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141st year, No.

43 Keeping you current since 1872


Bette Conrad, 84, Fontana Museum hosting workshops
Tuesdays at Two continue at the
Geneva Lake Area Museum, 255
Mill St., with What was so Civil
about the Civil War? on Nov. 4.
Find local trick-or-treat
hours on page 5D of this issue.
GLAF planning new exhibit
On Nov. 21, the Geneva Lake Art
Foundation will open its Winter
Exhibit, All That Glitters. The
opening reception will take place
from 6 to 8 p.m. at their gallery,
647 Main St. Lake Geneva.
Classieds ..................11-12B
Community ..................3-6D
Community Scrapbook ... 4C
Editorial .......................... 1D
Sports............................... 1-3C
TV Listings ................... 5-6C
To subscribe call
(262) 248-4444
OBITUARIES PAGE 3D INDEX COMING ATTRACTIONS
Bulldogs rst playoff appearance
in 10 years
Page 1C
Pie High brings
the thin crust
Page 2A
Bay loses at Potosi A house full of
art and history
Page 1B
Fresh slice
ROBERT IRELAND/REGIONAL NEWS
CINDY GRUENWALD writes a parking ticket on Monday afternoon. The
city council is considering raising the cost of tickets from $12 to $20.
ROBERT IRELAND/REGIONAL NEWS
LAKE GENEVAS NEW ALDERMAN, Richard Hedlund, was appointed
by the city council Oct. 16 to fulll the term of the late Sturges Taggart.
Hedlund and Alderman Bob Kordus represent Lake Genevas District 3.
ROBERT IRELAND/REGIONAL NEWS
CHUCH SCHLEHLEIN goes all out to decorate his home for trick-or-treaters on Halloween. During trick-or-
treating, Schlehlein hides in a casket and jumps out to greet the trick-or-treaters. See more pictures on the
Community Scrapbook, page 4C.
Eugene Drives eerie Halloween house
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Richard Hedlund, Lake Gene-
vas newest alderman, said he
during the next ve months he
wants to kick the tires and take
a test spin of his seat on the city
council.
If it all works out, he said, he
may run for election in spring.
Mayor Jim Connors broke
a 3 to 3 tie on the city council to
appoint Hedlund.
He has a very strong nancial
background, Connors said. And
its good to get some new blood in
this organization.
Hedlund, 368 S. Stone Ridge
Drive, the former of owner of a
General Motors- Buick-Pontiac
dealership in Lake Geneva, was
selected by the city council to ful-
ll the term of the late Sturges
Taggart.
The council vote was 4 to 3,
with Mayor Jim Connors breaking
the councils tie between Hedlund
and former alderman Bill Mott.
Hedlund now runs McHenry
County Investment Services Inc.,
a service of McHenry Savings
Bank, McHenry, Ill.
Hes been with McHenry
County Investment Services for
seven years.
Called at his McHenry ofce,
Hedlund said he considered run-
ning for District 3 alderman in
the 2014 municipal election, but
he pulled back when he saw that
Bob Kordus was running.
He said he thought Kordus
was a good t on the council.
But when the council asked
for resumes from those interested
in lling the vacant District 3
seat, Hedlund said he decided to
submit his application.
I thought I could give it a shot
and Id try it, he said. I think I
can help the city.
Hedlunds rst city council
meeting as a member was Oct. 22.
During the meeting, coun-
cil members debated a projected
$66,000 shortfall between the
proposed city general fund budget
and anticipated revenues.
Hedlund said he didnt intend
to get drawn into the discussion,
but he said he had to speak up
when a council member said city
employees didnt need a pay raise.
Hedlund said he was against
across-the-board wage increases,
but people who do a good job
deserve a raise.
Hedlund to try out council seat
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Parking nes may take a
bigger bite out of tardy motor-
ists wallets, and residents may
see the cost of their beach passes
increase from free to $3 per beach
pass per season under a budget
proposal reviewed and approved
by the Lake Geneva City Council
on Monday
The public hearing on the
budget will be 5 p.m. Nov. 17.
Meanwhile, raises for full-
time city employees will amount
to no more than 1.5 percent over
last year.
The council convened in a
special session Oct. 22 to review
the proposed 2015 budget. The
spending plan was shaped during
a series of workshops and special
meetings.
The proposed city general
fund budget is $8.3 million.
But at the bottom line, the
proposal was still out of balance
by $66,422.
City Administrator Dennis
Jordan told council members
at the Oct. 22 meeting that
the department heads were
instructed to hold budget pro-
posals to a zero increase this year.
We had cut everything to
acceptable levels to keep the ser-
vices we have, said Jordan.
Jordan also said that the city
administration was considering a
2 percent raise for employees in
2015, which would cost another
$100,000.
Expenses have gone up, said
Alderman Dennis Lyon, who
chairs the nance committee.
Council reviews proposed city budget
Parking nes may jump 66 percent
PLEASE SEE BUDGET PAGE 11A
PLEASE SEE HEDLUND PAGE 10A
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
With no discussion and a
quick, unanimous vote, the Lake
Geneva City Council on Monday
cleared away the downtown color
barrier.
The citys downtown zoning
ordinance which dated from the
middle 1990s, banned primary
colors, dened as red, blue, green
and yellow, from the downtown.
The city council of nearly 20
years ago approved the downtown
color code to preserve its historic
look and prevent any garish out-
siders from gaining access.
When the new Bricks & Mortar
store at 222 Center St., rst
opened, its facade was painted a
demur shade of light gray.
But strikingly red doors and
awnings accented the otherwise
subdued color scheme.
Most observers said the com-
bination was pleasing to the eye.
It was not, however, pleasing
to the citys zoning ordinance.
The offending doors and
awnings have been shrouded in
gray cloth awaiting the citys deci-
sion on its old color restrictions..
Meanwhile, the original Brick
& Mortar faade had some strong
supporters who went before the
pan commission.
They wanted to see that red
again.
During the September plan
commission meeting, City Planner
Michael Slavney of Vandewalle &
Associates, Madison, said his staff
reviewed nearly 8,000 shades of
red, blue, yellow and green.
In his rewrite of the zoning
ordinance, he rst struck the term
primary colors, because they
were not adequately dened.
Slavney adapted the PAN-
TONE Process Color System
Guide to provide a chromatic ref-
erence for allowed and forbidden
colors for the zoning administra-
tor to follow.
Council removes
citys color barrier
PLEASE SEE COLORS PAGE 10A
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brings
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ance
otosi
Thursday, October 30, 2014
$1.50 lakegenevanews.net
2A | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
*Oil change offer good for up to 5 quarts of non-synthetic oil. See service department for other details and restrictions.
Pie High opens second location
in crowded Lake Geneva market
Thin crust za joins LG pizza scene
By Edwin Scherzer
For Lake Geneva Regional News
The pizza business in Lake
Geneva is about as crowded as
Main Street during any weekend
festival.
When you consider local
favorites, major national chains
in town, take and bake concepts
within driving distance, its not
easy for a newcomer trying to get
a piece of the pie.
Pie High Pizza owner John
Karabas apparently hasnt
noticed or if he has, he doesnt
sound like hes concerned.
I have never really worried
about major chains or really any
other restaurant for that matter,
he said. My dad told me a long
time ago that if you pay close
attention to what you are doing,
you wont have to worry about
the other guys.
Born in DesPlaines, Ill.,
and transplanted to Wisconsin,
Karabas, 54, knows a thing or
two about pizza and the restau-
rant business.
Karabas, a 1983 Carthage
graduate, has worked in the
industry for more than 30 years,
and owned four pizza stores
in Chicago under the name of
Tomato Head Pizza Kitchen.
Karabas sold all of them in
2008 and moved to his summer
cottage in Williams Bay.
The family decided to stay
in Williams Bay until 2010 then
moved to Fontana. Following the
move, Karabas opened Pie High
Pizza.
The restaurant serves pizza,
calzones, salads and more and
was an instant hit with their thin
crust recipe. Opening the second
location this summer in Lake
Geneva, 820 Williams St., was
prompted out of a need Karabas
recognized.
We were getting a lot of calls
to our Fontana store for deliver-
ies into Lake Geneva which we
could do from there, Karabas
said.
To be sure, Karabas has been
successful, in a timeframe where
the economy wasnt the greatest
and in an industry with tough
competition.
The restaurateur also recog-
nizes, if he wanted to just make
money he could have stayed in
the Windy City where volume of
sales is greater, and operating
hours are longer.
When asked if he would stay
with only two locations this time
around, Karabas said, he didnt
have an answer for that.
Im not sure if two restau-
rants are enough, when I sold
my stores down in Chicago I
never thought I would get into
the business again, but God had
other plans for me, he said.
Pie High Pizzas owner is also
a dedicated family guy, spending
whatever spare time he has with
his wife and three children.
Family plays an important
role, which is apparent by just
visiting the company website
where Karabas has posted a per-
manent dedication to his brother
Pete, who passed away at age 39
from cancer.
Two decades have passed
since his first pizza restaurant
opened, and things are different
this time.
In Chicago I was focused on
only one thing and that was to
make money, this time around
its more about the people I am
able to hire and the relationships
I have with them and commu-
nity, Karabas said.
ROBERT IRELAND/REGIONAL NEWS
JOHN KARABAS, owner of Pie High Pizza in Lake Geneva and Fontana,
ips pizza dough last week at his new Lake Geneva location, 820
Williams St. Below, he places his thin-crust pizza in the oven.
COMMUNITY NOTES
WCEDA wants to learn
about local businesses
The Walworth County Eco-
nomic Development Alliance
wants to know about businesses
within the county that go above
and beyond the status quo. There
will be a Business of the Year cat-
egory for businesses that have
demonstrated a commitment to
the community and a desire to
grow within the region. There will
also be an Innovation category
for businesses that have demon-
strated a commitment to innova-
tive practices in various aspects of
business.
A nomination form is avail-
able on the website, walworth-
business.com, and the deadline is
Wednesday, Nov. 5. Awards will
be presented at WCEDAs annual
meeting on Thursday, Nov. 12,
from 11:45 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Grand
Geneva Resort and Spa.
For more information, contact
Derek DAuria at (262) 741-8134.
Genoa Citys Smith
completes basic training
Army Pvt. Sean M. Smith
has graduated from basic combat
training at Fort Jackson, Colum-
bia, S.C. He is the son of Sean and
Valerie M. Smith, Genoa City, and
a 2014 graduate of Badger High
School.
During the nine weeks of
training, the soldier studied the
Army mission, history, tradi-
tion and core values, physical
tness and received instruction
and practice in basic combat
skills, military weapons, chemi-
cal warfare and bayonet training,
drill and ceremony, marching,
rie marksmanship, armed and
unarmed combat, map reading,
eld tactics, military courtesy,
military justice system, basic rst
aid, foot marches and eld train-
ing exercises.
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 3A
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
The annual census of
boats on Geneva Lake seems
to show that boaters had a
few more square feet of ves-
sel-free surface water to play
on this year.
For the third year in a
row, the number of boats and
vessels on Geneva
Lake has declined.
But this year,
the decline was very
noticeable.
The total
number of boats
counted for 2014
was 4,769, down
398, about 7.7 per-
cent, from last
years total of 5,167,
according to the
boat census report from the
Geneva Lake Environmental
Agency.
This years count resulted
in the lowest number of boats
counted since 1998 when
4,764 boats were counted,
according to the boat census
report.
And last years total was
18 below the year before that.
The decline in boats on the
lake started in 2012 when its
total of 5,185 was 46 boats
lower than the 2011 census.
The GLEA and the
Geneva Lake Water Safety
Patrol conduct an annual
boat census usually in late
August or early September.
Geneva Lake covers
5,280 acres. In the past, the
count has come close to, but
never quite reached, one boat
per acre of lake surface.
The numbers from this
years count is also the lowest
census in the past seven
years. The last time the
census was less than 5,000
was 2008, when 4,920 boats
were counted.
The boat census invento-
ries all boats docked, moored
on the lake and stored in off-
lake sites.
Ted Peters, GLEA direc-
tor, said the counters do
not tally boats on the lake
because of the risk of double
counting.
According to
the GLEA, the on-
lake count was done
Aug. 28. Boats in
dry storage were
counted Sept. 1 and
2.
Boats are cat-
egorized into four
groups, motor, sail,
and personal water
craft and other.
Personal watercraft
includes Jet Skis and Wave
Runners. Other includes
kayaks, canoes, rowboats
paddle boards and miscella-
neous.
Motorboats again
accounted for the largest
type of boats at 3,115 boats
or 65 percent of all boats. The
second largest group of boats
were the other with 722 or
15 percent of the boats. Per-
sonal watercraft accounted
for 612 crafts (13 percent)
and sailboats had a count of
320 (7 percent).
Usually, the boat coun-
ters are out when the weather
is cold or rainy and few boats
on the lake, Peters said. The
lower number recorded this
year may in part be due to the
good weather at the time of
the count resulting in more
boats out on the lake than
during past years when the
count was done in cool wet
weather.
However, the boat
census report noted that the
number of empty slips and
buoys, seen this past season,
seemed to indicate that there
were fewer boats on the water
throughout the summer.
Over the past 10 years,
the boat censuses have
wavered around 5,000 boats.
The highest number of boats
counted in the last 16 years
were 5,231 boats in 2011.
The 2014 count found
reductions in all types of
boats. Sail boats had the larg-
est reduction with 121 less
sail boats counted in 2014
than in 2013.
One cause may be that
the Lake Geneva Yacht Club,
which usually houses many
sail boats, is in the process of
major renovations, and not
as many boats were on site as
in years past.
Motorboats decreased
by 95 boats, personal water-
craft decreased by 58 crafts
and others decreased by 125
units.
Fontana had the greatest
number of boats, 1,885 total
with 481 stored off the lake.
Williams Bay had the
second most, 1,038 boats
including 102 boats in off-
lake storage.
Only Williams Bay and
Fontana have off-lake stor-
age that was included in this
count.
Linn South Shore had
the third greatest number of
boats with 989, followed by
Lake Geneva at 598 boats
and Linn North Shore at 259
boats.
Geneva Lake has 112,854
feet of shoreline, with 48 per-
cent of the shoreline in the
town of Linn. Fontana has
19 percent and Williams Bay
and Lake Geneva have 17 and
16 percent respectively.
Boat density can be mea-
sured by feet of shoreline per
boat.
When evaluated with
the inclusion of the off-lake
boats that have access to the
lake it gives an idea of poten-
tial boating pressure. When
evaluated with just the boats
docked on the lake it repre-
sents more of an aesthetic
evaluation, yet can still give
an idea of potential boating
pressure. The 2014 lake-
wide boat density of docked
or moored boats on Geneva
Lake decreased from one
boat every 21.8 feet of shore-
line in 2013 to one boat every
23.7 feet of shoreline.
More room in lake to oat your boat
FILE PHOTO BY CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS
THIS YEARS BOAT census shows a decrease in the number of boats moored and stored
around Geneva Lake. The annual census is conducted by the Geneva Lake Environmental
Agency and the Water Safety Patrol.
Peters
EDUCATION NOTE
Catholic Central hosting open house
Catholic Central High School, Burling-
ton, will host an Open House on Wednesday,
Nov. 5, at 6:30 p.m., beginning in Topper
Hall. Catholic Central faculty and staff will be
available to answer questions and share infor-
mation on what the school has to offer, while
student ambassadors will conduct tours.
Catholic Central is the parish high school
for 17 area parishes, including St. Andrew in
Delavan, St. Benedict in Fontana, St. Francis
de Sales, Lake Geneva, St. John the Evange-
list in Twin Lakes and St. Joseph in Lyons. It
is a co-ed Catholic college prep high school.
Freshman registration takes place beginning
Feb. 2, 2015. Transportation is available in
many areas. Tuition assistance programs are
available for eligible families.
Contact Karen Schwenn in the CCHS
Admissions Ofce at (262) 763.1510, ext. 225
for more information on the registration pro-
cess. Interested families may also contact the
admissions ofce for individual tours at any
time.
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4A | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Tyler August is running
for his third term as state
representative from the 32nd
District.
August has been loyal
to the 32nd District, even
moving from Walworth
to Lake Geneva when the
districts boundaries were
redrawn.
August was in
the state Legislature
during the heady
days of Republi-
can dominance in
the Legislature and
governors ofce,
and the Assembly
and Senate passed
Act 10 and then
reshaped the state
laws, government
and budget more to their
liking.
August said the GOP
is poised to do more after
this coming election, fully
expecting to maintain their
dominance in both houses
and hang on to the governors
mansion.
He said the state is now
on the right track, with
unemployment statewide
on decline and cuts to both
income and property taxes.
August is holding up the
states recent climb to fourth
among the 11 midwestern
states in job creation. He
touted gures from the state
Department of Workforce
Development which reported
the creation of 8,400 Wis-
consin jobs in September.
Those who believe in
sound scal management
should expect more, he said.
The Republican-domi-
nated Legislature wants to
keep property taxes under
control, said August.
This time, the legislature
is considering a statewide
reduction of 70 cents on the
technical school property tax
rate.
August said the state now
has a cash balance of a half
billion dollars. The state has
already enacted tax cuts of
$2 billion.
And the state has $300
million in its rainy day fund,
a budget line item for funds to
pay for emergency expenses.
He said hes now looking
forward to more tax
cuts to come out of
Madison.
Its danger-
ous to keep money
around Madison,
because it tends to
get spent, he said.
A supporter of
the two-year tuition
freeze for the Uni-
versity of Wiscon-
sin system, August
said he would like to see
that freeze extended. And
he would like to extend the
tuition freeze to the technical
schools, as well.
August said he supports
a state constitutional amend-
ment, on the Nov. 4 ballot,
which would limit transpor-
tation fund use to creating
and maintaining highway
and highway infrastructure.
The transportation fund
is nanced with proceeds
mainly from the state gas tax
and car registration fees.
While budget cutting and
trimming may seem to be
the rage in Madison, August
said he is also proud that the
GOP in Madison was able
to increase funding by $150
per student this year for all
schools in the state.
The increase went around
the usual state education aid
formula to ensure that all
school districts got the same
per-pupil boost, he said.
August said he also favors
putting more into the states
Department of Tourism.
Studies show that every
dollar we put into tourism
we get $6 back into the econ-
omy, said August. And thats
just through state and local
taxes.
Michigan nances its
tourism department at $40
million, said August. Wis-
consins Department of Tour-
ism gets $16 million a bien-
nium.
Were certainly getting
outspent by our neighbors,
he said.
August also claims
that the legislatures recent
changes to the states current
health care system elimi-
nated the waiting list for
Badger Care.
August agreed that
68,000 people lost their
access to Badger Care
when the state tightened its
requirements for enlisting in
the state health care system
from 200 percent to 100 per-
cent of the federal poverty
level.
But August said those
68,000 are now able to get
their insurance through the
federal Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act
insurance exchanges.
Basically, were cover-
ing more people through our
system, he said.
August said he was aware
that Lake Geneva city council
members and the mayor are
in favor of a premier resort
designation. State law limits
premier resort designations
to communities that have 40
percent of its property value
devoted to tourism, or those
endorsed by their local leg-
islators. Most communities
designated premier resort
communities were endorsed
by their local legislators.
But August said he isnt
sure thats the right path.
If the city were to enact
a half-percent sales tax, it
wouldnt just be a tax on
people who visit here, but
the locals would pay it, too,
August said. I just havent
been convinced that its the
way to go. I dont want to see
the people who live here pay
additional taxes.
If a sales tax is approved
by Lake Geneva, wouldnt
that drive business from
Lake Geneva to Delavan,
where there is no sales tax?
he asked.
He said he is looking at
ways to free up some addi-
tional liquor licenses for Lake
Geneva. I think theres ways
to do it without hurting cur-
rent license holders, he said.
August aims for third term
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
Al Kupsik doesnt believe
that local state representa-
tives are doing their jobs.
My biggest concern is
that we do not get the proper
amount of representation for
our little towns and cities
along the Illinois border,
Kupsik said in a recent inter-
view.
Kupsik is the
Democratic can-
didate for the
32nd Assembly
District seat, held
by Republican
incumbent Tyler
August.
A Lake Geneva
alderman and
president of the
Lake Geneva City
Council, Kupsik said the city
hasnt been getting any sat-
isfaction trying to work with
August about room taxes,
liquor licenses and getting
Lake Geneva declared a pre-
mier resort location.
In somewhat conserva-
tive Lake Geneva, (however,
the city did go for Obama in
2012) it might come as a sur-
prise to some that Kupsik is a
Democrat.
But it runs in the family,
Kupsik said.
Ive always been a Dem-
ocrat. Im from Chicago,
Kupsik said. He said his
father was a Democratic pre-
cinct captain in Chicago.
Since moving to Lake
Geneva 21 years ago, Kupsik
said party was never an issue
because he ran in nonparti-
san elections.
Kupsik said that, should
he be elected, his priorities
would be economic develop-
ment, education, tourism,
having Lake Geneva declared
a premier resort, and some
changes to the states room
tax and liquor license
laws.
He sticks to the
Democratic side
when talking about
state issues.
Locally, having
Lake Geneva
declared a premier
resort is important,
Kupsik said. If the
city gets that designa-
tion, it may go to the
voters on a binding referen-
dum, asking for permission
to impose up to a half percent
sales tax.
Because the citys Class B
liquor licenses are all issued,
no new restaurants want to
locate in Lake Geneva, he
said.
Getting the premier
resort designation would
help the city make the case
that it doesnt have enough
liquor licenses, Kupsik said.
Perhaps the most divisive
act by the Republican domi-
nated Wisconsin-Legislature
was the passage of Act 10,
which eliminated most of the
public employees collective
bargaining abilities.
But Kupsik said he
doesnt see that legislation
being reversed all at once
should the majorities in the
state Assembly and Senate
turn around.
Kupsik said hes not sure
that Act 10 can be completely
reversed, at least not all at
once.
From a government
stand point, its been a suc-
cess, Kupsik said. Its put
the responsibility on local
units of government to pro-
duce employee handbooks,
he said.
Act 10 is already in place.
Its already there, he said. It
will be up to future legisla-
tures to make the best of it.
What needs to be
reversed, are the cuts to edu-
cation, Kupsik said.
The legislature cut 15.8
percent from school budgets
between 2008 and now,
he said. And another cut is
coming.
Kupsik said he talked
with Warren Flitcroft,
nance director for the Lake
Geneva school districts.
The schools are desper-
ate, said Kupsik. They keep
cutting and cutting.
Kupsik said he under-
stands the need to keep the
budget under control, but
cutting education is prob-
ably not the right way.
Kupsik said hes also in
favor of a nonpartisan redis-
tricting system, even if that
requires a change in the state
constitution.
Finally, Kupsik said that
women should be paid the
same for the same work done
as a man.
He is in favor of equal pay
for equal work.
Being paid 25 cents an
hour less because youre a
woman doesnt make much
sense to me, he said.
Kupsik runs as Democrat
Race for 32nd Assembly District
A new generation of onlineTV for theLakeGenevaarea
Catch all the sneak previews
of where to dine, shop, stay & play
Currently playing on ReelLifeTV.net
August Kupsik
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NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
City of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin
November 4, 2014
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at an election to be held in the City of
Lake Geneva, Walworth County on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, the following
proposed question will be submitted to a vote of the people:
Shall the City of Lake Geneva, Walworth County, Wisconsin, be autho-
rized to spend an amount not to exceed $6,999,995.00 to construct a public
parking structure on tax parcels ZOP00250 and ZOP00251 located at 818
Geneva Street which amount includes all costs to acquire lands and ease-
ments, relocate existing infrastructure, demolish existing infrastructure,
and to construct the public parking structure paid for by funds from the
Tax Incremental District #4?
Te question will appear on the ballot as follows:
Shall the City of Lake Geneva, Walworth County, Wisconsin, be autho-
rized to spend an amount not to exceed $6,999,995.00 to construct a public
parking structure on tax parcels ZOP00250 and ZOP00251 located at 818
Geneva Street which amount includes all costs to acquire lands and ease-
ments, relocate existing infrastructure, demolish existing infrastructure,
and to construct the public parking structure paid for by funds from the
Tax Incremental District #4?
Yes No
EXPLANATION
A Yes vote will authorize the City of Lake Geneva to construct the public
parking structure.
A No vote will prohibit the City of Lake Geneva to construct the public
parking structure.
Given under my hand, and the Great Seal of the City of
Lake Geneva, County of Walworth,
State of Wisconsin, this 27th day of October, 2014
/s/ Sabrina Waswo, City Clerk
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 5A
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
The former Traver Hotel, 323
Broad St., is now in a legal limbo.
Sold to former owner John
Klug and mortgage holder at an
Oct. 2 sheriffs sale, conrmation
of the sale is on hold.
Klug appeared to have regained
possession of the building with an
uncontested bid of $185,000 plus
$34,482 in back property taxes.
The conrmation hearing set
for Oct. 28 was cancelled, and Wal-
worth County Judge Phillip Koss is
now trying to arrange a new hear-
ing at the request of attorney Scott
Connors of Wauwatosa, who is
representing 323 Broad Properties
LLC and its agent, Keith Venturi of
Barrington, Ill.
A spokeswoman from Koss
ofce said no rm date has been set
yet, but it appears the hearing will
be rescheduled to early December.
Venturi bought the Traver
from Klug in 2004 for a reported
$469,000.
According to court documents
led Oct. 20, Connors says he also
represents Barrington Bank &
Trust and VP Construction LLC,
both of which have liens against
the property.
In his challenge to the conr-
mation hearing, Connors claims
that he was not properly notied
of the sheriffs sale or conrmation
hearing and requested that it be
rescheduled.
He also challenges a Walworth
County judges opinion that the
construction lien held by VP Con-
struction was inferior to the mort-
gage held by Klug.
Key to the challenge is a dis-
agreement over the fair market
value of the 140-year-old struc-
ture.
Connors claims that the sale
price offered by Klug and accepted
as the high bid, is actually well
below the fair market value of the
property.
According to court documents,
Connors says that the property
was sold by Klug to Keith Venturi
Figures provided by Connors
indicate that the buildings value is
$550,000, well above the $185,000
bid by Klug at the sheriffs sale. The
supporting appraisal was done by
L.A. Duesterbeck & Associates
Inc., Janesville. The appraisal is
dated Sept. 29, 2008.
The Duesterbeck appraisal,
signed by Linn Duesterbeck, con-
cludes that the building is in fair to
poor condition, the interior needs
complete redevelopment and an
elevator and sprinkler system need
to be installed.
According to Duesterbeck, the
owner (Venturi) indicated that the
building would need between $3
million and $4 million in renova-
tions. However, Klug, through his
attorney Richard Torhorst, led
a differing appraisal by local real
estate broker Sal Dimiceli, which
shows the fair market value at
$275,000. While the report itself
is not dated, two supporting docu-
ments in the appraisal bear the
date Oct. 16, 2014.
According to the Dimiceli
appraisal, the building is consid-
ered near or at condemnation.
The appraisal report also notes the
city of Lake Geneva would like to
see it razed.
County tax records led with
the court indicate that property
taxes totaling $34,428 are due on
the property for the years 2011,
2012 and 2013. The documents
also note that $7,311 is also due as
of January 2014.
The property is assessed at
$282,900 with an estimated fair
market value of $298,000.
Klug added the $34,428 taxes
due to his $185,000 bid at the sher-
iffs sale.
Included in the Duesterbeck
appraisal are some facts about the
former Traver:
The chalet-style four-story
building encompasses 14,306
square feet on a 7,208 square foot
site.
Historically, the building was
a 68-unit hotel, with its average
room size at 125 square feet. There
is dedicated parking for four vehi-
cles.
The building has 106 feet of
frontage on Broad Street and is in
an area zoned for general business.
In his 2008 report, Duester-
beck notes that there had been
little or no updating of the building
in 35 to 50 years.
He lists the highest and best
use as a 20-suite hotel with a res-
taurant and retail on the rst level.
According the Lake Geneva
Regional News archives, the build-
ing was built in 1870 by Benjamin
Fish who opened it as the Union
House hotel.
The Union House was later
enlarged when a vacant building
was moved from Main Street along
side the Union House and the two
structures were connected.
Since 1870, the building has
been known as the Garrison
House, the Hotel Denison and the
Traver Hotel. Mrs. Travers home-
made pies reportedly made the
Traver name famous.
The building was used as a
retirement home for missionaries
for a number of years, but it ceased
being a residence of any kind about
2000.
It has sat vacant since then.
After buying the building
in 2004, Venturi did repair and
cleanup on the building, but he
was never able to nd a renter to
occupy the structure.
Conrmation of Traver sale delayed
Attorney contests sale of old hotel
COMMUNITY
FILE PHOTO BY JOY KOWALD/REGIONAL NEWS
THE FORMER TRAVER Hotel, 323 Broad St., was sold at a sheriffs sale,
but that sale is being contested.
Workshop on Braving the
Holidays
The holiday season can be
the most difcult time of year for
people who have experienced the
death of a loved one. Mercy Hos-
pice Care is hosting a workshop
called Braving the Holidays
where guests learn ways to pre-
pare themselves for the upcoming
holiday season and nd the com-
forting support of others facing
the same challenges.
The workshop will meet
Thursday, Nov. 6, at 6 p.m., at
Mercy Walworth Hospital and
Medical Center, lower level com-
munity education room A, N2950
State Highway 67, at the corner of
Sate Highway 50. The workshop
is free and open to the public. To
learn more or to RSVP, call (888)
39-MERCY. For more informa-
tion, visit MercyHospiceCare.org.
Fontanas Doreza
performing in Philadelphia
William Doreza, Fontana, will
perform Gustav Mahlers choral
masterwork Symphony No. 2
Resurrection with the Philadel-
phia Orchestra, conducted by Yan-
nick Nezet-Seguin, at the Kimmel
Center in Philadelphia on Oct 30,
Nov. 1 and 2. They will also per-
form at Carnegie Hall in New York
on Friday, Oct. 31.
Dodreza is a student at West-
minster Choir College of Rider
University in Princeton, N.J.
Wasser joins soccer team
Nate Wasser, Lake Geneva, a
junior, is a member of the Wiscon-
sin Lutheran College mens soccer
team.
Wisconsin Lutheran, Milwau-
kee, prepares students for lives of
Christian leadership and is recog-
nized for its academic excellence
and superior student experience.
~ VOTE ~
NO!
Paid for by residents against wasteful spending,
Treasurer Frank Marsala, 1823 Conant St., Lake Geneva, WI 53147
$7 MILLION PARKING GARAGE
Referendum, Nov. 4th
* 20 years and Millions Spent on T.I.D. Tell
City Hall it is time to close the T.I.D. and
Return Millions of Your Taxes $$ Back to
ALL the Tax Payers.
* $30K Per Stall-Occupied for 8 hours per
day for 125 days of Summer and Special
Events. $1000.00 Recovery Per Year for
30 Years. Smart Spending???
* Full Time Solution for Part Time Problem.
*$1000.00 For Every Resident in Lake Geneva.
Lake Genevas Road To Nowhere
Authorized and paid for by Alan Kupsik
6A | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014 October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 7A
The Proposed Luke Genevu Purking Guruge: Whut oes It Meun Ior You?
Why do we need u urkIng sLrucLure?
An IndeendenL urkIng sLudy deLermIned LhuL uke Genevu Is currenLIy uL u
oInL where Lhe euk seuson Lrumc und urkIng Issues ure drIvIng downLown
busIness cusLomers uwuy. ThIs urkIng shorLuge resuILs In downLown grIdIock,
Lrumc congesLIon und un overow oI urkIng In resIdenLIuI ureus.
Why uL LhIs IocuLIon und why Iour IeveIs?
ThIs IocuLIon Is wILhIn Lwo bIocks or Iess oI u mujorILy oI Lhe downLown ureu, Lhe
beuch, Lhe IukeIronL und Lhe RIvIeru whIch ure Lhe rImury druws Ior Lhe CILy. n
uddILIon, Lhe CILy uIreudy owns Lhe roerLy. The sLrucLure wouId be Iour IeveIs
In order Lo geL Lhe greuLesL vuIue Irom Lhe sILe whIIe sLuyIng wILhIn CILy zonIng
heIghL resLrIcLIons. One rum Is u beLLer oLIon Lhun muILIIe surIuce IoLs.
How Is Lhe CILy goIng Lo uy Ior Lhe conLrucLIon oI Lhe
sLrucLure und whuL wIII be Lhe ImucL on my Luxes?
There currenLIy Is sumcIenL IundIng wILhIn Lhe exIsLIng Tux ncremenLuI DIsLrIcL
#q (TD #q) Lo consLrucL Lhe urkIng sLrucLure. ThuL meuns no new Luxes Ior
uke Genevu resIdenLs.
sn`L Lhe urkIng sLrucLure jusL Ior LourIsLs und downLown
busIness owners?
No, Lhe sLrucLure Is Ior everyone drIvIng u vehIcIe. The mosL sIgnIhcunL benehL
Lo Lhe resIdenLs wouId be Lo reduce Lhe urkIng LhuL now LIes u mujor orLIons
oI Lhe sLreeL urkIng In Lhe resIdenLIuI neIghborhoods Lo Lhe norLh und wesL oI
downLown durIng euk erIods. The sLrucLure couId uIso be used by CenLruIJ
DenIson durIng Lhe o seuson.
WIII u Iour-IeveI urkIng sLrucLure In Lhe downLown
desLroy Lhe CILy`s smuII Lown churucLer und churm?
The sLrucLure Iucude Is desIgned Lo comIemenL Lhe neIghborhood und
surroundIng MuIe Purk hIsLorIc dIsLrIcL. The heIghL wouId be sImIIur Lo Lhe
hIsLorIc undmurk BuIIdIng where KIIwIn`s Is IocuLed und Lhe Iormer BurLon`s
where KeeIe`s downLown omce Is IocuLed.
There Is u need!
Everyone knows Lhere Is u urkIng shorLuge. Everyone. The urkIng guruge
Is Lhe besL oorLunILy Lo Imrove LhIs sILuuLIon Ior resIdenLs und everyone
who works In downLown uke Genevu.

HeIIng Lhe busIness communILy Is heIIng yourseII!
Yes, Lhe urkIng guruge wIII benehL downLown busInesses. ThuL`s where
uImosL o%oI Lhe CILy oI uke Genevu revenue Is generuLed. gnorIng
Lhe urkIng sILuuLIon weukens Lhe busIness envIronmenL resuILIng In Iess
revenue Irom roerLy Luxes, user Iees, room Lux, Lhe RIvIeru, beuch und
urkIng Iees. ThuL meuns resIdenLs huve Lo uy more In roerLy Luxes und
user Iees or vuIuubIe servIces wIII huve Lo be cuL.

The PurkIng Guruge Is uIreudy uId Ior!
The IundIng Ior u urkIng guruge wus seL usIde yeurs ugo. There won`L be
uny new Luxes. MuInLenunce cosLs wIII be uId Ior by urkIng revenue.

L wIII muke u dIerence!
The uddILIonuI urkIng suces wIII rovIde ImmedIuLe reIIeI Lo urkIng
shorLuges on euk duys by 6%und wIII reduce Lrumc congesLIon In
resIdenLIuI ureus LhroughouL Lhe yeur.

The CosL oI DoIng NoLhIng.
The robIem won`L go uwuy becuuse we choose Lo Ignore IL.
The cosL oI buIIdIng u urkIng guruge wIII onIy geL more exensIve.
The IundIng suved u Lo uy Ior Lhe urkIng guruge wIII be IosL.
QuuIILy oI IIIe Ior uke Genevu resIdenLs suers.

VoLe YES on Lhe November qLh ReIerendum
A heulthy tourism industry lowers property tues und generutes tu
revenues thut suve tupuyers neurly $gqo per household.
Visitors spent $q,,.g, Million in Wulworth County lust yeur.
Most Irequently Asked Questions Why Residents Should Vote "Yes!
eL`s suy u IumIIy oI Lhree goes onu Lhree nIghL vucuLIon
Louke Genevu. They urrIve by cur undsLuy uL u resorL
Ior IodgIng, dIne uL IocuI resLuurunLs, sho, Luke u bouL
cruIse, muybe goII or Lry u su LreuLmenL, undvIsIL muny
oLher busInesses us Lhey exIore Lhe ureu.
The doIIurs Lhey send uL Lhese
busInesses In our communILy ure
re-cIrcuIuLed buck InLo Lhe IocuI
und sLuLe economIes und dIrecLIy
benehL oLher reIuLed IndusLrIes.
ExumIes IncIude medIcuI,
consLrucLIon, LechnoIogy,
munuIucLurIng, ugrIcuILure, Iood
rocessIng und oLher servIce
IndusLrIes LhuL reIy on LourIsm
Ior LheIr growLh und sLubIIILy.
The muILIIIer benehLs vIrLuuIIy everyone In
WuIworLh CounLy by generuLIng Lux revenues,
whIch heI uy Ior our rouds, schooIs, rogrums
Ior Lhe dIsubIed und eIderIy und more. VIsILors
generuLed $1. bIIIIon In sLuLe und IocuI revenue
und $1 bIIIIon In IederuI Luxes In zo1, suving
Wisconsin tupuyers neurly $gqo per
household.
TruveI sendIng uIso heIs suorL hIsLorIcuI ureus, urL guIIerIes und museums und muny cuILuruI und
communILy evenLs. So, even II Lhose doIIurs weren`L senL uL u busIness dIrecLIy, IL cun sLIII benehL Irom Lhe
osILIve rIIe eecLs oI LhuL sendIng.
Ior more inIormution, visit
Authorized und puid Ior by the Luke Genevu Chumber oI Commerce und the
Luke Genevu Business Improvement istrict. Jesse Jucobs, Treusurer.
hLL:JJbIL.IyJIgurkIngguruge
www.cILyoukegenevu.com
c
m

In
8A | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
Genoa City, Linn leaders take on Bloomeld becoming village, how it affected their communities
Incorporation taught neighbors valuable lessons
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
Editors note: This is part of a series
looking at the village of Bloomeld incor-
poration from the perspectives of key of-
cials in different areas. A story was pub-
lished in last weeks Regional News about
the effects of incorporation from the point
of view of leaders in the town and village
of Bloomeld.
Communication. Ingenuity.
Those were the things Bill Antti and
Jim Weiss, respectively, said they learned
from Bloomelds effort to incorporate a
12-square-mile region as a village, which
was successful in December 2011.
Antti is village president in Genoa City,
south of the town of Bloomeld. Weiss is
chairman of the town of Linn, west of the
town of Bloomeld.
They offered their thoughts and how
the matter relates to their communities in
recent telephone interviews.
Genoa City was one of several parties,
along with the city of Lake Geneva, the
Joint 1 School District and others, which
led a motion to intervene in the effort by
the village of Bloomeld to mass annex the
remaining town.
The annexation attempt was denied by
a Walworth County Circuit Court judge in
February 2013.
I think the whole thing would have
gone better had there been more dis-
cussion between the proposed village of
Bloomeld, the town, Genoa City and Lake
Geneva, Antti said. I think its a matter
of communication. That was really impor-
tant for all parties involved.
He also said everybody should have
been more open to communication.
Weiss had a different take.
I think it was very creative, the way
they carved out their section to incorpo-
rate. Its a creative way to think outside the
box.
In the mid 2000s, town of Linn of-
cials including Weiss,
who was then a supervi-
sor discussed the pos-
sibility of incorporation.
Talks eventually
died, Weiss said.
But given that the
incorporation in Bloom-
eld was a success, is it
something the town of
Linn may soon recon-
sider?
I personally am not a proponent of
(incorporation) for the town of Linn, he
said.
Town of Linn
Why not?
Well, were a unique community.
When it was looked at last time, the stum-
bling block was you have to provide a
city center to all residents.
Weiss said Geneva Lake cuts the town
into two sections known as the north
and south shore regions. Geographically,
the southern region is the largest. Thats
where Zenda is, the location of the town
hall, post ofce and police department.
There also are several businesses in
and around Zenda. Two school districts
and the re and EMS department are
located in Linns south shore region.
So, say, for example, that (the city
center) would be Zenda, Weiss said. We
are unable to provide that (center) to all
residents because of the way our township
is split up. We are not contiguous.
But what about just incorporating the
area of Zenda?
Weiss said he is personally opposed to
that because, to me, the north shore resi-
dents are just as important as the south
shore residents.
Id hate to have two factions in the
town of Linn.
State law allows cities and villages to
annex land, at a property owners request,
from nearby towns.
Is that something
Weiss is concerned
about?
Its always a con-
cern, and in the back
of your mind, he said.
Then, he gave one poten-
tial reason why land
owners may ask nearby
incorporated commu-
nities the village of
Fontana or Lake Geneva
to be annexed. We currently dont have
sewer and water, and it appears we wont
in the near future.
How does the town address the con-
cern? Keeping a low tax base, Weiss said.
Currently, Linns mil rate is about
$1.40 per $1,000 of equalized value.
It appears good working relationships
with neighbors also plays a factor.
Weiss feels Linn works well with Lake
Geneva, Fontana, the village of Williams
Bay and the town of Bloomeld.
He said, recently, the Linn Town Board
approved a road agreement with Lake
Geneva. When the city annexed about 710
acres of former Linn land, that included
the northern side of Willow Road.
The southern side of the road remained
in the town of Linn, Weiss said. But what
happened was the town only maintained
and plowed that side of the road, while the
city only plowed and maintained the north
side.
It appears Linn and Lake Geneva of-
cials reached a solution.
They will now maintain and plow all
of Wilmot Road, and we will maintain and
plow all of Willow Road, Weiss said. Its
a 10-year agreement.
Why did incorporation talks die in
Linn?
Partly because of the geographical sit-
uation, Weiss said, but also because of the
change in economy.
There was activity in the building
trades, (more) annexations but every-
thing slowed down and there was no
longer that volume of building we were
seeing. So, the incorporation talks (fell) to
the wayside.
Genoa City
Anttis village was in a more adver-
sarial position around the time of Bloom-
elds incorporation requests. He was a
trustee when Genoa City actively opposed
the attempts to create the village of Bloom-
eld.
We kind of felt Bloomeld, the village,
was overreaching (in its borders). It just
seemed like they were trying to gather all
that they could.
Early incorporation proposals would
have had the village of Bloomeld abut
Genoa Citys borders. Antti said that would
have landlocked his village, thereby lim-
iting future growth options.
But a region of the town of Bloomeld
remains between the two villages.
Theres a kind of natural buffer,
because theres a (wetland) in between us
that acts as a natural border line, Antti
said.
There are, however, no active annexa-
tion plans for that region of the town
that Antti was aware of. Neither was Ken
Monroe, president of the village of Bloom-
eld, or town of Bloomeld chairman Dan
Schoonover when they were interviewed in
mid October.
How did the incorporation affect
Genoa City?
Antti thought it put a strain on his vil-
lages relations with Bloomeld at the time
the incorporation process was running its
course. Now, things have settled down,
he said. Right now, were ne, I think.
The only effect Antti saw from Bloom-
elds incorporation was that it added a
third partner in the joint re department.
When asked if that was good or bad, he
said it was neither.
We split the (re department) costs,
but essentially, its the same costs whether
theres a village or not.
Weiss Antti
SCHOOL NOTES
Stetter receives training
Cortney Stetter, Williams Bay, a junior
psychology major, and Kelton Oberle, Elk-
horn, a sophomore occupational safety and
health major, have been trained and certi-
ed to be UW-Whitewater resident assis-
tants for the 2014-15 academic year.
The purpose of the resident assistants
is to generate a community in the residence
halls, help new students adjust to campus
and create a sense of unity among all resi-
dents. To hold the position, applicants must
have a strong academic record and complete
several interviews with their peers and fac-
ulty members. Although the process seems
difcult, the premier leadership experience
available is priceless.
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
2014 JOINT & CRACK CLEANING & SEALING
Sealed proposals will be accepted by the City of Lake Geneva in the City
Clerks of ce at 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin until Tursday,
November 6, 2014, at 10:00 A.M. for Joint & Crack Cleaning & Sealing, as
specifed in these bid documents. Award by the Common Council is expected
on Monday, November 10, 2014.
Proposals must be sealed and submitted on the attached proposal form and
returned clearly marked with date and time of opening. No undated, unsigned,
or faxed proposals will be considered.
Bidders shall submit pre-qualifcation packet prior to the opening of bids.
All bids shall be F.O.B. destination, prepaid and allowed to the job site with
no charges for packing or cartage.
Te City reserves the right to reject any or all proposals and to accept any
proposal deemed most advantageous to the City of Lake Geneva.
Copies of bidding documents are available in the City Clerks of ce for
viewing.
Te City of Lake Geneva is exempt from Federal Excise Tax and State Sales
Tax; therefore, proposals should be made exclusive of these taxes. A Tax Ex-
emption Certifcate and/or Tax Exemption Registry number will be furnished
to the successful proposer.
Venders must complete the enclosed insurance questionnaire with propos-
al. Requirements are: $1,000,000 General Liability, Workers Compensation -
Statutory Limits, $5,000,000 Employers Liability.
Successful bidder shall properly hold the City of Lake Geneva harmless
from all damages occurring in any way by his acts or negligence, or that of his
employees, agents or workers. Insurance questionnaire shall be submitted with
your proposal.
A current Certifcate of Insurance will be required of the successful vendor.
Contractor to include any clarifcations to the specifcation in his proposal.
Proposed price shall be all-inclusive for Joint & Crack Cleaning & Sealing.
Published by authority of the City of Lake Geneva.
BY ORDER OF: JAMES CONNORS
MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
SABRINA WASWO
CITY CLERK
PREPARED BY: DANIEL S. WINKLER, P.E.
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA &
THE LAKE GENEVA UTILITY COMMISSION
361 WEST MAIN STREET
LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147 (T) (262) 248-2311
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 9A
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
Outside-the-box thinking strives for more efciency
Meet Linns new highway superintendent
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
LINN Change is good, said Dan
Pitt, the towns new highway superintendent.
Change is hard, but change is good.
Pitt, 53, likes to think outside the box.
Sometimes, solving a problem only requires
a different viewpoint, he said.
Pitt takes that approach at his new job,
and at his other one. He joined the town re
department in 2004, and since 2011, has
served as rst assistant re chief.
The most recent example of thinking out-
side the box to solve a problem is the reboat
idea.
Pitt worked on the boat proposal with
re chief Jason Smith. The boat is expected
to arrive in early November.
The problem improve emergency
response times from the south shore of Linn
to the north shore. Rather than ght trafc
by driving around the Geneva Lake, a boat
allows reghters and EMTs the ability to
cut across the lake.
The re boat proposal is a shining exam-
ple of how thinking outside the box can be
benecial, said Pitt.
In August, he said it addresses another
problem. The concept behind this is its a
oating hydrant. Thats what I used to sell
this. Linn doesnt have any hydrants, so when
you think about it, its a pretty easy sell.
Theres another advantage to having Pitt
as town highway superintendent, which is a
daytime job. Linn chairman Jim Weiss said
Pitt can respond to calls easier than most
reghters and EMTs.
With our volunteer re department,
calls at night are easy to respond to, due to
a larger number of people working a day
schedule, said Weiss.
During the day, its more challenging to
answer calls because volunteers are at work.
Having Pitt as town highway superintendent
gives us someone we know can answer and
respond to calls during the duration of the
day, said Weiss.
Pitt said he brings an emergency kit bag
every time he hops into a highway depart-
ment vehicle.
Is that why he got the job?
Sort of. When asked what gave Pitt the
advantage over the other three applicants for
the superintendents job, Weiss said, Dan
has been with the town of Linn for quite
some time.
He said Pitt has worked for the town
highway department for the past several
years. Through his highway and re depart-
ment experiences, Pitt is very familiar with
our neighborhoods.
But Pitt guessed that board members
may have also selected him because of his
high level of passion.
I think theyre happy that my passion
will spill into the highway department, which
it does. I treat the highway department like I
do the re department.
Where does that passion come from?
OCD, laughed Pitt. No, its a really good
feeling to have a sense of accomplishment. I
dont need a pat on the back, but I know when
Im doing something good for people.
Background
While he may be a familiar face at the re
departments annual pig roast or from driv-
ing snow plows in the winter, Pitts fallen in
love with a town he adopted after a series of
changes.
Originally, from Wheeling, Ill., Pitt
moved near Wilmot when he was in high
school. After he graduated in 1979, he
became a carpenter.
I always loved building stuff. I was really
good.
Then, in 2006, the economy went belly
up. Pitt was laid off, but he found part-time
work at highway departments in the towns
of Geneva and Linn. Each municipality has
their own way of doing stuff. That diversity
was kind of fun.
Last year, Pitt started full-time in the
Linn department.
What does he see that needs to be
changed?
Our snow plowing. We need to improve
it.
He said although most feedback he
received on plowing during last winters
record-setting snowfalls was positive, I
think we could have done a better job. We
could have been a little more efcient.
Pitt said thats his biggest goal ef-
ciency.
He hates complacency, but hes not afraid
to fail.
Youre never going to be able to change
anything unless youre willing to fail.
STEVE TARGO/REGIONAL NEWS
DAN PITT, the town of Linns rst assistant re chief/new highway superintendent, is happy
about the more active role he will have in problem-solving for the towns highway department.
BLOOMFIELD POLICE REPORTS
Oct. 1
10:47 p.m.: Ofcers
responded to a two-vehicle
crash with airbag deploy-
ment on North Lakeshore
Drive west of Orchid Road.
The driver of the vehicle,
Michael Benedict, 23, Genoa
City, ed the scene and was
later arrested then conned
in the Walworth County jail.
Benedict was cited for hit
and run property damage,
failure to notify police of
an accident, operating a
motor vehicle without insur-
ance, open intoxicants in
a motor vehicle, operating
left of center and operating
a motor vehicle while intoxi-
cated as a rst offense.
Oct. 4
1:07 a.m.: Ofcers
responded to a report of a
vehicle versus a detached
garage on Posy Road. When
ofcers arrived on scene,
they learned the driver had
ed after the crash.
At the conclusion of
the investigation, George
Hansen Jr., 32, Genoa City,
was cited for inattentive
driving, hit and run prop-
erty damage, operating a
motor vehicle without insur-
ance and failure to notify
police of an accident.
According to the acci-
dent report, Hansen was
arguing with his girlfriend
when he ran a stop sign on
Eastwood Road.
Oct. 5
11 a.m.: Officers
responded to the area of
Nippersink Road in the
area of Tombeau Road for
a report of a two-vehicle
property damage crash.
Deangelo Richardson,
23, Lake Geneva, was cited
for following too closely.
COMMUNITY NOTE
Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews
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GENEVA POLICE
Oct. 12
12:30 a.m.: Town of
Geneva police cited Dean
Wanty, 58, Oak Creek, for
operating while intoxicated.
Wantys vehicle was stopped
on State Highway 67.
After school program starts
VIBE, an after school program for
middle school kids, in the Lake Geneva area
will open its doors on Oct. 27.
The program is located at 700 N. Bloom-
eld Road, Lake Geneva, in the lower level
of Immanuel Lutheran Church.
This is a nonreligious program designed
for kids to study, watch movies and build
relationships.
Itll run Monday through Thursday
from 2:45 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Tutors in a variety of academic areas
will be available.
Were starting this program because
we understand that Lake Geneva has many
middle school-aged children who usually
go home to an empty house and even some-
times an empty pantry, said Zach Ortiz,
the programs director.
For more information, the programs
Facebook page is www.facebook.com/
vibelg or you may call Ortiz at (815) 519-
5167
TURKEY DINNER
Sat., Nov. 1st, 2014
4 to 7 p.m.
Christ Lutheran
Church
228 Martin Street, Sharon, WI
Adults $10.00-- 6-12 $5.00
5 & Under - FREE
Carry outs - Front Entrance to Church
Sherwood Lodge
116 Cherry Street
Williams Bay, WI
262.245.7320
Assisted Living With Style!
Join us for a delicious Chef prepared
brnch! Take a tour of Sherood Lodge and
be entered to win a $100 Visa Gi Card.
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, November 1st
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
We are curently featring a move in special
$500 o your second and third months rent.
10A | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
1078330
Hedlund was born in Eau
Claire, but his father, who worked
for General Motors, moved the
family rst to Michigan and then
to Illinois. Hedlund said he grew
up in the Chicago area.
He attended Texas A&I in
Kingsville, Texas. Drafted into the
Army in 1968, he served in Viet-
nam as a personnel specialist.
Hedlund moved here from
Schaumburg in 1989.
Before buying the former Alpine GM-
Buick-Pontiac dealership which was located
at the current site of Community Bank, he
worked as a salesman at a Chicago
area dealership.
Hedlund said he owned the
dealership until 1996, when he
sold it to Don Jacobs.
He also bought the Dairy Ripple
restaurant and ice cream stand in
Walworth in the late 1980s, until
he sold it in the early 1990s.
Hedlund and his wife Marta
have lived in Lake Geneva for 25
years. He said his daughter still
lives in Lake Geneva and his son lives in the
Chicago area. Both are graduates of Badger
High School.
Hedlund
Hedlund/Served in Vietnam
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Biggest business proposal yet, says village president
Super Mix USA looking at Genoa City land
By Steve Targo
steve@lakegenevanews.net
GENOA CITY Another business has
its sights set on the village.
On Oct. 9, the village board and plan-
ning commission approved the concept
presented by Super Mix USA, a producer
of ready-mix concrete and aggregates with
locations in southern Wisconsin and north-
ern Illinois.
For years, Genoa City ofcials have
been trying to attract businesses.
Recently, they turned their attention
to the area of Highway 12 and South Road,
hoping developments such as the travel
center a multi-business project by David
Laurine that includes a gas station, bakery
and convenient store will bring larger
franchises such as Walgreens into the area.
Not far from that intersection, Super
Mix USA has proposed to build on 13.1
acres off Williams Road, south of the
former Highway 12 rest area.
On Oct. 9, Jack Pease, owner of Super
Mix USA, presented the plan to the board
and the commission. It was unanimously
approved at both meetings.
On the phone Oct. 23, Bill Antti vil-
lage of Genoa City president and commis-
sion chairman said its the largest busi-
ness proposal in recent memory to reach
the table.
What (Pease) would like to do is park
a number of his trucks on that site, Antti
said. He also wants to put up a fairly large
building, where he can repair his trucks,
and have it as his business headquarters.
The idea is Genoa City is sort of at the center
of major activities in the area, and (the pro-
posed site) would be centrally located.
Antti said Super Mix USA has locations
in Walworth and Kenosha counties, as well
as McHenry and Lake counties in Illinois.
The proposed facility could bring with
it about 140 employees, Antti said. He also
said that Pease mentioned it could create
new local jobs.
The proposal also calls for 108 truck
parking spaces on the property, as well as a
54,000-square-foot ofce and repair shop
building.
Thats a good-sized building, said
Antti.
Part of what appeals to (Pease) is he
wants to be able to show his company along
Route 12 ... so people are aware of him.
The rear of the business would be vis-
ible from U.S. Highway 12. Its frontage
would be on Williams Road, across from
The Ponds of Genoa City.
Antti said Pease had questions about
signage. He wants to put a sign on the
building that advertises his business.
Pease also wants to put up a monument
sign near Williams Road.
I dont think it would be an issue, said
Antti. You see a lot of places where they
have trucks parked along the Interstate, so
this would be another one. I dont anticipate
the signs will be a problem.
The site is north of the Highway
12-South Road intersection, which is where
Walgreens reps once told village ofcials
they would like to build if there was a stop-
light at the intersection.
When asked if the Super Mix USA
development would help create need for
a stoplight, Antti said he hadnt thought
about that, but it could help.
I think, if (Super Mix USA) comes in
there, maybe it will also bring in some more
businesses. He seemed to think it would,
but that remains to be seen.
The next step, said Antti, is for Super
Mix USA to purchase the property, which is
about 20 acres.
Antti said commissioners and trustees
liked the concept because it sounded good
and has potential not just to build up that
area, but the local economy.
Well try to work with (Pease) to get
it done. Once you have a business like this
in town, theres always job opportunities
available.
It will be up to the zoning administrator to determine
whether a proposed color is bold, bright, fluorescent,
Day-Glo or neon based on examples provided, Slavney
said.
Those shades deemed bold would be allowed on
architectural elements not to exceed 5 percent of faade
area, Slavney said.
Architectural elements include sills, lintels, dentils,
moldings, frames, brackets, awnings and doors, Slavney
said.
Those colors deemed bright, Day-Glo or neon
would not be allowed.
The ordinance leaves it up to the zoning adminis-
trator and the plan commission to allow bold, striking
colors on building facades.
Business owner faces sex assault charge
ELKHORN A 62-year-old Bar-
rington Ill., man is accused of sexually
assaulting a woman inside of his busi-
ness in Pell Lake.
Charles Scharf faces a felony charge
of third-degree sexual assault. If con-
victed, he faces up to 10 years imprison-
ment and $25,000 in nes.
Scharfs defense attorney, Larry
Steen, didnt return a voicemail seeking
comment.
Scharf is free from custody after
posting a $5,000 cash bond. He is
court-ordered not to have contact with
the alleged victim.
According to the criminal complaint
and search warrant afdavit:
The alleged victim told police that
she was agged down by Scharf, who
asked her if she
wanted a job clean-
ing his business.
The woman
expressed an interest
and Scharf invited
her inside to show
her the business.
Scharf is the owner
of Erosion Specialist
Inc., which is located
on Park Road. Inside
of the building, Sharf and the woman
talked about back problems.
While in the upstairs of the busi-
ness, Scharf reportedly offered the
woman a back massage, and the woman
agreed knowing it may be a bad idea.
The woman told police that during
the back massage, Scharf forced his
hand down her pants. He also report-
edly removed her pants against her
consent. The woman told police that she
repeatedly said no.
The assault ended when the wom-
ans phone rang, and she told Scharf it
was her father and she would have to
leave. As the woman left, Scharf report-
edly gave her his business card, and told
her he would contact her about cleaning
the business.
The woman told police she ran
home crying, and when she talked to her
mother she told her what had happened.
Police reported that they were
familiar with Erosion Specialists Inc.,
and the woman accurately described
the inside of the business.
Scharf
Colors/Zoning head will
have some discretion
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Generosity is the Act of Caring for others
Tis community showed how generous it is by giving in so many
diferent ways in support of Ashleigh Clausons Fight Against
Leukemia. Te Beneft was Fantastic because of all you! We would
like to thank all of the silent auction and raf e donors and all of the
Amazing people who came out to Foleys Irish Woods Pub to make
this beneft a huge success.
Miss Ashleigh.Together we will help you with your fght against Leukemia
Tere are numerous businesses and volunteers that we need to thank and if we have missed you here, please
know you are not forgotten.You will always have a place in our hearts.
Foleys Pub, Pat & Heather Burns-Te Owl Tavern, Ukes Harley, Woodstock Harley, Mandy Z and Rural
Route One, Green Pro Chicago, Ray Radigans, Lake Geneva Canopy Tours, Sprechers Restaurant & Pub, Te
Abbey Resort and Avani Spa, Lake Lawn Resort, Grand Geneva, Feminine Touch, Lakeview Construction,
Premium Waters, Kellys Pub N Grub, Twisted Cuisine, Daddy Maxwells, Bye the Seat of your pants Catering,
Crandalls, Home Again, Mannys, Golden Corral, Texas Roadhouse, Lynch Chevrolet, American Discount
Muf er, Teena Schenning, Te Kronwall Family, Elkhorn Chamber of Commerce, Tara Umnus / Impreza,
Lighthouse Pub & Grill, Te Final Inning, Te Crisman Family, Springfeld Auto, Sassy Salon, Helen Miller,
Beth Conlee, Liberated Tattoos, Ship Shape Marine, Paparazzi Accessories, Lindas Family Restaurant, Peck
& Weis-Tom Walton, Sea World Orlando, Hyatt Regency Orlando, Nancy Welch, Te Cornerstone,
Steinbrinks Piggly Wiggly, Chilis, Walworth County CVB, DITR , Harbor Shores on Lake Geneva, Ginos
East, Kevin Lederer, Nate Zimmerman-Apex Signs, K Erickson Design, CJ Donuts, Te Cake Box, Culvers,
Hallmark, N & T Restaurant, Market Square, Callies Gif Shop, Sand Jose Restaurant, Hair Illusion, SaHara,
Whistling Petes, Lindas Restaurant, Subway, Stonecreek, Outdoor Man, Harbor Foods
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 11A
LAKE GENEVA AREA NEWS
He said department heads pretty much
came up with zero percent increases. Theres
not a lot of fat in the budget to cut out.
Among recommendations for raising the
required $166,422 were:
Raise parking nes from $12 to $20.
Increase visitor child beach passes from
$3 to $4 per visit. Nonresident adult beach
passes are now $7.
Charge residents $2 or $3 a season for
beach passes.
A 0.08 percent increase in the city prop-
erty tax rate.
However, there is no proposed property
tax rate for 2015 at this time.
City Comptroller Peg Pollitt said the state
still has not calculated the citys valuation for
the 2015 tax year.
However, the city must approve a pro-
posed general fund budget before setting a
budget hearing in November, Pollitt said.
Notices of the public hearing must also be
published in advance.
Pollitt said its anticipated that the citys
tax base has increased, which might allow the
city to keep its current tax rate and still col-
lect an increase in property taxes.
Council members Elizabeth Chappell,
Jeff Wall and Richard Hedlund said they
were concerned with the proposed property
tax rate increase, even as small as the one
proposed.
Chappell said she only favored increasing
parking nes.
She said she was against any other fee
increases and she was opposed to pay raises
for city employees.
Jordan said that the beach pass tags cost
money and it takes staff time to manage the
program.
The costs are starting to add up, he said.
If a citizen is concerned about paying
$12 for a season beach pass (for a family of
four) then my goodness, Jordan said.
Hedlund said he supported raising fees
and nes if necessary.
If a tourist gets a parking ticket in Lake
Geneva, theyre mad, said Hedlund. It
doesnt matter if theyre paying $12 or $20.
As for beach passes, Lake Genevas seem
reasonable compared to other communities,
he said.
Beach passes in Crystal Lake (Ill.) for
adults is $10 a day, Hedlund said.
Increasing the cost of beach passes will
bring an anticipated $27,000, he said. And if
he were on the nance committee, hed push
for $10 adult nonresident
beach passes and $5 non-
resident children beach
passes.
Alderwoman Ellyn
Kehoe said she, too,
believes visitors would be
willing to pay more for a
city beach pass.
We could take it to
$8 or $9 for nonresident
adult passes, she said.
Wall said he didnt mind raising fees and
nes, as long as the property tax rate wasnt
increased.
However, Wall said he also didnt want
to consider raises for city employees until
an employee compensation study was com-
pleted. In February this year, the council
agreed to join Elkhorn and Delavan in hiring
Springsted, a Milwaukee consulting rm,
to do a job classication and compensation
study for the three cities.
Lake Genevas share of Springsteds fees
comes to $16,675, of which $13,000 will come
out of the city administrators study budget
and the difference from miscellaneous cash.
The study was to have been done this
summer, but its still not completed.
Dont we want to see that before we con-
sider raises? Wall asked.
Why are we so far behind on the com-
pensation plan? It was supposed to be done
June 28, added Alderman Alan Kupsik.
Jordan said the consultants are still
working on the study, but one of the cities has
been making special requests which is caus-
ing the study to take longer than expected.
The report should be ready before the end of
the year, he said.
In other business, the city bumped up
its payment to the YMCA, from $48,000 to
$54,000 to handle the citys recreation pro-
gram.
Mayor Jim Connors said the city is also
considering an increase in room tax.
The city currently has a 5 percent room
tax on hotel and motel rooms, said Connors.
The city takes in $420,000 a year, of
which $100,000 is given to the chamber
of commerce and convention and visitors
bureau.
Since the city enacted its room tax, the
state enacted a new statute calling for 70 per-
cent of all room taxes to go to convention and
visitors bureaus or organizations that pro-
mote tourism.
If Lake Geneva were to increase its room
tax to the maximum 8 percent, 70 percent of
that 3 percent increase would have to go to
the chamber and CVB, Connors said.
Chappell asked why that proposal wasnt
part of the budget presented to the city coun-
cil. Connors said the city needs to talk to hotel
owners and the chamber to see what they
think of the proposed increase.
He said the chamber is not a fan of the
proposal. They think it will hurt tourism,
he said.
Chappell chided that the city was careful
to go to hotel owners and the chamber before
proposing an increase in the room tax, but it
never approached residents about an increase
in the beach pass fees.
It just seems all so convenient, she said
of the proposed fee increases.
Chappell proposed just increasing the
parking nes from $12 to $20 only, and no
raises for city employees.
I would rather look into a room tax
increase, Chappell said, but that wasnt part
of her motion. Wall seconded for discussion.
Chappells motion failed 1 to 5.
A motion by Kupsik, seconded by Lyon
proposed to raise the parking ne to $20,
raise the nonresident children beach pass
from $3 to $4 and charge residents a fee of $3
each for a season beach pass.
Raises would be held to 1.5 percent.
The motion was approved 5 to 1, with
Chappell the only dissenting vote.
The resolution directs staff to craft the
budget with those changes.
Budget/City considers increases to season beach passes, room tax
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Chappell
851 Park Drive-Suite 103
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262.248.1601
www.racinedentalgroup.com - kidsteeth@ameritech.net
FEATURED "NO CAVITY CLUB STARS" FOR OCTOBER
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CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
COBB PARK RESTROOM BUILDING REMODEL
LAKE GENEVA, WISCONSIN
PROJECT NO. GBG-14-05
Te City of Lake Geneva hereby gives notice that sealed General Construction Bids will be received
until 10:00 AM on Tursday, November 13, 2014 and publicly opened at that time for the remodeling
of the Cobb Park Restroom Building Remodel project.
Te work to be performed by the General Contractor will include, but not be limited to, the following
work as a lump sum price:
1. General Construction, including Concrete Work, Doors & Windows, Finishes, Specialties, and
all other all work as called for in the Contract Documents.
2. Plumbing Work, as called for in the Contract Documents.
3. Electrical Work, as called for in the Contract Documents.
GENERAL:
Proposals must be sealed and submitted on the attached proposal form and returned clearly marked
with date and time of opening. No undated, unsigned, or faxed proposals will be considered.
Bid documents are available by calling the of ce of the Director of Public Works & Utilities, 262-248-
2311, for pick-up at the Lake Geneva Utility Commission, 361 West Main Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Copies
of bidding documents are available for viewing at the Commissions main of ces or at the City Clerks of-
fce, 626 Geneva Street, Lake Geneva, WI. Bids obtained from clearing houses will not be accepted.
Bidders shall complete the enclosed insurance questionnaire with proposal. Requirements are; Con-
tractor shall furnish evidence of Workers Compensation, public liability and property damage insurance.
Limits of insurance shall be as follows: Minimum amounts of $1,000,000 bodily injury and $1,000,000
property damage including both injury and property damage caused by vehicles and machinery.
Successful bidder shall properly hold the City of Lake Geneva harmless from all damages occurring
in any way by his acts or negligence, or that of his employees, agents or workers. A current Certifcate of
Insurance will be required of the successful vendor.
LEGAL PROVISIONS: Letting of the work described herein is subject to the provisions of Sections
62.15, 66.0901, and 66.0903 of the Wisconsin State Statutes and all applicable local, state and federal re-
quirements pertaining to public works projects.
PREVAILING WAGE RATES: Tis project is not subject to Wisconsin State Statutes which requires
all Contractors and Subcontractors to comply with the prevailing wage rates, hours of labor and hourly
basic pay rates in all trades contemplated as determined by the Wisconsin Department of Workforce De-
velopment for a single trade project with a total cost of $48,000 or multi-trade project cost of $100,000 or
more.
BID SECURITY: No Bid shall be received unless accompanied by a Certifed Check, Bid Bond, Ca-
shiers Check or Money Order equal to at least 5% of the total Bid, payable to the City of Lake Geneva as
a guarantee that if his Bid is accepted, the General Contractor will execute and fle the Contract and the
Insurance Certifcates that are required by the Contract Documents within the time limit set by the City of
Lake Geneva.
CONTRACT SECURITY: Te successful Bidder will not be required to furnish a satisfactory Per-
formance Bond & Payment Bond. However, if the successful Bidder fails, for any reason, to execute and
fle such contract with the City, the amount of the Check or Bid Bond shall be forfeited to the City of Lake
Geneva as liquidated damages.
BID REJECTION / ACCEPTANCE: Te City of Lake Geneva reserves the right to reject any and
all Bids, waive any formalities in the bidding, or to accept the Bid which they feel is in their best interest.
Te acceptance or rejection of any bid submitted is fnal and binding on all bidders without recourse by
rejected bidders against the City. No Bid shall be withdrawn for a period of sixty (60) days afer the
opening of the Bids without the consent of the City.
Published by authority of the City of Lake Geneva.
BY ORDER OF: JAMES CONNORS
MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LAKE GENEVA
SABRINA WASWO
CITY CLERK
PREPARED BY: DANIEL S. WINKLER, P.E.
CITY OF LAKE GENEVA &
THE LAKE GENEVA UTILITY COMMISSION
361 WEST MAIN STREET
LAKE GENEVA, WI 53147 (T) (262) 248-2311
12A | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
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Serving Fontana, Walworth, Williams Bay and Walworth County
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JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
MARTHA HAYDEN views some of her etchings of Zodiac signs. On the wall above, one of her paintings hangs.
By Chris Schultz
cschultz@lakegenevanews.net
WILLIAMS BAY Thurs-
day was probably the last day of
school for school district voters
planning to vote in the Nov. 4
election.
The Williams Bay School
Board had two informational
open houses Thursday to explain
to voters its proposal to build a
new elementary school at the site
of the existing junior-senior high
school, at 500 Geneva St.
On Aug. 11, the school board
approved a resolution to go to
referendum on the Nov. 4 ballot,
asking district electors to approve
a $19.9 million bond to nance
the project.
If approved, the bond issue
would add about $1.19 per $1,000
of equalized assessed valuation
to the districts property tax levy.
The increase takes into
account that the bond for the
junior/senior high school will be
paid off in 2015. For a property
valued at $341,000, the median
value for homes in the district,
the bond for the new building
would add $420 to that proper-
tys tax for school purposes.
From 3 to 5 p.m. at the Wil-
liams Bay Junior/Senior High
School, and from 5 to 7 p.m. at
the Williams Bay Elementary
School, 139 Congress St., school
district electors were invited
to attend informational open
houses to review plans for the
proposed elementary school and
to ask school board members
and school administration about
those plans.
The school district made
available conceptual drawings,
fact sheets, coffee and cookies.
Attendance, however, was
low. Superintendent Wayne
Anderson said only 10 electors
turned up for the open house at
the junior/senior high school,
and no more than seven turned
up at the elementary school.
Anderson said he didnt
expect a heavy turnout. By now,
news, information and opinion
about the proposed new elemen-
tary school has pretty much satu-
rated the Williams Bay area.
Except for a few still seeking
a bit more information, minds
seem to have been made up.
Few attend
nal meetings
on referendum
Lesser-known candidates attend chamber forum
By Jade Bolack
jbolack@lakegenevanews.net
GENEVA Ten candidates
for local and statewide seats gath-
ered at the Geneva Ridge Resort
Oct. 21 for an informal question-
and-answer session with constitu-
ents.
One candidate for governor,
one candidate for secretary of
state, one candidate for the U.S.
House of Representatives, two
candidates for state senate, two
candidates for state assembly and
three candidates for treasurer
attended the event hosted by the
Geneva Lake West Chamber of
Commerce.
From a new political party,
gubernatorial candidate Dennis
Fehr said he was running because
he wanted to bring the best ideas
to Madison.
The 24-year-old Chippewa
Falls native founded the Peoples
Party and helped create the par-
tys platform.
The key ve points of the
platform, Fehr said, are to bring
smarter technology to government
services, reform the tax structure,
change the judicial system to help
those with mental health issues,
lower or eliminate the drinking
age and legalize the use of mari-
juana.
Fehr elded questions about
his progressive tax ideas, saying
he wanted the rst bracket of
taxpayers to not pay any income
tax. After that the second bracket
would pay the highest percent,
with higher tax brackets paying
a lower percent of income to the
state.
Fehr said he and party orga-
nizers spoke with economists and
professors to develop the tax plan,
but it wasnt set in stone yet.
Fehr is running against incum-
bent Gov. Scott Walker, Republi-
can, Democratic candidate Mary
Burke and Libertarian candidate
Robert Burke.
Incumbent Secretary of State
Doug LaFollette said hes done a
very good job in ofce over the
past 30 years.
Im not afraid of computers or
science, LaFollette said. When I
came into ofce, we had one of the
worst departments in the country,
and I made it one of the best.
LaFollette said he has fought
with legislators to restore some
of the duties of the ofce back to
the secretary of state. Most state
departments in the rest of the
country issue trademarks and
incorporate businesses.
Not in Wisconsin, LaFol-
lette said. Those duties have been
assigned to the Department of
Financial Institutions since 1995.
LaFollette said he would con-
tinue that ght. He is running
against Republican candidate
Julian Bradley, Constitution Party
candidate Jerry Broitzman and
Libertarian candidate Andy Craig.
Five candidates are running
for state treasurer. Matt Adamc-
zyk, Republican candidate, David
Sartori, Democratic candidate,
and Jerry Shidell, Libertarian
candidate attended the forum last
week. Constitution Party candi-
date Andrew Zuelke and Green
Party candidate Ron Hardy are
also running for the seat.
Adamczyk called himself a
limited government kind of guy
who wanted to eliminate the ofce
of the treasurer.
He said the ofce costs taxpay-
ers more money than its worth,
and the job duties can be switched
to another executive ofce in
Madison.
Shidell also said he would
work to eliminate the ofce if he
were elected.
CHRIS SCHULTZ/REGIONAL NEWS
GOING OVER THE PLANS for the proposed new Williams Bay Elementary
School are Williams Bay School Superintendent Wayne Anderson, left,
and Williams Bay resident Jim Anton. Anton was one of just ve electors
who showed up for the school districts informational open house at the
elementary school on Thursday. The district is asking voters for permission
to borrow $19.9 million for a new building on the Nov. 4 ballot.
PLEASE SEE FORUM PAGE 3B
PLEASE SEE BAY PAGE 5B
Sharon artist has work
displayed worldwide
By Jade Bolack
jbolack@lakegenevanews.net
SHARON There arent
many art galleries in Sharon.
Martha Haydens home is the
exception.
Once a year, Hayden opens her
home on Prairie Street to show-
case her artwork, some of which
dates back to the 1950s.
I dont have a favorite paint-
ing, Hayden said of her work.
Just like you dont have favorite
children.
For half the year, she paints at
her home or around the area. For
the other half of the year, shes in
New York City.
(If I could go back), I would
have gone to New York sooner,
Hayden said. Its easy to get to
exhibitions. You can go spend an
hour or two and come back and
work. Here (in Sharon), its a full
day to a gallery.
She said shes inspired by the
caliber of other people making art
in New York.
Being around other artists is
invigorating, Hayden said.
There are also many more
options to get artwork into shows,
she said.
Hayden has painted in other
countries and elsewhere around
the U.S., too. Her artwork remains
in those places, as well.
Her paintings can be seen at
the British Museum in London,
the Museo do Arte Moderno in
Sao Paulo, Brazil, the Brooklyn
Museum in New York and the
Smithsonian Institution in Wash-
ington, D.C.
Hayden said shes learned to
accept rejection from shows and
galleries the same way she han-
dles acceptance.
You cant get too down, and
you cant get too excited, she said.
Mostly, you dont get art in until
after you think you should. There
are many, many disappointments.
You cant focus on the success or
the failure.
Instead, Hayden said, focus on
consistent practice.
Consistency is whats impor-
tant, she said. If you get into
a show or you dont is mostly a
matter of luck. Its a matter of the
right person seeing your work at
the right time.
Haydens two-story Victorian
house is full of canvas and paper
paintings, etchings and charcoal
drawings.
Most of the walls feature
framed artwork, and on the oor,
more canvases are stacked against
the walls. Shes so prolic that she
forgets about some of her paint-
ings.
Find a catalogue of Martha
Haydens work at www.
marthahayden.com.
PLEASE SEE HAYDEN PAGE 4B
2B | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
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92 CHEVY 1500 PICKUP ....................................................................... $1,500*
91 GMC JIMMY 4DR 4X4 ...................................................................... $1,500*
99 PONTIAC GRAND AM 4DR ............................................................... $1,500*
98 CHEVY CONVERSION VAN ............................................................... $1,800*
95 SATURN SC1 2DR ............................................................................ $1,800*
00 CADILLAC SEVILLE 4DR .................................................................. $1,800*
96 CHRYSLER CONCORDE 4DR ........................................................... $1,800*
95 JEEP CHEROKEE 4X4 ...................................................................... $1,995*
95 JEEP CHEROKEE 4DR 4X4 ............................................................... $1,995*
94 CHEVY ASTRO VAN ......................................................................... $1,995*
02 PONTIAC AZTEK 4DR ...................................................................... $1,995*
94 DODGE 1500 4X4 PICKUP ................................................................ $1,995*
93 CADILLAC ELDORADO 2DR ............................................................. $1,995*
98 DODGE 1500 PICKUP ...................................................................... $1,995*
01 FORD WINDSTAR ............................................................................. $1,995*
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95 FORD F-150 SUPER CAB ................................................................. $2,195*
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00 FORD EXPLORER 2DR 4X4 .............................................................. $2,495*
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October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 3B
GENEVA LAKE WEST NEWS
Stakeholders hear plans for Highway 14
By Jade Bolack
jbolack@lakegenevanews.net
WALWORTH Theres
still no consensus in the village
regarding U.S. Highway 14.
During a presentation by the
Wisconsin Department of Trans-
portation, accusations and head
shaking were more frequent than
agreement.
Dolores Pophal, a member of
the Walworth Task Force, said the
DOT was creating a plan for only
10 percent of the trafc in the vil-
lage.
Pophal cited numbers from a
2012 study of the Highway 14 traf-
c, of which only 10 percent was
large trucks.
Someones trying to sell this
to residents, she said.
DOT project manager Julie
Jenks said the two plans currently
being considered are designed for
all modes of trafc.
Pophal and Louise Czaja are
members of the three-member
Walworth Task Force, a commit-
tee that was created by the Wal-
worth School Board. Along with
that committee, the Geneva Lake
West Chamber of Commerce, the
school board and the village board
had representatives at the meet-
ing.
Jenks said the task force often
has a different opinion than the
school board, and the committee
is allowed to share comments at a
stakeholders meeting because the
group has been involved in the
process since the beginning.
Czaja said she volunteered to
be in the committee in 2009.
Jenks said no public com-
ments were allowed during the
meeting Oct. 24, but she said
those comments would be wel-
come at a public information ses-
sion in December. The date and
location of that meeting arent set
yet, she said.
Safety issues
Jenks said the proposed plan
to reroute trafc on the west side
of the square and eliminate one-
way trafc would be much safer
than current conditions.
Pophal said the village has
had 48 years of safety the way
the trafc is routed now, but Jenks
said there are a lot of crashes at the
intersections around the square
and she hears of at least one vehi-
cle a week going the wrong direc-
tion.
Village President David Ras-
mussen said telling the state
to move the highway wasnt an
option.
Trucks have gotten longer,
he said. Theyre 70 (feet long)
now. What if they go up to 75?
One of the reasons for rerout-
ing the highway, Jenks said, is
because trucks have a hard time
making turns onto and off of the
highway.
Kristina Staude, executive
director of the chamber, said
the village would have trucks no
matter what.
Theyre going to deliver gas,
theyre going to deliver to Sentry,
she said.
One plan, which maintains
one-way trafc around the
square, will reduce the number of
parking spots. The DOT doesnt
allow angle parking on a highway,
and because of the widening of
the intersections, parking spaces
would be lost.
When the road was most
recently repaved in 1991, the state
allowed the village to maintain
angle parking. Jenks said they
couldnt allow angle parking this
time.
Because this is a reconstruc-
tion, we need to meet all stan-
dards, she said. There are safety
issues that we need to address.
The two plans the DOT is
considering the east option
that straightens the highway on
the west side of the square and
through the parking lot and the
west option that maintains one-
way trafc around the square
both address these safety con-
cerns.
Jenks said both plans are
still an option, but once an envi-
ronmental study is complete, the
DOT will recommend a plan. The
Federal Highway Administration
has the nal approval on the proj-
ect because some federal funds
are being used.
Rasmussen said the straight-
ened highway is safer for pedes-
trians.
I dont know how anyone
can claim its safer to keep trucks
on the north and east side of the
square, he said. Theres no way
the east plan is safer.
The east plan creates turn
lanes on Main Street, which would
increase the crosswalk distance
for students walking to school,
Rasmussen said.
Eminent domain
Pophal questioned the DOTs
authority to take public school
property.
Weve conrmed that we
are able to purchase that, Jenks
said. This has happened at other
schools.
The DOT is already in negotia-
tions with owners of the Antique
Mall on the corner of Beloit and
Main streets to purchase that
property.
Jenks said the DOT prefers to
purchase property, rather than
using the right of eminent domain.
Youre land locking the
school, Pophal said.
I dont think the DOT has
(the money) to pay the school for
relocation costs when it needs to
grow.
The DOT is purchasing the
Antique Mall ve years before the
anticipated start of construction.
Demolition of the building is
expected in spring 2015.
Demolition of that building is
needed with both proposed plans.
With the east plan, which
maintains one-way trafc, the
King Dragon Chinese restaurant
will be relocated. With the west
plan, that straightens the high-
way to the west of the square, two
houses south of the antique mall
will be relocated.
Those properties will not be
purchased until a plan is chosen.
School issues
Rasmussen accussed the
school of sending a misleading
newsletter to parents about the
highway.
In the Oct. 13 issue of the dis-
trict newsletter, the district states
the north turnaround on Beloit
Street will be eliminated and all
student drop offs and pickups will
be diverted to Fremont Street.
However, at the DOT meeting,
Jenks said the DOT wasnt man-
dating the school eliminate trafc
on the north end of the school.
Thats a dishonest newslet-
ter, Rasmussen said. You should
be ashamed for sending that out.
Interim District Administra-
tor Pam Larson said the letter
was a fair representation of what
would happen.
Students, Larson said,
shouldnt be that close to the high-
way, so the school would move
drop off and pickups to the west
side of the school.
The newsletter also states that
handicapped-accessible parking
will be moved farther from the
entrance on the east side of the
school, near the multipurpose
room, and that the school will
lose some of its playground space,
if the west plan is chosen for the
highway.
U.S. Highway 14 time line
December 2014: Public
information meeting
Spring 2015: Public hearing
2016-2018: Right-of-way
acquisition
2020: Construction
Project manager Julie Jenks
said these dates are subject to
change.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
JULIE JENKS, left, U.S. Highway 14 DOT project manager, describes some changes to a proposed plan
for rerouting the highway through the village. Village President David Rasmussen and Trustee Dennis
Vanderbloemen watch.
Because the treasurer is
a constitutional ofce, two
sessions of the legislature
need to pass the same bill
to eliminate the ofce. Then
voters must approve the
changes in a referendum.
Sartori said he wants to
keep the ofce in Madison.
Im quite familiar with
how government works,
Sartori said.
This ofce could be run
more efciently than other
ofces which are handling
the work.
S a r -
t o r i
said the
Depar t-
ment of
Revenue,
w h i c h
was given
r e s pon-
s i bi l i t y
over lost
property,
has a backlog that the trea-
surers ofce never saw. He
said he would ght to get
those duties back.
Rob Zerban, Democratic
candidate for the U.S. House
seat, said he wants to bring
new ideas to Washington.
We know whats going
on right now is not work-
ing, he said. We need to
make corporations pay their
fair share.
Zerban said he was in
favor of
r e f o r m-
ing the tax
code to
reduce the
number of
deductions
for corpo-
rations.
He also
said he
e n v i e d
other nations for their
cheaper health care sys-
tems.
Theres a reason its
cheaper, he said. They
all have the single-payer
system.
Without insurance car-
riers, who do nothing for
consumers, Zerban said, the
middleman is removed form
the health care process.
Zerban faces incumbent
Republican Paul Ryan.
Candidates for state
senate Dan Kilkenny,
Democrat, and Steve Nass,
Republican, also attended
the forum and spoke briey
about their views on taxes.
Kilkenny said Nass was
misleading voters by saying
Kilkenny would raise taxes
if there was a good reason.
Im not against raising
taxes, Kilkenny said. But I
wont do it for anything, for
any reason.
Nass said he wanted
governments to prioritize
spending and work with the
revenue they already receive
from taxpayers.
Lastly, incumbent
Republican Tyler August
and Democrat candidate Al
Kupsik also attended the
forum.
Read more about these
two candidates on page 4A.
Forum/Candidates for state treasurer attend
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
Sartori Adamczyk
COMMUNITY NOTE
Volunteers needed for prairie seeding
Fontana residents are invited to volunteer on Saturday,
Nov. 8, on the Duck Pond Prairie. Volunteers are needed to
sow seeds to enlarge the prairie.
Participants will meet at village hall at 12:30 p.m. for a
free pizza lunch and hear an update on the progess of the
prairie from Tom Vanderpoel. After the talk, the group will
go to the prairie to sow the seeds.
Belfrey Theater coming back in 2016
The historic Belfrey Music Theater is coming back in
the summer of 2016.
Come visit the historic building on Nov. 2 from 11 a.m.
to 2 p.m. and ring the bell in support of great theater in
Walworth County. Tours will be available.
The cost is $5 per person to help restore the facility,
located on State Highway 67 just south of State Highway 50
on the hill above Williams Bay.
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WED LIKE TO GET TO KNOW YOU
Think you
know Whitewater?
So why is it
called Second Salem?
Come to the dark side
and see things in a new
light. On Halloween,
ReelLifeTV.net
presents
Witches of Whitewater,
a serious, and sometimes
creepy recounting of
the rumors, legends
and facts of the citys
supernatural past.
ReelLifeTV.net.
Currently Playing.
4B | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
GENEVA LAKE WEST NEWS
Fontana board mulls cuts
to post-retirement benets
By Jade Bolack
jbolack@lakegenevanews.net
FONTANA The Fontana School
Board still hasnt decided how it will
eliminate post-retirement benets for
employees.
Board Vice President Lisa Laing
said shes spoken with the boards
attorney to make sure the proposed
options are legal.
We dont have a nal solution,
Laing said at the Oct. 27 board meet-
ing. The attorneys have reviewed the
options. We should have something for
next month.
The school board agreed earlier
this year that it wanted to get out of
the post-retirement benet business.
In prior years, teachers and staff
who retired from the district received
about $120,000 in health insurance
coverage, according to a draft proposal
for changes to the policy.
The costs were burdening the
school board and reducing its ability to
increase salaries. Since April, the board
has discussed several different alterna-
tives for phasing out the program.
Currently, the district has three
employees that have completed the 20
years required to receive the benet,
but the board changed the way they
will receive it when they retire.
Instead of receiving $120,000 in
insurance coverage over six years, these
three employees will receive $80,000
in premium-only, retiree-only health
reimbursement account over ve years.
For other staff members that have
worked at the district for at least ve
years, the board wants to have some
benet when they retire. Staff mem-
bers that have worked less than ve
years will not receive any benet, if the
board approves changes.
Board President Rebecca Decker
said the ve-year cutoff was chosen
because thats when Act 10 was imple-
mented.
Act 10 mandated government
employees pay for a larger percentage
of their health insurance coverage and
retirement plan. On Monday night, the
board delayed further discussion for a
special meeting next month. Laing said
shed like District Administrator Sara
Norton to be at the meeting.
Construction update
Harlan Ward, a representative from
McKinstry Co., said the rst phase of
construction on the school was nearly
nished.
Ward told the school board he had
a short list of mostly cosmetic xes
to nish before construction stopped
until student vacation days. Phase two
of the project, which includes exte-
rior masonry work, wont begin until
summer vacation.
The board is considering changing
the project list to include new kitchen
equipment or at least an exhaust hood
and re suppression system over the
stove. The current hood is undersized
for the space, Ward said.
The board said they would talk
with the cook who works in the schools
kitchen to determine what is needed
in the space. Ward said if the space is
remodeled, other items might need to
be brought up to code that have been
grandfathered in because of the age of
the building.
The board also wants the lighting in
the library and the entryway updated
to a more energy efcient product.
Board Treasurer Chadd Hartwig
said he appreciated the work McKin-
stry was doing in the school.
A few teachers at the meeting also
said workers at the school were always
polite and clean in the classrooms.
The district took out a loan for the
projects, totaling an estimated $4.4
million, and is allowed to increase the
tax levy because the projects are for
energy efcient building maintenance.
Earlier this year, the district bor-
rowed $3.5 million in a one-year loan,
which will be paid back when the board
borrows the long-term loan for the
exact amount of the project.
Delavan man
killed in crash
LYONS A 45-year-old Delavan man was killed in a
single-vehicle crash that occurred Oct. 27 at 9:31 a.m. on
State Highway 36.
Jeffrey S. Bonsall, who was pronounced dead at the
scene, was the passenger in the vehicle. The driver, Taran
Q. Raczka, 22, Burlington, was transported to Burlington
Hospital via Paratech and then own to Froedtert Hospital,
Wauwatosa. The initial investigation suggests that Raczka
was driving east on Highway 36 when he lost control of his
vehicle, drove off the road and hit a tree.
There were no indications that Raczka applied his brakes
prior to the vehicle striking the tree, according to a press
release by the Walworth County Sheriffs Department.
Bonsall was trapped in the vehicle. Responding deputies
and Lyons Rescue personnel, along with Paratech, found no
sign of life from Bonsall.
He was eventually extricated from the vehicle and the
Walworth County Coroners Ofce pronounced him dead at
the scene at 10:44 a.m.
An autopsy is being performed tomorrow to determine
the exact cause of death. The investigation remains ongoing.
Hayden/She likes to solve a problem when she paints
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
OConnell misquoted
An article last week incorrectly cited a statement by
Fontana Plan Commissioner Micki OConnell. OConnell
said during the Oct. 6 commission meeting that she was
opposed to the 18 planned town homes on Douglas Street
because it would be too much crammed in one small area.
CORRECTION
We make every effort to be accurate. If you feel weve
made an error, please contact us at jhalverson@
lakegenevanews.net. Include your name and phone
number in case we need to get back to you.
Hayden said when she was prepping for the open house,
she found some shed forgotten.
Typically I remember most pieces, she said. I dont
really remember faces, but if (people) describe to me which
piece they bought, then I can place them.
She makes remembering her pieces a bit easier with
simple titling.
This is probably titled Fruit, she said, ipping over a
framed canvas. Yes, Plate of Fruit.
An artists day
Hayden said she paints every day, unless shes getting
ready for the open house or traveling.
In the morning, she does all the work thats not art but
related to art, she said.
Theres correspondence, applying for grants and residen-
cies, she said. I also make most of the frames. Thats all in
the morning. From noon until dark, I work.
She used to teach art classes in Sharon, but she gave it up
to focus on her own development.
I found that teaching is detrimental after a while, she
said. It calls you back to the beginning. The best art is made
by people who dont realize their style. Its where really break
through items are made, when an artist doesnt know.
That continued development is why Hayden changed
from studying ceramics in college to studying painting.
I realized that ceramics was something you could master,
and then it would be like working in a factory, she said.
Painting isnt like that. Theres always something new to
learn.
Hayden graduated from the Art Institute of Chicago, after
taking a few semesters off to do artwork, getting married
and having two kids.
The Art Institute, she said, was the perfect place to go to
school for an artist because she got to live with the paintings
in the galleries.
Hayden and her family decided to move to Sharon to
reduce costs of living, so her and her artist husband could
focus on their artwork.
They came to Sharon to look at a house. Instead they
found the Victorian abandoned and in sad shape. They moved
in 1961.
Hayden said she renished most of the woodwork in the
house. She said there were layers of paint to remove.
Sharon was magically Victorian back then, Hayden said.
There were so many Victorian houses. A lot of them have
been ruined ... people put up aluminum siding and take down
the porches. There are still some Victorian houses but not as
many as back then.
During the restoration process, Hayden said she liked to
look at other restored Victorian homes.
I like to see how old houses are supposed to be, she said.
I wanted this house to be that way. Of course, there are cer-
tain changes.
A reason for the painting
Hayden said she likes to solve a problem with her paint-
ings.
In one, the view is out her New York window, but its not
just the cityscape. Instead, shes working on scale issues. In
the foreground, theres a milk carton. In the background,
theres a bridge.
I was trying to solve that, she said.
The paintings hung on her homes walls arent just art.
Theyre art about art, she said. Its the formal aspects of
the painting, not just the subject matter.
Hayden has a 10-piece allegorical series that she plans to
continue. On the large canvas, Hayden has imitated charac-
ters from Manets Luncheon on the Grass into a contemporary
setting. Art historians or those with rst-hand knowledge of
it, would recognize these three characters, Hayden said.
She expects to continue to paint as long as possible.
Why would I quit? she asked. I cant imagine what else
Id do.
JADE BOLACK/REGIONAL NEWS
MARTHA HAYDENS home is covered with her artwork,
acrylic and oil paintings, etchings and charcoal drawings.
WALWORTH IMMANUEL
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Adults $10.00 - Ages 4-8 - $5.00
ALL Drive-Trough Carry-Outs - $10.00
Live Entertainment Before Eight
Turkey, Dressing, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Squash,
Rolls, Cranberry, Beverages, Pies
111 Fremont St., Walworth, WI - (Across from the Grade School)
Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014 - 3:30-7 p.m.
VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY
November 4, 2014
General Election
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the GENER-
AL ELECTION will be held at the Village Hall, 250
Williams Street, on Tuesday, November 4, 2014. Te
poll of said election opens at 7:00 a.m. and closes at
8:00 p.m. on that day serving Wards 1 - 4.
Te Village of Williams Bay meets the requirements
mandated by the ADA for the accommodation of all
voters.
Jacqueline Hopkins
Village Clerk
NOTICE OF REFERENDUM ELECTION
NOVEMBER 4, 2014
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at an election to be held in the several
towns, villages, wards, and election districts of the State of Wisconsin, on Tuesday,
November 4, 2014, the following question will be submitted to a vote of the people
pursuant to law:
2013 ENROLLED JOINT RESOLUTION 1
To renumber section 9 of article IV; and to create section 9 (2) of article IV and
section 11 of article VIII of the constitution; relating to: creation of a department of
transportation, creation of a transportation fund, and deposit of funds into the trans-
portation fund (second consideration).
Whereas, the 2011 legislature in regular session considered a proposed amend-
ment to the constitution in 2011 Senate Joint Resolution 23, which became 2011
Enrolled Joint Resolution 4, and agreed to it by a majority of the members elected to
each of the two houses, which proposed amendment reads as follows:
SECTION 1.Section 9 of article IV of the constitution is renumbered
section 9 (1) of article IV.
SECTION 2. Section 9 (2) of article IV of the constitution is created to read:
[Article IV] Section 9 (2) The legislature shall provide by law for the
establishment of a department of transportation and a transportation fund.
SECTION 3. Section 11 of article VIII of the constitution is created to read:
[Article VIII] Section 11. All funds collected by the state from any taxes or fees lev-
ied or imposed for the licensing of motor vehicle operators, for the titling, licensing,
or registration of motor vehicles, for motor vehicle fuel, or for the use of roadways,
highways, or bridges, and from taxes and fees levied or imposed for aircraft, air-
line property, or aviation fuel or for railroads or railroad property shall be deposited
only into the transportation fund or with a trustee for the benet of the department
of transportation or the holders of transportationrelated revenue bonds, except for
collections from taxes or fees in existence on December 31, 2010, that were not
being deposited in the transportation fund on that date. None of the funds collected
or received by the state from any source and deposited into the transportation fund
shall be lapsed,further transferred, or appropriated to any program that is not directly
administered by the department of transportation in furtherance of the departments
responsibility for the
planning, promotion, and protection of all transportation systems in the state except
for programs for which there was an appropriation from the transportation fund on
December 31, 2010. In this section, the term motor vehicle does not include any
allterrain vehicles, snowmobiles, or watercraft.
SECTION 4. Numbering of new provision. If another constitutional amend-
ment ratied by the people creates the number of any provision created in this joint
resolution, the chief of the legislative reference bureau shall determine the sequenc-
ing and the numbering of the provisions whose numbers conict.
Now, therefore, be it resolved by the assembly, the senate concurring, That the
foregoing proposed amendment to the constitution is agreed to by the 2013 legisla-
ture; and, be it further
Resolved, That the foregoing proposed amendment to the constitution be sub-
mitted to a vote of the people at the election to be held on the Tuesday after the rst
Monday in November 2014; and, be it further
Resolved, That the question concerning ratication of the foregoing proposed
amendment to the constitution be stated on the ballot as follows:
QUESTION 1: Creation of a Transportation Fund. Shall section 9 (2) of
article IV and section 11 of article VIII of the constitution be created to require
that revenues generated by use of the state transportation system be deposited into a
transportation fund administered by a department of transportation for the exclusive
purpose of funding Wisconsins transportation systems and to prohibit any transfers
or lapses from this fund?
EXPLANATION
In general, funds collected in fees and taxes may be appropriated for any public
purpose determined by the Legislature. Wisconsins transportation fund, which cur-
rently exists under statute, is designed to be the source of funding for all modes of
transportation in the state. Wisconsin law requires that specic revenue streams such
as taxes or fees related to motor vehicles, aircraft, and railroads be deposited into the
transportation fund.
At times, the Legislature has transferred moneys initially deposited into the
transportation fund to programs with non-transportation-related purposes. Such
transfers have typically been to general revenue funds, which are used for state pro-
grams such as education, health care, and shared revenue. The Wisconsin Supreme
Court has suggested that these transfers are permissible under current law.
In essence, the proposed amendment would change the Wisconsin Constitution
to require that revenues generated by specied uses of the state transportation system
be deposited into a transportation fund and expended only for transportation-related
purposes.
Ayes vote on this question would establish a department of transportation and
a transportation fund in the state constitution. The current Department of Transporta-
tion and transportation fund exist only under statute. Ayes vote would mean that
all funds collected from taxes or fees in existence after December 31, 2010 for the
licensing of motor vehicle operators, for the titling, licensing, or registration of motor
vehicles, for motor vehicle fuel, or for the use of roadways, highways, or bridges, and
from taxes and fees levied or imposed for aircraft, airline property, or aviation fuel
or for railroads or railroad property would be deposited in the transportation fund
or with certain authorized parties, such as a trustee for the benet of the department
of transportation. Funds in the transportation fund may not be lapsed, further trans-
ferred, or used for any program that is not directly administered by the department
of transportation in furtherance of the departments responsibility for the planning,
promotion, and protection of all transportation systems in the state (except for pro-
grams with an appropriation from the statutory transportation fund as of December
31, 2010). The proposed amendment does not dene transportation systems.
A no vote would mean that the Department of Transportation continues to be
a statutory agency. It also would mean that monies collected from motor vehicle,
aircraft, and railroad fees and taxes could be appropriated by the Legislature for
transportation systems or for other programs as determined by the Legislature.
DONE in the County of Walworth,
This 29th day of October, 2014.

Kimberly S. Bushey
Walworth County Clerk
Government Center, Room 101
100 West Walworth Street
P.O. Box 1001
Elkhorn, WI 53121
(262) 741-4241
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 5B
COMMUNITY NOTES
Im here as an inquiring mind, said Bill Lovell, a Wil-
liams Bay resident. Lovell said he hasnt decided which
way hell vote on the referendum.
Im checking it out as a reconnaissance, he said of
his visit to the open house. Lovell said hes also taking
information about the proposed school building to family
who still live in Illinois, but who own property is Williams
Bay.
Jim Anton, also a resident, said he was at the open
house to check out some facts. On the referendum ques-
tion itself, Im on the fence, Anton said.
For the past two years, the Williams Bay School Board
reviewed options and talked with consultants about what
to do with its aging elementary school building at 139
Congress St.
The consensus reached by a citizen committee and the
school board was to build new and gather all the grades
on the 80-acre property at 500 W. Geneva St. The old
elementary school, once the districts sole K-12 building,
would be either sold or razed. The property at 139 Con-
gress St. would also be sold.
Architects and consultants from Eppstein-Uhen &
Associates, Milwaukee, have come up with a design that
would connect the K-5 grade school to the junior-senior
high school building.
Although the proposed elementary building would be
connected to the junior/senior high building on the out-
side, inside the elementary and junior-senior high school
students would be separated, while the two buildings
would share some spaces, including gymnasiums and
food service.
The $19.9 million bond would pay for all project costs,
including new construction, renovations to the current
junior/senior high school, site work, furnishings, equip-
ment, professional services fees, required permits and
the cost to demolish the current elementary school, if it
cannot be sold by May 2015.
Anderson has said that electors can still nd informa-
tion about the proposed project on his blog on the school
district website.
In April, the school board did a quick review of what
it wanted in the new elementary school. The two-story
structure would connect to the existing junior/senior high
school on the northeast side. It would have its own secure
entrances and exits.
It would share the kitchen with the junior-senior high
school. The building would also have shared and multi-
use features, such as a full-sized gym with two basket-
ball courts and a stage for multi-purpose use and a weight
room.
In June, the school board approved spending up to
$28,000 to have its building consultants Eppstein Uhen,
Milwaukee, and Scherrer Construction, Burlington, to
prepare interior and exterior drawings and renderings of
the proposed structure.
The problem with the existing elementary school
building is not capacity. The board has made clear that
the problem with the elementary school building is age.
The core of the building dates back to World War I.
Originally built in 1916 to house all 12 grades in the
Williams Bay School District, at least six additions have
been added to the building.
The building served as the districts only school build-
ing until the new junior/senior high school was opened in
1996.
The additions to the older building added space, but
also made the buildings mechanical and electrical ser-
vices more complex.
The old school still uses boilers rst installed in 1916.
Those boilers have been reworked over the years to
use rst wood, then coal, then oil and now natural gas as
its primary fuel. Maintenance staff has said its hard nd-
ing parts for the old boilers.
The schools wiring also runs through a series of
junction boxes separated around the school. The wiring
cannot easily support modern electronics, including com-
puters. In the newest addition, dating to 1991, the class-
room windows cant be opened because parts inside the
windows are broken.
Repairing some of the xtures in the building is
impossible because they are no longer manufactured,
Anderson has said.
Bay/Some in attendance say they are on the fence
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
Genealogical Society meets Nov. 4
The public is invited to the Tuesday, Nov. 4 meeting of
the Walworth County Genealogical Society at 6:30 p.m., in
the Delavan Community Centre, 826 E. Geneva St., Dela-
van.
Taking Your Family Research from Chaos to Calm
will be the program presented by Jean Hoffmann. As clerk
of the Kenosha Civil War Museum Resource Center, Hoff-
mann assists museum visitors in digging deeper into the
events of the American Civil War or aspects of that time
period in American history, as well as providing assistance
in nding a Civil War ancestor.
Independently she offers genealogy classes, speaks to
genealogical organizations and demonstrates effective
ways of organizing family research. She is also a board
member of the Kenosha Cemetery Association.
The business meeting agenda includes the nominating
committees slate of candidates for the ofces of president,
treasurer, and two board members.
Nominations can also be made from the oor and the
election will be held at the Dec. 2 meeting.
The WCGS meets on the rst Tuesday of every month
at the Delavan Community Centre at 6:30 PM. Meetings
are free and open to the public. Guests are invited to join
by paying annual dues, individual $15, family $18, and stu-
dent $7.
Visit the Genealogy Library in the Matheson Memorial
Library, 101 N. Wisconsin St., Elkhorn, every Tuesday from
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., or the WCGS website www.walworthcgs.
com for more information.
Mercy receives donation from Enbridge
Mercy Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Mercy
Health System, received $500 from Enbridge Energys
Community Investment Fund. The funds will be allocated
to the Autism Support Fund which provides free or low cost
access to social skills classes.
Autism affects 1 in 68 children. More children will be
diagnosed with autism this year than with AIDS, diabetes
and cancer combined. Autism is the fastest growing seri-
ous developmental disability in the United States. There is
no medical detection or cure; its presence is growing at an
overwhelming rate.
The families affected by autism struggle to provide the
quality care their children need because of the staggering
costs and lack of insurance coverage.
To help, the Mercy Foundation created the ASF, which
provides nancial resources to families affected by Autism
Spectrum Disorder in Walworth County.
Resources are used toward social skills classes, sensory
and safety equipment, respite care and more. To qualify,
all applicants must present documentation of a veried
diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder and a completed
application and necessary nancial documentation.
For more information about the Mercy Foundation or
ASF, visit Foundation.MercyHealthSystem.org.
Ray wins Invest in Others award
Tyson Jon Ray, founding partner of FORM Wealth
Management Group, Lake Geneva, afliated with Raymond
James Financial Services, won the 2014 Invest in Others
Global Community Impact Award, one of ve categories of
awards presented on Sept. 18 at the eighth annual Invest
in Others Community Leadership Awards dinner in New
York City.
Ray earned the honor for his work with Childrens
World Impact, which will receive a $20,000 donation from
the Invest in Others Charitable Foundation. He has worked
tirelessly throughout Haiti and Ghana, raising more than
$750,000 to date, recruiting volunteers and leading mis-
sion trips.
Through his work with CWI, he has served more than
1,000 women and children in Ghana and more than 3,000
women and children in Haiti.
Success is investing in others and changing lives, Ray
said.
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NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
SCHOOL DISTRICT OF WILLIAMS BAY
NOVEMBER 4, 2014
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at an election to be held in the School District of
Williams Bay on November 4, 2014, the following proposed Initial Resolution of the School
Board will be submitted to a vote of the people:
INITIAL RESOLUTION
AUTHORIZING GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS
IN AN AMOUNT NOT TO EXCEED $19,900,000
BE IT RESOLVED by the School Board of the School
District of Williams Bay, Walworth County, Wisconsin that there
shall be issued pursuant to Chapter 67 of the Wisconsin Statutes,
general obligation bonds in an amount not to exceed $19,900,000
for the public purpose of paying the cost of constructing, equipping
and furnishing a new elementary school addition onto the existing
Junior/Senior High School site and the cost of demolition of the
current Elementary School.
The question will appear on the ballot as follows:
"Shall the School District of Williams Bay, Walworth County,
Wisconsin be authorized to issue pursuant to Chapter 67 of the
Wisconsin Statutes, general obligation bonds in an amount not to
exceed $19,900,000 for the public purpose of paying the cost of
constructing, equipping and furnishing a new elementary school
addition onto the existing Junior/Senior High School site and the
cost of demolition of the current Elementary School?"
EXPLANATORY STATEMENT AND EFFECT OF VOTE
The referendum election ballot will ask District electors to vote "yes" or "no" on the
referendum election question as set forth above.
A "yes" vote on the question is in favor of the Initial Resolution set forth above and is a
vote to approve the borrowing of $19,900,000 by the School District of Williams Bay through
the issuance of general obligation bonds for the purpose of paying the cost of constructing,
equipping and furnishing a new elementary school addition onto the existing Junior/Senior High
School site and the cost of demolition of the current Elementary School.
A "no" vote on the question is opposed to the Initial Resolution set forth above and is a
vote to deny the School District of Williams Bay the authority to borrow $19,900,000 through
the issuance of general obligation bonds for the purpose of paying the cost of constructing,
equipping and furnishing a new elementary school addition onto the existing Junior/Senior High
School site and the cost of demolition of the current Elementary School.
In the event a majority of the electors voting vote "yes" on the question set forth above,
the District will be authorized to undertake the school building program described above and
borrow not in excess of $19,900,000 therefor; if a majority vote "no" on the question set forth
above, the District will not be so authorized.
LOCATION AND HOURS OF POLLING PLACES
At the election to be held on November 4, 2014 in the School District of Williams Bay
the following polling place locations will be used for the municipalities and/or wards indicated:
School District Electors
Residing in Vote at
Village of Williams Bay Village Hall
250 Williams Street
Williams Bay, WI 53191
Town of Geneva N3496 Como Road
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Town of Linn Chapel on the Hill Parish Hall
N2482 Cisco Road
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Town of Delavan 1220 South Shore Drive
Delavan, WI 53115
Town of Walworth W6741 Brick Church Road
Walworth, WI 53184
ALL POLLING PLACES WILL BE OPEN AT 7:00 A.M. AND WILL CLOSE AT 8:00
P.M.
If you have any questions concerning your polling place, contact the municipal clerk:
Village of Williams Bay (Jacqueline) Village Hall-250 Williams Street-Williams Bay, WI 53191
262-245-2700 Starting October 13 31, 2014
Absentee ballot hours: M-T-W-F 9:30 am-12:00pm & 1:00 am-
4:00 pm; Thursday 9:00 am-11:00 am
Geneva Township (Jodi) N3496 Como Road Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-8497 Starting October 20, 2014 In-house voting
Absentee ballot hours: 8am 4pm
Linn Township (Marna) Chapel on the Hill Parish Hall N2482 Cisco Road Lake Geneva WI 53147
262-275-6300 Starting October 20, 2014 In-house voting
Absentee ballot hours: M-T-W-F 8:00 am 4:00 pm In-house
voting Thurs: 8:00 am Noon
Delavan Township (Dixie) 1220 South Shore Drive Delavan, WI 53115
262-728-3471 Starting October 20, 2014 In-house voting
Absentee ballot hours: M-F 8:30 am-4:30 pm
Walworth Township (Marie) W6741 Brick Church Road Walworth, WI 53184
262-275-9800 Absentee ballot hours: M-W-F 9:00 am-4:00 pm
All polling places are accessible to elderly and disabled voters.
INFORMATION TO ELECTORS
Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall state his or her name and address and
sign the poll book before being permitted to vote. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the
initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector
shall retire alone to a voting booth or machine and cast his or her ballot except that an elector
who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector's minor child or minor ward. An
election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official
may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice.
On referenda questions, where paper ballots are used, the elector shall make a cross (X)
in the square at the right of "yes" if in favor of the question, or the elector shall make a cross (X)
in the square at the right of "no" if opposed to the question.
When using a tactile ballot marking device (Vote-PAD) to mark a paper ballot, the elector
shall obtain from the inspectors, the assistive device and any audio or dexterity aids if required.
On referendum questions, the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to "yes" if in
favor of the question, or the elector shall fill in the oval or connect the arrow next to "no" if
opposed to the question.
On referenda questions, where optical scan voting systems are used, the elector shall fill
in the oval or connect the arrow next to "yes" if in favor of the question, or the elector shall fill in
the oval or connect the arrow next to "no" if opposed to the question.
When using an electronic ballot marking device ("Automark") to mark an optical scan
ballot, the elector shall touch the screen at "yes" if in favor of the question, or the elector shall
touch the screen at "no" if opposed to the question.
On referenda questions, where touch screen voting systems are used, the elector shall
depress the button next to "yes" if in favor of the question, or the elector shall depress the button
next to "no" if opposed to the question.
The vote should not be cast in any other manner. Not more than five minutes' time shall
be allowed inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the elector in casting
his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to
anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked.
If the elector spoils a paper or optical scan ballot, he or she shall return it to an election
official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued
to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any
other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its
place. The elector may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station, but not more than three
ballots shall be issued to any one elector.
After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the voting booth, properly deposit the
ballot and promptly leave the polling place.
After an official paper ballot is marked, it shall be folded so the inside marks do not
show, but so the printed endorsements and inspectors' initials on the outside do show. The
elector shall leave the booth, deposit the folded ballot in the ballot box, or deliver the ballot to an
inspector for deposit in the box, and shall leave the polling place promptly.
After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve
so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the booth, insert
the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for
deposit. If a central count system is used, the elector shall insert the ballot in the ballot box and
discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. The elector shall leave the
polling place promptly.
After an official touch screen ballot is cast, the elector shall leave the polling place
promptly.
An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector
declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or
understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected
individual rendering assistance may not be the elector's employer or an agent of that employer or
an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector.
The following is a sample of the official ballot:
OFFICIAL REFERENDUM BALLOT
November 4, 2014
NOTICE TO ELECTORS: THIS BALLOT MAY BE INVALID UNLESS INITIALED
BY TWO (2) ELECTION INSPECTORS. IF CAST AS AN ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE
BALLOT MUST BEAR THE INITIALS OF THE MUNICIPAL CLERK OR DEPUTY
CLERK.
If you desire to vote on the question, make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of
"YES" if in favor of the question or make a cross (X) in the square at the RIGHT of "NO" if
opposed to the question.
Shall the School District of Williams Bay, Walworth County,
Wisconsin be authorized to issue pursuant to Chapter 67 of the
Wisconsin Statutes, general obligation bonds in an amount not to
exceed $19,900,000 for the public purpose of paying the cost of
constructing, equipping and furnishing a new elementary school
addition onto the existing Junior/Senior High School site and the
cost of demolition of the current Elementary School?
YES NO
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
Persons with questions regarding the referendum election should contact Dr. Wayne
R. Anderson, District Administrator.
Done in the School District of Williams Bay
on October 30, 2014
Dianna Woss
District Clerk
6B | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
SPOTLIGHT ON LOCAL BUSINESSES
www.MercyHealthSystem.org
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For More Information Call Tish Lux at
(262) 740-7225 or (262) 203-0266
5680 Parliament Lane, Delavan, WI 53115
WESTSHIRE FARMS
FACTORY DIRECT
2462 HWY. 120 Lake Geneva, WI
(1/2 miIe north of HWY. 12)
(262) 249-0420
SAVINGS
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Coffee House & Wine Bar
80 N Walworth Ave. No.1 - Williams Bay, Wis. - (262) 686 - 8016
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KIDDIE KOTTAGE
LEARNING
ACADEMY
601 Walworth St., Lake Geneva
262/248-3434
www.kiddiekottagecare.com
Owners name:
Milisa OSullivan
How many years in business?
13 yrs in Ingleside, IL
Lake Geneva location opened
May 5, 2014
What services or products are
your specialties?
At Kiddie Kottage Learning
Academy, we know that learn-
ing begins in the earliest stages
of life and continues throughout
our lives. Our facility is family
owned and operated. We believe
the best way to meet your needs
as parents is by working closely
with you to provide a warm
secure atmosphere, caring pro-
fessional services and ongoing
communication between your
family and our staff. Providing a
developmentally appropriate ed-
ucational curriculum. Promoting
a relaxed, fun atmosphere where
children are free to be creative
and encouraged to pursue their
individual talents.
Describe your typical clientele:
Working parents
What is the compliment you
hear most about the way you
run your business?
Kiddie Kottage Learning Acad-
emy, strives to provide quality,
affordable, child care services in
a home like setting.
What is the key factor that
makes this business rewarding
for you?
I enjoy being able to provide a
safe and secure facility where
the children are in a structured
environment that we focus on
the whole child, both education-
ally and emotionally.
Learning Academy, Inc.
601 N. Walworth St. - Lake Geneva, WI
Why Does Kiddie Cottage Stand Out?
(262) 248-3434 - Fax (815) 873-4084
www.kiddiekottagecare.com
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 7B
SPOTLIGHT ON LOCAL BUSINESSES
Geneva Lake Manor &
Geneva Lake Rehabilitation
Whether it is Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall, At Te Lake House is the
perfect gift of memories for your family or close group of friends. Tings
are just that...things. But memories and time spent together are forever.
To Reserve
Call Mary
(262) 903-6636
Gift Certicates
Available!
maryking@wi.rr.com
AtTeLakehouse.com
Your hosts, Andy and Mary, built At Te Lake House in 2010 to
provide a complete vacation home for every family without the cost
and maintenance associated with owning such a dream home.
ReelLifeTV.net
currentl y pl ayi ng
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business. We offer a variety of photo packages
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262.248.4444 for more information.
Active Senior Living, Assisted Living & Memory Care
Curtis Street & Townline Road
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The Highlands The Terraces
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EQUAL HOUSING
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HOURS: Open 7 days a week from 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
846 Madison St. - Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Dog Boarding,
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Pet Sitting,
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CONTEMPORARY STYLES
TRADITIONAL SERVICE
Suzy RcinhoIm ]ack RcinhoIm
p: 262.248.6687
fax: 262.248.9068
801 Main Street
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
lakegenevaoptician@sbcglobal.net
Email(s): luxwhiieddsqgmail.com - dr.richardwhiieqsbcglobal.nei
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Dr. Laura Lux, DDS, MS - Dr. Richard White, DDS
415 Broad St. Suite 3 - Iake ueneva, WI
(262) 248-0452 - (262) 248-0446 (Iax)
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ws.net lakegenevanew y, , Thursday, March 20, 2014 $1.50
Candidate
questionnaires
the video online at lakegenevanews.net
Subscriptions available in
print and online.
Call (262) 248-4444 to get your copy today.
Owners names:
Andy Smyth and Mary King
What services or products are
your specialties?
Family Vacations, Intimate Wed-
dings, Man-cations, Girls Get a
Ways, Reunions
Describe your typical customers
or clientele:
Families / friends vacationing
together
What is the compliment you
hear most about the way you
run your business?
The house is Beautiful and the
views of the lake are outstand-
ing.
What is the most unique ser-
vice/product that you offer?
Providing a luxurious, lakeside
home, where guest can come
together to enjoy the people they
love under one roof.
What is the key factor that
makes this business rewarding
for you?
Seeing our guests enjoy playing
with their children and grand-
children.
AT THE LAKE
HOUSE
W3920 Lake Shore Drive,
Lake Geneva
www.atthelakehouse.com
262-903-6636
8B | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
POLICE AND COURT REPORTS
NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION
AND SAMPLE BALLOTS
November 4, 2014
OFFICE OF THE WALWORTH COUNTY CLERK
TO THE VOTERS OF WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice is hereby given of a general election to be
held in the several wards in Walworth County, on
the 4th of November, 2014, at which the officers
named below shall be chosen. The names of the
candidates for each office to be voted for, whose
nominations have been certified to or filed in this
office, are given under the title of the office and
under the appropriate party or other designation,
each in its proper column, together with the
questions submitted to a vote, in the sample ballot
below.
INFORMATION TO VOTERS
Upon entering the polling place, a voter shall state
his or her name and address and sign the poll
book before being permitted to vote. If a voter is
not registered to vote, a voter may register to vote
at the polling place serving his or her residence if
the voter provides proof of residence. Where
ballots are distributed to voters, the initials of two
inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being
permitted to vote, the voter shall retire alone to a
voting booth or machine and cast his or her ballot
except that a voter who is a parent or guardian may
be accompanied by the voter's minor child or
minor ward. An election official may inform the
voter of the proper manner for casting a vote, but
the official may not in any manner advise or
indicate a particular voting choice.
Where hand-count paper ballots are used, the
voter shall make a mark (X) in the square next to
the name of the candidate of his or her choice for
each office for which he or she intends to vote. To
vote for a person whose name does not appear on
the ballot, the voter shall write in the name of the
person of his or her choice in the space provided
for a write-in vote. On referendum questions, the
voter shall make a cross (X) in the square next to
"yes" if in favor of the question, or the voter shall
make a cross (X) in the square next to "no" if
opposed to the question.
Where an optical scan voting system is used,
the voter shall fill in the oval next to the name of
the candidate of his or her choice for each office
for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a
person whose name does not appear on the ballot,
the voter shall write in the name of the person of
his or her choice in the space provided for a write-
in vote, and fill in the oval on the write-in line. On
referendum questions, the voter shall fill in the
oval next to "yes" if in favor of the question, or the
voter shall fill in the oval next to "no" if opposed
to the question.
Where touch screen voting systems are used,
the voter shall touch the screen next to the name
of the candidate of his or her choice for each office
for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a
person whose name does not appear on the ballot,
the voter shall type in the name of the person of
his or her choice in the space provided for a write-
in vote. On referendum questions, the voter shall
touch the screen next to "yes" if in favor of the
question or the voter shall touch the screen next to
"no" if opposed to the question.
Note: A voter must vote for Governor and
Lieutenant Governor jointly on one ticket. A vote
for Governor is also a vote for Lieutenant Governor.
To vote for persons whose names do not appear
on the ballot, write the names of individuals for
both offices on the lines provided.
The vote should not be cast in any other manner.
Not more than five minutes' time shall be allowed
inside a voting booth. Sample ballots or other
materials to assist the voter in marking his or her
ballot may be taken into the booth and copied.
The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so
as to reveal how the ballot is marked.
If a voter spoils a paper or optical scan ballot,
he or she shall return it to an election official who
shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more
than three ballots shall be issued to any one voter.
If the ballot has not been initialed by two
inspectors or is defective in any other way, the
voter shall return it to the election official who
shall issue a proper ballot in its place. The elector
may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting
station before the ballot is cast.
After casting his or her vote, the voter shall leave
the voting booth, properly deposit the ballot, and
promptly leave the polling place.
After an official hand-count paper ballot is
marked, it shall be folded so that the inside marks
do not show, but so the printed endorsements and
inspectors' initials on the outside do show. The
voter shall then deposit his or her folded ballot in
the proper ballot box or deliver the ballot to an
inspector for deposit, and leave the polling place
promptly.
After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it
shall be inserted in the security sleeve so the
marks do not show. The voter shall then insert the
ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve,
or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit.
The voter shall leave the polling place promptly.
After an official touch screen ballot is cast, the
voter shall leave the polling place promptly.
A voter may select an individual to assist in
casting his or her vote if the voter declares to the
presiding official that he or she is unable to read,
has difficulty reading, writing, or understanding
English, or that due to disability is unable to cast
his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering
assistance may not be the voter's employer or an
agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a
labor organization which represents the voter.
The following is a sample of the official ballot:
Kimberly S. Bushey
Walworth County Clerk
Government Center, Room 101
100 West Walworth Street
P.O. Box 1001
Elkhorn, WI 53121
(262)741-4241
TOUCH SCREEN SAMPLE BALLOT
OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR PARTISAN OFFICE
AND REFERENDUM
OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR PARTISAN OFFICE
AND REFERENDUM
Attached is a sample ballot for Walworth County.
Voting districts vary throughout Walworth County;
please consult the below instructions to determine
which offices and candidates will appear on your
ballot.
All electors in Walworth County will vote
for:
Governor/Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General,
Secretary of State, State Treasurer, Sheriff, Clerk of
Circuit Court and State Referendum. You may
consult the sample ballot which is attached to
identify these offices and candidates.
Congressional Districts, State Senate and
Assembly Districts change throughout Walworth
County. To identify the appropriate Congressional,
Senate and Assembly District for your area, please
consult the Congressional/Senate /Assembly
District chart which appears in this notice. Please
note that only electors residing in odd-numbered
State Senate Districts will have the office of State
Senate appear on their ballot.
Please note that voters in the City of Lake Geneva
will also be voting on a local referendum question
which is cited in the list of candidates and
referenda questions.
Also note that voters in the following school
districts will be having a school district referendum
question(s) on their ballots:
Delavan-Darien School District
East Troy Community School District
Williams Bay Community School District
Whitewater Unified School District
TOWNS:
Bloomfield - Wards 1,2 1 11 32
Darien - Wards 1-3 1 11 31
Delavan - Wards 1-11 1 11 32
East Troy-Ward 1 1 28 83
East Troy - Wards 2,3 1 11 33
East Troy-Wards 4-6 1 11 32
Geneva - Wards 1-8 1 11 32
LaFayette - Wards 1-3 1 11 32
LaGrange - Wards 1-3 1 11 33
Linn - Wards 1-4,6 1 11 32
Linn - Wards 5 1 11 32
Lyons - Wards 1-7 1 11 32
Richmond - Wards 1-3 1 11 31
Sharon 1 11 31
Spring Prairie - Wards 1-4 1 11 32
Sugar Creek - Wards 1-5 1 11 31
Troy - Wards 1-3 1 11 33
Walworth - Wards 1-3 1 11 31
Whitewater - Wards 1,2 1 15 43
Whitewater-Ward 3 5 15 43

VILLAGES:
Bloomfield Wards 1-5 1 11 32
Darien - Wards 1,2 1 11 31
East Troy - Wards 1-5 1 11 32
Fontana - Wards 1-3 1 11 31
Genoa City - Wards 1-4 1 11 32
Mukwonago - Ward 11 1 11 33
Sharon - Wards 1, 2 1 11 31
Walworth - Wards 1-3 1 11 31
Williams Bay - Wards 1-4 1 11 31

CITIES:
Burlington - Ward 9 (no voters) 1 21 63
Delavan - Wards 1-5
(Ald. I) 1 11 32
Delavan - Wards 6-10
(Ald II) 1 11 32
Delavan - Wards 11-14
(Ald. III) 1 11 32
Elkhorn - Ward 1 (Ald. I) 1 11 31
Elkhorn - Wards 2,7
(Ald. II) 1 11 31
Elkhorn-Ward 3 (Ald.III) 1 11 31
Elkhorn - Ward 4 (Ald. IV) 1 11 31
Elkhorn Ward 5 (Ald. V) 1 11 31
Elkhorn-Ward 6 (Ald. VI) 1 11 31
Elkhorn - Wards 8 (Ald. IV) 1 11 32
Lake Geneva - Wards 1,2
(Ald. I) 1 11 32
Lake Geneva - Wards 3,4
(Ald. IV) 1 11 32
Lake Geneva - Wards 5,6,10
(Ald. III) 1 11 32
Lake Geneva - Wards 7-9 11-14
(Ald. II) 1 11 32
Whitewater - Wards 1,2
(Ald. I) 5 15 43
Whitewater - Wards 3,4,9
(Ald. III) 5 15 43
Whitewater - Wards 5,6
(Ald. IV) 5 15 43
Whitewater - Wards 7, 8
(Ald. II) 5 15 43
Please consult the above list of Congressional,
Senate and Assembly Districts to identify the
districts where you live.
To identify the candidates that will appear on your
ballot see the
Listing of Candidates for Congressional,
Legislative, State and Walworth County
Offices and Referenda to be Voted on in
Walworth County-November 4, 2014
General Election which follows:
Statewide
Governor/
Lieutenant Governor
Vote for One
Mary Burke/John Lehman
(Democratic)

Scott Walker/
Rebecca Kleefisch
(Republican)
Dennis Fehr/
No Candidate
(Peoples Party)
Robert Burke/
Joseph M. Brost
(Libertarian)
Attorney General
Vote for One
Susan V. Happ
(Democratic)
Brad Schimel
(Republican)
Thomas A. Nelson, Sr.
(Libertarian)
Secretary of State
Vote for One
Doug La Follette
(Democratic)
Julian Bradley
(Republican)
Jerry Broitzman
(Constitution)
Andy Craig
(Libertarian)
State Treasurer
Vote for One
David L. Sartori
(Democratic)
Matt Adamczyk
(Republican)
Andrew Zuelke
(Constitution)
Ron Hardy
(Wisconsin Green Party)
Jerry Shidell
(Libertarian)
Congressional
Representative in Congress
District 1
Vote for One
Rob Zerban
(Democratic)
Paul Ryan
(Republican)
Representative in Congress
District 5
Vote for One
Chris Rockwood
(Democratic)
F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr.
(Republican)
Legislative
State Senator, District 11
Vote for One
Dan Kilkenny
(Democratic)
Steve Nass
(Republican)
State Senator, District 15
Vote for One
Janis Ringhand
(Democratic)
Brian Fitzgerald
(Republican)
State Senator, District 21
Vote for One
Randy Bryce
(Democratic)
Van Wanggaard
(Republican)
Representative to the Assembly,
District 31
Vote for One
Amy Loudenbeck
(Republican)
Representative to the Assembly,
District 32
Vote for One
Alan Kupsik
(Democratic)
Tyler August
(Republican)
Representative to the Assembly,
District 33
Vote for One
Cody Horlacher
(Republican)
Representative to the Assembly,
District 43
Vote for One
Andy Jorgensen
(Democratic)
Leon L. Hebert
(Republican)
Representative to the Assembly,
District 63
Vote for One
Andy Mitchell
(Democratic)
Robin J. Vos
(Republican)
Representative to the Assembly,
District 83
Vote for One
Jim Brownlow
(Democratic)
Dave Craig
(Republican)
County
Sheriff
Vote for One
Kurt Picknell
(Republican)
Clerk of Circuit Court
Vote for One
Sheila T. Reiff
(Republican)
Referendum
State
QUESTION 1: Creation of a Transportation
Fund. Shall section 9 (2) of article IV and section
11 of article VIII of the constitution be created to
require that revenues generated by use of the state
transportation system be deposited into a
transportation fund administered by a department
of transportation for the exclusive purpose of
funding Wisconsins transportation systems and to
prohibit any transfers or lapses from this fund?
Yes
No
Referendum
Municipal
City of Lake Geneva Referendum
Shall the City of Lake Geneva, Walworth County,
Wisconsin, be authorized to spend an amount not
to exceed $6,999,995.00 to construct a public
parking structure on tax parcels ZOP00250 and
ZOP00251 located at 818 Geneva Street which
amount includes all costs to acquire lands and
easements, relocate existing infrastructure,
demolish existing infrastructure, and to construct
the public parking structure paid for by funds from
the Tax Incremental District #4?
TOUCH SCREEN VOTING DEVICE
TOUCH SCREEN SAMPLE BALLOT
C
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e
s
s
i
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a
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S
e
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a
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e
A
s
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Daniel P. Berczyk, 38, Hales Corners, has
been charged with possession of a narcotic
drug and possession of drug paraphernalia.
If convicted, he faces up to three years and
seven months imprisonment and $10,500 in
nes.
Colin J. Gordon, 20, Lake Geneva, faces
a felony charge of repeated sexual assault of
a child. If convicted, he faces up to 40 years
imprisonment and $100,000 in nes.
Adam T. Hufnagel, 33, Janesville, has
been charged with felony theft from a busi-
ness setting in an amount over $10,000. If
convicted, he faces up to $25,000 in nes and
10 years imprisonment.
Lupe T. Medina, 21, Whitewater, has been
charged with felony bail jumping, misde-
meanor theft and misdemeanor possession
of an illegally obtained prescription. All of
the charges have been enhanced to a repeater
status. If convicted of all counts, he faces 12
years imprisonment and $30,000 in nes.
In a separate complaint, Medina faces
a felony charge of bail jumping and a mis-
demeanor charge of possession of drug
paraphernalia. If convicted of both counts,
Medina faces six years imprisonment 10
years imprisonment and $10,500 in nes.
Lance C. Mueller, 22, Whitewater, faces
a felony charge of identity theft for nancial
gain. If convicted, he faces up to six years
imprisonment and $10,000 in nes.
John J. Odoherty, 27, Chicago, faces a
felony charge of possession of THC with
intent to deliver and misdemeanor posses-
sion of drug paraphernalia. If convicted, he
faces up to six years and one month impris-
onment and $10,500 in nes.
Cory Sexton, 26, Bloomeld, faces a
felony bail jumping charge and misdemeanor
obstructing an ofcer. If convicted, he faces
up to six years and nine months imprison-
ment and $20,000 in nes.
Chase N. Stevens, 26, Whitewater, has
been charged with possession with intent to
deliver THC, delivering a schedule I, II or III
non-narcotic and misdemeanor possession of
drug paraphernalia.
If convicted, of all counts, Stevens faces
up to nine years and seven months imprison-
ment and $20,500 in nes.
Rafael Venegas Jr., 21, Elkhorn, faces
a felony charge of sexual assault of a child
under the age of 16. If convicted, he faces up
to 40 years imprisonment and $100,000 in
nes.
RECENT CHARGES
COURT REPORT
Sharon man pleads guilty to sex
assault
A 21-year-old Sharon man was sen-
tenced on Oct. 21 to four years of probation
after he pleaded guilty to second-degree
sexual assault of a child.
As a condition of his probation, Mat-
thew K. Stout, was sentenced to one-year in
jail with work-release privileges.
He also must be a lifetime registrant on
the sex offender registry.
According to the criminal complaint:
Stout, who was 20 at the time of the
incident, had sex with a 15-year-old girl.
The victim told police she met Stout on
Facebook.
When Stout was questioned by police,
he admitted to having sex with the girl.
LAKE GENEVA POLICE REPORTS
Oct. 5
1:41 a.m.: An ofcer conducted a traf-
c stop on Broad at Dodge streets. Robert
C. Flores, 58, Lake Geneva, was cited for
operating without required lamps lighted
and operating while under the inuence, as
a rst-offense.
Oct. 7
11:11 a.m.: The school resource ofcer
at Badger High School cited two 17-year-old
Lake Geneva boys for daily truancy.
12:30 p.m.: The school resource ofcer
at Badger High School cited a 16-year-old
Genoa City boy for disorderly conduct.
Oct. 9
11:20 a.m.: The school resource ofcer
at Badger High School issued a 17-year-old
Lake Geneva boy a citation for daily tru-
ancy.
Oct. 11
7:28 p.m.: Ofcers responded to the
800 block of Wrigley Drive for a report of
a hit-and-run accident. Keith Ray Cilley,
23, Racine, was cited for hit and run-unat-
tended vehicle, reckless driving-endanger-
ing safety and operating while under the
inuence-rst offense.
Oct. 14
8:16 a.m.: The school resource ofcer
at the Lake Geneva Middle School cited a
14-year-old Lake Geneva boy with disor-
derly conduct and damage to property.
Oct. 16
11:30 p.m.: An ofcer conducted a traf-
c stop on Wells Street at Townline Road.
Lukas J. Larsen, 20, Pleasant Prairie, was
cited for possession of drug paraphernalia.
Oct. 17
7 a.m.: Ofcers conducted a search
warrant in the 1100 block of Madison Street.
Ofcers cited a 15-year-old Lake Geneva
boy for possession of drug paraphernalia.
Oct. 18
1:11 a.m.: An ofcer conducted a traf-
c stop on South Edwards Boulevard at
Park Drive. Dakota Mackenzie Lininger, 19,
Whitewater, was cited for operating after
suspension - fourth plus offense and under-
age possession/consumption of alcohol.
3:01 a.m.: An ofcer was dispatched to
the 200 block of North Edwards Boulevard
for a shoplifting complaint. Lacey Marie
Vanantwerp, 21, Lake Geneva, and Alexan-
dria Nicole Eichelberg, 18, Genoa City, were
cited for retail theft.
Oct. 19
5:22 p.m.: An ofcer responded to the
200 block of North Edwards Boulevard for
a report of retail theft.
Karen M. Avery, 44, Spring Grove, Ill.,
was cited for retail theft.
Your link to the community.
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 9B
Yes
No
Referendum
School
Delavan-Darien School District
REFERENDUM TO
EXCEED STATE REVENUE LIMITS ON A
NON-RECURRING BASIS
DELAVAN-DARIEN SCHOOL DISTRICT
Shall the Delavan-Darien School District be
authorized to exceed state revenue limits by
$1,250,000 each year for a period of three years
on a non-recurring basis, commencing with the
2014-15 school year and ending with the 2016-17
school year, in order to pay operating costs to
support the Districts educational programs and
services identified in the Districts community-
developed strategic plan that are needed to
provide quality opportunities for each student to
achieve his or her academic and personal
potential?
Yes
No
East Troy Community School District
Shall the East Troy Community School District,
Walworth and Waukesha Counties, Wisconsin be
authorized to issue pursuant to Chapter 67 of the
Wisconsin Statutes, general obligation bonds in
an amount not to exceed $20,800,000 for the
public purpose of paying the cost of renovations
and additions at the Leona Doubek Elementary
School, including improvements for the relocation
of the administrative offices and alternative
education program; remodeling, renovation and
improvement projects at the Middle School;
transportation safety improvements and site work
at Prairie View Elementary School; renovations,
remodeling and additions at the High School;
demolition of Chester Byrnes Elementary School;
and acquisition of furnishings, fixtures and
equipment at all District buildings?
Yes
No
Whitewater Unified School District
Shall the Whitewater Unified School District,
Jefferson, Rock and Walworth Counties,
Wisconsin be authorized to exceed the revenue
limit specified in Section 121.91, Wisconsin
Statutes, by $1,200,000 a year beginning with the
2015-2016 school year through the 2018-2019
school year, for non-recurring purposes consisting
of the following objectives: maintaining elementary
class sizes, student support services,
comprehensive instructional programs,
co-curricular programs, technology infrastructure
and facilities maintenance?
Yes
No
Williams Bay School District
Shall the School District of Williams Bay,
Walworth County, Wisconsin be authorized to
issue pursuant to Chapter 67 of the Wisconsin
Statutes, general obligation bonds in an amount
not to exceed $19,900,000 for the public purpose
of paying the cost of constructing, equipping and
furnishing a new elementary school addition onto
the existing Junior/Senior High School site and
the cost of demolition of the current Elementary
School?
Yes
No
NOVEMBER 4, 2014
LOCATIONS & HOURS OF POLLING
PLACES IN WALWORTH COUNTY
ALL POLLING LOCATIONS WILL BE OPEN
FOR VOTING FROM 7:00 A.M. TO 8:00
P.M.
At the General Election to be held on November 4,
2014 in the County of Walworth, the following
polling place locations will be used for the wards
indicated:
TOWNSHIPS:
BLOOMFIELD WARDS 1,2:
Town Hall, N1100 Town Hall Rd., Pell Lake
DARIEN WARDS 1-3:
Darien Town Hall, N2826 Foundry Rd., Darien
DELAVAN WARDS 1-11:
Town of Delavan Community Center, 1220 South
Shore Dr., Corner of Hwy 50 and South Shore Dr.,
Delavan
EAST TROY WARDS 1-6:
Town Hall, N9330 Stewart School Rd., East Troy
GENEVA WARDS 1-8:
Town Hall, N3496 Como Rd., Lake Geneva
LAFAYETTE WARDS 1-3:
Town Hall, W4614 Potter Rd.
LAGRANGE WARDS 1-3:
Town Hall, N7899 County Road H
LINN:
Wards 1-4,6 (South Shore) Town Hall, W3728
Franklin Walsh St., Zenda;
Ward 5 (North Shore) Chapel on the Hill, Parish
Hall N2482 Cisco Road, Lake Geneva
LYONS WARDS 1-7:
Lyons Town Hall, 6339 Hospital Rd., Lyons
RICHMOND WARDS 1-3:
Town Hall, W9046 County Road A
SHARON WARD 1:
Town Hall, N1097 Bollinger Rd., Sharon
SPRING PRAIRIE WARDS 1-4:
Town Hall, N6097 State Rd. 120, Burlington
(corner of Potter & Hwy. 120)
SUGAR CREEK WARDS 1-5:
Town Hall, N6641 County Road H, Elkhorn, WI
TROY WARDS 1-3:
Town Hall, N8870 Briggs St., Troy Center
WALWORTH WARDS 1-3:
Town Hall, W6741 Brick Church Road, Walworth
WHITEWATER WARDS 1-3:
Town Hall, W8590 Willis Ray Rd., Whitewater
VILLAGES:
BLOOMFIELD WARDS 1-5
Town Hall, N1100 Town Hall Rd., Pell Lake
DARIEN WARDS 1,2: NOTE NEW LOCATION
Senior Center, 47 Park St, Darien (Lower
Level)
EAST TROY WARDS 1-5:
Village Hall, 2015 Energy Dr., East Troy

FONTANA ON GENEVA LAKE WARDS 1-3:
Village Hall, 175 Valley View Dr., Fontana
GENOA CITY WARDS 1-4:
Village Hall, 715 Walworth St., Genoa City
MUKWONAGO WARD 11:
Village Hall, 440 River Crest Court, Mukwonago

SHARON WARDS 1,2:
Village Hall, 125 Plain St., Sharon
WALWORTH WARDS 1-3:
Village Hall, 227 N. Main St., Walworth
WILLIAMS BAY WARDS 1-4:
Village Hall, 250 Williams St., Williams Bay
CITIES:
DELAVAN:
Municipal Building, 123 S. Second St.:
Ald. Dist. 1-Wards 1-5
Ald. Dist. 2-Wards 6-10
Ald. Dist. 3-Wards 11-14
ELKHORN:
National Guard Armory
401 Fair Street, Elkhorn:
Ald. Dist. 1-Ward 1
Ald. Dist. 2-Wards 2,7
Ald. Dist. 3-Ward 3
Ald. Dist. 4-Wards 4,8
Ald. Dist. 5-Ward 5
Ald. Dist. 6-Ward 6
LAKE GENEVA:
City Hall, 626 Geneva St.:
Ald. Dist. 1-Wards 1,2
Ald. Dist. 2-Wards 7-9,11-14
Fire Station, 730 Marshall St.:
Ald. Dist. 3-Wards 5,6,10
Ald. Dist. 4-Wards 3,4
WHITEWATER:
Downtown Armory, 146 W. North St.:
Wards 1,2
Wards 3,4
Wards 5,6
UW-Whitewater
University Center Building Hamilton Room,
800 W. Main St.:
Wards 7-9
ALL POLLING PLACES WILL OPEN FOR VOTING
AT 7:00 A.M. AND WILL CLOSE AT 8:00 P.M.
If you have questions concerning your polling
place, contact the municipal clerk serving your
area. If you need information about how to contact
your municipal clerk, you may call the County
Clerks Office at 262-741-4241 for assistance.
All polling places are accessible to elderly and
disabled voters.
PUBLIC NOTICES
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice Setting Time to Hear
Application and Deadline for
Filing Claims
Case No. 2014PR156
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
LYDIA K. SIEVERT
D.O.D. May 28, 2014
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
April 6, 1929 and date of death May 28,
2014 was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 6722 Hwy. 50 East, Lyons, WI 53148.
3. The application will be heard at the
Walworth County Judicial Center, 1800 Cty.
Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin, Room 2085,
before Sheila T. Reiff, Probate Registrar, on
November 14, 2014 at 10:30 a.m.
You do not need to appear unless you
object. The application may be granted if
there is no objection.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 15,
2015.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
6. This publication is notice to any
persons whose names or address are
unknown.
If you equire reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7014
at least 10 working days prior to the sched-
uled court date. Please note that the court
does not provide transportation.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
October 8, 2014
Attorney Gabrielle Boehm, LLP
123 Wolf Run, Ste. 1, P.O. Box 717
Mukwonago, WI 53149
262-363-7311
Bar Number 1011378
October 16, 23, 30, 2014
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
2015.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate Office, P.O. Box
1001, 1800 County Rd., NN, Elkhorn,
Wisconsin, Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
October 21, 2014
John L. Maier, Jr.
Sweet & Maier, S.C.
114 N. Church St.
Elkhorn, WI 53121
262-723-5480 Bar Number 01016034
Oct. 30, Nov. 6, 13, 2014
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice and Order for
Name Change Hearing
Case No. 14CV00816
In the matter of the name change of:
Sarah Dianne OLaughlin Roth
By: Sarah Dianne OLaughlin Roth
NOTICE IS GIVEN:
A petition was filed asking to change
the name of the person listed above from
Sarah Dianne OLaughlin Roth to Sarah
Dianne Roth
Birth Certificate: Sarah Dianne OLaughlin
IT IS ORDERED:
This petition will be heard in the
Circuit Court of Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin before the Hon. Phillip A. Koss,
at the Walworth Co. Judicial Center,1800
County Road NN, Elkhorn, WI 53121, on
December 4, 2014 at 11:45 a.m.
If you require reasonable accommo-
dations due to a disability to participate in
the court process, please call 262-741-7012
at least ten (10) working days prior to the
scheduled court date. Please note that the
court does not provide transportation.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED:
Notice of this hearing shall be given
by publication as a Class 3 notice for three
(3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the
hearing in the Lake Geneva Regional News,
a newspaper published in Lake Geneva,
Walworth County, State of Wisconsin.
BY THE COURT:
Phillip A. Koss
Circuit Court Judge
10/16/14
Oct. 30, Nov. 6, 13, 2014
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 14PR169
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
BRUNO RAGO
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
10/2/1952 and date of death 6/12/2012 was
domiciled in Cook County, State of Illinois
with a mailing address of 504 Hillcrest Drive,
Prospect Heights, IL 60070.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 29,
2015.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Judicial Center, P.O. Box
1001, 1800 Cty Rd. NN, Elkhorn,
Wisconsin, 53121, Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
October 22, 2014
Attorney Richard P. Rasmussen
P.O. Box 250
Walworth, WI 53184
262-275-5482
Oct. 30, Nov. 6, 13, 2014
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 2014PR167
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
THOMAS A. TASCH
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal admin-
istration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
August 21, 1957, and date of death
September 15, 2014, was domiciled in
Walworth County, State of Wisconsin with a
mailing address of 1717 Woodland Drive,
Lake Geneva, WI 53147.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 28,
PUBLIC
NOTICES
THE COURT ORDERS:
1. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 9,
2015.
2. A claim must be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
BY THE COURT:
Sheila T. Reiff
Circuit Court Commissioner
October 6, 2014
Kelsey Berns, Esq.
1000 N. Water St., Suite 1700
Milwaukee, WI 53202
414-298-8217
Bar Number: 1096466
October 16, 23, 30, 2014
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 2014PR155
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
ANTONINA KASZCZYSZYN
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal admin-
istration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
May 21,1927, and date of death May 6,
2014, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of 1461 W. Highland, Genoa City, WI 53128.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 13,
2015.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O.Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
October 6, 2014
Attorney David W. Schiltz
P.O. Box 158
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-9143
Bar Number 1000392
Oct 30, Nov 6, 13, 2014
WNAXLP
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 14-PR-161
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
JAMES P. DULBIS
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal admin-
istration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
July 10, 1930 and date of death September
7, 2014, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address
of N1161 Linden Rd., Genoa City, WI
53128.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 21,
2015.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Judicial Center, P.O. Box
1001, 1800 County Hwy NN, Elkhorn,
Wisconsin, Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
October 14, 2014
Attorney Julie H. Nommensen
15 S. Lincoln Street, Unit 2
Elkhorn, wI 53121
262-723-4700
Bar Number: 1063765
Oct. 30, Nov. 6, 13, 2014
WNAXLP
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Order Setting Deadline
for filing a Claim
(Formal Administration)
Case No. 2014PR154
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
Mary Anne Niehoff Kirchschlager
Deceased
A petition for formal administration
was filed.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The decedent, with date of birth
September 18, 1924 and date of death
August 3, 2014, was domiciled in Walworth
County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing
address of 160 Conference Point Road,
Williams Bay, WI 53191.
2. All interested persons waived
notice.
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 2014PR158
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
Helen M. Gifford
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
3/22/1919 and date of death 9/28/2014 was
domiciled in Walworth County, State of
Wisconsin, with a mailing address of N1085
Cty Rd H. Genoa City, WI 53128.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 16,
2015.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate PO Box 1001,
1800 County Rd NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
October 9, 2015
Brian A. Schuk
Wasel, Harvey & Schuk, LLP
P.O. Box 524
Delavan WI 53115
262-728-0700
Bar Number 1035097
Oct. 23, 30, Nov. 6, 2014
WNAXLP
contact Sue at
262-248-4444
sue@lakegenevanews.net
MUST BE PLACED
BY 12 P.M. MONDAY
TO APPEAR IN THE
UPCOMING ISSUE
LEGAL NOTICES
10B | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
PUBLIC NOTICES
is the councils prevue to appoint some-
one. Although Mr. Connors said the
council would be following the same
process it had when Mr. ONeill resigned
and Mr. Tolar came in and filled the bal-
ance of his term. Ms. Hill noted there
was not an ad put in the paper at that
time. Mr. Connors stated he and Mr.
Draper discussed this item prior to the
agenda and felt it would be best to make
the announcement tonight to allow for
anyone wishing to submit their desire to
serve. The council would then discuss it
at the next meeting. There was further
discussion on how the council wanted to
proceed with the process. Alderman
Kehoe suggested putting the opening on
the city website. Mr. Connors encour-
aged the council to make a motion to ask
anyone interested in filling the vacant
spot to submit a letter stating such by
Friday, October 3rd and the council
would vote on a person to fill the vacan-
cy on the next regularly scheduled meet-
ing, October 13th. City Administrator
Jordan suggested that applicants include
a resume.
Kordus/Wall motion to allow any-
one currently living in the 3rd district to
submit a resume and letter of interest for
the 3rd District Alderman position to the
city by October 3rd, for review prior to
the October 13th agenda where the
council would vote to select a new alder-
person. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Presentation of Accounts
Alderman Lyon
Purchase Orders. None.
Lyon/Kordus motion to approve
Prepaid Bills in the amount of $7,991.44.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus, Hill,
Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted yes
with Alderman Wall voting no. Motion
carried 6 to 1.
Lyon/Kupsik motion to approve
Regular Bills in the amount of
$212,710.34.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Lyon/Kordus motion to accept
Monthly Treasurers Report for May
2014. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Closed Session
Kupsik/Lyon motion to go into
Closed Session pursuant to Wis. Stat.
19.85 (1)(e) for competitive bargaining
reasons for Police and Fire union negoti-
ations (Administrator Jordan) and delib-
erating or negotiating the purchasing of
public properties, the investing of public
funds, or conducting other specified pub-
lic business, whenever competitive or
bargaining reasons require a closed ses-
sion (Attorney Draper).
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
The Council entered into Closed
Session at 7:55 p.m.
Return to Open Session
Kupsik/Hill motion to return to open
session pursuant to Wisconsin Statues
19.85 (2) and take action on any items
discussed in closed session.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
The Council reconvened in open
session at 9:00 p.m.
Hill/Kordus motion to direct staff to
negotiate with the police and fire unions
as discussed in closed session. Motion
carried 7 to 0.
Adjournment
Kordus/Hill motion to adjourn at
9:02 p.m. Motion carried 7 to 0.
/s/ Sabrina Waswo, City Clerk
October 30, 2014
WNAXLP
agreed that the council should not have
to garner three bids for every project that
comes through and felt that department
heads usually do a pretty good job of
getting close to the ballpark, however
this was just one particular item she felt
was excessive and asked for an addi-
tional bid. Mr. Kupsik stated in this case,
just like the Police and Fire Commission,
once the council approves the money for
the Library, the Library can spend it how-
ever they want and the council has no
say.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted yes
with Alderman Wall voting no. Motion
carried 6 to 1.
Plan Commission
Recommendations Alderman Kupsik
Discussion/Action on an
Application for Land Division Review for
a Certified Survey Map submitted by
David and Julie Merhar, 129 Thatcher
Ave, River Forest, IL 60305 for James
and Kathleen Springer, 1591 Orchard
Lane, Lake Geneva, WI 53147 to com-
bine two parcels into one. Current Tax
Key Nos. ZLM 00077 & ZLM 00079.
Kupsik/Lyon motion to approve.
Alderman Kupsik stated the applicant
was looking to combine the lot numbers
18 and 21. He stated there were some
staff and engineer recommendations
included. Mr. Connors noted the engi-
neers comment was that he wanted
Orchard Lane fully visible so that every-
one understood there was a right-of-way
involved with the property, which has
been corrected.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Personnel Committee
Recommendations Alderman Kupsik
Second Reading of Ordinance 14-
05, to amend Section 2-49(3)f pertaining
to the personnel committee responsibili-
ties.
Kupsik/Hill motion to approve.
Mayor Connors asked there be a change
of language to the last two words of 1(f)
to state the Lake Geneva Employee
Handbook, which matches the title of our
document. There is no change to the
actual document. Alderman Kordus stat-
ed that this ordinance allows the city to
run more like a business and that the
council should not have to be involved in
the day to day hiring and operations. He
also pointed out that it is in the councils
best interest to keep tabs on our depart-
ment heads and ensure we have a man-
aging body for the department heads as
we pass the responsibility on to them.
Alderman Lyon stated he believes
the department heads that are closest to
the employee can make the best objec-
tive determination relative to their
employment at that level and not at the
council level. He said the council ends
up getting into debates where they dont
have a lot of objective evidence on their
side. He said he is fully in support of this
and feels the responsibility should be put
where it belongs and allow the depart-
ment head to operate their department
including their employees. Alderman
Kupsik noted that if you refer to the
employee handbook on page 18 and 19,
there is a due process for termination,
resignation and reduction in force.
Mayor Connors stated this is the result
from Act 10 and Act 32 and these are
new rules that all municipalities are run
by. Alderman Hill pointed out that every
single person employed in the communi-
ty is an at-will employee as Wisconsin is
an at-will state, where you can be escort-
ed to your car at any given time. She
presumes that department heads are
managing their employees in such a way
that they would obviously have due
cause, and noted there are not many
people where are not already familiar
with this process.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Discussion/Action on the process
for appointment of an individual to fill the
balance of the vacant aldermanic term in
the third district.
City Attorney Draper stated he
thought it would be wise for the council to
discuss the process in filling the vacancy.
He stated the statutes provide that the
council will make an appointment for the
replacement. In the past it was thought
that the mayor made the replacement,
however, it is actually the council. He
stated the council should set up a
process on how to gather candidates,
how to determine which candidate to
vote on or whether to take the whole
slate of people who submit their names.
Mr. Draper suggested letting the public
know that the city is seeking someone to
fill the position and allow people a certain
amount of time to submit their name. He
stated there should be a process estab-
lished and followed. Mayor Connors
stated per state statute and city ordi-
nance, the council would appoint some-
one to the remainder of the term, ending
this April. Had the vacancy been open
for another year, it would have gone to a
special election, but in this circumstance
its an appointment for the balance of the
term. Alderman Hill asked what the pre-
vious process has been. Mr. Connors
stated it was not done correctly in the
past as the mayor would appoint some-
one and the council would vote on it,
where the city ordinance clearly states it
Intoxicating Liquor & Fermented Malt
Beverage License application filed by
Scuttlebutts, 831 Wrigley Drive, Lake
Geneva, Randy A. Horch, Agent.
d. Original 2014-2015 Operators
(Bartender) License applications filed by
Julia Hallock, Allyssa Ingram, Desiree
Newell and Chaz Wagner.
e. Renewal of 2014-2015 Operators
(Bartender) license applications filed by
Gweneth Garber, Pamela Quiller and
Kara Vogt.
Alderman Kupsik stated item b.
should be corrected to Sunday, October
5.
Kupsik/Wall motion to approve the
consent agenda. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Items Removed from the Consent
Agenda. None.
Finance, License and Regulation
Committee Recommendations
Alderman Lyon
Discussion/Action on award of
contract to Dan Larsen Landscape of
Cedarburg, WI for the 2014 Fall Tree
Planting in the amount of $27,772.00
funded by the Capital Projects Fund.
Lyon/Wall motion to approve.
Alderman Lyon stated Dan Larsen
Landscape had the winning bid on this
contract and has successfully done work
for the city in the past. Alderman Hill
questioned the disparity in the bids as
the other bid was almost twice the
amount. Alderman Kordus stated that
DPW Winkler thought it was due to the
company being a new bidder out of
Brookfield, where they may be higher
priced. Mayor Connors stated the unit
cost for all the trees for this bidder were
significantly higher as well. He also
noted that staff had contacted 15 possi-
ble vendors, 6 took out packets and only
2 returned bids. He said Dan Larsen
Landscape has held the bid for the last
two out of three years and they have
always done quality work.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Discussion/Action on award of
contract to Stark Asphalt of Milwaukee
for the 2014 Street Improvement
Program in the amount of $879,325.61
funded by the Capital Projects Fund.
Lyon/Kupsik motion to approve.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Discussion/Action on renewal of
Liability, Property and Workmans
Compensation policy.
Lyon/Kupsik motion to approve.
Alderman Lyon stated the premium for
the prior year was just under $305,000
and the premium for the current year is
331,000, approximately a 9% increase.
Mr. Lyon stated the City Administrator
informed the Finance Committee the 9%
increase is primarily due the citys expe-
rience on workmans comp side. City
Administrator Jordan stated there was a
$400 increase for all the coverages
including the increase to workmans
comp. He received the final number
today for the renewal of the policy of
$332,061. He stated the numbers are
based on a three year average. If the
city has a good year, the amount may
decrease. Mr. Jordan noted that the
state sets the rate for workmans comp
by taking the salary multiplied by the rate
that they categorize each job classifica-
tion and then base it on the municipalitys
experience. He said it went up because
the city had a bad year. Alderman Wall
asked if the carrier puts on safety class-
es that the staff would be able to attend.
Mr. Jordan confirmed that they do have
classes that staff has been involved in
and training is held at least every other
month. However, he noted most of the
incidents were accidents. Alderman Hill
asked if this is a calendar year policy.
Mr. Jordan stated the policy runs
October 1 through September 30 and
comes due the first of October. Ms. Hill
asked if this had been included in the
2013 budget. Mr. Jordan stated, yes it is,
however this part is for this coming year.
He said we cant really estimate what our
workmans comp will be as it depends on
if we have had a good or a bad year. If
we do not have enough, it is taken out of
the general fund. Mayor Connors noted
that with the renewal period now, we can
budget for it as it is in front of the budget
process.
Roll Call: Chappell, Wall, Kordus,
Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon voted
yes. Motion carried 7 to 0.
Resolution 14-R43, amending the
2014 Capital Projects Fund Budget for
the City of Lake Geneva.
Lyon/Kupsik motion to approve.
Alderman Lyon stated this is a final state-
ment of the projects, their amounts and
what is included in the 2014 Capital
Projects. He stated the council is essen-
tially lining up the monies approved for
borrowing against the capital budget list.
Alderman Kordus pointed out that
there is a $17,000 expenditure for
Library blinds. He said the council had
asked the Library Board to come forward
with three bids and they did not, but went
forward with the highest bid and already
spent the money. Mayor Connors asked
the City Attorney to address a recent arti-
cle in the Municipality explaining how a
Library Board functions. City Attorney
Draper said the Library Board has con-
trol of their funds and the city council
controls how much is given to the
Library. However, once it is funded to the
Library, they have the ability to spend it
as they see fit. Mr. Connors noted this is
similar to the Police and Fire Budget.
Alderman Wall stated he was
under the assumption the Library was to
obtain a third bid and bring it before the
council for final approval. He stated the
Library had asked for $17,000 and the
council asked for a third bid, however, he
was unsure if the Library had obtained
the third bid. He questioned how the
council could give out the money if they
had not received three bids. Mr.
Connors stated the $17,000 was a line
item that was on the capital borrowing
that council had already approved. Mr.
Wall replied this is not how it was stated
in the workshop and that the Library was
to come forward with a third bid. Mr. Wall
noted that otherwise, he would not have
voted for it at the workshop. Mr. Connors
stated if those were the reservations, the
amount should have been limited or cut
down at the capital workshop. Mr. Wall
said there were two bids, one of $17,000
and one of $9,000. Alderman Chappell
confirmed that this is what she under-
stood as well and it didnt mean that they
would get the full $17,000, just that it was
a maximum amount. Ms. Chappell
asked if they had come back with a third
bid. Mayor Connor stated they did not
come back to this body with the third bid.
There was further discussion if the
Library had or had not received a third
bid and what was included in the bids.
Mr. Wall stated he did not feel the pur-
chase of the Library blinds was a wise
use of taxpayers money as the Library
could have purchased two sets of blind
for the price they spent on one set.
Alderman Hill stated she agreed with Mr.
Wall as there was a large disparity in
what they were asking for and noted that
the vendor that was selected is one of
the most expensive in the area. She
REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2014
7:00 PM
COUNCIL CHAMBERS, CITY HALL
Mayor Connors called the meeting
to order at 7:02 p.m.
The Pledge of Allegiance was led
by Alderman Kupsik.
Roll Call. Present: Mayor
Connors, Aldermen Chappell, Wall,
Kordus, Hill, Kehoe, Kupsik, and Lyon.
Also present: City Administrator
Jordan, City Attorney Draper and City
Clerk Waswo.
Awards, Presentations, and
Proclamations.
Mayor Connors stated the city will
be hosting a Parking Structure Open
House on September 24, the Park and
Open Space Open House will be on
October 8 at City Hall, and the Walworth
County Clean Sweep Program will be
coming up in October with details on the
city website.
Re-consider business from previ-
ous meeting. None.
Comments from the public as
allowed by Wis. Stats. 19.84(2), limited
to items on this agenda, except for pub-
lic hearing items. Comments will to be
limited to 5 minutes.
Terry ONeill, 954 George Street,
Lake Geneva, spoke on behalf of his
concerns for ordinance 14-05. He stated
that if department heads have the
authority to hire and fire their employees,
the employees loyalty will shift to the
department head rather than the city
council.
Acknowledgement of
Correspondence.
City Clerk Waswo stated the City
had received letters on September 8, 9,
15, 16, 17 and 19, 2014 from Margaret
Clark, Ken Cottingham, Midael & Aranda
Duntenon, Stacey Finnegan, April and
Shawn Lawrey, Nancy Picken, Ann
Shlensky, Wanda Timmons and Dalton
Waldeck in regards to the color restric-
tion in the business district. The City also
received a letter from Richard Hedlund
expressing his interest in the vacant
position in the 3rd aldermanic district.
Approval of Minutes
Kordus/Chappell motion to
approve the Regular City Council
Meeting minutes of September 8, 2014,
as prepared and distributed.
Consent Agenda
a. Establish Trick or Treat hours for
the City of Lake Geneva for Sunday,
October 26, 2014, from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00
p.m.
b. Request for Temporary Extension
of Licensed Premises filed by Chad
Bittner on behalf of Next Door Pub &
Pizzeria, 411 Interchange North, to
include parking lot area behind the
restaurant during the Next Door Pub &
Pizzeria Fall Fest event on Saturday,
October 5, 2014 from noon to 10:00 p.m.
c. Original Class B/Class B
FONTANA
PUBLIC NOTICES
Village of Fontana on Geneva Lake,
Walworth County, WI
LOCATION AND HOURS OF
POLLING PLACE
At the 2014 General Election to be held on
Tuesday, November 4, 2014, in the Village
of Fontana on Geneva Lake, Walworth
County, WI, the following polling place loca-
tion will be used:
Location Wards
Fontana Village Hall 1, 2 & 3
175 Valley View Drive
THE POLLING PLACE WILL OPEN AT
7:00 A.M. AND WILL CLOSE
AT 8:00 P.M
If you have any questions concerning your
polling place, contact the municipal clerk.
Theresa Linneman
PO Box 200
175 Valley View Drive
Fontana, WI 53125
TELEPHONE: 262-275-6137
OFFICE HOURS:
Monday through Friday (excluding
holidays), 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM
The polling place is accessible to elderly
and disabled voters.
Oct. 30, 2014
WNAXLP
WALWORTH
PUBLIC NOTICES
VILLAGE OF WALWORTH
WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Village of Walworth Board of Trustees
has received the following applications for
alcohol beverage licenses for the 2014-
2015 licensing period and will consider
approval of the licenses at its November 10,
2014, meeting:
Class A Liquor Original Application
JJF Pacesetters Inc
dba Walworth Landing
Jeffrey and Julianne Froelich, Officers
Jeffrey Froelich, Agent
Premises: 680 Kenosha St.,
Walworth WI 53184
Donna Schut
Clerk Treasurer
Dated: October 30, 2014
WNAXLP
GENOA CITY
PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON
VILLAGE OF GENOA CITY,
WISCONSIN
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a
Public Hearing will be held on Thursday,
November 13, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. at Village
Hall, 715 Walworth St. before the Plan
Commission of the Village of Genoa City,
Wisconsin to consider amending Zoning
Ordinance 11-13-2014: Chapter 310 ZON-
ING, Sub-section 310-49 Business districts,
(A) B-1 General Business District, (2)
Conditional uses to add: sub-section (t)
Light Industrial to the Village Municipal
Code.
All interested parties in the above
matter are invited to attend. The Village
Planning Commission will be in session on
Thursday, November 13th, 2014, at 6:00
p.m. at the Village Hall, 715 Walworth
Street, Genoa City, Wisconsin to consider
any objections that may have been filed and
to hear all persons desiring to be heard.
Dated this 30th day of October and
6th day of November, 2014.
William Antti
Chairman,Village Planning Commission
October 30, November 6, 2014
WNAXLP
VILLAGE OF
BLOOMFIELD
VILLAGE OF BLOOMFIELD
LIQUOR LICENSE APPLICANT
Notice is hereby given that the following has
filed applications for licenses to deal fer-
mented malt beverages and wine in the
Village of Bloomfield in accordance with
Chapter 125.4 (G) of the Wisconsin
Statutes:
Eddie Cash Show Inc.
d/b/a Eddie Cash Music Hall
Agent: Cheryl Cash
N1530 Powers Lake Road
Genoa City, WI 53128
Class B Liquor
Said license to expire 06/30/2015 will be
considered by the Village Board at a regular
or special meeting on November 10, 2014
at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the
agenda permits.
Cynthia L. Howard
Village Clerk
Published October 23 & 30, 2014
WNAXLP
WILLIAMS BAY
PUBLIC NOTICES
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION
VILLAGE OF WILLIAMS BAY
WALWORTH COUNTY, WISCONSIN
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
there will be a Public Hearing before the
Plan Commission on Tuesday, November
11, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. at the Village Hall in
Williams Bay, Wisconsin to consider the fol-
lowing:
THE PETITION OF: Village of Williams Bay
Recreation Dept. - Conditional Use Permit.
LEGAL DESCRIPTION: WWUP - 21
STREET ADDRESS: 250 Williams Street,
Williams Bay, WI 53191
The petitioner requests a Conditional
Use Permit for a six foot high chain link
fence for the Lions west baseball field.
All persons, and their agents or attor-
neys will be given an opportunity to be
heard in relation thereto.
Jacqueline Hopkins
Village Clerk
Oct. 23 & 30, 2014
WNAXLP
CITY COUNCIL
PROCEEDINGS
PUBLIC
NOTICES
PUBLIC
NOTICES
PUBLIC
NOTICES
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNT
Case Code: 30303
CLEANING, INC dba
SERVPRO OF LAKE GENEVA
120 E. Sheridan Springs Rd.
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Plaintiff,
v.
EDWARD SCHWINN and
MARY SCHWINN
W4446 Basswood Dr.
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
Defendants.
SUMMONS
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
To each person named above as a defen-
dant:
You are hereby notified that the plain-
tiffs named above have filed a lawsuit or
other legal action against you.
Within twenty (20) days of receiving
this summons, you must respond with a
written answer, as that term is used in
Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to
the complaint. The court may reject or dis-
regard an answer that does not follow the
requirements of the statutes. The answer
must be sent or delivered to the court,
whose address is Clerk of Circuit Court,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin
53121 and to Attorney Darryl J. Lee, plain-
tiffs attorney, whose address is 1624 Hobbs
Drive, Suite 1, Delavan, WI 53115. You may
have an attorney help or represent you.
If you do not provide a proper answer
within twenty (20) days, the court may grant
judgment against you for the award of
money or other legal action requested in the
complaint, and you may lose your right to
object to anything that is or may be incorrect
in the complaint. A judgment may be
enforced as provided by law. A judgment
awarding money may become a lien against
any real estate you own now or in the future,
and may also be enforced by garnishment
or seizure of property.
Dated at Delavan, Wisconsin
this 23rd day of August, 2014.
THORPE & CHRISTIAN, S.C.
Attorneys for Plaintiffs
By: Darryl J. Lee
SBN: 1006100
P.O. Address:
1624 Hobbs Drive, Suite 1
Delavan, WI 53115
Phone: (262) 740-1971
Fax: (262) 740-1090
Oct. 23, 30, Nov. 6, 2014
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT
WALWORTH COUNTY
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 2014PR165
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
Duane LaVerne Reinke
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal adminis-
tration was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth
July 29, 1949 and date of death September
1, 2014, was domiciled in Walworth County,
State of Wisconsin with a mailing address of
N3775 County Road H, Lake Geneva, WI
53147.
3. All interested persons waived
notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim
against the decedents estate is January 27,
2015.
5. A claim may be filed at the
Walworth County Probate, P.O. Box 1001,
1800 County Rd. NN, Elkhorn, Wisconsin,
Room 2085.
Wendy A. Esch
Deputy Probate Registrar
October 20, 2014
Oct. 23, 30, Nov. 6, 2014
WNAXLP
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
TRAINING!!
The #1 Real Estate organization in Wisconsin is searching for the right
candidates to partner with the most rewarding and exciting business oppor-
tunity today.
SHOREWEST REALTORS is now interviewing for our next training
class. Contact John Tisdall at jtisdall@shorewest.com or call
(262) 248-1020 today to learn more or to attend one of our career seminars.
HELP WANTED
FT Housekeepers and Housekeeping Supervisor
Experience required. Available weekends and holi-
days.
Strong English speaking skills and valid Drivers
Licence needed.
COVENANT HARBOR. 262.248.3600 EXT 339.
ASK FOR ALEX.
NOTICE OF SALE
OF ABANDONED MERCHANDISE
POTTERS SELF STORAGE, LLC
Sale at 9:00 a.m. at Townline Road location,
followed immediately by Sale at Host Drive location
NOVEMBER 8, 2014
Owners of record are:
W2285 TOWNLINE RD. LAKE GENEVA 351 E. HOST DR. LAKE GENEVA
Owners of record are:
Jason Leonard #1103
appliances, household items &
misc. personal property
Julio Luna #2406
furniture, boxes, household items,
appliances & misc. personal property
Renae Chambers #432
furniture, of ce furniture, boxes,
household items, appliances
& misc. personal property
Clarissa Honkan #509
household items
& misc. personal property
TOWN OF LINN
SEASONAL HELP WANTED
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT
Town of Linn is accepting applications for
seasonal snow plow driving.
CDL LICENSE REQUIRED
Applications are available at the Town Clerks
Of ce, W3728 Franklin Walsh St. , Zenda,
WI 53195 and are due back by November
17, 2014 at 3:00 pm. Questions call Dan Pitt,
Hwy Supt. at (262) 275-6300 x18.
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 11B
12B | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
Lake Geneva Regional News
Featuring Badger, Big Foot and Williams Bay High Schools
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Sports
C
Bulldogs football team loses in their rst postseason game in the last 10 years
Williams Bay dogged by Potosi Chieftains
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
POTOSI Every dog may
have its day, but Friday certainly
wasnt the Bulldogs.
Williams Bay found that out to
their dismay as they were plagued
by an onslaught of explosive plays
in their 44-24 loss to the Potosi
Chieftains in their rst WIAA
Division 7 postseason appearance
in 10 years on Friday, Oct. 24.
The Chieftains struck quickly,
jumping out to a 7-0 lead before
their offense ever even touched
the eld.
After gaining a rst down, the
Bulldogs offense was forced to
punt less than two minutes into
their opening drive.
Potosis Brent Curtis elded
the punt, cut towards the sideline
and returned it 79 yards to the end
zone.
The rest of the rst half didnt
go much better for Williams Bay
as the Chieftains mercilessly
ripped off big play after big play,
vaulting ahead to a 37-3 halftime
lead.
Potosi quarterback Kyle Kaiser
compiled 164 yards and three
touchdowns on six-of-seven pass-
ing.
Curtis also gouged the Bull-
dogs on offense, rushing for 84
yards and a touchdown.
After halftime, the Bulldogs
focused on winning the half and
did just that.
After allowing Kaisers third
and nal touchdown midway
through the third quarter, Wil-
liams Bays offense started to
move the ball consistently and
maintain possession.
Senior Jacob Clark rushed
the ball for 15 yards on eight car-
ries and scored the rst Bulldogs
touchdown of the night on a two-
yard dive with 2:20 left in the
third quarter.
Williams Bay would score two
more touchdowns in the fourth
quarter before eventually falling
to the Chieftains.
We played hard, head coach
Derek Diehl said after the game.
It just comes down to Potosis a
bigger program. They have what,
18 seniors on their roster and the
kids have been lifting for four-
straight years and we start four
freshman. So anytime that you
have that, its going to be a favor-
able matchup for the team that
has those seniors.
Theyre strong, theyre fast,
theyre physical and we knew it,
but our kids didnt quit. They
kept the hammer down the best
we could and we moved the ball
in chunks, but Potosis senior
leadership and having so many
kids on the eld that have been in
the weight room for four years, it
showed.
DAVID MICHELS/REGIONAL NEWS
WILLIAMS BAY QUARTERBACK John Higgins Jr. successfully converts a two-point conversion.
PLEASE SEE BULLDOGS PAGE 3C
Bulldogs 24, Chieftains 44
Attended team tournament and sent doubles to individual state meet
Badgers tennis success
leads to state appearance
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
MADISON Badgers tennis
team capped off a marvelous 2014
season with an appearance at
the WIAA Division 1 State Team
Tennis Tournament, their second
such trip in the past three years.
The Badger girls competed
against Neenah in the state quar-
ternals on Friday, Oct. 24, losing
0-7 to the eventual state runner-
up.
Overall, head coach Phil Laut-
erbach said that he thought his
girls played well, citing the state
tournament as a possible source
of prematch jitters.
I think the magnitude of the
event affected the play a little
bit, Lauterbach said. You know,
youre down and hundreds of
people are watching you, its loud
and youre playing against the
second best team in the state. So
I think it was denitely an expe-
rience for all of the girls, but I do
think that moment overwhelmed
us a little bit.
R e g a r d -
less of the out-
come and the
stiing state
a t mo s phe r e ,
Lauterbach was
pleased with his
teams effort.
Obviousl y
(Neenah is)
an extremely
strong team.
After they beat
us they went on
to beat Middle-
ton, last years
state champion,
and they n-
ished second
overall.
L a u t e r -
bach said that
his team obvi-
ously had an
extremely positive year and he
wants to improve upon the experi-
ence of reaching state and take it
to the next level, where he hopes
the Badgers can do more than just
reach the state tournament and
can truly impact it as well.
In addition to qualifying for
the team state tournament, the
Badgers had a pair of doubles
teams representing them at the
individual state tournament the
weekend before.
Badgers rst doubles team of
seniors Joan Williams and Andrea
Chironis (22-2) opened against
Sami Koppa and Lydia Moser of
Cedarburg in the round of 64.
Williams and Chironis
defeated the Cedarburg duo 6-1,
6-7 (4), (6) before moving on to
face Maria Mihailescu and Cris-
tina Villalovas of De Pere.
Williams and Chironis were
eliminated from the tournament
in the round of 32 by Mihailescu
and Villalovas 1-6, 3-6.
Senior Gillian Suhre and soph-
omore Joanne Walczynski (23-2)
made up the Badgers second dou-
bles team.
Suhre and Walczynski were
defeated in the opening round
by Stephanie Keryluk and Greta
Schmitz of the Verona area.
PLEASE SEE TENNIS PAGE 3C
Chironis
Williams
Alexandra Demco nishes fth, qualies as an individual for the state tournament
Big Foot freshman shines at sectionals
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
PEWAUKEE In an oth-
erwise lackluster day for Big Foot
cross country, one young girl stole
the show for the Chiefs as she out-
distanced even her coachs wildest
expectations.
Big Foot freshman Alexandra
Zanzie Demco ourished in the
spotlight of the WIAA Division 2
Sectional Championships on Satur-
day, Oct. 25 as she nished rst for
the Chiefs and fth overall out of a
eld of 91 participants.
Tim Collins, athletic director
and head coach of Big Foot cross
country, was enamored of Demcos
performance on Saturday and has
been pleased by the young runners
work ethic all season long.
She started out the year as
probably our number three runner
and just continued to improve
every single meet, Collins said in
a phone interview. She proves that
hard work pays off. While some of
the girls worked as hard as she did,
nobody outworked her this year
and thats why shes in the spot shes
in now.
Demco nished the race with
a time of 20:25, approximately a
minute and a half faster than shes
run all year.
You can just see her getting
better and better every meet, every
practice, and not only is she a great
athelete, shes a great person, which
makes it even better, Collins said.
Demcos hard work paid major
dividends as she was the lone Big
Foot racer to qualify for the WIAA
State Meet on Saturday, Nov. 1.
Overall, the Chiefs nished
eighth with a score of 183.
Senior Libby Brooks nished
second for Big Foot, 23rd overall
with a time of 22:03.
Kathryn Colby, senior, nished
40th with a time of 22:50 and Kalen
Gillingham, junior, nished 57th
with a time of 23:54.
Sophomore Brooke Wellhau-
sen rounded out the scoring-ve for
Big Foot, nishing right on Gilling-
hams heels in 58th with a time of
23:55.
Alternates Olivia Briggs, soph-
omore, and Sarah Heath-Brost,
junior, nished 65th and 66th with
times of 24:12 and 24:13, respec-
tively.
While the Rock Valley Confer-
ence champions didnt run poorly,
Collins thought that his team could
have run better, saying that it could
be classied as an average day for
everyone with the exception of
Demco.
Big Foots boys struggled as
well, nishing
11th out of 14
schools.
S e n i o r
Fletcher Strahan
nished 28th
with a time of
18:31.
Bernie Ler-
chegger, sopho-
more, followed
Strahan, nish-
ing 37th with a time of 18:50.
Big Foots Travis Berryman,
sophomore, nished 56th with a
time of 19:47, Randy Robaczewski,
senior, nished 91st at 23:30, Jacob
Fort nished 92nd at 23:44 and
alternate Ben Nickel, senior, n-
ished 93rd with a time of 24:07.
They were also very aver-
age, Collins said. Nothing really
jumped out at us. We competed and
their season is, unfortunately, over
for now.
While the rest of the Chiefs
begin to plan their offseason work-
out regiments, Demco is still train-
ing hard as she prepares for the
state meet.
Zanzies going to state and
were just going to enjoy the moment
up there, Collins said. Obviously,
wed like her to nish in the top half.
If she can nish in the top half, I
believe there are 140 runners, and
if she can go top half that would be
great. I think as a 14-year old fresh-
man, you cant ask for much more.
Collins said that he knew
Demco had an overwhelming
amount of potential, but for her to
be performing as well as she has
in her rst year of high school has
taken him aback.
You could see it coming, he
said. But I didnt expect her to pop
like she did.
Demco
Badger boys CC
sends two to state
tournament
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
VERONA Badgers boys
cross country team has sped past
the competition through a wil-
derness of forest preserves and
hillsides en route to an appear-
ance at the WIAA Division 1 cross
country sectional on Saturday,
Oct. 25.
Their early success made it a
much more bitter pill to swallow
when the season ended for the
majority of the Badger runners
on Saturday.
The Badgers nished the sec-
tional in third place with a score
of 84 points, only ve more than
Janesville Craig who nished
second with 79.
We always say some guys
rise to the occasion and some
guys dont quite rise, Badger
head coach Mike Butscher said
in a phone interview. I think
we had three guys really rise to
the occasion and that was Alex
(Martinez), Miguel (Barrera) and
Sam (Carmona), and then the
other guys just had OK races. You
know, we needed them to have
good races and they just had OK
races.
Martinez, senior, nished rst
for the Badgers and third overall,
clocking in with a time of 16:24.
Carmona, senior, came in
10th with a time of 17:05 and Bar-
rera, sophomore, nished right
behind Carmona at 12th with a
time of 17:18.
The nal four Badgers pack
ran relatively far back behind the
rest.
Junior Cody Sadikoff nished
29th with a time of 17:53. Sopho-
more Mario Gomez was 30th at
17:55, Gustavo Gordillo, fresh-
man, was 33rd at 17:56 and senior
Eric Krause nished 39th with a
time of 18:11.
The third place nish elimi-
nated the Badger squad from con-
tention for qualifying for the state
tournament.
PLEASE SEE BADGER PAGE 3C
2C | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
SPORTS
Badger drops opening playoff
game to Kenosha Indian Trail
Badgers knocked around by Kenosha
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
KENOSHA After attain-
ing a playoff berth in last weeks
season finale against Union
Grove, the Badgers took to the
road for their opening WIAA
Division 1 playoff matchup with
the Kenosha Indian Trail Hawks.
After a stellar outing in his
varsity debut, sophomore tail-
back Patrick
Watrous had
only two
carries for
four yards
as Tyler
VanDeVelde,
j u n i o r ,
received the
m a j o r i t y
of Badgers
touches.
Va n De -
V e l d e
rushed for
160 yards
on 10 car-
ries and
two touch-
d o w n s ,
i n c l u d i n g
a 76 yard
sprint that
resulted in
VanDeVelde
finding the
end zone as
time expired
in the fourth
quarter of
Sat ur day s
contest.
I t
w o u l d n t
be enough
however, as the Hawks soared
past the Badgers to a 41-26 vic-
tory.
Badger drew first blood
late in the opening quarter as
VanDeVelde crossed the goal
line on a three-yard touchdown
run, but Badgers porous defense
was futile in its attempts to stop
Hawks running back Cameron
Bishop.
Bishop carried the ball 23
times for 157 yards and four
touchdowns, three of which were
scored in the first half.
Badgers quarterback Mick
Borchert completed three-of-
seven passes for 103 yards, two
touchdowns and an interception.
Borcherts first touchdown of
the day was a 64 yard completion
to Isaac Ziervogel, and it came
with five minutes remaining in
the second quarter.
Ziervogel had two receptions
for 66 yards and a touchdown
in the game. He also ran for 15
yards on four carries.
Borcherts touchdown pass
kept Badger within shouting dis-
tance of Kenosha Indian Trail as
the Hawks entered halftime with
a 28-13 lead. His second scor-
ing pass made the game a one
possession contest in the third
quarter.
Badger receiver Chase Craig
hooked in the pass from Borchert
and took it 47 yards to the end
zone.
As the Hawks grip on the
game seemingly started to slip
away, their offense rallied and
produced two more scoring
drives.
Kenosha Indian Trail quar-
terback Lane Ochs drove the
Hawks down the field and tossed
a 26 yard touchdown to receiver
Christian Jones early in the
fourth quarter to reinforce their
lead.
Five minutes later, Kenosha
Indian Trail was knocking on the
door again before Bishop plowed
across the goal line for his fourth
and final score of the night,
cementing the win as the Hawks
went up 41-20 with 4:58 to play.
VanDeVelde ended the game
by breaking a 76 yard run for pay
dirt but it did nothing to change
the outcome.
The Badgers finished their
season at 4-6 overall, 4-3 in the
Southern Lakes Conference.
The enigmatic Badgers
opened with three consecutive
losses before going on a three
game win streak against SLC
opponents in the 2014 season.
While facing numerous inju-
ries at key positions, particularly
tailback, they streaked up and
down all season.
Ziervogel led the team in
passing for the season with 451
yards, while he and Borchert tied
each other with three touchdown
passes apiece.
VanDeVelde was the Badgers
leading rusher with 434 yards
and five touchdowns this season.
Ziervogel ranked second with
424 yards.
Myriad injuries thrust
numerous running backs into
the starting line up for Badger
this season, however, result-
ing in Tristan Steiner and Zane
Zachary each tallying more than
300 yards rushing and James
Patrick Quinn totalling 206.
Quinn also was the teams
leading receiver with 189 yards
and a touchdown on just nine
receptions.
Defensively, Nick Kretsch
had 55 tackles and Mason
Dumez had two interceptions,
both team-highs.
Badgers 26, Hawks 41
DAVE BAKER FOR THE REGIONAL NEWS
BADGERS TYLER VAN DE VELDE ran for 160 yards and two touchdowns in the teams playoff loss to Kenosha
Indian Trail.
Big Foot loses to Edgerton in Regional Final after defeating Whitewater to advance
Chiefs swept away by the Tide
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
Big Foot vol-
leyballs erratic
season con-
cluded as the
Chiefs run
through region-
als was halted
by a loss in the
nals to the
Edgerton Red
Tide 0-3 on Sat-
urday, Oct. 25,
just two days
after escaping
Whitewater in a
pulse-pounding
3-2 victory on
Thursday.
The Chiefs
defeated the
Whippets after
rallying back
from being
behind 1-2 through three sets.
Theyre a tough team, Big
Foot head coach Caitlin Dowden
said. I mean to battle, theyre
huge, and it really took a lot for
our team. When we calmed down,
we pushed through and when we
were frantic, we played frantic, so
as soon as we calmed it went ne.
Its a big win for our team.
After a sluggish start resulted
in a 16-25 loss of the rst set, the
Chiefs and Whippets played an
extremely aggressive match, trad-
ing points back and forth as each
team vied for an edge.
The Chiefs rallied to win the
second set 26-24 only to lose the
third 22-25 and fall behind 1-2.
A large portion of Big Foots
early struggles is attributed to
errors as the Chiefs accumulated
eight serving errors, ve dig-
ging errors and 11 serve receiving
errors.
Dowden said she noticed a
major change in the psyche of her
team in relation to how they would
have reacted to falling behind
early in the year.
Its huge, she said. Our team
at the beginning of the season
would have shut the doors and
said were done and then been
done with it. For us to be able to
come back, its huge. Id like to
be able to be in a situation where
were up and we can go, but to get
a win when youre down is big.
Big Foot bounced back in a big
way as they took the fourth and
fth sets 25-15 and 15-13, respec-
tively.
The Chiefs offensive attack
was led by senior Rachel Heiden-
reich with 14 kills as she averaged
2.8 per set.
Samara Enz, senior, followed
Heidenreich with nine kills on 34
attempts, a team-high hit percent-
age of .147.
Sophomore Gloria Esarco reg-
istered three assists on the night,
the most of any Big Foot player.
After the match, Dowden
highlighted junior Morgan Stalker
as one of the key contributors for
Big Foot throughout their region-
als campaign.
Morgan Stalker, our libero,
has stepped in and she didnt
play there the (regular) season,
Dowden said. Shes played there
for the last couple of matches and
for her to step in and to pass well
and be aggressive, its huge. Its
something that we needed.
Stalker had 15 digs, received
20 serves and had an assist
through the ve sets.
Heidenreich led the Chiefs
with 28 serves received and 20
digs.
Senior Ally Mazur followed
closely with 18 digs and also had
30 assists, a team high.
The win qualied Big Foot
for the regional nals on Satur-
day, Oct. 25 against the one-seed
Crimson Tide in Edgerton.
The Chiefs struggled to gain
any ground against the Tide in
Saturdays match, dropping three
straight sets by scores of 14-25,
23-25, 16-25.
The loss signals the close
of the volleyball season for Big
Foot, but the bitter end in no way
diminishes the Chiefs accom-
plishments.
Despite nishing with an over-
all record of 16-27-1, the Chiefs
secured a share of the Rock Valley
- South title in Dowdens rst year
coaching the Chiefs with a 9-1
conference record.
The conference crown kept
with tradition, continuing a long
line of six straight RVC South
championships.
DAVID MICHELS/REGIONAL NEWS
BIG FOOTS SAMARA ENZ AND RACHEL HEIDENREICH defend the net
in Thursdays 3-2 win over Whitewater.
Ziervogel
Craig
VanDeVelde
Stalker
Mazur
Badger
volleyball
loses in
regional
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
WATERFORD The
Badger volleyball teams season
ended with a 0-3 loss in their
WIAA regional matchup against
the Waterford Wolverines on
Thursday, Oct. 23.
The Badgers and the Wol-
verines clashed as Waterford
repeatedly defeated Badger in
the waning moments of each set.
Badger dropped three in a
row by scores of 21-25, 22-25,
25-27.
Senior Emma Dumez put
forth a monstrous effort for the
Badgers, logging 25 kills and
.360 hit percentage in only three
sets.
Junior Sydney Collins and
sophomore Emma Pezza tied for
second on the team with three
kills apiece.
Collins had the only block of
the match for Badger.
A host of Badgers each had
two aces throughout the contest:
Dumez, Pezza, Victoria Hod-
kiewicz, sophomore, and Aleah
Haworth, senior, all tied for the
team-lead.
Hodkiewicz and senior Mack-
enna Bogan led the team with
11 digs while Dumez and senior
Miranda Durbin followed closely
behind with 10.
Badgers 0,
Wolverines 3
PLEASE SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE 3C
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 3C
SPORTS
Chiefs fall in Jefferson
By David Michels
sports@lakegenevanews.net
JEFFERSON One week
after Big Foots monumental Rock
Valley Conference win-streak
came to an end against Brodhead,
the Chiefs slipped into a two-
game skid with their 43-28 playoff
loss at the hands of the Jefferson
Eagles.
A number of Big Foot support-
ers were irked when the WIAAs
seeding was announced and they
found that the Chiefs had been
bumped to the Division 3 level.
Despite having already beaten
the Eagles at Jefferson in the regu-
lar season, Big Foots squad found
themselves on the road again.
Big Foot scored the rst
points of the game with 9:28 to
play in the second quarter when
senior quarterback Brett Morris
connected with junior receiver
Michael Heidenreich for a 19-yard
touchdown, but they wouldnt
hold the lead for long.
Jefferson managed to reel
off three-straight touchdown
drives, pulling ahead 21-7 midway
through the third quarter.
I think the kids fought and
worked hard, I dont think there
was a lack of effort or anything
in what they were doing, rst-
year head coach Greg Enz said in
a phone interview. I think at the
end of the day that were not dis-
appointed in that regard. I think
we just got into a game where we
needed to stop them defensively
and in the second half we couldnt
come up with a stop and the score
reected that. And offensively, I
think we did some good things. In
the rst half we left a touchdown
on the board and in the second half
we just had to play catch up and
I think there were a couple times
that we forced a couple plays, but
I dont blame the kids for having
done that because youre trying
to make something happen. And
when you want to make a play
and you try a
little too hard,
the result isnt
always what you
as the coach or
they as the play-
ers want, but we
just got into a
game where we
had to be perfect
and be incred-
ibly efcient
from an offen-
sive standpoint
and a defensive
standpoint they
just continued
to move the ball
and eat clock.
The Eagles
kept the ball out
of the hands of
the Chiefs by
employing a steadfast run game
and Big Foot wasnt able to score
again until ve minutes left in the
third quarter when Morris bar-
relled into the end zone from the
one yard line.
Jeffersons a very methodi-
cal team run-game wise, Enz
said. And from a statistical stand
point, we actually outgained them
in total yardage but the fact of
the matter is that we just couldnt
take them off the eld in a timely
manner. The time of possession
was more than two to one I think,
I think they controlled the ball
between 33 and 35 minutes of the
game to our 15, so I think that was
probably the disappointing part of
it. We were able to move the ball,
but we couldnt stop them from
moving the ball.
The Chiefs amassed 373 yards
of offense in the game in compari-
son to Jeffersons 365 yards.
Heidenreich hauled in two
more touchdown passes from
Morris in the fourth quarter, but
their decit was simply too big
to make up, especially with Jef-
fersons three pronged rushing
attack of Gabriel Horn, Jack Cin-
cotta and Garrett Blaeske.
Heidenreich nished the game
with six receptions for 122 yards
and three touchdowns.
Morris went 11-for-22 passing
with 154 yards, three touchdowns
and two interceptions. He also
rushed for 66 yards and a score on
eight carries.
Brett Morris had a real good
football game in many ways,
throwing the ball; running it, Enz
said. Then Michael Heidenreich, I
think he tied a school record with
three touchdown receptions in the
game, so he really had a nice foot-
ball game as well.
Enz also lauded Quinlan
Dixon for his play on both sides of
the ball in Fridays contest, saying
that Dixon gave an absolutely
impressive performance.
Dixon carried the football for
a team-high 72 yards, averaging
10.3 yards per carry. He also had
13 tackles for the defense.
Defensive back Anthony Wil-
liams led the team with 15 tackles
and William Utesch and Zakery
Greco each tallied a sack.
With the loss, 2014s Rock
Valley - South co-conference
champions bowed out of the play-
offs, but the Chiefs ended their
season with no regrets.
I think you have to say it was
a success, Enz said of his rst
season at the helm of Big Foots
football team. These kids had set
a goal for a conference title. They
obviously wanted more than that
and I dont disagree that there is
a level of disappointment amongst
them and myself, that I think we
thought we could have done more,
but all and all, for a group of kids
that had to go through a change,
a staff that had to go through
change with myself coming in,
and they were able to accomplish
what they did in really a short
amount of time when you think
about it, I think it speaks volumes
to them and everybody who was
associated with the season.
Chiefs 28, Eagles 43
LOCAL SPORTS SCHEDULE
OCT. 30 TO NOV 6.
Cross Country
Badger at State Tournament at Ridges Golf Course on
Nov. 1
Big Foot at State Tournament at Ridges Golf Course on
Nov. 1
Girls Swimming
Conference Meet at Badger on Nov. 1 at 11 a.m.
Durbin also led the team
with 32 assists.
Dumez received the most
serves for the Badgers with 18.
Bogan received 17 serves and
Hodkiewicz 16.
The loss dropped Badgers
overall record to 16-19 and they
finished the season with a 3-7
conference record.
Dumez was the season leader
in kills by an enormous margin,
totaling 313 and a hit percentage
of .290.
She also led the team in
serves received with 266.
Collins was the 2014 block
leader with 18 and Haworth fin-
ished second with 13.
Sophie Engerman, sopho-
more, finished the season with
a team-high 164 digs while Hod-
kiewicz and Durbin each fin-
ished with 158.
Durbin also led the team
with 543 assists, far and away
the most by any Badger.
Dumez Durbin
In the fourth quarter the Bull-
dogs perseverance paid off as
senior quarterback John Higgins
Jr. scored two touchdowns, one
a 26-yard pass to Andrew Breen
and the other a seven-yard touch-
down run.
Diehl said that Higgins big
performances had become kind
of an expectation, that hes a great
player and that they are going to
miss him dearly next year.
Andrew Breen looked great,
came up with some nice catches,
Diehl added. I love seeing him
ying over the top and coming
down with the ball in double cov-
erage.
Breen had ve catches for 98
yards and a touchdown.
Higgins nished the game
with 14-of-34 passing for 213
yards, a touchdown and an inter-
ception. He also led the team with
71 rushing yards.
Michael Guss picked up 21
rushing yards as well. Guss also
had 57 receiving yards, jump-
starting a number of Williams Bay
drives when the offense looked
ready to stall.
Diehl said that despite their
improved showing in the second
half, the Bulldogs didnt make any
drastic overhauls at halftime.
Not too many changes. Offen-
sively, we didnt change much at
all.
Defensively, we made a slight
adjustment, put another line-
backer back, took one off of pres-
sure because going into this week
we knew we didnt match up well
with Potosi since they were so
strong and physical, so we over-
loaded the box and tried to shoot
every gap. Hence, sometimes
the plays worked out well for us
for losses and other times theyd
break a tackle and go, and we
knew that going in, however, there
wasnt much of a defensive change
except for the fact is that Potosi
came one-dimensional a little bit
more.
Diehl called them an honor-
able program for not running up
the score, relying heavily on run-
ning the ball in the second half to
burn the clock.
Jacob Clark, the senior line-
man Alex Guss, Andrew Olson,
they just looked great. Diehl said.
In addition to four tackles,
Olson blocked a punt and recov-
ered the ball in the fourth quarter,
setting up a short eld for Wil-
liams Bays offense.
Alex Guss spent the game
clogging Potosis run lanes, snag-
ging a tackle in the process.
With Fridays loss, the Bull-
dogs concluded their rst trip to
the Trailways - Small Conference
playoffs, but Diehl doesnt want
his team to forget everything that
theyve learned and been through
now that the season is over.
The season, its basically a
mirror of life, Diehl said. We had
ups and downs. We had adver-
sity weve overcome, we pushed
through and weve learned. Its
just a representation of life all
piled into four months. So if any-
thing, I hope we learned from it.
Seniors who take that on to life
skills, if they go on to play col-
lege football, great. If they dont,
the things and principles that we
learned here in Williams Bay foot-
ball and in our school, I just hope
they utilize those things in their
lives later on and anytime things
get tough for them, they remem-
ber this season. We were able to
push through some adversity and
become one of the top teams in
the state and thats what making
the playoffs is.
As for a possible return to
the playoffs, Diehl made sure to
keep his feet rmly planted on the
ground as he begins planning for
next season.
One step at a time, Diehl
said, laughing. One step at a
time.
Heidenreich
Dixon
Obviously, it was a great
accomplishment, Lauterbach
said. Our one doubles team, it
was (Williams and Chironis)
fourth year back to the state
tournament which is tremen-
dous. Very few teams can say
that. And obviously, our two
doubles had to win the sectional
tournament to get to the state
tournament, and they finished
the season reaching the goal that
they had set the first day of prac-
tice, to win conference and go
to the state tournament. So you
know, they were able to check
those off and were able to reach
them.
Lauterbach said that in all his
time as the head coach of Badger
tennis he had never been a part
of a team that sent two doubles
teams to the state tournament,
and he was elated to be a part of
that achievement.
When asked what he thought
of the entire 2014 season, Laut-
erbach said, I think it has been
very, very good.
I dont want to use the word
overachieve but I think that
throughout the season we con-
tinued to improve, and at the
end of the season we played our
best tennis. I think everybody
throughout the season played to
their potential and kept improv-
ing on their potential all season
he said.
Lauterbach said that despite
losing their first conference
match, the girls didnt back down
and continued to gain momen-
tum in the Southern Lakes
Conference tournament before
ultimately hitting their stride at
sectionals.
I definitely think that we
reached our goals this year as far
as going to the team state tour-
nament, which is a very lofty
goal, and we were able to do that,
so I think we had an extremely
successful season. he said.
We were one of eight teams
left out of a boatload of schools.
We were one of the eight teams
left. Like I said, tremendous
season.
We qualified last year and
we thought this was an even a
better year to qualify, Butscher
said. But its tough when you
get to those meets. Its a differ-
ent kind of competition because
everyone kind of gets after it,
you know? We had a couple real
young guys running, which is
good for us for the future but
that inexperience might have
hurt them a little bit, they went
out kind of quick. So they didnt
run quite as well as they would
have liked.
Despite the team failing to
qualify, Badger High School will
still be represented at the state
tournament by individual quali-
fiers, Martinez and Carmona.
Butscher said that while most
sports do, this sport for sure,
rewards those who work hard
and Martinez and Carmona are
the two hardest working guys
the Badgers have.
Theyve been doing this for
three years, running all year
round, so it was neat for them
to get the reward. I was more
impressed with how sad they
were that their team wasnt
going. They were genuinely sad,
Butscher said.
Butscher also added that he
was positive that Martinez and
Carmona would represent the
school well, but he was most
proud of them for the selfless-
ness they displayed in wanting
their teammates to join them at
the state meet.
Its just a whole lot more fun
for them when the whole teams
there, he said.
Of his expectations for Bad-
gers two left standing, Butscher
said that it would be great if
Martinez could finish in the top
15 and Carmona in the top 40.
I really think those would
each be two very strong races for
those two guys.
Regardless of how their 2014
season ended, the Badgers have
no cause to hang their heads
after a largely successful season.
I would say we had a good
year. I think sometimes, for most
sports, most teams end with a
loss and thats hard, Butscher
said. We did some reflection
and we looked at our team goals
going into the year and our team
goals are, first and foremost, we
want to raise men of high char-
acter and we feel like we did a
good job of that. Our second
goal was to win conference and
I dont think its ever been done
in our school history, or even in
the conference history, where
there have been seven guys from
the same team all-conference,
so thats unheard of and that we
were pretty happy with.
Butscher said that all of the
Badgers were obviously dis-
sapointed with how the season
ended.
The coaches tell their runners
dont ever get beat by someone
whos worse than you and while
not taking anything away from
Janesville Craig, Butscher said
that he felt Badger had the better
team this year.
(Janesville Craig) ran a great
race and are a great program and
theyve been to state nine of the
past 10 years. I just feel like we
ran, like I said, OK. We needed
to run good and I think we would
have beat them, Butscher said.
Id say we had a good year
but that last meet leaves a bad
taste in your mouth.
Tennis/I think at the end of the season we were playing our best tennis.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Volleyball/Season leaders
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2C
Bulldogs/I hope we learned from it.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
Badger/We just ran OK.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1C
4C | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
The Lake Geneva Regional News welcomes its readers to submit photos of charitable events, personal
milestones and school activities for publication. We also accept unique photos of wildlife and nature.
Photos must have a minimum 200 resolution and be at least 6 inches wide. The photos must be in
focus and have a natural color distribution. The Regional News may alter the color on photos and crop
them. We use editorial discretion when reviewing pictures. The people in the pictures must be identied.
Submitted pictures may also appear online at www.facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews.
Please email photos to managing editor Robert Ireland at rireland@lakegenevanews.net. Readers can
also bring pictures to the Regional News Ofce, 315 Broad St. Lake Geneva, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
THE IMMANUEL LUTHERAN CHURCH QUILTERS made 232 quilts and
100 school kits that were recently boxed and sent to Lutheran World
Relief. The quilters meet weekly throughout the year to make these
quilts. They are sent around the world for those in need. The Rev. Mary
Ann Moller-Gunderson said, We are blessed with an amazing group of
tireless servants who give of their time and energy. With a record number
of refugees around the world, these quilts and kits will provide warmth,
shelter and hope for so many who are suffering.
ROBERT IRELAND/REGIONAL NEWS
CHUCK SCHLEHLEIN knows how
to celebrate Halloween. His home
on Eugene Drive is decorated for the
holiday, and, when trick-or-treaters visit
his home, Schlehlein is in full costume.
He even surprises visitors by jumping
out a casket.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH in Walworth held Quilt Sunday on Oct.
12, when 60 handmade quilts were presented to Lutheran World Service.
Members of the womens group made the quilts that will travel to
Minneapolis to be shipped out to countries all over the world to those in
need.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
THE FONTANA POLICE DEPARTMENT nished their Feed the Need food
drive for the Big Foot Emergency Food Pantry last week. The annual drive
was moved to October this year to help ll the pantry shelves before more
donations come in during the holiday season.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
FOR NATE. On Oct. 17 through 19, the Moelter farm hosted a Boy Scout
Camporee. Several troops came from Wisconsin and Illinois to participate.
Among the scheduled events was the dedication of a ag pole that was
crafted out of a 40-foot Hickory tree. The ceremony was for Nate Walter,
an Eagle Scout from Genoa City Troop 236, who was killed in a tragic
accident last year. Pictured are (from left to right) Frank Guske Jr. Michelle
and Scott Walter (Nates mother and father), Emily Walter (Nates sister)
and Kelly and Rick Blada. After Nates father spoke of his sons passion
for scouting, the 5-foot-by-8-foot ag was raised to half-mast for the
remainder of the day to honor Nate.
Beutlich a McNair Scholar
Marcy Beutlich, a junior psychology major from
Elkhorn, has been selected as a UW-Whitewater
McNair Scholar.
The program prepares rst-generation and mul-
ticultural students for graduate studies and even-
tual careers as university professors. Each student is
assigned a faculty mentor within their major to enhance
resources that benet research and critical thinking
skills.
The McNair Scholars are very on top of their tasks
this year and are eager to continue to further their nd-
ings, Christopher Maniece, graduate assistant for the
program, said. When our students conduct research,
they are not only working on those skills, but also on
how to present their ndings to a wide array of people.
After being selected, each McNair Scholar spends
eight weeks at UW-Whitewater during the summer
in order to conduct undergraduate research. Later
on, they will have the opportunity to present at the
National Conference on Undergraduate Research and
UW-Whitewater Undergraduate Research Day. The
following summer consists of the McNair Scholars par-
ticipating in external research internships at a different
university for six to 10 weeks.
Societys Assets hosting art contest
Societys Assets is sponsoring its 16th annual youth
art contest, with entries due by 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 10.
Students from kindergarten through high school in
the agencys service area of Walworth, Racine, Keno-
sha, Rock and Jefferson counties are eligible to partici-
pate. Schools in the areas have received contest packets.
Parents or students may ask for the entry blanks.
Judging takes place in November and winning
entries will be featured on the agency 2015 calendar.
The art contest in 2013 brought in 500 entries from
schools throughout our service area. The quality and
variety of the artwork impressed the judges. The com-
mittee believes this project creates disability awareness
and emphasizes out mission with young people in the
community, H.L. Denton, chairperson of the Commu-
nity Relations Committee, said.
Contact (262) 637-9128 ext. 3605 for more informa-
tion.
Retired Educators hosting meeting
On Tuesday, Nov. 11, at Ridgestone Village in Elk-
horn at 12:30 p.m., the Walworth County Association
of Retired Educators will hold their last meeting of the
year.
The guest speaker will be Paula Hocking, manager
of the Walworth County Advocacy Center in Elkhorn,
talking about the Tree House, a place where children
come for help if they may have been abused physically
or sexually, neglected, or exposed to domestic violence.
Hocking works with Childrens Hospital, Milwaukee,
and has more than 20 years of service with Childrens
Protective Services in Walworth County.
The WCARE welcomes all retired educators (teach-
ers, administrators, teacher assistants, support ser-
vices) and spouses to attend. The usual contribution of
food is being substituted this meeting for a Christmas
gift (unwrapped and new) for anyone from infant to 18
years. All support is appreciated. The cost of lunch is
$9.50. For reservations and questions, contact Beverly
Faust, W1928 Pastime Lane, East Troy, WI, 53120 or
call (262) 684-5500.
COMMUNITY NOTES
SUBMITTED PHOTO
WINNING SEASONS were recorded by both the Williams Bay High
School football and girls volleyball teams. Both teams were honored by
the Williams Bay Village Board. Village President John Marra is at center,
kneeling. To the immediate right of Marra, in a blue shirt, is Bay girls
volleyball head coach Bill Nevoraski. Derek Diehl, Bulldogs head football
coach, is third from right.
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 5C
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FAM Movie: Billy Madison (1995) Movie: Miss Congeniality (2000) Movie: Liar Liar (1997) Jim Carrey.
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LIFE The Good Sister Movie: Sorority Surrogate (2014) (cc) Movie: A Sisters Nightmare (2013) (cc) Movie
NICK Sanjay Bread Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. iCarly (s) iCarly (s) Nicky Thunder Thunder Henry
SYFY (11:30) Night of the Demons Movie: Hostel Part II (2007) Movie: Starve (2014) Bobby Campo, Mariah Bonner.
TBS Prince Movie: Spider-Man (2002) Tobey Maguire. Friends Friends Friends Friends Raymond Raymond
TNT (11:00) Movie: Training Day Movie: The Italian Job (2003) Mark Wahlberg. Movie: Collateral (2004) Tom Cruise.
TVLD Roseanne (s) (cc) Rose. Rose. Rose. Rose. Family Feud (s) FamFeud FamFeud FamFeud FamFeud
USA NCIS (s) (cc) (DVS) NCIS (s) (cc) (DVS) NCIS (s) (cc) (DVS) NCIS (s) (cc) (DVS) NCIS (s) (cc) (DVS) NCIS Alibi (s)
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SHOW (11:30) Movie: Bad News Bears Movie: Scary Movie V (2013) Movie: The Perks of Being a Wallower Movie: Sinister R
REGIONAL NEWS
Thursday, October 30th, 2014
through Wednesday, November 6th, 2014
TV
L i s t i n g s
6C | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
SATURDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 1, 2014
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
# WISC News Madison College Football: Navy vs. Notre Dame. (N) (Live) (cc) News Sidelines M*A*S*H Murdoch
$ WTMJ News Paid 2014 Breeders Cup Law & Order: SVU Saturday Night Live News Saturday Night Live (s) (cc)
& WITI Pregame College Football: Teams TBA. (N) (s) (Live) News Animation Dom TMZ (s)
_ WLS College Football College Football: Illinois at Ohio State. Fighting Illini face the Buckeyes. (N) Eyewitness News Castle (s)
) WGN-A Two Men Bulls Eye NBA Basketball: Bulls at Timberwolves WGN News at Nine Celebrity The Promotion
* WMVS Classic Gospel (s) Lawrence Welk Wine Spy (s) Poirot (s) (cc) Austin City Limits Artists Den
, WISN News Big 12 Sp College Football: Illinois at Ohio State. Fighting Illini face the Buckeyes. (N) News Huddle Big 12 Sp
` WREX News (N) TBA 2014 Breeders Cup Law & Order: SVU Saturday Night Live News (N) Saturday Night Live (s) (cc)
2 WVTV Commun Commun Anger Anger King King Celebrity Mother Anger Traveler Movie: Into the Blue
8 WCGV College Football: Alabama-Birmingham at Florida Atlantic. FAU Stadium. (N) Two Men ProWrest Ring of Honor Wr. Whacked
> WVCY VCY Presents Musical Prophecy Prophecy Watch MacAr Worship: Alter History Rejoice in the Lord
D WMVT Antiques Roadshow Antiques Roadshow Movie: Call Northside 777 (1948) Bid The Roosevelts-Intimate
Z WDJT Jeopardy Wheel College Football: Navy vs. Notre Dame. (N) (Live) (cc) News The Closer (cc) Castle (s)
CABLE CHANNELS
AMC Rambo III Movie: First Blood (1982) R Movie: Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) Movie: Rambo III (1988) R
ANIM To Be Announced My Cat From Hell Americas Cutest (s) Pit Bulls-Parole To Be Announced Pit Bulls-Parole
A&E Criminal Minds (s) Criminal Minds (s) Criminal Minds (s) Criminal Minds (s) Criminal Minds (s) Criminal Minds (s)
COM Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay Movie: Superbad (2007) Jonah Hill. (cc) Date and Switch
DISN Dog Dog Jessie Jessie Jessie Jessie Mighty Kickin It Austin Austin Gravity Austin
DSC Last Frontier Last Frontier Alaska: The Last Skyscraper: Road to Chicago: (N) (s) (cc) Airplane Repo (s)
ESPN2 College Football: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) (cc) Score College Football: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) (cc)
ESPN College Football: Teams TBA. (N) (Live) (cc) Score College Football: Arizona at UCLA. (N) (Live) (cc)
FAM Movie: Bruce Almighty (2003) Movie: The Proposal (2009) Sandra Bullock. Movie: The Wedding Planner
HGTV Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers House Hunters Hunters Hunt Intl Property Brothers
LIFE (5:00) Movie Movie: Hocus Pocus (1993) (cc) Movie: Hocus Pocus (1993) (cc) Movie: Hocus Pocus
NICK Henry Haunted Henry Nicky Thunder Awesome Prince Prince Friends Friends Mother Mother
SYFY Movie: Resident Evil: Extinction (2007) Movie: Disaster L.A. (2014) Justin Ray. Movie: Resident Evil: Extinction (2007)
TBS Raymond Raymond Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Deal With Fake Off Meet
TNT Movie: Fast & Furious (2009) Transporter Transporter Transporter Transporter
TVLD FamFeud Family Feud (s) FamFeud Raymond Raymond Friends Friends King King King King
USA Movie: Do the Right Thing (1989) Danny Aiello. Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Chrisley Law & Order: SVU
PREMIUM CHANNELS
HBO (5:00) Admission (s) Movie: Winters Tale (2014) PG-13 Boardwalk Empire Foo Fighters: Sonic Movie: Winters Tale
MAX (4:45) Enders Game Movie: Identity Thief (2013) (s) NR Movie: Walk of Shame (2014) The Great Bikini Bowling Bash
SHOW (5:00) Sinister (2012) The Affair Boxing: Andrzej Fonfara vs. Doudou Ngumbu. From Chicago. (N) Homeland (s) (cc)
SUNDAY MORNING NOVEMBER 2, 2014
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
BROADCAST CHANNELS
# WISC Paid No Aposto Paid CBS News Sunday Morning (s) Nation Attorney General: The NFL Today (cc)
$ WTMJ Todays TMJ4 News Today (N) (s) (cc) Todays TMJ4 News Meet the Press (cc) Insight Beauty Poppy Noodle
& WITI Estate Pets.TV Fox 6 WakeUp News Sunday (N) (cc) Fox News Sunday DW-TV Outdoors FOX NFL Sunday
_ WLS Sunday ABC7 News Good Morning Sunday Morning ABC7 Eyewitness News This Week Rescue Wildlife
) WGN-A WGN News Coolest Animal State On Spot Singsatn Mass Pain Free House Weekend Healthy
* WMVS Tiger Dinosaur Super Builder Thomas Sid Space WordWrl Fourth St Here Nw CHANGE Charlie
, WISN Good Morning 12 News This Morning Sunday (N) (cc) UpFront This Week OurDin Kds Outback
` WREX Faith TV: Mass Think Big 13 Cares Today (N) (s) (cc) Meet the Press (cc) United Paid To Be Announced
2 WVTV World RightSide Paid Our Is Building Paid Paid Grilln Paid Wisc. Outdoors Paid
8 WCGV Paid Butt Lift! Matthew Paid Pain Free Paid Mass Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid
> WVCY Prophecy Prophecy J. Whitcomb At Calvary Lead Truth In Touch MacAr Alter
D WMVT Basic Statistical Thurgood Marshall: Dropping Dropping Martha Cooking Kitchen Cook Taste Food
Z WDJT Paid Paid Eye to Grace CBS News Sunday Morning (s) Face the Nation (s) Green The NFL Today (cc)
CABLE CHANNELS
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Featuring Letters to the Editor, Obituaries and Community Matters
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Community & Commentary
D
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Lake Geneva Regional News Keeping you current since 1872 Published every Thursday by the Lake Geneva Printing & Publishing Co.
PLEASE SEE TIME IS NOW PAGE 5D
PLEASE SEE BRETL PAGE 2D
Why we play it safe with election letters
We dont print letters to
the editor regarding elec-
tions or referendums
the week prior to an election.
Our reasoning: We want
to avoid any chance of a
grievous error being made
that might affect how you
vote.
As a result, Ive rejected
several letters voicing opin-
ions about the Lake Geneva
parking structure and the
Williams Bay School referendum
that showed up this week. All let-
ters were rejected regardless of
the side they took.
We expect the facts to be
straight in our news stories. At
least we try our best. But our
opinion section is different, more
prone to errors.
Normally we allow people
to have their say in letters to the
editor and let the reader decide
w h o s
right and
w h o s
wrong.
A
g r i e v -
ous error
in one
per s on s
mind may
be the
truth in
anothers.
And facts too often rest uncom-
fortably between a lie and simply
a vigorous opinion.
When mistakes are made most
of the time theyre not on the eve
of an election.
Then the stakes are higher and
theres no chance for a correction.
And, in deadline journalism,
mistakes do happen.
Most of us know about Dewey
defeats Truman. Thats the head-
line the Chicago Tribune printed
after the 1948 election. And it was
wrong.
Ive heard of the headline
about a crime on top of a story
about a politician.
Or even a politicians picture
being swapped with the dog of the
week.
How can these things happen?
Newspapers are run by humans.
And humans make mistakes. Its
happened to the best newspapers
in the world. It can happen to us.
I also tried to live by the rule,
too. I ran my opinion in last weeks
paper.
So in essence we have a buffer
week.
I can correct a statement I
made last week about a road run-
ning behind the Lake Geneva Util-
ity building connecting Geneva
Street hadnt been discussed in a
dozen years. A former member of
the city council corrected me. It
was last discussed six years ago.
And were running the entire
list of TIF ideas on our website, so
people know whats on it.
Hopefully, by now, all sides of
the issue were explored on both
the Williams Bay School and the
parking structure referendum
over the last two years.
We tried to alert readers of our
letters policy. We ran it several
times. Were sorry some people
missed it.
We ran two ads on the parking
structure. That may look hypo-
critical; it may be. And the irony is
both advertisers would have lived
with the policy. Next year, Ill look
at expanding the ban to include
late ads, too.
I dont think either one of them
had a grievous error.
On another election note:
Signs against the parking
structure have shown up about
town. Only to be removed just as
quickly. Letters have been distrib-
uted door-to-door.
The issue is not what was said.
But we wondered if it was against
election laws as no attribution was
printed on the material.
So we asked the Government
Accountability Ofce. If an indi-
vidual or group spends more than
$2,500 on their campaign, they
must put paid for by he or she.
The authors probably didnt
spend that much, so dont have to
register as a political action com-
mittee.
Or identify who they are.
Its just never made any sense
to me, why people want to hide
what they believe in.
Halverson is editor and gen-
eral manager of the Regional
News.
Former recipient seeks help for another
Dear W.C.,
You provided
help to my family
two years ago when
my daughter was
so ill and in the
hospital.
My daugh-
ter still has many
medical needs but
we manage to get
by. My husband is
working full-time
and some side jobs
so we have enough to at least pay
our rent and utilities.
I am not writing you asking
for help for my family. I am writ-
ing to you to ask if you could help
a mother I met while our children
were in intensive care at the same
time.
She has just begun this long
road of caring for a sick child as
her daughter is just a newborn
with health challenges ahead of
her.
We got to be friends while
going through this ordeal together.
There is nothing that can prepare
you for the sight of your child in
a hospital bed with all kinds of
tubes and wires attached to her.
We spent long hours talking
while our children fought for their
lives.
When my
daughter was
released we
exchanged phone
numbers and I told
her to call me if she
ever needed some-
one to talk to. She
called me yesterday
because she needed
someone to talk to.
Her car had
broken down and
she had not been able to pay her
rent due to losing her job over the
amount of time she had to take off
to care for her daughter.
My friend said she would be
evicted next week and was wor-
ried her car would not make it
back and forth to the hospital.
I told her about The Time Is
Now to Help and offered to write
you a letter.
Is there any way you could
help my friend like you helped me
and my family?
Dear Readers,
I remembered the woman that
had written this letter and the
special circumstances her family
was struggling with.
I knew they probably still had
a daily struggle with their own
medical and nancial needs. It
was a seless thing to ask for help
for someone ahead of your own
needs. I also thought of how self-
less it is to care for a sick child
every day of your life.
Many of the recipients of our
assistance are caregivers that give
of themselves every day.
Most are thrust into their role
of caregiver by the needs of a sick
child or an elderly relative.
Many have to give up their
jobs to take on this role. This only
adds nancial stress to an already
traumatic situation.
I called the woman and we
spoke for a few minutes, catching
up on her daughters and the fam-
ilys progress.
She was adamant that her own
family did not need help.
She only wanted The Time Is
Now to Help to bring the same
sense of nancial stress relief to
her friend that we had provided
for them two years ago.
The woman again told me
how we had changed their lives
and provided them the assistance
they had needed to get through an
incredibly difcult time. She pro-
vided me the name, address and
phone number for her friend in
need.
I called the friend and she
answered immediately. She
explained she had been waiting
for a call from a new specialist
for her baby and knew it would
come from an unknown number.
She apologized as she told me she
would have to hang up imme-
diately if another incoming call
interrupted our conversation.
I assured her I completely
understood that she must not
miss that important phone call. I
asked the mother some questions
about the babys condition, not
sure if she wanted to share all the
personal details.
She immediately opened up
and shared all the medical facts.
The baby had several birth
defects and complications to deal
with and would have a long road
ahead. The mother told me she
was a single mother and did not
have anyone to fall back on for
support, other than the friend she
had met in the hospital that knew
what she was going through, and
had offered to write us a letter in
her behalf.
The babys father had died in
a motorcycle crash when she was
just three months pregnant. I
could hear she was crying when
she told me about the loss of her
boyfriend and the babys father.
She told me how happy they both
were to nd out she was pregnant.
The mother told me about her
difcult pregnancy that only got
worse after his death and how she
blamed the stress and grief on the
premature birth and health prob-
lems.
I could hear in her voice she
was under a great amount of
stress.
I agreed to meet the mother at
the hospital that afternoon to go
over her nancial situation. She
admitted she had slept in her car
the previous night in the hospital
parking lot due to being worried
the car would not make it back
and forth to her home.
I arrived and found the car in
the space she had told me it would
be. The mother was waiting inside
the car and opened her door after
I showed her my identication
and introduced myself.
I asked if she would like to go
talk in the cafeteria, and we could
get something to eat.
The mother said, I cannot
afford to eat in the cafeteria. I
told her I would like to buy her
lunch.
It looks like the federal government is trying to keep
closer tabs on its money. Last December the U.S. Ofce
of Management and Budget (OMB) issued comprehen-
sive grant reform rules entitled Uniform Administrative
Requirements, Cost Principles and Audit Requirements for
Federal Awards.
Contrary to what the
length of the title would sug-
gest, the stated intent of the
effort, according to the OMB,
is to consolidate the existing
grant rules and reduce the
administrative burden for
agencies that receive federal
grants. Eight separate circu-
lars or rule books governing
how grant money must be
handled and accounted for are being combined into one
super or omni circular. I thought I was familiar was most
government jargon, but I will admit this is the rst time I
have ever heard the term omni-circular. Im skeptical that
anything called an omni-circular is going to make life sim-
pler, but if we want federal money, and we do, were going
to have to get with the program.
New rules increase
red tape, safeguards
2D | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Have fun making some treats
for a fall party and try to have
some children helping out with
the project. These can be taken
to school or a potluck or served
at home and all have a bit of fun
attached to them.
Microwave Caramel Corn uses
a brown paper grocery bag as part
of the preparation. The caramel
mixture is done in the microwave,
poured over the popped corn in the
bag and processed, then shaken
up and processed some more.
Several helping hands make
Bear Track Cookies more quickly.
Peanut halves are placed indi-
vidually into the dropped cookie
mounds to make the claws. A
surprise ingredient in the cookie
dough is fortied chocolate-a-
vored syrup, like Ovaltine.
Haystacks come in many vari-
eties, all unbaked and using chow
mein noodles.
This mixture of chunky peanut
butter, chocolate chips and min-
iature marshmallows is poured
over the noodles and dropped into
small mounds.
A savory snack, Beefy Pop-
corn is dressed with a mixture of
chopped dried beef that has been
shredded and sauteed in butter.
The mixture makes a good con-
trast with many sweet snacks.
BEAR TRACK COOKIES
2 1/3 cups our
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup margarine
2/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup fortied chocolate-
avored syrup (Ovaltine)
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 cup milk
Peanut halves
Sift our, baking powder
and salt together, set aside. Beat
margarine and sugar until light
and uffy. Stir in syrup, than
add eggs, one at a time, beat-
ing well after each one. Stir in
vanilla. Add dry ingredients
alternately with milk. Chill
dough one hour.
Heat oven to 375 degrees.
Drop by heaping teaspoonfuls
onto greased baking sheets.
Insert four peanut halves about
halfway of their length into
fattest side of each cookie, to
resemble claws. Bake 10 to 12
minutes at 375 degrees. Makes
three dozen cookies.
MICROWAVE CARAMEL CORN
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup butter or margarine
1/4 cup light corn syrup
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon vanilla
13 cups popped corn, plain
Place popped corn in large
brown bag.
In large microwave con-
tainer, combine brown sugar,
butter, corn syrup and salt.
Microwave on high one to two
minutes. Stir and microwave
three more minutes, stirring
after each minute. Add soda
and vanilla; stir well. Mixture
will quickly foam up. Pour over
popcorn in bag.
Fold bag down and micro-
wave one minute on high. Take
out of microwave; shake well
and microwave one minute.
Shake well and microwave for
30 seconds. Shake again and
microwave 30 seconds. Repeat
if needed to coat all kernels.
Shake well and pour onto two
cookie sheets to cool completely.
Note: one to two cups dry
roasted peanuts may be added
to bag with popcorn.
HAYSTACKS
1 cup chocolate chips
1/4 cup chunky peanut
butter
2 cups miniature marsh-
mallows
1 6-ounce can chow mein
noodles
Melt chips, stir in peanut
butter until smooth. Stir in
marshmallows and noodles.
Spoon into mounds on waxed
paper and cool to set. Makes
about 25.
BEEFY POPCORN
1/2 cup butter
2 1/2 ounces dried beef,
chopped ne
3 quarts hot popped corn,
plain
Saute dried beef in butter for
three minutes, stirring often.
Pour over hot popped corn; toss
to mix.
Nearly 16 percent of the
money spent by Walworth County
government comes from state and
federal sources. Put another way,
if we continued to offer the pro-
grams we do, without grant funds,
the county tax levy would jump by
$21.7 million.
Ive heard two explanations
for OMBs latest project; the rst
is that the Feds are doing noth-
ing new, but merely reorganizing
existing rules.
The second explanation, and
the one that I believe is closer to
the mark, is that the federal gov-
ernment will be scrutinizing how
state and local units of govern-
ment spend federal money far
more carefully than it has in the
past.
Walworth County has a fair
amount of work to do to ensure
that our own ordinances and
forms are in place before the new
federal rules go into effect, which
happens to be the day after Christ-
mas.
We are in better shape than
many other counties in achieving
compliance, however, because we
have developed a centralized pro-
curement process over the years.
Purchasing and contracting gure
prominently into the new federal
mandates.
Unlike cities, county govern-
ment has traditionally been highly
decentralized.
It is not unusual, in many
counties, for individual depart-
ments to apply for grants and buy
things on their own with little
oversight by their boards.
Over the past 12 years or so,
Walworth County has imposed
more or less uniform rules on
grants and purchasing.
This increased oversight was
not always popular with our man-
agers, who preferred the exibility
of having very few rules. The old
system had many problems, how-
ever, including the fact that we
missed out on volume discounts
when each department acted as its
own purchasing agent. Competi-
tive bidding, moreover, was a hit-
or-miss proposition and the time
spent by individual employees to
search for bargains and even drive
to the store to pick items up was
never gured into the nal price.
Centralizing our procurement
process solved these issues and
now gives us a leg up in comply-
ing with the new federal require-
ments.
Because we have a well-doc-
umented purchasing system, we
dont need to create one from
scratch. We need only tweak exist-
ing ordinances to comply with the
federal standards.
One of the rst planning ques-
tions that we faced was whether to
operate under a single set of rules
or create two different purchasing
systems; one for spending federal
dollars and another when only
county or state funds are being
used.
We opted to extend the federal
requirements to all of our pur-
chases.
The downside of doing this
is that it will create even more
requirements for vendors and
staff to follow. The danger of not
making the rules uniform, how-
ever, is twofold: rst, it creates
two systems that workers must
understand; secondly, and more
importantly, it creates the pos-
sibility that an incorrect process
will be followed when federal
money is involved.
It is not always apparent when
federal funds are being spent. In
some cases, grants that we receive
from the state are actually fed-
eral dollars that the state passes
through to us. In those cases, the
county is a sub-recipient and the
OMB omni-circular would apply
to our use of that money.
We will do our best to fully
comply with the new OMB rules
by the December due date. Like
any new program, we expect well
learn as we go along.
Hopefully, the accountants
and agencies that audit our pro-
grams will take this into consid-
eration, but we cant count on it;
the stakes of losing grant dollars
are high.
Complying with the federal
grant regulations will require
effort from both county staff and
the vendors that we rely on to pro-
vide vital services. I expect to hear
complaints about the additional
red tape created by the rules. I
have two answers to this criti-
cism; rst, it isnt a choice. If we
want to receive federal money, we
will need to comply. Secondly, it is
hard to argue with the overall goal
of the omni-circular, which is to
carefully account for tax dollars.
It is impossible to have things
both ways. Those who criticize red
tape are the same people who are
outraged when waste or fraud are
uncovered in government con-
tracts.
OMBs omni-circular will
result in some additional rules;
ensuring that government pur-
chasing is done in a transparent
and accountable manner, how-
ever, is in the interest of all tax-
payers.
The opinions expressed in this
column are those of the author
and not necessarily those of
the Walworth County Board of
Supervisors.
Bretl/New rules add work, but should improve government transparency
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
While researching primary sources
for this column, I necessarily learned
more about Lake Genevas history than
I ever knew before. For example, it
became clear to me that Lake Genevas
history between 1837 and the Civil War
is not appreciably different from that
of most small towns in southern Wis-
consin, which were founded in the late
1830s and early 1840s after the Potawa-
tomi Native Americans were removed
from the area. In hindsight, I might have
surmised that Geneva (as it was called
then) located on one of the most beautiful lakes in the
world would eventually come to have a far different
history than other nearby towns such as Spring Prairie
or Sharon. A brief foreshadowing of Lake Genevas des-
tiny occurred between 1856 and 1860 when the rst rail
connection was completed, linking the small town with
the rapidly growing metropolis of Chicago 80 miles to
the southeast. But bad track caused the railroad to cease
running, and the Civil War intervened.
The Civil War profoundly affected Geneva, both neg-
atively and positively. Of the 100 or so young men from
the Geneva area who joined Company F of the 4th Wis-
consin Infantry when the Civil War began in 1861, few
returned.
Many were killed or seriously wounded 1,000 miles
to the south in May and June of 1863 when the 4th Wis-
consin was one of many Union regiments that assaulted
the Confederate stronghold of Port Hudson, La., on the
Mississippi River. The 4th Wisconsin Infantry was dev-
astated and had to be reformed as the 4th Wisconsin
Cavalry.
Young men from the Geneva area also joined two
other companies, Company C of the 22nd Wisconsin
Infantry and Company K of the 49th Wisconsin Infantry,
as well as many other Union regiments.
The 22nd and 49th Wisconsin fared better during
the Civil War than the 4th Wisconsin. Most of the mem-
bers of the regiments returned to the Geneva area after
the Civil War ended. These Civil War veterans and veter-
ans of the Union regiments from New York, Pennsylva-
nia, Ohio, Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri would play key
roles in forging Genevas history between the close of the
Civil War in 1865 and the beginning of the 20th century.
The years 1865 to 1871 saw Geneva return to normal.
Eighty-eight miles to the southeast, the rapidly growing
metropolis of Chicago was booming. The Civil War had
massively expanded Chicagos economy, especially in the
meatpacking and clothes manufacturing sectors, which
produced much of the food and uniforms for the Union
army. Chicagos favorable location at on Lake Michigan,
where a water route provided access to the Illinois River
and ultimately to the Mississippi River, made it an ideal
location for the transportation of agricultural products,
primarily grain and beef, which were shipped to Chicago
from farms throughout the Midwest via railroads, boats,
and wagons, then processed, loaded onto the lake schoo-
ners or freight cars, and shipped to Eastern cities. Chi-
cagos excellent location had ensured its development as
the heart of the nations rapidly expanding rail network.
These developments all fueled a booming economy in
Chicago, which in turn created a rising class of wealthy
entrepreneurs. It was this newly rich class that would
have a profound impact on Geneva, transforming it
from an ordinary small Midwest town into the prosper-
ous small city that it would become during the last three
decades of the 19th century.
Lake Genevas 19th century history was determined
by the intersection of three factors: the rise of Chicago,
which, during and after the Civil War, had rapidly
become one of the major cities in the world; Genevas
proximity to the booming metropolis; and the extraor-
dinary beauty of the deep lake upon which Geneva was
situated a beauty that had been largely ignored during
the rst three decades of the villages existence.
Flush with their newly acquired fortunes, several
members of the nouveau riche class in Chicago began to
look for suitable venues where they and
their families could escape from Chi-
cagos heat, noise and congestion during
the summers. In their vanguard was
George Sturges, who had made his for-
tune by owning grain elevators. Sturges
discovered a beautiful lake located only
80 miles from Chicago. He purchased a
home that was built on the shore at the
head of the northwest bay of the beauti-
ful lake from the widow of Asa Farr, an
attorney in the small village. (Farr, an
ofcer in the Union army, tragically had
been murdered in cold blood by William Quantrill and
his notorious band of Confederate guerillas in Baxter
Springs, Kan., on Oct. 6, 1863.)
Sturges installed his family in the Farr house on
Main Street in Geneva overlooking the lake. He also pur-
chased more land on the western shore of Geneva Bay
and began construction of a large summer home, which
he named Snug Harbor (todays Covenant Harbor).
George Sturges was soon joined by his newly rich broth-
ers, Shelton and Buckingham Sturges, who also pur-
chased land on the northwest shore of Geneva Bay and
began construction of summer homes. The three Sturges
brothers were followed by many other members of Chi-
cagos newly-rich class.
But on Oct. 8, 1871, everything changed. The Great
Chicago Fire occurred, destroying much of downtown
Chicago. Some of the newly minted millionaires who
owned summer homes and estates on the shores of
Geneva Lake lost their Chicago homes when they burned
to the ground. They were compelled to live in their
summer homes on the shores of Geneva Lake as their
Chicago homes were being rebuilt.
Word quickly spread among Chicagos wealthy about
the virtues of owning estates on the shores of Geneva
Lake and dozens bought property on the lakes shore and
commenced building summer homes. In many respects
they were emulating the rich of the eastern seaboard
cities who had built massive summer mansions (ironi-
cally called cottages) in Newport, R.I.
The transformation of the village of Geneva during
the 1870s is well-documented in the U.S. censuses of
1870 and 1880. In Geneva, there was a marked increase
in the number of carpenters, masons, laborers and other
building tradesmen living in the village, many of whom
were employed building the summer mansions that
began to ring the lake. The 1880 census records a dra-
matic increase in the number of servants, gardeners, and
nannies living in the village.
The restoration of rail service from Chicago to
Geneva in 1871 was a watershed in the transformation
of the village as it made it much easier for wealthy Chica-
goans to travel to their summer homes on Geneva Lake
on the weekends. To be sure, fulltime employment of vil-
lage residents was largely conned to the months of May
through October. (If weather permitted, they were also
employed in November, March, and April).
The growth of the village of Geneva in the 1870s and
1880s led to its becoming a city in 1886. It was during
the 1870s and 1880s that many of the stores in Gene-
vas downtown business district along the 700 block of
Main Street were constructed. It was also in the 1870s
and 1880s that the Victorian homes in what is now the
Maple Park historic district were built, evidencing the
emergence of a prosperous middle class in Lake Geneva.
It was still a city dominated by residents of Protestant,
Anglo-Saxon origin, but a further transformation was
getting underway as hundreds of immigrants from the
newly-unied Germany (1871) were migrating to the
United States. (Many were eeing conscription in the
Franco-Prussian war).
Milwaukee would be the destination for many of
them as would Lyons and Bloomeld townships, where
they would replace the diminishing generation of farm-
ers from upstate New York and Vermont who had origi-
nally settled the area. The next chapter in Lake Genevas
history will address this formative development.
LGs 19th century history
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 3D
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Vincent T. Domino, 64, Genoa City, died Tues-
day, Oct. 21, 2014, at his home. A celebration of Vincents
life was held Friday, Oct. 24, at 11 a.m., at Trinity Lutheran
Church in Pell Lake. Visitation was Friday in church from 9
a.m. until time of services. Derrick Funeral Home and Cre-
mation Services in Lake Geneva assisted the family with
arrangements. To sign the online guest registry, go to www.
derrickfuneralhome.com.
Rose Mary Babe Kasken, 90, Twin
Lakes, died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, at the Aurora Kenosha
Medical Center in Kenosha. Funeral services will be held
at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Haase-Lockwood and Associates
Funeral Home in Twin Lakes. Interment will be in Burling-
ton Cemetery. Visitation will be from 9 a.m. until time of
services at the funeral home. For online guestbook: haasel-
ockwoodfhs.com.
Michael G. Matthews, 50, Pell Lake, died
Friday, Oct. 17, 2014, in Twin Lakes. A memorial service
was at 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 25, at Messiah Lutheran
Church in Twin Lakes. Visitation was from 4 p.m. until time
of services. The family has requested memorials be sent to
the Haase-Lockwood and Associates Funeral Home, P.O.
Box 310, Twin Lakes, WI, 53181. For online guestbook, go
to haaselockwoodfhs.com.
Elnora F. Meinel, 95, Lake Geneva, died
Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2014, at Arbor Village in Lake Geneva.
Services were held at noon, Tuesday, Oct. 28, at the Steinke
Funeral Home, Lake Geneva. Visitation was from 10 a.m.
until the time of services at the funeral home.
Richard L. Micklevitz, 79, Lake Geneva, died
Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, at Mercy Walworth Hospital, Geneva
Township. No services are scheduled at this time. Steinke
Funeral Home and Cremation Services, Lake Geneva,
assisted the family with arrangements. www.steinkefuner-
alhomeinc.com.
Rev. Colleen Dempsey Robertson, 88,
Lake Geneva, died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, at the Mercy
Walworth Hospital, Geneva Township. Services were at 10
a.m., Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Steinke Funeral Home and
Cremation Services, Lake Geneva. Visitation was at the
funeral home from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday.
Constance C. Schmucker, 83, Wauconda,
Ill., and Powers Lake died Monday morning, Oct. 20, 2014,
at the Aurora Memorial Hospital of Burlington. Private
family services will be held. The Haase-Lockwood and
Associates Funeral Home and Crematory of Twin Lakes
handled the arrangements. For online guestbook, go to
haaselockwoodfhs.com.
DEATH NOTICES
Bette May Grandstrom Harsky Avakian Conrad, 84,
Fontana, died Friday, Oct. 24, 2014, surrounded by her
loving family.
Bette grew up in
Beverly, Ill., where she
worked in the steel and
construction industry.
She moved to Fon-
tana in 1964 where
she raised her three
children. She loved the
waters of Lake Geneva
and taking the kids to
the beach. She was an
active member at the
Community Church
of Fontana where
she enjoyed playing
the organ, teaching
Sunday school and
singing in the choir.
She had a natural talent for creating decorative home
accessories and volunteered her time teaching craft classes
at Inspiration Ministries.
She loved her garden and plants and shared this love
with her grandchildren every summer.
Her true passion was her family and socializing with
her dear friends. From back in the dance hall days to the
recent Green Bay Packer tailgate parties Bette was always
the life of the party.
Her favorite spot may have been at home, sitting at the
dining room table, entertaining friends and family with
stories from the past or playing a quiet game of cards with
Jimmy. Bette was a hardworking, loving woman with a
true heart of gold and will be dearly missed.
She is survived by her husband, James Richard Conrad;
her sister, Charlotte Eleanor Esther Grandstrom; and her
children, Bobette Ruth Harsky Miller Huizenga, Jerry
Vaughn Avakian and Keg Alan (Amy) Avakian. She was
adored by her grandchildren, Virgil (Rose) Miller, Keg Alan
Avakian Jr., Michael Steven Avakian and Suzanne Eliza-
beth Avakian.
She was preceded by her parents, Esther and Carl Seth
Grandstrom; and her sister, Dorothy Ruth.
A memorial service was held Wednesday, Oct. 29, at 4
p.m., at the Community Church of Fontana. In lieu of ow-
ers, memorials can be made to Inspiration Ministries, P.O.
Box 948, Walworth, WI, 53184. The Toynton Walworth
Funeral Home assisted the family with arrangements.
Bette Conrad
Oct. 24, 2014
Oct. 20, 1994
Denison Middle School literature classes have
researched local history as background material for
Black Point author Jerome Burke. Their teacher is Mrs.
Chris Brookes.
The 25th year reunion of the Badger High School
Class of 1969 was held in July. Among those attending
were Mary Lynn Payne, Linda Boilini, Scott Braden and
Keith Redell.
Oct. 21, 2004
Longtime Lake Geneva resident Don Getzen secured
an agreement with the University of Wisconsin march-
ing band to provide 10 Dynasty drums for the band,
manufactured at the DEG percussion plant in Green-
ville, Ill.
Local dignitaries including Dan Kehoe, Karla Hill,
Judy Mangold and Peter Scherrer took part in ground-
breaking for the new Lyons municipal buildings.
Big Foot High School homecoming queen and king
were Rachel Fogerty and Brandon Papcke.
Oct. 27, 1994
Jane Keefe was selected to receive the Stu Herzog
Outstanding Citizen Award by the Geneva Lake Area
Chamber of Commerce.
The Boy Scouts of America honored Patrick Larkin
and William Sills IV at an Eagle Scout Bridge of Honor
Oct. 16, at the Lake Geneva Yacht Club, sponsor of Sea
Scout Ship I.
Denison University junior Margaret Edward is
studying in Barcelona, Spain, for the fall semester. Her
parents are Peter and Sara Edwards, Lake Geneva.
Brookwood School sixth-grade students including
Kara Pellack, Jill Davis, Megan Herrod, Monica Sexton
and Tara Rush were among classmates who attended
outdoor education at Camp Wonderland.
Oct, 28, 2004
A car crashed into Immanuel Lutheran Church,
1229 Park Row, knocking concrete blocks and debris
inside the basement classroom. The driver sustained
some injuries.
Kyle Schryver, Williams Bay High School, was
the Regional News athlete of the week, scoring three
touchdowns against Moosehart in a 33-16 victory.
Sixth-grade students at Walworth Grade School
studied bridges in a science class, using toothpicks and
glue to design and build a 3-inch-by-12-inch bridge
that was tested for strength.
TIME FLIES
COMMUNITY NOTES
Otaku Club to meet at library
Otaku Club will meet at the Lake Geneva Public Library
on Monday, Nov. 10, from 4 to 5:30 p.m. Teens are invited
to talk about their favorite Anime and Manga, share their
original Manga style artwork, and work with the librarian to
build the young adult graphic novel collection. After school
snacks will be served. No registration is required. The pro-
gram is sponsored by the Friends of the Lake Geneva Public
Library.
Library continuing its Teen Reads series
The Lake Geneva Public Library will continue its Teen
Reads series on Saturday, Nov. 15, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
The book selected for this month is Looking for Alaska,
by John Green. Teens are invited to enjoy the refresh-
ments and talk about young adult books. Preregistration is
required for free copies of the book available to the rst six
registrants at the circulation desk. The series is sponsored
by the Friends of the Lake Geneva Public Library.
Local author will talk about Civil War
The Lake Geneva Public Library will present local
award-winning author Lance J. Herdegen with his book,
The Iron Brigade in Civil War and Memory: The Black
Hats Run to Appomattox and Thereafter, on Tuesday, Nov.
11 at 6:30 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Friends of
the Lake Geneva Public Library and is hosted in celebration
of Veterans Day. Herdegen will share images and discover-
ies from his lifetime of research on the Iron Brigade, one of
the most celebrated military organizations in the American
Civil War. Composed of the 2nd, 6th and 7th Wisconsin,
19th Indiana and 24th Michigan regiments, the Iron Bri-
gade is primarily known and studied because of its remark-
able stand on the rst bloody day at Gettysburg.
For more information, call (262) 249-5299, visit the
librarys Facebook page or website at www.lakegeneva.lib.
wi.us.
WCEDA meeting set for Nov. 12
The fourth annual meeting for Walworth County Eco-
nomic Development Alliance will be held on Wednesday,
Nov. 12, from 11:45 a.m. until 2 p.m., at the Grand Geneva
Resort and Spa, Lake Geneva.
This years keynote speaker, Bill Dougan, principal at
Blackthorne Group and professor at UW-Whitewater, will
give a presentation on Big Data, Data Science and Competi-
tive Strategy.
All are welcome. Seating is limited. Reservations are
recommended.
For more information or to make a reservation, visit
walworthbusiness.com or call (262) 741-8527.WCEDA
800 Park Drive Lake Geneva, WI, 53147
262.248.2031
www.derrickfuneralhome.com
500 Commercial Court, Suite 100
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-8252
Steven J Lois
Financial Advisor
114 E. Geneva Square
Lake Geneva, WI 53147
262-248-4058
Sheila M Broderick
Financial Advisor
302 Third Avenue
Fontana, WI 53125
262-275-0314
Daniel E Maus
Financial Advisor
49 W. Geneva Street
Williams Bay, WI 53191
262-245-1135
Sam Asani
Financial Advisor
Call or visit your local
Edward Jones
financial advisor today.
4D | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Ongoing
UPCOMING ATTRACTIONS
Geneva Lake
Museum
255 Mill St., Lake
Geneva, features "Main
Street. You can not
only peek into historic
stores, homes, a school
room and other places,
but you can actually go
into them for a close up
look at furniture, cloth-
ing, tools, machines,
merchandise, photos
and other artifacts of
daily living from the
Geneva Lake area circa
1870-1930.
St. Francis de Sales
148 W. Main St., Lake
Geneva, hosts bingo
on the rst and third
Wednesdays of the
month. More than
$1,000 in cash prizes
including progressive
Jackpot and pull-tabs.
Doors and concessions
open at 6 p.m. Bingo
starts at 7 p.m.
Visit ReelLifeTV.net for
video on local events
and more.
NOV. 2
The First Baptist
Church, 212 S. Main
St., Delavan, will present
Helpers In Harmony, a
fundraiser for the Dela-
van Food Pantry and
Delavan Human Con-
cerns. The event will be-
gin at 6:30 p.m. and will
include various musical
selections performed by
choirs, instrumental-
ists, vocal duets and so-
los. Admission is a non-
perishable food item. A
free will offering will be
taken.
Local Trick-or-Treat hours
Bloomeld: 4 to 7 p.m.
Delavan: 4 to 7 p.m. (Parade at 6:30 from
Legion)
Delavan Township: 5 to 8 p.m. (party
from 3 to 5 in the Community Park)
Elkhorn: 5 to 7 p.m.
Fontana: 4 to 7:30 p.m.
Genoa City: 4 to 7 p.m.
Lyons Township: 4 to 7 p.m. Bonre
party at 7 p.m. in Riverview Park. The Fire
Department will serve hot dogs and hot
chocolate.
Walworth: 4 to 6 p.m.
Williams Bay: 3 to 6 p.m. The Bay will also
host a movie showing from 6 to 9 p.m. at
Edgewater Park.
OCT. 30
The last Lake Geneva farmers market
of the season will be open 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 30, at Horticultural Hall,
330 Broad St.
OCT. 31
Heyward performing at
Republican costume party
The Republican Party of
Walworth County will pres-
ent Genevieve Heyward in
a one-hour performance
on Friday, Oct. 31, from 7
to 8 p.m. at a Halloween
costume party. The event is
free and open to the public,
at 18 E. Walworth St., Elk-
horn.
There will be snacks,
drinks and cash prizes.
The Walworth County
Republican ofce, 18 E.
Walworth St. Elkhorn, will
be open through Nov., 4
for the public to stop in and
pickup signs, etc. for free.
SUBMITTED
GENEVIEVE HEYWARD
will perform on Halloween
for the Republican Party of
Walworth County.
More information on TIF funded projects
A letter to the editor in last weeks Regional News sug-
gested a road would run behind the Lake Geneva Utility
commission.
A road to run behind the Lake Geneva Utility commis-
sion connecting Geneva Street is not on the list of funded
TIF projects.
You can see the entire list at tinyurl.com/mdpzwmm.
Bay referendum
A letter to the editor in last weeks Regional News had
the incorrect impact on taxpayers for the Williams Bay
School referendum.
The proposal would cost taxpayers $119 per $100,000
of assessed value.
CORRECTIONS
We make every effort to be accurate. If you feel weve
made an error, please contact us at jhalverson@
lakegenevanews.net. Include your name and phone
number in case we need to get back to you.
EDUCATION NOTE
NAMI support group meets Nov. 19
The National Alliance on Mental Illness will host an
evening of Healing Through Creativity on Wednesday,
Nov. 19, at 7:15 p.m.
The NAMI support groups are full of people with varied
artistic talents.
The program gives these individuals a chance to share
their works and to relate the different feelings they experi-
ence as they create.
Last years program included poetry readings, paint-
ings, musical demonstrations, drawings and mixed media
works. Some members simply brought in a favorite picture
or poem and described the feelings evoked in them.
Participants should enter at the East Entrance of the
Health and Human Services Building in Elkhorn.
The Support Group meets every rst and third Wednes-
day of the month for members, non-members and families.
For more information about NAMI, call (262)495-2439.
Delavan church hosting events
Christ Episcopal Church in Delavan announced calen-
dar events that are open to the public.
Women of Joy is a womens Bible sharing on Thursdays,
from 9:30 to 11:15 a.m.
Trunk-or-Treat will be held Friday, Oct. 31, from 4 to 6
p.m., in the parking lot at church or in case of bad weather,
inside the church. Kids with costumes get Halloween treats
along with free hot dogs and a juice box, while supplies last.
Adams Rib and Chicken Wing BBQ Cook-Off will be
Saturday, Nov. 8, 5:30 and 7:30 p.m., held in the Parish
Hall. Cook up ribs, chicken wings, side dishes and desserts
for cash prizes.
Tickets in advance are $7 for adults and $3.50 for chil-
dren 12 and under.
Tickets at the door increase to adults $10 and children
$7. The deadline to register is Nov. 2.
The Veterans Remembrance Walk and meditation on
the labyrinth will be Tuesday, Nov. 11, between 9 a.m. and
noon. Walk on the labyrinth and pray, experience peace
and give thanks for those who protect our freedoms.
Kids Nite and Dinner, with parents night out, is Friday,
Nov. 21, from 6 to 10 p.m.
It includes children 3 years through seventh grade.
Dinner, fun, games and crafts all associated with giving
thanks and gratitude in action. The deadline to register is
Nov. 18.
An Old English Advent Tea will be held Sunday, Dec. 7,
from 2 to 4 p.m., in Parish Hall. The cost is $7 per person
(12 and under free).
Hats are required and gloves are optional. Reservations
are due by Dec. 2, call (262) 728-5292.
Fury doesnt necessarily have
just one plot or conict. It follows
a Sherman tank crew consisting of
ve members. Don Wardaddy Col-
lier (Brad Pitt) is the battle-hardened
leader of the crew. He keeps all of the
other crew members personalities and
egos in check. Boyd Bible Swan (Shia
LaBeouf) is an interesting character in
the sense that he is a Christian man that
constantly quotes the Bible despite the
fact that he nds joy in killing Nazis.
Trini Gordo Garcia (Michael Pena)
is the wise- cracking likeable every-
day guy in the crew. Grady Coon-Ass
Travis (Jon Bernthal) is a jerk for lack
of a better word. He does everything
he can to terrorize and bully Norman
Ellison (Logan Lerman), the newbie of
the crew who is thrust into battle with-
out training. The lm focuses mainly
on him, and his inability to cope with
the horrors of war.
Fury is one of the best war lms
Ive seen in quite some time. Direc-
tor David Ayer maintains a bleak tone
throughout the lm with the use of
brutal violence and plenty of gray
colors. The lm looks beautiful. While
World War II was won by the United
States, Ayer doesnt make these guys
out to be hugely patriotic. They arent
ghting for the motives of the United
States; theyre ghting
for themselves. They
believe that theyre
doing what is right.
This is an interest-
ing approach to a war
movie. Every charac-
ter has his own set of
morals and they all
work together because
they have a common
enemy. The lm also
focuses on how the war
has changed all of these
characters. This dynamic is perhaps
the most interesting aspect of the lm.
When Norman Ellison joins the
crew, hes terried and unsure of
whats to come. Almost immediately
he comes to the realization that war
is horrifying when Wardaddy orders
him to clean his section of the tank.
The reason Norman is put on the crew
is because he must take the place of a
man who died in combat. As Norman
is cleaning, he nds part of this mans
face in the tank. This disgusting image
brings me to my next claim: Fury is
the most brutally violent war movie of
all time. Decapitations and a part of a
mans face are only a few examples of
the violence in this lm. Many of these
haunting images have stuck with me
since Ive seen the movie.
Fury also has incredibly tense
and exhilarating action
sequences sprinkled
throughout the rst two
acts. The third act con-
tains one of the most
incredible action scenes
Ive seen this year, if not
the best. Getting into
detail regarding this
scene would warrant
a spoiler warning, so I
wont do that. What I
will say is that Ayer does
a great job immersing
you into the scene. You almost feel as
though youre a member of the crew.
The performances all around are
terric. Pitt is great here as Ward-
addy. His character seems like a typi-
cal commander, but theres much more
under the surface.
You can tell that the war has
affected him in unimaginable ways,
and Pitt clearly portrays that in his
performance. LaBeouf apparently put
himself through a lot in order to make
his character more realistic. He went
as far as cutting his own face everyday
in order to immerse himself more into
the character. His performance is truly
magnicent. Pena does great work as
always, and Bernthal gave character
to the stereotypical jerk. The standout
however is Lerman as the rookie who
hasnt yet been exposed to the wars
horrors. This is the character that the
general audience is able to connect
with most on a personal level due to
our lack of war experience. He bril-
liantly displays his acting ability in
multiple scenes in which his morals
are challenged.
My only major issue with this lm
is a character transformation that hap-
pens at one point in the movie that
seemingly comes out of nowhere. This
is another plot detail that could be
a spoiler, so I wont say what charac-
ter, but I will say that it comes out of
nowhere.
Overall, Fury is a bleak WWII lm
containing great performances, realis-
tic banter between the crew, incredible
action scenes and a few unclear char-
acter motivations throughout. The
nal shot has ingrained itself into my
mind. It perfectly encapsulates every-
thing that this movie is trying to say.
War is ugly.
It changes people. Sure, our coun-
try won, but at what cost?
Rating: 3/4
Locals make UW-Whitewater soccer team
Autumn Mikrut, Lake Geneva, and Alexandrea
Swarthout, Genoa City, were named to the UW-Whitewater
womens soccer team for the 2014 season.
When the players are not on the eld, they are giving
back to the community. The Go Pink Game held by the
team last year raised $4,500 for breast cancer research.
Facebook.com/LakeGenevaRegionalNews
News You Can Share
Fury best recent war lm
PROMOTIONAL IMAGE
FURY STARS BRAD PITT, Shia LaBeouf, Michael Pena, John Bernthal and Logan
Lerman. Lorenz writes its a brutally violent movie.
COMMUNITY NOTES
214 Broad Street, Lake Geneva 262.248.6988
www.facebook.com/CornerstoneShop
"It was so much fun to work on this video with Joy and Phil -
everyone had a great time putting it together and they made it
easy for us to get it done! We love it!
- Karin & Bruce Bennett (Owners) Cornerstone Shop & Gallery
October 30, 2014 | Lake Geneva Regional News | 5D
COMMUNITY & COMMENTARY
Time is Now/My heart went out for this poor hungry woman
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1D
She collected a few of her belongings in a tote bag and we
went inside the hospital.
We picked out our trays of food, I encouraged her to ll
her tray even adding some nonperishable things for later,
and we sat in a less crowded corner of the cafeteria to talk.
I watched as the mother ate very fast, as only a truly
hungry person does. I asked when the last time she had
eaten was, and she confessed not since a peanut butter sand-
wich the previous day. I asked if she had any money on her at
all for food, gas, etc. She had $1.29 in her pocket. My heart
went out to this poor hungry woman.
The mother told me she had taken every penny she could
nd to try and pay her last months rent to prevent the evic-
tion. She still was $300 dollars short for that rent and the
landlord was demanding that he be paid immediately. The
mother told me how she worried each time she left her apart-
ment that when she returned she would nd her belongings
on the curb. I asked if she had spoken to her landlord about
her situation.
She said she had not told him the details. I told the
mother she needed to share with her landlord the reason
she was unable to pay her rent this month. The mother said,
When I called him to tell him I was late he said he did not
want to hear any excuses, he just wanted his rent money.
He would not even let me give him a reason for being late.
When I offered to speak to her landlord for her she looked
confused and asked, Would you? I called the landlord and
once he heard it was The Time Is Now to Help calling he was
willing to listen to what the mother had to say.
After I explained the mothers situation the landlord
went from a place of defensiveness to asking what he could
do to help. He apologized for his rudeness in their previous
conversation stating he had gotten so used to overdue rent-
ers he never thought there might be a valid excuse.
After we spoke with the landlord, and I told him we
would be paying her overdue rent and two months into the
future allowing the mother time to get the baby well and
home, he offered to reduce her rent by $100 per month.
Both the mother and I thanked him for his help. I went
through her remaining overdue bills and found she needed
help with her utilities. These were brought up to date and
paid into the future. I arranged for her car to get in for the
much needed repairs. The mother looked panicked as she
asked, How will I get back and forth to the hospital while
my car is in for repairs?
I told her we would provide a motel room for the next
few days within walking distance of the hospital. This would
give her a safe place to sleep and would eliminate her long
daily commute while her car was in for much needed service.
We also provided her with some pocket money to use for her
food and personal needs for the next few days. The next day
the mother dropped her car off for service and a volunteer
graciously drove her to the hospital where she would stay
with her baby and walk to the motel at night to sleep.
Three days later the mother called to thank all of us for
her car repairs. She said she had driven to the hospital and
it had run like new. The mother said she could now focus on
the health of her little girl and getting her well enough to
come home.
Thankfully the mother was able to bring her daughter
home several weeks later. The mother was so grateful she
had her apartment to bring her baby home to. She also had
formed a closer friendship with the woman that had written
a letter in her behalf. The mother told me to share her appre-
ciation with all of you. God bless you for making this and all
our assistance possible.
We promise to continue our good works, our mission
of caring and sharing, removing the pains of poverty for as
many as donations allow in our communities. Your support
has been crucial in our success at changing lives forever. We
are so grateful to call you not only donors but friends in our
mission The Time Is Now to Help. God bless all of you.
Health and happiness, God bless everyone, W.C./Sal
Please help: There are many coming to us in desperation.
Our good fellow creations need our compassion. Together we
make a big difference. Make checks payable to: The Time Is
Now to Help, P.O. Box 1, Lake Geneva, WI 53147. The Time
Is Now to Help is a federally recognized 501(c)3 charitable
organization licensed in Wisconsin and Illinois. You will
receive a tax deductible, itemized thank you receipt show-
ing how your donation provided assistance for the poverty
stricken. A Very Special Thank You: Fox Charities, Clarence
and Marilyn Schawk Family Foundation, I.Am.Giving Foun-
dation, Geneva Wells Motel, Martin Group, John Stensland
and Family, Lake Geneva Area Realty, Petco Foundation,
Terry Dignan, Aurora Health Care Partnership Campaign,
Heidi Hall, Joanne Abbe, Mary Cucchi, Shawna Kneipper,
Gene Krauklis, Judith Mackessy, Jeanne Mc Donald, Walter
Myalls, Randall and Margaret Smith, Claudia Garber,
Gerald and Joyce Byers, Lake Geneva Antique Mall, Claws
Restaurant, George and Lauretta Clettenberg, Jack and
Mary Lou Mc Kinney, Yvonne Mol, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Schuberth, W.C. Family Resource Center/Food Pantry vol-
unteers, and all the God loving volunteers of all our caring
pantries, all of you who support The Time Is Now to Help
donation boxes, and the businesses that allow our donation
boxes. Anyone who would like a Time Is Now donation box
in your business, please call (262) 249-7000.Memorials:
Margaret Cardiff in memory of Dot Cardiff. Elaine McMil-
lin and Carolee Olson in memory of Frederick Clausen.
Furniture donations: Please contact Love Inc. for all your
furniture, clothing and household item donations. Call (262)
763-2743 or (262) 763-6226 to schedule pickup. Please visit:
www.timeisnowtohelp.org.
SERVICES DIRECTORY
Garbage & Rubbish Removal
Commercial-Industrial-Residential
608-752-8210
Serving Walworth County
WASTE MANAGEMENT
of
GENEVA LAKES
Got skills? Show them off here.
Call your
LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
ad representative today. 262.248.4444
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LAWNCARE
New Construction Carpet Cleaning Winter Watch Program
Windows & Gutters Power Washing Snow Removal
Stephanie Nicewarner
homecleaning@sbcglobal.net
www.homecleaning-service.com
LANDSCAPING
FIREWOOD
262.248.4829
B.L.G. SERVICE
262-249-1455
Friendly, Dependable
LAWN SERVICE
SEASONAL CLEANUP
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
BRUSH & TREE CUTTING
Topsoil Manure Traffic Bond Sand Gravel Stone
MATERIAL DELIVERY-BOBCAT WORK
WINDOWS AND GUTTERS
Seasoned Oak, Hickory, Cherry
$129 Face Cord / $14.00 Delivery
Seasoned Hardwoods
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1/2 Face - Full Face Cords Available
Sorry, No Pick Ups, Delivery Only
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1-800-820-6155
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McMahon Window Washing
THE MOST RESPECTED NAME IN WINDOW WASHING
GUTTER CLEANING STARTING AT $70
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CUSTOMER
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Sills Free-Storms/Screens Extra
# WINDOWS IN/OUT OUT ONLY
1-18 $100 $70
19-26 $120 $80
27-34 $145 $89
35-50 $170 $99
51-79 $195 $109
80-100 $220 $119
L.A. McMahon WindowWashing Inc.
1-800-820-6155
Mention this ad. Not valid with any other offer.
Offer expires 12-31-14.
ReelLifeTV.net
currentl y pl ayi ng
ReelLifeTV is now offering professional
commercial photography services. Our award-
winning, nationally published photographers
set out to capture the character of your
business. We offer a variety of photo packages
that provide your business with quality,
high-resolution images to use in all of your
marketing campaigns. Contact ReelLifeTV at
262.248.4444 for more information.
6D | Lake Geneva Regional News | October 30, 2014
2014
Football CHallenge
300 Wrigley Drive Lake Geneva 100 Yards East of Riviera Docks
(262) 248-2525 - ginoseastlakegeneva.com
offer expires 12/04/14
Must mention and present coupon when ordering to redeem offer.
One coupon per party per day. Not valid with any other offers or discounts.
Customer pays all applicable sales tax. Valid at Lake Geneva location only.
$
5
00
Off
Delivery or Carryout
COUPON
Walworth Countys
home for Home Brew!
Complete line of
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for making your own quality
beer and wine at home.
~ PREMIUM CIGARS ~
Walworth Countys only walk-in humidor
9 S. Wisconsin Street - Elkhorn, WI - (262) 729-3001
HOURS: Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. - Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Our Family Committed to Yours For Over 30 Years!
100 E. Geneva Square - Lake Geneva - (262) 248-8798
1414 E. Geneva St. - Delavan - (262) 728-2638
7600 Pershing Blvd. - Kenosha - (262) 764-1954
- OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 6 A.M.-10 P.M. -
2215 80th St. - Kenosha - (262) 654-6961
747 MAIN STREET LAKE GENEVA 262-248-6008
IS READY
FOR FOOTBALL!!
SATURDAY COLLEGE GAMES
SUN NFL GAMES
MON. NITE FOOTBALL
(including) Big 10 Network!
On 14 TVs with High Definition
Plasmas and Big Screen T.V.s
RETRO BEERS - $1.00
PORTABELLA MUSHROOM &
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HOURS:
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827 Main Street, Lake Geneva, WI
248-1207
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262.249.WASH (9274) - www.lakegenevacarwash.com
Join Club Ultimate
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Full Service Soft Cloth Car Wash
- HOURS -
Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Sun. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Hwy. 120 North - Lake Geneva
743-2665 - 248-6836 - 877-4328
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Electric or Plumbing Projects
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Lake Genevas
Largest Liquor
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Great Selection of Fine Wines, Craft Beers,
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524 Broad Street - Lake Geneva, WI
CALL 262.248.6407 - 9 a.m.-9 p.m. - OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Selling the Finest Wisconsin Cheeses For
Over 70 Years ... The Tradition Continues
Daily Specials ~ Sandwiches ~ Gif Boxes
Wisconsin's Finest Cheeses ~ Sausage ~ Novelty Items
HOURS: Monday thru Saturday 9 a.m.-7 p.m. - Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
The Local Spot To Watch The Games
Smaller Crowds ~ More Fun!
DJ or Live Music Every Friday & Saturday Night
104 8tsa ti. LaIt 0tatca z6zz486818
Watch the Big Game on Our 60 TV
YOU COULD WIN $50 OR $25 THIS WEEK PLAYING THE LAKE GENEVA REGIONAL NEWS
WEEKLY FOOTBALL CHALLENGE. Either an NFL or college game of the week is listed on each of
the ads below. To play the Football Challenge, choose a winner from each of the weeks matchups.
Select the teams you think will be winners this week and write their names in the spaces after the
corresponding businesses. The player who selects the most winning teams wins the challenge.
Contestants are also encouraged to guess the point total of the highest scoring team in this weeks
games. (No, we dont want the name of the team, and the margin of victory doesnt matter. We just
want the point total.) Point estimates will be used as a tie-breaker.
Bring your contest entries to the Lake Geneva Regional News office, 315 Broad St., Lake Geneva,
Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. All entries must be received by 5 p.m. Friday to be
eligible. Winning players names will be printed in the following weeks Lake Geneva Regional News.
Prizes will be mailed to participants.
Football Challenge is limited to one entry per person. Limit one $50 win per four week period, per family/
household. Limit one $25 win per four week period, per family/household. Lake Geneva Regional News
employees and their families are not eligible to participate in the challenge. No purchase necessary.
Ginos East ______________________________________
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Piggly Wiggly ____________________________________
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Next Door Pub ___________________________________
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The Cheese Box _________________________________
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ARIZONA VS UCLA
ST. LOUIS VS SAN FRANCISCO
ARIZONA VS DALLAS
BALTIMORE VS PITTSBURGH WASHINGTON VS MINNESOTA
OAKLAND VS SEATTLE INDIANA VS MICHIGAN
SAN DIEGO VS MIAMI
Play Today!
All entries due
by 5 p.m. Friday.
1
ST
PLACE WINNER: $50 CHECK BOB BABIAK, PELL LAKE, WI
LAST WEEKS WINNER:
2
ND
PLACE WINNER: $25 GIFT CERTIFICATE
BILL SEKERES, ELKHORN, WI
LAST WEEKS RUNNER-UP: