Page 10A - - THE SPECTATOR, Ozark, Ark.

, Wednesday, September 29, 2014
VOTE
MARK PRYOR, US SENATE
I am asking each of you to vote for my cousin,
Mark Pryor. Mark is a Christian with true Ar-
kansas Values. His roots are deep in Franklin
County. Family relations include the
Andersons, Turners, Conleys, Jameses,
Weltons, Wisdoms, Gilbreaths, Rogers, Miltons,
Childers, Barhams, Shaws, Millers, Woolseys,
Hills, Englishes, Patricks, Rosses, Whites and a
lot of others with roots along the Big Mulberry.
His mother’s story appeared in two recent is-
sues of The Spectator, Sept. 17 and Sept. 24.
These are serious times and we do need solid
by-partisan representation in our Government.
Please support and vote Mark Pryor for US
Senate.
Early voting has commenced so take friends
with you.
Thank You,
Lonnie C. Turner
Paid political ad
• Committed to bringing jobs and
growth to Ozark.
• Knows how to work within a bud-
get and will be a good steward of
your tax dollars.
• Always available to listen to the
questions and concerns of the citi-
zens of Ozark.
“I would appreciate the chance to
be your voice on the Ozark City
Council.”
CHARLIE MEADORS
OZARK CITY COUNCIL
Paid political ad
COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD
Use this free space to promote your community event.If your charity, civic or school group
is interested, please contact Angela Rogers, (479) 667-2181.
• 8:30 a.m. - check-in Begins at 7:15 a.m.
• $25 entry fee until Oct. 31. $35 afterwards. Proceeds go to the Charles-
ton Dog Shelter.
• USATF Certified course starting at Charleston Middle School parking
lot. Timing by Jaymax.
• Run, Walk or Leisure Stroll to Charleston Lake. Dog Friendly!
• Register Online at www.register-wizard.com. Under EVENTS.
• Entry forms available at Charleston City Hall, Zoe Bug’s Boutique in
Charleston or by emailing shayes@tigersmail.org
• Call/Text Susan Hayes at 479-965-3591 for more information.
5K/10K Run/Walk
To Benefit the
Charleston Dog Shelter
Saturday, Nov. 1
Southern Grill
311 West Commercial
667-0704
(Located at the former Model Cafe)
Back to School
Breakfast Specials
Plus
Saturday Night is Family Night
Free drinks with meals
& 1/2 price desserts
“Worth a few extra steps”
CONSUMER ALERT
from Attorney General Dustin McDaniel
SAFETY POSTER CONTEST WINNERS at Ozark Kindergarten Center were
front row (L-R): Elijah Ramirez, Gabriela Lopez and Avery Dunk. Back row: Riley
Corbin, Zander Trouerbach, Mattie Russell, Lawson Wright and Alyson Childers.
Just Ordinary Days
by Clydene Overbey
I wonder if our lives re-
ally are measured by the
number of breaths we take
or even by the number of
moments that take our breath
away. Or are our lives mea-
sured by the ordinary days?
Aren’t our lives more about
those plain old ordinary
days than about the num-
ber of breaths we take or the
number of moments which
take our breath away?
The moments which take
our breath away are certainly
wonderful moments to be
sure. Moments which take
our breath away might be
some magnificent milestone
or a celebration or some
other important events in
our lives, like the birth of a
child or falling in love for the
first time. They are the smiles
and the joys of special mo-
ments, frozen in time. The
moments which take our
breath away are moments
that will become treasured
and special memories we
can cherish throughout our
lives.
But will we measure our
lives by the number of mo-
ments that take our breath
away?
We spend most of our
lives living ordinary days.
Those uneventful days
which pass by without much
thought. Those days long
past when we came home
from school and Grandma
had baked a sorghum cake;
when we sat on the porch
on a warm spring Saturday
morning; made fudge on Fri-
day night; the days I drove
to work each morning and
home each night; spring and
summer days when I mowed
the lawn; drank iced tea;
took a walk; or read a book.
I’m somehow certain that
it will not be the moments
that took my breath away
that will define my life. I
know in my heart that when
I reach those final days of
my life that it will be the or-
dinary, typical, even boring
days of my life that I will find
myself yearning for the
most.
I will remember snowy,
ordinary winter days when I
hated the cold and wished
for warmer days, and hurried
in out of the wind.
I will remember ordinary
days when I sat at the sup-
per table across from my
daddy and spilled my milk
which always ended up in
Daddy’s lap.
I’ll remember Brenda and
me walking on beautiful
warm spring days singing
and holding hands. I’ll re-
member riding the school
bus and those long school
days when I longed to be
outside running in the pas-
ture at home.
I’ll remember the beauty
of the autumn trees blazing
under the blue skies of Oc-
tober. And, I’ll remember ly-
ing on the warm spring grass
looking up to the blue skies
and fluffy white clouds.
Those beautiful, splendidly
beautiful colors of spring,
never failed to remind me of
the miracle of life and life re-
born. These were gentle re-
minders, but they were es-
pecially profound after a
long, cold, bitter winter.
I’ll remember my friends,
my family, my wonderful
son, Richard, and my mis-
takes. I will, no doubt, have
some regrets. And I might
even remember, in passing,
the moments that took my
breath away. But they will
not define my life.
Life is precious and even
the most ordinary day is any-
thing but ordinary. And, it
seems to me that all is as it
should be. I wouldn’t think
it could ever be any other
way.
Joshua 1:9 - Have not I
commanded thee? Be
strong and of a good cour-
age; be not afraid, neither
be thou dismayed: for the
Lord thy God [is] with thee
whithersoever thou goest.
Austin City Limits
features songwriter
AETN (Conway) – Enjoy
an hour with songwriter Jeff
Tweedy, joined by his son
Spencer and members of the
band on “Austin City Lim-
its: Tweedy.”
The show can be seen at
9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30.
LITTLE ROCK – As con-
sumers consider their insur-
ance options and health-
care needs for the upcoming
year, some may be surprised
to learn that insurance com-
panies may utilize mail-order
pharmacies to fill beneficia-
ries’ prescriptions.
Insurance companies of-
ten use Pharmacy Benefit
Managers, or PBMs, to pro-
cess pharmacy benefits un-
der a consumer’s health in-
surance plans. Some of
those PBMs automatically
enroll consumers into mail-
order prescription drug pro-
grams. These mail-order pro-
grams purport to save the
consumer money on pre-
scriptions and promise the
convenience of at-home de-
livery at in-network prices.
While many consumers
may find mail-order pharma-
cies to be beneficial, others
may want to retain the op-
tion to buy their prescription
drugs at a local pharmacy.
Therefore, Attorney General
Dustin McDaniel issued this
consumer alert today to en-
courage Arkansans to read
all correspondence from
their insurance providers
and make sure they know
their options.
“The Health Care Bureau
of my Consumer Protection
Division has received sev-
eral calls with questions
about mail-order prescrip-
tion drug programs in which
beneficiaries are automati-
Consumers urged to study
pharmacy options
cally enrolled in the plans,”
McDaniel said. “We ask
consumers to read the mail-
ings and understand their
choices. It’s almost always
possible for consumers to
opt out of these programs if
they so choose, but they
must proactively do so, and
they must do so in a timely
manner.”
McDaniel said any mail-
ings from insurance provid-
ers about mail-order phar-
macy plans will contain in-
formation about how con-
sumers can choose to con-
tinue to obtain medications
from local pharmacies. Most
likely, consumers would be
required to call the insur-
ance company or fill out a
specific form in order to opt
out.
In considering their
choices regarding opting
out, consumers should de-
termine whether there are
cost advantages to the mail-
order prescription drug plan
and whether they would
prefer to remain with a local
pharmacist because of an
already-established relation-
ship.
McDaniel offered the
following advice on this is-
sue:
* Consumers should ask
insurance companies about
the benefits and costs of a
mail-order pharmacy, and
what the cost-savings may
be on specific prescriptions.
* Consumers who opt
out of a mail-order program
should remember that they
may be required every year
to renew their “opt out” op-
tions.
* Consumers who prefer
to use local pharmacies need
to confirm with their health
insurance companies that
prescriptions will be covered
at either in-network price
levels or at levels that would
be acceptable to the con-
sumer.

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