
mode.
Table 5-17 RME Credentials
Field Explanation
RME Server Name DNS name or IP address of the RME server.
local host or 127.0.0.1 should not be given.
RME Server Port Port number of the RME server. For
example, 1741.
For https, the port number is 443.
RME Server Protocol Protocol used by RME server. For example,
http or https.
User Name User name of the RME server.
User Password Password of the RME server.
Verify User Password Password of the RME server for
confirmation.

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Setting Debugging Options
To add Peer Server Certificate, go to Common Services > Server > Security> Peer Server Certificate
Setup. Launch Help and follow the instructions to add the certificate.
Step 3 Click OK to apply the changes
or
Click Cancel to discard the values you have entered.
Possible Cause and Solution for Error Conditions
If you cannot connect to the RME server, it could be because of the following reasons:
RME Server name or IP address is wrong.
Enter correct DNS name or IP address of the RME server. Do not enter local host or 127.0.0.1.
RME Server Protocol is wrong.
Enter either http or https as the server protocol.
RME Server Port is wrong.
Port number for http is 1741 and that for https is 443.
RME Server is down.
Try connecting to the server after it is up.
RME Server is not installed in the specified machine.
Either:
Install RME in the specified machine and try again.
Or:
Provide machine details where RME is installed.
Peer Server Certificate is not imported properly
If you have specified https as the server protocol, make sure that the Peer Server Certificate is
properly imported. Peer Server Certificate is mandatory for communication between CiscoWorks
servers in SSL mode.
To add Peer Server Certificate, go to Common Services > Server > Security> Peer Server
Certificate Setup. Launch Help and follow the instructions to add the certificate.
Setting Debugging Options
If you face issues while running Campus Manager, you can enable logging to debug the same. You can
set debugging options for the following functions:
Data Collection (see Setting up Debugging Options for Data Collection)
Configuration and Reports (see Setting up Debugging Options for Configuration and Reports)
Device Groups (see Setting Debugging Options for Device Groups)
Topology (see Setting Debugging Options for Topology)
User Tracking Server (see Debugging Options for User Tracking Server)
Dynamic User Tracking (see Debugging Dynamic Updates)

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Setting Debugging Options
User Tracking Reports (see Debugging Options for User Tracking Reports)
Dynamic User Tracking Console (see Dynamic User Tracking Console)
Setting up Debugging Options for Data Collection
You can set the trace, and debugging, for Campus Manager Data Collection as follows:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration >Debugging Options >Data Collection.
The Debugging Options dialog box appears.
Step 2 Modify the debugging options as specified in Table 5-18.
Step 3 Click Apply.
Table 5-18 Data Collection Debugging Options for Data Collection
Field Description Usage Notes
Enable Debug Select this option to enable
logging for Data Collection.
You can select the modules for debugging
only if you select this option.
Modules Specify the modules on
which you need to enable
debugging.
Click Select to view the available modules
and select the modules in which you want to
enable debug.
For details on Debug modules, see Selecting
Data Collection Debug Modules
File Name Name of the log file in
which the trace messages are
to be recorded.
The default log file is NMSROOT\log\ani.log
Maximum File Size
(lines)
Maximum size of the log file
in lines
None
Enable Device Level Debugging
Device IP(s) IP Addresses (IPv4 or IPv6
Addresses) of devices for
which you need to log
debugging messages.
You can enter multiple IP
addresses, separated by
commas.
This field is enabled only when the Device
Level Debugging option is enabled.

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Setting Debugging Options
Selecting Data Collection Debug Modules
Table 5-19 describes the debug modules available for Data Collection in Campus Manager.
Table 5-19 Data Collection Debug Modules
Module Description
framework Constructs and maintains data in the memory.
Provides framework for Campus Manager features.
Enable debugging for this module only when requested by TAC. This is because
enabling debugging for this module creates huge logs.
topo Provides network topology computation and layouts.
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems with Topology
computation of devices.
vlad Discovers VTP domains, VLANs, port-in-VLAN configurations
Performs VLAN configuration tasks
Determines Spanning Tree state
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems with VTP, VLAN
reports, and configuration.
ccm Discovers Cisco CallManager (CCM).
Enable debugging for this module if you encounter issues with data collected for
CCM.
vmpsadmin Discovers end-user hosts on the network
Records end-user host information in the ANI database
Manages requests for scheduling user and host discoveries, ping sweeps,
database queries, and updates to user and notes information
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems with User Tracking.
dcrp Provides computation of network discrepancies.
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems in Discrepancy reports.
status Enables status polling on previously discovered devices.
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems with device and link
status polling.
apps Discovers application hosts such as MCS.
Enable debugging for this module if you encounter issues with data collected on
application hosts.
stp Discovers all STP related information from the network.
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems with STP reports and
configuration.

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Setting Debugging Options
Click OK to save the selected modules or click Cancel to exit.
Setting up Debugging Options for Configuration and Reports
If you need information on Configuration and Reports in Campus Manager, you can enable debugging
for the same. To do this:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Debugging Options >Configuration and Reports.
The debugging page appears.
Step 2 Select the level of debugging. It can be any one of the following:
INFO
Only informational messages are recorded in the log file.
DEBUG
All messages related to Configuration and Reports are recorded in the log file.
FATAL
Messages related to fatal errors are recorded in the log file. This is the default option.
The Log File Name field specifies the location and name of the log file. The default log file is
NMSROOT\log\Campus.log
Step 3 Click Apply.
stpeng Performs STP configuration tasks
Provides basic STP analysis for migration from one STP type to another
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems with STP reports and
configuration.
devices Provides specific information, if any, available for device categories.
Enable debugging for this module if you have problems specific to a particular
device type.
Table 5-19 Data Collection Debug Modules (continued)
Module Description

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Setting Debugging Options
Setting Debugging Options for Device Groups
If there are errors related to System defined or User defined groups in Campus Manager, you can enable
debugging for the same. Its done as follows:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Debugging Options >Device Groups.
The debugging page appears.
Step 2 Select the level of debugging. It can be any one of the following:
INFO
Only informational messages are recorded in the log file. This is the default option.
DEBUG
All client side messages are recorded in the log file.
FATAL
Messages related to fatal errors are recorded in the log file.
The Log File Name field specifies the location and name of the log file. The default log file is
NMSROOT\log\CampusDeviceSelector.log
Step 3 Click Apply.
Setting Debugging Options for Topology
You can enable debugging for Topology Services client side activities. The debugging information will
be available in the J ava Console.
To display J ava Console:
Step 1 Select Start > Settings > Control Panel > Java.
Step 2 Select the Advanced tab.
The corresponding tree structure is displayed.
Step 3 Go to the tree and select Java Console > Show Console.
Step 4 Click Apply and then OK.
The J ava console is displayed when you launch Topology Services.
Note In case you close the J ava Console, to reopen it, close the Topology window and relaunch it.

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Setting Debugging Options
To enable debugging:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > Debugging Options >Topology.
The debugging page appears.
Step 2 Select the level of debugging. It can be any one of the following:
TRACE
Only informational messages are displayed in the J ava Console.
DEBUG
All Topology Services client side messages are displayed in the J ava Console.
ERROR
Messages related to all errors are displayed in the J ava Console. This is the default option.
Step 3 Click Apply.
To change log level settings:
Step 1 Close the Topology Services window.
Step 2 Change the settings in the Campus Manager Administration page.
Step 3 Re-launch Topology services.

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Using Campus Manager Job Browser
Using Campus Manager Job Browser
The Campus Manager J ob Browser enables you to view the status of all Campus Manager J obs (User
Tracking jobs, Campus Manager reports).
The job details that you can view here include the job ID, the job type, the job status, the job description,
the job owner, the time the job is scheduled to run at, the time of job completion, and the schedule type.
To open the job browser, select Campus Manager > Job Management.
The Campus Manager J ob Browser appears.
You can filter the jobs by any specified criteria using the Show Only drop-down list. Select your criteria.
The jobs pertaining to that category are displayed.
Table 5-20 displays the fields in the Campus Manager J ob Browser.
Table 5-20 Campus Manager Job Browser
Column Description
J ob ID Unique ID of the job. For example, 1007.0.
J ob IDs have N.x format, where x stands for the number of instances
of that job.
For example, 1007.4 indicates that the J ob ID is 1007 and it is the
fifth instance of that job.
J ob Type Type of job. The jobs include, User Tracking jobs, Campus Manager
reports.
Description Description of the job.
Owner Username of the job creator.
Scheduled At Date and time at which the job was scheduled.
Completed At Date and time at which the job was completed.
Run Status J ob states include:
Running
Waiting for approval
Scheduled (pending)
Succeeded
Succeeded with Info
Failed
Crashed
Cancelled
Suspended
Rejected
Missed Start
Failed at Start

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Administration Command Line Interface
Click the Refresh icon to refresh the Campus Manager job browser.
Use the Stop and Delete buttons to stop or delete jobs:
Stop buttonStops or cancels a running job. You will be prompted to confirm the cancellation of
the job.
However, the job is stopped only after the devices currently being processed are successfully
completed. This is to ensure that no device is left in an inconsistent state.
Delete buttonDeletes the selected job from the job browser. You can select more than one job to
delete. You will be asked to confirm the deletion.
Note You cannot delete a running job.
Administration Command Line Interface
This section describes how to administer Campus Manager database from the command line. This is
explained in the following topics:
Replacing Corrupted Database
Re-initializing the Database
Deleting all Active Entries from User Tracking, and Restarting Servers
Deleting all Inactive Entries from User Tracking, and Restarting Servers
Deleting all History Entries from User Tracking, and Restarting Servers
Deleting all User Tracking Entries, and Restarting Servers
Restoring the Original Data in the Server
Restoring Data from Another Server
Performance Tuning Tool
This section also explains Configuration Settings for SNMPv3 Devices
Schedule Type Type of job scheduledaily or periodic.
Status Provides the status of the current jobs. The status of the current jobs
is displayed as succeded or failed. It also displays the failure
reasons.
Table 5-20 Campus Manager Job Browser (continued)
Column Description

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Administration Command Line Interface
Replacing Corrupted Database
If you have a corrupted database, you can use the database administration tools to restore the database
from a previous backup. However, if you do not have a previous backup, you must re-initialize the
database.
When you run this command, if Data Collection is running, it is automatically stopped and then restarted
when the database initialization is complete.
Caution If you re-initialize the database, information from discovered devices will be lost. However, user and
host information is retained. Replace the database only if recommended by a Cisco technical
representative.
Note Your login determines whether you can use this option.
Re-initializing the Database
From the command prompt or shell window, enter:
On Solaris: NMSROOT/campus/bin/reinitdb.pl
On Windows: perl NMSROOT\campus\bin\reinitdb.pl
The following message appears:
This will erase all data from the database. Are you sure [y/n] ?
If you enter y, it erases all data (database tables Wbu*...) from the server.
Deleting all Active Entries from User Tracking, and Restarting Servers
From the command prompt or shell window, enter:
On Solaris: NMSROOT/campus/bin/reinitdb.pl -ut -active
On Windows: perl NMSROOT\campus\bin\reinitdb.pl -ut -active
where active entries are hosts that are currently logged in
Deleting all Inactive Entries from User Tracking, and Restarting Servers
From the command prompt or shell window, enter:
On Solaris: NMSROOT/campus/bin/reinitdb.pl -ut -inactive
On Windows: perl NMSROOT\campus\bin\reinitdb.pl -ut -inactive
where inactive entries are hosts that are currently not logged in
Deleting all History Entries from User Tracking, and Restarting Servers
From the command prompt or shell window, enter:
On Solaris: NMSROOT/campus/bin/reinitdb.pl -ut -history
On Windows: perl NMSROOT\campus\bin\reinitdb.pl -ut -history
where history entries are complete entries. That is, hosts that have a login and logout in the past.

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Administration Command Line Interface
Deleting all User Tracking Entries, and Restarting Servers
From the command prompt or shell window, enter:
On Solaris: NMSROOT/campus/bin/reinitdb.pl -ut -all
On Windows: perl NMSROOT\campus\bin\reinitdb.pl -ut -all
Restoring the Original Data in the Server
From the command prompt or shell window, enter:
On Solaris: NMSROOT/campus/bin/reinitdb.pl -restore
On Windows: perl NMSROOT\campus\bin\reinitdb.pl -restore
Note Before executing the -restore command, you should stop the daemon manager and start again
manually. For details, see Using Daemon Manager.
Restoring Data from Another Server
When you take database backup for Campus Manager in one server and restore it in another server, the
NMSROOT logfile location may not be the same in both servers.
In that case, Campus Manager will log messages to the log file stored in the default NMSROOT location
in the restored machine.
where NMSROOT is the root directory where you installed CiscoWorks.
Performance Tuning Tool
When you get out of memory errors in Campus, the following command can be used to tune the
performance:
NMSROOT/bin/perl NMSROOT/campus/bin/CMPTT.pl ProcessName HeapSize MaxPermSize
ProcessName should be either one of the following:
ANIServer
UTMajorAcquisition
Heap size should be multiples of 512 and should not exceed 1536 MB.
Ensure you have enough swap space in the server before tuning the heap size.
MaxPermSize will set the J VM MaxPermSize option to 64m.

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Administration Command Line Interface
Configuration Settings for SNMPv3 Devices
Campus Manager supports the following Authentication protocols for SNMP v3:
md5
SHA
Campus Manager supports the following Privacy protocols for SNMP v3:
des
3des
aes128
aes192
aes256.
For using various Campus Manager features in devices running SNMPv3, you must make specific
configurations on the devices. The commands that need to be configured are:
Configuring MIB Views
Configuring Access Groups
Configuring Device with Context Name
Configuring a New User
Configuring Password for a User
Relating a User to a Group
Configuring Privacy Protocol
Configuring MIB Views
For Catalyst devices, enter the following command:
set snmp view campusview 1.3.6.1 included nonvolatile
For IOS devices, enter the following command:
snmp-server view campusview oid-tree included
Configuring Access Groups
You must set the access rights for a group with a certain security model in different security levels.
For Catalyst devices, enter the following command:
set snmp access campusgroup security-model v3 authentication read campusview write
campusview nonvolatile
For IOS devices, enter the following command:
snmp-server group campusgroup v3 auth read campusview write campusview access access-list
Configuring Device with Context Name
For Catalyst devices, enter the following commands:
set snmp access campusgroup security-model v3 authentication read campusview write
campusview context vlan- prefix nonvolatile

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Administration Command Line Interface
Context exact is also supported. The following is an example:
set snmp access campusgroup security-model v3 authentication read campusview write
campusview context vlan-1 exact nonvolatile
For IOS devices, enter the following command:
snmp-server group campusgroup v3 auth context vlan-1 read campusview write campusview
IOS image versions prior to12.4 support only exact context name.
IOS image versions 12.4 or higher, support both exact or prefix context names.
You need to configure the device with and without context name, since Data Collection manages the
device without context name and User Tracking requires context name to contact the device.
Configuring a New User
For Catalyst devices, enter the following command:
set snmp user campususer authentication md5
For IOS devices, enter the following command:
snmp-server user campususer campusgroup v3 auth md5 password1
Configuring Password for a User
For Catalyst devices, enter the following command:
set snmp user campususer authentication md5 password1
For IOS devices, enter the following command:
snmp-server user campususer campusgroup v3 auth md5 password1
Relating a User to a Group
Using a specified security model you can relate a user to a group.
For Catalyst devices, enter the following command:
set snmpw group campusgroup user campususer security-model v3 nonvolatile
For IOS devices, enter the following command:
snmp-server user campususer campusgroup v3
Configuring Privacy Protocol
For Catalyst devices:
set snmp user campususer authentication md5 password1privacy des password2
For IOS devices:
snmp-server user campususer campusgroup v3 auth md5 password1 priv des password2

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Starting Campus Manager Applications
Starting Campus Manager Applications
The Campus Manager Applications are:
Topology Services
User Tracking
VLAN Port Assignment
Network Discrepancies
You can select these applications from:
Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services
Campus Manager > User Tracking
Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Port Assignment
Campus Manager > Reports, then choose Report Generator to launch reports on Discrepancies
or Best Practices Deviations.
Security
After a period of inactivity, the LMS Portal page times out and is no longer accessible. Close all browser
instances and relaunch CiscoWorks.
C H A P T E R

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6
Generating Reports
You can perform all your reporting related tasks from a single locationThe Reports tab (Campus
Manager > Reports).
You can perform the following tasks:
Managing report jobs. You can view the output for completed jobs, abort or delete jobs, etc. See
Using the Reports J ob Browser.
Generating immediate reports or scheduling them for a later point of time. See Using the Report
Generator.
Managing report archives. You can view an archived report. A report is archived when a scheduled
report job is completed successfully. See Viewing Archived Reports.
Performing administrative tasks. You can do administrative operations on reports such as purging
the archives, or report jobs. See Purging Reports J obs and Archived Reports.
Using the Reports Job Browser
You can manage Report J obs using the Reports J ob browser. You can also view the output of completed
jobs, stop running jobs or delete jobs if required.
Note View the Permission Report (Common Services > Server > Reports) to check whether you have the
required privileges to perform this task.
To open the Reports J ob Browser, select Campus Manager > Reports > Report Jobs.
The Reports J ob Browser page appears with a detailed list of all scheduled report jobs.

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Using the Reports Job Browser
The columns in the Reports J ob Browser page are:
Table 6-1 Reports Job Browser
Column Description
J ob ID Unique ID assigned to the job when it is created.
For periodic jobs such as Daily, Weekly, etc., the job
IDs are in the number.x format. The x represents the
number of instances of the job.
If you click the J ob Id link, reports of the successful
jobs is displayed on the screen.
For example, 1007.4 indicates that this is the fourth
instance of the job ID 1007.
J ob Type Type of Reportfor instance, Discrepancies.
Description Description of the job provided by the job creator.
(Alphanumeric characters).
Owner Username of the job creator.
Scheduled At Date and time the job was scheduled at.
Completed At Date and time the job was completed at.
Schedule Type Specifies the type of schedule for the job:
OnceRuns the report once at the specified date
and time.
DailyRuns daily at the specified time.
WeeklyRuns weekly on the day of the week and
at the specified time.
MonthlyRuns monthly on the day of the month
and at the specified time.
For periodic jobs, the subsequent instances of jobs
will run only after the earlier instance of the job is
complete.

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Using the Reports Job Browser
Use the Show Only drop-down list to filter results based on J ob Type.
Click View to launch the respective report of the job selected in the J ob Browser page.
You can stop a running job from the Reports J ob Browser.
Select the job and click Stop. You are prompted for a confirmation before the job is stopped. You can
select only one job to stop.
You can delete a job from the Reports J ob Browser.
Select the job and click Delete. You are prompted for a confirmation before the job is deleted. You can
select more than one job to delete.
Status Provides the status of the current jobs. The status of
the current jobs is displayed as succeded or failed.
Run Status J ob states include:
Running
Waiting for approval
Scheduled (pending)
Succeeded
Succeeded with Info
Failed
Crashed
Cancelled
Suspended
Rejected
Missed Start
Failed at Start
Table 6-1 Reports Job Browser (continued)
Column Description

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Using the Report Generator
Using the Report Generator
Using the Report Generator of Campus Manager, you can generate immediate reports or schedule reports
to be run at a later time.
You can generate reports for the following:
Best Practices Deviations
Device Attributes
Discrepancies
Port Attributes
VLAN
To use the report generator:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Reports > Report Generator.
The Campus Manager Reports dialog box appears, in the Report Generator page.
Step 2 From the first drop-down list, select the application for which you want to generate a report.
Campus Manager Reports is selected by default.
Step 3 Select a Report from the list of available reports for the selected application.
You can also schedule the reports as jobs. That is, you can specify the date, time, and frequency at which
the reports are to be generated.
The Campus Manager Reports dialog box appears for the selected report. For details of how to enter
information, see the respective chapters or sections in the User Guide.
To generate:
Best Practices Deviations Report, see Viewing Best Practices Deviations Reports
Device Attributes Report, see Displaying Device Attributes
Discrepancies Report, see Viewing Discrepancy Reports
Port Attributes Report, see Displaying Port Attributes
VLAN Report, see Displaying VLAN Reports
If you want to reset the information that you have entered into the Campus Manager Reports dialog box,
and revert to the default report settings, click Reset.
Step 4 Click Submit.
The report is generated if the Run Type is set to Immediate. For any other Run Type, the report is created
as a job. You can view the job from the Campus Manager Report J ob Browser (Campus Manager >
Reports > Report Jobs).
Successfully generated reports are stored in the Archives. You can access the reports archives by
selecting Campus Manager > Reports > Report Archives.

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Viewing Archived Reports
Viewing Archived Reports
The report output that is created from a scheduled report is stored in the reports archive. The archive
displays the list for completed report jobs and you can view or delete them.
To view or delete archived reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Reports > Report Archives.
The Archives dialog box displays all archived reports.
The columns in the Archives dialog box are:
Step 2 Select the required report.
Step 3 Click View.
The archived report that you selected, appears.
If you want to delete an archived report, select the report and click Delete. You are prompted to confirm
the deletion.
Note Immediate Run Type reports are not archived by Campus Manager.
Table 6-2 Report Archives
Column Description
Report Description Description of the report, that was entered at creation
time.
Report Type Type of Archived ReportVLAN Report, Port
Attributes Report, and so on.
Creation Time The date (yyyy-mm-dd) and the time (hh:mm:ss) the
report was created.

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Purging Reports Jobs and Archived Reports
Purging Reports Jobs and Archived Reports
You can purge jobs or report archives in Campus Manager. By default, purging is disabled.
To enable the Purge option for report jobs and archives:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Admin > Other Admin Settings > Purge Settings
The Report Settings dialog box appears. You can specify the Purge Policy for archives or jobs here.
Step 2 Check the Purge Archives Older Than checkbox to specify the number of days, or weeks, or months to
purge archives.
For instance, if you select 44 days, Campus Manager purges archives that are older than 44 days.
Step 3 Check the Purge J obs Older Than checkbox to specify the number of days, or weeks, or months to purge
jobs.
For instance, if you select 2 weeks, Campus Manager purges jobs that are older than two weeks.
Step 4 Click Save.

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Tracking Users
User Tracking application of Campus Manager allows you to track end stations. This chapter contains
the following sections:
Understanding User Tracking
Using User Tracking Administration
Understanding Dynamic Updates
Debugging Options
Understanding User Tracking Reports
Using User Tracking Reports
Integrating CiscoWorks WLSE
User Tracking Command Line Interface
Understanding UTLite
User Tracking Utility
User Tracking Debugger Utility
Understanding User Tracking
User Tracking helps you to locate and track the end hosts in your network. In this way, you get the
information required to troubleshoot and analyze any connectivity issues. The application identifies all
end users connected to the discovered Cisco access layer switches on the network, including printers,
servers, IP phones PCs and wireless hosts.
User Tracking collects the details of the end users and the layer 2 connections, and updates User
Tracking table in the Campus Manager database. This is done through automated polling of the network,
by User Tracking (UT) Major Acquisition process.
In addition to polling the network, Dynamic UT process receives details from the end users and update
the database dynamically. User Tracking also computes subnet related data and updates the database
with complete host information. Thus you get latest information about the changes in connections on
your network.
You can also configure User Tracking to collect usernames of the end hosts connected in the network.
The user names are collected from the UTLite process installed in UNIX hosts, Primary Domain
Controller (PDC), or Novell Directory Services (NDS). This makes it easier for you to locate and track
specific users on your network.

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Understanding User Tracking
You can sort and query the User Tracking table that contains details such as VLANs, switches and switch
ports to which the end users are connected. Predefined reports such as the reports on duplicate IP
addresses or MAC addresses, multiple MAC addresses enable you to accurately locate the end users.
Switch Port reports give you information on:
Recently down ports
Ports which are in unused condition for the specified interval
Connected ports and Free ports
Percentage utilization of ports for each device
These reports give a clear picture of the switch port utilization in the network and help you in doing
capacity planning for the network. For complete details on switch port reports, see Understanding
Switch Port Usage Reports.
This topic covers:
Using User Tracking
Accessing UT Data
Various Acquisitions in User Tracking
Using User Tracking
You can use User Tracking to:
Display information about the connectivity between the devices, users, and hosts in your network.
For example, you might want to identify all users connected to a particular subnet, or all hosts on a
particular switch.
Display information about the IP phones registered with discovered Media Convergence Servers.
Use simple queries to limit the amount of information User Tracking displays.
Configure or limit the User Tracking acquisition by subnets.
Create and save simple and advanced queries.
Modify, add, and delete username and notes.
You can configure User Tracking Acquisition settings to collect usernames during UT Major
Acquisition and update UT table. The user names are collected from the UTLite process.
Customize User Tracking table layouts.
For example, you can design a layout that displays only the MAC addresses of hosts on your
network.
View User Tracking reports that identify Switch Port usage, duplicate IP addresses, duplicate MAC
addresses, duplicate MAC and VLAN names, and ports with multiple MAC addresses.
You can also view History Reports for Switch port utilization, and the connection and disconnection
of endhosts and users from your network.
You can set the schedule for generating the reports, and also generate the reports for a subset of
devices.
Launch Device Center, host center, phone center.

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Understanding User Tracking
Accessing UT Data
The following are the ways to access User Tracking data:
Quick Reports
You can generate End hosts or IP Phones report based on the given filter criteria
For example, you can generate reports on end hosts which belong to a specific VLAN.
For more details, see Viewing Quick Reports
Scheduled Reports
You can schedule reports that run at the specified date and time. You can generate immediate reports or
schedule them to run once or at repititive intervals.
For more details, see Using Report Generator
Custom Reports
You can customize the layout and columns displayed in the reports to suit your needs.
For more details, see Using Custom Reports
Command Line Interface
You can generate various User Tracking reports from the Command Line Interface also.
For more details, see User Tracking Command Line Interface
Data Extraction Engine
Data Extraction Engine is a Campus Manager UTility that allows you to generate User Tracking data in
XML format.
For more details, see Overview of Data Extraction Engine
Object Finder
You can search for Device details, the J ob details, the End host details using the Object Finder
For more details, see the User Guide for LMS Portal 1.2.
User Tracking Utility
CiscoWorks User Tracking Utility 1.1.1 is a Windows desktop utility that provides quick access to useful
information about users or hosts discovered by Campus Manager User Tracking application.
You can use UTU search band to search for the users or hosts in your network. You can search using user
name, host name or IP address, or MAC address.
For more details, see User Tracking Utility

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Understanding User Tracking
Various Acquisitions in User Tracking
This section explains the various acquisitions that can be done using Campus Manager, to get
information about the end users.
User Tracking Major Acquisition
Discovers all the end hosts that are connected to the devices managed by Campus Manager.
For details on the various options that can be set before starting an acquisition, see Modifying
Acquisition Settings.
User Tracking Acquisition can also be initiated from the CLI prompt. To do so, enter the following
command:
NMSROOT/campus/bin/ut cli performMajorAcquisition u userid -p password
where NMSROOT is the directory where you have installed CiscoWorks. For more details, see User
Tracking Command Line Interface.
User Tracking Minor Acquisition
Minor acquisition occurs on a device if any of the following changes take place:
A new endhost or IP phone is added to the network.
Port state changes (when the port comes up or goes down).
A new VLAN is added to the network.
There is a change in the existing VLAN.
Minor acquisition updates the Campus database, only with the changes that have happened in the
network. It is triggered at regular intervals. The default for these intervals is 60 minutes. You can
configure the interval at which the acquisition takes place.
For details on modifying the acquisition interval, see Modifying Acquisition Schedule
User Tracking IP Phone Acquisition
Discovers all phones registered in Cisco Call Managers (CCM), that are managed by Campus Manager.
Subnet based User Tracking Major Acquisition
User tracking subnet based acquisition would run only on those subnets that are configured in Campus
Manager. Campus Manager discovers end hosts on all the VLANs available in the configured subnets.
Do subnet based acquisition, when you need details about the end hosts connected to a particular subnet
or a select set of subnets. The acquisition completes faster, since it is not run on all devices managed by
Campus Manager.
For details on running subnet based acquisition, see Configuring Subnet Acquisition
Single device on-demand User Tracking Acquisition
This discovers the end hosts on all the VLANs available in the selected device. Hence this acquisition
is useful for collecting information only on end hosts connected to the specified device.
For details on initiating this type of acquisition, see Configuring User Tracking Acquisition Actions

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Using User Tracking Administration
Understanding Network and Campus Manager Dependencies
For User Tracking to display user and host data, Campus Manager must perform Data Collection before
User Tracking discovers end hosts and collects user data. Data Collection is done for active and properly
configured devices in your network.
Therefore, before using User Tracking, you must:
Step 1 Set up your network devices so that they can be discovered.
This includes enabling Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP), Integrated Local Management Interface (ILMI)
and SNMP.
Step 2 Run Data Collection.
For more details on Data Collection, see Viewing Summary of Data Collection Settings.
Using User Tracking Administration
You can perform the following administrative tasks using User Tracking Administration:
Modify Acquisition settings.
Before you start collecting information about the hosts in your network, you can set various options
that control the way in which Acquisition happens.
For example, you can set Campus Manager to perform DNS lookup, while resolving the IP address
of a host.
For complete details, see Modifying Acquisition Settings
Schedule Acquisition.
You can set the day and time of the week when you want to run Major Acquisition. The time interval
at which Minor Acquisition happens in the network can also be set.
For more details, see Modifying Acquisition Schedule
Configure Ping Sweep options for Acquisition.
You can configure Campus Manager to perform Ping Sweep on selected subnets, during
Acquisition.
For more details, see Modifying Ping Sweep Options
Configure Subnet Acquisition.
You can trigger acquisition on a single subnet or a select set of subnets. Subnet based acquisition
collects details about the end hosts that are connected to a particular subnet or a select set of subnets.
This Acquisition completes faster, since it is not run on all devices managed by Campus Manager.
For more details, see Configuring Subnet Acquisition
Configure end host and IP phone data delete interval.
You can modify the time interval for deleting entries from the End Host Table, IP Phone Table, or
the History Table from the database.
For more details, see Modifying Delete Interval

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Configure UT Acquisition to discover end hosts connected to non-link trunk ports.
Normally UT Acquisition only discovers end hosts that are connected to access ports. If you enable
this feature, UT Acquisition also discovers end hosts that are connected to non-link trunk ports.
For more details, see Configuring Trunk for End Host Discovery
Specify Purge Policy.
You can specify the intervals when you want old reports and jobs to be purged. You can save the
Purge Policy, so that the older jobs and archives are purged at the specified interval.
For more details, see Specifying Purge Policy
Specify Domain Name display.
You can specify the way in which domain names are to be displayed in User Tracking Reports.
For more details, see Specifying Domain Name Display
Import information on end hosts.
You can import user names and notes for end hosts that are already discovered by User Tracking,
from a file.
For more details, see Importing Information on End Host Users
Enable Dynamic User Tracking.
Dynamic Updates are asynchronous updates that are based on SNMP MAC notifications traps.
Campus Manager tracks changes about the end hosts and users on the network to provide real-time
updates, based on these traps.
For more details, see Understanding Dynamic Updates
Enable Debugging options.
When you face issues in running User Tracking, logging can be enabled for debugging purposes.
For more details, see Debugging Options
Viewing Acquisition Information
You can view acquisition information using the Acquisition tab of the Campus Manager User Tracking
window.
To view acquisition information:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Click Acquisition.
The acquisition information appears.

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Interpreting Acquisition Information
Acquisition Information window displays the fields described in Table 7-1.
Table 7-1 Acquisition Information Field Description
Field Description
Acquisition status Status of the User Tracking Major Acquisition process. It can be
either Idle or Running.
Last acquisition type Type of User Tracking acquisition that you had performed last time.
Types of acquisition are:
MajorUser Tracking Major Acquisition
DevicesUser Tracking Acquisition for a device
SubnetsUser Tracking Acquisition for subnets
IP PhonesUser Tracking Acquisition for IP phones
Acquisition start time Date and time when User Tracking started the Acquisition process.
This is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Acquisition end time Date and time when User Tracking stopped the Acquisition
process. This is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy, hh:mm:ss
time zone.
Number of acquisitions Number of major and minor acquisitions performed.
Number of host entries Number of hosts found after User Tracking acquisition.
Number of duplicate MAC Number of MAC addresses that have duplicate entries in the list of
hosts found.
Number of duplicate IP Number of IP addresses that have duplicate entries in the list of end
hosts found.
Number of CCM hosts Number of Cisco CallManagers in the list of devices found after
Data Collection.
Number of IP phone entries Number of IP phones available in the Campus Manager managed
network.
Last Campus data collection
completed at
Date and time of the previous Campus Manager Data Collection
process. This is displayed in the following format: dd mon yyyy
hh:mm:ss time zone.
Campus data collection status Status of the Campus Manager Data Collection process. It can be
either Idle or Running.

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Configuring User Tracking Acquisition Actions
You can trigger the following acquisitions from this page:
Device based Acquisition
Subnet based Acquisition
IP Phone Acquisition
To configure the required acquisition:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Acquisition >Actions.
The Acquisition Actions dialog box appears.
Step 3 Configure Acquisition Actions as specified in Table 7-2.
Table 7-2 Acquisition Actions
Field Description Usage Notes
Select a type You can select the type of acquisition. Type
of acquisition can be:
Device
Subnet
IP Phones
When you select a type of acquisition the appropriate
fields are displayed.
Scope Selection Select the All hosts and users check box to
acquire information about all hosts and
users in your network.
If you do not select the All hosts and users check box, the
device selection field is enabled and you can enter the
name or IP address of the device for which you require
data.
Device Selection
Device Name or IP
Address
Enter the name or IP address of the device
about which data is to be acquired.
Click Select to select the device from the list of available
devices.
Subnets
Type Selection You can choose to get data about a particular
subnet or all the configured subnets.
If you choose to acquire data about a particular subnet, the
subnet selection fields are enabled.
Subnet Selection
Subnet ID Select the ID/IDs of the subnet/subnets on
which you need to get data.
This field is enabled only if you select the Subnet option
in the Type Selection area.
Click Select to select the subnet ID from the list of
available subnets.

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You do not have to specify any details for the IP Phones option.
Step 4 Click Start Acquisition.
Using User and Host Acquisition
You can modify the Acquisition settings and Acquisition schedule using the User and Host Acquisition
option in the Administration tab of the Campus User Tracking window.
This section contains:
Modifying Acquisition Settings
Configuring Rogue MAC List
Modifying Acquisition Schedule
Specifying Purge Policy
Specifying Domain Name Display
Modifying Ping Sweep Options
Configuring Subnet Acquisition
Modifying Delete Interval
Importing Information on End Host Users
Modifying Acquisition Settings
You can modify User Tracking Acquisition settings using the Acquisition Settings option of the
Administration tab in Campus User Tracking window.
This section contains:
Modifying Acquisition Settings from UI
UT Behaviour in DHCP Environment for Missing IP address
Configuring Properties That Support Duplicate MAC Address
Configuring User Tracking Properties from the Backend
Subnet Mask Enter the subnet mask. If you select the subnet ID, the subnet mask is
automatically entered.
Acquire Only
VLAN Specific to
Subnet
Select this check box to get data only about
the VLANs specific to the subnet.
If you select this check box, only the work stations
associated to the VLANs that are mapped to the
selected subnets will be acquired.
If you do not select this check box, work stations
associated to all the available VLANs in the selected
subnets will be acquired.
Table 7-2 Acquisition Actions (continued)
Field Description Usage Notes

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Modifying Acquisition Settings from UI
To modify acquisition settings:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Acquisition > Acquisition Settings.
The Acquisition Settings dialog box appears.
Step 3 Modify the acquisition settings as specified in Table 7-3.
Table 7-3 Acquisition Settings Field Description
Field Description Usage Notes
Enable User Tracking for
DHCP Environment
Enables User Tracking for DHCP
Environment.
If you enable this property, it allows you to control
inclusion and exclusion of Duplicate MAC addresses in the
Acquisition.
To understand the behavior of User Tracking in case of
missing IP address, see UT Behaviour in DHCP
Environment for Missing IP address.
For details on properties that support Duplicate MAC
address, see Configuring Properties That Support Duplicate
MAC Address.
Enable User Tracking on
Access Points
Enables User Tracking on Access
Points
This is enabled by default which allows UT Major
Acquisition process to collect Access point information.
However, WlseUHIC cannot collect Wlse related end host
information.
If disabled, it precludes Access point acquisition. However,
WlseUHIC collects Wlse related end host information.
Get user names from
UNIX hosts
Select this option to allow
Acquisition to collect the active
usernames of UNIX hosts.
UNIX user names are updated at
the end of major acquisitions.
Collects information only for users, who are logged into the
console port of the UNIX hosts.
Get user names from hosts
in NT and NDS
Allows Campus Manager to
collect active user names on the
Windows or Novell Directory
Service (NDS) servers.
This option helps you to:
Collect information only for users who are currently
logged into the network.
Collect information from NDS hosts. You must use
NDS 5.0 or later.
You must install UTLite script, since it is a prerequisite.

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Step 4 Click Apply to save the modifications in the settings.
Step 5 Click Start Acquisition to start User Tracking Acquisition with the modified settings.
Use DNS to resolve host
names
Resolves host names using DNS. User Tracking performs DNS Lookup for a host to resolve
its IP address.
When you choose this option the Advanced button is
enabled. Click on this to launch the Advanced UT
Acquisition Settings window.
The following options are available:
DNS threads
Number of parallel threads allowed for name
resolution. The default value is 1. Maximum number of
threads allowed is 12.
DNS Timeout
Time duration for which UT waits for response from
the DNS server, for name resolution. The value should
be entered in milli seconds. The default value is 2000
milliseconds (2 seconds).
Enter values and click OK to save changes.
User Port Number Specify the UDP port number from
where logon and logoff messages
are received from hosts in
Windows and NDS.
You must use the default port number unless it is already in
use. This port number must match the port indicated in the
login script.
Rogue MAC Detection Enable notification when Rogue
MACs are detected in the network.
Campus Manager sends e-mails to the specified addresses,
when unauthorized end hosts are detected in the network.
E-Mail Specify the E-mail IDs to be
notified when Rogue MACs are
detected in the network.
You can enter multiple E-mail IDs separated by commas.
This field is enabled only when you check the Rogue MAC
Detection field.
Define Rogue MACs Specify the list of Rogue MACs in
the screen that is launched.
For details, see Configuring Rogue MAC List.
New MAC Detection Enable notification when new
MACs are detected in the network.
Campus Manager sends e-mails to the specified addresses,
when new end hosts are detected in the network.
E-Mail Specify the E-mail IDs to be
notified when new end hosts are
detected in the network.
You can enter multiple E-mail IDs separated by commas.
This field is enabled only when you check the New MAC
Detection field.
Table 7-3 Acquisition Settings Field Description (continued)
Field Description Usage Notes

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UT Behaviour in DHCP Environment for Missing IP address
Selecting the Enable User Tracking for DHCP Environment property allows you to control inclusion
and exclusion of Duplicate MAC addresses in UT Acquisition.
Campus Manager will not get the IP address of end hosts, if the Router is not reachable or if it is excluded
from DCR. In such cases, behaviour of User Tracking after enabling Enable User Tracking for DHCP
Environment property, is as explained in Table 7-4.
The conventions used in Table 7-4 are:
MACx MAC address of the endhost
IPx IP address of the endhost
Device x Device to which the end host is connected.
Time in xx:xx format Time entries in the Last seen column
NA Not Available.
Note The explanation given for scenarios 1 and 2 holds good, irrespective of the value set for Enable User
Tracking for DHCP Environment property.
Table 7-4 UT Behaviour in DHCP Environment for Missing IP address
Scenario Explanation What gets Updated in Database
Scenario1: Missing IP Address
MAC1 NA Device 1 6:35 For an endhost, if the IP address is
not available in the first UT
acquisition, but is available in the
next, the IP address field in the
database is updated with the value
that is currently discovered.
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 6:40
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 6:40
Scenario 2: Missing IP Address
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 6:45 For an endhost, if the IP address is
available in the first UT
acquisition, but is not available in
the next, the older value for IP
address is retained in the
database.
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 6:50
MAC1 NA Device 1 6:50
Scenario 3: Single MAC, Multiple IP
Addresses
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 6:55 For an endhost with Single MAC
address but multiple IP addresses,
if UT does not get the IP address
in the current acquisition, it
retains the older values in the
database.
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 7:00
MAC1 IP2 Device 1 6:55 MAC1 IP2 Device 1 7:00
MAC1 IP3 Device 1 6:55 MAC1 IP3 Device 1 7:00
MAC1 NA Device 1 7:00
Scenario 4: Dynamic change in IP
Address

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Configuring Properties That Support Duplicate MAC Address
The following properties can be configured in the ut.properties file stored in
NMSROOT/campus/etc/cwsi/
where NMSROOT is the root directory where you installed CiscoWorks.
Table 7-5 lists the properties that support Duplicate MAC Address
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 4:00
For an endhost with different IP
addresses at different points of
time, if UT does not get the IP
address in the current acquisition,
it retains the value that was last
discovered.
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 4:00
MAC1 IP2 Device 1 5:00 MAC1 IP2 Device 1 5:00
MAC1 IP3 Device 1 6:00 MAC1 IP3 Device 1 7:00
MAC1 NA Device 1 7:00
Scenario 5: Endhost moving between
devices
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 4:00 When an end host moves between
devices, if UT does not find the
IP address in the current
acquisition, it retains the IP
address value that was last
discovered for that device.
MAC1 IP1 Device 1 6:00
MAC1 IP1 Device 2 5:00
MAC 1 NA Device 1 6:00
Table 7-4 UT Behaviour in DHCP Environment for Missing IP address
Scenario Explanation What gets Updated in Database
Table 7-5 Properties Supporting Duplicate MAC Address
Property Description
UT.DuplicateMac.Include_SwitchPorts List of switchports connected to endhosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be included in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.
UT.DuplicateMac.Exclude_SwitchPorts List of switchports connected to endhosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be excluded in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.
UT.DuplicateMac.Include_Switches List of switches connected to end hosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be included in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.
UT.DuplicateMac.Exclude_Switches List of switches connected to end hosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be excluded in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.

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For the above list of properties:
Values should be separated by commas.
IP addresses of the devices should be given.
Port numbers should be given along with the devices IP address as deviceip:port.
The Exclude list takes precedence over the Include list.
The usage scenario for the above lists is as follows:
If you use the Include list OR the Exclude list alone, the duplicate MAC addresses will be included
or excluded as specified.
For example, if you set the Include list as,
UT.DuplicateMac.Include_Switches=X,Y
Duplicate MAC addresses will be allowed only for endhosts connected to Switches X and Y.
Duplicate addresses will not be allowed for any other endhost.
If you set both Include and Exclude list as,
UT.DuplicateMac.Include_Switches=X,Y
UT.DuplicateMac.Exclude_Switches=A,B
Duplicate MAC addresses will not be allowed for endhosts connected only to Switches A and B.
Duplicate addresses will be allowed for all other end hosts, even for those connected to switches not
specified in the Include list. Thus when an Exclude list is set, the Include list is ignored.
UT.DuplicateMac.Include_Vlans List of VLANs associated with endhosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be included in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.
UT.DuplicateMac.Exclude_Vlans List of VLANs associated with endhosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be excluded in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.
UT.DuplicateMac.Include_Subnets List of subnets associated with endhosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be included in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.
UT.DuplicateMac.Exclude_Subnets List of subnets associated with endhosts, for which
duplicate MAC entries need to be excluded in UT Major,
UT Minor, UT device based, and UT subnet based
Acquisition.
Table 7-5 Properties Supporting Duplicate MAC Address
Property Description

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The above examples hold good for the Include/Exclude lists of Switchports, Subnets and VLANs.
The order of priority for the property list is as follows:
a. SwitchPorts
b. Switches
c. VLANs
d. Subnets
The SwitchPorts list has the highest priority, followed by Switches, VLANs and Subnets list.
For example, if you set
UT.DuplicateMac.Include_SwitchPorts=10.77.211.33:3/2
UT.DuplicateMac.Exclude_Switches=10.77.211.33
Although the switch 10.77.211.33 is in the Exclude list, a switchport belonging to that switch is also
present in the Include list. So Duplicate MAC addresses will be allowed for that port on the switch.
Thus the SwitchPorts list has higher priority over the Switches list.
Configuring User Tracking Properties from the Backend
This section explains the new user configurable properties that have been added to UT.
You can configure properties that control DNS name resolution and history reports, by editing them in
the file ut.properties, stored in
NMSROOT/campus/etc/cwsi/
where NMSROOT is the root directory where you installed CiscoWorks.

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Table 7-6 lists the new properties added to UT:
Table 7-6 Configuring User Tracking Properties
Property Default Value Description
HistoryHostPurgeTime 10 days Purges history entries which are older than the specified time.
The value should be provided in minutes.
For example,
If you want to purge entries older than 10 days, set
HistoryHostPurgeTime=14400
UT.nameResolution both Name resolution for end hosts using J ava APIs J NDI and
InetAddres.This property can have the following values:
wins (Use only InetAddress)
dns (Use only J NDI)
wins,dns (First InetAddress then J NDI)
both (J NDI first and InetAddress next)
UT.nameResolution.dnsTimeout 2000 Time duration for which UT waits for response from the DNS
server, for name resolution. The value should be entered in
milliseconds.
UT.nameResolution.winsTimeout 2000 Time duration for which UT waits for response from the DNS
server, for name resolution.The value should be entered in
milliseconds.
This property must be enabled only for windows server.
UTMajorUseDNSCache false Uses cache memory for name resolution in subsequent User
Tracking discoveries.
User Tracking performs DNS Lookup for a host only if the IP
address of the host is being resolved for the first time.It does
not perform DNS Lookup for every Major Acquisition.
This helps the application to reduce the number of queries
during User Tracking Acquisition. This in turn reduces the
time taken for Acquisition process.
UT.RunLookupAnalyzer OFF To analyze the performance of DNS servers and provide the
following information in the NMSROOT\log\ut.log file:
DNS Server Efficiency for each DNS Server
Overall Summary of DNS Servers
Namelookup related settings in ut.properties file
Issues found and recommendations to overcome them
Set the value to ON to turn on the feature.
You need not enable debugging for UT to get the
LookupAnalyzer data in the ut.log file.
For details on running Lookup Analyzer utility from the
command prompt and example output of the utility, see Using
Lookup Analyzer Utility, page 7-91

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Configuring Rogue MAC List
MAC Addresses that are not authorized to exist in your network are termed as Rogue MAC addresses.
When you enable the Rogue MAC notification feature, you need to define the list of MAC addresses that
are to be classified as unauthorized addresses in the network.
You can also import MAC addresses to Acceptable OUI either from a file or directly from UT.
If you import the MAC Addresses from a file or directly from UT, the MAC addresses in the file are
converted to OUIs before you add them to the Acceptable OUI list.
To do so:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking > Acquisition Settings.
The User Tracking Acquisition settings window appears.
Step 2 Click Define Rogue MACs.
The Rogue MAC Configuration window appears. The lists displayed in the window are:
Rogue MAC/OUI List
Acceptable MAC/OUI List
Step 3 Click Add MAC/OUI to add new entries to the list.
The Add MAC/OUI window appears.
The Organizationally Unique Identifier (OUI) is a 24-bit number. It is used as an identifier to uniquely
identify the vendor, manufacturer, or other worldwide organization.
An OUI reserves a block of each type of derivative identifier, such as MAC addresses, group addresses,
Subnetwork Access Protocol protocol identifiers, and so on. It is used to identify an network interface
controller (NIC), network protocol, or MAC addresses for Ethernet.
In case of MAC addresses, OUI is combined with a 24-bit number to form the address. The first three
octets of the address are the OUI.

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The Add MAC/OUI page is as explained in Table 7-7:
Step 4 Select any of the following:
Manual Add
a. Select the required OUIs from the list displayed in OUI List.
b. Click either the Add to Rogue MAC List or the Add to Acceptable MAC List, based on your
requirement.
The MAC or OUIs that you enter in the ADD MAC or in the OUI textbox will be added to the list
that you selected.
Table 7-7 Populating the MAC/OUI list
Property Description
Select Mode Provides the following options to add MAC addresses to
MAC/OUI List:
Manual Enables you to add MAC/OUI to either the
Acceptable MAC/OUI List or to the Rogue MAC/OUI
list. The Manual Add option is selected by default.
Import from file Enables you to import MAC
Addresses from a file to the Acceptable MAC/OUI
List
Import from UT Enables you to import MAC
Addresses directly from UT to Acceptable MAC/OUI
List
Add MAC/OUI Enter the MAC Address or OUI in the text box provided.
The values should be separated by spaces, tabs, or commas.
You can also enter values on separate lines.
The address can have only hexa decimal numbers separated
by hyphen.
Example:
00-c0-1d-99-06-b6
OUI List Displays predefined values in Campus Manager. You can
select values from the list, to add to the Rogue OUI or
Acceptable OUI list.
To add more values to the list, add them to the Property file:
NMSROOT/campus/etc/cwsi/OUI.properties
where NMSROOT is the directory where you installed
CiscoWorks.
To get the latest OUIs listed by IEEE, see
http://standards.ieee.org/regauth/oui/index.shtml

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Import From File
a. Click Browse and browse to the folder location and choose the file to be imported
b. Click the Import to Acceptable OUI list.
The MACs are converted to OUIs before you add them to the Acceptable MAC/OUI list.
Import From UT
Click the Import to Acceptable OUI list. The MACs are converted to OUIs prior to adding them to
the Acceptable MAC/OUI List.
It is mandatory that the file that is imported to Acceptable MAC/OUI list must include the header -
MAC Address followed by MAC Address entries.
For example: In the example, the file to be imported includes a MAC Address column with MAC
Address entries.
MAC Address
MAC 1
MAC 2
MAC 3
The newly added values are reflected in the Rogue MAC Configuration screen.
Step 5 Check Consider unqualified MAC as Rogue
When you check this, Campus Manager treats any new MAC address coming into the network as Rogue
MAC. This is if it is not defined in the Acceptable MAC list.
Step 6 Click any of the following:
Save
Saves the settings to the server. They come into effect in the next UT Major Acquisition cycle.
If Dynamic User Tracking is running, notification for new or Rogue MACs detected in the
network, are sent immediately.
If WLSE is integrated with Campus Manager, notification for wireless MACs detected in the
network is sent.
Delete
Deletes entries
Cancel
Cancels changes and closes the window.

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Modifying Acquisition Schedule
You can modify UT acquisition schedule using the Acquisition Schedule option of the Administration
tab in Campus User Tracking window.
To modify acquisition schedule:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Acquisition > Schedule Acquisition.
The Acquisition Schedule dialog box appears.
Step 3 Modify the acquisition schedule as specified in Table 7-8.
Step 4 Select the schedule and do any of the following:
Click Edit to edit the schedule.
Click Delete to delete the schedule.
Click Add to add a new schedule.
Step 5 Click OK to save the changes or Cancel to cancel the changes.
Step 6 Click Apply after adding or editing a schedule.
Table 7-8 Acquisition Schedule Field Description
Field Description Usage Notes
Minor Acquisition Specify the periodicity in minutes at which a
minor acquisition should take place.
None.
Major Acquisition Specify the time at which a major acquisition is to
take place.
Specify the days of the week on which a major
acquisition is to be scheduled.
None.
Days, Hour, Min Days on which and the time at which a major
acquisition is to be carried out.
You can add new schedules and edit or delete
existing schedules.
Recurrence Pattern Select the days of the week on which a major
acquisition is to be scheduled.
This field is available only when you are adding
or editing a schedule.

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Modifying Ping Sweep Options
A ping sweep (also known as an ICMP sweep) is a basic network scanning technique used to determine
which range of IP addresses map to live end hosts (computers). You can use a single ping to find out
whether a specific end host exists on the network.
A Ping Sweep consists of ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol) ECHO requests sent to multiple
hosts. If a given address is live, it will return an ICMP ECHO reply. Ping sweeps are among the older
and slower methods used to scan a network.
When Ping Sweep is enabled in Campus Manager, the UTPing program in NMSROOT/campus/bin will
be invoked during acquisition to send out a sweep of pings for each subnet.
Before collecting information from a device, the subnets connected to the device are pinged. This serves
as a connectivity check, as well as loads the ARP table of the layer 3 device with the latest information.
After pinging, acquisition process starts collecting end host information from the device.
You can modify Ping Sweep option from the Admin tab in Campus User Tracking window.
To modify Ping Sweep options:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Acquisition > Ping Sweep.
The Ping Sweep dialog box appears.
Step 3 Choose any of the following:
Disable Ping Sweep
Perform Ping Sweep on all subnets
Exclude subnets from Ping Sweep
When you choose Exclude subnets from Ping Sweep, select the subnets that you want to exclude
from Ping Sweep. You can select subnets from the list of available subnets and add to the list of
subnets to be excluded.
Step 4 Specify the Wait Interval, if Ping Sweep is enabled.
Wait Interval is the time duration between pinging subnets. The interval ensures that the network is not
flooded with ping packets.
For example, assume that you have included 4 subnets for pinging, and set the wait interval to 10
seconds.
If Subnets 1 and 2 are connected to Device 1, and Subnets 3 and 4 are connected to Device 2, then 10
seconds lapse between pinging Subnets 1 and 2. After pinging both the subnets, acquisition starts on
Device 1. Same happens with Device 2.
Step 5 Click Apply.
User Tracking does not perform Ping Sweep on large subnets.
For more details, see Notes on Ping Sweep Option.

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Notes on Ping Sweep Option
User Tracking does not perform Ping Sweep on large subnets, for example, subnets containing Class A
and B addresses. Hence, ARP cache might not have some IP addresses and the User Tracking may not
display the IP addresses.
In larger subnets, the Ping process leads to numerous ping responses that might increase the traffic on
your network and result in extensive use of network resources.
You can increase the value of the wait interval. Wait interval helps the ping response traffic to settle,
which may appear as Denial Of Service (DOS) or may affect the functioning of router by high CPU
usage.
To perform Ping Sweep on larger subnets, you can:
Configure a higher value for the ARP cache time-out on the routers. To configure the value, you
must use the arp time-out interface configuration command on devices running Cisco IOS.
Use any external software, that will enable you to ping the host IP addresses. This will ensure that
when you run User Tracking Acquisition the ARP cache of the router contains the IP addresses.
Configuring Subnet Acquisition
You can configure Campus Manager to perform User Tracking Acquisition on selected subnets. These
configurations are used for User Tracking Major Acquisition and Configured Subnets based acquisition.
You can choose to include or exclude specified subnets to perform User Tracking major acquisition.
To configure Subnet acquisition:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Acquisition > Configure Subnet Acquisition.
The Configure Subnet Acquisition dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select either of the following options:
Perform acquisition on all subnets
All the subnets are included for User Tracking Major Acquisition. If you select this option do not
perform steps 4 and 5.
Or
Perform Subnet-based acquisition
The action depends on the Filter value.
Step 4 Select either of the following Filter values:
Perform major acquisition on selected subnets
All subnets added to the Selected Subnets list are included for User Tracking acquisition.
Or
Do not perform major acquisition on selected subnets
All subnets added to the Selected Subnets list are excluded for User Tracking acquisition.

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Step 5 Select subnets from the list of Available Subnets and add them to the list of Selected Subnets.
Step 6 Click Apply.
Modifying Delete Interval
Using this option, you can modify the time interval for deleting entries from the End Host Table, IP
Phone Table or the History Table from the database.
To modify the Delete Interval:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Acquisition > Delete Interval.
The Delete Interval dialog box appears.
Step 3 Specify delete intervals for end host, IP phone and history tables.
Step 4 Either:
Click Delete now to delete the entries immediately.
If you select this step do not perform Step 5.
Or
Select Delete After Every Major Acquisition.
If you select this option, Campus Manager will delete records older than the specified interval, after
every UT Major Acquisition.
Step 5 Click Apply.
Configuring Trunk for End Host Discovery
Normally UT Acquisition discovers end hosts connected only to access ports. If you enable this feature
UT Acquisition discovers end hosts connected to non-link trunk ports also.
Campus Manager classifies trunk ports as follows:
Link ports Trunk ports connected to Cisco devices (Switch or Router).
Non-link ports Trunk ports connected to end hosts or IP phones.
Scenarios where a Trunk port is connected to an end host:
In a switched network, many clients from different VLANs might access an enterprise resource, such as
a database server.
If the server has only a standard EthernetNIC, it can belong to only one VLAN. Clients that belong to a
different VLAN would have to send their traffic to a router. The router forwards the frames to the
database server. The problem with this approach is the latency introduced by the router.
To overcome this, a trunk-capable NIC card can be placed in the server that understands multiple VLAN
information. With this arrangement, an end station need not send its frame to the router. Instead it can
directly access the file server. This makes the access much faster.

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To configure trunk ports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Acquisition > Configure Trunk for End Host Discovery.
The corresponding page appears.
Step 3 You can:
Select Enable End Host Discovery on all Trunks to include all non-link trunk ports to UT
Major Acquisition. After choosing this option, go to Step 9.
Select Enable End Host Discovery on selected Trunks to include only the required set of
non-link trunk ports to UT Major Acquisition. After choosing this option, go to Step 4.
Select Disable End Host Discovery on Trunks to disable this feature. For this option, only the
end hosts connected to access ports will be discovered by UT Major Acquisition. After choosing
this option, go to Step 9.
Step 4 Select the list of switches where end hosts are connected to trunk ports, from the device selector.
Step 5 Click Show Trunks.
This displays the list of non-link trunk ports from the selected switches. Non-link trunk ports in down
state are also listed here.
If you have selected devices that do not have non-link trunk ports, a message is displayed indicating the
same. Change your selection to devices that have non-link trunk ports and click Show Trunks, to display
the ports. Link ports are not listed here.
Step 6 Select the list of trunk ports where end hosts are connected from the Available Trunks list.
Step 7 Click Add.
The selected ports are displayed under the Selected Trunks list.
Step 8 Select either
Discover End Hosts on Trunks to include the selected ports in UT Major Acquisition.
Or
Do not Discover End Hosts on Trunks to exclude the selected ports from UT Major Acquisition.
Step 9 Click Apply.
This saves the configuration on the server.
After saving the configuration, run Data Collection. End hosts connected to trunk ports will be
discovered in the successive UT Major Acquisition.
For Dynamic User Tracking to track end hosts connected to trunk ports, enable SNMP traps in these
ports. For details on Enabling SNMP traps, see Enabling SNMP Traps on Switch Ports.

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Specifying Purge Policy
You can specify the intervals at which old reports and jobs are to be purged, using the Purge Policy
option. You can save the Purge Policy, so that the older jobs and archives are purged at the specified
interval.
To specify the Purge Policy:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Reports > User Tracking Purge Policy.
The Report Settings dialog box appears.
Step 3 Check the relevant check box:
Purge Archives Older than
Purge J obs Older than
You must specify the period in days, or weeks, or months for which you want to retain the report archives
or jobs.
Step 4 Click Save.
Specifying Domain Name Display
You can specify the way in which domain names are to be displayed in User Tracking Reports, using the
Domain Name Display option.
To specify the Domain Name display:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Reports > Domain Name Display.
The Report Settings dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select the format for displaying the domain names in User Tracking Reports. You can:
Show full domain name suffix
Hide full domain name suffix
Hide specified domain name suffix
If you want to hide the specified domain name suffix, enter the domain name suffix in the field.
Step 4 Click Save.

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Importing Information on End Host Users
You can import from a file, user names and notes for end hosts already discovered, using the End Host
Table Import option of the Administration tab in the Campus Manager User Tracking window.
To import information in end host users:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration >User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > End Host Table Import.
The End Host Table Import dialog box appears.
Step 3 Specify the name of the file from which you are importing the end host table data.
Step 4 Click Apply.
Note We recommend you to import file either of the format CSV or txt file. The imported file must have the
following mandatory headers: MAC Address, User Name and Notes.
For example:
MAC1 Peter Finance department
Understanding Dynamic Updates
User Tracking generates reports on various functions and attributes of the end hosts and devices
connected to your network that are managed by Campus Manager . These reports are generated by
polling the network at intervals set by the network administrator.
In addition to polling the network at regular intervals, Campus Manager tracks changes about the end
hosts and users on the network to provide real-time updates.
Dynamic Updates are asynchronous updates that are based on SNMP MAC notifications traps.
When an endhost is connected to a switch managed by Campus Manager, an SNMP MAC notification
trap is sent immediately from the switch to the Campus Manager Server, indicating an ADD event. This
trap contains the MAC address of the end host connected to the switch.
Similarly if an end host is disconnected from a switchport, an SNMP MAC notification trap is sent from
the switch to the Campus Manager indicating a DELETE event. Thus Campus Manager provides real
time data about end hosts coming into and moving out of the network.
The difference between UTMajor Acquisition and Dynamic UT process is :
Campus Manager collects data from the network at regular intervals for UTMajor Acquisition.
In Dynamic UT, the devices send traps to Campus Manager as and when changes happen in the network.
This implies that you need not wait till next UTMajor Acquisition cycle to see the changes that have
happened in your network. This is an improvement over the earlier versions, where updates on endhost
information happened based on the polling cycle.

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As a result of Dynamic updates, the following reports contain up-to-date information:
End-Host Report
Contains information from UT Major Acquisition and the recently added end-hosts.
History Report
Contains information from UT Major Acquisition and the recently disconnected
end-hosts/end-hosts that have moved between ports or VLANs.
Switch Port reports
Contains information about the utilization of switch ports.
SNMP Traps are generated when a host is connected to the network, disconnected from the network or
when it moves between VLANs or ports in the network.
See Figure 7-1for an overview of Dynamic Updates.
Figure 7-1 Overview of Dynamic Updates
Configure devices to send traps
Is it a DHCP environment?
Enable DHCP snooping
Dynamic UT configuration
Configure Campus Manager as Primary listener Configure DFM/HPOV as Primary listener
Configure Campus Manager as Secondary listener
Yes
Campus Manager starts processing dynamic updates
Run UTLite Script (for Windows)
No
Switches should be managed
by Campus Manager
1
8
2
1
7
3

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To enable the Dynamic Updates feature:
Switches must be managed by Campus Manager .
Configure Campus Manager as a primary or secondary receiver of the MAC notifications. For
details, see SNMP MAC Notification Listener.
Configure all devices to send traps to the Trap Listener port of the Campus Manager server (This is
the port number that you would have configured on Campus Manager Administration screen). For
more details, see Enabling SNMP Traps on Switch Ports.
Configure DHCP snooping on the switches
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) snooping is a security feature that filters untrusted
DHCP message received from outside the network or Firewall, and builds and maintains a DHCP
snooping binding table.
Campus Manager queries the CISCO-DHCP-SNOOPING-MIB to get the IP address of the end-host
connected.
For details on configuring DHCP, see
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2/ip/configuration/guide/1cfdhcp.html
User Tracking collects username and IP address through UTLite for Windows environment. For
more details, see Understanding UTLite.
In a Windows environment you can either install UTLite or configure DHCP snooping to get IP address
of the end host. They can also co-exist.
If you have neither installed UTLite nor enabled DHCP snooping, the IP address of the end-host
connected will be updated only in the next UT Major Acquisition cycle. The ARP cache of the device
should be populated with the IP address, for UT Major Acquisition to discover it.
The User Tracking Dynamic Updates process includes:
MAC User-Host Information Collector (MACUHIC) Process
User Tracking Manager (UTManager) Process
UTLite
MAC User-Host Information Collector (MACUHIC) Process
MAC User-Host Information Collector tracks wired end users dynamically. It receives MAC
notifications from the switches either directly or through DFM or HPOV.
After receiving the MAC notifications, MACUHIC validates the traps as follows:
Checks whether the traps are generated from a switch managed by Campus Manager .
Checks whether the source is an access port.
If the traps are from valid sources:
Updates Campus Manager database.
Informs UTManager if the trap is received for an ADD event.
User Tracking Manager (UTManager) Process
UTManager receives the information from MACUHIC about the ADD MAC notification trap that is
received. This information is not complete and can be completed using updates from DHCP or UTLite
or from both.
In the UTLite process, UTLite receives details of changes in username, and the time at which the host
has logged in or logged out of the network.

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UTLite
UTLite is a utility that allows you to collect user names from Primary Domain Controllers, Active
Directory, and Novell servers.
To do this you need to install UTLite in the Windows Primary Domain Controllers and in the Novell
servers. You can also install UTLite in an Active Directory server.
For complete information, see Understanding UTLite.
Figure 7-2 Processes Involved i n Dynamic Updates
When an end-host is connected to your network, the following happens in the background. See
Figure 7-2 for details:
1. The switch to which it is connected sends a MAC notification.
2. The MACUHIC process in Campus Manager receives the MAC notification either directly from the
switch or through other applications like DFM or HPOV.
3. After processing this MAC notification, MACUHIC informs the UTManager.
4. Campus Manager updates the database with the username and IP Address received from the UTLite.
Database does not contain the complete information about the end host.
5. UTManager finds the following details:
Subnet, VTP domain, VLAN, Port duplex, and port speed from XML files generated after Data
Collection.
Hostname from DNS Server
Campus Manager updates the database with the complete User Tracking information for the host.
The User Tracking end host history reports, end host reports, reports on switch ports, wireless clients,
duplicate MAC addresses, duplicate IP addresses, and so on use this updated information while
generating reports.
User Tracking Reports
SNMP Traps
sent
by devices
Campus Manager
Campus
Manager
Database
MACUHIC processes
traps
from wired hosts
UTLITE sends
user login/logout
information
UTM polls
various external systems
to get complete information
about the hosts
External Systems
like DHCP Snooping MIB
etc.
1
8
2
1
7
4

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Viewing Dynamic Updates Process Status
You can check whether the Dynamic Updates processes are running or not.
To check the status:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Administration > Dynamic Updates.
The Dynamic Updates Process Status window appears.
If you have started the process already, the status window shows Dynamic Updates Processes are
RUNNING.
Step 3 Click Stop to stop the Dynamic Updates processes.
The Stop button then toggles to Start, and the status window shows Dynamic Updates Processes are
STOPPED. When you stop these processes, Campus Manager stops processing traps sent by devices.
Step 4 Click Start to restart the Dynamic Updates processes.
The Start button again toggles to Stop.
Enabling SNMP Traps on Switch Ports
You must configure the Cisco switches for sending SNMPv1/SNMPv2 MAC Notification Traps when a
host is connected to or disconnected from that port.
Even if the device is managed with SNMPv3, Campus Manager processes only SNMPv1/SNMPv2 traps.
You can configure the ports Through Campus Manager Interface or Through Command Line Interface
(CLI).
Note Campus Manager supports only those switches which contain the Management Information Base (MIB)
named MAC Notification, for enabling the SNMP traps.
Through Campus Manager Interface
Prerequisites to enable MAC Notification on switches through Campus Manger interface:
The switches must be managed by RME.
If the devices are managed in SNMP version 2 (SNMPv2), you need to configure the Read as well
as the Write community strings to enable MAC Notification in the switches.
Configure the RME server credentials in Campus Manager . For more details, see Setting RME
Credentials.
Note Campus Manager configures SNMP MAC Notification version 1 as the default version on switches for
Dynamic Updates.

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To enable MAC notification in switches:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking, from LMS Portal.
Step 2 Select Administration > Dynamic Updates > Device Trap Configuration.
The Configure Trap on Devices dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select the switches for which you want to enable the traps, from the Device Selector.
Step 4 Click Selection to see the devices that you have selected.
Step 5 Click Configure to configure MAC notification on the ports in the devices.
The Configure MAC-Notification Trap on Ports dialog box appears. Table 7-9 describes the entries in
the Configure MAC-Notification Trap on Ports dialog box.
Step 6 Check the check boxes to select the ports that you want to enable SNMP traps.
Step 7 Click Configure to enable the SNMP traps.
An Information window appears.
Step 8 Click OK.
Table 7-9 Configure MAC-Notification Trap on Ports Field Description
Field Description
Add Campus Manager
Server as Trap Receiver
Check the check box to configure devices, to send SNMP traps to Campus
Manager.
To configure Campus Manager to listen to traps sent from devices, see
Configuring SNMP Trap Listener.
Trap Community Set a community string for the SNMP traps sent by devices. This property
is enabled only when Campus Manager is the Primary receiver for SNMP
traps. This string is added to the list of valid strings in the Dynamic User
Tracking Configuration screen.
Set as Dynamic User
Tracking Default
Check the check box to make this community string as the default for
future configurations, if Campus Manager is the Primary Trap receiver.
Filter Allows you to filter the ports listed, based on port name, device name and
the device address (IP address of the device).
Trap Receiver Port Port number that you entered for receiving traps.
The default trap receiver port number of the Campus Manager server is
1431.
Port Name of the port.
Access ports as well as Non-link Trunk ports are listed.
Device Name Name corresponding to IP address of the switch.
Device Address IP address of the switch.
Rows per page Select to view 10 to 50 rows on a page.

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Through Command Line Interface
If you do not have RME installed on your CiscoWorks server, you must configure the switches manually,
for the switches to send MAC Notifications to the Campus Manager server.
If you do not have RME installed on your CiscoWorks server, you must configure the switches manually,
for the switches to send MAC Notifications to the Campus Manager server.
See Commands to Enable MAC Notification Traps on Devices for a list of commands to be run on each
device.
For complete list of devices supported by Campus Manager, see
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/cscowork/ps563/products_device_support_tables_list.html
SNMP MAC Notification Listener
You must enable the switches to send SNMP MAC notifications to the listener, to avail the Dynamic
Updates feature. After you enable the switches, you can choose either Campus Manager , CiscoWorks
Device Fault Manager (DFM), or HP OpenView (HPOV) as the primary listener for MAC notifications.
If you select Campus Manager as the Primary listener, the MAC notifications reach the application
directly from the switches.
If you select Campus Manager as the Secondary listener, (with HPOV or DFM as the primary
listener), MAC notifications reach Campus Manager through HPOV or DFM.
Note Even if the device is managed with SNMPv3, Campus Manager processes only SNMPv1/SNMPv2 traps.
To select the MAC notification listener, see the following sections:
Configuring SNMP Trap Listener
HPOV as Primary Listener
DFM as Primary Listener
Configuring SNMP Trap Listener
Campus Manager receives SNMP traps directly from the switches, unless you configure the port to
direct the traps through HP Open View (HPOV) or CiscoWorks Device Fault Manager (DFM)
applications.
To configure the trap listener:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking, from LMS Portal.
Step 2 Select Administration > Dynamic Updates > Trap Listener Configuration.
The Trap Listener Configuration dialog box appears.
Step 3 Check Listen traps from Device to configure the trap reception directly from the devices
This makes Campus Manager as the primary listener for receiving SNMP traps from devices.
OR
Check Listen traps from DFM/HPOV to receive the traps through these applications.
In this case, DFM or HPOV act as the primary listener for SNMP traps from devices. They forward it to
Campus Manager which acts as the secondary listener for traps.

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If both options are enabled, Campus Manager can receive traps directly from devices, from HPOV and
from DFM.
Step 4 Enter the port number of the port through which you want to receive the traps, in the Trap Listener Port
field.
The default trap listener port number of the Campus Manager server is 1431.
Step 5 Click Apply to save the details.
HPOV as Primary Listener
If you select HPOV as the primary listener, you must perform the following to receive the Dynamic
Updates through Campus Manager :
Install CiscoWorks Integration Utility
Install Trap Adapter for HPOV
The supported versions of HPOV are HPOV 7.50, HPOV 7.51 and HPOV 7.53.
Install CiscoWorks Integration Utility
You must have CiscoWorks Integration Utility (Integration Utility) installed on your system. Integration
Utility is a utility that integrates CiscoWorks applications with third-party Network Management
Systems (NMS).
This utility is available as part of the DVD in the CiscoWorks LAN Management Solution 3.2.
This integration utility adds Cisco device icons to topology maps, allows Cisco MIB browsing from
NMS, and sets up menu items on the NMS to launch remotely installed CiscoWorks applications.
See User Guide for CiscoWorks Integration Utility 1.7, for more details on the integration utility.
Note You must install the Integration Utility on the same machine on which you have installed HPOV.
Install Trap Adapter for HPOV
Campus supports Trap Adapter for OpenView on Windows and Solaris operating systems.
To install the adapter on Windows:
Step 1 Locate the TrapListener.conf file in the NMSROOT/campus/hpovadapter/WIN/ directory.
Step 2 Modify the Trap Receiver address and the port number to the Campus Manager values, in the file.
Step 3 Set the LIB environment variable to HP OpenView lib directory.
Step 4 Run the fwdTrap.exe program located in the same directory.
The Trap Adapter gets attached to OpenView process and starts sending traps to the Campus Manager
server.
To install the adapter on Solaris:
Step 1 Locate the TrapListener.conf file in the /opt/CSCOpx/campus/hpovadapter/SOL directory.

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Step 2 Modify the Trap Receiver address and the port number to the Campus Manager values, in the file.
Step 3 Set the LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable to HP OpenView lib directory.
Step 4 Run the fwdTrap program located in the same directory.
The Trap Adapter gets attached to OpenView process and starts sending traps to the Campus Manager
server.
Supported Platforms (Operating Systems)
The supported platforms for the HP NNM and HPOV adapters are:
DFM as Primary Listener
If you select DFM as the primary listener, you must perform the following to receive MAC Notifications
from the switches, thus availing the Dynamic Updates feature in Campus Manager .
The default port number of DFM Server for receiving Traps from the switches is 9000. You must
configure or verify this port number on the device, for the device to forward the Traps to DFM. The
trapd.conf file has the details regarding the port number that receives the Traps at the DFM server.
To enable DFM to forward the MAC Notifications, you must modify the trapd.conf file in the DFM
server, at NMSROOT/object/smarts/conf/trapd directory. You can modify the file through the command
line interface or through the application interface.
You can configure the application to forward the MAC Notifications to Campus Manager Server in two
ways:
From LMS Portal
Network Management System Supported Platforms
HP Open View 7.53 Solaris 9
Solaris 10
Windows 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 1 or
2
Windows 2003 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 1
or 2
Windows 2003 R2 Standard Edition
Windows 2003 R2 Enterprise Edition
HP Open View 7.51 Solaris 9
Solaris 10
Windows 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 1
Windows 2003 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 1
Windows 2003 R2 Standard Edition
Windows 2003 R2 Enterprise Edition
HP Open View 7.50 Solaris 9
Windows 2003 Standard Edition with Service Pack 1
Windows 2003 Enterprise Edition with Service Pack 1

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From LMS Portal
Step 1 Select Device Fault Manager > Configuration.
The Configurations page appears.
Step 2 Select Other Configurations > SNMP Trap Forwarding.
The Notification Services page appears.
Step 3 Enter the Hostname and the port number of the Campus Manager server to which you want to forward
the MAC Notifications.
Step 4 Click Apply to configure.
The trapd.conf file is modified and the DFMServer process is restarted.
Note If you configure through CiscoWorks, Campus Manager server receives all Traps including MAC
Notification.
From the DFM Server
Step 1 Access the DFM server using Telnet.
Step 2 Enter pdterm DfmServer at the command line to stop the DFM server.
Step 3 Navigate to NMSROOT/object/smarts/conf/trapd directory.
Step 4 Edit the trapd.conf file in the directory to reflect the following changes.
Enter:
FORWARD: address OID generic type specific type \ host [:port] | [:port:community] [host [:port] |
[:port:community] ...], where the explanation for each variable is provided in the trapd.conf file.
Step 5 Enter pdexec DfmServer at the command line to restart the DFM server.
Configuring Dynamic User Tracking
You can configure certain properties in Dynamic User Tracking to enhance the security of the system.
These properties make the server receive traps only from specified devices and with specified
community strings.
To configure properties for filtering SNMP Traps:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking, from LMS Portal.
Step 2 Select Administration > Dynamic Updates > Dynamic User Tracking Configuration.
The Dynamic User Tracking Configuration page appears.

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Step 3 Check Validate SNMP Community.
Campus Manager validates the community string in SNMP traps, with the values you have set. You can
add community strings only after checking this check-box.
If you configure a device with SNMP v2 or v1 settings in DCR, then the device is initially queried
with SNMP v2 by Campus Manager. If the query fails, CM will query the device with SNMP v1.
If you configure a device with SNMPv3 settings in DCR, then the device is queried with SNMP v3.
However, if the query fails, the same device will not be queried with SNMP v2 or v1.
Step 4 Enter the community string in the Valid Community List text box and click Add.
You can add the community strings one at a time. You can use the Delete button to remove the extra or
erroneous strings.
The default Trap community string that you might have added in the Device Trap configuration screen
is also listed here.
Step 5 Check Validate Trap Source.
Campus Manager validates the source IP Address of the trap. You can add the list of IP Addresses only
after checking this check-box.
Step 6 Enter the IP Address in the text box provided and click Add.
You can use the Delete button to delete extra or erroneous entries.
Step 7 Click Apply to save changes to the server.
To revert to the default values, click Reset.
You can use any one of the options to filter SNMP traps.
For example:
If you set
Validate SNMP Community = true (by checking the check-box)
Community String = private, test
Validate Trap Source =false
then traps from all sources with community string private or test will be processed by Campus Manager.
If you set
Validate SNMP Community =true
Community String = private, test
Validate Trap Source =true
Valid IP Addresses = 10.77.210.211, 10.77.210.212
then traps from the listed IP addresses, with the community string private or test will be processed by
Campus Manager. In this case, Campus Manager first validates the community string and if it matches,
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Debugging Options
Debugging Options
When you face issues in running User Tracking, logging can be enabled for debugging purposes. Debug
settings related to all User tracking functionality can be done here.
You can enable debugging for:
User Tracking Server side processes
You can debug events related to all User Tracking server side processes. For details on this, see
Debugging Options for User Tracking Server.
Dynamic User Tracking
You can set the debugging options required for Dynamic Updates. For details on this, see Debugging
Dynamic Updates.
User Tracking Client side activities
You can debug events related to User Tracking client side activities. For details on this, see
Debugging Options for User Tracking Reports.
Dynamic User Tracking Console
This feature helps you to troubleshoot the three major processes involved in Dynamic User Tracking
updates. For details on this, see Dynamic User Tracking Console
Table 7-10 explains the difference between Debugging dynamic updates and Dynamic User Tracking:
Table 7-10 Difference Between the Debugging Methods
Debugging
Method Explanation Advantages Limitations
Debugging
Dynamic
Updates
Allows you to enable
debugging for the
various processes,
which results in
immediate logging.
Complete information
about trap processing
starting from
receiving traps,
processing them, and
information about
various stages in
MACUHIC, UTLite
and UTManager.
Interferes with the trap processing
capability of Campus Manager.
We recommend that you enable
debugging for this module only when
requested by TAC.
Dynamic UT
Console
Error conditions that
occurred while
processing Dynamic
Updates are stored in
circular buffers, in the
Campus Manager
Server.
If you need to see
these conditions, you
can download the
errors in a file format.
Does not interfere
with the trap
processing capability
of the Campus Server
Can be used to get only error
conditions
Circular buffers hold only the last
10 error conditions

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Debugging Options
Debugging Options for User Tracking Server
To debug events related to all User Tracking server side processes:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Debugging Options >User Tracking Server.
The debugging page appears. See Table 7-11 for a description of the fields:
Step 2 Click Apply.
Table 7-11 User Tracking Server Side Debugging Options
Field Description Usage Notes
Enable Debug Check this option to enable
logging for User Tracking
Server side activities.
You can select the modules for debugging
only after you select this option.
Modules Specify the modules on
which you need to enable
debugging.
Click Select to view the available modules
and select the modules in which debug is to be
enabled. Table 7-12 lists the debug modules
available for User Tracking Server.
File Name Name of the log file in
which the trace messages are
to be recorded.
The default log file is NMSROOT\log\ut.log
Maximum File Size
(lines)
Maximum size of the file in
lines
Enable Device Level Debugging
Device IP(s) IP addresses of devices for
which you need to log
debugging messages.
You can enter multiple IP
addresses, separated by
commas.
This field is enabled only when the Device
Level Debugging option is enabled.

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Debugging Options
Selecting User Tracking Server Side Debug Modules
Table 7-12 describes the debug modules available for User Tracking Server in Campus Manager.
Click OK to save the selected modules or click Cancel to exit.
Debugging Dynamic Updates
You can set the debugging options required for Dynamic Updates. Enabling debugging, records all the
required information to the log files. To know the difference between Dynamic User Tracking Console
and debugging Dynamic Updates, see Table 7-10.
To enable debugging Dynamic Updates:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Debugging Options >Dynamic User Tracking.
Or
Go to Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking > Administration > Debugging Options
>Dynamic User Tracking.
The debugging page appears.
Step 2 Check Enable Debug to set the options.
Step 3 Select the Service Name from the drop down list in the Service Name field.
The framework modules appear in the Module Name column. The framework modules depend on the
service that you select.
Step 4 Select the debug level for each module.
The debug level options are INFO, DEBUG, and TRACE.
INFO logs minimum information required for debugging and is the default option. DEBUG is the next
level of debugging. TRACE provides complete debugging information and creates huge logs.
Table 7-12 User Tracking Debug Modules
Module Description
user tracking Provides user tracking functionality. Enable debugging for this if user tracking
fails to discover end hosts as expected.
framework Constructs and maintains data in the memory.
Provides framework for Campus Manager features.
Enable debugging for this module only when requested by TAC. This is because
enabling debugging for this module creates huge logs.
devices Provides specific information, if any, available for device categories.
Enable debugging for this module if you encounter issues specific to a particular
device type.

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Debugging Options
Step 5 Enter the filename for the log file in the Log Filename field.
The default log file for UT LITE is NMSROOT\log\utlite.log
The default log file for MACUHIC is NMSROOT\log\macuhic.log
The default log file for UTManager is NMSROOT\log\utm.log
The default value for Log file size is 1,000,000 lines. You can give values between 1 and 2,147,483,647.
Giving zero or negative values or alphabets results in errors.
Step 6 Click Apply to save the settings.
Dynamic User Tracking modules available for debugging are explained in Table 7-13:
Note Enabling debugging for these modules creates huge logs which interferes with the Trap processing
capability of Campus Manager. We recommend that you enable debugging for this module only when
requested by TAC.
Table 7-13 Dynamic User Tracking Debug Modules
Module Description
UT Lite
control plane Handles configuration events related to:
Log level Settings
Log file
Port number
For example:
If you changed the log file from X to Y, but logging still happens in X , enable debugging
for this module.
listener Listens to data sent by the UTLite script installed in the Windows/Novell server.
Checks for the integrity of the data received.
execution framework Handles code level execution of the data received.
Enable debugging for this module to debug J ava related errors.
execution Processes and validates the data received.
UTLite receives MACAddress, IPAddress and User logged in for the end host. This
information is updated to the database only if the endhost has been discovered in last UT
Major Acquisition cycle or through Dynamic User Tracking.
MACUHIC
control plane Handles configuration events related to:
Log level Settings
Log file
Port number
listener Listens to SNMP traps sent by devices.
Checks for the integrity of the data received.

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Debugging Options
execution framework Handles code level execution of data received by MACUHIC.
Enable debugging for this module to debug J ava related errors.
decoder Validates the traps sent by devices by checking whether:
The trap is sent by a device managed by Campus Manager.
The SNMP version is correct
execution Checks whether:
The data received is duplicate data
If the data is sent by a Link port or Access port.
Dynamic UT does not process traps sent from link ports.
Updates the database with information received and forwards it to UTManager for further
processing.
UTManager
control plane Handles configuration events related to:
Log level Settings
Log file
Port number
listener Listens to data sent by UTLite and MACUHIC.
Checks for the integrity of the data received.
execution framework Handles code level execution of data received by UTManager.
Enable debugging for this module to debug J ava related errors.
decoder Validates the data received from UTLite, MACUHIC, SNMP data from DHCP Snooping
MIB and the other data sent by external systems.
execution Processes the data received and updates the database.
es framework Handles queries sent to External Systems.
es.snmp Handles SNMP queries sent to External Systems.
es.subnet Performs subnet calculation based on the information sent by External Systems.
es.db Handles database operations.
Table 7-13 Dynamic User Tracking Debug Modules (continued)
Module Description

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Debugging Options
Debugging Options for User Tracking Reports
You can debug events related to User Tracking client side activities as follows:
Step 1 Go to Campus Manager > Administration > Debugging Options >User Tracking Reports. Or Go to
Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking > Administration > Debugging Options >
User Tracking Reports. The debugging page appears.
Step 2 Select the level of debugging. It can be any one of the following:
INFO
Only informational messages are recorded in the log file. This is the default option.
FATAL
Messages related to fatal errors are recorded in the log file.
DEBUG
All User Tracking client side messages are recorded in the log file.
The Log File Name field specifies the location and name of the log file. The default log file is
NMSROOT\log\Cmapps.log
Step 3 Click Apply.
Debugging is enabled for UT client side activities and the messages are recorded in the corresponding
log file.
Dynamic User Tracking Console
This feature helps you to troubleshoot Dynamic User Tracking updates in a detailed way. Dynamic UT
consists of three major processes:
UTLite
UTManager
MACUHIC
Each process monitors different error conditions using circular buffers in the memory. For each error
condition, the buffer will have the count of error occurrences and the conditions under which the error
occurred.
You can write this information from the memory to a file if you need to, and troubleshoot based on that.
To know the difference between Dynamic User Tracking Console and debugging Dynamic Updates, see
Table 7-10.

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To enable Dynamic User Tracking Console:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Administration > User Tracking > Administration > Debugging
Options >Dynamic User Tracking Console.
The debugging page appears.
Step 2 Select the Service name from one of the following:
UTLite
UTM
MACUHIC
The error conditions related to that process is listed under the Error Details section.
Step 3 Select the error condition for which you need details and click Generate.
A new file is generated with all the error details and stored in the Campus Manager server. Its also listed
under the File list pane.
Step 4 Select a file and:
Click View to see the file contents.
Click Download to save the file in your local machine.
Click Delete to delete the file from the server. You can delete multiple files at the same time.
Understanding User Tracking Reports
User Tracking automatically locates servers and end-user workstations, and Cisco Voice over IP (VoIP)
telephone handsets and their connections to Cisco switches. During this acquisition process it also
tabulates specific connection information about the end station.
The Reports section displays various options to view, create and schedule various reports that User
Tracking provides.
User Tracking Data Migration
When you upgrade from older versions of Campus Manager to Campus Manager 5.x, complete details
about end hosts and IP phones are migrated. This helps you retain data from the earlier database.
For complete details on Data Migration, see Data Migration Guide for LAN Management Solution 3.0

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Using User Tracking Reports
The Reports section displays various options to view, create and schedule various reports that User
Tracking provides. This section contains:
Viewing Quick Reports
Exporting and Printing Reports
Viewing Report J obs List
Viewing J ob Details
Using Report Generator
Viewing Duplicates Report
Viewing End Hosts Reports
Interpreting Active End Hosts Report
Viewing IP Phones Reports
Viewing MAC Reports
Interpreting MAC Reports
Viewing Reports on Wireless Clients
Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports
Understanding History Report
Using Custom Reports
Using Custom Layouts
Using Archived Reports

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Viewing Quick Reports
You can view the reports on end hosts or IP phones, based on the filter criteria for which you want to
generate the report.
To view the reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking > Reports.
The Quick Report dialog box appears.
Step 2 Enter the required information as given in Table 7-14.
Step 3 Click Submit.
The selected type of report is appears in the standard layout. The data displayed depends on the query
expression specified. For details on the report, see Interpreting End Host Reports.
You can also view all end hosts or IP phones in your network using User Tracking. For more details, see
Viewing End Hosts Reports and Viewing IP Phones Reports.
Table 7-14 Viewing Quick Reports
Field Description Usage Notes
Select a type Select the type of report that you wish to
view.
The two types of reports that are available are:
End Hosts
IP Phones
QueryExpression
Column Select a query expression based on
which you want to generate the report.
To view a list of valid query expressions, click the drop-down
arrow.
The information on the other query expressions are available
in the corresponding report.
Operator Logical operator for the query
expression.
To view a list of valid operators click the drop-down arrow.
Pattern Pattern for the selected query
expression.
Enter the pattern for the selected query expression.
The Pattern field is mandatory for all other Operator options
except for is null and is not null.
In the pattern field to search the pattern for MAC Address
Column, you can use the following separators: dot (.) or
colon (:). You can also search the pattern for MAC Address
without any separator.
For example: String for pattern FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF can be
replaced with continuous string FFFFFFFFFFFF.
For details on date formats and operator values, see Operator
Values and Date Formats for Last Seen Column.

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Operator Values and Date Formats for Last Seen Column
Table 7-15 lists the operators available for the Last Seen column and their corresponding values for
Pattern field.
Table 7-15 Operators Available and Their Values
Operator Pattern
Contains
Does not contain
Begins with
Does not begins with
Ends with
Does not end with
yyyy/mm/dd
yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy
hh:mm:ss GMT
hh:mm:ss
Matches
Does not match
yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss
Less than
Greater than
yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy
Is between
Is not between
yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss,yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT,dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss GMT,dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss ,dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss ,dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy ,dd mmm yyyy
Is in
Is not in
yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss,yyyy/mm/dd hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT,dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT,dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss GMT
dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss ,dd mmm yyyy, hh:mm:ss
dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss ,dd mmm yyyy hh:mm:ss

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Exporting and Printing Reports
Campus Manager allows you to export and print reports. For details see,
Exporting Reports
Printing Reports
Exporting Reports
To export a report:
Step 1 Click the Export icon at the top right of the screen.
The Exporting Report dialog box appears.
Step 2 Enter the format in which the report needs to be exported. You can export reports to CSV or PDF format.
End Host Report and End Host History Reports can be exported only to CSV format.
Step 3 Enter the range of rows or the row numbers that you want to export. Separate the rows and numbers by
commas.
Step 4 Click OK.
The report is exported.
Printing Reports
To print a report:
Step 1 Click the Print icon at the top right of the screen.
The Printing Report dialog box appears.
Step 2 Enter the number of rows that need to be printed.
Step 3 Click OK.
The report is printed.
Restrictions on Printing Reports
For End hosts report, End hosts history report and IP Phones report, you can print only 30,000
records at a time. If you want to print more than 30,000 records, do it in batches of 30,000.
For End hosts report and End hosts history report, comma separated values are not accepted in the
print range.
For example, specifying the range as 10-40, 70-80 will not work.
Specify the range as 10-40 to print from the 10th record to the 40th record.
Repeat it for 70-80 range.

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Viewing Report Jobs List
You can view a list of scheduled jobs and their current status using the Report Jobs option of Campus
Manager User Tracking window.
To view Report J obs:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Jobs.
The Report J obs dialog box appears. See Table 7-16
Table 7-16 Report Jobs Column Description
Column Description
J ob ID Unique ID of the job. J ob IDs have N.x format, where x stands for the number of
instances of that job.
For example, 1007.4 indicates that it is the fifth instance of the J ob with ID 1007.
Click on the J ob ID to launch the report.
J ob Type Type of job. It includes:
Duplicate IP
Duplicate MAC
Duplicate MAC and VLAN
Ports with Multiple MAC
End Hosts All Host entries
History End Host History
History Switch Port Utilization
IP Phone All IP Phone entries
Switch Port Report Switch Port Capacity
Switch Port Report Switch Port Summary
Switch Port Report Recently Down
Switch Port Report Reclaim Unused Up Ports
Switch Port Report Reclaim Unused Down Ports
Wireless Report Wireless End Hosts
Description Description of the job.
Owner Username of the job creator.
Scheduled
At
Date and time at which the job was scheduled.
Completed
At
Date and time at which the job was completed.

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Note for Custom Reports
Custom reports are generated by evaluating a query on a group of devices.
They do not launch, if the group has been deleted or if the underlying query does not return any device.
Viewing Job Details
To view the details of a selected job:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Jobs.
The Report J obs dialog box appears.
Step 3 Check the check box against the job whose details you want to view.
Step 4 Click View.
The report is launched. You can also launch the report by clicking on the J ob ID.
Run Status J ob states include:
Running
Waiting for approval
Scheduled (pending)
Succeeded
Succeeded with Info
Failed
Crashed
Cancelled
Suspended
Rejected
Missed Start
Failed at Start
Schedule
Type
Type of job scheduleDaily or Periodic.
Status Provides the status of the current jobs. The status of the current jobs is displayed as
succeded or failed.
Table 7-16 Report Jobs Column Description (continued)
Column Description

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Stopping Jobs
To stop a scheduled job:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Jobs.
The Report J obs dialog box appears.
Step 3 Check the check box against the job that you want to stop.
Step 4 Click Stop.
Deleting Jobs
To delete a job:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Jobs.
The Report J obs dialog box appears.
Step 3 Check the check box against the job that you want to delete.
Step 4 Click Delete.
Using Report Generator
The Report Generator in User Tracking allows you to view System-defined reports and Custom reports.
You can also schedule to generate these reports immediately, once, daily, weekly, monthly or quarterly.
You can generate the following reports using Report Generator:
Select an Application Select a Report
Duplicates Duplicate IP, Duplicate MAC, Duplicate MAC and VLAN, and
Ports with multiple MAC.
End Hosts All Host Entries.
History End Host History, Switch Port Utilization.
IP Phones All IP Phone Entries
MAC Report Dormant MAC, New MAC and Rogue MAC report.

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To use the report generator:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select the Application for which you want to view reports.
Step 4 Select the Report that you want to view.
Step 5 Schedule the report by selecting the report type and the date on which you want the report to be
generated.
Step 6 Enter J ob Description and E-mail address, if any.
Step 7 Set system preferences for receiving mail.
Step 8 Click Submit to generate the report.
The report is generated.
To modify the settings, click Reset.
Viewing Duplicates Report
Duplicate report helps you to identify possible network discrepancies related to MAC Address or IP
Address of the end hosts. Network Administrators can either correct them or ignore them, if they feel
that these discrepancies will not affect the network.
For example,
Single MAC address may be detected in more than one port
Single IP address assigned to more than one end host
You need to take appropriate action based on the network condition.
You can generate the following reports to get the details of all duplicate IP addresses, duplicate MAC
addresses, duplicate VLANs, or ports with multiple MAC addresses.
Duplicate IP addresses
Duplicate MAC addresses
Duplicate MAC and VLANs
Ports with multiple MAC addresses.
Switch Port Usage Recently Down, Switch Port Summary, Switch Port Capacity,
Reclaim Unused Down Ports, and Reclaim Unused Up Ports.
Wireless Report Wireless End Hosts
Select an Application Select a Report

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Note Running Immediate Report on a large amount of data will take a long time to complete. We recommend
that you run it as a Scheduled J ob.
To view reports on duplicates:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select Duplicates from the Select Application list.
Step 4 Select the Report for the application that you want to view.
Step 5 Schedule the report by selecting the report type and the date on which you want the report to be
generated.
Step 6 Enter J ob Description and E-mail address, if any.
Step 7 Click Submit to generate the report.
The report is generated.
To modify the fields, click Reset.
Interpreting Duplicate Reports
Table 7-17 displays details of the columns in the duplicates report.
Table 7-17 Duplicate Reports Column Description
Field Description
UserName Discovered username or the username that you have entered. You can edit
this field.
You can configure the Asynchronous Network Interface (ANI) Server to
collect user names. See the ANI Server online help for further information.
MACAddress Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card in
end-user node.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that endhost.
HostName Name of host. Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that
endhost.
IPAddress IP address of host. Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for
that endhost.
Subnet Subnet of IP address.
IPv6 Address IPv6 address of the host, if any

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Prefix Length Length of the IPv6 address prefix.
Prefix IPv6 address prefix
DeviceName Name corresponding to IP address of device. Clicking on the value
launches the Device Center page for that device.
Device IP address of device to which end user node is attached. Clicking on the
value launches the Device Center page for that device.
Port Port name in device to which a host is connected.
Port Name User assigned port name (port label)
Port State Configured port mode
Port Duplex Operational duplex
Port Speed Operational speed
VTP Domain VTP Domain the port is associated with.
VLAN VLAN name associated with port.
VLAN ID VLAN identifier associated with the MAC address or port
VLAN Type Ethernet, FDDI, unassigned, or unknown
Parent VLAN Parent VLAN of the host.
Secondary VLAN Secondary VLAN of the host.
Last Seen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry for this user or host
in a switch. Last Seen is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Notes Notes on this entry, that you enter.
dot1xEnabled Status of Dot 1x authentication on the device. Two status are:
TrueWhen authentication is enabled on the device.
FalseWhen authentication is disabled on the device.
Associated Routers IP addresses of the routers associated with the host.
Discrepancies Found Number of discrepancies found associated with the port.
Best Practice Deviations
Found
Number of best practice deviations found associated with the port.
Table 7-17 Duplicate Reports Column Description (continued)
Field Description

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Viewing End Hosts Reports
You can view a report on all end host entries using the End Hosts option in the Reports Generator dialog
box.
End hosts report also displays all active wireless clients, which are connected to your network.
To view report on end hosts:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select End Hosts from the Select Application list.
Step 4 Select All Host Entries, from the Select Report list.
Step 5 Schedule the report by selecting the report Type and the date on which you want the report to be
generated.
Step 6 Enter a description in the J ob Description field of the J ob Info area.
Step 7 Enter a valid E-mail ID in the Email field, of the J ob Info area, to receive the report through mail.
Step 8 Click Submit to generate the report.
The report is generated.
To modify the settings, click Reset.
Interpreting End Host Reports
This section contains the following topics:
Launching CiscoWorks Assistant from End Host Report
Duplicate MAC Entries in End Host Reports
Handling Disconnected End Host entries in the Report
Printing End Host Reports
Filters in End Host Reports
End Hosts ReportStandard Layout Columns
End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout

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Launching CiscoWorks Assistant from End Host Report
To launch CiscoWorks Assistant from End Host Reports:
Step 1 Click on MAC Address or Host name or IP address in the report.
The Host center page is launched for that endhost.
Step 2 Click Troubleshoot at the bottom of the page.
CiscoWorks Assistant > End Host/ IP Phone Down page is launched. Launch the report based on the
instructions provided in Help. This report displays the information that you need to troubleshoot and
analyze the connectivity issues.
Duplicate MAC Entries in End Host Reports
Campus Manager lists endhosts, whose MAC address is seen in any of the managed devices at the time
of running User Tracking Major Acquisition.
It merges CAM table and ARP table entries from multiple switches and routers to gather information on
end hosts.
An endhost creates multiple ARP/CAM entries in different devices if the endhost:
Is in DHCP environment and the IP Address changes often
Moves from one port to another
Moves from one VLAN to another
The entries are removed from the device if ARP timeout/CAM timeout happens.
Campus Manager treats the end host as a distinct entity, if any of the following information about the
end host does not match:
IP Address
VLAN
Port
Device Name
MAC Address
For example, end hosts with same MAC Address but two different IP address are listed as two different
entities in the end hosts report.
Handling Disconnected End Host entries in the Report
Campus Manager lists end hosts that are discovered during User Tracking Acquisition in the end hosts
report. If any of these end hosts are found disconnected during subsequent acquisitions, their data is
moved from End Host reports to History reports. This is the case with User Tracking Major Acquisition
with no subnets configured.
In case of all other Acquisitions, data about disconnected end hosts are moved from end host reports to
history reports only if the device is reachable through SNMP, at the time of acquisition.
For example,
Assume there are five end hosts connected to device X, which have been discovered previously and data
is available in End host reports. You start a device based UT Acquisition for that device X.

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At the time of UT Acquisition assume that:
Three end hosts are disconnected
The device is unreachable through SNMP
In this case, since the CAM table of that device is not read at the time of acquisition, data about the
disconnected end hosts will remain in the End Host reports. They are not moved to History reports.
Printing End Host Reports
You can print only 30,000 records at a time. If you want to print more than 30,000 records, do it in
batches of 30,000.
Comma separated values are not accepted in the print range. For example, specifying the range as 10-40,
70-80 will not work. Specify the range as 10-40 to print from the 10th record to the 40th record. Repeat
it for the 70-80 range.
Filters in End Host Reports
Filters in the report operate on the selected column and fetch records containing the user input value.
In the pattern field to search the pattern for MAC Address Column, you can use the following separators:
dot (.) or colon (:). You can also search the pattern for MAC Address without any separators.
For example: String for pattern FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF can be replaced with continuous string
FFFFFFFFFFFF.
Table 7-18 displays details of the columns in End Hosts ReportStandard Layout.
Table 7-18 End Hosts ReportStandard Layout Columns
Column Description
User Name Discovered username or the username that you have entered. You can edit this
field.
MAC Address Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card in end-user
node.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center page for that endhost.
Host Name Name of host. If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center page for
that endhost.
IP Address IP address of host. If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center page
for that endhost.
Subnet Subnet of IP address, which is displayed in the format String,
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
Device Name Name corresponding to IP address of device. If you click on the value it
launches, the Device Center page for that device.
Port Port in device to which a host is connected.
VLAN VLAN name associated with port.
Status Displays status as Active for the end hosts that are detected as connected to
the network.
Displays status as Inactive for the end hosts that are detected as disconnected
from the network.

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Table 7-19 displays details of the columns in End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout.
LastSeen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry for this user or host in
a switch. Last Seen is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Notes Notes on this entry, that you enter.
Table 7-18 End Hosts ReportStandard Layout Columns (continued)
Column Description
Table 7-19 End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout
Field Description
UserName Discovered username or the username that you have entered. You can edit
this field.
You can configure the Asynchronous Network Interface (ANI) Server to
collect user names. See the ANI Server online help for further information.
MACAddress Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card in
end-user node.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that endhost.
HostName Name of host. Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that
endhost.
IPAddress IP address of host. If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center
page for that endhost.
Subnet Subnet of IP address.
IPv6 Address IPv6 address of the host, if any
Prefix Length Length of the IPv6 address prefix.
Prefix IPv6 address prefix
DeviceName Name corresponding to IP address of device. If you click on the value it
launches, the Device Center page for that device.
Device IP address of device to which end user node is attached. If you click on the
value it launches, the Device Center page for that device.
Port Port name in device to which a host is connected.
Port Name User assigned port name (port label)
Port State Configured port mode
Port Duplex Operational duplex
Port Speed Operational speed
VTP Domain VTP Domain the switch is associated with.
VLAN VLAN name associated with port.
VLAN ID VLAN identifier associated with the MAC address or port
VLAN Type Ethernet, FDDI, unassigned, or unknown
Parent VLAN Parent VLAN of the host.

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Interpreting Active End Hosts Report
The End hosts that are currently connected to the network are termed as Active End Hosts.
Active end hosts reports can be launched from the User Tracking Summary portlet in the Campus
Manager view. For more details on Campus View and the portlets in it, see User Guide for LMS Portal
1.2.
Filters in Active End Hosts Reports
Filters in the report operate on the selected column and fetch records containing the user input value.
The pattern field to search pattern for MAC Address Column is enhanced to include the following
separators: dot (.) or colon (:). You can also search the pattern for MAC Address without any separators.
For example: String for pattern FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF can be replaced with continuous string
FFFFFFFFFFFF.
Active End Hosts report can be displayed in two formats:
Active End Hosts ReportStandard Layout
Active End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout
Table 7-20 displays details of the columns in End Hosts ReportStandard Layout.
Secondary VLAN Secondary VLAN of the host.
Last Seen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry for this user or host
in a switch. Last Seen is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Notes Notes on this entry, that you enter.
dot1xEnabled Status of Dot 1x authentication on the device. Two status are:
TrueWhen authentication is enabled on the device.
FalseWhen authentication is disabled on the device.
Associated Routers IP addresses of the routers associated with the host.
Discrepancies Found Number of discrepancies found associated with the port. If you click on the
number it launches, the Discrepancies report.
Best Practice Deviations
Found
Number of best practice deviations found associated with the port. If you
click on the value it launches, the Best Practice Deviations report.
Table 7-19 End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout (continued)
Field Description
Table 7-20 Active End Hosts ReportStandard Layout
Column Description
User Name Discovered username or the username that you have entered. You can edit this
field.
MAC Address Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card in end-user
node.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center page for that endhost.

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Table 7-21 displays details of the columns in End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout.
Host Name Name of host. If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center page for
that endhost.
IP Address IP address of host. If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center page
for that endhost.
Subnet Subnet of IP address, which is displayed in the format String,
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
Device Name Name corresponding to IP address of device. If you click on the value it
launches, the Device Center page for that device.
Port Port in device to which a host is connected.
VLAN VLAN name associated with port.
LastSeen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry for this user or host in
a switch. Last Seen is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Notes Notes on this entry, that you enter.
Table 7-20 Active End Hosts ReportStandard Layout (continued)
Column Description
Table 7-21 Active End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout
Field Description
UserName Discovered username or the username that you have entered. You can edit
this field.
You can configure the Asynchronous Network Interface (ANI) Server to
collect user names. See the ANI Server online help for further information.
MACAddress Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card in
end-user node.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that endhost.
HostName Name of host. Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that
endhost.
IPAddress IP address of host. If you click on the value it launches, the Host Center
page for that endhost.
Subnet Subnet of IP address.
IPv6 Address IPv6 address of the host, if any
Prefix Length Length of the IPv6 address prefix.
Prefix IPv6 address prefix
DeviceName Name corresponding to IP address of device. If you click on the value it
launches, the Device Center page for that device.
Device IP address of device to which end user node is attached. If you click on the
value it launches, the Device Center page for that device.

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Interpreting End Host Reports
Viewing IP Phones Reports
You can view a report on all IP phones in the network using the IP Phones option of the Report Generator
dialog box.
To view a report on IP phones:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select IP Phones from the Select Application list.
Step 4 Select the Report, from the Select Report list.
Port Port name in device to which a host is connected.
Port Name User assigned port name (port label)
Port State Configured port mode
Port Duplex Operational duplex
Port Speed Operational speed
VTP Domain VTP Domain the switch is associated with.
VLAN VLAN name associated with port.
VLAN ID VLAN identifier associated with the MAC address or port
VLAN Type Ethernet, FDDI, unassigned, or unknown
Parent VLAN Parent VLAN of the host.
Secondary VLAN Secondary VLAN of the host.
Last Seen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry for this user or host
in a switch. Last Seen is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Notes Notes on this entry, that you enter.
dot1xEnabled Status of Dot 1x authentication on the device. Two status are:
TrueWhen authentication is enabled on the device.
FalseWhen authentication is disabled on the device.
Associated Routers IP addresses of the routers associated with the host.
Discrepancies Found Number of discrepancies found associated with the port. If you click on the
number it launches, the Discrepancies report.
Best Practice Deviations
Found
Number of best practice deviations found associated with the port. If you
click on the value it launches, the Best Practice Deviations report.
Table 7-21 Active End Hosts ReportAll Columns Layout (continued)
Field Description

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Step 5 Schedule the report by selecting the report type and the date on which you want the report to be
generated.
Step 6 Enter J ob Description and E-mail address, if any.
Step 7 Click Submit.
The report is generated.
Interpreting IP Phones Reports
Filters in IP Phone Reports
Filters in the report operate on the selected column and fetch records containing the user input value.
The pattern field to search pattern for MAC Address Column is enhanced to include the following
separators: dot (.) or colon (:). You can also search the pattern for MAC Address without any separators.
For example: String for pattern FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF can be replaced with continuous string
FFFFFFFFFFFF.
Table 7-22 gives details of the columns in IP Phones ReportStandard Layout.
Table 7-23 gives details of the columns in the IP Phones ReportAll Columns Layout.
Table 7-22 IP Phones ReportStandard Layout Columns
Column Description
PhoneNumber Phone number.
MACAddress Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card on the phone.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that endhost.
IPAddress IP address of phone.
CCM Address IP address of the Cisco CallManager.
Status Status of the phone, as known to Cisco Call Manager
PhoneType Can be SP30, SP30+, 12S, 12SP, 12SPplus, 30SPplus, 30VIP, SoftPhone, or
unknown.
PhoneDesc Description of the phone.
DeviceName Name corresponding to IP address of device.
LastSeen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry. Last Seen is displayed
in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.

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Printing IP Phones Reports
You can print only 30,000 records at a time. If you want to print more than 30,000 records, do it in
batches of 30,000.
Viewing MAC Reports
You can generate reports to get information on new end-hosts, unauthorized endhosts, and idle end hosts
in the network. To do that:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking > Reports.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select MAC Report from the drop down list.
Step 4 Select one of the following from the sub-list:
Dormant MAC
MAC Addresses that are inactive for the specified number of days.
New MAC
MAC Addresses that are newly added to your network.
Table 7-23 IP Phones ReportAll Columns Layout
Field Description
PhoneNumber Phone number.
MACAddress Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card on the phone.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
Clicking on the value launches the Host Center page for that endhost.
IPAddress IP address of phone, which is appears in the format String, xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
CCM Address Cisco CallManager IP address.
Status Status of the phone, as known to Cisco Call Manager
PhoneType Can be SP30, SP30+, 12S, 12SP, 12SPplus, 30SPplus, 30VIP, SoftPhone, or
unknown.
PhoneDescr Description of the phone.
DeviceName Name corresponding to IP address of device.
Device IP address of device to which IP phone is attached in the format String,
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
Port Port name in device to which IP Phone is connected.
Port Name User assigned port name (port label)
LastSeen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry. Last Seen appears in
the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.

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Rogue MAC
MAC Addresses that are not authorized to exist in your network.
Step 5 Either:
Specify the number of days.
The Days drop-down list is editable. It allows you to specify a value, other than the ones listed. The
maximum number of days that can be specified is 999.
Or
Specify the date from which you want to generate the report.
For example, select 30 from the Date Since drop down list, to generate reports for the new, dormant,
or rogue MACs found in the network for the past 30 days.
Note The data in the Dormant MAC report depends on your Purge policy. If you have set the Purge
policy to 30 days, the report lists the MACs that were dormant for the past 30 days.
If the purge policy is set to 20 days, and you generate the report for 30 days, the Dormant MAC
report will not contain any data.
Step 6 Select the Run Type. It represents the periodic interval at which the report is generated. It can be one of
the following:
Immediate
Once
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Quarterly
If you have selected Immediate report, go to Step 10.
Step 7 Select the date and time at which the report is scheduled to run.
Step 8 Enter J ob Description which is a required field.
Step 9 Enter E-mail address if any, to send notification, when the scheduled job is completed.
Step 10 Click Submit.
If the Run Type is Immediate, the report is generated.
For other Run Types the Report J ob number is displayed. You can view the list of jobs in the Report J obs
page. For more details on this, see Viewing Report J obs List.
Click Reset, to bring back the default settings.

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Interpreting MAC Reports
The columns in New MAC, Dormant MAC and Rogue MAC reports are explained in Table 7-24.
New MAC Report
To mark a MAC as a Rogue MAC
Step 1 In the New MAC Report page, select the New MAC
Step 2 Click Mark As Rogue
After the selected MAC is marked as Rogue, you cannot make any changes to the MAC selection as the
checkbox used to select the MAC is disabled.
Table 7-24 Column description for MAC Report
Field Description
User Name Name of the user logged into the end host.
MACAddress Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card on the end
host.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
Host Name Host Name of the end host.
IPAddress IP address of the end-host, which is appears in the format String,
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx.
DeviceName Name of the device to which the end host is connected. Clicking on the value
launches the Device Center page for that endhost.
Device IP address of device to which the end-host is connected in the format String,
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx. Clicking on the value launches the Device Center page for
that endhost.
Port Port name in device to which the end-host is connected.
VLAN ID VLAN ID to which the device belongs to.
First Seen (For New
MAC Report)
Date and time when User Tracking first found the end host. First Seen date
appears in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Last Seen (For Rogue
MAC and Dormant
MAC Report).
Date and time when User Tracking last found the end host. Last Seen date
appears in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Mark As Non-Rogue This button is available in the Rogue MAC Report page.
Mark As Rogue This button is available in the New MAC Report page.

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Rogue MAC Report
To mark a MAC as a Acceptable MAC
Step 1 In the Rogue MAC Report page, select the MAC
Step 2 Click Mark As Non-Rogue
After the selected MAC is marked as Non-Rogue, the MAC is deleted from the Rogue MAC Report
page.
Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports
You can generate the following switch port reports using Campus Manager , based on the status of the
switch ports.
Report on Recently Down Ports
Reclaim Unused Down Ports Report
Reclaim Unused Up Ports Report
Switch Port Summary Report
Switch Port Capacity Report
You can use the Advanced Search feature to select the devices for which you want to generate reports.
For more details on performing advanced search, see Using Advanced Search.
For a detailed description of the features in Device Selector, see User Guide for Common Services 3.3
Group Selector can be used to create reports based on device groups. For details, see Using Group
Selector.
Campus Manager classifies trunk ports as follows:
Link ports Trunk ports connected to Cisco devices (Switch or Router).
Non-link ports Trunk ports connected to end hosts or IP phones.
Report on Recently Down Ports
Campus Manager generates report for recently down ports as follows:
Link ports that were connected to a device in the previous Data collection, but found unconnected
in the current Data Collection
Access ports that were connected to an endhost in the last UT Major Acquisition cycle, but found
unconnected in the current Data Collection
If the ports are still in an Unconnected state when the next UT Major Acquisition cycle runs, they are
classified as Unused Up or Unused Down ports. These ports are further moved to the Reclaim Unused
Up Ports report or Reclaim Unused Down Ports report.

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Reclaim Unused Down Ports Report
Campus Manager queries both link and access ports to generate the Unused Down report. It uses ports:
That are administratively down
and
That were previously connected to an endhost or a device but are unconnected at least for a period
of one day.
You can generate reports on ports which have been in Unused Down state for a specified interval of time.
Reclaim Unused Up Ports Report
Campus Manager queries both link and access ports to generate the Unused Up report. It uses ports:
That are administratively up
and
That were previously connected to an endhost or a device but are unconnected at least a day
You can generate reports on ports that have been in Unused Up state for a specified interval of time.
The data provided by the reports will be lost if you reinitialize the database. For information on
reinitializing the database, see Re-initializing the Database.
Note Reclaim Unused Up Ports and Reclaim Unused Down Ports reports are used to generate reports on both
link or access ports that were previously connected to an endhost or a device, but are unconnected at
least for a day.
Switch Port Summary Report
Switch Port Summary report gives the number of Connected, Free, and Free down ports in each switch.
Ports that are administratively up but are not connected to a device or endhost are Free Ports.
Ports that are administratively down and are not connected to a device or endhost are Free Down
ports.
This report also displays the sum total of Connected, Free and Free Down ports in each switch. This
report lists all the Down ports in a switch, regardless of whether they were previously connected to an
endhost or not.
The number for Connected, Free and Free Down ports are given as links. Clicking on them launches a
detailed report giving the Port, Port name, Administrative and Operational status of the ports for the
selected device.
For details on generating and viewing these reports, see Generating Switch Port Reports.

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Switch Port Capacity Report
The Switch Port Capacity report lists switches that have crossed utilization threshold limits, along with
the value of percentage port utilization. This report enables you to do capacity planning for network
growth.
Port Utilization for each switch is calculated as follows:
% Port Utilization (per switch) =(Number of Connected ports/ Total number of ports) * 100
Greater than option lists the switches whose port utilization is greater than the specified threshold.
Less than option lists the switches whose port utilization is less than the specified threshold.
Between option lists the switches whose port utilization falls between the specified threshold limits.
You can configure these reports as jobs, to get the list of switches that have crossed the threshold limits,
at regular intervals. For details on Configuring reports as jobs, see Generating Switch Port Reports.
Using Group Selector
Group Selector allows you to create report jobs based on device groups.The Group Selector displays
only the device groups that exist in the network and not the individual devices that form the group.
When a report job is created based on a device group, Campus Manager evaluates that group at the
time of running the job, and devices corresponding to that group are used in the report generation.
In case of devices being included or deleted from the group after scheduling the report job, the report
will reflect these changes, since Campus Manager dynamically evaluates the group information at the
time of running the report job.
For example, if you have
1. Created a User Defined Group, with devices ranging from 10.77.210.1 to 10.77.210.15.
2. Scheduled a Switch Port Summary report for this group.
3. Deleted Device 10.77.210.13 from the group.
When the report job runs at the scheduled time, the resultant report will not contain information on
10.77.210.13.
Group Selector is available for all Switch Port Reports and Switch Port Utilization History Report.
Generating Switch Port Reports
To view a report on Switch Port usage:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking > Reports.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select Switch Port Usage from the drop down list.
Step 4 Select one of the following from the sub-list:
Recently Down
Reclaim Unused Down Ports
Reclaim Unused Up Ports
Switch Port Summary
Switch Port Capacity

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The Report Generator page appears.
If you select the report for Switch Port Capacity, go to Step 5.
If you select the report for Unused Up Access Ports or Unused Down Access Ports, go to Step 6.
If you select either Recently Down or Switch Port Summary, go to Step 7.
Step 5 For Switch Port Capacity report, specify the percentage value of utilization and the condition indicator.
For example, select greater than and 90 from the drop down lists to generate a report on devices, where
port utilization exceeds 90%. The utilization percentage drop-down list is editable. It allows you to
specify a value, other than the ones listed.
Step 6 For Report on Unused Up Access Ports or Unused Down Access Ports, either:
Specify the number of days. The maximum number of days that can be specified is 999.
Or
Specify the date from which you want to generate the report.
For example, select 30 from theUnused for drop down list, to generate report for ports that are in
unused state for the past 30 days. The Unused for drop-down list is editable. It allows you to specify
a value, other than the ones listed.
Step 7 Select the device(s) from the Device Selector or Group Selector, for which you want to view the Port
information.
Step 8 Select the Run Type. It represents the periodic interval at which the report is generated. It can be one of
the following:
Immediate
Once
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Quarterly
Step 9 Schedule the report by selecting the date on which you want the report to be generated.
Step 10 Enter J ob Description and E-mail address, if any.
Step 11 Click Submit.
If the Run Type is Immediate, the report is generated.
For other Run Types the report job number is displayed. You can view the list of jobs in the Report J obs
page. For more details on this, see Viewing Report J obs List
Using Advanced Search
The Advanced Search feature in Device Selector helps you search for devices based on a set of search
criteria which you specify in the Advanced Search window. You can either select the search criteria from
the drop-down menu or enter Custom Search criteria in the Rule Text area, or use a combination of both.
When you enter the search criteria manually, you can use the Check Syntax button to verify whether the
Rule Expression you have entered is correct.
You can define single or multiple search criteria based on which you can search for devices. Table 7-25
describes the device attributes available for defining rules.

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Operator
The operator used in forming a rule. The following operators are available:
equals
contains
In addition to the above, the following operators are also available for the variable IPAddress:
startswith
endswith
contains
When the variable DiscoveryStatus is used, only one operator is available, which is equals.
Value
A free flow operand forming the last part of the rule.
When the variable DiscoveryStatus is used, only the following values are available:
Never_Reachable
Reachable
Currently_Unreachable
Table 7-25 Device Attribute Description
Attributes Description
DiscoveryStatus Status of the device after data collection has been completed.
Host name Name of the device.
ImageVersion Software version running on the device.
IPSubnet Subnet address of the device's IP address.
IPSubnetMask Subnet mask address of the device.
IPAddress Single IP AddressNot a range of addresses.
SysName Name of the device as configured by the Administrator.
SysObjectID SysObjectID of the device.
SystemContact Contact for the device details as entered by the Administrator.
SystemLocation Location of the device as entered by the Administrator.

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Interpreting Switch Port Capacity Report
Table 7-26 describes the columns of Switch Port Capacity Report:
For more details on this, see Switch Port Capacity Report
Interpreting Switch Port Usage Reports
The following reports have information as described in Table 7-27:
Reclaim Unused Up Ports
Reclaim Unused Down Ports
Recently Down ports
Detailed Report on Connected Ports, Free ports and Free Down Ports
Table 7-26 Switch Port Capacity Report
Field Description
Device Name Name of the device displayed as link. Upon clicking the link, it
launches CiscoWorks Device Center where you can perform
device-centric activities.
IP Address IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address) of the device displayed as link.
Upon clicking the link, it launches CiscoWorks Device Center
where you can perform device-centric activities.
Usage (%) Usage of ports in the device, displayed as a percentage. This is the
ratio between the connected ports and the total number of ports.
Click the Usage link to view a detailed report of all ports in the
device.
Connected Ports/Total Ports Actual number of Connected Ports and actual number of total ports
in the device.
Table 7-27 Switch Port Usage Report
Field Description
Port Port or interface of the device.
Port Name User assigned port name (port label)
Operating Status Operating status of the port
Admin Status Administrative status of the port
Last Used (For Reports on
Unused Up and Unused Down
Ports)
Date and time when the port was last used.

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Switch Port Capacity Report
This report has three sections:
Connected Ports
The ports that are administratively UP and are connected to a device will be listed here.
Free Ports
The Ports that are administratively UP but are not connected to a device will be listed here.
Free Down Ports
The ports that are administratively down will be listed here.
Interpreting Summary Report for Switch Ports
The Switch Port Summary Report displays the details given in Table 7-28.
Understanding History Report
History reports help you to track the log in and log out information about the end hosts and the users in
your network.
They provide information about the end hosts that were connected to and disconnected from each switch
port. History Reports can also track the various users who logged in and out of the end hosts.
You can generate History reports to understand the utilization of switch ports. These reports help you to
estimate the usage of ports and devices. You can also generate the reports based on the username of the
host, MAC address, IP address, and device name. History reports also display all active wireless clients,
which are connected to your network.
Table 7-28 Summary Report Field/Column Description
Field/Column Description
Device Name Name of the device displayed as link. Upon clicking the link, it
launches CiscoWorks Device Center where you can perform
device-centric activities.
IP Address IP Address of the device displayed as link. Upon clicking the link,
it launches CiscoWorks Device Center where you can perform
device-centric activities.
Connected Ports Number of ports that are connected to a device/endhost.
Click the number to view the details on the ports.
Free Ports Number of ports that are administratively up but are not connected
to any device/endhost.
Click the number to view the details on the ports.
Free Down Ports Number of ports that are administratively down and are not
connected to any device/endhost.
Click the number to view the details on the ports.
Total Ports Total number of ports in that device (Sum of Connected, Free and
Free Down ports).

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This section contains:
Viewing History Reports for Switch Port Utilization
Interpreting History Reports for Switch Ports
History Reports Based on Filters
Interpreting End Host History Reports
Viewing History Reports for Switch Port Utilization
History Report for Switch Port Utilization helps you to view the log in and log out of end hosts for a set
of selected devices.
To view the User Tracking history report for switch port utilization:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking > Reports > Report Generator.
Step 2 Select History from the Select an Application drop down menu on the left, in the Report Generator
window.
Step 3 Select Switch Port Utilization from the Select a Report drop down menu on the right, in the Report
Generator window.
Step 4 Select the devices from Device Selector or the device groups from the Group Selector. For details on
Group Selector, see Using Group Selector.
Step 5 Specify the period for which you need the report in the Period area.
You must specify the start and end dates, which defines the period for which User Tracking must
generate the report.
If you enter the same value for start and end dates, the application displays an error message.
Step 6 Select a Run type from the drop down menu, in the Scheduling area to schedule the report generator
according to your requirement.
You can schedule it for generating the report immediately, once, daily, weekly, monthly or quarterly. If
you choose to generate the report immediately, go to Step 10.
Step 7 Set the date and time for generating the report, in the Scheduling area.
Step 8 Enter a description to identify this job in the J ob Description field.
Step 9 Enter a valid e-mail ID in the Email field, of the J ob Info area, to receive the report through mail.
Step 10 Click Submit to generate the report or click Reset to modify the values that you have entered.

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Interpreting History Reports for Switch Ports
The Report lists each switch with its ports and the usage time in hours.
Table 7-29 describes the entries in the History Report for switch ports.
Click the usage time value for a port. The History Report for that port appears.
History Reports Based on Filters
You can view the log in and log out information of the end hosts, by querying the database. To do this
use username, MAC address, IP address, or device name. Report Generator in User Tracking helps you
to view a report on the history of the end hosts.
Note Running Immediate Report on a large amount of data will take a long time to complete. We recommend
that you run it as a Scheduled J ob.
To generate the reports on the log in and log out:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking > Reports > Report Generator.
Step 2 Select History from the Select an Application drop down menu on the left, in the Report Generator
window.
Step 3 Select End Host History from the Select a Report drop down menu on the right, in the Report Generator
window.
Step 4 Select the filter value from the Column drop down menu.
The filter can be any one of the following:
Username
MAC Address can filtered using only a hyphen as a separator. It does not support dot (.) or colon (:)
as a separator.
IP Address
Device Name
Step 5 Select the variable option from the Operator drop down menu, to link the device credential with the
value you want to enter.
Step 6 Enter the filter value in the Value text box field, for which you want to generate the report.
Apart from specific values, blank space and * can also be given.
Step 7 Specify the period for which you need the report in the Selection Criteria area.
You must specify the start date, start time and end date, end time. These dates define the period for which
User Tracking must generate the report.
Table 7-29 Switch Port Utilization Report Field Description
Field Description
Port Lists the names of the ports in the switch.
Usage Time (Hrs, Mins & Sec) Duration of time for which the port is connected to a host or
utilized.

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Step 8 Select Run Type from the drop down menu, in the Scheduling area to schedule the report generator
according to your requirement.
You can schedule it for generating the report immediately, once, daily, weekly, monthly or quarterly. If
you choose to generate the report immediately, go to Step 12.
Step 9 Set the date and time for generating the report, in the Scheduling area.
Step 10 Enter a description to identify this job, in the J ob Description field, of the J ob Info area.
Step 11 Enter a valid e-mail ID in the Email field, of the J ob Info area.
Step 12 Click Submit to generate the report or click Reset to modify the values that you have entered.
Interpreting End Host History Reports
Table 7-30 describes the entries in the History Report.
Printing End Host History Reports
You can print only 30,000 records at a time. If you want to print more than 30,000 records, do it in
batches of 30,000.
Comma separated values are not accepted in the print range. For example, specifying the range as 10-40,
70-80 will not work. Specify the range as 10-40 to print from the 10th record to the 40th record. Repeat
it for the 70-80 range.
Table 7-30 End Host History Report Field Description
Column Description
User Name Discovered username or the username that you have entered.
MAC Address Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card in
end-user node.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
IP Address IP address of the host.
Device IP address of the device to which the host was connected.
Port Port name in device to which the host was connected.
VLAN VLAN name associated to the port
Port Connect Date and time when the host or user was connected to the port. Port
Connect is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.
Port Disconnect Date and time when the host or user was disconnected from the
port. Port Disconnect is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy
hh:mm:ss.

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Using Custom Reports
You can customize the layout and columns displayed in the reports to suit your needs.
For example, you can design a layout that displays only the MAC addresses of hosts on your network.
You can create, view, edit, copy, and delete user-defined reports for end hosts and IP phones using the
Custom Reports option.
This section contains:
Viewing List of Custom Reports
Creating Custom Reports
Editing Custom Reports
Copying Custom Reports
Deleting Custom Reports
Viewing List of Custom Reports
You can view the list of Custom reports using the Custom Reports option in the Reports tab of the
Campus Manager User Tracking window.
To view the list of Custom reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Reports.
The Custom Reports dialog box appears with the list of Available Reports.
Creating Custom Reports
You can create Custom reports by clicking Create in the Available Custom Reports dialog box.
To create Custom reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Reports.
The Custom Reports dialog box appears with the list of Available Reports.
Step 3 Click Create.
You can use the Custom Reports wizard to customize and create reports. The Type selection page
appears.
Step 4 Select the type of devices for which you need the report, from:
End HostContains all the devices managed by Campus Manager , including IP phones.
IP PhonesContains only the IP phones managed by Campus Manager .

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Step 5 Click Next.
The Group Selection page appears.
Step 6 Select the devices from the Group Selection box.
Step 7 Click Next.
The Properties and Query Expression page appears. See Table 7-31.
Step 8 Click View to launch the report and view details.
Step 9 Click Next.
The Summary page appears. The Custom Report Summary pane displays a summary of the values and
options you have selected for the query to generate the report.
Table 7-31 Properties and Query Pane Field Description
Field Description
Name Enter a name for the query you are going to create.
Description Enter a description for the query you are going to create.
Select a type
Simple
Advanced
Select the type of query.
Simple
In the Query Expression area, select the radio button to search using any of the options
or all the options that you select.
Select the options for the query, from:
ColumnSelect a query expression based on which you want to generate the
report.
OperatorSelect a logical operator for the query expression.
PatternEnter a pattern for the selected query expression. The pattern field to
search the pattern for MAC Address Column is enhanced to include the following
separators: dot (.) or colon (:). You can also search the pattern for MAC Address
without any separators.
For example: String for pattern FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF can be replaced with
continuous string FFFFFFFFFFFF.
Advanced
You can enter the query string in the Query Text area. Click Check Syntax to validate
the query string.
Select the options to create the query string, from the Query Expression area.
You can choose the sort criteria and add the string for them.
To query using the Last Seen option, you must enter the date in the format yyyy/mm/dd
hh:mm:ss. For more details on operator values and date formats, see Operator Values and
Date Formats for Last Seen Column.

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Editing Custom Reports
You can edit custom reports by clicking Edit in the Available Custom Reports dialog box.
To edit Custom reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Reports.
The Custom Reports dialog box appears with the list of Available Reports.
Step 3 Select a report and click Edit.
You can use the Custom Reports wizard to modify group, report properties, and query expressions.
Copying Custom Reports
You can copy Custom reports by clicking Copy in the Available Custom Reports dialog box.
To copy Custom reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Reports.
The Custom Reports dialog box appears with the list of Available Reports.
Step 3 Select a report and click Copy.
You can use the Custom Reports wizard to modify the Name of the report, group, report properties, and
query expressions.
Deleting Custom Reports
You can delete Custom reports by selecting a report from the Available Custom Reports dialog box and
clicking Delete.
To delete Custom reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Reports.
The Custom Reports dialog box appears with the list of Available Reports.
Step 3 Select a report, and click Delete.

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Using Custom Layouts
You can create or customize the columns displayed in Custom Reports using Custom Layouts option in
the Reports tab of Campus Manager User Tracking window. This section contains:
Viewing List of Custom Layouts
Creating Custom Layouts
Editing Custom Layouts
Copying Custom Layouts
Deleting Custom Layouts
Viewing List of Custom Layouts
You can view the list of Custom layouts using the Custom Layouts option in the Reports tab of the
Campus Manager User Tracking window.
To view the list of Custom layouts:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Layouts.
The Custom Layouts dialog box appears with the list of Available Layouts.
Note Standard layouts are available after a fresh install. You can edit the standard layouts. However, you
cannot delete them.
Creating Custom Layouts
You can create Custom layouts by clicking Create in the Available Custom Layouts dialog box.
To create Custom layouts:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Layouts.
The Custom Layouts dialog box appears with the list of Available Layouts.
Step 3 Click Create.
Step 4 Select the type of report for which you want to create the layout.
Step 5 Select the columns that you want displayed in the report from the Available Sources list.
Step 6 Use the Up and Down arrow keys to arrange the columns in the order in which you want them displayed.
Step 7 Click Add to add the selected columns to the Selected Sources list.

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Step 8 Specify the Name and Description of the customized layout.
Step 9 Click OK.
Editing Custom Layouts
You can edit Custom layouts by clicking Edit in the Available Custom Layouts dialog box.
To edit Custom reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Layouts.
The Custom Layouts dialog box appears with the list of Available Layouts.
Step 3 Click Edit.
Step 4 Select the columns that you want displayed in the report from the Available Sources list.
Step 5 Click Add to add the selected columns to the Selected Sources list.
Step 6 Select the columns that you want removed from the Selected Sources list.
Step 7 Click Remove to remove these fields from the customized layout.
Step 8 Specify the Description of the customized layout.
Step 9 Click OK.
Note Editing Standard Layout columns is seen only in Device Center and external applications. They are not
seen in UT jobs.
Copying Custom Layouts
You can copy Custom layouts by clicking Copy in the Available Custom Layouts dialog box.
To copy Custom layouts:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Layouts.
The Custom Layouts dialog box appears with the list of Available Layouts.
Step 3 Click Copy.
Step 4 Select the columns that you want displayed in the report from the Available Sources list.
Step 5 Click Add to add the selected columns to the Selected Sources list.
Step 6 Select the columns that you want removed from the Selected Sources list.
Step 7 Click Remove to remove these fields from the customized layout.

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Step 8 Specify the Name and Description of the customized layout.
Step 9 Click OK.
Deleting Custom Layouts
You can delete Custom layouts by selecting a layout from the Available Custom Layouts dialog box and
clicking Delete. To delete Custom layouts:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Custom Layouts.
The Custom Layouts dialog box appears with the list of Available Layouts.
Step 3 Select the layout that you want to delete and click Delete.
Using Archived Reports
Reports are archived after the completion of a J ob. You can view and delete archived reports using the
Archives option in the Reports tab of Campus Manager User Tracking window. This section contains:
Viewing Archived Reports List
Viewing Reports
Deleting Archived Reports
Viewing Archived Reports List
You can view a list of archived reports using the Reports Archive option. To view a list of archived
reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Archives.
The Archives dialog box appears with the list of archived reports.

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Viewing Reports
Campus Manager generates various reports. You can view them using:
The Report Generator option in the Reports tab of Campus Manager User Tracking window (See
Using the Report Generator Option)
The Report J obs option in the Reports tab of Campus Manager User Tracking window (See Using
the Report J obs Option)
The Archives options in the Reports tab of Campus Manager User Tracking window (See Using the
Archives Option)
The Device Center feature of CiscoWorks and selecting a report pertaining to the device (See Using
the Device Center)
Using the Report Generator Option
You can schedule jobs for generating reports. To do so:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Report > Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select an application and a relevant report that you want to view
Step 4 Click Submit.
The report is generated.
Using the Report Jobs Option
You can view reports for the jobs that you have scheduled. To do so:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports >Reports Jobs.
The Report J obs dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select the job for which you want to view the report and click View.

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Using the Archives Option
Reports are archived after the completion of a J ob. You can view a list of archived reports. To do so:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports >Archives.
The Archives dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select the report that you want to view and click View.
Using the Device Center
You can view a report pertaining to a specific device. To do so:
Step 1 Go to the LMS Portal and select Device Troubleshooting >Device Center.
The Device Center window appears.
Step 2 Go to the Device Selector field and either:
Enter the IP address or name of the device you want to select and click Go.
Or
Select a device from the device groups.
The Campus Manager reports available for the selected device are displayed under the Reports column
in the Functions Available area.
Step 3 Click the report that you would like to view
Details of Individual Reports
Table 7-18 gives details of the columns in End Hosts Report - Standard Layout
Table 7-22 gives details of the columns in IP Phones Report - Standard Layout
Table 7-19 gives details of the columns in End Hosts Report - All Columns Layout
Table 7-23 gives details of the columns in the IP Phones Report - All Columns Layout.
Table 7-27 gives details of the columns in Switch Port Usage Report.

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Integrating CiscoWorks WLSE
Deleting Archived Reports
You can delete an archived report by selecting the report from the list of archived reports and clicking
Delete.
To delete an archived report:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Reports > Archives.
The Archives dialog box appears with the list of archived reports.
Step 3 Select the report that you want to delete and click Delete.
Integrating CiscoWorks WLSE
The CiscoWorks Wireless LAN Solution Engine (WLSE) is a management component of Cisco
Structured Wireless-Aware Network solution (SWAN) that provides a centralized, systems-level
solution for managing the entire Cisco Aironet WLAN infrastructure.
Integrating WLSE with Campus Manager , provides you a single integrated view and support for
wireless end hosts, in addition to the wired end hosts and Voice over IP (VoIP) phones that are already
supported in User Tracking.
Viewing Reports on Wireless Clients
You can view the User Tracking Wireless report for the devices managed by Campus with WLSE
integrated. The report is viewed using the Wireless End Hosts option in the Reports Generator dialog
box.
To view report on wireless end hosts:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > User Tracking > Reports.
The Campus Manager User Tracking window appears.
Step 2 Select Report Generator.
The Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 3 Select Wireless End Hosts from the Select Application list.
Step 4 Select All Wireless Entries, from the Select Report list.
Step 5 Schedule the report by selecting Run Type and the date on which you want the report to be generated.
Step 6 Enter a description to identify this job, in the J ob Description field, of the J ob Info area.

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Step 7 Enter a valid e-mail ID in the Email field, of the J ob Info area, to receive the report through mail.
Step 8 Click Submit to generate the report or Reset to modify the values that you have entered.
If you click Submit, the Wireless LAN Report window appears.
Interpreting Reports on Wireless Clients
Table 7-32 displays details of the columns in Wireless LAN Report.
Table 7-32 Wireless LAN Report Field Description
Column Description
User Name Discovered username or the username that you have entered.
Host Name Name of end host.
MAC Address Media Access Control (MAC) address of network interface card in
end-user node.
For Ethernet topology the MAC address is displayed in the format,
xx-xx-xx-xx-xx-xx.
Host Address IP address of the end host.
AP Name Name of the access point.
AP Address IP address of the access point.
VLAN VLAN to which the end host belongs.
SSID Service Set Identifiers (SSIDs) on the access point
Client Role Type of the role of a wireless client.
Client station, repeater access point, access point, bridge host,
bridge, root bridge, and ethernet client are the different types of
roles.
Dot1x Authenticated State of the 802.1x authentication. Shows whether the device is
802.1x authenticated or not.
802.11 Associated State of the 802.11 association. Shows whether the device is 802.1x
associated or not.
Last Seen Date and time when User Tracking last found an entry for this user
or host. Last Seen is displayed in the format dd mon yyyy hh:mm:ss.

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User Tracking Command Line Interface
User Tracking Command Line Interface
You can run User Tracking commands from the command line in Solaris and Windows 2000.
Enter ut -cli options -u username -p password.
The options can be one or more of those shown in Table 7-33.
Use the -prompt command if you do not want to enter your password from the command line. Using
-prompt prevents other users from running ps and seeing your password.
The -host option is required when you run the cli command on a remote Campus Manager Server.
Table 7-33 User Tracking CLI Commands
Option Arguments Function
-prompt No keywords or
arguments.
This command is required if you do not enter your
password from the command line.
If -prompt is specified, User Tracking prompts you to
enter your password.
-help No keywords or
arguments.
Prints the command line usage.
-ping {enable | disable} Enables the Ping Sweep option so that the ANI Server
pings every IP address on known subnets before
discovery. The default is the last setting used.
For more details, see Modifying Ping Sweep Options.
User Tracking does not perform Ping Sweep on large
subnets, for example, subnets containing Class A and B
addresses.
Hence, ARP cache might not have some IP addresses
and the User Tracking may not display the IP addresses.
In larger subnets, the ping process leads to numerous
ping responses that might increase the traffic on your
network and result in extensive use of network
resources.
To perform Ping Sweep on larger subnets, you can:
Configure a higher value for the ARP cache
time-out on the routers.
To configure the value, you must use the
arp time-out interface configuration
command on devices running Cisco IOS.
Use any external software, which will enable you to
ping the host IP addresses.
This ensures that when you run User Tracking
Acquisition, the ARP cache of the router contains
the IP addresses.

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-performMajorAcquisition No keywords or
arguments.
Acquires data about all users and hosts on the network
and updates the Campus Manager database.
This option starts an acquisition but does not wait for it
to complete.
-query This option takes one of
the following
arguments:
Queries the Campus Manager database and updates the
User Tracking table.
all Gets all User Tracking entries. Similar to All Host
Entries/simple query in the GUI.
name Runs the named advanced/simple query, created earlier
in the GUI.
dupMAC Finds duplicate MAC addresses.
dupIP Finds duplicate IP addresses.
hub Finds ports with multiple MAC addresses (hubs).
-queryPhone all Gets all IP Phone entries.
name Runs the named advanced query, created earlier in the
GUI.
-layout layout_name Uses the specified main table layout while performing a
query to fetch User Tracking display entries.
-layoutPhone layout_name Uses the specified IP phone table layout while
performing a query to fetch IP phone display entries.
-host ANI Server device name
or IP Address
Specifies the host name or IP address of the Campus
Manager Server.
Use this argument when you need to run the cli
command on a remote Campus Manager Server.
-port ANI Server web port
number
Specifies the web server port number of the ANI Server.
The default is 1741.
-export filename Exports data to a text file.
You must first specify the -query option to fetch the
data that you want to export.
-import filename Imports lost or deleted UserName and Notes fields from
the last exported file.
-importMACToAcceptableOUI filename Imports MACs and converts them to OUI and adds the
MACs to the Acceptable OUI List.
For example:
cd NMSROOT/bin ut -cli
-importMACToAcceptableOUI filename -u username
-p password
-stat No keywords or
arguments.
Displays statistical information, such as time of last
acquisition, acquisition status, number of records in the
User Tracking database, and so on.
Table 7-33 User Tracking CLI Commands (continued)
Option Arguments Function

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For details on Importing User Tracking Data through CLI, see Importing User Tracking Data
For details on Lookup Analyzer Script, see Using Lookup Analyzer Utility
-debug No keywords or
arguments.
Enables trace and debug messages for the User Tracking
client application.
-wireless No keywords or
arguments.
Displays detailed information on Wireless clients
connected to the network.
If you enter this option along with the export option,
data can be exported to a text file.
For example:
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli -wireless -export
c:/sample -u username -p password
-switchPortCapacity For complete details on this, see Exporting Switch Port Usage Report.
-switchPortreclaimreport For complete details on this, see Exporting Switch Port Usage Report
-switchPortSummary For complete details on this, see Exporting Switch Port Usage Report
Table 7-33 User Tracking CLI Commands (continued)
Option Arguments Function

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Exporting Switch Port Usage Report
Switch Port Capacity report lists switches whose utilization percentage falls in the specified range.
Switch Port Reclaim reports lists:
Ports that are administratively up/down
and
Ports that were previously connected to an endhost or a device but are unconnected at least for a
period of one day.
Switch port usage reports can be generated from the command prompt as given in Table 7-34:
Table 7-34 Switch Port Reports from the Command Prompt
Purpose Command
Switch Port Capacity Report
To generate reports where the utilization is
less than the specified percentage (for all
devices managed by Campus)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortCapacity lessthan 60 -devices all
-export c:/sample -u username -p password
To generate reports where the utilization is
less than the specified percentage (for
specific devices)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortCapacity lessthan 60 -devices
10.77.2.1,10.77.3.4,10.77.5.6 -export c:/sample -u
username -p password
To generate reports where the utilization is
greater than the specified percentage (for all
devices managed by Campus)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortCapacity greaterthan 60 -devices all
-export c:/sample -u username -p password
To generate reports where the utilization is
greater than the specified percentage (for
specific devices)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortCapacity greaterthan 60 -devices
10.77.2.1,10.77.3.4,10.77.5.6 -export c:/sample -u
username -p password
To generate reports where the utilization falls
between the specified range (for all devices
managed by Campus)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortCapacity between 10 60 -devices all
-export c:/sample -u username -p password
To generate reports where the utilization falls
between the specified range (for specific
devices)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortCapacity between 10 60 -devices
10.77.2.1,10.77.3.4,10.77.5.6 -export c:/sample -u
username -p password

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where NMSROOT is the directory where you installed CiscoWorks.
Note The above commands can be run in a Solaris machine. To run the same commands in Windows, replace
all forward slash (/) with reverse slash (\).
The report generated by the above options is saved as a file in the CSV format, at the specified location.
For more details on Switch Port Usage reports, see Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports
Switch Port Reclaim Report Generates reports for unused ports that are in up or
down state.
To generate Reclaim Unused Up Ports report
(for all devices managed by Campus)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortReclaimReport type up days 2
-devices all -export c:/sample -u username -p
password
To generate Reclaim Unused Up Ports report
(for specific devices)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortReclaimReport type up days 2
-devices 10.77.1.2,10.77.3.4 -export c:/sample -u
username -p password
To generate Reclaim Unused Down Ports
report (for all devices managed by Campus)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortReclaimReport type down days 2
-devices all -export c:/sample -u username -p
password
To generate Reclaim Unused Down Ports
report (for specific devices)
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortReclaimReport type down days 2
-devices 10.77.1.2,10.77.3.4 -export c:/sample -u
username -p password
Switch Port Summary Report Generates reports that gives the number of Connected,
Free, and Free down ports in each switch.
To generate Switch Port Summary report for
all devices
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortSummary -devices all -export
c:/sample -u username -p password
To generate Switch Port Summary report for
select devices
NMSROOT/campus/bin ut -cli
-switchPortSummary -devices 10.77.1.2,10.77.3.4
-export c:/sample -u username -p password
Table 7-34 Switch Port Reports from the Command Prompt
Purpose Command

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Importing User Tracking Data
You can import User Tracking data from previous releases of Campus Manager into the current database.
The data from the old database, has to be exported into files as Comma Separated or Tab Separated
values, through the Command Line Interface (CLI). It is mandatory to have the field MAC Address in
the exported file.
To import data:
Step 1 Place the exported files under the directory:
NMSROOT/campus/ etc/cwsi
where NMSROOT is the directory where you have installed CiscoWorks.
Step 2 Run the command:
NMSROOT/campus/bin/utupgrade.pl import_filename
The data is imported.
Note Support for importing data, from the User Interface (UI) exported file is not provided in this release.
Using Lookup Analyzer Utility
Lookup Analyzer is an utility used to analyze the performance of DNS servers and provide the following
information:
DNS Server Efficiency for each DNS Server
Overall Summary of DNS Servers
Namelookup related settings in ut.properties file
Issues found and recommendations to overcome them
For Solaris:
The utility file is NMSROOT/campus/bin/LookupAnalyzer.sh
If dir is the directory where the file is present, run the following command to run the utility:
dir#./LookupAnalyzer
For Windows:
The utility file is NMSROOT\campus\bin\LookupAnalyzer.bat
If dir is the directory where the file is present, run the following command to run the utility:
dir>LookupAnalyzer

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Example output of the Lookup Analyzer script:
Host IP: 172.20.123.74, DNS Server: 64.104.76.247, Time taken: 35, Status: FAILURE
Host IP: 172.20.123.74, DNS Server: WINS, Time taken: 22, Status: FAILURE
Host IP: 10.77.209.254, DNS Server: 64.104.128.248, Time taken: 18, Status: FAILURE
..
..
DNS Server : 64.104.128.248
Success Count: 12
Failure Count: 76
Failure % : 86 %
Total Time : 1 secs 561 ms
Min Time : 0 ms
Max Time : 52 ms
Avg Time : 17 ms
Server Efficiency(successCount/totalTime): 7.0
--------------------------------
DNS Server : 64.104.76.247
Success Count: 0
Failure Count: 76
Failure % : 100 %
Total Time : 2 secs 729 ms
Min Time : 0 ms
Max Time : 61 ms
Avg Time : 35 ms
Server Efficiency(successCount/totalTime): 0.0
--------------------------------
DNS Server : WINS
Success Count: 0
Failure Count: 76
Failure % : 100 %
Total Time : 750 ms
Min Time : 0 ms
Max Time : 23 ms
Avg Time : 9 ms
Server Efficiency(successCount/totalTime): 0.0
--------------------------------
Overall Summary
-----------------
Success Count: 12
Failure Count: 76
Failure % : 86 %
-----------------
Current Namelookup Related Settings
---------------------------------
UTMajorUseDNSSeperateThread: false
UT.nameResolution: both
UT.nameResolution.threadCount: 1
UT.nameResolution.winsTimeout: 2000
UT.nameResolution.threadThresholdPercentage: 10
UT.nameResolution.dnsTimeout: 2000
UTMajorUseDNSCache: false
nameserver.usednsForUT: true
DB.dsn: ani
---------------------------------
ISSUES/RECOMMENDATIONS
-----------------------
Issue #1: Failure Percent is greater than 20%
Recommendation: Check all DNS/WINS entries and ensure proper hostnames are configured
Issue #2: DNS reverse lookup is NOT done as separate process
Recommendation: Enable UTMajorUseDNSSeperateThread=true in ut.properties
Issue #3: Name Resolution DNS server order is not optimal

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Understanding UTLite
Recommendation: Change dns server order as 64.104.128.248=7.0, 64.104.76.247=0.0,
WINS=0.0,
Other Recommendations:
* If hostnames in your network are less likely to change often, set
UTMajorUseDNSCache=true
* If reverse lookup failure % is more, try increasing UT.nameResolution.winsTimeout,
UT.nameResolution.dnsTimeout and UT.nameResolution.threadThresholdPercentage
* Optimal timeout values are: UT.nameResolution.winsTimeout=0,
UT.nameResolution.dnsTimeout=48
The script can also be run by setting properties in the ut.properties file. For details, see Configuring User
Tracking Properties from the Backend.
Understanding UTLite
UTLite is a utility that allows you to collect user names from Primary Domain Controllers, Active
Directory, and Novell servers.
To do this you need to install UTLite in the Windows Primary Domain Controllers and in the Novell
servers. You can also install UTLite in an Active Directory server.
UTLite sends traps to Campus Manager whenever a user logs in or logs out. UTLite traps are processed
by Campus Manager at the rate of 150 traps per second, with a default buffer size of 76800.
If you need a higher trap processing rate, say 300 traps per second, increase the buffer size to 102400.
To increase the buffer size:
Step 1 Enter pdterm UTLITE at the command line to stop the UTLite process.
Step 2 Open utliteuhic.properties located at
NMSROOT\campus\lib\classpath\com\cisco\nm\cm\ut\uhic\utlite\properties\
Step 3 Set Socket.portbuffersize=102400
Step 4 Enter pdexec UTLITE at the command line to start the UTLite process.
Caution Increasing the buffer size beyond 102400 results in performance degradation of UTLite.
To receive UTLITE events:
Step 1 Open utliteuhic.properties located at
NMSROOT\campus\lib\classpath\com\cisco\nm\cm\ut\uhic\utlite\properties\
Step 2 Change the property of URTlite state by changing the value from "URTlite.state=disable" to
"URTlite.state=enable".
Or

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You can change the property of URTlite state by launching Campus Manager. Select the Acquisition
Settings option from User Tracking > Administration > Acquisition. The Acquisition Settings page
appears. In the Acquisition Settings page, check the Get user names from hosts in NT and NDS domains
and click Apply.
The UTLite script is supported on these platforms:
Windows NT
Windows 2000
Windows XP
Windows 2003
Windows Vista
Novell Directory Services (NDS)
The UTLite script is not supported on these UNIX hosts:
Solaris
HP-UX
AIX
This section contains:
Installing UTLite Script on Active Directory
Installing UTLite Script on Windows
Installing UTLite Script on NDS
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From Windows
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From Active Directory
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From NDS

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Installing UTLite Script on Active Directory
You must install the UTLite script on the Active Directory server and update the servers logon script to
get user logon information from Active Directory hosts.
You must have Administrator privileges on the Active Directory server to install the UTLite logon script.
To install the script:
Step 1 Copy the required files to the Active Directory server:
a. Log into the Active Directory server as Administrator.
b. Obtain the UTLite files from the Server Configuration:
NMSROOT\campus\bin\UTLite33.exe
NMSROOT\campus\bin\UTLiteNT.bat
where NMSROOT is the directory in which you installed CiscoWorks.
c. Copy the UTLiteNT.bat and UTLite33.exe files into the NETLOGON folder.
NETLOGON is located at:
%SystemRoot%\sysvol\sysvol\domain DNS name\scripts,
where %SystemRoot% is usually c:\winnt and domain DNS name is the DNS name of the domain
Step 2 Edit the UTLiteNT.bat file:
a. Open the UTLiteNT.bat file.
b. Locate the following line and replace domain and ipaddress with the domain name of the Windows
domain controller and IP address of the computer running the Campus Manager server:
start %WINDIR%\UTLite33 -domain domain -host ipaddress -port 16236
If port 16236 is already in use, enter a different number. This port number must match the number
that you entered in the Use Port Number field, in the User Tracking > Administration >
Acquisition > Acquisition Settings page.
For more details, see Modifying Acquisition Settings.
Step 3 Edit the logon script files to run the UTLiteNT.bat file when users log into the network by adding this
line:
UTLiteNT.bat
Step 4 Update the domain controller's logon script for each Windows domain that you add.
The first time users log into the network after you edit this script, UTLite33.exe is copied to the local
WINDIR directory on their Windows client system.

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Installing UTLite Script on Windows
You must install the UTLite script on the primary domain controller and update the domain controller's
logon script to get user logon information from Windows hosts. Do this once for each domain.
You must have Administrator privileges on the primary domain controller to install the UTLite logon
script. To install the script:
Step 1 Copy the required files to the primary Windows domain controller:
a. Log into the Windows primary domain controller as Administrator.
b. Obtain the UTLite files from the Server Configuration:
C:\Program Files\CSCOpx\campus\bin\UTLite33.exe
C:\Program Files\CSCOpx\campus\bin\UTLiteNT.bat
where C:\Program Files\ is the directory in which you installed CiscoWorks.
c. Copy the UTLiteNT.bat and UTLite33.exe files into the NETLOGON folder.
NETLOGON is located at
%SYSTEMROOT%\system32\Repl\Import\Scripts,
where, SYSTEMROOT% is the root directory for the Windows operating system files.
Step 2 Edit UTLiteNT.bat file.
a. Open the UTLiteNT.bat file.
b. Locate the following line and replace domain and ipaddress with the domain name of the Windows
domain controller and IP address of the computer running the Campus Manager Server:
start %WINDIR%\UTLite33 -domain domain -host ipaddress -port 16236
If port 16236 is already in use, enter a different number. This port number must match the number
that you entered in the Use Port Number field, in the User Tracking > Administration >
Acquisition > Acquisition Settings page.
For more details, see Modifying Acquisition Settings.
Step 3 Edit the logon scripts. Edit users' logon script files to run the UTLiteNT.bat file when users log into the
network by adding this line:
UTLiteNT.bat
Step 4 Update the domain controller's logon script for each Windows domain that you add.
The first time users log into the network after you edit this script, UTLite33.exe is copied to the local
WINDIR directory on their Windows client system.

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Installing UTLite Script on NDS
You must install the UTLite script on the Novell Server and update the domain controller's logon script,
to get user logon information from Windows hosts. You only need to do this once for each domain.
You must have ZenWorks installed and running on the Novell Server, and you must be using NDS 5.0
or later.
To install the script:
Step 1 Copy the required files to the Novell Server.
Step 2 Log into the Novell Server as Administrator.
Step 3 Obtain the UTLite files from the CiscoWorks Server:
C:\Program Files\CSCOpx\campus\bin\UTLite33.exe
C:\Program Files\CSCOpx\campus\bin\UTLiteNDS.bat
where C:\Program Files\ is the directory in which you installed CiscoWorks.
Step 4 Create a folder in \\Novell Server Name\SYS\public and copy UTLiteNDS.bat and UTlite33.exe to the
folder.
Step 5 Edit the UTLiteNDS.bat file:
Step 6 Open the UTLiteNDS.bat file.
Step 7 Locate the following line and replace domain and ipaddress with the domain name of the Windows
domain controller and IP address of the computer running the Campus Manager server:
start %WINDIR%\UTLite33 -domain domain -host ipaddress -port 16236
If port 16236 is already in use, enter a different number. This port number must match the number that
you entered in the Use Port Number field, in User Tracking > Administration > Acquisition >
Acquisition Settings page.
For more details, see Modifying Acquisition Settings.
Step 8 Edit the logon scripts.
Step 9 Enter \\Novell_Server_Name\SYS\public\NaL.exe at the command prompt.
Step 10 Click NWAdmin32 to run the Novell Netware Administrator program.
Step 11 Right-click on the users or organizational units whose logon scripts you want to modify and select
Details.
Step 12 Click Login Script and enter:
@\\%FILE_SERVER%\sys\public\your_folder_name\UTLiteNDS.bat where your_folder_name is
the name of the folder you created in Step 1.

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Understanding UTLite
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From Windows
If you choose not to have Campus Manager server automatically collect user names, follow these
instructions to properly remove the UTLite scripts. To uninstall the script:
Step 1 Remove UTLiteNT.bat and UTLite33.exe files from each primary domain controller.
Step 2 Remove the call to run UTliteNT.bat from users' logon scripts.
Step 3 Delete UTLite33.exe from the WINDIR directory of all Windows clients.
To quickly locate the WINDIR directory, enter set windir from a command prompt window on each
client.
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From Active Directory
If you choose not to have Campus Manager server automatically collect user names, follow these
instructions to properly remove the UTLite scripts. To uninstall the script:
Step 1 Remove UTLiteNT.bat and UTLite33.exe files from each Active Directory server.
Step 2 Remove the call to run UTliteNT.bat from users' logon scripts.
Step 3 Delete UTLite33.exe from the WINDIR directory of all Windows clients.
To quickly locate the WINDIR directory, enter set windir from a command prompt window on each
client.
Uninstalling UTLite Scripts From NDS
If you choose not to have Campus Manager server automatically collect user names, you must perform
these steps to properly remove the UTLite scripts. To uninstall the script:
Step 1 Remove UTLiteNDS.bat and UTLite33.exe files from the Novell Server.
Step 2 Remove the line added to the login scripts for all users and organizational units.
Delete UTLite33.exe from the WINDIR directory of all clients.
To quickly locate the WINDIR directory, enter set windir from a command prompt window on each
client.

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User Tracking Utility
User Tracking Utility
CiscoWorks User Tracking Utility 1.1.1 is a Windows desktop utility that provides quick access to useful
information about users or hosts discovered by Campus Manager User Tracking application. This
section contains:
Understanding UTU 1.1.1
Hardware and Software Requirements for UTU 1.1.1
Downloading UTU 1.1.1
Installing UTU 1.1.1
Accessing UTU 1.1.1
Configuring UTU 1.1.1
Searching for Users or Hosts
Using Search Patterns
Uninstalling UTU 1.1.1
Upgrading to UTU 1.1.1
Understanding UTU 1.1.1
User Tracking Utility 1.1.1 (UTU 1.1.1) allows users with Help Desk access to search for users or hosts
discovered by Campus Manager User Tracking application. UTU comprises a server-side component
and a client utility.
To use UTU, Campus Manager must be installed and functioning on your machine, and accessible
through the network.
UTU 1.1.1 has the following additional features:
Support for silent installation mode for easy deployment.
Support for communication with Campus Manager server in Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) mode, as
well as Non SSL mode.
You can use the UTU search band to search for the Users/Hosts in your network. You can search using
user name, host name or IP address, or MAC address. The default search criteria is Searching by Host.

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Definitions
Table 7-35 explains certain terms and definitions used in User Tracking Utility.
Hardware and Software Requirements for UTU 1.1.1
Table 7-36 lists the minimum system requirements for UTU.
Downloading UTU 1.1.1
UTU requires CiscoWorksUserTrackingUtility1.1.1.exe file to be downloaded and installed.
To download UTU:
Step 1 Locate the file CiscoWorksUserTrackingUtility1.1.1.exe at:
http://www.cisco.com/cgi-bin/tablebuild.pl/cw2000-campus-crypto
Step 2 Save the file to a temporary directory on your system.
Table 7-35 Definitions
Term Definition
Host Any UNIX or Windows system discovered by User Tracking.
Host Name Name of the discovered host.
Campus Manager
Server
Host name or IP address of CiscoWorks server on which you have installed
Campus Manager.
Port Port number to which the host is connected.
Port number on which Campus Manager is running on the CiscoWorks
server.
Subnet Subnet to which the host belongs.
User Name Name of the user who has logged into the host.
Table 7-36 System Requirements
Requirement Type Minimum Requirements
System Hardware IBM PCcompatible computer with Intel Pentium processor.
System software Windows 2000 (Professional or Server) with Service Pack 4 or higher.
User Tracking Utility is not supported on Windows Vista software.
Memory (RAM) 128 MB
Additional required
software
Campus Manager 5.2
Network Connectivity Campus Manager 5.2 must be running and accessible through the network

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Installing UTU 1.1.1
UTU 1.1.1 supports installation in normal installation mode and silent installation mode.
To install UTU 1.1.1 in normal installation mode:
Step 1 Log into the system with local system administrator privileges.
Step 2 Navigate to the directory that contains CiscoWorksUserTrackingUtility1.1.1.exe.
Step 3 Double-click CiscoWorksUserTrackingUtility1.1.1.exe to begin installation.
The User Tracking Utility Welcome screen appears.
Step 4 Click Next.
The Choose Destination Location dialog box appears. By default, UTU is installed in the directory
C:\Program Files\CSCOutu.
Step 5 Click Next to install UTU in the default directory.
Or
a. Click Browse to choose a different directory and click OK.
b. Click Next to continue with the installation.
The Configure CiscoWorks Campus Manager Server Details dialog box appears.
Step 6 Enter the name or IP address of the server on which Campus Manager is installed.
Step 7 Enter the HTTP port number of the Campus Manager server.
The default port number is 1741.
Step 8 Click Next.
The following message appears:
Is CiscoWorks LMS Server SSL Enabled?
Step 9 Click Yes if the Campus Manager server is SSL enabled, otherwise, click No.
The Configure LMS Server Authentication dialog box appears. You can also configure these server
details after installation.
Step 10 Enter a valid CiscoWorks Campus Manager Server user name and password.
This is used to verify the validity of the user when searching for users or hosts.
Step 11 Confirm the password and click Next.
The Setup Complete dialog box appears.
Step 12 Click Finish to complete the installation.
User Tracking Utility 1.1.1 is installed at the destination location you specified in Step 5 above.
However, it does not create a program group under Start > Programs. To access the utility, see
Accessing UTU 1.1.1, page 7-102.
To install UTU in silent mode:
At the command prompt, enter:
exe-location\CiscoWorksUserTrackingUtility1.1.1.exe a s f1file-location\setup.iss

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where
exe-location is the directory where you have CiscoWorksUserTrackingUtility1.1.1.exe
file-location is the directory where you have the setup.iss file.
Do not use space after the -f1 option. Use the complete path for file-location.
For example:
If the install directory for UTU is C:\utu, enter the following at the command prompt:
c:\utu\CiscoWorksUserTrackingUtility1.1.1.exe -a -s -f1c:\utu\setup.iss
To configure the server information, modify the setup.iss file before running the silent install. Edit the
following fields:
[SdShowDlgEdit2-0]
szEdit1= hostname
szEdit2= server-port
Result=1
[AskYesNo-0]
Result=1 <1- SSL Enabled, 0 - SSL Disabled>
[SdShowDlgEdit3-0]
szEdit1=username
szEdit2=password
szEdit3=password
You cannot re-install UTU on a system that already has this application installed on it. You must check
for existing installations of UTU before beginning a fresh installation.
To confirm UTU installation on your system, right-click the taskbar and select Toolbars of your
machine. You can find User Search Band option in the popup menu.
Accessing UTU 1.1.1
To display the UTU desktop band on the taskbar:
Step 1 Right-click the taskbar of the machine on which you installed UTU.
Step 2 Select Toolbars > User Search Band, as shown in Figure 7-3.
Figure 7-3 Selecting the Toolbar
The UTU desktop band appears on the taskbar with the title User Information.

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Configuring UTU 1.1.1
You must configure UTU only if you want to change the Campus Manager server configurations that
you entered while installing UTU.
To configure UTU:
Step 1 Right-click the User Information search area on the taskbar of the machine on which you installed UTU.
A popup menu appears.
Step 2 Select Configure.
The CiscoWorks Campus Manager Server Configuration dialog box appears.
Step 3 Modify the settings as required.
Step 4 Click Enable SSL for communicating with an SSL enabled server.
The port number changes to 443, which is the default port for SSL. See Figure 7-4.
Figure 7-4 Enabling SSL
Step 5 Click OK to configure or Cancel to quit.
Searching for Users or Hosts
You can use UTU search band to search for the users or hosts in your network. You can search using user
name, host name or IP address, or MAC address. The default search criterion is host name or IP address
of the host.
To search for users or hosts:
Step 1 Enter host name or IP address in the User Information field on the taskbar of the machine.
The default search criterion is host name or IP address of the host. To customize this search criterion:
a. Right-click the Users Information search area.
A popup menu appears with the default search criterion Host/IP as selected.
b. Select User, Host/IP, or MAC Address from this popup menu.
The selected criterion is set for future searches until you change the criterion.

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Table 7-37 describes the search criteria in UTU 1.1.1.
Step 2 Enter any value related to user name, host name, IP address, or the MAC address in the User Information
field.
For example, you can enter 10.77.208* in the User Information field.
Step 3 Press Enter.
If your server is not SSL enabled, go to Step 6.
When you query for data from an SSL enabled server, the Certificate Viewer dialog box appears. See
Figure 7-5.
Figure 7-5 Certificate Viewer
Step 4 Click Details to view the certificate details.
You can verify the authenticity and correctness of the SSL server here. See Figure 7-6.
Table 7-37 Search Criteria in UTU
Search Criterion Description
User User name of the hosts in the network.
Host/IP Host name or IP address.
MAC Address MAC address of the hosts in the network.

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Figure 7-6 Certificate Details
Step 5 Click Yes in the Certificate Viewer dialog box to accept and store the certificate.
SSL connection is established with the server.
If you click No, the certificate is not stored and no connection is established with the server.
The Certificate Viewer dialog box appears only for the first time configuration. If you had clicked Yes
the first time, you are not prompted to store the certificate during subsequent sessions.
Step 6 Select an entry in the Select Entry popup box.
UTU displays the search results. This is a list of user names, host names, IP addresses, or MAC
addresses, in a Select Entry popup menu.
Step 7 Select Copy All to Clipboard in the Select Entry popup to copy the complete search result.
Another popup box appears with the details for that particular entry, as described in Table 7-38.
Table 7-38 Details for Each Entry in Select Entry Box
Entry Description
User Name User name of the user logged in to the host.
Host Name Name of the host discovered by User Tracking.
MAC Address MAC address of the host.
IP Address IP address of the host.
Subnet Subnet to which the host belongs.
Switch Device name or IP address of the switch.
Port Port number to which the host is connected.
Port State State of the port: Static or Dynamic.

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The search results for the value you enter in the User Information field depends on the default search
criterion.
Using Search Patterns
UTU searches for the user or hosts, which match the user name, host name or IP address, or MAC
address. You can search for users or hosts by entering a pattern. For example if you enter
Cisco, it displays users or hosts, where the user name or host name matches Cisco.
Cisco*, it displays users or hosts that begin with the word Cisco
10.77.208* , it displays host IP addresses that begin with 10.77.208.
Uninstalling UTU 1.1.1
Before you uninstall UTU 1.1.1, you must hide the UTU desktop band.
To do that, right-click the taskbar of the machine on which you installed UTU, and deselect User Search
Band in the Toolbars popup menu.
To uninstall UTU 1.1.1:
Step 1 Go to the Windows taskbar and select Start > Settings > Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs.
The Add/Remove Programs dialog box appears.
Step 2 Select CiscoWorks User Tracking Utility.
Step 3 Click Change/Remove.
The system prompts you to confirm uninstallation.
Step 4 Click Yes.
The Remove Programs From Your Computer dialog box appears.
Step 5 Either:
a. Click Yes
The shared DLL, and UTBand.dll files, are removed.
b. Click OK.
VLAN VLAN to which the port of the switch belongs.
Port Speed Bandwidth of the port of the switch.
Port Duplex Port Duplex configuration details on the device.
Last Seen Last time User Tracking discovered this host.
Copy to Clipboard Copies the entries and the details to clipboard.
Table 7-38 Details for Each Entry in Select Entry Box (continued)
Entry Description

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Or
a. Click No.
The uninstallation proceeds, but it does not completely uninstall UTU. To complete the
uninstallation process, you must:
b. Go to the command prompt and access the directory where you have installed UTU.
The default directory is C:\Program Files\CSCOutu.
Step 6 Enter regsvr32 /u UTBand.dll
The following message appears:
DLLUnregisterServer in UTBand.dll failed
Step 7 Click OK.
Step 8 Enter del UTBand.dll
This removes the UTU installation completely from the machine.
Step 9 Restart your system.
Upgrading to UTU 1.1.1
You can upgrade User Tracking Utility from UTU 1.1 to UTU 1.1.1.
When you install UTU 1.1.1 above UTU 1.1, UTU prompts you to uninstall the previous version. A
message appears:
WARNING: The setup program has detected a previous version of CiscoWorks User Tracking
Utility. To install CiscoWorks User Tracking Utility 1.1.1, previous version of the
product must be uninstalled. Do you want to uninstall CiscoWorks User Tracking Utility 1.1
now?
Yes/No
Click either Yes to upgrade, or No to quit.
Re-installing UTU
You must not install UTU on a system that already has this application installed on it. You must check
for existing installations of UTU before beginning a fresh installation.
To check for an existing installation of UTU:
Step 1 Right-click the taskbar of the machine.
Step 2 Select Toolbars.
If the User Search Band option is displayed, UTU is already installed on the system.
You must first uninstall the current installation of UTU, and then start the new installation
.

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User Tracking Debugger Utility
The User Tracking Debugger Utility is a command line tool to help debug common problems with User
Tracking. This section contains:
Understanding Debugger Utility
Using Debugger Utility
Understanding Debugger Utility
The utility displays a report on the reasons why User Tracking failed to discover end hosts on specific
ports.
In many cases, User Tracking may not perform as expected. This may be because of problems in other
Campus Manager applications. For instance Campus Manager Server may have devices that are not
discovered or inadequate VLAN discovery in Topology Services.
You can run the utility to troubleshoot problems, or provide the report and log generated by the utility
when you contact TAC for help in diagnosing problems.
The debugger utility uses the data collected by Campus Manager Server and reports the reasons for the
missing ports in User Tracking.
This tool also has an SNMP component embedded which runs a SNMP query for the table as a part of
verification for SNMP failure. For example, SNMP bugs in Catalyst operating system because of which
User Tracking may fail to discover devices.
This generates an Action Report that you can use to analyze the data.
The Debugger Utility:
1. Checks the switch ports in a sequential order.
2. Reports violation of basic rules for each of the missing ports such as link ports and trunk ports.
3. Checks for SNMP retrieval of data, if the ports pass the validity check.
4. Generates an Action Report suggesting possible remedial actions to retrieve the valid missing ports.
Using Debugger Utility
The Debugger Utility is available at $NMSROOT/campus/bin/ (where $NMSROOT is the directory
where you have installed CiscoWorks).
To run the Debugger Utility, run the command:
utdebug -switch switch-ip -port port1[,port2 ...] [-export filename]
where,
switch is the switch to which the end hosts are connected.
ports are the ports on the switch which have missing end hosts User Tracking.
-export filename specifies that the debug messages be stored in the file specified. If this option is not
used, the messages are displayed on the console.
For example,
utdebug -switch 10.29.6.12 -port 5/12
utdebug -switch 10.29.100.10 -port Fa0/10
utdebug -switch 10.29.6.14 -port Gi6

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C H A P T E R

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Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations
The Discrepancies Reporting module of Campus Manager allows you to view the discrepancies and best
practices deviations in your network. This chapter contains the following:
Understanding Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations
Interpreting Discrepancies
Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
Viewing Discrepancy Reports
Viewing Best Practices Deviations Reports
Customizing Discrepancies Reporting and Syslog Generation
Understanding Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations
Campus Manager provides reports on discrepancies, such as network inconsistencies and anomalies or
misconfiguration in the discovered network. This makes it easy to identify configuration errors such as
link-speed mismatches on either end of a connection. Discrepancies are computed at the end of each data
collection schedule.
Campus Manager also reports Best Practices Deviations. These are variations from the normal or
recommended practices in a network. These do not have any serious impact on the functioning of the
network.
Campus Manager allows you to:
View Reports on Discrepancies. For details, see Viewing Discrepancy Reports
View Reports on Best Practices Deviations. For details, see Viewing Best Practices Deviations
Reports
Acknowledge Discrepancies. For details, see Acknowledging Discrepancies
Acknowledge Best Practices Deviations. For details, see Acknowledging Best Practices Deviations
Resolve Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations.
Customize Discrepancies Reporting. For details, see Customizing Discrepancies Reporting and
Syslog Generation.

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Interpreting Discrepancies
Fixing Discrepancies and Best Practices Deviations through Campus Manager
The following Discrepancies can be fixed through Campus Manager:
Link Duplex Mismatch
Link Speed Mismatch
Link Trunk/NonTrunk Mismatch
Port Fast Enabled on Trunk Port
The following Best Practices Deviations can be fixed through Campus Manager:
BPDU Filter Disabled on Access Ports
BPDU-Guard Disabled on Access Ports
Loop Guard and Port Fast Enabled on Ports
UDLD Disabled on Link Ports
CDP Enabled on Access Ports
High Availability not Operational
Interpreting Discrepancies
This section contains information on each of the discrepancy reported in Campus Manager. It describes
the discrepancy, the impact it has on the network, and ways to resolve it.
The user interface in Campus Manager displays commands you can use to make configuration changes
on devices to resolve discrepancies.
This section contains:
Trunking Related Discrepancies
VLAN-VTP Related Discrepancies
Link Related Discrepancies
Port Related Discrepancy
Device Related Discrepancy
Spanning Tree Related Discrepancy
Trunking Related Discrepancies
The trunking related discrepancies that Campus Manager reports are:
Trunk Negotiation Across VTP Boundary
Native VLANs Mismatch
Trunk VLANs Mismatch
Trunk VLAN Protocol Mismatch

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Interpreting Discrepancies
Trunk Negotiation Across VTP Boundary
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when the trunk mode on any end of the trunk link is set to Auto
or Desirable.
Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP) cannot be used for trunk negotiation across VTP domain boundary.
This occurs when trunk mode on both sides has any of the following combinations:
On/Auto
On/Desirable
Desirable/Auto
Desirable/Desirable
Off/Desirable
Impact
Trunk negotiation across VTP boundary (that is, trunk link connecting two devices that are part of
different VTP domains) fails.
Fix
You cannot fix this discrepancy using Campus Manager.
To fix the discrepancy on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Make sure that the Trunk mode is ON, on both sides of the link.
Step 2 Enter the following command:
switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q | isl
switchport mode trunk
end
Step 3 Enter the following command to check the status:
show interfaces trunk
Or
show interface mod interface_id trunk
To fix the discrepancy on switches using Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Make sure that the Trunk mode is ON, on both sides of the link.
Step 2 .Enter the following command:
set trunk mod/port on Dot1Q | ISL
Step 3 Enter the following command to check the status:
show trunk mod/port

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Interpreting Discrepancies
Native VLANs Mismatch
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when the native VLANs of all ports in a trunk do not match.
This mismatch occurs when you have created a trunk port to connect another switch, and both ends are
in different native VLANs.
Note This discrepancy is applicable only for trunks that use 802.1q encapsulation.
Impact
The native VLAN must match on both sides of the trunk link, otherwise the traffic flow across the link
is affected. The trunk continues to remain operational.
Fix
If you have altered the default native VLAN configuration, ensure that all trunks have the same native
VLAN. Use the set vlan command for Cisco Catalyst operating system switches or the switchport
trunk native vlan command for Cisco IOS switches to specify the native VLAN.
You cannot fix this discrepancy through Campus Manager.
For more information on configuring VLANs, see the document Creating and Maintaining VLANs at the
following location:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/products/hw/switches/ps637/
products_configuration_guide_chapter09186a008007f261.html
Trunk VLANs Mismatch
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when the list of active or allowed VLANs between the two ends
of a trunk do not match.
Impact
The trunk remains operational but the network traffic across the link is affected.
Fix
You can resolve this by modifying the list of allowed VLANs between the two ends of a trunk and
ensuring that there is no mismatch. You cannot fix this discrepancy through Campus Manager.
Trunk VLAN Protocol Mismatch
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when different trunk encapsulations are set on the two ends of
a trunk.
For example, when one end of a trunk is configured as ISL and the other as 802.1q, Campus Manager
reports a discrepancy.
ISL and 802.1q are the different encapsulation types that you can configure in a trunk VLAN.
Impact
The trunk remains operational when the trunk mode is set to On or No-negotiate with mismatching
encapsulation types. However, the network traffic across the link is affected because of the mismatch.

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Interpreting Discrepancies
Fix
Configure the same encapsulation type on both ends of the trunk. You cannot fix this discrepancy
through Campus Manager.
VLAN-VTP Related Discrepancies
The VLAN-VTP related discrepancies that Campus Manager reports are:
VTP Disconnected Domain
No VTP Server in Domain with at least One VTP Client
VTP Disconnected Domain
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy if the devices that are part of the same VTP domain have
different VTP configuration revision numbers. When a switch in the same VTP domain has a higher
configuration revision number compared to the other switches, it could overwrite your server-configured
switch with incorrect information.
Impact
The VLAN information is not dynamically shared across the VTP domain.
Fix
Ensure that you configure VTP Configuration Revision number consistently across devices of the same
VTP domain. You cannot fix this discrepancy through Campus Manager.
No VTP Server in Domain with at least One VTP Client
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when there is no VTP Server configured in a VTP domain.
You can configure a switch to operate in any one of these VTP modesServer, Client, Transparent, and
Off. Primary and secondary servers are two types of servers that may exist on an instance in the VTPv3
domain.
A VTP client cannot store VLAN information. When a VTP client boots, it needs to reacquire the entire
configuration that is propagated by VTP.
The primary server can initiate or change the VTP configuration. The main purpose of a VTP secondary
server is to back up the configuration that is propagated over the network.
Impact
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when an existing VTP server or primary server goes down and
there is no alternative or backup server.
This can occur in a VTPv2 or VTPv3 domain that has only client mode devices. This could happen when
the existing primary server or server mode device has gone down temporarily and if the server mode
device does not come up.
If you do not configure at least one server, the devices become unreachable. Campus Manager discovers
only the client-mode devices in the domain and ignores the rest.

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Interpreting Discrepancies
Fix
Configure at least one device as server in a VTP domain. If the device you have configured as server is
temporarily down, configure another device as server. You cannot fix this discrepancy through Campus
Manager.
For more information on VTP domain, see the document Configuring VTP at the following location:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/lan/catalyst6500/catos/8.x/configuration/guide/vtp.html
Link Related Discrepancies
The link related discrepancies that Campus Manager reports are:
Link Duplex Mismatch
Link Speed Mismatch
Link Trunk/NonTrunk Mismatch
Link Duplex Mismatch
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when there is a duplex mismatch between links.
Duplex mismatch on 10/100Mb Ethernet links occurs when one port on the link is operating at
half-duplex while the other port is operating at full-duplex.
This happens when one or both ports on a link are reset and the auto-negotiation process does not cause
both partners to have the same configuration. It also happens when you reconfigure one side of a link
and do not reconfigure the other side.
Impact
Half-duplex device waits until no other devices are transmitting on the same LAN segment. However a
full-duplex device transmits whenever it has something to send, regardless of other devices.
If this transmission occurs while the half-duplex device is transmitting, the half-duplex device will
consider this either a collision (during the slot time), or a late collision (after the slot time). Since the
full-duplex side does not expect collisions, it does not realize that it must retransmit that dropped packet.
A low percentage rate of collisions are normal with half-duplex, but not with full-duplex. If the switch
port receives many late collisions, it usually indicates a duplex mismatch problem. See Figure 8-1.

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Interpreting Discrepancies
Figure 8-1 Duplex Mismatch
Fix
Campus Manager provides commands to resolve link duplex mismatch. Campus Manager displays
commands to set the port speed to Auto. Setting the port speed to Auto will automatically make the link
duplex to be negotiated between devices.
To fix the discrepancy on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
duplex auto
end
where auto enables the autonegotiation capability.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.
Collision
Half-Duplex: Still
runs carrier sense
and collision
detection
A (root)
Half-Duplex
A
Full-Duplex C
X
BPDU lost
to be retransmitted
Does not do
carrier sense
1
3
0
8
7
6

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Interpreting Discrepancies
To fix the discrepancy on switches using Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
set port speed mod/port auto
where:
mod/port refers to the number of the module and the port on the module
auto specifies autonegotiation for transmission speed and duplex mode on 10/100 Fast Ethernet
ports
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.
Link Speed Mismatch
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when there is a mismatch in the link speeds, that is, different
link speeds on either side of a link (for 10/100 ports or for any group of links).
The IEEE 802.3u autonegotiation protocol manages the switch settings for speed (10 Mbps or 100 Mbps)
and duplex (half or full). There are situations when this protocol can incorrectly align these settings,
reducing performance. A mismatch occurs under these circumstances:
A manually-set speed or duplex parameter is different from the manually set speed or duplex
parameter on the connected port.
A port is in Autonegotiate modeand the connected port is set to full duplex with no autonegotiation.
Impact
Link speed mismatch results in reduced performance of the link.
Fix
Campus Manager displays commands to resolve link speed mismatch.
To fix the discrepancy on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
speed auto
end
where auto enables the autonegotiation capability.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.

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Interpreting Discrepancies
To fix the discrepancy on switches using the Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
set port speed mod/port auto
where:
mod/port refers to the number of the module and the port on the module
auto specifies autonegotiation for transmission speed and duplex mode on 10/100 Fast Ethernet
ports
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.
Link Trunk/NonTrunk Mismatch
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when there are trunking ports and non-trunking ports on either
side of a link. This happens when one end of the trunk is set to On, and the other end is set to Off.
Impact
This results in the trunk not coming up, and there would be no traffic flow across the link.
Fix
Campus Manager resolves the discrepancy by setting the trunk modes on the switches to Desirable mode.
To fix the discrepancy on switches using the Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
set trunk mod/port desirable
where:
desirable causes the port to negotiate actively with the neighboring port to become a trunk link
mod/port specifies the number of the module and the port or ports on the module
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.

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Interpreting Discrepancies
To fix the discrepancy on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
switchport mode dynamic desirable
end
where dynamic desirable specifies an interface that actively attempts to convert the link to a trunk link.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.
Port Related Discrepancy
The port related discrepancy that Campus Manager reports is Port is in Error Disabled State. See Port is
in Error Disabled State
Port is in Error Disabled State
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when one or more of the switch ports in the discovered network
have a status of errDisable.
Causes of errDisable
A port enters errdisable state for any of the following reasons:
Channel misconfiguration
Duplex mismatch
BPDU port-guard
UDLD
Impact
When a port is error-disabled, it is effectively shut down and no traffic is sent or received on that port.
The port LED is set to the color orange and when you enter the show port command, the port status
shows errdisable.
Fix
To recover from errDisable:
Step 1 Identify and fix whatever caused the ports to become error-disabled (cable, NICs, EtherChannel, and so
on).
Step 2 Re-enable the port.

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You cannot fix this discrepancy through Campus Manager.
For more information on the errDisable state, see the document Recovering From errDisable Port State
on the CatOS Platforms at the following location:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/partner/tech/tk389/tk214/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093dcb.sht
ml
Device Related Discrepancy
The device related discrepancy that Campus Manager reports is Devices With Duplicate Sysname. See
Devices With Duplicate SysName, page 8-11
Devices With Duplicate SysName
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when it discovers two devices with the same SysName. Campus
Manager stores the device details of only one of the two devices.
Impact
Campus Manager manages only one of these devices.
Fix
Assign unique SysName for all devices in the network. You cannot fix this discrepancy through Campus
Manager.
Spanning Tree Related Discrepancy
The spanning tree related discrepancy that Campus Manager reports is PortFast Enabled on Trunk Port.
See Port Fast Enabled on Trunk Port
Port Fast Enabled on Trunk Port
Campus Manager reports a discrepancy when PortFast is enabled on trunk ports.
PortFast causes a spanning tree port to immediately enter the forwarding state, bypassing the listening
and learning states.
You must disable STP PortFast for switch-switch links. This is because, if you enable PortFast on a port
that is connected to another Layer 2 device, such as a switch, you might create network loops.
Impact
If you enable PortFast on ports that connect two switches, spanning tree loops can occur if Bridge
Protocol Data Units (BPDUs) are being transmitted and received on those ports.
Fix
Campus Manager provides commands for disabling PortFast on ports.

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
To fix the discrepancy on switches using the Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
set spantree portfast mod/port disable
where disable disables the spanning tree PortFast-start feature on the port.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.
To fix the discrepancy on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Discrepancy report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Discrepancy Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the following
command:
no spanning-tree portfast
end
This command disables PortFast on the given port.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the discrepancy was successfully fixed or not.
Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
This section contains information on each of the Best Practice Deviation reported in Campus Manager.
It gives a description of the Best Practice Deviation, the impact (if any) it has on the network, and ways
to resolve it.
The user interface in Campus Manager displays commands to make configuration changes on devices,
to resolve some Best Practices deviations.
This section contains:
Channel Ports Related Best Practices Deviations
Spanning Tree Related Best Practices Deviations
Trunk Ports Related Best Practices Deviations
VLAN Related Best Practices Deviations
Link Ports Related Best Practice Deviation
Access Ports Related Best Practice Deviation
Cisco Catalyst 6000 Devices Related Best Practice Deviation

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Channel Ports Related Best Practices Deviations
The channel ports related best practices deviations that Campus Manager reports are:
Non-channel Port in Desirable Mode
Channel Port in Auto Mode
Non-channel Port in Desirable Mode
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when a non-channel port is in the Desirable mode.
There are four user-configurable channel modes:
On
Off
Auto
Desirable
Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) packets are exchanged only between ports in Auto and Desirable
modes. Ports configured in on or off mode do not exchange PAgP packets.
To form EtherChannel between, it is best to have both switches set to the Desirable mode. This gives the
most robust behavior if one side or the other encounters error situations or is reset. The default mode of
the channel is Auto.
Both Auto and Desirable modes allow ports to negotiate with connected ports to determine whether they
can form a channel. The determination is based on criteria such as port speed, trunking state, and native
VLAN.
Ports can form an EtherChannel when they are in different channel modes if the modes are compatible.
Examples of ports that can form an EtherChannel are:
A port in desirable mode can successfully form an EtherChannel with another port that is in
Desirable or Auto mode.
A port in the Auto mode can form an EtherChannel with another port in the Desirable mode.
A port in the Auto mode cannot form an EtherChannel with another port that is also in the Auto
mode, since neither port initiates negotiation.
A port in the On mode can form a channel only with a port in the On mode because ports in On mode
do not exchange PAgP packets.
A port in Off mode cannot form a channel with any port.
Impact
When a non-channel port is in the Desirable mode, the links will not be efficiently used.

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
Fix
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practice Deviation report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set port channel mod/port mode auto
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practice Deviation report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
channel-group Channel group number mode auto
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
Channel Port in Auto Mode
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when a channel port is in Auto mode.
There are four user-configurable channel modes:
On
Off
Auto
Desirable
Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) packets are exchanged only between ports in Auto and Desirable
mode. Ports configured in On or Off mode do not exchange PAgP packets.
For switches to which you want to form an EtherChannel, it is best to have both switches set to Desirable
mode. This gives the most robust behavior if one of the sides encounters error situations or is reset. The
default mode of the channel is Auto.
Both Auto and Desirable modes allow ports to negotiate with connected ports to determine if they can
form a channel. The determination is based on criteria such as port speed, trunking state, and native
VLAN.
Ports can form an EtherChannel when they are in different channel modes if the modes are compatible.
Examples of ports that can form an EtherChannel are:
A port in Desirable mode can successfully form an EtherChannel with another port that is in
Desirable or Auto mode.
A port in Auto mode can form an EtherChannel with another port in Desirable mode.

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A port in Auto mode cannot form an EtherChannel with another port that is also in Auto mode, since
neither port initiates negotiation.
A port in On mode can form a channel only with another port also in On mode, because ports in this
mode do not exchange PAgP packets.
A port in Off mode cannot form a channel with any port.
Impact
Channel port set to Auto mode is considered a Best Practice Deviation because it is not the recommended
configuration. Cisco recommends that you set the channel port to Desirable mode. There is no serious
impact on the network.
Fix
To fix the Best Practise Deviation on switches using the Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practise Deviation report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practise Deviation Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set port channel mod/port mode desirable
which sets the port to desirable mode.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practise Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
To fix the Best Practise Deviation on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practise Deviation report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practise Deviation Detail dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
channel-group Channel group number mode desirable
which sets the port to desirable mode.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practise Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
Spanning Tree Related Best Practices Deviations
The spanning tree related best practices deviations that Campus Manager reports are:
BPDU Filter Disabled on Access Ports
BPDU-Guard Disabled on Access Ports
BackboneFast Disabled in Switch
UplinkFast not Enabled
Loop Guard and Port Fast Enabled on Ports

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BPDU Filter Disabled on Access Ports
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when BPDU Filter is not enabled on access ports.
Impact
BPDU filtering allows you to avoid transmitting BPDUs on PortFast-enabled ports that are connected to
an end system. When you enable PortFast on the switch, spanning tree places ports in the forwarding
state immediately, instead of going through the listening, learning, and forwarding states.
By default, spanning tree sends BPDUs from all ports regardless of whether PortFast is enabled.
BDPUFilter can be enabled for each port or globally. When you enable BPDUFilter globally, it applies
to all PortFast-enabled ports on the switch.
When you disable PortFast on a port, the BPDU Filter that was globally enabled on the PortFast enabled
port is also disabled.
Fix
Campus Manager provides commands for enabling BPDU Filter on access ports.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set spantree bpdu-filter mod/port enable
where:
mod/port specifies the number of the module and the port on the module
enable enables BPDU packet filtering
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
spanning-tree bpdufilter enable
end
where enable enables BPDU Filtering on the particular interface.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.

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BPDU-Guard Disabled on Access Ports
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation if PortFast is enabled and BPDU-Guard is not
enabled on a port.
BPDU-Guard prevents spanning-tree loops by moving a port into the errdisable state when a BPDU is
received on that port. When you enable BPDU-Guard on the switch, spanning tree shuts down the
interfaces that receive BPDUs instead of putting the interfaces into the spanning-tree blocking state.
Impact
Cisco recommends that you enable BPDUGuard to block incoming BPDUs on edge devices (end-hosts).
The Cisco BPDUGuard feature, when enabled, informs the switch to disable PortFast ports if a BPDU
is received on those ports.
BDPUGuard can be enabled on each port or globally. When you enable BPDUGuard globally, it applies
to all PortFast-enabled ports on the switch.
Fix
Campus Manager displays commands for enabling BPDU Filter on access ports.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set spantree bpdu-guard mod/port enable
where:
mod/port specifies the number of the module and the port on the module
enable enables BPDUGuard
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
spanning-tree bpduguard enable
end
where enable enables BPDUGuard on the particular interface.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
BackboneFast Disabled in Switch
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when BackboneFast is enabled on one of the
switches and not enabled on all other switches in a switch cloud.
Cisco recommends that BackboneFast be enabled on all switches running STP. It can be added without
disruption to a production network.
Impact
If you do not enable BackboneFast on all devices, it might lead to undesirable effects on the spanning
tree operation.
BackboneFast provides rapid convergence from indirect link failures. By adding functionality to STP,
you can reduce convergence times from the default of 50 seconds to 30 seconds.
Figure 8-2 shows an example topology with no link failures. Switch A, the root switch, connects directly
to Switch B over link L1 and to Switch C over link L2. The port on Switch C that connects directly to
Switch B is in the blocking state.
Figure 8-2 BackboneFast Example Before Indirect Link Failure
If link L1 fails, Switch C detects this failure as an indirect failure, because it is not connected directly
to link L1.
Switch B no longer has a path to the root switch. BackboneFast allows the blocked port on Switch C to
move immediately to the listening state without waiting for the maximum aging time for the port to
expire.
BackboneFast then transitions the port on Switch C to the forwarding state, providing a path from Switch
B to Switch A.
This switchover takes approximately 30 seconds. Figure 8-3 shows how BackboneFast reconfigures the
topology to account for the failure of link L1.
L1
L2 L3
Switch C
Switch A
(Root) Switch B
Blocked port
1
1
2
4
1

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Figure 8-3 BackboneFast Example After Indirect Link Failure
Fix
Enable BackboneFast on all switches in a switch cloud.
To enable BackboneFast Globally on a Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Enter the command:
set spantree backbonefast enable
Step 2 Enter this command to check the status:
show spantree backbonefast
To enable BackboneFast Globally on Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Enter the command:
spanning-tree backbonefast
Step 2 Enter this command to check the status:
show spanning-tree backbonefast
You cannot fix this Best Practice Deviation through Campus Manager.
For more information on Spanning Tree related configuration, see the document Configuring Spanning
Tree PortFast, UplinkFast, and BackboneFast at the following location:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/lan/catalyst6500/catos/8.x/configuration/guide/stp_enha.ht
ml
L1
L2 L3
Switch C
Switch A
(Root) Switch B
Link failure
1
1
2
4
4
BackboneFast transitions port
through listening and learning
states to forwarding state

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UplinkFast not Enabled
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when UplinkFast is not enabled on switches.
Note This Best Practice Deviation is not applicable if the device is not an access layer switch.
Cisco recommends that you enable UplinkFast for switches with blocked ports, typically at the access
layer. Do not use on switches without the implied topology knowledge of a backup root linktypically,
distribution and core switches in Cisco's multilayer design. It can be added without disruption to a
production network.
Impact
UplinkFast provides fast STP convergence after a direct link failure in the network access layer. It
operates without modifying STP, and its purpose is to speed up convergence time in a specific
circumstance to less than three seconds, rather than the typical 30-second delay.
Figure 8-4 shows an example topology with no link failures. Switch A, the root switch, is connected
directly to Switch B over link L1 and to Switch C over link L2. The port on Switch C that is connected
directly to Switch B is in the blocking state.
Figure 8-4 UplinkFast Example Before Direct Link Failure
If Switch C detects a link failure on the currently active link L2 (a direct link failure), UplinkFast
unblocks the blocked port on Switch C and transitions it to the forwarding state without going through
the listening and learning states, as shown in Figure 8-5. This switchover takes approximately 1 to 5
seconds.
L1
L2 L3
Switch C
Switch A
(Root) Switch B
Blocked port
1
1
2
4
1

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Figure 8-5 UplinkFast Example After Direct Link Failure
Fix
Enable UplinkFast on all access layer switches.
To enable Uplink Fast on Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Enter the command:
set spantree uplinkfast enable
Step 2 Enter this command to check the status:
show spantree uplinkfast
To enable Uplink Fast on Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Enter the command:
spanning-tree uplinkfast
Step 2 Enter this command to check the status:
show spanning-tree uplinkfast
You cannot fix this Best Practice Deviation through Campus Manager.
For more information on Spanning Tree related configuration, see the document Configuring Spanning
Tree PortFast, UplinkFast, and BackboneFast at the following location:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/lan/catalyst6500/catos/8.x/configuration/guide/stp_enha.ht
ml
L1
L2 L3
Switch C
Switch A
(Root) Switch B
UplinkFast transitions port
directly to forwarding state
Link failure
1
1
2
4
2

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Loop Guard and Port Fast Enabled on Ports
Loop Guard
Assume that a switch port is receiving BPDUs, and is in the blocking state. The port makes up a
redundant path. It is blocking because it is neither a Root Port nor a Designated Port. If, the flow of
BPDUs stops, the last known BPDU is retained until the Max Age timer expires.
When the Max Age timer expires, that BPDU is flushed, and the switch thinks there is no longer a need
to block the port. The port moves through the STP states until it begins to forward traffic. The switch
then forms a bridging loop. In its final state, the port becomes a Designated Port.
To prevent this situation, you can use the loop guard STP feature. When you enable this feature, loop
guard keeps track of the BPDU activity on nondesignated ports. While BPDUs are received, the port is
allowed to behave normally.
When BPDUs are missing, loop guard moves the port into the loop-inconsistent state. The port is
effectively blocking at this point to prevent a loop from forming and to keep it in the nondesignated role.
After BPDUs are received on the port again, loop guard allows the port to move through the normal STP
states and become active. In this way, Loop Guard automatically governs ports without the need for
manual intervention.
STP PortFast
STP configures meshed topology into a loop-free, tree-like topology. When the link on a bridge port goes
up, STP calculation occurs on that port. The result of the calculation is the transition of the port into
forwarding or blocking state. The result depends on the position of the port in the network and the STP
parameters.
This calculation and transition period usually takes about 30 to 50 seconds. At that time, no user data
passes through the port. Owing to this, some user applications can time out during the period.
To allow immediate transition of the port into forwarding state, enable the STP PortFast feature. PortFast
immediately transitions the port into STP forwarding mode upon linkup. This way the port still
participates in STP. So if the port is to be a part of the loop, the port eventually transitions into the STP
blocking mode.
Impact
Enabling both the above features in a port, gives unpredictable results. Hence Campus Manager flags it
as a Best Practice Deviation.
Fix
If you fix the above Best Practice Deviation through Campus Manager, it disables the Port Fast feature
in the port.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using the Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set spantree portfast disable
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
spanning-tree portfast disable
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
Trunk Ports Related Best Practices Deviations
The trunk ports related best practices deviations that Campus Manager reports are as follows:
Non-trunk Ports in Desirable Mode
Trunk Ports in Auto Mode
Non-trunk Ports in Desirable Mode
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when non-trunk ports are set to Desirable mode.
Impact
Cisco recommends that you set trunk to Off on all non-trunk ports. This helps eliminate wasted
negotiation time when bringing host ports up. If a non-trunk port is set to Desirable, it attempts to
become a trunk port if the neighboring port is in Desirable or Auto mode, although that is not the
intended behavior.
Fix
To fix the Best Practice Deviation, set the trunk mode to Off on all non-trunk ports.
To fix it through Campus Manager, on switches using the Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set port host mod/port
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.

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To fix it through Campus Manager, on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
switchport mode access
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
Table 8-1 lists all possible combinations of trunk mode configurations and when Campus Manager
reports a Best Practice Deviation.
Table 8-1 Trunking Configuration
1
1. Information in brackets indicate the trunking state of the interface.
Modes On Auto Desirable Nonegotiate Off
On None.
(Trunking)
Reports
Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Trunking)
None.
(Trunking)
None.
(Trunking)
Reports Best Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
Auto Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Trunking)
None.
(Not
Trunking)
Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Trunking)
Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
None.
(Not Trunking)
Desirable None.
(Trunking)
Reports
Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Trunking)
None.
(Trunking)
Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
Reports Best Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
Nonegotiate None.
(Trunking)
Reports
Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Not
Trunking)
Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
None.
(Trunking)
Reports Best Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
Off Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Not
Trunking)
None.
(Not
Trunking)
Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
Reports Best
Practice
Deviation.
(Not Trunking)
None.
(Not Trunking)

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
Trunk Ports in Auto Mode
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when trunk ports are set to Auto mode.
Impact
Cisco recommends an explicit trunk configuration of Desirable at both ends. Auto mode indicates a
static property and the port will not initiate the trunking link, if the neighbor does not initiate it. See
Table 8-1 for different trunk mode combinations.
Fix
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using the Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set trunk mod/port desirable
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
switchport mode dynamic desirable
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
VLAN Related Best Practices Deviations
The VLAN related best practices deviations that Campus Manager reports are as follows:
VLAN Index Conflict
VLAN Name Conflict
VLAN Index Conflict
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when there is a conflict in the VLAN Index. A VLAN
Index conflict occurs in case of a VTP domain which has Server mode and Transparent or Off mode
devices, where a same VLAN index has different VLAN name in transparent and server mode devices
in the domain.

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
Impact
There is no serious impact on the network connectivity. It is considered as a Best Practice Deviation
because Campus Manager cannot manage a VTP domain where the same VLAN index has different
VLAN names in transparent and server mode devices.
Fix
Assign the same name for a VLAN Index in both the transparent and server modes of the VTP domain.
You cannot fix this Best Practice Deviation through Campus Manager.
VLAN Name Conflict
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when there is a conflict in the VLAN Name. A
VLAN Name conflict occurs in case of a VTP domain which has Server mode and Transparent or Off
mode devices, where a VLAN part of the transparent mode device in the domain has the same name as
VLAN part of the server mode device in the domain.
Impact
There is no serious impact on the network connectivity. It is considered as a Best Practice Deviation
because Campus Manager cannot manage a VTP domain with devices where a VLAN part of the
transparent mode device in the domain has the same name as VLAN part of the server mode device in
the domain.
Fix
Resolve the conflict by assigning different names for the VLAN part of the transparent mode and the
server mode devices. You cannot fix this Best Practice Deviation through Campus Manager.
Link Ports Related Best Practice Deviation
The link port related Best Practice Deviation that Campus Manager reports is UDLD Disabled on Link
Ports. See UDLD Disabled on Link Ports

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UDLD Disabled on Link Ports
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation if UniDirectional Link Detection (UDLD) is disabled
on link ports.
Impact
If you disable UDLD, it could result in Spanning Tree loops.
Unidirectional links are often caused by a failure not detected on a fiber link, or by a problem with a
transceiver.
Figure 8-6 Unidirectional Links
In Figure 8-6, suppose the link between A and B is unidirectional and drops traffic from A to B while
transmitting traffic from B to A. Suppose that B should be blocking. It has previously been stated that a
port can only block if it receives BPDUs from a bridge that has a higher priority. In this case, all these
BPDUs coming from A are lost and bridge B eventually forwards traffic, creating a loop.
To detect the unidirectional links before the forwarding loop is created, Cisco designed and implemented
the UniDirectional Link Detection (UDLD) protocol. This feature is able to detect improper cabling or
unidirectional links on Layer 2 and automatically break resulting loops by disabling some ports.
For maximum protection against symptoms resulting from uni-directional links, we recommend that you
enable aggressive mode UDLD on point-to-point links between Cisco switches, where you have set the
message interval to the default 15 seconds.
Fix
Campus Manager provides commands to enable UDLD on link ports.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set udld enable mod/port
where enable enables the UDLD information display.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
B
Blocking A
X
X
BPDU lost this way B unblocks its port and can forward
traffic this way......
1
3
0
8
7
7

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix displays the following
command:
udld port
end
This command enables UDLD in normal mode by default on all interfaces.
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
Access Ports Related Best Practice Deviation
The access ports related Best Practice Deviation that Campus Manager reports is CDP Enabled on
Access Ports. See CDP Enabled on Access Ports
CDP Enabled on Access Ports
Campus Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) is enabled on
the access port of a switch.
CDP is enabled by default and is essential to gain visibility of adjacent devices and for troubleshooting.
It is also used by network management applications to build Layer 2 topology maps.
Impact
In parts of the network where a high level of security is required (such as Internet-facing de-militarized
zones), you should turn off CDP.
Fix
Campus Manager provides commands to disable CDP on switches.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches running Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set cdp disable mod/port
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.

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Interpreting Best Practices Deviations
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches running Cisco IOS:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
no cdp enable
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
Cisco Catalyst 6000 Devices Related Best Practice Deviation
The Cisco Catalyst 6000 devices related Best Practice Deviation that Campus Manager reports is High
Availability not Operational. See High Availability not Operational
High Availability not Operational
Enabling High Availability on switches is applicable only for Cisco Catalyst 6000 devices. Campus
Manager reports a Best Practice Deviation when there are two supervisor engines in Cisco Catalyst 6000
devices and High Availability is not enabled.
Impact
High Availability:
Is a critical requirement for most networks. Switch downtime must be minimal to ensure maximum
productivity in a network.
Allows you to minimize the switch-over time from active supervisor engine to the standby
supervisor engine, if the active supervisor engine fails.
Allows the active supervisor engine to communicate with the standby supervisor engine, keeping
feature protocol states synchronized.
Provides a versioning option that allows you to run different software images on the active and
standby supervisor engines.
You can enable High Availability using Command Line Interface (CLI).

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Fix
As a general practice with redundant supervisors, we recommend that you enable High Availability
feature for normal operation.
Campus Manager provides commands for enabling High Availability.
To fix the Best Practice Deviation on switches using Catalyst operating system:
Step 1 Go to the Best Practices Deviations report and click the hyperlink in the Summary field.
The Best Practice Deviation Details dialog box appears. The Recommended Fix field displays the
following command:
set system highavailability enable
Step 2 Click Fix.
A message appears indicating whether the Best Practice Deviation was successfully fixed or not.
For more information on Supervisor engines and High Availability, see the document Configuring
Redundancy at the following location:
http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/switches/lan/catalyst6500/catos/6.x/configuration/guide/redund.htm
l
Viewing Discrepancy Reports
To view discrepancy reports:
Step 1 Go to the LMS Portal and select Campus Manager > Reports > Reports Generator.
The Report Generator page appears.
Step 2 Select Discrepancies from the list of available reports.
The Report Generator page has options to configure the report you want to view. Table 8-2 describes the
options that you can configure to generate a Discrepancy Report.

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Step 3 Click Submit to generate the Discrepancy Report.
The Discrepancy Report appears if you had set the Run Type to Immediate.
For any other Run Type, the report is created as a job. For details on viewing, stopping, and deleting the
scheduled report job, see Using the Reports J ob Browser
Table 8-2 Generating Discrepancy Reports
Option Usage Notes
Device Selector Click Selection tab to choose the device groups for which you
want discrepancies to be reported.
A list of all the available System Defined Groups and User
Defined groups appears.
Check the checkbox next to the device group for which you
want discrepancies to be reported.
Report Options Click Unacknowledged to view a report of the discrepancies
that are not acknowledged.
Click Acknowledged to view a report of only the
acknowledged discrepancies.
Click Both to view a report of both acknowledged and
unacknowledged discrepancies.
Severity Selector You can select the severity level of the discrepancies for which you
want to generate a report. The different severity levels are Medium
and High.
Type Selector 1. Select the discrepancies from Available Types, for which you
want the report to be displayed.
You can select multiple entries by pressing Ctrl or Shift while
clicking.
2. Click Add.
The selected discrepancies are added to Selected Types. You
can also double-click on a discrepancy from Available Types to
add it to Selected Types.
To remove a discrepancy from Selected Types, select the
discrepancy and click Remove.
Scheduling 1. Select the Run Type for the jobImmediate, Once, Daily,
Weekly, Monthly.
2. For jobs with Run Type anything other than Immediate, select
the Date and Time for the job to run.
The Date and J ob Info fields are disabled when you select
Immediate as the Run Type for the job.
J ob Info 1. Enter a description for the job in the Description field.
The text you enter is displayed in the Campus Manager job
browser. This is a mandatory field.
2. In the E-mail field, enter the e-mail ID to which you want the
job completion status to be sent.

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To clear the values you entered click Reset.
Understanding Discrepancy Reports
This section explains:
Viewing Details on Discrepancies
Fixing Discrepancies
The Discrepancy Report is displayed in a tabular format. Table 8-3 describes the fields in a Discrepancy
Report.
Table 8-3 Discrepancy Reports
Field Description
Acknowledge If you have launched:
Unacknowledged Discrepancy Report
You can acknowledge discrepancies from this report.
For details on acknowledging a discrepancy, see
Acknowledging Discrepancies.
Acknowledged Discrepancy Report
You can unacknowledge discrepancies from this report.
For details on unacknowledging a discrepancy, see
Unacknowledging Discrepancies.
Acknowledged and Unacknowledged Discrepancy Report
The Acknowledge column displays Yes for Acknowledged
discrepancies and No for Unacknowledged Discrepancies.
Type Brief description of the discrepancy.
Severity The severity level of the discrepancy. Discrepancies are categorized
according to their severity as medium, or high.
Summary The IP addresses of the devices that are affected by the discrepancy
are displayed here. Click the hyperlink to view more details on the
discrepancy.
For more information, see Viewing Details on Discrepancies.
Fix States if the discrepancy can be fixed through Campus Manager.
A link is provided, clicking on which takes you to the Fix Page.
For details on fixing discrepancies, see Fixing Discrepancies.
First Found The date and time when the discrepancy was first discovered by
Campus Manager.
Remarks If a fix has been attempted on the discrepancy, it is shown here. The
RME J ob ID for the fix operation is also shown here.

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Acknowledging Discrepancies
Discrepancies that do not having serious impact in the network, can be acknowledged. You can also
acknowledge a discrepancy that you no longer want to see in the Discrepancy Report. If you
acknowledge it, it is removed from the report.
To acknowledge a discrepancy:
Step 1 In the Discrepancy Report, check the checkbox corresponding to the discrepancy.
Step 2 Click Acknowledge.
The acknowledged discrepancy does not appear in the report, the next time you generate it.
Unacknowledging Discrepancies
If you want the acknowledged discrepancy to reappear in the Discrepancy Report, you need to
unacknowledge it.
To unacknowledge a discrepancy:
Step 1 In the Discrepancy Report, check the checkbox corresponding to the discrepancy.
Step 2 Click UnAcknowledge.
The unacknowledged discrepancy appears in the report, the next time you generate it.
Viewing Details on Discrepancies
To get detailed information on a discrepancy, click the hyperlink in the summary column of the
Discrepancy Report. The Discrepancy Details dialog box appears.
Table 8-4 explains Discrepancy Details:
Table 8-4 Discrepancy Details
Field Description
Type Name of the discrepancy.
Severity Severity level of the discrepancy. Discrepancies are categorized
according to their severity as low and high.
First Found Date and time when the discrepancy was first discovered by
Campus Manager.
Description IP addresses of the devices which cause this discrepancy are
displayed here.
Detail Brief summary of the discrepancy.

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Fixing Discrepancies
This page displays information about the Discrepancy detected in the network and helps you fix it
through appropriate commands.
Table 8-5 describes the fields in the Discrepancy Details dialog box.
Command Format
Commands should be entered in the following format in the Fix column:
[IP Address or Host Name]
command1
command2
Table 8-5 Discrepancy Details
Field Description
Type Name of the discrepancy.
Severity Severity level of the discrepancy. Discrepancies are categorized
according to their severity as low and high.
First Found Date and time when the discrepancy was first discovered by
Campus Manager.
Description IP Addresses of the devices which cause this discrepancy are
displayed here.
Detail Brief summary of the discrepancy.
Recommended Fix If the discrepancy can be fixed through Campus Manager:
A set of commands is displayed that will be used to resolve the
discrepancy. You can edit the commands provided by Campus
Manager, to suit your network requirements.
Caution Make sure that you do valid changes to the commands.
Campus Manager does not check the correctness of the
commands, after you edit it. So, if the commands are
incorrect, the results will be unpredictable.
If the discrepancy cannot be fixed through Campus Manager:
This field will be blank. You can enter commands to fix the
discrepancy. See Command Format for details on the format to be
used.
Campus Manager uses the cwcli interface of Resource Manager
Essentials (RME) to resolve discrepancies.
For details on setting RME Credentials, see Setting RME
Credentials

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If the commands have to be run for more than one device:
[IP Address1 or Host Name1]
command1
command2
[IP Address2 or Host Name2]
command1
command2
For example:
[172.20.5.82]
interface Gi49
speed auto
[172.20.5.6]
interface Gi2/1
speed auto
Notes on Fixing Discrepancies
For fixing Discrepancies, Campus Manager uses RME CiscoWorks CLI (CWCLI) framework.
Set the following from Campus Manager to access the RME Server:
RME Server Name
RME Server Port
RME Server Protocol
User Name
User Password
For complete details on this, see Setting RME Credentials.
While fixing Discrepancies through Campus Manager:
Enter the correct RME Server Credentials
If you enter the wrong RME server or IP Address or if the RME server is down, the fix fails. To
overcome this, ping RME server from the Campus Manager server and ensure connectivity.
Enter the correct port numbers for the selected protocols
Port number for http is 1741 and for https is 443. The fix fails if you enter the wrong port numbers.
Enter the valid RME username and password
The fix fails when the username or password is incorrect.
Enter valid SNMP credentials
TFTP uses SNMP credentials for RME CWCLI. So ensure that correct SNMP read/write credentials
are available while using TFTP as transport protocol in RME.

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Enter correct Device Credentials
RME CWCLI updates the device configuration with the transport protocols configured in
RME > Admin >Config Management >Transport Settings dialog box.
To update the device configuration, RME uses the protocols in the available order. If the fix fails for
one protocol, RME tries again with the next protocol according to the specified order.
For the fix to succeed, ensure that the correct credentials are set for the devices. The credentials need
to be configured in the CommonServices >Device and Credentials page.
Ensure that the device on which the fix is applied is managed in RME.
Check whether the device is managed in RME when you are fixing the Discrepancy on a remote
RME Server. If the device is not managed in RME, the job is not created for that device and the fix
fails.
When RME job status shown Partially successful but fix fails:
When either deploy or fetch configuration is successful, J ob Status in RME J obs/Archive
Management is shown as Partial Success. However, the Fix status in Campus Manager is shown as
fail. Fix is successful only when both deploy and fetch are successful.
For example, when trying to deploy configuration with TFTP, the operation may be successful.
However, fetching configuration may fail because of timeouts for the TFTP operation. This could
happen if the configuration is large.
In this case, select RME > Admin > System Preferences > RME device Attributes and increase
TFTP Timeout in the dialog box.
Viewing Best Practices Deviations Reports
This section explains Understanding Best Practices Deviations Reports.
To view Best Practices Deviations reports:
Step 1 Go to the LMS Portal and select Campus Manager > Reports > Reports Generator.
The Report Generator page appears.
Step 2 Select Best Practices Deviations from the list of available reports.
The Report Generator page has options to configure the report you want to view. Table 8-6 describes the
options that you can configure to generate a Best Practices Deviations Report.

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Step 3 Click Submit to generate the Best Practices Deviations Report.
The Best Practices Deviations report appears if you had set the Run Type to Immediate.
For any other Run Type, the report is created as a job. For details on viewing, stopping, and deleting the
scheduled report job, see Using the Reports J ob Browser
You can click Reset to clear the values you entered.
Table 8-6 Generating Best Practices Deviations Report
Option Usage Notes
Device Selector Click Selection to choose the device groups or devices for which you
want Best Practices Deviations to be reported.
A list of all the available System Defined Groups and User Defined
groups, and devices appears.
Check the checkbox next to the device group or a particular device for
which you want Best Practice Deviations to be reported.
Report Options Click Unacknowledged to view a report of the best practices
deviations that are not acknowledged.
Click Acknowledged to view a report of only the acknowledged best
practices deviations.
Click Both to view a report of both acknowledged and
unacknowledged best practices deviations.
Type Selector 1. Select the best practices deviations from Available Types, for which
you want the report to be displayed.
You can select multiple entries by pressing Ctrl or Shift while
clicking.
2. Click Add. The selected best practices deviations are added to
Selected Types.
You can also double-click on a Best Practice Deviation from Available
Types to add it to Selected Types.
To remove a Best Practice Deviation from Selected Types, select the
Best Practice Deviation and click Remove.
Scheduling 1. Select the Run Type for the jobImmediate, Once, Daily, Weekly,
Monthly.
For jobs with Run Type anything other than Immediate, select the Date
and Time for the job to run.
The J ob Info and Date fields are disabled when you select Immediate
as the Run Type for the job.
J ob Info 1. Enter a description for the job in the Description field.
The text you enter is displayed in the Campus Manager job browser.
This is a mandatory field.
2. In the E-mail field, enter the e-mail ID to which you want the job
completion status to be sent.

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Viewing Best Practices Deviations Reports
Understanding Best Practices Deviations Reports
This section explains:
Viewing Details on Best Practices Deviations
Fixing Best Practices Deviations
The Best Practices Deviations Report is displayed in a tabular format. Table 8-7 describes the fields in
this report.
Table 8-7 Best Practices Deviations Report
Field Description
Acknowledge If you have launched:
Unacknowledged Best Practise Deviations Report
You can acknowledge Best Practise Deviations from this
report.
For details, see Acknowledging Best Practices Deviations.
Acknowledged Best Practise Deviations Report
You can unacknowledge Best Practise Deviations from this
report.
For details, see Unacknowledging Best Practices Deviations.
Acknowledged and Unacknowledged Best Practise Deviations
Report
The Acknowledge column displays Yes for Acknowledged
Best Practise Deviations and No for Unacknowledged Best
Practise Deviations.
Type Brief description of the Best Practice Deviation.
Summary IP addresses of the devices which are affected by the Best Practice
Deviation. Click the hyperlink to view more details on the Best
Practice Deviation.
For more information, see Viewing Details on Best Practices
Deviations.
Fix States if the Best Practice Deviation can be fixed through Campus
Manager.
A link is provided, clicking on which takes you to the Fix Page.
For details on fixing Best Practice Deviation, see Fixing Best
Practices Deviations.
First Found Date and Time when the Best Practice Deviation was first
discovered by Campus Manager.
Remarks If a fix has been attempted on the Best Practice Deviation, it is
shown here. The RME J ob ID for the Fix operation is also shown
here.

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Acknowledging Best Practices Deviations
You can acknowledge a Best Practice Deviation that you no longer want to see in the Best Practices
Deviations Report.
If you acknowledge it, it will no longer be available in the report. If you want the acknowledged best
practice deviation to reappear in the Best Practice Deviation Report, you need to unacknowledge it.
To acknowledge a Best Practice Deviation:
Step 1 Check the checkbox in the Acknowledge column corresponding to the Best Practice Deviation.
Step 2 Click Acknowledge.
The Best Practice Deviation is not shown in the report, the next time you generate it.
Unacknowledging Best Practices Deviations
If you want the acknowledged Best Practise Deviations to reappear in the Best Practise Deviations
Report, you need to unacknowledge it.
To unacknowledge a Best Practise Deviation:
Step 1 In the report, check the checkbox corresponding to the Best Practise Deviation.
Step 2 Click UnAcknowledge.
The unacknowledged Best Practise Deviation appears in the report, the next time you generate it.
Viewing Details on Best Practices Deviations
To get detailed information on a Best Practice Deviation, click the hyperlink in the summary column of
the Best Practices Deviations Report. The Best Practices Deviations Details dialog box appears.
Table 8-8 displays the following details:
Table 8-8 Best Practices Deviations Details
Field Description
Type Name of the Best Practice Deviation.
First Found Date and time when the Best Practice Deviation was
first discovered by Campus Manager.
Description IP addresses of the devices which cause this Best
Practice Deviation.
Detail Brief summary of the Best Practice Deviation.

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Fixing Best Practices Deviations
This page displays information about the Best Practice Deviation detected in the network and helps you
fix it through appropriate commands.
Table 8-9 explains the Best Practice Deviation Details:
Command Format
Commands should be entered in the following format in the Fix column:
[IP Address or Host Name]
command1
command2
Table 8-9 Best Practices Deviations Details
Field Description
Type Name of the Best Practice Deviation.
First Found Date and time when the Best Practice Deviation was first discovered
by Campus Manager.
Description IP addresses of the devices which cause this Best Practice
Deviation.
Detail Brief summary of the Best Practice Deviation.
Recommended Fix If the Best Practice Deviation can be fixed through Campus
Manager:
A set of commands is displayed here that will be used to resolve the
Best Practice Deviation. You can edit the commands provided by
Campus Manager, to suit your network requirements.
Caution Make sure that you do valid changes to the commands.
Campus Manager does not check the correctness of the
commands, after you edit it. So, if the commands are
incorrect, the results will be unpredictable.
If the Best Practice Deviation cannot be fixed through Campus
Manager:
This field will be blank. You can enter commands to fix the Best
Practice Deviation. See Command Format for details on the format
to be used.
Campus Manager uses the cwcli interface of Resource Manager
Essentials (RME) to resolve Best Practice Deviations.
For details on setting RME Credentials, see Setting RME
Credentials

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If the commands have to be run for more than one device:
[IP Address1 or Host Name1]
command1
command2
[IP Address2 or Host Name2]
command1
command2
Example:
[10.77.209.131]
interface Fa0/1
no cdp enable
interface Fa0/2
no cdp enable
[cfm-sw1]
interface Fa0/2
no cdp enable
interface Fa0/3
no cdp enable
Notes on Fixing Best Practices Deviation
For fixing Best Practices Deviations, Campus Manager uses RME CiscoWorks CLI (CWCLI)
framework.
Set the following from Campus Manager, to access the RME Server:
RME Server Name
RME Server Port
RME Server Protocol
User Name
User Password
For complete details, see Setting RME Credentials.
While fixing Best Practise Deviations through Campus Manager:
Enter the correct RME Server Credentials
If you enter the wrong RME server or IP Address or if the RME server is down, the fix fails. To
overcome this, ping RME server from the Campus Manager server and ensure connectivity.
Enter the correct port numbers for the selected protocols
Port number for http is 1741 and for https is 443. The fix fails if you enter the wrong port numbers.

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Enter the valid RME username and password
The fix fails when the username or password is incorrect.
Enter valid SNMP credentials
TFTP uses SNMP credentials for RME CWCLI. So ensure that correct SNMP read/write credentials
are available while using TFTP as transport protocol in RME.
Enter correct Device Credentials
RME CWCLI updates the device configuration with the transport protocols configured in
RME > Admin >Config Management >Transport Settings.
To update the device configuration, RME uses the protocols in the available order. If the fix fails for
one protocol, RME tries again with the next protocol according to the specified order.
For the fix to succeed, ensure that the correct credentials are set for the devices. Select
CommonServices >Device and Credentials and configure the credentials in the page.
Ensure that the device on which the fix is applied is managed in RME.
Check whether the device is managed in RME when you are fixing the Best Practice Deviation on
a remote RME Server. If the device is not managed in RME, the job is not created for that device
and the fix fails.
When RME job status is shown as Partially successful but fix fails:
When either Deploy or Fetch Configuration is successful, J ob Status in RME J obs/Archive
Management is shown as Partial Success. But the Fix status in Campus Manager is shown as fail.
Fix is successful only when both Deploy and Fetch are successful.
For example, when trying to deploy configuration with TFTP, the operation may be successful.
However, fetching configuration may fail because of timeouts for the TFTP operation. This could
happen if the configuration is large.
In this case, increase TFTP Timeout in RME > Admin > System Preferences > RME device
Attributes.
Customizing Discrepancies Reporting and Syslog
Generation
You can customize the Discrepancies Report and Best Practices Deviations Report to display only those
discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations about which you want to be notified.
To customize the reports:
Step 1 Select Campus anager > Administration > Discrepancies, from the LMS Portal.
Alternatively, if you are in Campus Manager Administration page, click Other Admin Settings and
choose Discrepancies from the Table of Contents (TOC).
The discrepancies page appears. You can view the list of Network discrepancies, and Discrepancies
configured to send Syslog messages by clicking the corresponding View Details link.
Step 2 Click Configure.

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Customizing Discrepancies Reporting and Syslog Generation
The Configuring Discrepancies dialog box appears.
To include a Discrepancy or Best Practice Deviation in the Reports, check the checkbox next to it.
Checking all the checkboxes results in a report displaying all discrepancies and Best Practice
Deviations in the network.
To exclude a Discrepancy or Best Practice Deviation from the Reports, uncheck the corresponding
checkbox.
Step 3 Generate Syslog messages for the selected Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations. To do this, check
Configure Syslog and click Next.
A list of the selected Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations appears.
Step 4 Check Send Syslogs and enter the name of the server in the Syslog Server field.
Step 5 Select the Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations for which you want to generate Syslog messages
and click Next.
A summary of the selected Discrepancies and Best Practice Deviations appears.
Step 6 Click Finish.
You can use the filters to display discrepancy reports for specific devices, link or network types. This
makes it easy to find a particular discrepancy for a particular type.
You can use more than one filter at the same time, but results will vary.
If you select more than one filter in the same top-level category, Boolean OR is used.
For example, if you select Duplex, Speed under Link, any link or port that fulfils at least one filter
criteria will be displayed in the report.
If you select more than one filter from different top-level categories, Boolean AND is used.
For example, if you select both a Link type and a Port type filter from the discrepancy filter, any
link that fulfils both filter criteria will appear in the report.

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Customizing Discrepancies Reporting and Syslog Generation
C H A P T E R

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9
Using Topology Services
Topology Services is an application that enables you to view and monitor your network including the
links and the ports of each link.
Topology Services displays the network topology of the devices discovered by Campus Manager through
the Topology Maps. Besides these Maps, the application includes numerous reports that helps you to
view the physical and logical connectivity in details.
Note For information on launching Topology Services from Solaris client, see Launching Topology Services
from Solaris Client. If the CiscoWorks server is not DNS resolvable from the client, see Launching
Topology Services when the Server is not DNS Resolvable.
This chapter contains:
Understanding Topology Services
Starting Topology Services
Using Topology Services Legend
Understanding Topology Services Main Window
Using Topology Services Main Window
Understanding Network Topology Views
Using Network Views
Using Topology Filters
Using Find in Network Topology Views
Understanding Summary View
Upgrading Network Topology Views
N-Hop View Portlet
Using Microsoft Visio With Topology Views
Working With Links
Time Domain Reflectometry Reports
Working With Devices
Displaying Campus Reports
Monitoring Protocol Filter by Port
Viewing Data Collection Metrics

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Understanding Topology Services
Topology Groups
Topology Services Menu Reference
Supported Protocols
Understanding Topology Services
You can use Topology Services to:
View detailed network information about all devices (see Working With Devices), links (see
Working With Links), and ports (see Displaying Port Attributes) in your network.
Display the physical and logical services in your network. See Understanding Network Topology
Views.
Open network management tools from the network views. See Using VLANs.
Segment your network logically and manage workgroups that use VLANs.
View port, device, and trunk attributes; view and find port information in a VTP domain; and
configure VLANs on a trunk.
Display reports about inconsistencies or misconfigurations in your physical or logical network
setup.
Configure and manage Etherchannel and Trunk links between devices.
Configure and Visualize Spanning Tree Protocol.
Configure and manage IVR.
Run TDR test between devices.
Cross-launching CiscoWorks Applications from Topology Services
The following Cisco Works applications can be launched from Topology Services:
Resource Manager Essentials
Device Fault Manager
Virtual Network Manager
Internetwork Performance Monitor
CiscoWorks Assistant
Health and Utilization Monitor
For complete details, see Starting CiscoWorks Applications From Topology Views.
This topic contains:
Navigating in Main Window
Using Network Views
Working With Links

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Starting Topology Services
Starting Topology Services
Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
You must install the J ava plug-in to access Topology Services from a client. If you are prompted to install
the J ava plug-in, download and install it using the installation screens.
The next time you start the application, it automatically uses the plug-in. For more information on the
J ava Plug-in, see User Guide for CiscoWorks Common Services.
While launching Topology Services, if the daemon is down or the ANIServer process is terminated.
For daemon:
Check whether the daemon is up and running by entering pdshow at the command prompt.
You can restart the daemon by entering:
For Windows: net start crmdmgtd.
For Solaris: /etc/init.d/dmgtd
For ANIServer:
Check whether the ANIServer process is up and running by entering pdshow ANIServer at the
command prompt.
If the process is down, restart ANIServer by entering pdexec ANIServer at the command prompt and
try again.
Step 1 Verify that your network is set up properly.
Step 2 Verify that the Campus Manager Server is set up properly and running. For information about the
Campus Manager Server, see Campus Manager Applications
This section contains the following:
Prerequisites to Launch Topology Services
Launching Topology Services when the Server is not DNS Resolvable
Launching Topology Services from Windows Client
Launching Topology Services from Solaris Client
Prerequisites to Launch Topology Services
To access Campus Manager Topology Services, we recommend that you install J ava Plug-in version
1.6.0_11. If the client machine is installed with the J RE Update version equal to or higher than the
recommended version, then Topology Services is launched in the client machine.
If the client machine is installed with an Update version equal to or higher than the recommended J RE
version (1.6.0_11), then Topology Services will be launched only if either one of two versions is
selected.
If the user selects the recommended J RE as well as the higher Update version of J RE, Topology Services
will be launched with the higher Update version of J RE.
For example, CM 5.2 requires J RE 1.6.0_11 to launch Topology Services. If the client machine is
installed with an Update version higher than J RE 1.6.0_11, say 1.6.0_12, and user selects J RE 1.6.0_12,
then Topology Services is launched with J RE 1.6.0_12.

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Starting Topology Services
Launching Topology Services when the Server is not DNS Resolvable
The CiscoWorks client must be able to resolve the hostname of the CiscoWorks server to server's
IP Address, through DNS.
If the CiscoWorks server is not DNS resolvable, CiscoWorks client can access it with the IP address
itself, by performing the following steps:
Step 1 Open the orb.properties file
Solaris: NMSROOT/lib/classpath
Windows: NMSROOT\lib\classpath
where NMSROOT is the directory where you have installed CiscoWorks.
Step 2 Set the property as follows:
jacorb.dns.enable=off
Step 3 Go to Common Services > Server > Security Single-Server Management > Certificate Setup.
The Certificate Setup page appears.
Step 4 Enter the IP Address of the CiscoWorks Server in the Hostname textbox.
Step 5 Populate the other columns as explained in the Common Services help.
Step 6 Click Apply to generate the self-signed certificate.
Step 7 Restart the daemons, as explained in Using Daemon Manager.
You will be able to launch Topology Services with the IP address itself.
Launching Topology Services from Windows Client
In LMS 3.1, Visibroker is migrated to J acORB.
While launching Topology Services, check whether the hostname is DNS resolvable or edit the hosts file
in the Windows client.
If the mapping is not available, you need to edit the hosts file by adding the IP Address details for the
LMS Server in the following format:
IPAddress Hostname
The Hostname entry can be of the form hostname, example You can access the hosts file in the Windows
client from the following location:
%SYSTEMROOT%\system32\drivers\etc
To launch the Topology Service from Windows Vista client, do the following:
Step 1 Disable UAC when you download the jar files for the first time.
Step 2 Launch the Topology Service. If you are unable to launch the Topology Service, go to Step 3.
Step 3 Manually copy the jacorb-sign-1-3.jar, avalon-framework-4.1.5-sign-1-3.jar and logkit-1.2-sign-1-3.jar
files from the location NMSROOT/campus/www/classpath in LMS server to J RE installed directory
\lib\endorsed.
Step 4 Assign full control permission to jre/lib folder.

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Using Topology Services Legend
Launching Topology Services from Solaris Client
The Topology_Services.jnlp file has to be associated with the correct J ava application for Topology
services to launch properly. You need to associate the jnlp file only once, when you access Topology
Services for the first time.
While launching Topology Services, check whether the hostname is DNS resolvable or edit the hosts file
in the Solaris client. You can access the hosts file in the Solaris client from the following location:
/etc
If the mapping is not available, you need to edit the hosts file by adding the IP Address details for the
LMS Server in the following format:
IPAddress Hostname
To associate the jnlp file with the correct J ava application:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
A pop up window is displayed, prompting you to save or cancel the Topology_Services.jnlp file.
Step 2 Click Save.
Step 3 Go to the folder where you saved the file, right click and choose Open with.
A pop up window is displayed.
Step 4 Click Go here.
Another pop up window is displayed.
Step 5 Click Browse and locate the jre folder.
For example, if your J ava plugin version is jre1.6.0_05,
the directory can be /usr/java/jre1.6.0_05/bin
Step 6 Associate the file with javaws, by choosing javaws from the above path.
Step 7 Click Apply and close the pop up window.
Step 8 Click on the Topology_Services.jnlp file to launch Topology services.
Using Topology Services Legend
The Topology Services Legend explains the use of icons and colors in network views. You can refer the
Legend to identify devices in your network and their status. The Legend includes all manageable
devices, including devices that might be in your network. Color indicators described in the Legend
enable you to quickly determine the status of your network.
To display the Legend:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select Help > Legend from the menu.
The Campus Manager Color and Icon Legend window opens. For details, see Table 9-1.
Step 3 Click Close to close the window.

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Using Topology Services Legend
Table 9-1 Color and Icon Legend
Symbol Description
Icons
Ethernet VLAN
Filter On
FDDI Ring
Link Port
Network Topology View (Topology Map)
Switch Port
Router
Serial Bus
Switch
Switch Cloud
Virtual Switching System (VSS)

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Using Topology Services Legend
Unknown VLAN
WAN Switch
Embedded Router
Embedded Switch
Embedded SBC
End Station
Integrated Communications System
Layer 2 and Layer 3 Switch Router
Application Server
Hub
Switch Probe
Voice Gateway
Table 9-1 Color and Icon Legend (continued)
Symbol Description

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Using Topology Services Legend
Access Point
Optical Services Router
Cisco ONS Series Device
Content Engine
Content Server Switch
DSL Switch
Switch Stack
Storage Switch
Add Row
Campus Manager Server Unknown
Campus Manager Server Idle or Running
Restricted Topology View
Table 9-1 Color and Icon Legend (continued)
Symbol Description

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Using Topology Services Legend
Broadband Router
Cisco CallManager
Cluster Commander Switch
Device
Navigate Down
Link in Forwarding State
Link in Blocking State
Isolated VLAN
Community VLAN
Two-way Community VLAN
Closed Folder
Domain Folder
Table 9-1 Color and Icon Legend (continued)
Symbol Description

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Chapter 9 Using Topology Services
Using Topology Services Legend
Open Folder
Layer Map
Route Switch Module (RSM) Switch
Display All Rows
Begin
Stop Tree
Unknown Device
Zoom to Fit
Icon Colors
Major Fault (red)
1
OK (green)
Links
Active (black)
Table 9-1 Color and Icon Legend (continued)
Symbol Description

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Using Topology Services Legend
Table 9-2 lists the special scenarios for Layer 2/Layer 3 Switch Routers.
For example, the switch is running Catalyst operating system and the router is an RSM or MSFC module,
and if either the switch or the router is unreachable the topology map displays the icon as:
Inactive (red)
Not in network (red dashes)
Unknown (blue)
Link virtualization status as black link displays that both
the interfaces connecting devices are a part of VRF
Link virtualization status as cyan link displays only one
interface is a part of VRF
Link virtualization status as grey link displays no
interface is a part of VRF
1. Device is not reachable using SNMP or the device is down.
Table 9-1 Color and Icon Legend (continued)
Symbol Description
Table 9-2 Icons for Discrepancies of Layer 2/Layer 3 Switch Router
Symbol Description
Router is reachable, but switch is unreachable using SNMP.
Router is unreachable using SNMP, but switch is reachable.

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Understanding Topology Services Main Window
Understanding Topology Services Main Window
You can access the LAN Edge, Layer 2, and Unconnected Devices network views of managed domains
discovered in your network, and you can filter, access, or view network information or status. For more
information, see Table 9-3.
Table 9-3 Topology Services Main Window Components
Item Description Usage Note
Menu Contains Topology Services
commands.
See Topology Services Main Window
Menu Reference for more information.
Toolbar Provides quick access to frequently
used menu options.
To show or hide the toolbar, select
View >Show Toolbar.
Tree View Access the LAN Edge, Layer 2, and
Unconnected Devices network views
of managed domains.
Right-click items that you want to
display, and select View >Display
View to display network views.
Single-click items to display
summary information in the
Summary View.
Summary View Displays configuration information
about the items displayed in the Tree
View.
Click and drag column headings to
change the order in which they appear.
Status Bar Displays Topology Services system
messages on the left and the Status
button on the right.
Click the color-coded Status button to
open Campus Manager Server Status
Information window.
In this window you can view Data
Collection status.

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Understanding Topology Services Main Window
Understanding Tree View
The Tree View displays the discovered network objects in a hierarchical list. This list includes managed
domains and available network views.
Table 9-4 Understanding Tree View
Folder Item Description
Domains VTP
Domains
Displays and monitors the details of the VLANs in your network.
Sometimes includes special cases labeled NULL or NO_VTP.
NULL Lists devices that are in transparent mode and that support
VTP, but that do not have configured domain names. Each of these
devices is identified in the list by its IP address.
NO_VTPLists devices that do not support VTP. Each of these
devices is identified in the list by its IP address.
However, devices that do not support VTP but support VLANs (for
example, Catalyst 2900XL Standard Edition switches) will be placed in
the NO_VTP domain.
Devices that do not support VLANs and VTP (for example, Catalyst
1900 Standard Edition switches) will be placed in the domain category
of the neighbor device.
Network
Views
LAN Edge
View
Shows network connectivity between Layer 3 devices that have routing
characteristics. Devices without Layer 3 connectivity are displayed in
switch cloud network views.
Layer 2 View Displays Layer 2 information about your network, including LAN
switches, routers, multilayer switching devices, hubs, and switch
probes.
Unconnected
Devices
View
Displays devices for which connectivity information could not be
obtained.
VTP Views Displays devices that are participating in VTP domains, and their
neighbors.
Topology
Groups
System
Defined
Groups
Displays a top-level container for standard groups that are accessible to
and used by most Campus Manager users. This also includes a set of
predefined groups.
User Defined
Groups
Displays a top-level container where individual Campus Manager users
create their own groups.

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Using Topology Services Main Window
Using Topology Services Main Window
You can use Topology Services Main Window for displaying the discovered VTP domains, VLANs, and
access the LAN Edge view, Layer 2 view, and the Unconnected Devices view.
The topic contains:
Navigating in Main Window
Understanding the Status Bar
Using Find in Main Window
Navigating in Main Window
You can display VTP domains and VLANs from the Main Window. You can also access the LAN Edge,
Layer 2, and Unconnected Devices network views of managed domains discovered in your network, and
you can filter, access, or view network information or status.
Figure 9-1 displays the Topology Services Main Window.
Figure 9-1 Topology Services Main Window

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Using Topology Services Main Window
Table 9-5 describes the areas in the Topology Services Main Window.
1 Menu 3 Topology Tree View
2 Toolbar 4 Device Summary View
Table 9-5 Using Main Window
Item Description Usage Notes
Menu Contains Topology Services
commands.
See Topology Services Main Window Menu
Reference for more information.
Toolbar Provides quick access to frequently
used menu options.
To show or hide the toolbar, select View >
Show Toolbar.
Tree View Displays discovered VTP domains and
VLANs. Access the LAN Edge, Layer
2, and Unconnected Devices network
views of managed domains.
Right-click items that you want to display, and
select View >Display View to display
network views.
Single-click items to display summary
information in the Summary View.
Summary
View
Displays configuration information
about the items displayed in the Tree
View.
Click and drag column headings to change the
order in which they appear.
Status Bar Displays Topology Services system
messages on the left and the Status
button on the right.
Click the color-coded Status button to view
status.
This dialog box displays the Data Collection
status. It also displays the time at which the
most recent Data Collection was completed.

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Using Topology Services Main Window
Understanding the Status Bar
The status bar displays information about the current status of the Topology Services application, and
includes a button that you can click to view the current network Data Collection statistics.
Figure 9-2 describes sections of the Status Bar.
Figure 9-2 Status Bar
Table 9-6 describes different parts of a Status Bar.
1 Topology filter results 4 Topology map results
2 Discovery status button 5 Topology map status
3 Restricted View Icon
Table 9-6 Status Bar Field Descriptions
Field Description
Topology Services Messages about the status of Topology Services appear on the left side of the
status bar. These messages typically are displayed at the start and end of a task
that is performed within Topology Services.
Discovery Status A color-coded Data Collection Server status message appears in a button on the
right side of the status bar:
GreenDenotes that Topology Services is able to communicate with the
Data Collection Server.
The status message is either Running, denoting that one or more discovery
processes in the Data Collection server are in discovery; or Idle, denoting
that there are no discoveries currently active in the Data Collection Server.
RedDenotes that the Data Collection Server is down or unreachable. In this
case, the status message is Unknown.
Click this button to open the Discovery Information window. This window
displays detailed information on all Discovery processes.
Restricted View A lock icon appears when Campus Manager is integrated with ACS Server and
Topology is set to display only authorized devices. For details, see Restricted
Topology View.

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Understanding Network Topology Views
Using Find in Main Window
You can use Find to locate specific items in your network. Your search is restricted to either the Tree
View or Summary View. You cannot search both views simultaneously in Topology Services. Select the
view based on the item you want to locate.
To use the Find option in the Main Window:
Step 1 Select Edit > Find from the menu.
Step 2 Enter the required information as described in the Main Window Find Field Descriptions table.
Step 3 Click Next to find items that match your search criteria.
Select Edit > Find Next to quickly repeat your last search.
Understanding Network Topology Views
A Network View is a graphical representation of the devices in your network. You can use Network
Views to see different aspects of your network. Only devices and links discovered in your network are
displayed.
While you use Topology Services, the listed devices and links change dynamically to display what the
Campus Manager Server discovers in your network.
Network Views provide various abstract views of your network. Table 9-3 describes the Network
Topology window components.
You can use Network Views to see different aspects of your network. Only devices and links discovered
in your network are displayed in topology maps.
As you use Network Topology Views, the listed devices and links change dynamically to display devices
and links that Data Collection detects in your network.
Table 9-7 Main Window Find Field Description
Field Description Usage Notes
Search For Enter the search string Search by any string, partial or complete.
Search In Select either of these views:
Tree View
Summary View
The Find function searches only the selected item
in the specified view, and those items that appear
below your selection in the view.
To search an entire view, you must select the first
(top) item in that view.
Options Select from these options:
Ignore Case
Exact Match
Ignore CaseSelect this option to allow
matches in any case.
Exact MatchSelect this option to find
entries that match the search string exactly.

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Understanding Network Topology Views
Table 9-8 provides a list of functions that you can perform in Network Topology Views.
This topic contains:
Navigating in Network Topology Views
Connecting Securely to Devices From Clients
Displaying Network Views
Navigating in Network Topology Views
You can use Network Topology Views to see different aspects of your network. Only devices and links
discovered in your network are displayed in network views.
As you use network views, devices and links change dynamically to display changes that the Campus
Manager Server discovers in your network. See Table 9-9:
Table 9-8 Using Network Topology Views
Function Description
Displaying Network Views Access and display network views
Changing Network Topology View Layouts Displays logical and physical services in your network
Working With Links Displays information about the links between discovered
devices
Working With Application Servers Displays and access application servers in your network
Displaying Port Attributes Displays information about the status of device ports in
your network
Displaying Aggregate Link Attributes Displays information about any aggregate links that you
have created in your network
Displaying Service Attributes Displays information about the available services in your
network
Customizing Network Topology Views Modifies network views to suit your individual network
management needs
Using Topology Filters Use filters or the Find function to locate specific devices,
or specific kinds of devices
Table 9-9 Network Topology View Features
Item Description Usage Notes
Menu Contains Topology Services
commands.
See Network Topology View
Menu Reference for more
information.
Toolbar Provides quick access to
frequently used menu options.
To show or hide the toolbar,
select View >Show Toolbar.

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Understanding Network Topology Views
Figure 9-3 Network Topology View
Topology Filters Allows you to filter and display
devices and links.
Filter device types, LANE
components, link types, and
discrepancies in your network.
For more details on filters, see
Using Topology Filters.
Status Bar Displays Topology Services
system messages on the left and
the Discovery Status button on
the right.
This window displays Data
Collection status.
Click the color-coded Status to
view the Data Collection
statistics.
1 Menu 3 Topology Filters
2 Toolbar 4 Topology Map
Table 9-9 Network Topology View Features (continued)
Item Description Usage Notes

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Understanding Network Topology Views
Connecting Securely to Devices From Clients
You can connect securely to a device using SSH. To connect to a device from a client, Microsoft
Windows clients must perform the SSH executable configuration. Solaris clients must use the default
SSH client provided by the operating system.
To connect to the devices securely:
For Microsoft Windows Clients
For Solaris Clients
For Microsoft Windows Clients
This section describes how to connect to the devices from Microsoft Windows clients.
To specify the SSH Client
You must provide the location of the SSH client executable in the appropriate property file.
To connect to the device
To specify the SSH Client
Step 1 Create a file named campusmgr.properties.
The SSH Client is the default connection type.
If you select Putty as Client
a. Choose SSH as the Connection Type
b. Select Default Settings from the Saved Sessions list
c. Click Save to save the default settings.
To verify whether the default settings have been applied, close Putty and relaunch it
Step 2 Write the following property in the file:
CMSSH=SSH executable file name
For example,
If you are using Secure Shell:
CMSSH=C:\\Progra~1\\SSHCOM~1\\SSHSEC~1\\ssh2.exe
If you are using Putty:
CMSSH=C:\\PROGRA~1\\putty\\putty.exe
Step 3 Save the file in your home directory.
For example, your home directory can be D:\Documents and Settings\admin.

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Understanding Network Topology Views
To connect to the device
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services.
Step 2 Go to a Network Topology View and right-click a device icon, and select SSH from the popup menu
Or
Go to a Summary View and right-click a device entry, and select SSH from the popup menu.
The SSH dialog box opens.
Step 3 Enter the username in the User Name field.
Step 4 Click OK to connect or click Cancel to disconnect.
An SSH terminal window opens.
For Solaris Clients
This section describes how to connect to the devices from Solaris clients.
To specify the SSH Client
You must provide the location of the SSH client executable in the appropriate property file.
To connect to the device
To specify the SSH Client
Step 1 Create a file named campusmgr.properties.
Step 2 Write the following property in the file:
CMSSH=SSH executable file name
For example,
If you are using Secure Shell:
CMSSH=/usr/bin/ssh/ssh2.exe
Step 3 Save the file in your home directory.
For example, if your username is maria, your home directory will be /home/maria.
To connect to the device
Step 1 Right-click a device icon from a Network Topology View, and select SSH from the popup menu
Or Right-click a device entry from a summary view, and select SSH from the popup menu.
The SSH dialog box opens.
Step 2 Enter the username in the User Name field.
Step 3 Click OK to connect or click Cancel to disconnect.
An SSH terminal window opens.
.

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Understanding Network Topology Views
Displaying Network Views
A Network Topology View is a graphical representation of the devices in your network.
To access and display several network and domain views:
Step 1 Right-click a network view from the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
A popup menu appears.
Step 2 Select Display View.
The Network Topology window opens, displaying the specified network or domain view. See Table 9-9
for more information.
Using Panner to View Topology Maps
Figure 9-4 Panning the Topology Map
1 Menu 4 Topology Map
2 Toolbar 5 Navigator
3 Topology Filter 6 Panner Window

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Using Network Views
You can select a network view from the Tree View to display different segments of your network in a
Network Topology window.
See Table 9-10 for a list of functions you can perform in Network Topology views.
Table 9-10 Network View Item Descriptions
Item Description Usage Notes
LAN Edge View Shows network connectivity
between Layer 3 devices that
have routing characteristics.
Devices without Layer 3
connectivity are placed in
Switch Cloud network views.
View:
Device Attributes
IPv6 Addresses. See Understanding IPv6
Support in Campus Manager
Port Attributes. See Displaying Port
Attributes
Change Management IP
Configure Inter-VLAN Routing
Link Attributes
Virtual Network Manager
Aggregate Link Attributes
Delete Links
Switch Cloud
View
Displays the Layer 2 devices
between two Layer 3 devices
in your network.
View:
Device Attributes
IPv6 Addresses
Port Attributes
Service Attributes
Change Management IP
Configure Inter-VLAN Routing
VLAN Report
Link Attributes
Configure EtherChannel
Create Trunk
Virtual Network Manager
Trunk Attributes
TDR Report

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Layer 2 View Displays the Layer 2
information about your
network, including LAN
switches, routers, MLS
devices, hubs, and switch
probes.
View:
Device Attributes. See Displaying Device
Attributes
IPv6 Addresses
Port Attributes. See Displaying Port
Attributes.
Service Attributes
Change Management IP
Configure Inter-VLAN Routing
VLAN Report
Link Attributes
Configure EtherChannel
Create Trunk
Virtual Network Manager
Trunk Attributes
TDR Report
End Host Report
Switch Port Report
Unconnected
Devices View
Displays devices for which
connectivity information could
not be obtained, including
devices not supported by
Topology Services.
View:
Device Attributes
IPv6 Addresses
Port Attributes
VLAN Report
Virtual Network Manager
Change Management IP
Configure Inter-VLAN Routing
Link Attributes
Table 9-10 Network View Item Descriptions (continued)
Item Description Usage Notes

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For complete details on launching other LMS applications, see Starting CiscoWorks Applications From
Topology Views.
This topic contains:
Customizing Network Topology Views
Changing Network Topology View Layouts
Starting CiscoWorks Applications From Topology Views
Modifying Network View Features
Customizing Network Topology Views
You can modify the Network Topology Views to change the location of device icons or links, save
Network Topology Views, and remove devices from the Network Topology View.
This section contains:
Saving Network Topology View Layouts
You can customize Network Topology Views by rearranging and dragging devices and links to different
locations on the view. This allows multiple users to customize the way the Network Topology Views
appear. To do this:
Step 1 Make any changes you want to the Network Topology View.
Step 2 Select File > Save Layout.
VTP Views Shows the devices that are
participating in VTP domains.
VTP Views also shows the
non-VTP devices connected
directly to the VTP domain.
View:
Device Attributes
Port Attributes
Service Attributes
VLAN Report
Change Management IP
Configure Inter-VLAN Routing
Link Attributes
Configure EtherChannel
Create Trunk
Virtual Network Manager
Trunk Attributes
TDR Report
Table 9-10 Network View Item Descriptions (continued)
Item Description Usage Notes

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Deleting Devices From Network View
To delete devices from any Network Topology View.
Step 1 Select the device you want to delete from the Network Topology View.
Step 2 Select Edit > Delete Devices.
This step only removes the device from the Campus Manager Server database. If the device still exists
in your network and is discoverable by the Campus Manager Server, it reappears during the next Data
Collection.
If devices that you do not want displayed in Topology Services continue to reappear on the Network
Topology View, go to Admin > Data Collection > Device Management > Exclude Devices and
manually delete the device. This permanently deletes the device from Campus Manager.
Changing Network Topology View Layouts
To change the layout for each Network Topology View.
Step 1 Go to a Network Topology View window and select View > Relayout.
Step 2 Select a layout style. See Table 9-11.
Starting CiscoWorks Applications From Topology Views
This section contains:
Launching RME from Topology Map
Launching DFM from Topology Map
Launching DFM Alert Reports
Launching CiscoWorks Assistant from Topology Map
Launching Internetwork Performance Monitor from Topology Map
Table 9-11 Layout Style
Style Description
Circular Arranges devices in a circular pattern, resizes devices to fit in
viewable area.
Hierarchical Arranges devices in a hierarchical pattern, resizes devices to fit
in viewable area.
Symmetric Arranges devices in a compact pattern, resizes devices to fit in
viewable area.
Orthogonal Arranges devices in an angular pattern. Each link bends at right
angles. Individual devices resize to show each link.

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Launching HUM from Topology Map
Launching VNM from Topology Map
Edge VLAN Configuration at Distribution Layer
Edge VLAN Configuration at Access Layer with Trunk
You can start some of the applications of CiscoWorks LAN Management Solution, from Topology maps.
This section also instructs you on Modifying DFM Alert Settings.
Table 9-12 gives the list of applications that can be launched:
Table 9-12 Applications Invoked from Topology Maps
Product Application Description
Resource Manager
Essentials (RME)
NetConfig Enables you to make configuration
changes to all RME supported network
devices
SWIM Software Management automates the steps
associated with upgrade planning,
scheduling, downloading software images,
and monitoring your network.
Device Fault
Manager (DFM)
DFM Fault History Report Fault History provides the history of DFM
events and alerts.
Show DFM Alerts Launches the DFM report. This report
displays information on the alerts and
events that are associated with the device.

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Virtual Network
Manager
Create VRF (Virtual Routing and
Forwarding).
VNM enables you to create VRF on the
devices and interfaces in an Enterprise
network. For more information on creating
VRF, see Configuring VRF.
Edit VRF Enables you to edit the VRF details
configured on devices. For more
information, see Editing VRF.
Extend VRF Enables you to extend the VRF
functionality to neighboring devices and
interfaces. For more information, see
Extending VRF.
Edge VLAN Configuration Enables you to assign edge VLANs to a
VRF instance. For more information, see
Edge VLAN Configuration
Troubleshooting. For more
information on Troubleshooting, see
Troubleshooting.
Enables you to troubleshoot the
end-to-end connectivity of devices
participating in a VRF.
You can troubleshoot using:
Ping VRF. For more information on
Ping, see Ping or Traceroute.
Traceroute VRF. For more
information on Ping, see Ping or
Traceroute.
Show Command VRF. For more
information on Show Results, see
Show Results.
Software Upgrade Enables you to upgrade the software of the
device to enhance its capability to
participate in a VRF.
Create VLAN Enables you to create VLAN for selected
devices. For more information, see
Configuring VLANs.
CWA CiscoWorks Assistant CiscoWorks Assistant is a web-based tool
that provides workflows to help you to
overcome network management and
software deployment challenges.
CiscoWorks Assistant workflows contain
functionalities that are available across
LMS applications.
These functionalities are grouped
logically to setup and configure the LMS
server. This helps you troubleshoot your
network devices.
Table 9-12 Applications Invoked from Topology Maps
Product Application Description

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Using Network Views
Note You can launch RME, DFM, CWA, IPM and HUM from Topology maps even if they are installed on
different CiscoWorks servers, in a Master Slave setup.
Launching RME from Topology Map
Step 1 Select a device in the Layer 2 View.
Step 2 Right click on the device and select Resource Manager Essentials.
Step 3 Select either Software Management or NetConfig report.
Resource Manager Essentials is launched.
HUM Health and Utilization Monitor CiscoWorks HUM is a software
application that allows the network
administrator to monitor the health and
utilization of devices connected to the
network.
HUM monitors the device for performance
parameters such as CPU utilization,
memory utilization, interface utilization,
interface availability, device availability
and so on.
HUM does this by querying the device
through Simple Network Management
Protocol (SNMP).
IPM Internetwork Performance Monitor Internetwork Performance Monitor (IPM)
is a network management application that
allows you to monitor the performance of
multi-protocol networks.
IPM monitors the network performance by
configuring collectors on IP SLA (IP
Service Level Agreement) capable source
devices (routers) and collects the
performance-related statistics from these
devices.
You can launch the following IPM
workflows from Topology Services:
Creating Colletors
Showing Collectors
Table 9-12 Applications Invoked from Topology Maps
Product Application Description

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Using Network Views
Launching DFM from Topology Map
Step 1 Select a device in the Layer 2 View.
Step 2 Right click on the device and select Device Fault Manager.
Step 3 Select either Fault History Report or Show DFM Alert.
Device Fault Manager is launched. For more details see, User Guide for Device Fault Manager.
Launching DFM Alert Reports
Step 1 Select a device in the Layer 2 View.
Step 2 Right click on the device and select Show DFM Alert.
Note You can launch DFM Alert reports, even if Campus Manager and Device Fault Manager are installed on
different CiscoWorks servers, in a Master Slave setup.
From N-Hop View Portlet, you can right click on any device and then click Show DFM Alert, to the see
the alert associated with the device.
When DFM information is polled and displayed in Topology Maps, and if an alert is associated with a
device, you can see the following icons, displayed along with the devices:
For more details see, User Guide for Device Fault Manager.
Icon Indication
Critical
Warning
Informational

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Launching CiscoWorks Assistant from Topology Map
Step 1 Select any device and right-click.
Step 2 Select Troubleshoot.
The Device Troubleshooting Report page is launched. This page gives various details about the device.
In case of devices that are down, the details in this page helps you to analyze why the device is
unreachable. For more details, seeUser Guide for CiscoWorks Assistant.
Launching Internetwork Performance Monitor from Topology Map
Step 1 Select any device and right-click.
Step 2 Select either:
Create Collector
Select Internetwork Performance Monitor> Create Collector to create Collectors page. You can
create new collectors for the device.
Or
Show Collector
Select Internetwork Performance Monitor> Show Collector to view the list of collectors
associated with the device.
You can create collectors only on devices that are IPSLA capable. For more details, seeUser Guide for
Internetwork Performance Monitor.
Launching HUM from Topology Map
To launch HUM from the Topology map, select:
Any device from the map and right-click and Select Device Dashboard. The Device Dashboard
report is launched, that provides performance details for the device.
Or
Any link from the Topology map and right-click and Select Interface Report. The Interface Report
for that particular link is launched, displaying the data for the last one hour.
For complete details on the report, see User Guide for Health and Utilization Monitor.

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Launching VNM from Topology Map
Step 1 Select any device from the map and right-click. You can select multiple devices.
To select multiple devices, press Ctrl.
Step 2 Select any of the following:
Virtual Network Manager > Create VRF
The Create VRF page with the selected devices is launched. You can create VRF on the selected
device.
Virtual Network Manager > Edit VRF
The Edit VRF page appears with the selected devices and corresponding VRF details. You can Edit
VRF on the selected device.
Virtual Network Manager > Extend VRF
The Extend VRF page appears with the selected devices and the VRF details of the selected devices
is launched. You can extend VRF configuration details to the devices that are neighbors to the
selected device.
Virtual Network Manager > Edge VLAN Configuration
The Edge VLAN Configuration workflow is used to access edge VLANs to a VRF instance. This
provides an end-to-end virtualization. You can assign Edge VLAN to a VRF by associating it to a
Switch Virtual Interface (SVI). You can assign VLANs to VRF at the edge, using the following
options:
To perform Edge VLAN Configuration at the Distribution Layer, see Edge VLAN
Configuration at Distribution Layer
To perform Edge VLAN Configuration at the Access Layer where Trunk exists on the selected
device, see Edge VLAN Configuration at Access Layer with Trunk
Virtual Network Manager > Troubleshooting
The Ping or traceroute page is launched. You can troubleshoot the end-to-end connectivity of
devices that participate in a VRF. You can troubleshoot using either Ping or Traceroute.
Virtual Network Manager > Troubleshooting > Ping VRF. For more information on Ping,
see Ping or Traceroute.
Virtual Network Manager > Troubleshooting > Traceroute VRF. For more information on
Ping, see Ping or Traceroute.
You can view the results after troubleshooting using Virtual Network Manager > Troubleshooting
> Show Results VRF. For more information on Show Results, see Show Results.
Virtual Network Manager > Software Upgrade.
The SWIM page is launched and it displays the selected devices. You can upgrade the device
software to make it a VRF capable device. If the device is already VRF Capable, the image can be
upgraded to the next available higher version.
Virtual Network Manager > Create VLAN
Using Virtual Network Manager, you can create VLAN. The VLAN configuration page from
Campus Manager. The VLAN Configuration page guides you through the VLAN configuration
process. See Figure 9-5.

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Figure 9-5 Launch Virtual Network Manager from Topology Services
For more information on Virtual Network Manager, see Virtual Network Manager.
Edge VLAN Configuration at Distribution Layer
To achieve complete end-to-end VRF configuration, you must virtualize the Distribution Layer by using
the Edge VLAN Configuration feature in Virtual Network Manager.
Here, Access VLANs are mapped to a VRF instance to allow the data from the devices in the
Distribution layer to participate in a VRF. VLANs are associated to a VRF by associating them to an
SVI.
Step 1 Launch TopologyView
The Topology Services page appears.
Step 2 Expand the Network View tree and select Layer 2 View.
Step 3 Right-click the Layer 2 View and select Display View.
The Layer 2 View page appears.
Step 4 Select a VRF from the VRF filter under Topology Filters.
If you do not select a VRF, you can perform Edge VLAN Configuration on only one device.
Step 5 Select the devices from the Distribution Layer.
Step 6 Right- click the selected device and select Virtual Network Manager > Edge VLAN Configuration
If you directly select a device without selecting a VRF, you are prompted to select a VRF from the VRF
Selector for the device window. The VRF selector displays a list of VRFs that are configured on the
selected device.

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The Edge VLAN Configuration: Select Devices page appears.
The Device Selector does not display pure L3 devices. The devices selected in the map view are already
selected in the Select Devices page. In this page, you can select more devices to perform Edge VLAN
Configuration.
For more information on the Edge VLAN Configuration, see Edge VLAN Configuration.
Edge VLAN Configuration at Access Layer with Trunk
Consider a scenario where VLAN is not configured on the interface of the selected devices with Trunk
configured on the selected devices.
To configure VLAN
Step 1 Launch Toplogy View
The Layer 2 View page appears.
Step 2 In the Layer 2 View page, select the devices in the Access Layer.
Step 3 Right-click and select Create VLAN.
The VLAN Configuration page appears.
For more information on Creating VLAN, see Configuring VLANs
If Trunk is not configured on the selected device, you can create Trunk by following Step 4 and Step 5.
Step 4 Select a link connecting devices from the Distribution Layer to the Access Layer
Step 5 Right-click the link and select Create Trunk.
The Create Trunk page appears.
For more information on Creating Trunk, see Creating Trunk.
Modifying DFM Alert Settings
After configuring the settings in the Admin page, the Topology maps show all the Critical Warning and
Informational alerts, by default.
If you want to see only a certain type of alerts, you can change the settings as follows:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services.
Step 2 Launch any Network Topology View.
Step 3 Right click on the Topology map and choose DFM Alert Settings.
Or
Click View > DFM Alert Settings from the Topology Services menu.
The following settings are displayed:
Critical
Warning
Informational

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These settings are checked by default.
Step 4 Uncheck the required setting, for which you do not want to display the information.
For example if you want to display only Critical alerts, leave the Critical option checked and uncheck
the other two options.
The DFM Alert settings is client specific. Therefore, the settings are applied only for your Topology
maps and N-Hop View portlet. Other users connected to the same Campus Manager server can choose
their own settings.
Step 5 Click Apply to save the settings.
The settings are saved to the server.
Step 6 Close all Topology Windows and relaunch Topology Services for the change to take effect.
Modifying Network View Features
You can modify and customize various Network Topology View features to suit your operating
environment. For example, you can change the display colors and view layout of the Network Topology
View.
You can also customize the view features for individual user roles, or modify the default features for all
users.
This section contains:
Changing Network Topology View Properties for One User Role
Changing Network Topology View Properties for All Users
Setting Background Images for Topology Views

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Using Network Views
Changing Network Topology View Properties for One User Role
You can change client map properties for one user role without affecting the Network Topology View
properties for other user roles. To do this:
Step 1 Go to a Network Topology View and select Edit > Map Preferences.
The Client Map Properties window opens.
Step 2 Change the properties as described in Table 9-13.
Table 9-13 Client Network Topology View Field Descriptions
Field Description
Colors
Map Background Color of the background in Network
Topology Views
Map Foreground Color of the foreground in Network
Topology Views
Map Selection Color of the outline for selected links and
devices
Highlight Color Color that links and devices are
highlighted in

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Step 3 Click Apply to apply these changes based on your current user role.
Changing Network Topology View Properties for All Users
To change the Network Topology View properties for all users:
Step 1 Go to a Network Topology View and select Edit > Map Preferences.
Step 2 Click Edit Defaults.
The Client Default Properties window opens.
Step 3 Change the Network Topology View properties as described in Table 9-14.
Layout Style
Hierarchical Reveals precedence relations
Circular Portrays interconnected ring and star
topologies
Symmetrical Produces representations of complex
networks
Orthogonal Produces graph layouts with edges
running parallel to x and y axes
Label Display Fallback Rule
Fallback Rule Allows you to set the order in which
device labels appear in Network
Topology Views
Edit Defaults Allows you to edit the default properties
for all users
Restore Defaults Allows you to restore the default settings
Table 9-13 Client Network Topology View Field Descriptions (continued)
Field Description
Table 9-14 Default Network Topology View Properties
Field Description
Colors
Network Topology View
Background
Color of the background in Network Topology
Views
Network Topology View
Foreground
Color of the foreground in Network Topology
Views
Network Topology View
Selection
Color of the outline for selected links and devices
Highlight Color Color that links and devices are highlighted in

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Step 4 To trim SysName based on Domain suffix, enable Trim Domain Suffix On Labels, specify Domain
Suffix value and ensure that Truncate SysName On Labels is not enabled.
Step 5 Click Apply to change the Network Topology View preferences for all users.
Setting Background Images for Topology Views
You can set an image as the background of the Network Topology Views in Topology Services. Campus
Manager allows you to upload images and set the image, where the image is in GIF, J PEG, or J PG image
formats.
This section contains:
Uploading the Image
Selecting the Image
Deleting the Image
To set the background image:
Step 1 Upload the image.
Step 2 Set the image as the background image.
Layout Style
Hierarchy Reveals precedence relations
Circular Portrays interconnected ring and star topologies
Symmetrical Produces representations of complex networks
Orthogonal Produces graph layouts with edges running
parallel to x and y axes
Label Display Fallback Rule
Fallback Rule Allows you to set the order in which device labels
appear in Network Topology Views
Other
Domain Suffix Lets you specify a domain suffix for all devices in
your network
Trim Domain Suffix On
Labels
Lets you shorten the domain suffix on Network
Topology View labels
Sysname Max Characters
Allowed
Lets you specify the maximum character length of
device sysNames in the display
Truncate Sysname On
Labels
Lets you enable or disable the truncation of
sysNames in the display
Table 9-14 Default Network Topology View Properties (continued)
Field Description

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Uploading the Image
To upload and set the background image:
Step 1 Right-click any Network View from the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 2 Select Display View from the pop up menu.
The Network Topology window appears.
Step 3 Select Edit > Map Preferences from the menu.
The Client Map Properties window appears.
Step 4 Click Upload Image, in the Map Background Image section.
Step 5 Select the file from the list in the Upload Map Background Image window, and click Open.
Selecting the Image
After you finish uploading the image, you can select and set the background for each network view.
To select an image for the background:
Step 1 Select Edit > Map Preferences from the menu in the Network Topology Display view.
The Client Map Properties window appears.
Select an image from the drop-down menu for Background Image, in the Map Background Image
section.
If you do not want to set an image, select the default None.
Step 2 Click Apply.
Step 3 Click OK.
Deleting the Image
To delete the image from the list of images that you have uploaded.
Step 1 Select Edit > Map Preferences from the menu from the Network Topology Display view.
The Client Map Properties window appears.
Step 2 Select an image from the drop-down menu for Background Image, in the Map Background Image
section.
Step 3 Click Delete Image.

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Chapter 9 Using Topology Services
Understanding Cluster Switches
Understanding Cluster Switches
Campus Manager is now enhanced to discover Commander and member devices of a Switch Cluster.
You can create and delete VLANs in these switches.
You can configure switch clusters to manage a set of switches using a single IP address. Switch cluster
is a group of switches connected to each other, where one switch is designated as the Command switch
and upto 15 switches can be designated as Member switches.
Communication to all these member switches is carried out through the command switch. The Command
switch is the single point of contact for configuring, managing, and monitoring the cluster of switches.
A member switch can not be a member of any other cluster at a point of time.
Clustering the switches allows you to:
Manage a group of switches using a single IP address, especially when you have a limited number
of IP addresses.
Manage switches regardless of them being distributed across Layer 2 or Layer 3 networks. The
member switches are connected to the Command switch through one common VLAN.
Designate standby Command switch to avoid losing connectivity with the member switches.
Restrictions:
Command switch cannot be a member or command switch of another cluster.
Commander switches must connect to standby Command switches only through the management
VLAN.
For information on displaying Cluster switches in Topology maps, see Displaying Cluster Switches.
Displaying Cluster Switches
Campus Manager discovers and displays the switches participating in clustering and the devices
connected to the cluster members.
To display the cluster members:
Step 1 Go to the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window and right-click any Network View.
Step 2 Select Display View from the pop up menu.
The Network Topology window appears. The Map displays the Command switch using an icon, which
you can see in Using Topology Services Legend.
The member switches of the cluster displays the IP address of the Command switch and the member
number, in the following format: IP address-Member Number. For example, 10.77.210.211-2, where
10.77.210.211 is the IP address of the Command switch and 2 is the member number.
To display the IP address, select View > Display Labels > Show IP, from the Menu on Topology Map.

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Using Topology Filters
Using Topology Filters
You can filter devices, links, and networking services, and locate these items on the Network Topology
Views. Many different filters are available, but the availability of specific filters varies among each of
the different Network Topology Views.
You can use multiple filters at the same time to display more than one media type.
This section contains:
Link Virtualization Status
Enabling RMON to Measure Bandwidth Utilization
Customizing Bandwidth Utilization Filters
Highlighting Filtered Devices
To filter devices:
Step 1 Start Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Go to the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window, right-click the Network View you want
and select Display View from the pop up menu.
The Network Topology View appears.

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Step 3 Toggle any top-level item in the Topology Filters list to display additional options.
Table 9-15 describes various filters.
Table 9-15 Topology Filters Description
Field Description
Types Filter
Device Types Filters by individual device; for example, Catalyst 5000.
Link Types Filters by type of link; for example, Ethernet100M.
Groups
Filters by Topology Groups in the Map. The filter displays the number of
Groups displayed in the Map, in parentheses.
For example, Topology Groups (3).
Services
Filters by the service running on the device. For example,
Cisco CallManager.
Device Status
Reachable Filters based on status of the device (reachable).
Unreachable Filters based on status of the device (unreachable).
Internal Routers
Filters by the routers.
For example, RSM/MSFC.
Discrepancy
Physical Filters by physical discrepancy; for example, link speed.

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Network Address Filters
Filters based on the protocols supported on the devices. For example,
IPv6.
STP Inconsistency Filters based on STP loop, PVID, device, or type inconsistencies.
Spanning Tree
Filters based on the spanning tree details of devices. Selecting the filter
will result in a view listing the VLANs applicable to all the switches in
the selected switch cloud.
PoE Devices
PoE Capable Devices Filters based on the Power over Ethernet (PoE) capability of the device.
Selecting the filter will highlight the devices that are PoE capable in the
displayed network view.
PoE is the ability of the LAN switching infrastructure to provide power
over the ethernet copper wire to an endpoint (device).
TDR
TDR Links Filters by the TDR enabled links.
VRF
Readiness Filters based on the readiness information of the following devices:
VRF Capable Devices Represents the devices with necessary
hardware support. However, the software must be updated to
configure VRF.
VRF Supported Devices Represents the VRF supported devices.
You can filter devices based on only one Readiness filter at a given time.
VRF List Filters based on the list of VRFs present in the Network Enterprise.
The VRF Collection process collects the VRFs in your network. By
default, the VRF collection process is scheduled to run after the Data
Collection process has completed.
To get the latest VRFs under VRF Filters, you must relaunch the Display
View.
When you select a VRF, the Map view displays the devices participating
in the selected VRF along with the virtualization status of the links that
connect two devices. You can view the following details based on the
VRF filters:
Devices participating in a VRF
Link virtualization status of the link connecting any two devices in
the Map view. For more information, see Link Virtualization Status
You can filter devices based on only one VRF at a given time.
VTP
Trunk Encapsulation Filters based on the trunk encapsulation enabled on devices.
VTP Devices Filters based on the devices running VTP.
Table 9-15 Topology Filters Description (continued)
Field Description

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Link Virtualization Status
You can get the virtualization status by hovering the mouse over the links displayed in the Map view in
Topology Services.
Grey links have both From and To interfaces that do not participate in the selected VRF.
In the Figure 9-6, the Green VRF is selected. When you select the Green VRF, the Map view
displays the number of devices and the interfaces participating in the Green VRF. The devices
that are greyed out do not participate in the Green VRF. The devices participating in the Green
VRF are highlighted in the Map view in Topology Services.
The interface in grey means that both the interfaces (Gi4/9 and Fa4/0) do not participate in
Green VRF.
Figure 9-6 Grey Links - Neither Interfaces are a Part of VRF
Bandwidth Utilization
Low Filter for highlighting the links that are in the low utilization range.
Medium Filter for highlighting the links that are in the medium bandwidth
utilization range.
High Filter for highlighting the links that are in the high bandwidth utilization
range.
Table 9-15 Topology Filters Description (continued)
Field Description

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Cyan links have only one interface that participate in the selected VRF.
In the Figure 9-7, the Blue VRF is selected. When you select the Blue VRF, it displays the status
of the devices and interfaces participating in the Blue VRF. Here, two devices are a part of the
Blue VRF. The devices that are not participating in Blue VRF are greyed out.
The interface in Cyan means that only one interface (Fa0/1) is participating in the Blue VRF.
Figure 9-7 Cyan Links - Only One interface Part of VRF
Black links represents the links with both from and to interfaces that participate in Green VRF.
Black links have both From and To interfaces participating in the selected VRF.
In the Figure 9-8, the Green VRF is selected. The selection of Green VRF displays the status of
the devices and interfaces participating in the Green VRF. Here, four devices are a part of Green
VRF. One devices is greyed out because it is not participating in the Green VRF.
The interface in Black means that both interfaces (Fa0/0 and Fa0/1) are participating in Green
VRF.

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Figure 9-8 Black Links - Both From and To Interfaces Part of VRF
You can filter devices based on only one VRF at a given time.
Step 4 Select the check box next to any option to filter specific items.
If you select multiple options from two different top-level filters (such as Types and VTP), your
selection is an assumed Boolean AND expression.
This requires that all criteria be met to highlight devices on the Network Topology View. Therefore,
only those devices supporting active links of the selected type are displayed.
If you select multiple options from the same top-level filter (such as Device and Link), your
selection is an assumed Boolean OR expression.
This requires that any criteria be met in order to highlight the selection on the Network Topology
View. However, for discrepancy filters, selecting multiple options from the same top level filter will
assume an AND operation.
If you choose to filter by a Service, the application servers that are configured to run that service,
are highlighted on the map.
However, you must complete the Displaying Service Attributes procedure to determine whether the
specified Service (or any other Service) is currently active on the application server.
Step 5 Select Edit > Highlight Filtered to highlight the filtered items.
To deselect items and check boxes that you have selected and return to the normal view, select Edit >
Clear Highlighting.

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This topic contains:
Enabling RMON to Measure Bandwidth Utilization
Customizing Bandwidth Utilization Filters
Highlighting Filtered Devices
Enabling RMON to Measure Bandwidth Utilization
Bandwidth Utilization is the measure of traffic flowing across a link. Campus Manager highlights
bandwidth utilization across links, in the Topology maps. It computes the bandwidth utilization by
taking the best estimate of the mean physical layer network utilization on the links, during the sampling
time interval.
In Topology Map, Campus Manager can differentiate the links using colors, based on the bandwidth
utilized by them. You can customize the filters to display bandwidth utilization.
For more details, see Customizing Bandwidth Utilization Filters.
This section contains:
Modifying the Parameters
Enabling RMON on All Ports in Selected Devices
Enabling RMON on Selected Ports in Selected Devices
Disabling RMON
Note Campus Manager computes bandwidth utilization only on ethernet links, and not on any other type of
link.
To compute bandwidth utilization in Campus Manager, you must enable Remote Monitoring (RMON).
Enabling RMON depends on two parameters.
Parameters to Compute Bandwidth Utilization
Enabling RMON depends on the following parameters:
Bucket SizeNumber of samples (incoming and outgoing packets) that will be examined for a
given point of time.
IntervalDuration for which samples are to be collected.
The default values for Bucket Size and Interval are 10 and 300 respectively. Though you cannot edit the
values through the user interface of Campus Manager, you can reconfigure these values through
command line interface. For more details see Modifying the Parameters.
Campus Manager computes bandwidth utilization only for those devices that have the same parametric
values as configured and displayed in the RMON Settings page. This application allows you to configure
only the same parametric values on all link ports. This is to avoid conflicts in computation.
Enabling RMON on Ports
Campus Manager allows you to enable RMON on:
All Ports in selected devices. For details, see Enabling RMON on All Ports in Selected Devices
Selected Ports in selected devices, see Enabling RMON on Selected Ports in Selected Devices

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Campus Manager highlights links in the Topology Map even if the devices are managed by other
applications such as DFM, HPOV, or CiscoView.
This topic contains:
Modifying the Parameters
Enabling RMON on All Ports in Selected Devices
Enabling RMON on Selected Ports in Selected Devices
Disabling RMON
Modifying the Parameters
The default Bucket Size is 10 and the Interval is 300 seconds. Campus Manager does not compute
bandwidth utilization for the links whose ports have different Interval values.
You can configure new values for the parameters in the ANIServer.properties file. To reconfigure the
values, you must restart the ANI server so that the file takes the new value.
For computing bandwidth utilization, Campus Manager takes only the latest values in the
ANIServer.properties file. You must reconfigure the link ports according to the values set in the
properties file for Topology Map to highlight the links.
You must reconfigure the parametric values before you enable RMON on ports.
Note You must configure the same value for Interval across the devices.
To reconfigure the values:
Step 1 Enter pdterm ANIServer at the command line to stop the ANI server.
Step 2 Go to NMSROOT/campus/etc/cwsi/ANIServer.properties.
Step 3 Modify the values of the properties, RMON.interval for Interval and RMON.bucketSize for the Bucket
Size.
The maximum value that you can enter for RMON.interval is 3600 seconds (One hour).
Step 4 Enter pdexec ANIServer at the command line to start the ANI server.
After modifying the bucket size and interval, enable RMON in devices as explained in Enabling RMON
on All Ports in Selected Devices or Enabling RMON on Selected Ports in Selected Devices.
You can use RMON.percentageTolerance property in the ANIServer.properties file to provide a value
for the Interval in a range. This is a hidden property that creates a range for the Interval value.
The property adds a value to the current interval that forms the upper limit and subtracts a value from
the current interval that forms the lower limit of the range. The default hidden value is 10 percent of the
interval.
For example, if the value provided in the ANIServer.properties file is 300, the range will be 270-330.
Thus, the samples are collected for the range of 270 to 330 seconds.

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If you want to change this default value, you must:
Step 1 Stop the ANI server.
Step 2 Enter pdterm ANIServer at the command line to stop the ANI server.
Step 3 Go to NMSROOT/campus/etc/cwsi/ANIServer.properties.
Step 4 Enter RMON.percentageTolerance=value.
Step 5 Start the ANI server.
Step 6 Enter pdexec ANIServer at the command line to start the ANI server.
Enabling RMON on All Ports in Selected Devices
To enable RMON on all ports in selected devices:
Step 1 Click Campus Manager > Visualization > RMON Configuration.
The Enable RMON dialog box appears. The Device Selector pane displays a list of all devices.
Step 2 Select the check box corresponding to the devices for which you want to enable RMON.
The RMON Settings area displays the default Bucket Size required as 10; and the Interval in seconds as
300.
For a Bucket Size of 10, and interval of 300 seconds, Campus Manager collects 10 samples of bandwidth
utilization across links over a period of 50 minutes, with an interval of 5 minutes (300 seconds).
To modify the Bucket Size and Interval, see Modifying the Parameters. If you modify the parameters,
repeat all the steps listed in this section, for enabling RMON with the new parameters.
Step 3 Check the Configure on all links check box to configure all the ports of the selected devices in the
Device Selector.
Step 4 Click Configure to enable RMON on all the ports in the selected devices.
The following command is configured on the selected ports:
rmon collection history integer owner ownername buckets bucket-number interval seconds
Example:
rmon collection history 4 owner campusmanager buckets 10 interval 300

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Enabling RMON on Selected Ports in Selected Devices
To enable RMON on selected ports in selected devices:
Step 1 Click Campus Manager > Visualization > RMON Configuration.
The Enable RMON dialog box appears. The Device Selector pane displays the list of devices.
Step 2 Select the check box corresponding to the devices for which you want to enable RMON.
The RMON Settings area displays the default Bucket Size required as 10; and the Interval in seconds as
300.
For a Bucket Size of 10, and interval of 300 seconds, Campus Manager collects 10 samples of bandwidth
utilization across links over a period of 50 minutes, with an interval of 300 seconds (5 minutes).
To modify the Bucket Size and Interval, see Modifying the Parameters. If you modify the parameters,
repeat all the steps listed in this section, for enabling RMON with the new parameters.
Step 3 Uncheck the Configure on all Links check box since it is checked by default.
Step 4 Click Select links to select the ports for which you want to enable RMON.
It displays the list of ports in the selected devices. For details on the list displayed, see Table 9-16.
TheSelect Links check box is enabled only when you uncheck the Configure on all links check box.
Step 5 Select check boxes corresponding to the ports for which you want to enable RMON.
Step 6 Click Configure to enable RMON on the selected ports.
The following command is configured on the selected ports:
rmon collection history integer owner ownername buckets bucket-number interval seconds
Example:
rmon collection history 4 owner campusmanager buckets 10 interval 300
Table 9-16 Select Links for RMON Configuration Column Description
Column Description
Port Name of the port.
Device Name Name of the device where the port is connected.
Device Address The IP address of the device.
isLink True is displayed for link ports and False for a non-link port.

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Disabling RMON
After you have enabled RMON on a device through Campus Manager, you can disable it using
Command Line Interface (CLI) only.
Commands to Disable RMON
For a device running Cisco IOS, enter the following command at the CLI prompt:
no rmon
For a device running Catalyst operating system, enter the following command at the CLI prompt
set snmp rmon disable
Customizing Bandwidth Utilization Filters
You can customize the three ranges of bandwidth utilization, which are low, medium, and high, provided
in the Topology Filters. You can also customize the colors for the links in different ranges of bandwidth
utilization.
To customize the range of utilization and the color for the ranges:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select Edit > Bandwidth Filter Settings.
The Bandwidth Filter Settings window appears.
Step 3 Select the percent of utilization and color you want to specify for each range.
For example, if you want to displays links with utilization between 0 to 40% in Yellow, set
From % to 0
To % to 40
Color to Yellow
Step 4 Click Apply to save the changes.
Now the links with 0 to 40% utilization will appear in yellow in all the topology maps.

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Using Find in Network Topology Views
Highlighting Filtered Devices
You can highlight the devices that you have filtered using the Topology filters.To do this:
Step 1 Select the required Topology Filters from the Network Topology View.
Step 2 Select Edit > Highlight Filtered from the menu.
Or
Right-click the topology map and select Highlight Filtered from the popup menu.
The topology map highlights the devices that are being filtered.
Step 3 To clear the highlight on the devices, select Edit > Clear Highlighted from the menu.
Using Find in Network Topology Views
You can locate specific devices in your network by searching for the device name or device address. You
can do this by using the Find option. To do this:
Step 1 Go to a Network Topology View and select Edit > Find.
Step 2 Enter the required information as described in Table 9-17.
To highlight the device in the Network Topology View window, click Find.
Table 9-17 Network Topology View Field Descriptions
Field Description Usage Notes
Find Device By Select search criteria:
Name
IP Address
Use the drop-down list box to find devices
by device name or IP address.
What Enter the desired search string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the device
name or IP address.
Matches Lists devices that match the
specified criteria
Select the device from the list of matches.
Add to current
Network Topology
View selection
Selects the device without
resetting the currently selected
devices
Use this option if you are selecting several
devices, and want to add this device to those
selected.

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Understanding Summary View
Understanding Summary View
You can use the Summary View to monitor the current configuration of your network and easily find
devices in your network.
The Summary View allows you to obtain summary information about the managed domains, logical
components, and physical topology of your network. See Interpreting Summary Information for details
on summary information.
Note You can select multiple rows from the table and display the context sensitive menus.
This topic contains:
Highlighting Devices From Summary View
Interpreting Summary Information
Interpreting Network View Summary Information
Interpreting Unconnected Device View Summary Information
Highlighting Devices From Summary View
You can select a device and choose to highlight the device in the Network View from the Summary View
in the Topology Services Main Window. To do this:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The introduction page for Topology Services appears.
Step 2 Click Launch Topology Services.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 3 Select the device listed in the Summary View.
Step 4 Right-click the device and select Highlight Device from the popup menu.
The Topology Map appears with the highlighted device.
Interpreting Summary Information
To interpret summary information see the following sub-sections:
Interpreting Network View Summary Information
Interpreting Topology Groups Summary Information

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Understanding Summary View
Interpreting Network View Summary Information
To display summary information about items in the network views, click a Network View from the Tree
View in Topology Services.
See Table 9-18 to interpret this information.
Interpreting Unconnected Device View Summary Information
To display summary information about items in the unconnected device views, click Unconnected
Devices View from the Tree View in Topology Services.
See Table 9-19 to interpret the fields in the Unconnected Devices View Summary.
Table 9-18 Network View Field Descriptions
Field Description
Devices Number of devices displayed on the particular
view.
Switches Number of switches.
Routers Number of routers.
Device List
Device Name Name of the device.
IP Address IP address of the device.
Device Type Product type.
State Current status of device; that is, whether it is
reachable or not.
Table 9-19 Device View Summary
Field Description
Devices Number of devices displayed in the particular view.
Switches Number of switches in the selected view.
Routers Number of routers in the selected view.
Device List
Device Name Name of the device.
IP Address IP Address of the device.
Device Type Product type.
State Current status of the device; whether it is reachable or not.
Neighbors Devices that are physically connected to the selected
device.

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Upgrading Network Topology Views
Upgrading Network Topology Views
After an upgrade installation or manual data import from Campus Manager 4.0, you may upgrade the
Layer 2 View, LAN Edge View, or Unconnected Devices View that was saved in Campus Manager 4.0
to the new Campus Manager 5.2 format.
If this upgrade is not performed, you can directly use the default views, with enhanced features,
generated by Campus Manager 5.2.
You can perform the following upgrade procedure more than once. To do this:
Step 1 Go to the Topology Services Main Window and select File > Upgrade View layouts.
The Upgrade Topology Views window appears.
Step 2 Select the views to upgrade.
Step 3 Click Upgrade to upgrade the views.
Step 4 Select the corresponding views from the side panel in the Topology Main Window.
Step 5 Select Display View.

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N-Hop View Portlet
N-Hop View Portlet
N-Hop View portlet is a HTML based light weight feature and is available as a part of CiscoWorks
Portal. This is much faster than the regular Campus Manger Topology services.
This portlet displays a N-hop view from a specified device. It should be used to view a limited set of
devices. See Configuring the Portlet for details on configuring this portlet.
N-Hop view displays only the devices your are authorized to view, if Campus Manager is integrated with
ACS and the option Set Topology to ACS mode is checked. For details, see Restricted Topology View.
Using N-Hop view, even if more than 30 devices are present within the specified Hop Count of the root
device, you can view a network of up to 30 devices only. You can view the other part of the network by
randomly selecting a root device and specifying a Hop Count for the root device. To view the entire
network, use Topology Services.
Using N-Hop View:
You can cross-launch the following CiscoWorks applications:
CiscoView
DeviceCenter
Resource Manager Essentials
CiscoWorks Assistant
Health and Utilization Monitor
Internetwork Performance Monitor
Device Fault Manager
To launch the applications, choose a device, right click and choose the required application.
Note You can launch RME, DFM, CWA, IPM and HUM from Topology maps even if they are installed on
different CiscoWorks servers, in a Master Slave setup.
Resource Manager Essentials
Select any device, right-click and choose SWIM
It cross-launches to the RME Software Distribution page. This page enables you to distribute
the images in your network.
For more details, see User Guide for Resource Manager Essentials.
Select any device, right-click and choose NetConfig
It cross-launches to the RME NetConfig page. This page enables you to manage NetConfig jobs.
The page allows you to apply a set of commands (a task) on selected devices. You can create
your own custom tasks that run on multiple devices.
For more details, see User Guide for Resource Manager Essentials.
Launch CiscoWorks Assistant
Select any device, right-click and choose Troubleshoot.
The Device Troubleshooting Report page is launched. This page displays details about the device.
In case of devices that are down, you can use these details to analyze why the device is unreachable.
For more details, see User Guide for CiscoWorks Assistant.

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N-Hop View Portlet
Launch Health and Utilization Monitor
Select any device from the map and right-click and choose Device Dashboard.
The Device Dashboard report is launched, which provides performance details for the device.
Select any link from the Topology map and right-click and choose Interface Report.
The Interface Report for that particular link is launched, displaying the last one hour data.
For complete details on the reports, see User Guide for Health and Utilization Monitor.
Launch Internetwork Performance Monitor
Select any IPSLA capable device, right click and choose Show Collector or Create Collector.
The corresponding Collector Management page is launched. You can create collectors only on
devices which are IPSLA capable. For more details, see User Guide for Internetwork Performance
Monitor.
Launch Device Fault Manager
Select any device, right-click and choose Show DFM Alert, to the see the alerts associated with
the device.
Select any device, right click and choose DFM Fault History Report, to see the history of
DFM events and alerts.
For more details see, User Guide for Device Fault Manager.
You can access a device using Telnet. To do so, choose a device, right click and choose Telnet.
You can display the following information in the map:
To view information, right click anywhere in the map and select the required value. The selected
information is displayed for all devices.
To hide the displayed information, right click anywhere in the map and select Show/Hide
Labels. Move the mouse over the label to display this relevant information.
You can drag the labels anywhere inside the map. To set it to its original position, right click in the
map and choose Reset Draggables.
To print the N-hop view, right click anywhere in the map and choose Print View.
Before printing the N-hop view, we recommend that you provide the following browser settings:
For Internet Explorer:
1. Go to Tools > Internet Options > Advanced Tab > Printing
2. Check Print background colors and images under Printing
IP Address IP Address of the Device
devicename Name of the device
sysName sysName
sysContact Contact person for that device
sysLocation Physical location of the device
sysOID Value of the System Object Identifier MIB variable of the device

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N-Hop View Portlet
For Mozilla Firefox:
1. Go to File > Page Setup > Format & Options Tab
2. Check Print Background (Colors & Images) under Options
You can view the details about a single device/link.
Click the link Show Properties at the top right corner (This link toggles between Show
properties and Hide Properties).
Choose a device or link. Properties of the device or link are displayed as explained below:
Configuring the Portlet
To configure the N-Hop View portlet:
Step 1 Go to the LMS Portal and click CM from the menu.
The Campus Manger view is launched.
Step 2 Move the mouse over the top right corner of the N-Hop View portlet and choose Configuration.
The configuration screen is displayed.
Step 3 Enter the IP address or the Device name of the root device.
If the device you specify is not managed by Campus Manager, it will display an error message.
Step 4 Enter the number of hops in the Hop count field.
The Network Topology map is drawn for the specified number of hops.
Step 5 Add the device to the critical device poller by checking the Poll devices check-box.
Campus Manager polls the network periodically. If you need to monitor the status of a certain device
more frequently, add it to the critical device poller. For more information on Critical device poller, see
Device Poller.
Device Details
Devicename Name of the device
IP Address IP Address of the device
status Indicates if the device is up or down
imageVer Version details of the image installed in the device
sysLocation Physical location of the device
sysName sysName
sysContact Contact person for that device
sysOID Value of the System Object Identifier MIB variable of the device
Link Details
Link Status Indicates whether the link is up or down
Device IP IP Address of the device. Shown for both devices between which
the link is configured.
Interface Interface in the device. Shown for both devices between which the
link is configured.

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Using Microsoft Visio With Topology Views
This device is removed from the critical device poller list when you close the N-Hop View portlet
window.
To display DFM alerts in N-Hop view, choose Show DFM Alerts.
To display Critical alerts, choose Critical.
To display Warning alerts, choose Warning.
To display Informational alerts, choose Information.
For the above feature to work, the DFM poller should be enabled. For details on this, see Configuring
DFM Polling.
Step 6 Select the time interval from the Refresh Every drop-down list. This interval can be in minutes or hours.
By default, the portlet refreshes the Topology map every 5 minutes. If you set the time interval, it
refreshes accordingly. For every refresh, the data is fetched from the last polling cycle of the critical
device poller.
Step 7 Click Save.
Step 8 Click the back arrow to view the Topology map for the configured device.
Using Microsoft Visio With Topology Views
You can export the network clouds, aggregate links, device nodes, links, buses, and all associated labels
into a Visio drawing.
You can export Network Topology Views to Visio 2003 as an XML file. For more details, see Exporting
Network Topology Views to Visio. Visio 2003 does not support CSV file format.
To export Network Views to Microsoft Visio 2002 or previous versions, there are two options:
1. Export to .CSV file. To do so,
Download the Cisco stencil file (cm_cisco.vss).
This file stores images of Cisco devices that Visio uses to create the drawing. For more details, see
Downloading the Cisco Visio Stencil File.
Export Network Topology Views to Visio.
For more details, see Exporting Network Topology Views to Visio.
2. Export to an XML file.
For more details, see Exporting Network Topology Views to Visio.

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Using Microsoft Visio With Topology Views
Downloading the Cisco Visio Stencil File
You must download the Cisco stencil file if you want to export Network Topology views to Visio 2002
or previous versions. See Exporting Network Topology Views to Visio for more details. To do this:
Step 1 Select File > Download Visio Stencil from a Network Topology View.
Step 2 Navigate to the Solutions directory where Visio is installed.
The directory path is usually Visio\Solutions
Caution Do not change the default filename.
Step 3 Click Save.
Exporting Network Topology Views to Visio
To export Network Topology views to Visio:
Step 1 Select the devices you want to export from a Network Topology view.
Step 2 Select File > Export ToVisio.
Step 3 Select either of the following options:
Export To csv...
Saves the Network Topology view as a .CSV file, which you can open in Visio 2002 or previous
versions and convert into a Visio drawing. When you open the saved text file in Visio, select comma
as the delimiter to use. See the Visio manual on how to create drawings from external data.
Or
Export To xml...
Saves the Network Topology view as a .VDX file, which you can open in Visio 2003. Proceed to
Step 5.
Step 4 Navigate to the directory where you saved the Cisco stencil file (cm_cisco.vss).
Step 5 Accept the default or enter a filename.
Step 6 Click Save.
Note When you try to export more than 50 nodes from the Topology view, there will be loss of clarity in the
exported Visio diagram.

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Working With Links
Working With Links
You can use Network Topology Views to display information about links between discovered devices
and the type of link connecting the devices. This section explains:
Interpreting Link Tooltips
Displaying Link Attributes
Displaying Aggregate Link Attributes
Interpreting Link Tooltips
Link tooltips provide detailed information about links. They appear as popup windows as you move the
cursor over different items in the discovered network.
Some network types display additional information in the tooltips.
Use Table 9-20 to help you interpret the tooltips that appear.
Displaying Link Attributes
You can display information about the links between devices in your network.
From a Network Topology View, right-click a link and select Link Attributes from the popup menu, or
select Reports > Link Attributes.
The Link Attributes window opens. See Interpreting Link Attributes for more information.
Table 9-20 Link Tooltip Item Descriptions
Item Description Example
Links Connecting switch name or IP
address:slot/port (media type,
media speed)
172.18.2.25:2/4 - 172.18.2.2:1/3
(Ethernet 100M)
Buses Media type Ethernet bus, FDDI

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Working With Links
Interpreting Link Attributes
See Table 9-21 to interpret the fields shown in the Link Attributes window.
Displaying Aggregate Link Attributes
The aggregation of multiple physical Ethernet links into a single, virtual link allows network managers
to speed the flow of traffic through their networks, reaching speeds that would not be possible otherwise.
For example, if you have no access to links any faster than 100 Mbps, you might aggregate four separate
channels of 100 Mbps each into a single 400 Mbps channel.
If there are any aggregate links between devices in your network, you can use Topology Services to
display information about those aggregate links.
To display information about the aggregate links:
Right-click a link from a Network Topology View and select Aggregate Link Attributes from the
popup menu
Or
Select Reports > Aggregate Link Attributes.
The Aggregate Link Attributes window opens. See Interpreting Aggregate Link Attributes for more
information.
Table 9-21 Link Attribute Window
Field Description
From Device from which link originates
To Device at which link ends
Device Device name
Interface Port to which link is connected on the originating and
ending devices
Type Media type of the link, such as Ethernet
Speed Speed of the link, such as 10Mbps, which is 10 megabits
per second, or 100Mbps, which is 100 megabits per
second.

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Time Domain Reflectometry Reports
Interpreting Aggregate Link Attributes
See Table 9-22 to interpret the fields shown in the Aggregate Link Attributes window.
Time Domain Reflectometry Reports
Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) is used to detect faults in a cable. TDR checks and locates open
circuits, short circuits, sharp bends, crimps, kinks, impedance mismatches, and other such defects.
Time Domain Reflectometry is required when the application cannot establish a link, or if the link does
not perform as expected.
This usually occurs if you:
Replace a cable.
Migrate from Fast Ethernet to Gigabit switch.
Develop new cable plants.
In such cases, the nature of the defect in the cables are important. To detect the defects, you can perform
a TDR test on the link. The TDR test checks the various aspects of the performance of physical links and
its reliability, and reports status and failure.
This topic contains:
Understanding Time Domain Reflectometry
Using Time Domain Reflectometry Reports
Understanding Time Domain Reflectometry
Time Domain Reflectometry detects the defects by sending a signal through a cable, and reflecting it
from the end of the cable. Open circuits, short circuits, sharp bends and other defects in the cable, reflects
the signal back, at different amplitudes, depending on the severity of the defect.
The TDR measures the time taken by the signal to reflect back and thus calculates the distance to the
defect in the cable. When the signal reaches the end of the cable, it reflects at a very low amplitude.
Table 9-22 Aggregate Link Attributes
Field Description
From Domain from which link originates
To Domain at which link ends
Device Device name
Interface Port to which link is connected on the originating and
ending devices
Type Media type of the link, such as Ethernet
Speed Speed of the link, such as 10 Mbps

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Using Time Domain Reflectometry Reports
Campus Manager supports TDR Cable Diagnostic Test and generates a report listing the results of the
test on Cisco Catalyst 6000 switches.
This topic contains:
Running TDR Test for a Link
Running TDR Test For a Port.
Running TDR Test for a Link
To run the TDR test for a link:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
Step 2 Select a view that contains the device for which you want to run TDR Test.
This view in the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Right-click the view and select Display View.
The Network Topology window for the selected view appears.
Step 4 Select the link for which you want generate TDR Report.
Step 5 Right-click the link.
Step 6 Select TDR Report from the pop up menu.
A message appears:
Running TDR Report may affect data traffic in the link. Do you like to run the TDR Test.
Step 7 Click Yes.
The TDR Report window appears. See Table 9-23 for details on the report.

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After you generate the TDR Report you can:
Print the TDR report. To do so select File > Print from the menu.
Export the report to your machine. To do so select File > Export from the menu.
To view the links that support TDR:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
Step 2 Select a view that contains the device, for which you want to run TDR Test.
This view is in the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Right-click the view and select Display View.
The Network Topology window for the selected view appears.
The Topology Filters pane has a filter, TDR.
Step 4 Click TDR.
Step 5 Check the check box for TDR Links.
The supported links are highlighted.
Table 9-23 Field Description for TDR Report on Links
Column Description
Local Device Name of the local device.
Local Port Port of the local device.
Pair Pair name corresponding to the local port.
Local Pair Length Length of the cable from the local device.
Local Pair Status Status of the local pair.
Local Distance To Fault Distance to the defect on the cable pair, from the
local port.
Local Channel Channel to which the cable pair is connected.
Remote Device Remote device connected to the local device.
Remote Port Remote port on the remote device.
Remote Pair Remote pair connected to the local pair.
Remote Pair Length Length of the cable from the remote device.
Remote Pair Status Status of the remote pair.
Remote Distance to Fault Distance to the defect on the cable pair, from the
remote port.
Remote Channel Channel to which the cable pair is connected.

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Running TDR Test For a Port
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
Step 2 Select a view that contains the device that has the port for which you want to run TDR Test. This view
is in the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Select the device that has the port for which you want to run TDR Test.
Step 4 Right-click the device and select Port Attributes from the pop up menu.
The Port Attributes window for the device appears.
Step 5 Select the port for which you want to run TDR Test.
Step 6 Select View > TDR Report from the menu.
A message appears:
Running TDR Report may affect data traffic in the link. Do you like to run the TDR Test.
Step 7 Click Yes.
The TDR report window appears.
See Table 9-24, for more details on the TDR report.
After you generate the TDR report you can:
Print the TDR report. To do so, select File > Print from the menu.
Export the report to your machine. To do so, select File > Export from the menu.
Table 9-24 TDR Report on Ports Field Description
Field Description
Device Name of the device.
Port Name of the port.
Pair Pair name corresponding to the port.
Pair Length Cable length from the device.
Pair Status Status of the pair.

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Working With Devices
Working With Devices
You can use a Network Topology View to display information about the routers and switches in your
network. This section contains:
Performing Data Collection for Devices
Interpreting Device Tooltips
Displaying Device Labels
Displaying Device Attributes
Viewing End Host Report
Viewing Switch Port Report
Displaying Port Attributes
Setting Preferred Management Addresses
Starting CiscoView
Starting Telnet
Starting Device Center
Working With MLS Devices
Working With Application Servers
Displaying Device Service Modules
Displaying Service Attributes
Performing Data Collection for Devices
You can perform data collection for each device or a group of devices from Topology Services.
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
Step 2 Select the device entry in Summary View, for which you want to perform the data collection.
Step 3 Right-click the device entry and select Perform Data Collection from the popup menu.
Or
Select the device from the topology map.
Step 4 Select Edit > Perform Data Collection, or right-click the device and select Perform Data Collection
from the popup menu.
The status bar displays the message:
Request data collection for n device(s) accepted by ANI.
The discovery status button on the status bar shows the status as Running.
After the data collection is complete, the status bar displays a message:
Data Collection done, and the discovery status on the status bar shows the status as Idle.

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Interpreting Device Tooltips
A tooltip is a text message that clarifies the purpose or meaning of a user interface element such as a
button, a line, or an icon.
Generally, tooltips appear whenever your pointer rests on any user interface element for which a tooltip
has been defined. Tooltip messages are displayed against a colored background (typically yellow or
lavender) in a rectangle that hovers above the user interface element being described.
Tooltips in Topology Services provide detailed information about devices and links in Network
Topology Views.
Some device types display additional information in the tooltips.
Tooltip for a device, for example, 172.18.2.11(C3900), contains the device name or the IP address, and
the device type in parentheses.
Displaying Device Labels
To display device information labels in Network Topology Views. To do this:
Step 1 Select View > Display Labels. from the Network Topology View.
Step 2 Select either IP address, device name, or SysName to be displayed.
This topic contains:
Interpreting Device Labels
Clearing Device Labels
Interpreting Device Labels
The device labels are then displayed. See Table 9-25.
Clearing Device Labels
To clear device information labels in the Network Topology Views.
From a Network Topology View, select View > Display Labels > Clear Labels. The device labels are
hidden.
Table 9-25 Device Labels
Field Description
IP Address IP address of the device.
Device Name Name of the device.
SysName SysName of the device.

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Displaying Device Attributes
To display information about a specific device:
Right-click a device icon from a Network Topology View, and select Device Attributes from the
popup menu
Or
Select Reports > Device Attributes.
The Device Attributes window opens. See Interpreting Device Attributes for more information.
Viewing End Host Report
To view End Host Report for a specific device:
Right-click a device icon from a Network Topology View, and select End Host Report from the
popup menu
Or
Select Reports > End Host Report.
The Quick Report page appears. See Viewing Quick Reports for more information.
Viewing Switch Port Report
To view Switch Port Report for a specific device:
Right-click a device icon from a Network Topology View, and select Switch Port Report from the
popup menu
Or
Select Reports > Report Generator > Switch Port Report.
The Report Genertor page appears. See Understanding Switch Port Usage Reports for more information.
Interpreting Device Attributes
See Table 9-26 to interpret the fields shown in the Device Attributes window.
Table 9-26 Device Attributes Column Description
Column Description
Name Name of the device.
IP Address IP address of the device.
Type Cisco product name for the device, such as 7505 or 5500.
Module Module type; set to default for devices without modules.
ID Module identification (such as slot number for Cisco Catalyst 5000 series
switches or switch number for Cisco Catalyst 3000 series switches).
SubID Sub is the slot number and the ID is the box number for stackable
devices, such as Catalyst 3000 series switches.

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Displaying Port Attributes
To display information about the status of the ports in your network.
Right-click a device icon from a Network Topology View and select Port Attributes from the popup
menu
Or
Select Reports > Port Attributes.
The Port Attributes window opens. See Interpreting Port Attributes for more information.
Interpreting Port Attributes
See Table 9-27 to interpret the columns shown in the Port Attributes Report window.
#NumPorts Total number of ports that the Campus Manager Server has discovered
on the device or module.
Versions Model-specific string that varies by device type. For example, Cisco
Catalyst 5000 series switches display hardware (hw), software (sw), and
firmware (fw) versions.
However, only the hardware version is displayed for the Cisco Catalyst
3000 series switches.
Status Device-specific status string. For example, the Cisco Catalyst 5000
series switches display faulty, no module, stopped, and running.
The Cisco Catalyst 3000 series switches display Other, OK, Minor fault,
and Major fault.
Daughter Card Daughter cards added to modules (for example, the NetFlow Feature
Card or the Uplink module for the Supervisor III engine on Cisco
Catalyst 5000 series switches).
Table 9-26 Device Attributes Column Description (continued)
Column Description
Table 9-27 Port Attributes Report Column Description
Column Description
Device Name Name of the device.
Device IP IP address of the device.
Port Name of the port.
Port Description Description of the port that you have entered.
Type Media type, such as Ethernet.
AdminStatus Whether port has been brought down intentionally.
OperStatus Whether port is active or inactive.
isLink If checked, the port is linked to a switch.
isTrunk If checked, the port is participating in a VLAN trunk.

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To see the list of unused ports, select View > Unused Ports from the menu.
To see the complete list of ports, deselect View > Unused Ports to view the complete list of ports. You
can also save or print the lists.
Setting Preferred Management Addresses
Some devices, such as routers, can have multiple IP addresses. You can set a preferred management
address to be used by Campus Manager using either of the following procedures.
Note When you set an IP address as preferred management address, the IP address in the Device and
Credential Repository also changes accordingly.
To navigate from Topology Services Main Window:
Step 1 Select a view that contains the device, for which you want to set the IP.
This view is in the Tree View in Topology Services Main Window.
Step 2 Select a device from the device list in any one of the summary tables.
Step 3 Right-click and select Change Management IP from the popup menu.
The Select Management IP Address window containing the multiple IP addresses of the selected device
appears.
Speed Port speed.
Duplex Mode Half-duplex or full-duplex.
Protocols Enabled Filter protocols on MLS (Multi Layer Switching) devices. Indicates the protocols
that are allowed to pass through the port.
For MLS devices, IP, IPX, and Other are valid options.
For trunk ports or traditional filtered ports, All is always displayed.
Protocols Seen Filter protocols on MLS devices. Indicates the protocol forwarded on that port.
For MLS devices, IP, IPX, and Other are valid options.
For trunk ports or traditional filtered ports, All is always displayed.
VLAN Name of the VLAN.
L2L3 Shows whether the port is in Layer 2 or Layer 3, switched or routed.
J umboFrame J umbo frame status of the port. If you enable J umboFrame, The port supports a
frame size greater than the standard Ethernet frame size of 1518 bytes
Trunk
Encapsulation
Shows whether ISL or IEEE 802.1Q encapsulation is enabled on the switch port.
TrunkMode Trunk mode of the port. The trunk modes are desirable, on, off, auto, or no
negotiate
isChannel Shows whether the port is part of an EtherChannel or not.
Table 9-27 Port Attributes Report Column Description (continued)
Column Description

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Step 4 Select an IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address).
Step 5 Click Apply.
Step 6 To view the changes, select View > Refresh Summary from the menu.
To navigate from Topology View:
Step 1 Select a view that contains the device, for which you want to change management IP, from the Tree View
in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 2 Select View > Display View from the menu.
A topology map appears.
Step 3 Select a device icon from the map.
Step 4 Right-click the device icon and select Change Management IP from the popup menu.
The Select Management IP Address window containing the multiple IP addresses of the selected device
appears.
Step 5 Select an IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address).
Step 6 Click Apply.
To view the changes, select View > Refresh Map from the menu.
Starting CiscoView
You can display specific device configuration and diagnostic information by starting CiscoView.
CiscoView is a graphical user interface (GUI) based device management software application that
provides dynamic status, statistics, and comprehensive configuration information for Cisco
internetworking devices.
CiscoView allows you to configure and monitor the port level information.
To start CiscoView:
Step 1 Start Campus Manager >Configuration > VLAN Port Assignment from the LMS Portal.
The VLAN Port Assignment window appears.
Step 2 Select the VTP domain and enter appropriate search criteria, if necessary.
Step 3 Select the row that contains the device from the VTP Domain table. In the VTP Domain table, select the
row that contains the device.
Step 4 Right-click the selected row.
Step 5 Select CiscoView from the popup menu.
CiscoView page launches for the selected device.

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Starting Telnet
You can initiate a remote terminal connection with the Cisco Systems Console on a device that supports
Telnet and that appears in the Topology map.
To do this:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select the port of the device from the Summary View.
Step 3 Right-click the row and select Telnet from the popup menu.
A Telnet session window opens.
If you are using Internet Explorer 7.0, change the following settings to use Telnet:
Step 1 Go to Start > Run.
Step 2 Enter regedit in the textbox and click OK.
The Registry Editor opens.
Step 3 Click the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet
Explorer\Main\FeatureControl, from the list displayed.
Step 4 Go to the Edit menu and choose New > Key.
Step 5 Enter FEATURE_DISABLE_TELNET_PROTOCOL as the name of the new Key.
Step 6 Choose the above key, right click and choose DWORD.
Step 7 Enter iexplore.exe as the value of the DWORD property.
Step 8 Restart the browser.

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Starting Device Center
Device Center provides the summary of details for a device. The application launches troubleshooting
tools, management tasks, and reports for the selected device.
Since the application is based on a device-centric navigation paradigm, Device Center helps you to focus
on device centric features and information from one location.
After launching Device Center, you can change the device attributes, update inventory, and initiate telnet
with a device that is selected from the Device Center Window.
For more details on Device Center, see Using Device Center under User Guide for CiscoWorks Common
Services 3.3.
To launch Device Center from Topology Services.
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Right-click a device entry from a Summary View, and select Device Center from the popup menu,
Or,
Right-click a device icon from a Network Topology View, and select Device Center from the popup
menu.
Device Center launches for that device.
To launch Device Center from VLAN Port Assignment:
Step 1 Start Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Port Assignment from LMS Portal.
The VLAN Port Assignment window appears.
Step 2 Select the VTP Domain and click Show All Ports or Get Ports.
The VTP Domain table lists the ports that are in the selected VTP domain.
Step 3 Right-click the device and select Device Center from the popup menu.
Device Center launches for that device.
Working With MLS Devices
If you are using Multilayer Switching (MLS) in your network, Campus Manager displays MLS switches
and routers in the network view.
MLS provides high-performance Layer 3 switching for Cisco routers and switches. MLS switches IP
data packets between subnets while using standard routing protocols for route determination.
MLS also provides traffic statistics as part of its switching function. These statistics are used for
identifying traffic characteristics for administration, planning, and troubleshooting.
This topic contains:

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Displaying MLS Reports
You can obtain information about devices in your network that are participating in multilayer switching.
Step 1 Go to a Network Topology View and click two or more multilayer switching (MLS) devices.
If you do not know which devices are MLS devices, select Edit > Find.
Step 2 Select Reports > Multi-Layer Switching > Route Processors to display the relationship between
Layer 3 route processing devices in your network.
Or,
Select Reports > Multi-Layer Switching > Switch Engines to display the relationship between
Layer 3 switching and forwarding devices in your network.
Interpreting MLS Reports
You can use MLS reports to display the relationships among multilayer switching (MLS) devices in your
network.
The Route Processors Report displays information about the routers in your network that support
multilayer switching, and their relationship with the MLS switches.
The Switching Engines Report displays information about the switches in your network that support
Layer 3 switching (MLS), and their relationship with the MLS routers. This report also provides
information about how the flow is Layer 3 switched.
This topic contains:
Interpreting the Route Processors Report
Interpreting Switching Engines Report
Interpreting the Route Processors Report
See Table 9-28 to interpret information shown in the Route Processors report.
Table 9-28 Field Description for Route Processor Report
Field Description
MLS Routers Lists the Multilayer Switching Route Processors that participate in MLS. The
Route Processors are listed either by IP address or device name.
MLS Switches Lists the Multilayer Switching Engines that perform Layer 3 switching for the
routers listed in the MLS Routers field. The Switching Engines are listed either
by IP address or device name.

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Interpreting Switching Engines Report
See Table 9-29 to interpret information displayed in the Switching Engines report.
Note About Unified Icon
Network Topology View of the Campus Manager displays a single icon for Cisco Catalyst 6000 with
MSFC and Cisco Catalyst 5000 with RSM devices. The unified icon is Layer 2 and Layer 3 Switch
Router icon.
In previous versions of Campus Manager, the these devices were represented using different icons.
Working With Application Servers
Application servers are high-availability workflow systems that provide categories of service on a
network, such as Cisco AVVID (Architecture for Voice, Video and Integrated Data) services.
For example, a Media Convergence Server (MCS) is an application server providing such
AVVID-related applications as Cisco CallManager.
Cisco CallManager provides signaling and call control services to Cisco integrated multimedia
applications as well as third-party applications. Cisco CallManager services can be distributed and
clustered over an IP network, thereby allowing scale to 10,000 users and triple call processing
redundancy.
Table 9-29 Field Description for Switch Engines Report
Field Description
MLS Switches Lists the Switching Engines that perform Layer 3 switching (MLS) for the
routers listed in the MLS Routers field. The Switching Engines are listed either
by IP address or device name.
MLS Routers Lists Route Processors that participate in MLS. Route Processors are listed
either by IP address or device name.
Flow Mask Destination-IP (DST)Switching Engine maintains one MLS entry for
every destination IP address.
All flows to the destination IP address use this MLS entry. This mode is
used if there are no access lists on any of the MLS interfaces.
Source-Destination-IP (SRC, DST)Switching Engine maintains one
MLS entry for every source and destination IP address pair.
All flows between the source and destination use this MLS entry regardless
of the IP protocol ports (such as FTP). This mode is used if there is a
standard access list on any of the MLS interfaces.
IP-flow (SRC, DST, PORT)Switching Engine maintains one MLS entry
for every IP-flow. A separate MLS entry is created for every flow in
IP-flow mode.
The IP-flow includes source IP address, destination IP address, protocol,
and protocol ports. This mode is used if there is an extended access list on
any MLS interface.

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The Campus Manager Server component of CiscoWorks manages application servers, and Topology
Services displays them in the Layer 2 view.
You can access application servers and start Cisco CallManager from Topology Services.
Topology Services cannot distinguish a Windows server (NT and 2000) from an application server
running Cisco CallManager.
Topology Services always displays a Windows server or a Media Convergence Server as an application
server.
To start an application server:
Step 1 Right-click an application server icon from a Network Topology View and select Service Attributes
from the popup menu.
See Displaying Service Attributes for more details on the Service Attributes.
Or
Right-click an application server entry from a Summary View and select Service Attributes from the
popup menu.
The Service Attributes window opens.
Step 2 Click Launch in the Launch column of the Service Attributes window.
The application server starts. See the documentation included with the application server for more
information.
Displaying Device Service Modules
To view the details on service modules for the devices:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a Cisco Catalyst 6000 device from the Switch Cloud in the LANEdge View.
Step 3 Right-click the Cisco Catalyst 6000 device and select Service Modules from the pop up menu.
The Service Modules window appears.
Table 9-30 describes the fields shown in the Service Modules window.

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To print Service Modules information, select File > Print from the menu. To save the details to a text
file, select File > Export from the menu.
Displaying Service Attributes
Services are server processes on the application servers in your network. Examples might include Cisco
CallManager, Cisco Application Engine, and Cisco Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) Server.
You can use Topology Services to display information about the available services in your network. To
do this:
Step 1 Select a view or a domain from the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 2 Select View > Display View.
The Network Topology Window opens.
Step 3 Double-click Services in the Topology Filters list to expand the list of available services in the specified
view or domain, and select a service from the list.
Device icons in the network topology map become dimmed, except for those devices configured to run
the specified service. The icons that are not dimmed in the map are highlighted.
Step 4 Right-click a highlighted device, and select Service Attributes from the menu.
The Software Service Attributes window appears.
Table 9-30 Service Modules Field Descriptions
Field Description
Device Name Name of the device.
Module IP Address IP Address of the module on the device.
Device Type Cisco product name for the device, such as C6506.
Module Type Type of module.
Module ID Module identification, such as slot number.
Module Status Current operational status, that is whether the module is active or inactive.
Launch If IP Address is available, and Status is Ok, this button allows you to start the
administration screen of the service.
1
1. In case of a switch with a VPN card, the launch point is enabled with the IP address of the switch.

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Interpreting Service Attributes
See Table 9-31 to interpret the fields shown in the Software Service Attributes window.
Displaying Campus Reports
Campus Manager allows you to generate the following reports:
Discrepancies. For details, see Viewing Discrepancy Reports.
Best Practice Deviations. For details, see Viewing Best Practices Deviations Reports
Port Attributes. For details, see Displaying Port Attributes.
Device Attributes. For details, see Displaying Device Attributes.
VLAN. For details, see Displaying VLAN Reports.
To see these reports:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a view that contains the device, switch cloud, or the VTP Domain for which you want to view the
report. This view is in the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Select Reports > Campus Reports from the menu.
Or
Select Campus Manager > Reports > Report Generator from the LMS Portal.
The Campus Manager Report Generator dialog box appears.
Step 4 Select the Campus Manager Reports from the left drop down list. Campus Manager Reports is selected
by default.
Step 5 Select the report you want to view from the right drop down list. The reports are:
Best Practices Deviations
Device Attributes
Discrepancies
Table 9-31 Software Service Attributes Field Descriptions
Field Description
Name Name of the device.
IP Address IP Address of the device.
Application Name Name of the service.
Application Version Release number of the service.
Installed on Installation date.
Started at Time stamp.
Status Current operational status.
Launch Button that allows you to start the administration screen
of the service.

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Port Attributes
VLAN Reports
Step 6 Select the devices or the device groups from the Device Selector area.
Step 7 Select the run type from the drop down menu, in the Scheduling area to schedule the report generator.
You can schedule it for generating the report immediately, once, daily, weekly, or monthly. If you choose
to generate the report immediately, go to Step 11.
Step 8 Set the date and time for generating the report, in the Scheduling area.
Step 9 Enter a description to identify this job, in the J ob Description field, of the J ob Info area.
Step 10 Enter a valid e-mail ID in the Email field, of the J ob Info area, to receive the report through mail.
Step 11 Click Submit to generate the report or click Reset to modify the values that you have entered.
The report window for the report you selected, appears.
Monitoring Protocol Filter by Port
You can monitor protocol filtering by each port on devices that support this feature and have NetFlow
Feature Cards installed.
This section contains:
Understanding Protocol Filtering
Displaying Protocol Filter Information
Understanding Protocol Filtering
On Cisco Catalyst 5000 series switches with NetFlow Feature Cards installed, you can filter broadcast
traffic by protocol on a port-by-port basis.
You can display relevant ports on these switches and their protocol filtering status. This can help you
troubleshoot end-user host connectivity problems based on mismatched protocols.

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Viewing Data Collection Metrics
Displaying Protocol Filter Information
You can display protocol filter information for each port on switches with NetFlow Feature Cards.
Protocol filtering is supported on Ethernet VLANs only, and the ports must be non-trunking; trunking
ports are members of all protocol groups. Verify that the port for which you want to display filter
information is a non-trunking port.
To display protocol filter information:
Step 1 Go to a Network Topology View and click a device with a NetFlow feature card installed.
Step 2 Select Reports > Port Attributes or right-click the device icon and select Port Attributes from the
popup menu.
Step 3 Compare the information in the Protocols Enabled and Protocols Seen fields.
A mismatch between these fields implies connectivity problems.
Viewing Data Collection Metrics
To view a tabular report containing statistics for the last n Data Collection cycles.
From the Topology Services main window, select Reports > Data Collection Report. The Data
Collection Metrics window opens. See Table 9-32 for information displayed in the Data Collection
Metrics window.
Table 9-32 Data Collection Metrics
Column Description
StartTime Time at which the most recent Data Collection cycle began.
PercentComplete Percentage of Data Collection that has completed so far in the current
Data Collection cycle.
EndTime Time at which the most recent Data Collection cycle completed.
TotalTime Total time taken for the most recent Data Collection.
Total Devices Total number of managed devices.
New Devices Number of newly managed devices, not seen in the previous Data
Collection cycle.
Devices Deleted Number of devices that were seen in the previous Data Collection
cycle, but not in the most recent Data Collection.
Devices PerHour Number of devices managed per hour.
Objects PerHour Number of objects managed per hour.

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Topology Groups
Topology Groups
The Topology Groups feature in Campus Manager allows you to create customized views, of the
network, in which devices are grouped according to various criteria. A view may be considered as a
group of devices or device elements.
You can define the criteria (called a rule) that will determine the settings of your custom view. The rule
will determine the group of devices to be displayed in the view.
These groups are subsets of Layer 2 maps, the members being defined by a set of rule expressions. In a
network with a large number of devices, a Topology Group helps you to perform operations in a subset
of the large network.
You can use Topology Groups Administration to manage the Topology Groups in your system.
The following topics provide information about:
Understanding Topology Groups
Interpreting Topology Groups Summary Information
Hierarchical Maps
Understanding Topology Groups
A Topology Group can be thought of as a convenience view that allows you to view a subset of the entire
network based on the group rule defined while creating the view.
These views, which are subsets of the Layer 2 views, can be accessed by a user or a set of users. These
custom views are generated using a Campus Manager feature called Grouping Services, which helps
manage groups of devices.
Grouping Services determines the membership of a group by interpreting and applying the rule
associated with the group.
Hence, Topology Groups provides multiple benefits:
Provides a channel to identify, and view a set of objects corresponding to a view.
Facilitates the creation and management of views.
Provides you with a way to define convenience views which are a subset of the Layer 2 map.
See the following sections for a better understanding of Topology Groups concepts:
Understanding Groups
Using Groups

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Topology Groups
Interpreting Topology Groups Summary Information
You can display summary information about devices in Topology Groups. To do this:
Step 1 Go to the Tree view in Topology Services, click a Topology Groups view.
See Table 9-33 to interpret Topology Groups summary information.
Hierarchical Maps
Hierarchical maps are the Network Topology Views that display the devices listed under Topology
Groups in a hierarchical organization. Each map displays the selected group as a cloud of devices.
This section contains:
Understanding Hierarchical Maps
Viewing Hierarchical Maps
Understanding Hierarchical Maps
Hierarchical Maps provide a hierarchical view for the devices under the Topology Groups.
These Maps display each Topology Group as a cloud. If a Topology Group contains a sub-group, the
Network Topology View of the parent group displays a cloud icon to represent the sub-group.
Similarly, each sub-group is displayed inside the corresponding parent group as a cloud icon.
The Network Topology View for the parent topology Group displays an aggregate link for all the links
from the sub-group to the devices in the parent group.
If one or more devices in the sub-group of the Topology Group, are connected to the devices in the
parent Topology Group, the hierarchical map of the parent group displays an aggregate link for all
the links from the sub-group to the devices.
If you double-click the sub-group cloud, you can view the Hierarchical map for the child group
inside the parent group. Thus, hierarchical maps display the devices hierarchically till the last child
group.
Table 9-33 Interpreting Topology Groups Summary Information
Field Description
Devices Number of devices displayed in the particular view.
Routers Number of routers.
Device List
Device Name Name of the Device.
IP Address IP Address of the device.
Device Type Product Type.
State Current status of the device, whether it is reachable or not.

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Topology Groups
Viewing Hierarchical Maps
To view Hierarchical maps from the Topology Services window:
Step 1 Select Topology Services > Topology Groups from the Campus Manager Main Window.
Step 2 Select the Group that you want to view.
Step 3 Select View > Display View from the menu.
The Network Topology View window displays the hierarchical map for the selected group. If there are
sub-groups, the Network Topology View displays each sub-group as a Cloud icon in the map represents
the sub-group.
Step 4 Right-click the Cloud icon in the Network Topology View and select Open.
Or
Double-click the cloud to view the sub-group.
The Network Topology View window for the sub-group appears.
Displaying the Device Label
To display the name of the Cloud icon or the sub-group in the Network Topology View:
Select the Cloud icon, select View > Display Labels, and select either IP address, Device name, or
SysName.
The Network Topology View displays the sub-group device category names.
Filters for Topology Groups
Filters are provided for the Topology Groups, in Network Topology Views. You can use these filters to
filter the clouds, that are the sub-groups. For more details, see Using Topology Filters.
Displaying Aggregate Links in Hierarchical Maps
You can view the aggregate links between the clouds. The network view displays the aggregate links if
a device in a cloud is linked to another cloud or the sub-group. Aggregate links may contain one or more
links.
For more details, see Displaying Aggregate Link Attributes.
To view the aggregate links between the clouds, right-click the Cloud icon and select Show Aggregate
Links.
To clear the display of aggregate links, right the Cloud icon and select Clear Aggregate Links.
Notes:
The Groups under Campus Manager > Administration > Groups and under Topology Services >
Topology Groups follow the same hierarchy.
In Topology Groups, when you use the Find option using the device name or device IP address, the
Find on Map window displays only the devices in the respective selected group, and does not display
the devices in other sub-groups.
For more details, see Using Find in Network Topology Views.
After you create a Group through Campus Manager > Administration > Groups, you must reopen
the Topology Services to view the changes. For more details, see Using Groups.

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Chapter 9 Using Topology Services
Topology Services Menu Reference
Topology Services Menu Reference
See the command references for understanding the Topology Services windows.
This section contains:
Topology Services Main Window Menu Reference
Network Topology View Menu Reference
Topology Services Main Window Menu Reference
Table 9-34 Topology Services Main Window Menu Descriptions
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description
File Print Prints Summary View.
Export None Exports Summary View to a text file.
Upgrade View
Layouts
None Upgrades any Layer 2 View, Unconnected Device
View, and LAN Edge View that was saved in a previous
version of Campus Manager.
Exit None Exits Topology Services.
Edit Rename None Renames a switch cloud.
Copy None Copies selected text to the clipboard.
Find Opens Find window to enable searching for items in the
Tree View and Summary View.
Find Next None Uses Find to search for next item that matches
previously entered search criteria.
Bandwidth Filter
Settings
None You can set the ranges of bandwidth utilization and
color for the links to be highlighted in the Map.
For more details, see Customizing Bandwidth
Utilization Filters.
View Show Toolbar None Shows or hides the toolbar.
Reload None Refreshes Tree View contents.
Refresh Summary Updates information in Summary View.
Expand All None Expands selected folder in Tree View.
Collapse All None Closes selected folder in Tree View.
Display View None Opens Network Topology View for selected item in
Tree View.

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Topology Services Menu Reference
Reports Discrepancies None Displays discrepancies or anomalies in the discovered
network. You can generate a report on the
discrepancies.
For more details, see Viewing Discrepancy Reports.
Best Practices
Deviations
None Displays Best Practices Deviations page in Report
Generator, where you can generate a report of Best
Practices Deviations.
For more details, see Viewing Best Practices
Deviations Reports.
Data Collection
Report
None Opens the Data Collection Metrics window.
For more details, see Viewing Data Collection Metrics.
Campus Reports None Displays the Report Generator page from where you
can generate any of the five reports on: best practices
deviations, device attributes, discrepancies, port
attributes, or VLANs for VTP domain or the switch
cloud.
For more details, see Displaying Campus Reports.
VLAN Report None Displays VLAN reports for devices, switch clouds, or
VTP domains. You must select a VTP domain or a
switch cloud for generating the report.
Spanning Tree
Configuration
None Allows to generate reports and configure Spanning
Trees on the network.
Tools VLAN
Management >
Create
Creates an Ethernet VLAN. This function can be
performed only by users logged in as Network
Administrators or System Administrators.
VLAN
Management >
Delete
Deletes the selected VLAN. This function can be
performed only by users logged in as Network
Administrators or System Administrators.
PVLAN
Management >
Create
None Creates Private VLAN.
PVLAN
Management >
Delete
None Deletes Private VLANs.
VLAN Port
Assignment
Moves ports between VLANs in the same VTP domain.
Window None None Switches between all open Topology Services
windows.
Table 9-34 Topology Services Main Window Menu Descriptions (continued)
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description

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Topology Services Menu Reference
Network Topology View Menu Reference
Help Using Topology
Services
None Launches Topology Services Online help contents.
Legend None Interprets icons in Topology Services.
About None Shows version and copyright information for Topology
Services.
Table 9-35 Network Topology View Menu Descriptions
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description
File Save Layout Saves any changes you make to the Network
Topology View (applies only to your user ID).
Print >Print All Prints the entire Network Topology View, at the
normal viewing level. Each page will have a
corresponding column and row number with grid
marks to align the pages.
Print >Print
Visible
Prints what is visible the current screen, shrinking it
to fit on one page.
Export To Visio >
Export To csv
None Allows you to export the network map as a Visio
drawing and save it in .csv format.
Export To Visio >
Export To xml
None Allows you to export the network map as a Visio
drawing and save it in XML format.
Download Visio
Stencil
None Opens new browser window with a link for
downloading the cm_cisco.vss stencil file.
Close None Exits Network Topology View.
Edit Undo None Reverses the last operation.
Redo None Repeats the last operation.
Find Finds devices by name or IP address.
Select >All
Devices
None Selects all devices on the current Network Topology
View.
Select >All Links None Selects all links on the current Network Topology
View.
Table 9-34 Topology Services Main Window Menu Descriptions (continued)
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description

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Topology Services Menu Reference
Edit
(Contd.)
Select >All
Highlighted
Objects
None Selects all highlighted devices on the current
Network Topology View.
Select >All
Filtered Objects
None Selects all filtered objects on the current Network
Topology View.
Highlight Filtered None Highlights devices that conform to selected filters.
Clear Highlighted None Clears highlighting from Network Topology View.
Perform Data
Collection
Rediscovers a selected device or a group of devices.
This function can be performed only by users logged
in as System Administrators.
Delete Device(s) None Removes devices from the Network Topology View.
Devices still in your network and manageable by
Campus Manager will reappear on the Network
Topology View after the next Campus Data
Collection cycle.
This function can be performed only by users logged
in as Network Administrators or System
Administrators.
Delete Link(s) None Removes a link from the Network Topology View.
This function can be performed only by users logged
in as Network Administrators or System
Administrators.
Map Preferences None Edit Network Topology View settings such as color
and layout style.
View Show Toolbar None Shows or hides the toolbar.
Show Grid None Shows or hides the grid. When moving devices with
the grid on, the devices snap to the grid.
Panner None Displays compact view of entire Network Topology
View.
Zoom In Focuses on a specific Network Topology View area.
Table 9-35 Network Topology View Menu Descriptions (continued)
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description

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Topology Services Menu Reference
View
(Contd.)
Zoom Out Expands the focus to a larger area.
Zoom to Selected
Devices
Focuses on selected devices. Fits selected devices in
a Network Topology View window at the maximum
size possible.
Normal Returns to the default view.
Fit in Window View all discovered devices.
Display Labels >
Show IP
None Displays device IP addresses.
Display Labels >
Show Device Name
None Displays device names.
Display Labels >
Show Sysname
None Displays device sysNames.
Display Labels >
Clear Labels
None Clears labels from Network Topology View.
Relayout >
Circular
None Portrays interconnected ring and star topologies.
Relayout >
Hierarchical
None Reveals precedence relations.
Relayout >
Symmetric
None Provides representations of complex networks.
Relayout >
Orthogonal
None Provides graph layouts with edges running parallel to
x and y axes.
View
(Contd.)
Refresh Map None Refreshes the display.
DFM Alert Settings None Launches DFM Alert Settings Page.
Table 9-35 Network Topology View Menu Descriptions (continued)
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description

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Topology Services Menu Reference
Reports Discrepancies None Displays discrepancies or anomalies in the
discovered network. You can generate a report on the
discrepancies.
For more details, see Viewing Discrepancy Reports.
Best Practices
Deviations
None Displays Best Practices Deviations page in Report
Generator, where you can generate a report of Best
Practices Deviations.
For more details, see Viewing Best Practices
Deviations Reports.
Data Collection
Report
None Displays Data Collection Metrics report.
For more details, see Viewing Data Collection
Metrics.
Device Attributes None Displays descriptive information about the selected
device or devices.
IPv6 Addresses None Displays the IPv6 Addresses report.
For more details, see Viewing IPv6 Addresses
Report.
Service Attributes None Displays descriptive information about any
application servers that are running on the selected
device or devices.
Port Attributes None Displays descriptive information about ports
belonging to the selected device.
Link Attributes None Displays descriptive information about the selected
link or links.
VLAN Report None Displays the VLAN Report for the selected devices in
the Topology Map or for all devices in the Map.
For more details, see Interpreting VLAN Reports.
Multi-Layer
Switching >
Switching Engines
None Displays relationship between Layer 3 route
processing devices in network.
Multi-Layer
Switching >Route
Processors
None Displays relationship between Layer 3 switching and
forwarding devices in your network.
Table 9-35 Network Topology View Menu Descriptions (continued)
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description

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Supported Protocols
Supported Protocols
The following concepts are important for understanding how to use Topology Services:
Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP)
IEEE 802.1Q
You must make sure that the applicable protocols are implemented correctly in your network; otherwise,
the information gathered might be incomplete.
Inter-Switch Link (ISL) Protocol
Inter-Switch Link (ISL) is a Cisco-proprietary protocol that allows VLAN trunking by maintaining
VLAN information as traffic flows between switches and routers.
You can pass VLAN information between devices by configuring links between the switches. If you
want a link to carry more than one VLAN, you must use ISL. To use ISL, you must configure the ports
on both sides of the link as trunk ports.
When two VTP domains are interconnected using an ISL trunk between two LAN switches, by default,
no VLAN traffic is forwarded. However, you can configure the ports on each switch to receive and
forward specific VLANs.
Tools RMON Data
Collection >
Disable
None Disables RMON Data Collection.
RMON Data
Collection >Show
Enabled Devices
None Displays RMON enabled devices.
Template
Manager >Edit
Database Traffic
Templates
None Creates, edits, or deletes database traffic templates.
Template
Manager >Edit
Device Traffic
Templates
None Creates, edits, or deletes device traffic templates.
Windows None None Switches between all open Topology Services
windows.
Help Using Network
Views
None Opens online help for the Network Topology View.
Legend None Allows you to interpret icons in Topology Services.
About None Shows Topology Services version and copyright
information.
Table 9-35 Network Topology View Menu Descriptions (continued)
Menu Command
Toolbar
Button Description

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Supported Protocols
To configure the ports, the VLANs on either side of the ISL trunk must be identical and share the same
VLAN characteristics such as VLAN names, VLAN indexes, and so on.
IEEE 802.1Q
IEEE 802.1Q is the industry-standard for trunking. A standard for encapsulation protocol to carry traffic
for multiple VLANs over a single link. You can use this standard when you want to interconnect a Cisco
device with a trunk link to a non-Cisco device.
You can use the encapsulation dot1q command on Cisco IOS version 12.0.1(t) or higher for the Cisco
routers.
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10
Managing VLANs and VTP
Campus Manager collects data about devices so that you can configure and manage Virtual LANs
(VLANs) in your network. You must set up your LMS/Campus Manager server properly to ensure that
Data Collection is successfully performed in your network.
The Campus Manager configuration module helps you to manage your VLANs. You can configure and
manage VLANs, PVLANs, Trunk, and also assign ports to VLANs.
This chapter contains:
Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN)
Using VLANs
Configuring VLANs
Creating Ethernet VLANs
Interpreting VLAN Summary Information
Understanding Private VLAN
Using Private VLAN
Understanding Inter-VLAN Routing
Using Inter-VLAN Routing
VLAN Trunking Protocol
Understanding Trunking
EtherChannel
VLAN Port Assignment
Using VLAN Port Assignment
Usage Scenarios for Managing VLANs

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Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN)
Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN)
A Virtual Local Area Network (VLAN) allows you to create logical broadcast domains that can span
across a single switch or multiple switches, regardless of physical positioning. A VLAN contains a group
of devices on one or more LANs.
These devices are configured in such a way that they can communicate as if they were all on the same
network segment. VLANs are based on logical connections instead of physical connections, and hence
they are extremely flexible.
VLAN allows you to group ports on a switch to limit unicast, multicast, and broadcast traffic flooding.
Flooded traffic originating from a particular VLAN is only flooded out to other ports belonging to that
VLAN.
This helps to reduce the size of broadcast domains and it allows groups or users to be logically grouped
without being physically located in the same place.
The following topics are covered in this section:
Advantages of VLANs
VLAN Components
Using VLANs
Advantages of VLANs
VLANs provide the following advantages:
Simplification of Adds, Moves, and Changes
Controlled Broadcast Activity
Workgroup and Network Security
Simplification of Adds, Moves, and Changes
Adds, moves, and changes are some of the greatest expenses in managing a network. Many moves
require re-cabling and almost all moves require new station addressing and hub and router
re-configuration.
VLANs simplify adds, moves, and changes. VLAN users can share the same network address space
regardless of their location.
If a group of VLAN users move but remain in the same VLAN connected to a switch port, their network
addresses do not change.
If a user moves from one location to another but stays in the same VLAN, the router configuration does
not need to be modified.
Controlled Broadcast Activity
Broadcast traffic occurs in every network. Broadcasts can seriously degrade network performance or
even bring down an entire network, if the network is not properly managed.
Broadcast traffic in a particular VLAN is not transmitted outside that VLAN. This substantially reduces
overall broadcast traffic, frees bandwidth for real user traffic, and lowers the vulnerability of the network
to broadcast storms.

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Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN)
You can control the size of broadcast domains by regulating the size of their associated VLANs and by
restricting both the number of switch ports in a VLAN and the number of people using the ports.
You can also assign VLANs based on the application type and the amount of application broadcasts. You
can place users sharing a broadcast-intensive application in the same VLAN group and distribute the
application across the network.
Workgroup and Network Security
You can use VLANs to provide security Firewalls, restrict individual user access, flag any unwanted
network intrusion, and control the size and composition of the broadcast domain.
You can:
Increase security by segmenting the network into distinct broadcast groups.
Restrict the number of users in a VLAN.
Configure all unused ports to a default low-service VLAN.
VLAN Components
The VLAN components are:
Switches that logically segment the end stations connected to it.
Switches are the entry point for end-station devices into the switched domain and provide the
intelligence to group users, ports, or logical addresses into common communities of interest. LAN
switches also increase performance and dedicated bandwidth across the network.
You can group ports and users into communities using a single switch or connected switches. By
grouping ports and users across multiple switches, VLANs can span single-building infrastructures,
interconnected buildings, or campus networks.
Each switch can make filtering and forwarding decisions by packet and communicate this
information to other switches and routers within the network.
Routers that extend VLAN communication between workgroups.
Routers provide policy-based control, broadcast management, and route processing and distribution.
They also provide the communication between VLANs and VLAN access to shared resources such
as servers and hosts.
Routers connect to other parts of the network that are either logically segmented into subnets or
require access to remote sites across wide area links.
Transport protocols that carry VLAN traffic across shared LAN.
The VLAN transport enables information exchange between interconnected switches and routers on
the corporate backbone. This backbone acts as the aggregation point for large volume of traffic.
It also carries end-user VLAN information and identification between switches, routers, and directly
attached servers. Within the backbone, high-capacity links with high-bandwidth carry the traffic
throughout the enterprise.

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Using VLANs
Using VLANs
You can use Campus Manager to create, modify, and delete VLANs. You can use the Topology Services
to create Ethernet VLANs.
Campus Manager allows you to modify most of the VLAN characteristics that were entered when you
created the VLAN, such as purpose, description, and LANE services.
The following sections brief on the types of VLANs supported by Topology Services:
Ethernet VLAN (See Ethernet VLANs)
Private VLANs (See Understanding Private VLAN)
Configuring VLANs
You can configure VLANs using VLAN Configuration wizard.
Creating VLAN
To create VLANs, the VLAN Configuration wizard directs you through:
1. Selecting Devices or Entities
2. Creating VLANs
3. Assigning Ports to VLANs
4. Disallowing VLAN on Trunks
5. Understanding VLAN Creation Summary
Deleting VLAN
To delete VLANs, the VLAN Configuration wizard directs you through:
1. Deleting VLANs
2. Moving Affected Ports to New VLAN
3. Understanding VLAN Deletion Summary

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Configuring VLANs
Selecting Devices or Entities
You must select the devices or entities to be included in the VLAN. Domain Selector helps you to select
devices in Switch Clouds and VTP Domains.
To select devices or entities for a VLAN:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Configuration.
The VLAN Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the devices using the Device Selector or the Domain Selector from the VLAN Configuration
dialog box.See Table 10-1
Step 3 Either:
a. Click Create to create VLANs.
The Create VLAN page appears.
b. Go to Creating VLANs.
Or
a. Click Delete to delete the VLANs.
The Select VLAN to Delete page appears.
b. Go to Deleting VLANs.
Table 10-1 VLAN Configuration Field Description
Field Description
Device Selector Lists all the devices in your network.
Click the radio button to select the Device Selector.
Domain Selector Lists the Switch Clouds and VTP Domains in your
network.
Click the radio button to select the Domain Selector.
All Click All to view all the devices in the network. Check the
checkboxes to select the devices.
Selection Displays the devices that you have selected in the All pane.

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Configuring VLANs
Creating VLANs
After you select devices using the Device Selector or the Domain Selector and click Create in the VLAN
Configuration page, the Create VLAN page appears. For more details, see Selecting Devices or Entities.
You must enter the details as described in the Table 10-2.
Click any of the following:
Next to continue.
The Assign VLANs to Port page appears. For details, see Assigning Ports to VLANs.
Assigning ports to VLANs cannot be done for more than 100 devices at a time, since it results in
memory issues. If you have selected more than 100 devices, click Finish to save VLAN creation. Do
VLAN port assignment for 100 devices at a time.
Cancel to exit.
Finish to save changes.
VLANs are created on the specified devices and the initial VLAN Configuration page appears.
Creating VLANs on Transparent Devices
When you create VLANS without checking the Create On All Transparent Switches option in the VLAN
creation page, the following is the behavior of Campus Manager:
Table 10-2 Create VLAN Field Description
Field Description
VLAN Name Enter a name for the new VLAN.
VLAN Index Enter a number between 1 and 1024 to identify the VLAN.
Create on all transparent
switches
Check the checkbox to include all switches that are VTP transparent.
VTP transparent switches do not send VTP updates and do not act on
VTP updates received from other switches.
This checkbox is available only for VTP domain based VLAN creation.
For more details on this, see Creating VLANs on Transparent Devices
Copy running to start-up
config
Check the checkbox to copy the running configuration to the start-up
configuration.
Device Selected
Access and Trunk ports
listed in the VLAN
Creation flow VLAN created on
VTPv2 Server VTPv2 Server
VTPv2 Client
VTPv2Server
VTPv3 Primary Server VTPv3 Server
VTPv3 Client
VTPv3 Primary Server
VTPv3 Primary Server

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Configuring VLANs
When you create VLANS with the Create On All Transparent Switches option in the VLAN creation
page, the following is the behavior of Campus Manager:
In the above tables, VTPv2 refers to VTP version 2 and VTP v3 refers to VTP version 3.
Assigning Ports to VLANs
A VLAN created in a management domain remains unused until you assign one or more switch ports to
the VLAN.
The Assign VLANs to Port page appears after you create the VLAN name and index.
To assign ports to VLANs:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Configuration.
The VLAN Configuration page appears.
VTPv2 or VTPv3
Transparent device
Selected Transparent device Selected Transparent device
Device that has VTPv3 in Off
Mode
Selected Off Mode device Selected Off Mode device
Device Selected
Access and Trunk ports
listed in the VLAN
Creation flow VLAN created on
Device Selected
Access and Trunk ports
listed in the VLAN
Creation flow VLAN created on
VTPv2 Server VTPv2 Server
VTPv2 Client
VTPv2 Transparent
device
VTPv2Server
VTPv2 Transparent
VTPv3 Primary Server VTPv3 Server
VTPv3 Client
VTPv3 Primary Server
VTPv3 Transparent
device
VTPv3 Off Mode device
VTPv3 Primary Server
VTPv3 Transparent device
VTPv3 Off Mode device
VTPv2 or VTPv3
Transparent device
VTPv2 or VTPv3
Transparent device
VTPv3 Off Mode device
VTPv2 or VTPv3 Transparent
device
VTPv3 Off Mode device
Device that has VTPv3 in Off
Mode
VTPv3 Transparent
device
VTPv3 Off Mode device
VTPv3 Transparent device
VTPv3 Off Mode device

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Configuring VLANs
Step 2 Select device or domain from the VLAN Configuration page.
Step 3 Click Create.
Step 4 Enter VLAN Name and VLAN Index in the Create VLAN page and click Next.
The Assign Ports to VLAN page appears.
Step 5 Select the ports and click Next.
Table 10-3 describes the entries in the Assign Ports to VLAN page.
Step 6 Click any of the following:
Next to continue.
The Disallow VLAN on Trunks page appears.
Back to modify the Create VLAN page.
Table 10-3 Assign Ports to VLAN Page Field Description
Field Description
VLAN Displays the name of the new VLAN.
Filter Select any of the following criteria based on which you want to filter the list:
Link
Port
Device Name
Device Address
Port Status
VLAN Index
VLAN Name
Association type
Or enter * or leave the field blank and click Filter to get all the records.
Advanced Filter Click Advanced Filter to open Advanced Filter dialog box. Advanced filtering
allows you to search ports using more search criteria.
For more details on Advanced Filter, see Advanced Filter.
Column
Link Shows whether the port is connected to a switch or not. The value can either be
True or False.
Port Name of the port.
Device Name Name of the device to which the port belongs to.
Device Address IP address of the device to which the port belongs to.
Port Status Status of the port. Shows whether the port is active or down.
VLAN Index Index number for the VLAN to which the port belongs to.
VLAN Name Name of the VLAN to which the port belongs to.
Association Type Type of VLAN association.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Configuring VLANs
Cancel to exit.
Finish to save changes.
VLANs are created on the specified devices, selected ports are assigned to new VLAN and the initial
VLAN Configuration page appears.
For more details, see Disallowing VLAN on Trunks.
Advanced Filter
The Advanced Filter allows you to filter and choose the ports using various parameters and criteria, for
assigning the ports to the VLAN. Table 10-4 describes the fields in the Filter Ports Window, when you
click Advanced Filter from the Assign Ports to VLAN Window.
Table 10-4 Filter Ports Field Description
Field Description
Match All Select the radio button to filter the ports that match all the selected parameters.
Match Any Select the radio button to filter the ports that match any of the selected parameter.
Parameter Select a parameter for which you want to filter the ports. Parameter is the attribute
of a port.
The values displayed for Assigning ports to VLANs are:
Device Name
Device Address
Link
Port
Port Status
Port Description
VLAN Index
VLAN Name
Association Type
The values displayed for Configuring Promiscuous ports are:
Link
Port
Device Name
Device Address
VLAN Name
Port Mode

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Configuring VLANs
Click any of the following:
More to add filter.
Fewer to remove filter from the existing filters.
You can add or remove only one filter at a time.
Filter to filter the ports based on the values for the Parameters.
Disallowing VLAN on Trunks
You can select the links on which you do not want to allow Trunking in the newly created VLAN. After
you Assign the ports to the VLAN (See Assigning Ports to VLANs), the End-to end VLAN wizard
directs you to Disallow VLAN on Trunks page.
To disallow trunking on the links in your VLAN, check the checkboxes corresponding to those links,
and click Next. The VLAN Creation Summary page appears.
Clicking Back takes you to the Assign Ports to VLAN page, where you can modify the port assignment.
Clicking Finish saves the changes and takes you to the initial VLAN Configuration page.
For more details, see Understanding VLAN Creation Summary.
Table 10-5 describes the fields in the Disallow VLAN on Trunks page.
Criteria Select the right criterion with respect to the parameter. The values are:
contains
begins with
ends with
is
Value Enter a value corresponding to the parameter that you have selected.
Table 10-4 Filter Ports Field Description (continued)
Field Description
Table 10-5 Disallowing VLAN on Trunks Page Field Description
Field Description
VLAN Name of the VLAN.
Port1 Port on the first device linked to the VLAN.
Device1 Name of the first device in the link.
Device1 Address IP Address of the first device in the link.
Domain1 Domain to which the device belongs to.
Port2 Port on the second device linked to the VLAN.
Device2 Name of the second device in the link.
Device2 Address IP Address of the second device in the link.
Domain 2 Domain to which the device belongs to.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Configuring VLANs
Understanding VLAN Creation Summary
The VLAN Creation Summary page summarizes the operations that you performed through the VLAN
Configuration wizard. The Summary provides the following information:
VTP DomainLists the VTP domains.
SummaryLists different parameters that you have entered.
VLAN Creation ParametersLists the VLAN name and index, and the value of the parameters
Create on all transparent switches and Copy running-config to startup-config.
VLAN Port Assignment ParametersLists the VLAN name and index, and ports to which the
VLAN is assigned to.
VLAN Trunk Configuration ParametersLists the Trunks on which the VLAN is allowed or
disallowed.
Example:
VLAN Creation Parameters
VLAN Name: Test
VLAN Index: 912
Create on all transparent switches : true
Copy running-config to startup-config : true
-----------------------------------------
VLAN Port Assignment Parameters
VLAN Name: Test
VLAN Index: 912
Operation: Assign the VLAN to selected port(s)
Port : Fa4/28
Device: 10.77.209.43
Device Address: 10.77.209.43
------------------------------------------
VLAN Trunk Configuration Parameters
VLAN Name: Test
VLAN Index: 912
Operation: Disallow VLAN on selected Trunk(s)
Trunk: 10.77.209.52:2/1 => 10.77.209.61:2/25
Trunk: 10.77.210.211#2:Gi0/2 => 10.77.210.204:Gi1/0/24
Review the Summary, and click Finish to create the new VLAN, or click Back to modify the Disallow
VLAN on Trunks page, or click Cancel to exit.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Configuring VLANs
Deleting VLANs
You can delete the VLANs configured on the devices in your network. The VLAN Configuration wizard
directs you to delete a VLAN.
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Configuration.
The VLAN Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select devices or entities from the VLAN Configuration page.
For more details on selecting the devices, see Selecting Devices or Entities.
Step 3 Click Delete.
The Select VLAN to Delete page appears.
Table 10-6 describes the fields in the Select a VLAN to Delete dialog box.
Step 4 Click any of the following:
Next to continue.
The Move Affected Ports to New VLAN page appears. For more details, see Moving Affected Ports
to New VLAN.
Table 10-6 Select a VLAN to Delete Page Field Description
Field Description
Copy Running Config to Start-up
Config
Check the checkbox to copy the running configuration to start-up
configuration.
Delete on all Transparent
Switches
Check the checkbox to delete VLANs on all transparent switches.
If you have created VLANs by checking Create on all transparent
switches, it is mandatory that you check Delete on all Transparent
Switches option to delete the VLANs created in VTP Domains.
Filter Source Select the Filter type of the source:
VLAN
VLAN Name
Domain Name
Or enter * or leave the field blank and click Filter to get all the
records.
Select Select the radio button corresponding to the VLAN you want to
delete.
VLAN Index of the VLAN.
VLAN Name Name of the VLAN.
Domain Name Name of the domain in which the VLAN belongs to.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Configuring VLANs
Cancel to exit.
The VLAN configuration appears.
Finish to save changes.
The selected VLANs are deleted from the devices. The ports in the deleted VLAN are automatically
assigned to the default VLAN. The VLAN configuration page appears.
Moving Affected Ports to New VLAN
When you delete a VLAN, any port assigned to that VLAN becomes inactive. Such ports remain
associated with the VLAN (and thus inactive), until you assign them to a new VLAN. You can move
affected ports to a new VLAN using Campus Manager.
You can move the ports in the VLAN you want to delete, to a new VLAN, only after you select the
VLAN you want to delete. For more details on selecting a VLAN to delete, see Deleting VLANs.
To move affected ports to a new VLAN:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Configuration.
The VLAN Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select devices or entities from the VLAN Configuration page.
For more details on selecting the devices, see Selecting Devices or Entities.
Step 3 Click Delete.
The Select VLAN to Delete page appears.
Step 4 Select the radio button corresponding to the VLAN you want to delete and click Next.
The Move Affected Ports to New VLAN appears.
Table 10-7 describes the fields in the Move Affected Ports to new VLAN page.
Step 5 Select the new VLAN from the Move affected ports to new VLAN drop-down menu.
If you do not select any VLAN, the affected ports are moved to the default VLANVLAN 1.
Step 6 Click any of the following:
Next to continue.
The VLAN Deletion Summary page appears. For more details, see Understanding VLAN Deletion
Summary.
Table 10-7 Move Affected Ports to New VLAN Page Field Description
Field Description
Port Affected port in the VLAN.
Device Name Name of the device to which the port belongs to.
Device Address IP address of the device.
Port Status Status of the port.
Connected To End Host, Network Device

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Configuring VLANs
Back to modify the Select VLAN to Delete page.
Cancel to exit.
The VLAN configuration appears.
Finish to save changes.
The selected VLANs are deleted from the devices. The ports in the deleted VLAN are assigned to
the VLANs selected by you. The VLAN configuration appears.
Understanding VLAN Deletion Summary
The VLAN Deletion Summary page summarizes the operations that you performed through the VLAN
Configuration wizard to delete the VLAN. The Summary provides the following information:
VLAN DeletionLists the domain name, name of the VLAN that is deleted, and the VLAN ID.
Operation: Move the affected Ports to another VLANLists the name and ID of the new VLAN
to which the ports have been moved, and lists the details of the ports including the name and IP
address of the device.
Example:
VLAN Deletion:
===================
VLAN Domain :DMZ_10.77.209.43(T)
VLAN Deleted :VLAN0002
VLANId : 2
------------------------------------------
Operation: Move the affected Ports to another VLAN
New VLAN Name :internal VLAN 4
New VLAN Id :4
Port:Gi1/6
Device :172.20.118.182
Device Address :172.20.118.182
-------------------------------------------
Review the Summary and click Finish to delete the VLAN, or click Back to modify the Select VLAN
to Delete page, or click Cancel to exit.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Creating Ethernet VLANs
Creating Ethernet VLANs
You can use Topology Services to create Ethernet VLANs (which is the typical VLAN design). For
details, see Ethernet VLANs.
Ethernet VLANs
An Ethernet VLAN is the typical VLAN design. This consists of a logical group of end-stations,
independent of physical location on an Ethernet network. Catalyst switches support a port-centric or
static VLAN configuration.
All end stations that are connected to ports that belong to the same VLAN, are assigned to the same
Ethernet VLAN.
Creating Ethernet VLANs
Before you create Ethernet VLANs, you must create a VTP domain in your network.
Your login determines whether you can use this option.
To create Ethernet VLANs in your network:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a VTP domain from the Tree View.
Step 3 Select Tools > VLAN Management > Create > Ethernet from the menu.
The VLAN Creation wizard appears. For more details, see Creating VLANs
Interpreting VLAN Summary Information
This section contains:
Displaying VLAN Reports
Interpreting VLAN Reports
To display summary information about the VLANs in your network:
From Tree View in Topology Services, open a VTP domain and select a VLAN. The Summary
information is displayed in the right pane of the Topology services window. See Table 10-8 to interpret
this information.
Note Information on Bridge Number and Ring Number are not applicable to Ethernet VLANs.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Interpreting VLAN Summary Information
Displaying VLAN Reports
Campus Manager allows you to generate VLAN reports for devices, switch clouds, or VTP domains.
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Reports > Report Generator.
The Report Generator page appears.
The left drop-down list displays Campus Manager Reports.
Step 2 Select VLAN from Select a Report drop-down list.
The VLAN page appears with the following information. See Table 10-9:
Table 10-8 VLAN Field Description
Field Description
Ports Number of ports in the domain.
Up Ports Number of active ports in the domain.
ISL Index Inter-Switch Link (ISL) index of the VLAN.
Port List
Link A lightning bolt indicates a port that is connected to a switch.
PortDescription Description about the port.
PortName Name of the port.
Device Name Name of device to which the port belongs.
Device Address IP address of device to which the port belongs.
Port Status Whether the port is active, down, dormant, or testing.
isTrunk If checked, the port is configured as a VLAN trunk.
Association Type Type of VLAN.
Port Mode Displays mode of port. For example, PVLAN-Host, Promiscuous, or non
PVLAN.
Table 10-9 VLAN Page Field Description
Field Description
Scheduling
Run Type Select a run type from the drop-down list.
The following run types are available: Immediate, Once, Daily, Weekly,
Monthly.
If you select Immediate, the J ob Info fields and Scheduling Date will be
dimmed.
Note Launching immediate VLAN reports for more than 500 devices
results in an error. You can schedule reports to run for all devices
or launch immediate reports for less than 500 devices.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Interpreting VLAN Summary Information
Step 3 Click Submit to generate the report. The VLAN reports window appears.
Or
Click Reset to change the settings.
You can open VLAN reports page from Topology Services.
To open VLAN reports from Topology Services:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a view that contains the device, switch cloud, or the VTP Domain for which you want to view the
report.
This view is in the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Select Reports > VLAN Report from the menu.
or
Right-click the VTP Domain or the device, and select Display View.
The Network Topology window appears.
Step 4 Select the device or the switch cloud.
Step 5 Right-click and select VLAN Report from the popup menu.
or
Select Reports > VLAN Report.
The VLAN Report window appears.
Date Select the date and time at which you need to generate the report.
Format: 20 Apr 2005 at 01 20
Job Info
J ob Description Enter a description for this report.
E-mail Enter the e-mail id to which the report has to be sent.
Table 10-9 VLAN Page Field Description (continued)
Field Description

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Understanding Private VLAN
Interpreting VLAN Reports
The following information is displayed at the top of the report:
Device Name
Device IP
Device Type
Domain
Table 10-10 describes the fields in VLAN Report.
Understanding Private VLAN
A Private VLAN (PVLAN) is a VLAN that isolates devices at Layer 2 (L2), from other ports within the
same broadcast domain or subnet. PVLAN segregates traffic at L2 and converts a broadcast segment into
a non-broadcast multi-access segment.
PVLANs can stop L2 connectivity between end stations on a switch without distributing them into
different IP subnets, thus preventing wastage of IP addresses.
You can also assign a specific set of ports within a PVLAN, and thus control the connectivity among
them. You can configure PVLANs and normal VLANs on the same switch.
This topic contains Types of Private VLAN Ports
Types of Private VLAN Ports
The ports in a private VLAN are categorized as:
Promiscuous Ports
PVLAN Host Ports
PVLAN Trunk Ports
Table 10-10 VLAN Report Field Description
Field Description
VLAN ID VLAN index.
VLAN Name Name of the VLAN to which the device belongs.
Status Status of device can be operational or suspended.
VLAN Type Types of VLANs to which the device is associated. The VLANs can be
normal, primary, isolated, community, or two-way community VLANs.
Associated Primary VLAN ID of the associated primary VLAN.
MTU Size MTU size for the corresponding VLAN on that device.
Media Type Explains in which media type the device operates. Device can be in
ethernet, FDDI, or inactive.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Using Private VLAN
Promiscuous Ports
Promiscuous port communicates with all other interfaces and ports within a PVLAN. Such ports are used
to communicate with external routers, local directories, network management devices, backup servers,
administrative workstations, etc.
Ports to the routing module in some switches are promiscuous in nature (for example, MSFC).
PVLAN Host Ports
A PVLAN host port is a port connected to a server or an end host that requires Layer 2 (L2) isolation.
A host port exists in the PortFast mode and the BPDU Guard feature is enabled on these ports. These
ports can be further classified into:
Isolated Ports
Community Ports
This depends on the secondary VLAN to which the ports belong.
Isolated Ports
Isolated ports are completely isolated in L2, from other ports in the same PVLAN. These ports cannot
receive the broadcasts from other ports within the same PVLAN, but receive broadcasts from
promiscuous ports.
Privacy for the VLAN is ensured at L2 level by blocking the traffic to all isolated ports, except the
promiscuous ports. Broadcasts from an isolated port is always forwarded to all promiscuous ports.
Community Ports
Community ports communicate among themselves and with their promiscuous ports. These ports are
isolated at L2 from all other ports in other communities, or isolated ports within their private VLAN.
Broadcasts propagate only between associated community ports and the promiscuous port.
PVLAN Trunk Ports
Private VLAN Trunk ports are similar to Host ports that can carry multiple VLANs. A Trunk port carries
the primary VLAN and the secondary VLANs to the neighboring switch. The Trunk port is unaware of
PVLAN and will carry PVLAN traffic without any special action.
Using Private VLAN
A Private VLAN has four distinct parts:
Primary VLAN
Manages the incoming traffic from the promiscuous port to isolated, community, two-way
community ports, and all other promiscuous ports, in the same primary VLAN.
Isolated VLAN
Isolated ports use this VLAN to communicate to the promiscuous ports. The traffic from an isolated
port is blocked from reaching all adjacent ports within its private VLAN, except for its promiscuous
ports.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Using Private VLAN
Community VLAN
A group of community ports use this unidirectional VLAN to communicate among themselves and
to manage the outgoing traffic through the designated promiscuous ports from the private VLAN.
Two-way community VLAN
A group of community ports use this VLAN to communicate among themselves. This bidirectional
VLAN manages the incoming and outgoing traffic for community ports and Multilayer Switch
Feature Cards (MSFC).
Isolated and community VLANs are called secondary VLANs.
This section explains:
Creating PVLAN
Configuring Promiscuous Ports
Deleting PVLAN
While creating private VLANs, you:
Must set VTP to Transparent or Off modes, for VTP version 2.
Can create PVLAN on primary server, Transparent and Off modes for VTP version 3.
Campus Manager enables you to:
Create primary Private VLAN.
Create isolated, community or two-way community VLANs.
Associate secondary VLANs to primary VLANs.
Assign ports to secondary VLANs.
Configure promiscuous ports.
Creating PVLAN
To create a Private VLAN, you must designate one VLAN as primary and another as either isolated,
community, or two-way community VLAN. Then, you can assign additional VLANs as secondary
VLANs.
After creating primary and secondary VLANs you must associate the secondary VLANs to the
respective primary VLANs.
Creating a private VLAN involves the following steps:
Creating Primary VLAN
Creating Secondary VLAN and Associating to Primary VLAN
Associating Ports to Secondary VLAN

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Using Private VLAN
Creating Primary VLAN
You must create primary VLAN before creating any other secondary VLAN.
To create Primary VLANs:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > PVLAN Configuration.
The PVLAN Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select Create PVLAN from the TOC.
Or
Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 3 Select a VTP domain from the VTP Tree View, under the Managed Domain or Network View.
Step 4 Select Tools > PVLAN Management > Create.
The Create PVLAN page appears.
Step 5 Select the devices using the Device Selector or the Domain Selector.
For more details, see Step 2 of Selecting Devices or Entities.
Step 6 Select Primary from the Private VLAN Type drop-down list.
The Get Primary VLANs tab and the Associated Primary VLAN field is disabled.
Step 7 Enter a name for the VLAN in the VLAN Name field.
Step 8 Enter the VLAN index number for the new Primary VLAN, in the VLAN Index field.
Step 9 Check the check boxes as required:
To create private VLAN on all transparent switches.
To copy Running to Startup config for IOS switches.
The check box for creating private VLANs on all transparent switches, is enabled only when the
VLAN contains a device in transparent mode.
Step 10 Click Create to create primary PVLAN.
Note You must create primary VLAN before creating any other secondary VLAN.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Using Private VLAN
Creating Secondary VLAN and Associating to Primary VLAN
After creating a primary VLAN, you can create secondary VLANs. Once you create a secondary VLAN,
you must associate that to a primary VLAN.
To do this:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > PVLAN Configuration.
The PVLAN Configuration page appears.
Or
Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a view with a VTP domain, which has the devices listed for which you want to create PVLAN.
This view is in the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Select Tools > PVLAN Management > Create.
The Create PVLAN page appears.
Step 4 Select one of the following options from the Private VLAN Type drop-down list:
Isolated
Community
Two-Way Community
Step 5 Select the Associated Primary VLAN.
You can associate a secondary VLAN that you have created to a primary VLAN.
VTP Domain field displays the domain you have chosen.
You may enter the Private VLAN Name that you want to assign.
Step 6 Select the Private VLAN Index.
Step 7 Check the check boxes as required:
To create private VLAN on all transparent switches.
To copy Running to Startup config for IOS switches.
The check box for creating private VLANs on all transparent switches, is enabled only when the
VLAN contains a device in transparent mode.
Step 8 Click Apply to create PVLAN or click Cancel to exit.
Associating Ports to Secondary VLAN
You must associate ports to the secondary VLAN that you have created. You can assign ports to a
secondary VLAN as you assign for normal VLANs. For assigning ports to VLANs, see Using
VLAN Port Assignment

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Using Private VLAN
Configuring Promiscuous Ports
You must associate the promiscuous ports to the PVLANs you have created, to receive traffic from
outside the PVLAN.
You can configure only the ports on which Trunking is not enabled.
To configure a Promiscuous Port:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > PVLAN Configuration from the LMS Portal.
The PVLAN Configuration page appears.
Or
From Topology Services Main Window, select the device that has the ports you require and select
Tools > VLAN Port Assignment.
The VLAN Port Assignment window appears.
Step 2 Click Configure Promiscuous Ports from the TOC.
The Configure Promiscuous Ports page appears.
Step 3 Select a device or entities from the list using Device Selector or Domain Selector.
Step 4 Click List Ports.
The Port List displays the list of ports on the selected devices.
You can filter the list using the Filter or Advanced Filter.
Step 5 Select the ports from the ports listed in the table.
Step 6 Click Configure.
The Configure Promiscuous Port window appears.
The Port Details table displays:
Device Name
Port Name
Device IP Address
IfName
Step 7 Select the VLANs from the list of Available PVLANs.
Step 8 Click Add to add to list of Mapped VLANs.
Or
Click Remove to remove the VLANs from the Map VLANs table.
You can select the Copy Running to Start-up config check-box to copy the running configuration to the
start-up configuration.
Step 9 Click Apply to configure.

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Using Private VLAN
Deleting PVLAN
To delete PVLAN:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > PVLAN Configuration from the LMS Portal.
Step 2 Click Delete PVLAN in the TOC.
Or
From Topology Services, select Managed Domains > VTP Domains from the Tree View in the
Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Select the PVLAN which you want to delete.
Step 4 Select Tools > PVLAN Management > Delete.
A VTP Domain Name: Delete Private VLAN Name appears.
Step 5 Click List PVLANs to see a list of PVLANs. See Table 10-11.
Step 6 Select the check box corresponding to the PVLAN you want to delete.
To select all, select the check-box in the table heading.
Step 7 Click Delete.
Table 10-11 Fields in PVLAN List
Field Description
PVLAN List
Filter You can select any of the following filter criteria:
PVLAN Index
PVLAN Name
PVLAN Type
Associated Primary
Domain
Enter the filter string, then click Filter.
PVLAN Index Index value of the PVLAN.
PVLAN Name Name of the PVLAN.
PVLAN Type Type of PVLAN. Values are: Primary, Secondary, Community
Associated Primary Name of the Associated Primary VLAN.
Domain Domain to which the VLAN belongs to.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Understanding Inter-VLAN Routing
Understanding Inter-VLAN Routing
Inter-VLAN Routing enables to route the traffic between different VLANs. This feature is required when
an end station wants to communicate with another end station in a different VLAN. Devices within a
VLAN can communicate with one another without the help of a router.
On the contrary, devices in separate VLANs require a routing device to communicate with one another.
Network devices in different VLANs cannot communicate with one another without a router to route the
traffic between the VLANs.
In most of the network environments, VLANs will be associated with individual networks or
subnetworks. In a switched network, VLANs segregate devices into different collision domains and
Layer 3 (L3) subnets.
Configuring VLANs for inter-VLAN routing helps to control the size of the broadcast domain and to
keep local traffic local. You can configure one or more routers to route traffic in the network.
Layer 2 switches require a L3 routing device (either external to the switch or in another module on the
same chassis).
The new L3 Switches accommodate routing capabilities. The router or the switch receives a packet,
determines the VLAN to which it belongs, and sends the packet to the appropriate port on the other
VLAN.
Using Inter-VLAN Routing
Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing
Campus Manager supports Inter-VLAN Routing configuration on devices like MSFC, RSM, and
external routers with IPv4.
Prerequisite for configuring Inter-VLAN Routing through Campus Manager
Resource Manager Essentials is a prerequisite for configuring Inter-VLAN Routing using
Campus Manager. If the server running Campus Manager does not have RME, you can use a remote
server, which has the RME application.
If you want to configure Inter-VLAN Routing on a device:
Resource Manager Essentials must manage the devices.
The device must have the same device name when managed by Campus Manager as well as
Resource Manager Essentials.
See the User Guide for Resource Manager Essentials 4.3 for more details on how to manage devices.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Using Inter-VLAN Routing
Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing on RSM, MSFC, L2/L3 Devices
To configure Inter-VLAN Routing on a VLAN interface:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a device from the Topology Services Tree View, under the Network Views.
Step 3 Right-click the device and select Config Inter-VLAN Routing from the popup menu.
The Configure Inter-VLAN Routing window appears. This window displays the Device Name and the
Device IP of the selected device.
Step 4 Select a device interface from Device interface configuration list.
Step 5 Click Edit to edit an existing VLAN configuration.
Or
Click New to configure Inter-VLAN Routing for a new VLAN interface.
You can edit IP Address, Admin Status, and Subnet Mask. See Table 10-12.
You can also delete a Device Interface from the list of Interfaces for which you do not want to configure
Inter-VLAN Routing.
Step 6 Click Move to Interface Set.
If you want to edit the configuration details again:
a. Select the VLAN interface from the Interface Set.
b. Click Delete from Interface Set
c. Repeat the steps from Step 4.
Step 7 Click Apply.
You can configure Inter-VLAN Routing for more than one VLAN interface, at a time.
The RME Server credentials window appears.
Step 8 Enter RME Server, Server Port, User Name, and Password. See Table 10-13.
Table 10-12 Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing Field Descriptions
Field Description
VLAN Interface
1
1. You can enter the VLAN interface name to create a new interface. You cannot edit an existing VLAN interface.
Enter the VLAN interface.
IP Address Enter the IP address for the interface
Subnet Mask Enter the subnet mask address.
Admin Status Select the Admin status:
Up
Down

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Using Inter-VLAN Routing
Step 9 Click OK.
Inter-VLAN Routing is configured for all the VLAN interfaces in Interface Set.
Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing on External Routers
To configure Inter-VLAN Routing on a VLAN interface of an external router:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a device from the Topology Services Tree View, under the Network Views.
Step 3 Right-click the device and select Config Inter-VLAN Routing from the popup menu.
The RME Server credentials window appears.
Step 4 Enter RME Server, Server Port, User Name, and Password. See Table 10-14
Step 5 Click OK.
The Configure Inter-VLAN Routing window appears.
Step 6 Select a device interface from Device interface configuration list.
Step 7 Click Edit to edit an existing VLAN configuration.
Or
Click New to configure Inter-VLAN Routing for a new VLAN interface.
Table 10-13 RME Server credentials Field Description
Field Description
RME Server Name of the RME server or the IP address
Server Port
1
1. In Campus Manager, 1741 is the default port for http mode and 443 is the default port for SSL
(https) mode.
Enter the port number
User Name Enter the user name
Password Enter the password
Table 10-14 RME Server Credentials Field Description
Field Description
RME Server Name of the RME server or the IP address.
Server Port
1
1. In Campus Manager 1741 is the default port for http mode and 443 is the default port for SSL
(https) mode.
Enter the port number.
User Name Enter the user name.
Password Enter the password.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
VLAN Trunking Protocol
You can edit IP Address, Admin Status, Encapsulation, and Subnet Mask. See Table 10-15
You can also delete a device interface from the list of interfaces for which you do not want to configure
Inter-VLAN Routing.
Step 8 Click Move to Interface Set.
If you want to edit the configuration details again:
a. Select the VLAN interface from the Interface Set.
b. Click Delete from Interface Set
c. Repeat the steps from Step 2.
Step 9 Click Apply.
You can configure Inter-VLAN Routing for more than one VLAN interface, at a time.
Inter-VLAN Routing is configured for all VLAN interfaces in the Interface Set.
VLAN Trunking Protocol
VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) is a Layer 2 multicast messaging protocol that maps VLANs across all
media types and VLAN tagging methods between switches. In this way it maintains the VLAN
configuration consistency throughout a network.
VTP reduces the effort in adding, deleting, or renaming a VLAN at each switch, when the VLAN extends
to other switches in the network.
VTP minimizes misconfigurations and configuration inconsistencies that can result in a number of
problems, such as duplicate VLAN names, incorrect VLAN-type specifications, and security violations.
With VTP, you can make configuration changes centrally on one switch and have those changes
automatically communicated to all the other switches in the network.
Table 10-15 Configuring Inter-VLAN Routing Field Descriptions
Field Description
VLAN Interface
1
1. You can enter the VLAN interface name to create a new interface. You cannot edit an existing
VLAN interface.
Enter the VLAN interface.
IP Address Enter the IP address for the interface.
Sub-Interface ID Enter the ID for the sub-interface.
Admin Status Select the Admin status:
Up
Down
Encapsulation Select the encapsulation:
dot1Q
ISL
Subnet Mask Enter the subnet mask address.

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
VLAN Trunking Protocol
The major function of VTP is to distribute VLAN information. You must configure VTP before you
configure any VLAN.
Using VTP, each switch in server mode displays the following:
Management domain on the Trunk ports
Configuration revision number
VLANs and their specific parameters.
For more details on VLAN, see Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN), and for VTP Domains, seeVTP
Domains.
This topic contains:
VTP Domains
Understanding VLAN Trunking Protocol Version 3
Using VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP)
Using VTP Views
VTP Domains
A VTP domain is made up of one or more interconnected devices that share the same VTP domain name.
A switch can be configured to be in only one VTP domain, and each VLAN has a name that is unique
within a management domain.
Typically, you use a VTP domain to ease administrative control of your network or to account for
physical boundaries within your network. However, you can set up as many or as few VTP domains as
are appropriate for your administrative needs.
Consider that VTP is transmitted on all Trunk connections, including ISL, IEEE 802.1Q, 802.10, and
LANE.
VTP Domains display and monitor the details of the VLANs in your network. Sometimes includes
special cases labeled NULL or NO_VTP.
NULLLists devices that are in transparent mode and that support VTP, but do not have configured
domain names. Each of these devices is identified in the list by its IP address.
NO_VTPLists devices that do not support VTP. Each of these devices is identified in the list by
its IP address.
However, devices which do not support VTP but support VLANs (for example, Catalyst 2900XL
Standard Edition switches) are placed in the NO_VTP domain.
The devices that do not support VLANs and VTP (for example, Catalyst 1900 Standard Edition
switches) are placed in the domain category of the neighbor device.

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VLAN Trunking Protocol
Components of VTP Domains
Within a VTP domain, you can configure switches as follows:
ServerVTP servers advertise their VLAN configuration to other switches in the same VTP domain
and synchronize their VLAN configuration with other switches based on advertisements received
over Trunk links. VTP server is the default mode.
ClientVTP clients operate in the same way as VTP servers. However, you cannot create, change,
or delete VLANs on a VTP client. VTP clients also do not broadcast VTP advertisements like the
VTP servers do.
TransparentVTP transparent switches do not participate in VTP. A VTP transparent switch does
not display its VLAN configuration and does not synchronize its VLAN configuration based on
received advertisements.
Your VTP domain structure influences the behavior of Topology Services.
Understanding VLAN Trunking Protocol Version 3
VTP version 3 can distribute a list of opaque databases over an administrative domain.
VTP version 3 provides these enhancements to the previous VTP versions:
Support for extended VLANs.
Support for creating and advertising private VLANs.
Support for VLAN instances and MST mapping propagation instances.
Allows improved server authentication.
Prevents you from adding the wrong database to a VTP domain.
Allows interaction with VTP version 1 and VTP version 2.
Support for configuring VTP version 3 on a per-port basis.
Enables the network to propagate the VLAN database and other databases.
VTP version 3 is a collection of protocol instances. Each instance handles one database, which is
associated with a given feature. VTP version 3 runs multiple instances of the protocol by which it
handles the configuration propagation of multiple databases that are independent of one another.
Support for VTP Version 3 in Campus Manager
Campus Manager supports the version 3 of VTP. Following are the major features supported in this
release:
Displays Primary server as a subfolder under the parent VTP domain:
If your network contains devices running VTP version 3, the primary server is displayed as a
subfolder under the parent Domain in the VTP Domains. Under Primary server folder, you can find
all the server and client modes.
Supports devices with VTP set to Off mode:
The devices which are set to Off mode are supported as for the transparent mode devices. The Tree
View displays the Off mode devices in subfolder under the parent domain.

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VLAN Trunking Protocol
Provides VTP filters:
Topology Filters contains a filter for devices running VTP version 3 in the Network Topology view
for the VTP Domains and VTP Views.
You can enable the filters to view the primary, server, client, transparent, and Off mode devices. The
Off mode devices in VTP version 2 and version 3 domains, are displayed under different subfolders
of the parent domain, in the Tree View.
When you change the configuration through Campus Manager, the Off mode devices are considered
similar to the Transparent mode devices.
For more details, see Figure 10-1.
Figure 10-1 VTP Filters
1 Menu 7 Filter on for VTP devices
2 Toolbar 8 Check box dimmed for the filter
3 Topology map 9 Topology filter results

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
VLAN Trunking Protocol
Supports creating Private VLANs in VTP version 3 environment.
You can create a VLAN or PVLAN using a primary server domain or the parent domain. You can
create a VLAN or PVLAN only on the Primary server, Transparent and Off mode devices, in a VTP
version 3 environment.
Notes on creating VLAN or PVLAN in VTP version 3 domain using Campus Manager
You must select the parent VTP domain folder under the VTP domain Tree to create VLAN or
PVLAN.
To create VLAN or PVLAN on all transparent switches in the domain, you can check the check box
Create VLAN on all transparent switches in the Creating VLAN or PVLAN windows.
For more details, see Creating Ethernet VLANs and Creating PVLAN.
You must select the primary domain subfolder under the VTP domain, while creating VLAN and
PVLAN on the Primary server mode devices that has clients and secondary servers.
You must select Transparent or Off mode subfolders under the parent VTP domain to create VLAN
or PVLAN on a single Transparent or Off mode device respectively.
Using VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP)
Using VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), each switch in server mode advertises its management domain
on its Trunk ports, its configuration revision number, and its known VLANs and their specific
parameters.
Therefore, a new VLAN must be configured on only one device in the management domain, and the
information is automatically learned by all other devices (not in VTP transparent mode) in the same
management domain.
After a device learns about a VLAN, it receives all frames on that VLAN from any Trunk port and, if
appropriate, forwards them to each of its other Trunk ports.
This topic contains:
Displaying VTP Reports
Using VTP Views
4 Filtered devices 10 Check box enabled for VTP Transparent
devices
5 Filter collapsed 11 Expand icon for the filter
6 Filter dimmed

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VLAN Trunking Protocol
Displaying VTP Reports
To display a VTP report for the VTP domains in your network.
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a VTP domain under the VTP views for which you want to view the report. This view is in the
Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
The VTP Report, which is the Summary view, appears.
Interpreting VTP Reports
See Table 10-16 to interpret the fields shown in the VT Reports Summary view.
Table 10-16 Field Description for VTP Report
Field Description
Link A lightning bolt indicates a port that is linked to a switch.
Port Number of ports in the domain.
IfName Interface Name.
Device Name Name of the device to which the port belongs.
Device Address Address of the device to which the port belongs.
PortStatus Displays the status of the port, whether the port is active or dormant.
isTrunk If the box is checked, the port is configured as a VLAN Trunk.
VLAN Name of the VLAN.
Association Type Type of VLAN
Port Mode Displays the mode of the port. For example, PVLAN-Host, Promiscuous, or
a non-PVLAN.

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VLAN Trunking Protocol
Using VTP Views
VTP Views shows devices that participate in VTP domains. VTP Views also shows the non-VTP devices
connected directly to the VTP domain. See Figure 10-2
Figure 10-2 VTP Tree View
Use the VTP views to:
Display Device Attributes
Display Port Attributes
Display Link Attributes
Display information about multi-layer switching (MLS) devices in your network. See Displaying
MLS Reports
1 VTP domain in the Topology Tree View 4 VLANs under the Transparent switch mode
2 Parent VTP domain 5 VTP Views under the Network View
3 Switch in Transparent mode 6 Parent VTP domain under VTP views

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Chapter 10 Managing VLANs and VTP
Understanding Trunking
Understanding Trunking
A Trunk is a point-to-point link carrying traffic for several VLANs, and are typically used to connect
switches. Instead of configuring several access links to carry multi-VLAN traffic, its economical to do
it with a single trunk link.
Trunking is hence a type of configuration on an interface which allows VLANs to span the entire
network, instead of just one switch. The Trunked interface that connects to another network device is
allowed to pass traffic for multiple VLANs, instead of only one VLAN as in a non-Trunked interface on
a switch.
This topic contains:
Trunking Considerations
Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP)
Trunk Encapsulation
Trunk Characteristics
Encapsulation Types
Creating Trunk
Modifying Trunk Attributes
Trunking Considerations
While using a Trunk, consider the following:
VLANs are local database of a switch. VLAN information is not passed between switches.
Trunk links provide VLAN identification for frames traveling between switches.
You can use either of the two Ethernet Trunking mechanisms: ISL and IEEE 802.1Q.
Trunks carry traffic from all VLANs to and from the switch by default. However, they can be
configured to carry only specified VLAN traffic too.
Trunk links must be configured to allow Trunking on each end of the link.
Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP)
Dynamic Trunking Protocol (DTP) is a Cisco proprietary protocol. Trunk negotiation is managed by the
DTP on a link between two devices. DTP is also used for negotiating the type of Trunking encapsulation
to be used.
Dynamic Trunking is the ability to negotiate the Trunking method with the other device, and DTP is a
point-to-point protocol that supports auto-negotiation of both ISL and 802.1Q Trunks. DTP sends the
VTP domain name in a DTP packet.
Therefore, if you use DTP, and if the two ends of a link belong to a different VTP domain, the Trunk will
not function.
The Catalyst operating system options of auto, desirable, and on, and the IOS options of dynamic auto,
dynamic desirable, and trunk, configure a Trunk link using DTP. If one side of the link is configured
to Trunk and sends DTP signals, the other side of the link will dynamically begin to Trunk, if the options
match correctly.

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Understanding Trunking
To enable Trunking and not send any DTP signaling, you can use the option nonegotiate for switches
that support that function. If you want to disable Trunking completely, you can use the off option for a
Catalyst operating system switch or the no switchport mode trunk command on an IOS switch.
DTP is a second generation Dynamic Inter-Switch Link Protocol (DISL) and allows the Cisco Catalyst
devices to negotiate whether to use 802.1Q encapsulation. DISL and DTP do not negotiate Trunking in
case of EtherChannelthey only negotiate whether to enable Trunking.
Trunk Encapsulation
The following Trunking encapsulations are available on all Ethernet interfaces:
Inter-Switch Link (ISL)A Cisco-proprietary Trunking encapsulation.
802.1QAn industry-standard Trunking encapsulation.
Trunk Characteristics
Table 10-17 shows the DTP signaling and the characteristics of each mode.
Table 10-17 Trunking Mode Characteristics
Trunking
Mode
Frames
Sent Description
Final state (local
port)
on YES,
periodic
Trunking is active. The interfaces sends DTP
signals that actively attempt to convert the link to
a Trunk link.
The interface becomes a Trunk interface if the
neighboring interface is set to on, auto or
desirable, and is running DTP. A port that is in on
mode always tags frames sent out from the port.
Trunking,
unconditionally.
auto YES,
periodic
These links will only become Trunk links if they
receive a DTP signal from a link that is already
Trunking or desires to trunk.
This will only form a Trunk if the neighboring
interface is set to on or desirable. This is the
default mode for Catalyst operating system
switches.
The port will end up in
Trunking state only if
the neighboring
interface wants to.
desirable YES,
periodic
These links would like to become Trunk links and
send DTP signals that attempt to initiate a Trunk.
They will only become Trunk links if the other
side responds to the DTP signal.
This will form a Trunk if the neighboring interface
is set to on, auto, or desirable and is running
DTP. This is the default mode for all Ethernet
interfaces.
If the port detects that
the neighboring
interface is able to
Trunk (remote in on,
desirable or auto
mode), it will end up
in Trunking state.
Otherwise, it will stay
non-Trunking.

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Understanding Trunking
Encapsulation Types
The encapsulation type allows you to specify whether ISL or 802.1q should be used for Trunking. The
parameter is only relevant if the module you are using is able to use both types of encapsulation. The
parameter can have three different values as shown in table below.
Creating Trunk
To create trunk for a port:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager >Configuration > Trunk Configuration from the LMS Portal.
The Create Trunk page appears.
Step 2 Select the device or domain from the list, and click Show Links.
The Available Links pane displays the links for each device that you have selected. Table 10-18
describes the fields in the Available Links pane.
nonegotiate NO Sets Trunking on and disables DTP. These will
only become Trunks with ports in on or
nonegotiate mode.
Trunking,
unconditionally.
off YES This option sets Trunking and DTP capabilities
off. This is usually the recommended setting for
any access port since it prevents any dynamic
establishments of Trunk links.
Non Trunking,
unconditionally.
Table 10-17 Trunking Mode Characteristics (continued)
Trunking
Mode
Frames
Sent Description
Final state (local
port)
Encapsulation Type Description and Trunking
ISL Sets the port encapsulation to ISL.
802.1Q Sets the port encapsulation to 802.1q.
negotiate Only available in auto or desirable Trunking modes:
If the neighboring interface has encapsulation type
set to negotiate, the Trunk will eventually be set up
with ISL.
If the interface is configured for ISL or 802.1q or
only able to use ISL or 802.1q, the Trunking
encapsulation used will be the same as the
neighboring interface.

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Understanding Trunking
Step 3 Click the radio button corresponding to the link to select link for which you want to create trunk.
Step 4 Click Create Trunk.
Or
From Topology Map, right-click the link for which you want to create trunk, and select Create Trunk
from the popup menu.
The Create Trunk window appears.
Table 10-19 describes the fields in the Create Trunk page.
Table 10-18 Available Links Field Description
Field Description
Filter Select the filter type and then enter the string. Leave the field blank to display
all.
You can filter the list based on the Port1, Device1, Port2, or Device2.
For example, if you want to see only the trunks on the selected devices which
starts with IP address 10.77, select Device1 from the Filter type, then enter
10.77.* in the filter field and click Filter.
Port 1 Port of the first device in the link.
Device 1 IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address) of the device to which the port1 belongs to.
Port 2 Port of the second device in the link.
Device 2 IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address) of the device to which the port2 belongs to.
Table 10-19 Create Trunk Page Field Description
Field Description
Device Information
Device IP addresses of the devices forming the link.
Port Port numbers of the devices forming the link.
Trunk Settings
Encapsulation Select the Encapsulation type for the trunk. Campus Manager
supports: Dot1Q, ISL, Negotiate.
Mode Trunking mode of the port is set to Desirable. Campus Manager
supports only the Desirable mode.
Configure VLANs on Trunk
Allow Active VLANs Lists only the active VLANs.
1. Select the VLANs for which you do not want to configure
Trunk.
2. Click Add to move the VLANs to Disallowed VLANs list.
Disallow Active VLANs 1. Select the VLAN IDs of the VLANs, which must pass through
the Trunk.
2. Click Remove to move the VLANs to the list of Allowed
VLANs.

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Understanding Trunking
To copy the running configuration to start-up configuration, select Copy Running to Start-up Config
check-box .
Step 5 Click Create to create the Trunk or click Close to exit.
After you click Create, it will be idle for 2 minutes to see if the device goes down on setting the port to
trunking mode. After 2 minutes, if the creation of trunk is successful, Data Collection for these devices
is triggered.
Only after the completion of Data Collection, you can see the newly configured trunk ports in the Modify
Trunk Attributes page.
Note If the trunk link is configured in a port that flaps between blocking and non-blocking states due
to STP, then the port will be listed in both Create Trunk page and Modify Trunk Attributes page.
To know whether the port is trunking or not, enable logging in the device and see the log
messages.
Modifying Trunk Attributes
To modify trunk attributes:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > Trunk Configuration from the LMS Portal.
Step 2 Click Modify Trunk Attributes from the TOC.
The Modify Trunk Attributes page appears.
Step 3 Select devices from the device list, and click Show Trunks.
The trunks configured on the devices are listed in the Trunk List. See Table 10-20.
Configure VLANSs on Trunk Using Ranges
Allow VLANs Enter VLAN IDs of the VLANs, which must pass through the Trunk
in the range of 1 to 1005 and 1025 to 4094. The other VLANs are
not supported for Trunking.
Disallow VLANs Enter VLAN IDs of the VLANs, which must not pass through the
Trunk, in the range of 1 and 4096.
If you enter numbers into both fields, the VLAN indexes that you
are disallowing will take precedence over VLAN indexes that you
are allowing.
For example, if you allow 1-1024 and disallow 1-100, VLANs with
ISL indexes of 101-1024 will be allowed.
Table 10-19 Create Trunk Page Field Description (continued)
Field Description

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Understanding Trunking
Step 4 Select the radio-buttons corresponding the trunk you want to modify, and click Modify Trunk.
The Modify Trunk window appears.
The Device Information pane displays the device IP address and the port number of all the devices you
have selected.
Step 5 Select the Trunk Settings
a. Select Encapsulation:
Dot1Q
ISL
Negotiate
b. Mode
Campus Manager 3.3 supports only the Desirable mode.
Step 6 Configure VLANs on Trunk.
Allow VLAN(s)Enter VLAN IDs of the VLANs, which must pass through the Trunk, in a range
between 1 to 1005 and 1025 to 4094. The other VLANs are not supported for Trunking. * indicates
that the VLANs were previously disallowed.
Disallow VLAN(s)Enter VLAN IDs of the VLANs, which must not pass through the Trunk, in a
range between 1 and 4096.
Use the Add or Remove buttons to allow or disallow VLANs.
To copy the running configuration to start-up configuration, select Copy Running to Start-up Config
check-box.
Step 7 Click Modify.
Table 10-20 Trunk List Field Description
Field Description
Filter Select the filter type and then enter the string. Leave the field blank to display all.
You can filter the list based on the Port1, Device1, Port2, or Device2.
For example, if you want to see only the trunks on the selected devices which starts
with IP address 10.77, select Device1 from the Filter type, then enter 10.77.* in the
filter field and click Filter.
Port 1 Port number of the port of the device at one side in the link that is configured for
Trunking.
Device1 IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address) of the device to which the port1 belongs to.
Port2 Port number of the port of the device at the other end of the link that is configured
for Trunking.
Device2 IP Address (IPv4 or IPv6 Address) of the device to which the port2 belongs to.

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EtherChannel
EtherChannel
EtherChannel is a technology that bundles individual Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet links into a
single logical link that would provide higher bandwidth. EtherChannels thus enable you to aggregate up
to Gigabit Ethernet connections, providing up to 16 Gbps of bandwidth (in full duplex mode).
The channel is treated as a single logical connection between two switches. If one of the connections
fails in the EtherChannel, the other connections will be operating so that the connection is not down.
This topic contains:
Understanding EtherChannel
Using EtherChannel
Understanding EtherChannel
EtherChannel provides incremental Trunk speeds between Fast Ethernet (FE) and Gigabit Ethernet (GE)
by grouping multiple equalspeed ports into a logical port channel. EtherChannel combines multiple FEs
up to 800 Mbps or GEs up to 8 Gbps, providing fault-tolerant, high-speed links between switches,
routers, and servers.
Campus Manager supports only PAgP, the aggregation protocol. When a user selects a port or link for
configuring EtherChannel, the user is prompted with all available ports that can participate in the
channel (Ports that are directly connected between devices).
Admin Group ID attribute for each port is also provided under group attribute. User can change them
accordingly to choose which ports need to aggregate into a channel.
All ports that have same group value will participate in channel. Campus Manager supports only the
Desirable mode for EtherChannel configuration.
Campus Manager does not support EtherChannel configuration between a switch and router.
Using EtherChannel
Campus Manager allows you to:
Aggregate multiple links between switches into one or more EtherChannels.
Configure frame distribution parameters for EtherChannel load balancing.
Configuring EtherChannel
To configure EtherChannel:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the LMS Portal.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 Select a view that contains the devices for which you want to configure EtherChannel.
This view is in the Tree View in the Topology Services Main Window.
Step 3 Right-click the view and select Display View from the popup menu.
The Network Topology View window appears.

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VLAN Port Assignment
Step 4 From the Network Topology View select the link on which you want to configure EtherChannel.
Step 5 Right-click the link and select Configure EtherChannel.
The EtherChannel Configuration window appears.
Protocol field displays PAgP. Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP) is the Protocol that is supported for
configuring EtherChannel.
Step 6 Select one of the Distribution Protocols from the drop-down menu:
ip
mac
port
leave default
Select leave default when you do not want to configure distribution protocols.
The Channel Mode field displays the mode of the port.
Campus Manager supports only the Desirable mode for EtherChannel configuration.
Step 7 Select one of these Distribution Address Types from the drop-down menu:
source
destination
both
leave default
Select leave default when you do not want to configure distribution address type.
Step 8 Select the link for which you want to configure EtherChannel.
Step 9 Click Copy Running to StartUp config for IOS switches, if required.
Step 10 Click Apply to continue or click Close to exit.
VLAN Port Assignment
VLAN Port Assignment is an application that displays device, port, and related VLAN information for
an associated VTP domain in a tabular format and helps you manage ports on your network's VLANs.
Use VLAN Port Assignment to:
Assign or move ports to a VLAN.
View port, device, and Trunk attributes.
View and find port information in a VTP domain.
Configure VLANs on a Trunk.
Show and highlight a selected device or VLAN on a selected VTP domain.
Note Assigning ports to VLANs cannot be done for more than 100 devices at a time, since it results in memory
issues. Do VLAN port assignment for 100 devices at a time.

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VLAN Port Assignment
This topic contains the following sections:
Understanding VLAN Port Assignment
Starting VLAN Port Assignment
Using VLAN Port Assignment
Prior to using VLAN Port Assignment, you should understand the concepts of VLANs and VTP
domains. For more details on this, see:
Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN)
VTP Domains
Understanding VLAN Port Assignment
To enable end-user ports to participate in a specific VLAN, you must first assign the ports. You assign
ports to specified VLANs. The VLANs allow the ports to share the same broadcasts.
Ports that are not assigned to the VLAN cannot share these broadcasts. For more information about
VLANs, see Understanding Virtual LAN (VLAN).
For VLAN Port Assignment to work correctly, Campus Server must discover the network. Campus
Server requires a properly configured network to complete network discovery.
For information on the various settings, see Viewing Campus Manager Home Page.
VLAN Port Assignment queries the ANI database based on criteria you enter.
After you submit the query, VLAN Port Assignment displays the device, port, and related VLAN
information for an associated VTP domain. This is displayed in a tabular format.
You can use VLAN Port Assignment to:
View and find port information in a VTP domain
View port, device, and Trunk Attributes
Show and highlight a selected device or VLAN in the VTP domain view
Starting VLAN Port Assignment
To start VLAN Port Assignment:
Step 1 Verify that your network is set up properly.
Step 2 Verify that the Campus Manager server is set up properly and running.
See Analyzing ANI Server for more details.
Step 3 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Port Assignment from the LMS Portal.
Or
Select Topology Services > Tools > VLAN Port Assignment.
If you are prompted to install the J ava plug-in, you can download and install the plug-in using the
displayed installation screens. The next time you start the application, it will automatically use the
plug-in.

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Using VLAN Port Assignment
Using VLAN Port Assignment
This section contains:
Configuring Trunk Attributes
Displaying Attribute Summaries
To assign ports to a VLAN:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > VLAN Port Assignment from the LMS Portal.
Or
Select Topology Services > Tools > VLAN Port Assignment.
The VLAN Port Assignment page appears.
Step 2 Select device or domain from the list using Device Selector or Domain Selector.
Step 3 Click List Ports.
A list of ports in the selected devices or entities appears under the Port List. See Table 10-21 for the Port
List :
Table 10-21 Port List Field Description
Field Description
Filter Device Name
Device Address
Link
Port
Port Status
Port Description
VLAN Name
VLAN Index
Association Type
Enter the filter string, and click Filter to filter the list based on the inputs.
Leave this field blank to list all ports.
Advanced Filter Click Advanced Filter to open Advanced Filter dialog box. Advanced
filtering allows you to search ports using more search criteria.
For more details on Advanced Filter, see Advanced Filter.
Columns
Link Shows whether the port is connected to a switch or not. The value can either
be True or False.
Port Name of the port.
Device Name Name of the device to which the port belongs to.
Device Address IP address of the device to which the port belongs to.
VLAN Name Name of the VLAN to which the port belongs to.

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Using VLAN Port Assignment
Step 4 Select a VLAN from the VLAN drop-down list.
To copy the running configuration to the start-up configuration, select Copy running to start-up config
check-box.
Step 5 Click Assign.
Configuring Trunk Attributes
Your login determines whether you can use this option. You must have either Network Administrator or
System Administrator privileges.
To configure Trunk Attributes:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > VLAN Port Assignment from CiscoWorks desktop.
Or
From Topology Services Main Window, right-click a trunk link from a network view and select
VLAN Port Assignment from the popup menu.
Step 2 In the VLAN Port Assignment window, select the VTP domain and enter appropriate search criteria, if
necessary.
Step 3 Select the row that contains the Trunking port. A port is a trunking port if the isTrunk field contains a
check mark.
Step 4 Select Reports > Trunk Attributes.
To interpret this information, see Table 10-24.
Step 5 Enter a range of ISL indexes between 1 and 4096 in the Allow VLAN(s) field to specify VLANs that
you want to allow on this Trunk.
The range of ISL indexes from one to 4096 is applicable only if the device supports 4096 VLANs.
Step 6 Enter a range of ISL indexes between 1 and 1024 in the Disallow VLAN(s) field to specify VLANs that
you want to prevent from using this Trunk.
If you enter numbers into both fields, the ISL indexes that you are disallowing will take precedence over
ISL indexes that you are allowing. For example, if you allow 1-1024 and disallow 1-100, VLANs with
ISL indexes of 101-1024 will be allowed.
Step 7 Click Apply to configure these attributes.
Port Status Status of the port. Shows whether the port is active or down.
Port Description Description for the port.
Example: Intra-area 0.2.0.0 Resilient link
VLAN Index Index number of the VLAN to which the port belongs to.
Association Type Type of Association.
Table 10-21 Port List Field Description (continued)
Field Description

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Displaying Attribute Summaries
The following topics describe how to view status information about ports, devices, and trunks in your
network:
Displaying Port Attributes
Interpreting Port Attributes Report
Displaying Device Attributes
Interpreting Device Attributes Report
Displaying Trunk Attributes
Interpreting Trunk Attributes
Displaying Port Attributes
To display information about the status of the ports in your network:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Reports > Report Generator.
The Reports Generator page appears.
Step 2 Select Campus Reports from the Select An Application drop-down list.
Step 3 Select Port Attributes from Select a Report drop-down list.
The Port Attributes page appears.
Step 4 Select a device or domain from the list.
Step 5 Select the Scheduling Type.
The default scheduling type is Immediate.
You can set the time and date if you select any of the following scheduling types: Once, Daily, Weekly,
Monthly.
Enter a description for your job in the J ob Description field and enter the e-mail address to which the
details has to be sent.
Note Launching immediate Port Attributes reports for more than 500 devices results in an error. You
can schedule reports to run for all devices or launch immediate reports for less than 500 devices.
Step 6 Click Submit.
For more information on Port Attributes, see Interpreting Port Attributes Report.

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Interpreting Port Attributes Report
To view the Port Attributes report for a device, select the device from the Go To: list. The Go To: list
contains the device name and device IP address.
Alternatively, you can scroll the page to view the report for the selected devices.
The Port Attributes report contains the following information for a device:
You can export or print the report.
To export the report to a Common Services server, click the export button at the top right of the page.
To print the page, click the printer icon on the top right of the page.
Table 10-22 Port Attributes Report Fields
Field Description
Port Name of the port. Example: Fa4/0
Port Description Description for the port.
Example: Intra-area 0.2.0.0 Resilient link
Type Type of port.
Example: 1000Base
AdminStatus Administrative status of the port.
OperStatus Operational status of the port.
isLink Shows whether the port is connected to another device,
which is managed in Campus Manager.
isTrunk Shows whether the port is part of a trunk.
Speed Speed at which the port is working.
Duplex Mode Shows whether the port is in full-duplex mode or
half-duplex mode.
Protocol Enabled Protocol enabled on the port.
Protocol Seen Protocols seen on the port.
VLAN VLAN to which the port is part of.
L2L3 Shows whether the port is routed or switched.
J umbo Frame Displays whether J umbo Frames are enabled or disabled on
the port.
Trunk
Encapsulation
Shows the type of trunk encapsulation.
Trunk Mode Shows the trunk mode.
isChannel Shows whether the port is part of a channel.

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Displaying Device Attributes
To display information about a specific device.
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Reports > Report Generator.
The Reports Generator page appears.
Step 2 Select Campus Reports from the Select An Application drop-down list.
Step 3 Select Device Attributes from Select a Report drop-down list.
The Device Attributes page appears.
Step 4 Select a device or domain from the list.
Step 5 Select the Scheduling Type.
The default scheduling type is Immediate.
You can set the time and date if you select any of the following scheduling types: Once, Daily, Weekly,
Monthly.
Step 6 Enter a description for your job in the J ob Description field and enter the e-mail address to which the
details has to be sent.
Step 7 Click Submit.
For more information on Device Attributes, see Interpreting Device Attributes Report.
Interpreting Device Attributes Report
To view the device attributes report for a device, select the device from the Go To: list. The Go To: list
contains the device name, device IP address, and the device type.
Report for each device is displayed in a table with the Device Name, Device IP Address, and Device
Type as the table heading.
Alternatively, you can scroll the page to view the report for the selected devices.
The device attributes report contains the following information for a device:
Table 10-23 Port Attributes Report Fields
Field Description
Module Name of the module
Slot Number Slot in which the module is connected.
Sub Module ID Sub module id of the device.
#Ports Number of ports in the module.
Version(s) Hardware and software version of the module.
Example:
hw:1.2 sw:12.2(25)EWfw:12.1(12r)EW
Status Shows the status of the module.
Daughter Card Daughter cards in the module. Empty means daughter cards are not
available for the module.

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Using VLAN Port Assignment
Displaying Trunk Attributes
To display information about the status of the trunking ports in your network.
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Configuration > Trunk Configuration from the LMS Portal.
The Trunk Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Click Modify Trunk Attributes from the TOC.
Step 3 Select device or domain from the list.
Step 4 Click Show Trunks.
A list of trunks appears.
Step 5 Select the radio-button corresponding to a trunk.
Step 6 Click Modify Trunk.
The Modify Trunk Attributes window appears with the trunk attributes.
For more information on Trunk Attributes, see Interpreting Trunk Attributes.
Interpreting Trunk Attributes
See Table 10-24 for details about the fields shown in the Trunk Attributes window.
Table 10-24 Trunk Attributes Field Descriptions
Field Description
Device Information
Device Device to which the port belongs.
Port Name of the port.
Trunk Settings
Encapsulation Type of encapsulation the trunk is using. Supported encapsulation
types are: Dot1Q, ISL, Negotiate.
Mode Half-duplex or full-duplex.
Configure VLANs on Trunk
Allowed VLANs List of VLANs allowed. * sign indicates that the VLAN was
previously disallowed.
Disallowed VLANs List of disallowed VLANs.
Use Add and Remove buttons to move VLANs between these
lists.

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Usage Scenarios for Managing VLANs
Usage Scenarios for Managing VLANs
You can use the following scenarios to manage your network using Campus Manager.
Configuring PVLANs in External Demilitarized Zone
Scenario
Web servers and Domain Name Servers (DNS) are connected to a Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) switch.
The DMZ switch is configured with the VTP domain name, DMZ, where the switch is in transparent
mode running VTP version 2. The servers belong to the same broadcast domain or VLAN.
Understanding the Scenario
This scenario would help you to isolate Layer 2 devices using PVLAN, and ensure that the DMZ servers
do not send data across them, while internal and external hosts access these servers.
DMZ servers must be accessible from external clients as well as from the internal network. DMZ servers
eventually needs access to some internal resources, and the servers must not send data across. The
servers must not initiate traffic from the DMZ switch to the Internet. The DMZ servers reply only to the
traffic from the internal resources.
Understanding Concepts
Campus Manager provides an end-to end solution for configuring Private VLANs, the security feature
which Campus Manager provides for managing LANs. You can configure PVLANs using Campus
Manager.
You can configure PVLANs in scenarios where Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) switches are configured
without adhering to the right policies, leading to potential intrusions into your network.
Demilitarized Zone
Demilitarized Zone is a small subnetwork, which lies between a secure internal network, such as a
corporate private LAN, and a non secure external network, such as the public Internet. DMZ contains
devices like Web servers, FTP servers, SMTP servers and DNS that are accessible to the Internet traffic.
DMZ servers process incoming requests from the Internet, and initiate connections to certain internal
servers or other DMZ segments, such as database servers.
DMZ servers must not send data or initiate any connection to the external networks. This shows that the
necessary traffic flows on the basis of a trust model; but the model is not adequately enforced in many
networks.
Prerequisites
In this scenario, you need the following applications and tools in Campus Manager.
Topology Services
PVLAN configuration user interface
VLAN Port Assignment
Promiscuous port configuration user interface
VLAN report
Path Analysis

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Usage Scenarios for Managing VLANs
Reproducing Scenario
To set up the scenario you must configure secondary VLAN on the servers, with isolated ports and
community ports. The Firewall, the only device within the primary VLAN, must be defined in a primary
VLAN with a promiscuous port.
Step 1 Create a primary VLAN: VLAN 100.
Enter VLAN 100 in the Private VLAN Name field to name the primary VLAN. For more details on
creating primary VLAN, see Creating Primary VLAN.
Step 2 Create a community VLAN: VLAN 50.
a. Enter VLAN 50 in the Private VLAN Name field.
b. Associate VLAN 50 to the primary VLAN, VLAN 100.
For more details on creating secondary VLAN, see Creating Secondary VLAN and Associating to
Primary VLAN.
Step 3 Create an isolated VLAN: VLAN 60.
a. Enter VLAN 60 in the Private VLAN Name field to name the isolated VLAN
b. Associate VLAN 60 to the primary VLAN, VLAN 100.
For more details on creating secondary VLAN, see Creating Secondary VLAN and Associating to
Primary VLAN.
Step 4 Assign ports, which are connected to the Web servers, to the community VLAN 50.
Step 5 Assign ports, which are connected to the DNS servers, to the isolated VLAN 60.
Step 6 Configure the port that connects to the Firewall as a promiscuous port and map the secondary VLAN 50
and VLAN 60 to this promiscuous port. For more details, see Configuring Promiscuous Ports.
After you configure the promiscuous port, the secondary VLANs appear in the Mapped VLANs table.
You have configured promiscuous port and mapped both secondary VLANs to the primary VLAN 100.
If you want to map only the community VLAN 60, you must check the configurations, and map the other
isolated VLANs.
Check the Select to Unmap check box and click Apply to unmap the isolated VLAN from primary
VLAN. Community VLAN 60 is unmapped from the primary VLAN.
Verifying Configuration
To verify the configuration for this scenario:
Step 1 Select Campus Manager > Visualization > Topology Services from the CiscoWorks Homepage.
The Topology Services Main Window appears.
Step 2 From the Tree View in the Topology Services Main window, verify whether the new PVLANs are listed
under DMZ VTP domain in transparent mode.
Primary VLAN 100 is listed as a subfolder under the DMZ domain and the secondary VLAN under the
Primary VLAN subfolder. Note that the icon for PVLANs is different from the icon for normal VLANs.
Step 3 Generate VLAN Report for DMZ domain.

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Usage Scenarios for Managing VLANs
Step 4 Verify whether the new primary VLAN and secondary VLANs are listed. The associated primary VLAN
is also listed for the secondary VLANs.
Step 5 Select Campus Manager > Diagnostics > Path Analysis from the CiscoWorks Homepage.
Step 6 To confirm that the PVLAN configuration is functioning, you can:
a. Run a trace between the Web servers. The resultant traces must be successful.
b. Run a trace between any Web server and the DNS. The resultant trace must fail.
c. Run a trace between the DNS servers.
C H A P T E R

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11
Managing Network Spanning Trees
This chapter describes, the IEEE 802.1d Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), and how to use and configure
Ciscos proprietary spanning-tree protocols, Per VLAN Spanning Tree (PVST), Multiple
Spanning Tree (MSTP), and Multi-Instance Spanning Tree Protocol (MISTP) in a Campus network. It
contains the following sections:
Understanding Spanning Tree Protocol
Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
Spanning Tree Reports: STP Visualizer
Generating Reports and Configuring STP on the Network
Spanning Tree Filters
Understanding Spanning Tree Protocol
Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) is a link management protocol that provides path redundancy while
preventing undesirable loops in the network. Hence, STP is a loop-prevention protocol.
It is a technology that allows Bridges to communicate with each other to discover physical loops in the
network. The protocol then specifies an algorithm that Bridges can use to create a loop-free logical
topology.
In other words, STP creates a tree structure of loop-free leaves and branches that spans the entire Layer
2 network.
To provide path redundancy STP spans all switches in an extended network. STP forces certain
redundant data paths into a standby (blocked) state.
This section describes the specific functions available to you when you use spanning-tree protocols. STP
uses a distributed algorithm that selects one Bridge of a redundantly connected network as the root of a
Spanning Tree-connected active topology.
STP assigns roles to each port depending on what the ports function is in the active topology. Port roles
are:
RootForwarding port that is elected for the spanning-tree topology
DesignatedForwarding port that is elected for every switched LAN segment
AlternateBlocked port providing an alternate path to the root port in the Spanning Tree
BackupBlocked port in a loopback configuration
Designated, Alternate, and Backup states are specific to MST.

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Understanding Spanning Tree Protocol
The switches that have ports with these assigned roles are called the root or designated switches.
In Ethernet networks, only one active path may exist between any two stations. Multiple active paths
between stations can cause loops in the network.
When loops occur, some switches recognize the same stations on more than one side of the switch. This
situation causes the forwarding algorithm to malfunction allowing the duplicate frames to be forwarded.
The Spanning Tree algorithms provide path redundancy by defining a tree that spans all of the switches
in an extended network and then forces certain redundant data paths into a standby (blocked) state.
At regular intervals, the switches in the network send and receive Spanning Tree BPDUs that they use
to identify the path.
If one network segment becomes unreachable, or if the Spanning Tree costs change, the Spanning Tree
algorithm reconfigures the Spanning Tree topology and reestablishes the link by activating the standby
path.
The Spanning Tree operation is transparent to end stations, which do not detect whether they are
connected to a single LAN segment or a switched LAN of multiple segments.
STP provides these advantages:
Detection and elimination of loops
Capability to automatically detect failed active paths and to utilize alternate paths
User-configurable parameters that enable a network administrator to fine-tune the algorithm's
performance
These sections describe the following Spanning Tree Protocols in brief:
Per VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol
Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol
Multiple Instance Spanning Tree Protocol
Per VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol
Per VLAN Spanning Tree Protocol maintains a separate instance of STP for each individual VLAN
configured in the network.
It allows a VLAN trunk to be forwarding for some VLANs while blocking for other VLANs. Since
PVST treats each VLAN as a separate network, it has the ability to load balance traffic (at layer 2). It
does this by forwarding some VLANs on one trunk and other VLANs on another trunk without causing
a Spanning Tree loop.
Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol
Multiple Spanning Tree uses IEEE's RSTP as base Spanning Tree Protocol. MST uses only one BPDU
for all instances.
A disadvantage of PVST is that it adds a lot of overhead to your switching equipment. If a switch is
configured to use MST, it must ascertain which of its neighbors are using which type of STP.
It does this by configuring switches into common MST regions, where every switch in a region runs
MST with compatible parameters. You can map a group of VLANs to instance.

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Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
In most networks, a single MST region is sufficient, although you can configure more than one region.
Within the region, all switches must run the instance of MST that is defined by the following attributes:
MST configuration name (32 characters)
MST configuration revision number (0 to 65535)
MST instance-to-VLAN mapping table (4096 entries)
Multiple Instance Spanning Tree Protocol
Multiple Instance Spanning Tree Protocol (MISTP) allows you to group multiple VLANs under a single
instance of Spanning Tree (an MISTP instance).
An MISTP instance is a virtual logical topology that is defined by a set of bridge and port parameters.
When you map VLANs to an MISTP instance, this virtual logical topology becomes a physical topology.
Each MISTP instance has its own root switch and a different set of forwarding links, that is, different
bridge and port parameters.
Each MISTP instance root switch propagates the information that is associated with it to all other
switches in the network. This process maintains the network topology. This is because it ensures that
each switch has the same information about the network.
MISTP builds MISTP instances by exchanging MISTP BPDUs with peer entities in the network. MISTP
uses one BPDU for each MISTP instance
An MISTP instance can have any number of VLANs that are mapped to it, but a VLAN can be mapped
only to a single MISTP instance.
You can move a VLAN (or VLANs) in an MISTP instance to another MISTP instance if it has converged.
Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
Campus Manager Recommendation Reports aid deployment of Spanning Trees in the network. The
following reports are available:
Spanning Tree Reports: Optimal Root Recommendation Report
Spanning Tree Reports: Number of Instances Recommendation Report
Spanning Tree Reports: Instance Reduction Recommendation Report
Spanning Tree Reports: VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation Report

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Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
Spanning Tree Reports: Optimal Root Recommendation Report
The Optimal Root Recommendation Report allows you to compute the optimal root in a switch cloud
running Per VLAN STP, Cisco MISTP, or IEEE 802.1s.
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select any of the following:
Reports > Per VLAN STP Recommendations > Optimal Root Recommendation
Reports > Cisco MISTP Recommendations > Optimal Root Recommendation
Reports > IEEE 802.1s Recommendations > Optimal Root Recommendation
The Optimal Root Recommendation window appears.
Step 3 In the Computation Criteria, select a computation type.
Table 11-1 lists three computation types and their description.
If you select Traffic Data, go to Step 4, else go to Step 5.
Step 4 Select a traffic data source from the Traffic Details (Table 11-2).
Step 5 Click Compute.
The Recommended Roots table lists the optimal root devices.
Table 11-1 Computation Types
Field Description
Least Depth Computes depth from each node in the switch cloud.
Chooses the root in such a manner that the resulting Spanning Tree has
minimum depth.
Least Cost Computes cost for each node in the switch cloud.
Computes maximum edge node cost for all the nodes by assuming current
node as the root node.
The node with minimum value for maximum edge node cost is considered
as the optimal root.
Traffic Data Computes a Spanning Tree, which provides optimal path for given
percentage of traffic or selected nodes.
Table 11-2 Traffic Details
Field Description
Data Source Select either of the following network traffic data sources:
NAMSelect this option if you use Cisco Network Analysis Modules
to collect data.
Netflow Collector 3.6Select this option if you use NetFlow
FlowCollector to collect data.
Traffic File Name Enter the NAM or NetFlow traffic data filename.

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Step 6 Select a device, and click Highlight in Map to highlight the device icon in Switch Cloud Map.
Step 7 Click Close to close the Optimal Root Recommendation window.
Interpreting Optimal Root Recommendation
The optimal root recommendation report helps you to select the best root for your network using any of
the three methods:
Least Depth
Use this method to compute better overall convergence. Convergence time is based on the distance
to the boundary nodes. The node with the least path cost to boundary nodes is recommended as
optimal root.
A device farther from the boundary nodes takes longer to propagate the topology change that has
occurred than another node that is near the boundary nodes in the same switched environment.
This directly affects the convergence time of the switched or bridged network. After this root is
selected, you can make suitable adjustments to forward the delay timer of Spanning Tree protocol
to take advantage of faster convergence.
Least Cost
The node with the least cumulative cost to all other nodes is recommended as root according to this
method. When Spanning Tree root is computed based on this method it provides a better path
between nodes in the switched environment assuming equal traffic distributions.
In case of unbalanced switched environment where core switch A is connected to 10 other
distribution switches and another core switch B is connected to only 5 of the distribution switches,
this algorithm will suggest A as root as compared to B.
Five switches that are not directly connected to B should take a longer path to other nodes if B is
selected as root. If A is selected as root this problem could be avoided.
Traffic Data
In a switched or bridged network environment, when Spanning Tree is computed the primary aim is
to eliminate loops and it may not provide shortest possible path between every node to every other
node.
Based on the traffic pattern a particular device may provide optimal path for a greater percentage of
traffic than another.
For example, a switched network containing nodesA, B, C, D, and E. Overall traffic is 95%
localized between a set of nodes {A, B, and C}. A node which when selected as root, provides the
shortest path between A, B, and C would be the ideal choice. This is regardless of whether it
provides shortest path from D or E to any other nodes.
In some cases you may not be able to get the shortest path between A, B, and C when trying to find
the optimal root. In such cases, a root that provides most optimal path between A, B, and C is chosen.

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Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
Spanning Tree Reports: Number of Instances Recommendation Report
The Number of Instances Recommendation Report allows you to compute the number of instances in a
switch cloud running Cisco MISTP or IEEE 802.1s.
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select either of the following:
Reports > Cisco MISTP Recommendations > Instance Recommendation
Reports > IEEE 802.1s Recommendations > Instance Recommendation
The Number of Instance Recommendation window appears.
Step 3 In the Computation Techniques area, select a computation type.
Table 11-3 lists two computation techniques and their description.
Step 4 Click Compute.
The Recommended Number of Instances appears in the Results area.
Step 5 Select a value from the Select Instance drop-down list.
Step 6 Click Highlight in Map to highlight the device icon in Switch Cloud Map.
Step 7 Click Close to close the Number of Instances Recommendation window.
Interpreting Number of Instances Recommendation
The number of instance recommendation is made based on two methods:
Max instances for better link utilization method
Use this method to compute better balanced link utilization.
We recommend that you use the number of instances that is the least common multiplier of all the
independent redundant paths, as the maximum number of instances.
Min instances for better CPU utilization
Use this method to compute a minimum number of instances so that CPU utilization is minimum.
We recommend that the number of instances, which results in the maximum number of independent
redundant paths is recommended.
Table 11-3 Computation Techniques
Field Description
Max instances for better
link utilization
Computes the optimal number of Spanning Tree instances that can be run on
the given switched network for optimizing network link resources
Min instances for better
CPU utilization
Computes the optimal number of Spanning Tree instances that can be run on
the given switched network for optimizing device CPU resources.

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Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
Spanning Tree Reports: Instance Reduction Recommendation Report
The Instances Reduction Recommendation Report allows you to compute the number of instances in a
switch cloud running Cisco MISTP or IEEE 802.1s.
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select either of the following:
Reports > Cisco MISTP Recommendations > Instance Reduction Recommendation
Reports > IEEE 802.1s Recommendations > Instance Reduction Recommendation
The Instance Reduction Recommendation window appears.
Step 3 In the Computation Techniques area, select a computation type.
Table 11-4 lists two computation techniques and their description.
Step 4 Click Compute.
The Recommended Number of Instances in displayed in the table.
Step 5 Select a row, and click Highlight in Map to highlight the instances in Switch Cloud Map.
Step 6 Click Close to close the Instance Reduction Recommendation window.
Table 11-4 Computation Techniques
Field Description
Sub-tree Reduction Determine if one or more Spanning Tree instances are mergeable if the
instances have a supertreesubtree relationship.
Conditional Reduction Determines the Spanning Tree instances that can be merged based on the
forwarding topology of the network.
Table 11-5 Instance Reduction Results
Field Description
Instance Instance ID.
Mergeable Instances Comma separated list of instance IDs which can be merged.

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Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
Interpreting Instance Reduction Recommendation
You can use the Instance Reduction Recommendations if your network contains multiple Spanning Tree
instances that share the same forwarding topology.
The Recommendation report allows you to determine Spanning Tree instances. These instances can be
merged into a shared instance without any impact on convergence or operation.
Fewer instances help you to optimize the utilization of memory and CPU resources of the switches.
Instance reduction recommendation is made based on two methods:
Sub tree reduction method
Use this method to determine Spanning Tree instances, which can be merged when the switched
network has an instance that spans across different sets of switches as compared to another instance.
For example, instance A is considered a sub-tree of instance B if all the forwarding and blocking
paths of instance A are in the same state in instance B. Instance A is a sub-tree of instance B if the
forwarding and blocking paths of instance A exactly matches that of instance B.
If the above case is satisfied, the report recommends merging of the two STP instances.
Conditional reduction method
Use this method to determine the Spanning Tree instances, which can be merged when the switched
network has instances that share forwarding paths and root.
Spanning Tree Reports: VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation
Report
The Number of Instances Recommendation Report allows you to compute the optimum number of
VLANs to instances in a switch cloud running Cisco MISTP or IEEE 802.1s.
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select either of the following:
Reports > Cisco MISTP Recommendations > VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation.
Reports > IEEE 802.1s Recommendations > VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation.
The VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation window appears.
Step 3 In the Computation Metrics area, select a metric type. Table 11-6 lists the four computation techniques
and their description.
Table 11-6 Computation Techniques
Field Description
Number of VLANs Select a device (reference device), Spanning Tree instance that has least
number of VLANs mapped to it.
Optimal path for select
devices
Select multiple devices to find the Spanning Tree instance with least
sub-optimality.
Least instance load Select only one device (reference device). It recommends the Spanning
Tree with the least load.
Least instance load for
selected devices
Select multiple devices. It will recommend the Spanning Tree instance with
the least traffic.

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Spanning Tree Recommendation Reports
If you select Least instance load or Least instance load for selected devices, go to Step 4, else go to
Step 5.
Step 4 Select a traffic data source from the Traffic Type drop-down list in the Traffic Details area. Table 11-7
lists the two types of data sources supported.
Step 5 Click Compute.
The Recommended Instance ID is displayed in the VLAN Instance Recommendation area.
Step 6 Select a device, and click Highlight in Map to highlight the device icon in Switch Cloud Map.
Step 7 Click Close to close the VLAN Instance Mapping Recommendation window.
Interpreting VLAN to Instance Mapping Recommendation
The number of instance recommendation is made based on four methods:
Number of VLANs
Use this method when the traffic or load on each of the VLANs is almost the same. This method
assumes that an instance with least number of VLANs is optimal for mapping to a new VLAN.
Hence, the Spanning Tree instances with the least number of VLANs mapped to it will be
recommended.
Optimal path for select devices
You can provide the information on devices, which will be part of the new VLAN to be created. This
method determines the optimal path for various available instances for the selected devices.
Least instance load
The projected traffic of the new VLAN you selected is used, and the instance which has least overall
traffic is recommended.
Least instance load for selected devices
This method assumes that the devices you selected will be part of the new VLAN. Based on this
information, the instance with the least load that is spread across the devices you selected is
recommended.
Table 11-7 Traffic Details
Field Description
Traffic Type Select either of the following network traffic data sources:
NAMSelect this option if you use Cisco Network Analysis Modules
to collect data.
Netflow Collector 3.6Select this option if you use NetFlow
FlowCollector to collect data.
File Enter the NAM or NetFlow traffic data filename.

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Spanning Tree Reports: STP Visualizer
Spanning Tree Reports: STP Visualizer
The STP Visualizer allows you to test changes to STP settings before you enforce them on a network.
This section explains:
Interpreting STP Visualizer
STP Visualizer Notes
To view the STP Visualizer:
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select Reports > STP Visualizer.
The Spanning Tree Visualizer window appears.
Step 3 From the Select Instance ID field, click Select.
Depending on the Spanning Tree Protocol the device is running, one of the following appears:
If the device is running PVST, the Select Instance dialog box appears. Go to Step 4.
If the device is running MST, the Select Region dialog box appears. Go to Step 5.
If the device is running MISTP, the Select Instance dialog box appears. Go to Step 6.
Step 4 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-8.
To view the devices in the VLAN Region, click Select. The ID of the selected Spanning Tree instance
is displayed in the Selected Instance ID field.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-9.
Table 11-8 Selecting PVST or VLAN in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
type
Select either of the following criteria:
VLAN Name
VLAN ID
To view the valid values for the VLAN
Name or VLAN ID field, click the
drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
VLAN Name or VLAN ID.
Matches Lists VLANs that match the specified
criteria.
Select the VLAN from the list of
matches.

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Spanning Tree Reports: STP Visualizer
To view the Spanning Tree details of an MST Instance in the Network Topology View window, click
Select. The ID of the selected Spanning Tree instance is displayed in Selected Instance ID field.
Step 6 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-10.
To view the Spanning Tree details of an MIST Instance in the Network Topology View window, click
Select. The ID of the selected Spanning Tree instance is displayed in Selected Instance ID field.
The devices in the VLAN instance appear in a table. Table 11-11 lists the fields in the table, their
description, and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-9 Selecting MST in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
region
Select either of the following criteria:
All Regions
Region Name
To view the valid values for the region
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering the region name
(partially or fully).
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria.
Select the STP instance from the list of
matches.
Table 11-10 Selecting MISTP Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
region
Select either of the following criteria:
All Instances
Instance Name
To view the valid values for the
instance field, click the drop-down
arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
instance name.
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria.
Select the instance from the list of
matches.
Table 11-11 Port Details
Field
1
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address Displays the IP address of the
device.
This field is not configurable.
Port Displays the port name. This field is not configurable.
In case of device priority, this field displays NA.

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Spanning Tree Reports: STP Visualizer
To edit values of fields marked with an asterisk:
a. Select rows.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
b. To change the value of a field either double click the current value, or enter a new value.
The changed values are displayed, highlighted in pink.
c. Click Compute.
Interpreting STP Visualizer
The STP Visualizer allows you to:
Try different Spanning Tree settings offline before you configure them on the network.
Change settings and highlight devices on the Topology Map.
STP Visualizer Notes
STP Visualizer cannot suggest the correct configuration in the following scenarios:
If any of the devices in the switch cloud does not support the required MIB (for example
CISCO-STP-EXTENSIONS-MIB). In this case you may need to upgrade some of the device images
to solve this issue.
There are device families such as Cisco Catalyst 2900XL and Catalyst 3500XL, which do not
support the CISCO-STP-EXTENSIONS-MIB. An error may be displayed, if these devices are
present in the switch cloud.
Type Displays the Spanning Tree type:
Bridge priority of the device
Port Priority or Cost or the
port
This field is not configurable.
Existing Lists the current port priority or
cost value.
This field is not configurable.
New* Lists the new port priority or cost
that you have entered.
Enter a new value.
1. Field marked with asterisk is editable.
Table 11-11 Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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If there are SNMP request timeouts during discovery of devices, STP Visualizer may not be able to
proceed with the computation because of incomplete information about the devices. To resolve the
problem, In this case you may need to select these devices and rediscover.
If you are using SNMPv3, not all devices running SNMPv3 support context names for getting
required Spanning Tree information from the devices. Only a few later images of Catalyst 6500
series devices support this feature. You may need to use SNMPv2 or SNMPv1 to resolve this
problem.
Generating Reports and Configuring STP on the Network
You can generate reports and configure STP on switch clouds for the following:
Reporting and Configuring PVST Port
Reporting and Configuring MST Port
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Port
Reporting and Configuring PVST Device
Reporting and Configuring MST Device
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Device
Reporting and Configuring MST Instance
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Instance
Reporting and Configuring PVST Trunk
Reporting and Configuring MST Trunk
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Trunk
Reporting and Configuring PVST Port
To configure PVST port on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Port tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select PVST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
Step 4 From the Spanning Tree Instance field, click Select.
The Select Instance dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in the Table 11-12.

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Step 6 Click Select to view the devices in the VLAN Instance.
The devices in the VLAN instance appear in a table. Table 11-13 lists the fields in the table, their
description, and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-12 Selecting Spanning Tree Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
type
Select either of the following criteria:
VLAN Name
VLAN ID
To view the valid values for the VLAN
Name or VLAN ID field, click the
drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
VLAN Name or VLAN ID.
Matches Lists VLANs that match the specified
criteria.
Select the VLAN from the list of
matches.
Table 11-13 PVST Port Details
Field
1
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device. This field is not configurable.
Port Port number used for
bridge forwarding.
This field is not configurable.
isLink Displays a check mark if
the port is a link port.
This field is not configurable.
State State of the port. The
possible states are:
Blocking
Forwarding
Disabled
This field is not configurable.

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Cost
*
Port cost value. The STP port path cost default value is derived from
the media speed of a LAN interface.
If there are redundant paths, STP considers port
cost when selecting a LAN interface to place
that into a forwarding state.
You can assign lower cost values to LAN
interfaces that you want STP to maintain in a
forwarding state.
If all LAN interfaces have the same cost value,
STP puts the LAN interface with the lowest
LAN interface number in the forwarding state
and blocks other LAN interfaces.
The possible cost range is 0 through 65535 (the
default is media specific).
STP uses the port cost value when the LAN interface
is configured as an access port and uses VLAN port
cost values when the LAN interface is configured as
a trunk port.
Priority
*
Port priority. If there are redundant paths, STP considers port
priority when selecting a LAN port to put into
the forwarding state.
Priority is taken into account after examining
cost and sending bridge ID. That is, if the cost
and bridge ID is the same, priority is considered.
If all LAN ports have the same priority value,
STP puts the LAN port with the lowest LAN
port number in the forwarding state and blocks
other LAN ports.
Values are multiples of 16 ranging from 0-240.
The lower the number, the higher the priority.
Designated
Bridge
Bridge ID for the
designated bridge.
The Designated Bridge
provides the minimum root
path cost on a LAN.
Also, it is the only bridge
allowed to forward frames
to and from the LAN for
which it is the designated
bridge.
This field is not configurable.
Designated
Port
ID of the port that connects
a LAN to the designated
bridge.
This field is not configurable.
Table 11-13 PVST Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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PortFast
*
State of the PortFast
Interface Configuration
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, PortFast causes a switch or trunk port
interface to enter the Spanning Tree forwarding state
immediately, bypassing the listening and learning
states.
Loop
Guard
*
State of the Loop Guard
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, Loop Guard works on
non-designated ports and does not allow the port to
become designated via max_age expiry.
BPDU
Guard
*
State of the BPDU Guard
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU Guard feature prevents loops
by moving a nontrunking port into an errdisable state
when a BPDU is received on that port.
When the BPDU guard feature is enabled on the
switch, Spanning Tree shuts down
PortFast-configured interfaces that receive BPDUs,
instead of putting them into the Spanning Tree
blocking state.
BPDU
Filter
*
State of the BPDU filter
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU filtering allows you to avoid
transmitting BPDUs on a port, usually connected to
an end system.
When you enable PortFast on the switch,
Spanning Tree places ports in the forwarding state
immediately, instead of going through the listening,
learning, and forwarding states.
Root Guard
*
State of the Root Guard
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, Root Guard does not allow the port to
become non-designated.
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Table 11-13 PVST Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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To edit values of fields marked with an asterisk:
Select rows, and uncheck Read-only. The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here
section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values are displayed, highlighted in pink.
Step 7 Click Configure to make changes to the devices. Or Click Reset to return to the previous values without
making any changes.
Reporting and Configuring MST Port
To configure MST port on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Port tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
Step 4 From the Spanning Tree Instance field, click Select.
The Select Instance dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in the Table 11-14.
To view the devices in the VLAN Region, click Select.
The devices running the selected MST instance appear in a table. Table 11-15 lists the fields in the
table, their description, and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-14 Selecting Spanning Tree Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
region
Select either of the following criteria:
All Regions
Region Name
To view the valid values for the region
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
region name.
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria
Select the STP instance from the list of
matches.

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Table 11-15 MST Port Details
Field
1
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device This field is not configurable.
Port Port number used for bridge forwarding This field is not configurable.
isLink Displays a check mark if the port is a link
port
This field is not configurable.
LinkType Link type of the port. The possible link
types are:
Point-to-point link
Shared medium
By default, the switch derives the link type
of a port from the duplex mode.
A full-duplex port is considered as a
point-to-point link while a half-duplex
configuration is assumed to be on a shared
link.
This field is not configurable.
Cost
*
Port cost value The STP port path cost default value is
derived from the media speed of a
LAN interface.
If a loop occurs, STP considers
port cost when selecting a LAN
interface to place that into the
forwarding state.
You can assign lower cost values
to LAN interfaces that you want
STP to select first and higher cost
values to LAN interfaces that you
want STP to select last.
If all LAN interfaces have the
same cost value, STP puts the
LAN interface with the lowest
LAN interface number in the
forwarding state and blocks other
LAN interfaces.
The possible cost range is 0
through 65535 (the default is
media specific).
STP uses the port cost value when the
LAN interface is configured as an
access port and uses VLAN port cost
values when the LAN interface is
configured as a trunk port.

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Priority
*
Port priority If a loop occurs, STP considers
port priority when selecting a
LAN port to put into the
forwarding state.
You can assign higher priority
values to LAN ports that you want
STP to select first and lower
priority values to LAN ports that
you want STP to select last.
If all LAN ports have the same
priority value, STP puts the LAN
port with the lowest LAN port
number in the forwarding state
and blocks other LAN ports.
Values are multiples of 16 ranging
from 0-240. The lower the
number, the higher the priority.
State State of the port. The possible states are:
Blocking
Forwarding
Disabled
This field is not configurable.
Status Indicates if the port lies in the boundary of
an MST region.
If yes, the status is shown as Boundary.
If not, the field is left blank.
In generic terms, a port is at the
boundary of a region:
If the designated bridge on its segment
is in a different region
Or
If it receives legacy 802.1d BPDUs.
Role Role of the port. The possible roles are:
Root
Designated
Alternate
Backup
Disabled
MST assigns port roles as follows:
Root port or designated port role
includes the port in the active topology.
Alternate port or backup port role
excludes the port from the active
topology.
This field is not configurable.
Table 11-15 MST Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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Designated
Bridge
Bridge ID for the designated bridge.
The Designated Bridge provides the
minimum root path cost on a LAN.
Also, it is the only bridge allowed to
forward frames to and from the LAN for
which it is the designated bridge.
This field is not configurable.
Designated
Port
Displays the ID of the port that connects a
LAN to the designated bridge
This field is not configurable.
PortFast
*
Displays the state of the PortFast Interface
Configuration feature:
Enabled or Disabled
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, PortFast causes a
switch or trunk port interface to enter
the Spanning Tree forwarding state
immediately, bypassing the listening
and learning states.
Loop Guard
*
Displays the state of the Loop Guard
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, Loop guard works on
non-designated ports and does not
allow the port to become designated
via max_age expiry.
BPDU
Guard
*
Displays the state of the BPDU Guard
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU Guard feature
prevents loops by moving a
nontrunking port into an enable state
when a BPDU is received on that port.
When the BPDU Guard feature is
enabled on the switch, Spanning Tree
shuts down PortFast-configured
interfaces that receive BPDUs, instead
of putting them into the Spanning Tree
blocking state.
Table 11-15 MST Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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To edit values of fields marked with an asterisk, select rows, and uncheck Read-only.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values appear, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Port
To configure MISTP port on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Port tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MISTP from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
BPDU
Filter
*
Displays the state of the BPDU filter
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU filtering allows
you to avoid transmitting BPDUs on a
port, usually connected to an end
system.
When you enable PortFast on the
switch, Spanning Tree places ports in
the forwarding state immediately,
instead of going through the listening,
learning, and forwarding states.
Root Guard
*
Displays the state of the Root guard feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, Root Guard does not
allow the port to become
non-designated.
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Table 11-15 MST Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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Step 4 From the Spanning Tree Instance field, click Select.
The Select Instance dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in the Table 11-16.
To view the devices in the VLAN Instance, click Select.
The devices running the selected MIST instance appear in a table. Table 11-17 lists the fields in the
table, their description, and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-16 Selecting Spanning Tree Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
instance
Select either of the following criteria:
All Instances
Instance Name
To view the valid values for the
instance field, click the drop-down
arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
instance name.
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria.
Select the instance from the list of
matches.
Table 11-17 MISTP Port Details
Field
1
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device This field is not configurable.
Port Port number used for bridge
forwarding
This field is not configurable.
isLink Displays a check mark if the
port is a link port
This field is not configurable.
State State of the port. The possible
states are:
Blocking
Forwarding
Disabled
This field is not configurable.

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Cost
*
Port cost value The STP port path cost default value is derived from the
media speed of a LAN interface.
If a loop occurs, STP considers port cost when
selecting a LAN interface to place that into the
forwarding state.
You can assign lower cost values to LAN interfaces
that you want STP to select first and higher cost
values to LAN interfaces that you want STP to
select last.
If all LAN interfaces have the same cost value, STP
puts the LAN interface with the lowest LAN
interface number in the forwarding state and blocks
other LAN interfaces.
The possible cost range is 0 through 65535 (the
default is media specific).
STP uses the port cost value when the LAN interface is
configured as an access port and uses VLAN port cost
values when the LAN interface is configured as a trunk
port.
Priority
*
Port priority If a loop occurs, STP considers port priority when
selecting a LAN port to put into the forwarding
state.
You can assign higher priority values to LAN ports
that you want STP to select first and lower priority
values to LAN ports that you want STP to select
last.
If all LAN ports have the same priority value, STP
puts the LAN port with the lowest LAN port
number in the forwarding state and blocks other
LAN ports.
Values are multiples of 16 ranging from 0-240. The
lower the number, the higher the priority.
Designated
Bridge
Bridge ID for the designated
bridge.
The Designated Bridge
provides the minimum root
path cost on a LAN.
Also, it is the only bridge
allowed to forward frames to
and from the LAN for which
it is the designated bridge.
This field is not configurable.
Designated
Port
ID of the port that connects a
LAN to the designated
bridge.
This field is not configurable.
Table 11-17 MISTP Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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To edit values of fields marked with an asterisk, select rows, and uncheck Read-only.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values appear, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices. Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
PortFast
*
State of the PortFast
Interface Configuration
feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, PortFast causes a switch or trunk port
interface to enter the Spanning Tree forwarding state
immediately, bypassing the listening and learning
states.
Loop Guard
*
State of the loop guard
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, Loop Guard works on non-designated
ports and does not allow the port to become designated
via max_age expiry.
BPDU
Guard
*
State of the BPDU guard
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU Guard feature prevents loops by
moving a nontrunking port into an errdisable state when
a BPDU is received on that port.
When the BPDU Guard feature is enabled on the switch,
Spanning Tree shuts down PortFast-configured
interfaces that receive BPDUs, instead of putting them
into the Spanning Tree blocking state.
BPDU Filter
*
State of the BPDU filter
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU filtering allows you to avoid
transmitting BPDUs on a port, usually connected to an
end system.
When you enable PortFast on the switch, Spanning Tree
places ports in the forwarding state immediately, instead
of going through the listening, learning, and forwarding
states.
Root Guard
*
State of the Root guard
feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, Root Guard does not allow the port to
become non-designated.
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Table 11-17 MISTP Port Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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Reporting and Configuring PVST Device
To configure PVST device on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Device tab.
The Spanning Tree Device Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select PVST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
PVST details appear in text boxes. Table 11-18 lists the displayed fields and descriptions.
Step 4 From the Spanning Tree Instance field, click Select.
The Select Instance dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in the Table 11-19.
To view the devices in the VLAN Instance, click Select.
The devices in the VLAN instance appear in a table. Table 11-20 lists the fields in the table, their
description, and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-18 PVST Details
Field Description
Root Bridge IP address of the switch.
Forward Delay Forward Delay timer. This determines how long each of the listening and learning
states last before the port begins forwarding.
HelloTime Hello timer. This is the number of seconds between STP configuration messages.
The HelloTime determines how often the network device broadcasts hello
messages to other network devices.
Max Age Maximum age timer. This determines the amount of time protocol information
received on a port is stored by the network device.
Table 11-19 Selecting Spanning Tree Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
type
Select either of the following criteria:
VLAN Name
VLAN ID
To view the valid values for the VLAN
Name or VLAN ID field, click the
drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
VLAN Name or VLAN ID.
Matches Lists VLANs that match the specified
criteria.
Select the VLAN from the list of
matches.

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Table 11-20 PVST Device Details
Field
1
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device. This field is not configurable.
Root ID ID of the bridge assumed to
be root. On initialization,
each bridge assumes itself as
root.
This field is not configurable.
Root Port ID of the port, which is
closest to the root.
This field is not configurable.
Cost Mode Type of Spanning Tree path
cost mode configured on the
device.
Applies to all STP instances
running on the device.
When you change, the path
cost of all ports are
reassigned to the default path
cost values based on the new
Spanning Tree path cost
mode and ports' speed. The
possible values are:
ShortShort cost is
specified by 802.1d
LongLong cost is
specified by 802.1t
This field is not configurable.
Root Cost Cost of the root. This field is not configurable.
Extended
SysID
*
State of the extended system
ID feature on the switch:
Enable, Disabled, or
Unknown
Select a value from the drop-down list.
STP uses the VLAN ID as the extended system ID. It
uses the extended system ID plus a MAC address to
make the bridge ID unique for each VLAN. For more
details, see Understanding Bridge ID.
Priority
*
Bridge priority The device with the lowest bridge identifier is
considered the highest priority bridge and becomes the
root bridge. By default, the bridge priority is set to
32768.
Use the bridge priority command to set the priority that
the bridge Spanning Tree uses to choose the root bridge
in the network.
Bridge priority can range from 0 to 65535. But if you
have enabled MAC address reduction, the root bridge
priority becomes a multiple of 4096 plus the VLAN ID.

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Backbone
Fast
*
State of the Backbonefast
feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
Uplink Fast
*
State of the Uplinkfast
feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, UplinkFast feature dramatically
decreases the convergence time of the STP in the event
of the failure of an uplink on an access switch.
Loop Guard
*
State of the Loop Guard
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, Loop Guard works on non-designated
ports and does not allow the port to become designated
via max_age expiry.
PortFast
Global
*
State of the PortFast Global
Configuration feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, PortFast causes a switch or trunk port to
enter the Spanning Tree forwarding state immediately,
bypassing the listening and learning states.
If you configure the default on each port, this setting
applies to interfaces.
BPDU Filter
*
State of the BPDU Filter
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU filtering allows you to avoid
transmitting BPDUs on a port, usually connected to an
end system.
When you enable PortFast on the switch, Spanning Tree
places ports in the forwarding state immediately, instead
of going through the listening, learning, and forwarding
states.
BPDU
Guard
*
State of the BPDU Guard
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU Guard feature prevents loops by
moving a nontrunking port into an errdisable state when
a BPDU is received on that port.
When the BPDU Guard feature is enabled on the switch,
Spanning Tree shuts down PortFast-configured
interfaces that receive BPDUs, instead of putting them
into the Spanning Tree blocking state.
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Table 11-20 PVST Device Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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To edit values of fields marked with an asterisk, select rows, and uncheck Read-only.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values are displayed, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Reporting and Configuring MST Device
To configure MST port on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Device tab.
The Spanning Tree Device Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
MST details appear in text boxes. Table 11-21 lists the displayed fields and descriptions.
Step 4 From the Spanning Tree Instance field, click Select.
The Select Instance dialog box appears.
Table 11-21 MST Details
Field Description
Root Bridge IP address of the switch.
Forward
Delay
Forward delay timer. This determines how long each of the
listening and learning states last before the port begins
forwarding.
HelloTime Hello timer. This is the number of seconds between STP
configuration messages.
The HelloTime determines how often the network device
broadcasts hello messages to other network devices.
Max Age Maximum age timer. This determines the amount of time
protocol information received on a port is stored by the network
device.

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Step 5 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-22.
To view the devices in the Instance, click Select.
The devices in the instance appear in a table.
Table 11-23 lists the fields in the table, their description, and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-22 Selecting Spanning Tree Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
region
Select either of the following criteria:
All Regions
Region Name
To view the valid values for the region
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
region name.
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria
Select the STP instance from the list of
matches.

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Table 11-23 MST Device Details
Field
1
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device. This field is not configurable.
Root ID ID of the bridge assumed to
be root. Upon initialization,
the bridge assumes that it is
root.
This field is not configurable.
Root Port Port ID of the port, which is
closest to the root.
This field is not configurable.
Cost Mode Type of Spanning Tree path
cost mode configured on the
device.
Applies to all STP instances
running on the device.
When you change the value,
the path cost of all ports are
reassigned to the default path
cost values based on the new
Spanning Tree path cost
mode and ports' speed. The
possible values are:
ShortShort cost is
specified by 802.1d
LongLong cost is
specified by 802.1t
This field is not configurable.
Root Cost Cost of the root. This field is not configurable.
Extended
SysID
*
State of the extended system
ID feature on the switch:
Enable, Disabled, or
Unknown
Select a value from the drop-down list.
Priority
*
Bridge priority The device with the lowest bridge identifier is
considered the highest priority bridge and becomes the
root bridge. By default, the bridge priority is set to
32768.
Use the bridge priority command to set the priority that
the bridge Spanning Tree uses to choose the root bridge
in the network.
The range for bridge priority is 0 to 65535. The value
should be a multiple of 4096.

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Region
Name
*
Alphanumeric configuration
name assigned to the MST
region that the switch is part
of.
Enter a new name in the field to change the region name.
For two or more switches to be in the same MST region,
they must have the same VLAN-to-instance map, the
same configuration revision number, and the same
configuration name.
Region
Revision
*
MST configuration revision
number (0 to 65535).
Enter a new value in the field to change the revision
number.
For two or more switches to be in the same MST region,
they must have the same VLAN-to-instance map, the
same configuration revision number, and the same
configuration name.
Max. Hop
Count
Number of hops in an MST
region after which a BPDU is
discarded, and the
information held for a port is
aged.
(1 to 40; default is 20).
This field is not configurable.
VLANs List of VLANs that form part
of the MST region.
This field is not configurable.
Loop Guard
*
State of the Loop Guard
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, loop guard works on non-designated
ports and does not allow the port to become designated
via max_age expiry.
PortFast
Global
*
State of the PortFast Global
Configuration feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, PortFast causes a switch or trunk port to
enter the Spanning Tree forwarding state immediately,
bypassing the listening and learning states.
BPDU Filter
*
State of the BPDU filter
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU filtering allows you to avoid
transmitting BPDUs on a port, usually connected to an
end system.
When you enable PortFast on the switch, Spanning Tree
places ports in the forwarding state immediately, instead
of going through the listening, learning, and forwarding
states.
BPDU
Guard
*
State of the BPDU Guard
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU Guard feature prevents loops by
moving a nontrunking port into an errdisable state when
a BPDU is received on that port.
When the BPDU Guard feature is enabled on the switch,
Spanning Tree shuts down PortFast-configured
interfaces that receive BPDUs, instead of putting them
into the Spanning Tree blocking state.
Table 11-23 MST Device Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.

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To edit values of fields marked with an asterisk, select rows, and uncheck Read-only.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values appear, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Device
To configure MISTP port on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Device tab.
The Spanning Tree Device Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MISTP from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
MISTP details appear in text boxes. Table 11-24 lists the displayed fields and descriptions.
Step 4 From the Spanning Tree Instance field, click Select.
The Select Instance dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in the Table 11-25.
Table 11-24 MISTP Details
Field Description
Root Bridge IP address of the switch.
Forward Delay Forward Delay timer. This determines how long each of the listening and learning
states last before the port begins forwarding.
HelloTime Hello timer. This is the number of seconds between STP configuration messages.
The HelloTime determines how often the network device broadcasts hello
messages to other network devices.
Max Age Maximum age timer. This determines the amount of time protocol information
received on a port is stored by the network device.

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To view the devices in the MISTP instance, click Select.
The devices in the instance appear in a table. Table 11-26 lists the fields in the table, their
description, and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-25 Selecting Spanning Tree Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
instance
Select either of the following criteria:
All Instances
Instance Name
To view the valid values for the
instance field, click the drop-down
arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
instance name.
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria.
Select the instance from the list of
matches.
Table 11-26 MISTP Device Details
Field
1
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device. This field is not configurable.
Root ID ID of the bridge assumed to
be root. Upon initialization,
the bridge assumes that it is
root.
This field is not configurable.
Root Port Port ID of the port, which is
closest to the root.
This field is not configurable.
Cost Mode Type of Spanning Tree path
cost mode configured on the
device.
Applies to all STP instances
running on the device.
When you change the value,
the path cost of all ports will
be reassigned to the default
path cost values based on the
new Spanning Tree path cost
mode and ports' speed. The
possible values are:
ShortShort cost is
specified by 802.1d
LongLong cost is
specified by 802.1t
This field is not configurable.
Root Cost Cost of the root. This field is not configurable.

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Extended
SysID
*
State of the extended system
ID feature on the switch:
Enable, Disabled, or
Unknown
Select a value from the drop-down list.
Priority
*
Bridge priority The device with the lowest bridge identifier is
considered the highest priority bridge and becomes the
root bridge. By default, the bridge priority is set to
32768.
Use the bridge priority command to set the priority that
the bridge Spanning Tree uses to choose the root bridge
in the network.
The range for bridge priority is 0 to 65535. The value
should be a multiple of 4096.
Backbone
Fast
*
State of the Backbonefast
feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
Uplink Fast
*
State of the Uplinkfast
feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, UplinkFast feature dramatically
decreases the convergence time of the STP in the event
of the failure of an uplink on an access switch.
Loop Guard
*
State of the Loop Guard
feature:
Enable or Disable.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, loop guard works on non-designated
ports and does not allow the port to become designated
via max_age expiry.
PortFast
Global
*
State of the PortFast Global
Configuration feature:
Enabled or Disabled.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, PortFast causes a switch or trunk port to
enter the Spanning Tree forwarding state immediately,
bypassing the listening and learning states.
Table 11-26 MISTP Device Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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To edit values of fields marked with an asterisk, select rows, and uncheck Read-only.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values appear, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Note Preferred VLANs are available only on Cisco Catalyst switches running Catalyst operating system.
BPDU Filter
*
State of the BPDU Filter
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU filtering allows you to avoid
transmitting BPDUs on a port, usually connected to an
end system.
When you enable PortFast on the switch, Spanning Tree
places ports in the forwarding state immediately, instead
of going through the listening, learning, and forwarding
states.
BPDU
Guard
*
State of the BPDU Guard
feature:
Enabled, Disabled or
Default.
Select a value from the drop-down list.
When enabled, BPDU Guard feature prevents loops by
moving a nontrunking port into an errdisable state when
a BPDU is received on that port.
When the BPDU Guard feature is enabled on the switch,
Spanning Tree shuts down PortFast-configured
interfaces that receive BPDUs, instead of putting them
into the Spanning Tree blocking state.
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Table 11-26 MISTP Device Details (continued)
Field
1
Description Usage Notes

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Reporting and Configuring MST Instance
To configure MST instance on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Instance tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Instance Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
Step 4 From the Device field, click Select.
The Select Device dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in the Table 11-27.
To view the MST instances that are running on the device, click Select.
The instance and VLAN appear in a table. Table 11-28 lists the fields in the table, their description,
and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-27 Selecting Devices in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
filter
Select either of the following criteria:
Name
Device IP
SysName
To view the valid values for the filter
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
name, IP address or system name.
Matches Lists devices that match the specified
criteria.
Select the device from the list of
matches.
Table 11-28 MST Instance Details
Field
1
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Description Usage Notes
Instance MST instance that the device
is part of.
This field is not configurable.
VLANS
*
VLANs that are mapped to
the instance.
Select a value from the drop-down list.

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To edit the instance to VLAN mapping, select the particular instance, and uncheck Read-only.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
Or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values are displayed, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes,.
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Instance
To configure MISTP instance on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Instance tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Instance Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MISTP from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
Step 4 From the Device field, click Select.
The Select Device dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-29.
Step 6 To view the MST instances that are running on the device, click Select.
The instance and VLAN appear in a table. Table 11-30 lists the fields in the table, their description, and
usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-29 Selecting Devices in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
filter
Select either of the following criteria:
Name
Device IP
SysName
To view the valid values for the filter
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
name, IP address or system name.
Matches Lists devices that match the specified
criteria.
Select the device from the list of
matches.

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To edit the instance to VLAN mapping, select the particular instance, and uncheck Read-only.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values are displayed, highlighted in pink.
Step 7 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Reporting and Configuring PVST Trunk
To configure PVST trunk on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Trunk tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Trunk Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select PVST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
Step 4 From the Device field, click Select.
The Select Device dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in the Table 11-31.
Table 11-30 MISTP Instance Details
Field
1
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Description Usage Notes
Instance MISTP instance that the
device is part of.
This field is not configurable.
VLANS
*
VLANs that the device is part
of.
Select a value from the drop-down list.

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The instance and VLAN appear in a table. Table 11-32 lists the fields in the table, their description,
and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-31 Selecting Devices in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
filter
Select either of the following criteria:
Name
Device IP
SysName
To view the valid values for the filter
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
name, IP address or system name.
Matches Lists devices that match the specified
criteria.
Select the device from the list of
matches.
Table 11-32 PVST Trunk Details
Field
1
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device. This field is not configurable.
Port Trunk port on the device. This field is not configurable.
isTrunk Displays a check mark if the
port is a trunk port.
This field is not configurable.
Preferred
VLANs *
Preferred VLANs the trunk
port is configured for.
Preferred VLANs are VLANs you prefer to keep in
forwarding mode on a trunk link. You can do this by
setting the port instance cost of these VLANs to be
lower than the other VLANs.
When port instance cost is lowered these instances are
made forwarding on the trunk as against the other.
You can load balance VLAN traffic across multiple
trunk links.
For example, if you want to have some VLANs to use
only a particular trunk link, then you can lower their
STP cost so that they are preferred over that link.

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Uncheck Read-only, and select the trunk port.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
Select the trunk port, and enter the VLANs that have to be preferred in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values appear, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Note Preferred VLANs are available only on Cisco Catalyst switches running Catalyst operating system.
Reporting and Configuring MST Trunk
To configure MST trunk on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Trunk tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Trunk Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
Step 4 From the Device field, click Select.
The Select Device dialog box appears.

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Step 5 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-33.
The instance and VLAN appear in a table. Table 11-34 lists the fields in the table, their description,
and usage notes for editable fields.
Uncheck Read-only, and select the trunk port.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
Select the trunk port, and enter the VLANs that have to be preferred in the Edit Here section.
Table 11-33 Selecting Devices in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
filter
Select either of the following criteria:
Name
Device IP
SysName
To view the valid values for the filter
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
name, IP address or system name.
Matches Lists devices that match the specified
criteria.
Select the device from the list of
matches.
Table 11-34 MST Trunk Details
Field
1
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device. This field is not configurable.
Port Port number used for bridge
forwarding.
This field is not configurable.
isTrunk Displays a check mark if the
port is a trunk port.
This field is not configurable.
Preferred
Instance *
Preferred instances the trunk
port is configured for.
Preferred VLANs are VLANs you prefer to keep in
forwarding mode on a trunk link. You can do this by
setting the port instance cost of these VLANs to be
lower than the other VLANs.
When port instance cost is lowered, these instances are
made forwarding on the trunk as against the other.
You can load balance VLAN traffic across multiple
trunk links.
For example, if you want to have some VLANs to use
only a particular trunk link, then you can lower their
STP cost so that they are preferred over that link.

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To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values appear, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Note Preferred VLANs are available only on Cisco Catalyst switches running Catalyst operating system.
Reporting and Configuring MISTP Trunk
To configure MISTP trunk on a switch cloud:
Step 1 From the Summary View, select Reports > Spanning Tree Configuration.
The Spanning Tree Configuration page appears.
Step 2 Select the Trunk tab.
The Spanning Tree Port Trunk Configuration page appears.
Step 3 Select MST from the Spanning Tree Type drop-down list.
Step 4 From the Device field, click Select.
The Select Device dialog box appears.
Step 5 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-35.
The instance and VLAN appear in a table. Table 11-36 lists the fields in the table, their description,
and usage notes for editable fields.
Table 11-35 Selecting Devices in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
filter
Select desired criteria:
Name
Device IP
SysName
To view the valid values for the filter
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the desired string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
name, IP address or system name.
Matches Lists devices that match the specified
criteria.
Select the desired device from the list
of matches.

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Uncheck Read-only, and select the trunk port.
The selected rows are highlighted in the Edit Here section.
Select the trunk port, and enter the VLANs that have to be preferred in the Edit Here section.
To change the value of a field, do either of the following:
Double click the current value, and enter a new value,
or
Select a value from the drop-down list.
The new values appear, highlighted in pink.
Step 6 Click Configure to make changes to the devices.
Or
Click Reset to return to the previous values without making any changes.
Note Preferred VLANs are available only on Cisco Catalyst switches running Catalyst operating system.
Table 11-36 MST Trunk Details
Field
1
1. Fields marked with asterisk are editable.
Description Usage Notes
Device
Name
Name of the device. This field is not configurable.
IP Address IP address of the device. This field is not configurable.
Port Port number used for bridge
forwarding.
This field is not configurable.
isTrunk Displays a check mark if the
port is a trunk port.
This field is not configurable.
Preferred
Instance *
Preferred instances the trunk
port is configured for.
Preferred VLANs are VLANs you prefer to keep in
forwarding mode on a trunk link. You can do this by
setting the port instance cost of these VLANs to be
lower than the other VLANs.
When port instance cost is lowered these instances are
made forwarding on the trunk as against the other.
You can load balance VLAN traffic across multiple
trunk links.
For example, if you want to have some VLANs to use
only a particular trunk link, then you can lower their
STP cost so that they are preferred over that link.

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Spanning Tree Filters
Spanning Tree Filters
Topology Map provides two filters for STP enabled devices or links. These filters are available in the
topology maps for Switch Clouds under LAN Edge View.
STP Inconsistency
STP Filters in Switch Cloud View
Viewing STP Loop Inconsistency
STP Inconsistency
If your network has incorrect configurations, STP stops functioning and you may lose connectivity. STP
Inconsistency detects these incorrect configurations in your network and changes the state to
inconsistent for corresponding ports, thus preventing the ports from affecting the network.
When you select the filter, Topology View highlights the link and device associated with that specific
STP inconsistency.
STP inconsistencies are computed during each data collection. Devices in the switched clouds are polled
when the filter is applied.
Topology Map provides four filters under STP Inconsistency:
Loop (Viewing STP Loop Inconsistency)
PVID (Viewing STP PVID Inconsistency)
Root (Viewing STP Root Inconsistency)
Type (Viewing STP Type Inconsistency)
Spanning Tree
These filters are based on the Spanning Tree details of devices. When you select the filter, topology map
lists the Spanning Tree Instances applicable to all the switches in the selected switch cloud. Topology
Map provides three filters under Spanning Tree:
IEEE 802.1s Instance (Viewing Spanning Tree per IEEE 802.1s Instance)
Cisco MIST Instance (Viewing Spanning Tree per Cisco MISTP Instances)
VLAN (Viewing VLANs in Switch Clouds)
Viewing STP Loop Inconsistency
To view STP loop inconsistencies in switch clouds:
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select Topology Filters > STP Inconsistency > Loop.
The link and devices with loop inconsistencies appear.

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Spanning Tree Filters
Viewing STP PVID Inconsistency
To view STP PVID inconsistencies in switch clouds:
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select Topology Filters > STP Inconsistency > PVID.
The link and devices with PVID inconsistencies appear.
Viewing STP Root Inconsistency
To view STP root inconsistencies in switch clouds:
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select Topology Filters > STP Inconsistency > Root.
The link and devices with root inconsistencies are displayed.
Viewing STP Type Inconsistency
To view STP type inconsistencies in switch clouds:
Step 1 Invoke Switch Cloud Map View from Topology Services.
Step 2 Select Topology Filters > STP Inconsistency > Type.
The link and devices with type inconsistencies are displayed.
STP Filters in Switch Cloud View
Spanning Tree Filter is available in Switch Cloud Maps in Topology Services. Spanning Tree
information in a switch cloud provides a better picture of the Spanning Tree than displaying Spanning
Tree information in the VTP domain map.
Sometimes, the Spanning Tree root might not be part of VTP domain. The availability of STP Filters on
Switch Cloud View resolves this problem. When you select the filter, it displays the list of Spanning Tree
Instances that are applicable to all switches in the switch cloud, in a popup dialog box.
The following information is provided for the selected Spanning Tree Instance in the Topology Map:
Port states (forwarding or blocking) of Switches
Highlighted Root Bridge.

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Spanning Tree Filters
Spanning Tree
These filters are based on the Spanning Tree details of devices. When you select the filter, the Topology
map lists the Spanning Tree Instances applicable to all switches in the selected switch cloud. Topology
Map provides three filters under Spanning Tree:
IEEE 802.1s Instance (Viewing Spanning Tree per IEEE 802.1s Instance)
Cisco MIST Instance (Viewing Spanning Tree per Cisco MISTP Instances)
VLAN (Viewing VLANs in Switch Clouds)
Viewing Spanning Tree per IEEE 802.1s Instance
You can specify the IEEE 802.1s instances by searching for the instance number. To do this:
Step 1 From a Network Topology View, select Topology Filters > Spanning Tree > IEEE 802.1s Instance.
The Select Instance window appears.
Step 2 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-37.
To view the Spanning Tree details of an IEEE 802.1s Instance in the Network Topology View window,
click Select.
Viewing Spanning Tree per Cisco MISTP Instances
You can specify the MISTP instances by searching for the instance name.
To do this:
Step 1 From a network topology view, select Topology Filters > Spanning Tree > Cisco MISTP Instance.
The Select Instance window appears.
Step 2 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-38.
Table 11-37 Selecting IEEE 802.1s Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select instance by
region
Select either of the following criteria:
All Regions
Region Name
To view the valid values for the region
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
region name.
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria.
Select the STP instance from the list of
matches.

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Spanning Tree Filters
To view the Spanning Tree details of an MISTP Instance in the Network Topology View window, click
Select.
Viewing VLANs in Switch Clouds
You can specify VLANs by searching for the instance name.
Step 1 From a Network Topology View, select Topology Filters > Spanning Tree > VLAN.
The Select VLAN window appears.
Step 2 Enter the required information as described in Table 11-39.
To view the Spanning Tree details of the VLAN in the Network Topology View window, click Select.
Table 11-38 Selecting Cisco MIST Instances in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select device by
instance
Select either of the following criteria:
All Instances
Instance Name
To view the valid values for the
instance field, click the drop-down
arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
instance name.
Matches Lists instances that match the specified
criteria.
Select the instance from the list of
matches.
Table 11-39 Selecting VLANs in Switch Clouds
Field Description Usage Notes
Select VLAN Select either of the following criteria:
VLAN Name
VLAN ID
To view the valid values for the VLAN
field, click the drop-down arrow.
What Enter the string Use this field to narrow the number of
matches by entering part or all of the
VLAN name or ID.
Matches Lists the VLANs that match the
specified criteria.
Select the name or ID from the list of
matches.
C H A P T E R

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12
Support for IPv6
This chapter the Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) support provided in Campus Manager. It contains
the following topics:
Understanding IPv6 Support in Campus Manager
Viewing IPv6 Addresses Report
Interpreting IPv6 Addresses Report
Understanding IPv6 Support in Campus Manager
IPv6 support in Campus Manager includes the following network scenarios:
Devices that may have IPv6 configured on their interfaces, but which have at least one IPv4
interface. Devices are managed using IPv4.
Hosts running IPv6 are supported in the User Tracking application.
Note Virtual Network Manager does not support IPv6
Campus Manager has been updated as follows for IPv6 support:
User Tracking Changes
User Tracking Ping Sweep Applicability to IPv6 Subnets
Topology Changes
User Tracking Changes
In User Tracking, hosts configured with IPv6 address are discovered and shown in the main table. IPv6
name lookup is done if IPv4 name lookup fails. That is, for a given IPv6 address, it returns the host name.
IPv6 does not support reverse name lookup.
All global unicast addresses are fetched and used for User Tracking computation but link local addresses
are dropped.
User Tracking end host reports have an IPv6 format. Select this format to view the IPv6 address, Prefix
Length and Prefix of IPv6 enabled devices.
Note User Tracking is not supported for IPv6 devices

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Viewing IPv6 Addresses Report
User Tracking Ping Sweep Applicability to IPv6 Subnets
Ping Sweep functionality is currently available for Class C or smaller subnets. Since with IPv6 each of
the networks can be larger than Class C networks and we cannot determine individual IPv6 addresses
that can be present in a given network or sub-network, Ping Sweep is not on any of the IPv6 subnets.
Topology Changes
Topology Services provides the following for IPv6 support:
IPv6 filter that lets you highlight the IPv6 devices
Find option for IPv6 devices
Table for devices running IPv6
Change Management IP Address displays IPv6 address, if the device is enabled with IPv6 option.
Note IPv6 support for the following STP options has not been tested : Per VLAN STP Recommendations,
Cisco MISTP Recommendations, and IEEE 802.1s Recommendations.
Viewing IPv6 Addresses Report
You can view IPv6 addresses report for IPv6 enabled devices. To view this report:
Step 1 Right-click the LAN Edge View or Layer 2 View from Network Views in the Topology Services window.
Step 2 Click Display View.
The Network Topology window appears.
Step 3 Select an IPv6 enabled device.
Step 4 Right-click the device then select IPv6 Addresses, or choose Reports > IPv6 Addresses.
The IPv6 Addresses report appears.

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Interpreting IPv6 Addresses Report
Interpreting IPv6 Addresses Report
See Table 12-1 for interpreting the fields in the IPv6 Addresses Report.
Table 12-1 IPv6 Addresses Report
Field Description
Interface Name Name of the IPv6 address interface.
IPv6 Address IPv6 address of the device. An IPv6 address typically has four
groups of 8 bits each.
Example: 2001:5:A:3:0:0:0:2
Prefix Length Length of the prefix. This is a decimal value representing how many
of the left-most contiguous bits of the address comprise the prefix.
Prefix Address Prefix portion of the IPv6 address. This is similar to CIDR in IPv4
and is written in CIDR notation. An IPv6 address prefix is
represented by the notation: IPv6-address/prefix-length
Address Type Type of IPv6 address. Campus Manager supports unicast addresses.
The Address Type can be global, link-local, or site-local.
Global addresses are identified by the Format Prefix of 001.
Addresses of this type are designed to be aggregated or summarized
to produce an efficient routing infrastructure.
Link-local addresses are used to communicate between hosts on the
link with no router.
Site-local addresses are used between nodes that communicate with
other nodes in the same site. Site-local addresses are identified by
the Format Prefix of 1111 1110 11.

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Data Extraction Engine
CiscoWorks Campus Manager Data Extraction Engine (DEE) is a utility to export Campus Manager
application data.
This utility provides servlet and command line access to Campus Manager application data (User
Tracking, Topology and Discrepancy), and allows you to extract data in Extensible Markup Language
(XML) format.
This chapter contains:
Overview of Data Extraction Engine
The cmexport Command
cmexport User Tracking
cmexport Topology Command
cmexport Discrepancy Command
cmexport Manpage
DEE Developers Reference
Overview of Data Extraction Engine
Data Extraction Engine (DEE) is a utility that provides servlet access to User Tracking, Layer 2
topology, and discrepancy data.
It also includes a command line utility that you can use to fetch user tracking data, Layer 2 topology, and
discrepancy data for devices discovered by Campus Manager server.
This utility supports the following features:
Generating user tracking data in XML format:
Allows you to access servlet and command line utilities that can generate user tracking data for
devices discovered by Campus Manager Server.
Generating Layer 2 topology data in XML format:
Allows you to generate the latest Layer 2 topology data including information on neighbor devices.
Elements in XML file are created at the device level.

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The cmexport Command
Generating discrepancy data in XML format:
Allows you to use Campus Manager discrepancy APIs to retrieve latest discrepancy data from
Campus Manager server.
Archiving XML Data:
Data generated through CLI is archived at the following locations:
where PX_DATADIR is either %NMSROOT%/files folder (on Windows) or /var/adm/CSCOpx/files
directory (on Solaris).
NMSROOT is the directory where you installed Campus Manager; timestamp is the time at which
the log was written in YearMonthDateHourOfDayMinuteSecond format.
You can also specify a directory to store the output. This utility does not delete the files created in
the archive. You should delete these files when necessary. While generating data through the servlet,
the output appears at the client terminal.
Generating user tracking and configuration data in XML format using the Servlet:
Allows you to generate and download the user tracking, topology and discrepancy XML files using
the servlet.
You must upload a payload XML file, which contains the cmexport and utexport command options
and CiscoWorks user credentials.
You should write your own script to invoke the servlet with a payload of this XML file. If the
credentials are correct and options are valid, the servlet returns the exported file in XML format.
The cmexport Command
cmexport is the CiscoWorks Campus Manager command line interface for exporting discrepancy and
Layer 2 topology data details into XML format.
This section contains the following topics:
Running cmexport Command
cmexport Arguments and Options
Table 13-1 Data Archive Locations
For Location
User Tracking PX_DATADIR/cmexport/ut/timestamput.xml
Layer 2 Topology PX_DATADIR/cmexport/L2Topology/
timestampL2Topology.xml
Discrepancy PX_DATADIR/cmexport/Discrepancy/
timestampDiscrepancy.xml

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The cmexport Command
Running cmexport Command
This section contains:
Command Line Syntax
Commands
Command Line Syntax
The command line syntax of the utility is in the following format:
cmexport command arguments options
where:
cmexport is the CiscoWorks Campus Manager command line interface for exporting User Tracking,
Layer 2 topology, and discrepancy data details into XML format.
command specifies which core operation is to be performed.
arguments are the additional parameters required for each core command.
options are the optional parameters, which modify the behavior of the specific DEE core command.
The order of the arguments and options are not important. However, you must enter the core command
immediately after cmexport.
Commands
Table 13-2 lists the command part of the cmexport syntax.
You must invoke the cmexport command with one of the core commands specified in the above table. If
you do not specify any core commands, cmexport can only execute the -v or -h options:
Option -v displays the version of the cmexport utility
Option -h (or null option) lists the usage information for this utility.
cmexport Arguments and Options
This section contains:
Mandatory Arguments
Optional Arguments
Function-Specific Options
Table 13-2 Command Descriptions
Core Command Description
ut Generates User Tracking data in XML format.
l2topology Generates layer 2 topology data in XML format.
discrepancy Generates discrepancy data in XML format.

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The cmexport Command
Mandatory Arguments
The arguments that must be specified with all functions is:
-u userid: Specifies the CiscoWorks userid.
-p password: Specifies the password for CiscoWorks userid.
If you want to avoid the -p option which will reveal the password in clear text in CLI, you must
store your userid and password in a file and set a variable CMEXPORTFILE which points to
this file.
You must maintain this file and control access permissions to prevent unauthorized access. cmexport
looks for current working directory if CMEXPORTFILE is set only to the file name instead of to the
full path.
If you use the -p option, even after setting the CMEXPORTFILE variable, the password is taken
from the command line instead of from CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we
recommend that you do not use this option.
You must enter the password in the file in the following format:
userid password
where userid is the CiscoWorks user name given in the command line. The delimiter between the
userid and password is single blank space.
You must provide the delimiter if the password is blank. Otherwise, cmexport will not validate the
password.
The password file can contain multiple entries with different user names. If there are duplicate
entries the password that matches the first user name is considered.
Note If -p password is used, the password is read from the command line instead of
CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we recommend that you do not use this option.
Optional Arguments
The arguments you can specify with any function are:
-d debuglevel
Sets the debug level based on which debug information is printed. There are two levels of
debuggingTRACE and DEBUG. If you do not specify the-d option, logging will not occur.
-l logfile
Logs the results of the cmexport command to the specified log file name. By default the command
output is displayed in the standard output.

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The cmexport Command
Function-Specific Options
DEE supports the following function-specific option:
-f filename
If used with:
User Tracking function
Specifies the name of the file to which the user tracking information is to be exported.
Topology function
Specifies the name of the file to which the layer 2 topology information is to be exported.
Discrepancy function
Specifies the name of the file to which the discrepancy information is to be exported.
Displaying Help
To display help for cm export Enter the following at a CLI prompt: cmexport -h.
This displays a list of options for cmexport.
On Solaris, you can also enter the following at a CLI prompt:
man cmexport
Uses of cmexport
If you enter:
cmexport ut {u userid} p password host -f filename.xml
User Tracking XML output for host will be generated and it is stored in the file filename.xml.
If you want to export the latest topology details for all Layer 2 devices enter:
cmexport L2Topology {u userid} p password -f filename.xml
If you want to export the latest discrepancy details, enter:
cmexport Discrepancy {u userid} p password -f filename.xml
Notations
The notations followed in describing the command line arguments are explained below:
{argument}Argument is a mandatory parameter.
[argument]Argument is an optional parameter.
argumentArgument is a variable.
argument 1 | argument 2Either argument 1 or argument 2 may be specified but not both.
Table 13-3 lists the notations part of the cmexport syntax.

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cmexport User Tracking
-vDisplays the version of the cmexport utility.
-hLists the options available and function of each option.
cmexport User Tracking
This topic describes the cmexport User Tracking command, and the various options available to you. It
contains the following sections:
Name
Synopsis
Description
Mandatory Arguments
Accessing Help
Examples
Name
cmexport ut: CiscoWorks cmexport user tracking function
Synopsis
cmexport ut: {-u userid} [ -p password ] -host [ host-options ] | -phone [ phone-options ] [ options ]
Table 13-4 lists the command part of the cmexport syntax.
Table 13-3 Notations Descriptions
Command Description
ut cmexport ut {-u userid} [ -p password ] -host [
host-options ] | -phone [ phone-options ] [ options ]
l2topology {-u userid} [-p password] [-f filename]
discrepancy {-u userid} [-p password] [-f filename]
empty [-v | -h]

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cmexport User Tracking
Description
User Tracking (specified by ut) exports the user tracking data into an XML file based on a predefined
schema.
Mandatory Arguments
The options that must be specified with the cmexport ut function are:
-u userid: Specifies the CiscoWorks userid.
-p password: Specifies the password for CiscoWorks userid.
If you want to avoid -p option which will reveal the password in clear text in CLI, you must store
your userid and password in a file and set a variable CMEXPORTFILE which points to this file.
You must maintain this file and control access permissions to prevent unauthorized access. cmexport
looks for current working directory if CMEXPORTFILE is set only to the file name instead of to the
full path.
If you use the -p option, even after setting the CMEXPORTFILE variable, the password is taken
from the command line instead of from CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we recommend
that you do not use this option.
The password must be provided in the file in the following format:
userid password
where userid is the CiscoWorks user name given in the command line. The delimiter between the
userid and password is single blank space.
Table 13-4 Command Descriptions
Argument Can be one of the Following
host-options -query queryname
-query queryname -view viewname
-layout layoutname
-layoutlayoutname -view viewname
-query queryname -layout layoutname
-query queryname -layout layoutname -view viewname
phone-options -queryPhone queryname
-layoutPhone layoutname
-queryPhone queryname --layoutPhone layoutname
options -f filename
-d debuglevel
-l logfile

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cmexport User Tracking
You must provide the delimiter if the password is blank. Otherwise, cmexport will not validate the
password. The password file can contain multiple entries with different user names. The password
that matches the first user name is considered in case of duplicate entries.
Note If -p password is used, the password is read from the command line instead of
CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we recommend that you do not use this option.
-host: Specifies host data to be exported.
-phone: Specifies phone data to be exported.
Options
The options you can specify with the ut function are:
-d debuglevel
Sets the debug level based on which debug information is printed. There are two levels of
debuggingTRACE and DEBUG. If you do not specify the -d option, no logging will occur.
-l logfile
Logs the results of the cmexport command to the specified logfile name. By default the command
output will be displayed in the standard output.
-f filename
The file option specifies the filename where the XML output is to be stored. If the filename is not
specified with -f option, an XML file of the format timestamput.xml is stored in the following
directory: PX_DATADIR/cmexport/ut
-view
Specifies the format in which the user tracking XML data is to be presented. It supports two optional
arguments:
a. switch: User Tracking data are displayed based on the type of switch.
b. subnet: User Tracking data are displayed based on subnet in which they are present.
The -view options are not case sensitive.
-query queryname
User Tracking host data is exported in XML format for the query provided in queryname. This
option must be used with the -host argument. For this option:
Create a Custom report for end hosts in the following screen:
Campus Manager > User Tracking >Reports > Custom Reports.
Use the Custom report name as a value here.
-layout layoutname
User Tracking host data is exported in XML format for the layout provided in layoutname. This
option must be used with the -host argument. For this option:
Create a Custom layout for end hosts in the following screen:
Campus Manager > User Tracking >Reports > Custom Layouts.
Use the Custom layout name as a value here.

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cmexport Topology Command
-queryPhone queryname
User Tracking phone data is exported in XML format for the query given in queryname. This option
must be used with the -phone argument. For this option:
Create a Custom report for IP phones in the following screen:
Campus Manager > User Tracking >Reports > Custom Reports.
Use the Custom report name as a value here.
-layoutPhone layoutPhone
User Tracking phone data is exported in XML format for the layout given in layoutPhone. This
option must be used with the -phone argument. For this option:
Create a Custom layout for IP phones in the following screen:
Campus Manager > User Tracking >Reports > Custom Layouts.
Use the Custom layout name as a value here.
Accessing Help
Enter the following at a CLI:
cmexport -h: Displays a list of options for cmexport.
cmexport ut -h: Displays a list of options for the cmexport ut command.
On Solaris, you can also enter the following at a CLI:
man cmexport
Examples
Considering userid: admin, password: admin, queryname: host1Query, layoutname: host1Layout,
queryphone: phone1Query, layoutphone: phone1Layout, filename: file1.xml, we can have the following:
cmexport ut -u admin -p admin -host
cmexport ut -u admin -p admin -phone
cmexport ut -u admin -p admin -host -query host1Query -layout all
cmexport ut -u admin -p admin -host -query host1Query -layout layoutname
cmexport ut -u admin -p admin -phone -queryPhone phone1Query -layoutPhone phone1Layout
cmexport ut -u admin -p admin -host -f file1.xml
cmexport ut -u admin -view switch -host
cmexport Topology Command
This section contains:
Name
Synopsis
Description
Mandatory Arguments
Accessing Help
Examples

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cmexport Topology Command
Name
cmexport L2Topology: CiscoWorks cmexport layer 2 topology function
Synopsis
cmexport l2topology {-u userid} [ -p password ] [ options ]
where cmexport l2topology -h lists the options available and function of each option.
Description
Layer 2 Topology (specified by l2topology) exports the Layer 2 topology data into an XML file based
on a predefined schema.
Mandatory Arguments
The options that you must specify with the cmexport L2Topology function are:
The options that you must specify with the cmexport L2Topology function are:
-u userid: Specifies the CiscoWorks user ID.
-p password
Specifies the password for CiscoWorks user ID.
If you want to avoid -p option which will reveal the password in clear text in CLI, you must store
your userid and password in a file and set a variable CMEXPORTFILE which points to this file.
You must maintain this file and control access permissions to prevent unauthorized access. cmexport
looks for current working directory if CMEXPORTFILE is set only to the file name instead of to the
full path.
If you use the -p option, even after setting the CMEXPORTFILE variable, the password is taken
from the command line instead of from CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we recommend
that you do not use this option.
The password must be provided in the file in the following format:
userid password
where userid is the CiscoWorks user name given in the command line. The delimiter between the
userid and password is single blank space.
Table 13-5 Command Description
Argument can be one of the following
options -f filename
-d debuglevel
-l logfile

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You must provide the delimiter if the password is blank. Otherwise, cmexport will not validate the
password. The password file can contain multiple entries with different user names. The password
that matches the first user name is considered in case of duplicate entries.
Note If -p password is used, the password is read from the command line instead of
CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we recommend that you do not use this option.
Options
The options you can specify with the layer 2 topology function are:
-d debuglevel
Sets the debug level based on which debug information is printed. There are two levels of
debuggingTRACE and DEBUG. If you do not specify the -d option, no logging will occur.
-l logfile
Logs the results of the cmexport command to the specified logfile name. By default the command
output will be displayed in the standard output.
-f filename
The file option specifies the filename where the XML output is to be stored. If the filename is not
specified with -f option an XML file of the format timestampL2Topology.xml is stored in the
following directory: PX_DATADIR/cmexport/L2Topology
Accessing Help
Enter the following at a CLI:
cmexport -h: Displays a list of options for cmexport.
cmexport l2topology -h: Displays a list of options for the cmexport l2topology command.
On Solaris, you can also enter the following at a CLI:
man cmexport
Examples
Considering userid: admin, password: admin, filename: file1.xml, you can have the following:
cmexport L2Topology -u admin -p admin
cmexport L2Topology -u admin -p admin -f file1.xml
cmexport L2Topology -u admin -l file.log

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cmexport Discrepancy Command
cmexport Discrepancy Command
This section contains:
Name
Synopsis
Description
Mandatory Arguments
Accessing Help
Examples
Name
cmexport Discrepancy: CiscoWorks cmexport Discrepancy function.
Synopsis
cmexport discrepancy {-u userid} [ -p password ] [ options ]
where
cmexport discrepancy -help lists the options available and function of each option.
Description
Discrepancy (specified by Discrepancy) exports the Discrepancy data into an XML file based on a
predefined schema.
Mandatory Arguments
The options that you must specify with the cmexport Discrepancy function are:
-u userid: Specifies the CiscoWorks userid.
-p password
Specifies the password for CiscoWorks userid.
If you want to avoid -p option which will reveal the password in clear text in CLI, you must store
your userid and password in a file and set a variable CMEXPORTFILE which points to this file.
You must maintain this file and control access permissions to prevent unauthorized access. cmexport
looks for current working directory if CMEXPORTFILE is set only to the file name instead of to the
full path.
Table 13-6 Command Description
Argument Can be one of the Following
options -f filename
-d debuglevel
-l logfile

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If you use the -p option, even after setting the CMEXPORTFILE variable, the password is taken
from the command line instead of from CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we recommend
that you do not use this option.
The password must be provided in the file in the following format:
userid password
where userid is the CiscoWorks user name given in the command line. The delimiter between the
userid and password is single blank space.
You must provide the delimiter if the password is blank. Otherwise, cmexport will not validate the
password. The password file can contain multiple entries with different user names. The password
that matches the first user name is considered in case of duplicate entries.
Note If -p password is used, the password is read from the command line instead of
CMEXPORTFILE. This is not secure and we recommend that you do not use this option.
Options
The options you can specify with the Discrepancy function are:
-d debuglevel
Sets the debug level based on which debug information is printed. There are two levels of
debuggingTRACE and DEBUG. If you do not specify the -d option, no logging will occur.
-l logfile
Logs the results of the cmexport command to the specified log file name. By default the command
output will be displayed in the standard output.
-f filename
The file option specifies the filename where the XML output is to be stored. If the filename is not
specified with -f option an XML file of the format timestampDiscrepancy.xml is stored in the
following directory: PX_DATADIR/cmexport/Discrepancy<