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South Dixie Corridor

Implementation Strategy Committee
Report


Presented to:
The City of West Palm Beach
Commission
11, August 2014









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South Dixie Corridor
Implementation Strategy Committee Report

Outline



Outline

Vision Statement

Background Statement

Corridor Wide Overview


Section I: Okeechobee Boulevard to Belvedere Road

Section II: Belvedere Road to Southern Boulevard

Section III: Southern Boulevard to Forest Hill Boulevard

Section IV: Forest Hill Boulevard to City Limits






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Dixie Highway –
The South Dixie Historic Corridor
Vision Statement


The South Dixie Historic Corridor supports a vibrant business and
cultural community which serves both adjacent neighborhoods and
regional visitors. The District offers an eclectic mix of retail, dining,
art, antique and office uses in a tree-lined and consistently
landscaped setting to visually unify and enhance our beautiful
surroundings.

The City recognizes and supports revitalization efforts and the
significance of the entire corridor to the overall prosperity of West
Palm Beach by:

o sustaining a safe locale
o providing adequate and accessible parking
o maintaining safe pedestrian crossings
o nurturing linkages to the surrounding neighborhoods
o ensuring consistency of streetscape amenities
o practicing fair and community minded zoning and code
enforcement
o providing re-imaging assistance for existing businesses


The South Dixie Historic Corridor,
A vibrant place to live, work and visit.



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I. Background
Major efforts to encourage the revitalization of the 4.2 mile long South Dixie Corridor date back to the late
1990’s and into the 2000’s. Since the completion of the southern section of I-95 to PGA Boulevard in 1976, the
parallel road of South Dixie Highway has evolved from the main north-south connector, for which it was
originally designed in the 1920’s, to a supporting road serving the adjacent neighborhoods to the east and
west with the businesses lining the road from north to south. The highway itself is in generally good condition
with a substantial segment in the heavily trafficked area between Belvedere and Southern Boulevard having
been reconstructed within the last 5 years. The road right of way (“ROW”) is owned and controlled by the
Florida Department of Transportation (“FDOT”) requiring the City to work closely with FDOT to address some
of the changes recommended in this report.
On December 12, 2011, the City adopted Resolution No. 317-11.
This allowed the Urban Land Institute (ULI) to convene a Technical
Assistance Panel (the “TAP”) to obtain professional advice and
recommendations regarding the redevelopment of the South Dixie
Highway Corridor (the “Corridor”) from Okeechobee Boulevard to the
south City Limits at the Lake Worth Spillway. A group of nine (9)
experts in the fields of architecture, planning, transportation,
redevelopment and marketing were assembled on January 26
th
and
27
th
, 2012 to study the Corridor. The City convened the TAP to
provide seasoned expert advice on how to improve and revitalize the
Corridor. The panel was asked to focus on both near and longer-term
steps to show what the Corridor could be like in the future as well as
the implementation strategies necessary to make that future a reality.
The Final TAP report, which is attached to this report as Exhibit 1, was distributed to the Mayor,
Commissioners and the public in April 2012, and addressed the following major areas: Parking and Traffic
Flow, Streetscape Improvements, Marketing and Branding, Zoning,
and Financing and Implementation.
On May 7, 2012, City staff discussed an implementation strategy for the
ULI recommendations at the Mayor-Commission Work Session and
developed a chart of 42 recommendations based on the ULI report
(attachment 1). This was followed by a June 18, 2012 public
implementation kickoff meeting. Subsequently, the Mayor appointed nine
(9) individuals to form the South Dixie Corridor Implementation Strategy
Committee (the “Committee”). These nine individuals cover each area
of the Corridor (north, central, and south) and represent residents,
property owners, and business leaders.

“We need a plan that will
be implemented and will
make the South Dixie
Highway Corridor the
vital place it once was.”
William Moss
Former District 5
Commissioner
City of West Palm Beach
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South Dixie Corridor Implementation Strategy Committee
Residents Property Owners Business Reps
Michele Jones (Chair) Bill Jacobson,Esq.(Vice-Chair) Faustina Pace
Anthea Gianniotes Dina M. Rubio Elizabeth Dowdle
Ed Schmidt(resigned 4/10/13) Brian D. Guralnick, Esq. Dr. Karl Foose



Beginning in September, 2012, the committee
held publicly noticed monthly meetings with City staff
support from Alex Hansen, Senior Planner, Denise
Malone, City Comprehensive Planner, and Rick Greene,
Development Services Director.

The Committee was tasked with examining and
prioritizing the 42 Recommendations Table (attachment
1) and developing an overall strategy for revitalizing the
South Dixie Corridor. The area was divided into four
segments defined as:

Area1) Okeechobee Boulevard to Belvedere Road
Area2) Belvedere Road to Southern Boulevard
Area3) Southern Boulevard to Forest Hill Boulevard
Area4) Forest Hill Boulevard to the C-51 canal
bordering Lake Worth - generally known as the
Spillway.

Each segment of this report addresses the major topics of
the ULI report: Parking and Traffic Flow, Streetscape
Improvements, Marketing and Branding, Zoning and
Code Enforcement, and Financing and
Implementation.

As many of the recommendations impact the Corridor as
a whole, the report begins with a Corridor-Wide overview.
The highlighted recommendations are those that one or
more Committee Member considered a priority.







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Corridor-Wide Overview

As found in the TAP report, this Committee echoes the conclusion of the ULI TAP Panel of “South Dixie
Highway is well positioned to become a shopping and entertainment destination that is distinct from
others in the region”. And, “achieving that goal will require taking the necessary steps to make the
corridor a complete street that meets the needs of pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and transit riders
of all ages and abilities”. The recommendations below reflect a vision to enhance the beauty and visually
unify the entire Corridor moving us closer to the reality of a unique shopping and entertainment mecca that we
can all envision.

Parking and Traffic Flow

Overall this is a crucial issue for the residents and businesses along the Corridor. While it is understood that
Dixie Highway is a State Road and the City is limited in what it can do in regard to parking and traffic flow, it
should also be recognized that the City does have a degree of authority and power that can and should be
exercised. Currently the parking and traffic conditions reflect a multitude of diverse uses that have been
established through the years. Uses such as commercial, residential and public service (i.e. gas stations and
vehicular repair) contribute to an eclectic fabric but can make for complicated parking and traffic patterns when
coexisting within such close proximity to each other.

While many of these land uses are well established and
have been there for decades, others are adaptive re-
uses that can change parking availability and access
requirements. These new uses can be
problematic if not vetted and analyzed fully – if a
new salon or retail establishment were to open where a
small office had been, an increase in parking would be
necessary and most likely taken from adjacent or
nearby business’ parking.

Important to the corridor’s
character and function is the
road itself, the buildings
alongside, and the parking.
ULI TAP Report
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In addition - and further complicating parking issues FDOT, in efforts to adhere to progressing disability and
dimensional requirements, has through the years reconstructed South Dixie Highway and eliminated many on-
street parking spaces.

With these limitations in mind, the Committee examined zoning requirements as well as searching each
geographic section to find additional parking possibilities. In so doing, the Committee noted some businesses
have multiple, unnecessary or un-used curb cuts and driveways servicing their properties. The Committee also
located several open lots along, and just off, Dixie which could be suitable for small off street parking lots.

Therefore, the Committee recommends that on a Corridor-wide basis, the City take a fresh look at area
driveways, roadways and existing curb-cuts to see where:

 Filling in unnecessary curb-cuts would allow for additional parking.
 Conversing with, and/or offering incentives, to property owners to explore closing an
unnecessary access point (where multiple access points are currently on the property)
thereby allowing for additional on-street parking.
 Encouraging or requiring access from side streets and cross access between adjacent
parcels thereby, again, creating additional on-street parking.
 Instituting limitations on driveway widths to create more curbed area for increased on-street
parking.
 Developing code language to address new site proposals that incorporate the above
objectives.

In addition, look for locations and ways to provide more public parking by:

 Seeking out parcels for the City to lease or acquire to establish pocket parking areas – include
signage (see corresponding Marketing and Branding Section) and lighting for safety.
 Establishing guidelines for and encouraging Property Owners to convert vacant parcels into
temporary parking lots (following code requirements) as an interim use until redeveloped. Signage
and lighting for safety must be included.
 Encouraging shared parking of underutilized or off-business hour, private parking lots between
businesses along the Corridor.

Furthermore, while the Committee recognizes that FDOT has a final say on traffic related recommendations,
there are suggestions that the City can explore to augment this very important issue.

 Encourage FDOT to designate one representative to work with the City on design, implementation,
and grants. This person should be available to work with and attend various group and committee
meetings to better learn the needs of this particular area as well as to share ideas of what other
municipalities have done and are doing along the US-1 route.
 Establish a landscape plan that includes planting consistent
shade trees along the roadway. Studies have found that trees
uniformly planted in close proximity to each other have a traffic
calming effect as drivers will perceive that they are going too
fast if the trees seem to be moving quickly by, thus resulting in
a voluntary slowing of traffic. Placement of these trees should
be distanced from light posts so as not to interfere with lighting.

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 Evaluate measures to slow traffic, install medians, establish parking spaces and create landscaped
areas.
 Encourage FDOT to evaluate the visibility triangle to allow for additional on-site parking.
 Look for right turn only lanes to eliminate and create additional parking spots.
 Determine a visually unifying crosswalk treatment to be used at all crosswalks throughout the
Corridor. Stamped asphalt is recommended over brick for safety and longevity reasons.
 Light all pedestrian crosswalks effectively and
consistently. Encourage FDOT and the County to
update and replace pedestrian signals with pedestrian
countdown signals.
 Enforce existing speed limits.
 Green the striped no parking locations – Currently there
are many areas along the corridor that have painted
striping to designate No Parking. As an alternative to
this barren view, the Committee recommends adding
landscaping elements where this can be done safely.
Replacing the stripes either partially or completely with
some landscaping will assist in slowing traffic and
adding beauty to the corridor.
 Continue working with FDOT on improved pedestrian crossings. There are currently two locations
that FDOT is evaluating for additional crosswalks. In Area 2 between Roseland and Conniston, and
in Area 3 between Churchill Road and Colonial Road. In addition to these two, the Committee
recommends three more locations: Monceaux Road in Area 2, at Phipps Park near Russlyn Drive
in Area 3, and the area around Summa Road in Area 4.


Streetscape Improvement Plan

As pointed out in the ULI Report, streetscape improvements can contribute to creating a walkable
environment and enhancing the Corridor’s identity. Strategies to utilize include a uniform landscape
plan that includes ample shade, wider sidewalks as a better buffer to traffic, safe street crossings,
underground utilities corridor-wide, public art, and conveniently designed and placed street lighting.
As mentioned in Parking and Traffic Flow, the placement of consistently uniform trees as part of the
landscape plan not only provides shade but can also add a traffic calming effect. The impact of
attractive trees has the added value of enticing drivers to slow down and notice other things along
the street as well as adding shade to the sidewalks for greater pedestrian use.

Therefore the Streetscape recommendations are to:

 Visually narrow the roadway with landscaping, and adding on-street parking in as many
areas as feasible. (See additional comments in Parking and Traffic Flow).
 Require that all streetscape amenities be consistent and uniform (unless specifically
designated otherwise) throughout the Corridor. This is imperative to create a visually unifying
and distinct character. The idea is to exemplify a beautiful urban boulevard.

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 Encourage the use of consistent landscape materials
and shade tree types. However; not so consistent as to
the color of flowers. Flowering trees, such as
Bougainvillea can have different flower colors to
represent different geographic sections.
 Determine where additional landscape opportunities
exist and implement planting. (See individual sections for
more detail.
 Maintain and enforce minimum aesthetic requirements
such as landscaping and painting in code regulations.
Use incentives if needed, to more quickly induce
compliance. For those either unable or unwilling to
comply, establish a timeline for required compliance with
Code Enforcement oversight.
 Use native and drought tolerant tree/plant species in
streetscape landscaping
 Increase the visibility of the transit bulb-outs and bus
stops by painting the curb edges for visibility and safety.
 Require that all streetscape landscaping provide
permanent irrigation ability. If underground irrigation is
improbable the use of bladder bags, or a similar device,
should be investigated and used.
 Add irrigation to existing bulbouts and re-landscape
where necessary.
 Evaluate where street and crosswalk lighting along the
Corridor needs to be enhanced and unified.
 Require that all crosswalks are well-lit with consistent
lighting. Consideration should be given to pedestrian
activated, and solar powered options.
 Continue the path of street lamps and buried utility lines
that begins at the C-51 canal south city limit. Currently
that path stops at Pine Terrace, just south of Southern
Boulevard. These decorative lamps with buried lines
should be consistently used throughout the Corridor.
 Implementation of burying the utility lines will be a long
but necessary process and so should begin
immediately. (See financing and implementation).
 Require that all new major projects bury adjacent power
lines as Walgreens did.
 Look at all future building plans with an eye to the
architectural treatments. Villas on Antique Row and the
new Walgreens are examples of developers, the City and
residents working to achieve pedestrian-oriented and
aesthetically pleasing buildings. This should be
continued with all new buildings as well as major
renovations.


\

b


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 Require the placement of doors and windows face Dixie for all future building plans.
 Require new buildings be placed back enough to accommodate wide sidewalks and
placement of shade trees and landscaping where feasible.
 Widen existing sidewalks to a minimum width of 5 ft. where appropriate and feasible.
 Provide consistent, decorative wayfinding signage for ease of identification and travel along
Dixie and the intersecting streets. Signs at the major intersections should be backlit.
 Installation of Public Art would ideally be suited along the main intersections and especially
at the two gateways of the South Dixie Highway Corridor – at the south city limit C-51 canal
spillway and at Okeechobee Boulevard. Public Art should not be taken lightly and the
Committee concedes that public art can sometimes be controversial and therefore,
recommends that all public art be filtered through the Art in Public Places Committee.

The Committee also looked at the installation and development of bicycle lanes on Dixie and concluded that
reducing vehicular lanes would be better served by adding parking and landscaping opportunities and bicycle
lanes be enhanced and utilized on adjacent and parallel streets. The Committee endorses and encourages
the use of bicycles and bicycle lanes but due to the existing width feels that adding bicycle lanes is not feasible
at this time.

While the City is commended for requiring all new buildings have sufficient bicycle parking, it is acknowledged
that there may be some existing areas that need additional parking for bicycles and so recommend that the
City:

 Evaluate and encourage additional bicycle parking as needed at area businesses.


Marketing and Branding

The enhancement of existing districts and the creation of new ones is an objective of marketing and branding
an area, but these normally happen naturally and not by artificial means. Districts are created, not necessarily
by naming or signage, but by virtue of the clustering of related businesses and by allowing a natural unique
characteristic to develop. By fostering the growth and continued existence of developing districts, branding will
naturally ensue. Street walks, street fairs, musical events, and group sales coupled with support from the City
in the form of marketing assistance will go a long way in creating a named distinctive district which will attract
more retail establishments, coffee shops, local buyers and out of town visitors. Individual districts will then
establish a distinction of their own.

Grass roots efforts by the merchants coupled with infrastructure support from the City will result in a long term
and stable commercially successful region. There are many areas around the Country where such efforts have
been successful. Some examples are the 16
th
Street Mall in Denver where the City took bold steps in
transportation and infrastructure changes, DUMBO in NYC where a somewhat downtrodden district pulled
itself up by the bootstraps and the design district in Miami which grew from a substantial amount of private
investment and the involvement of businesses desiring to grow with each other. The Main Street Program of
the National Trust for Historic Preservation offers some useful lessons for marketing and branding programs,
including a designated staff person to work with the property owners in the district on collaborative plans,
façade restoration grant programs and architectural design assistance for merchants.
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And so, the Committee recommends the following:

 Develop a focused marketing and branding program with a City point person or responsible
party identified and utilized. This person would facilitate marketing and branding efforts and
activities to better establish a sense of place along the Corridor. This person should also
oversee communication of events and activities.
 Evaluate designating the entire Corridor to Dixie Highway – The South Dixie Historic
Corridor. In conjunction with this effort, the City should pursue an historic designation for the
area which will open it to seeking grants and other financial support. The Main Street
Program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation offers some useful lessons for
marketing and branding programs, including a designated staff person to work with the
property owners on collaborative plans, façade restoration grant programs and architectural
design assistance for merchants.
 Sponsor a competition for design and color of decorative wayfinding signs.
 Market the distinct sub-districts as well as the activities and events held there to better
motivate people to visit those areas and events.


Zoning and Code Enforcement

As a whole, the Corridor does not have a multitude of code enforcement violations, but instead has pockets of
violations and individuals who gravitate to following what others are doing - instead of learning and following
existing code regulations. These violation hotspots formulate a visual clutter that lends itself to a sense of
blight and urban decay. The Façade Improvement Grant, when actualized, will be a tremendous benefit to
alleviating this issue as property owners will have a means of securing monetary assistance to refurbish store
fronts and buildings. Properties that have been renovated present a greater sense of pride and business
owners are less likely to hide their updated presence by allowing too much merchandise be displayed in front
of their stores. However, this is still an issue that warrants evaluation and the committee recommends the City
evaluate its current code regulations to better approach safety and aesthetics. Cities such as Delray have
shown that by applying landscaping and other traditional zoning code regulations, mixed use areas such as
those that exist along the Dixie Corridor are more presentable, inviting, and ultimately result in the
establishment of compatible uses.

Therefore, the Committee recommends that the City:

 Require parcels along the Corridor to bring
their parking lots (striping, resurfacing) and
landscape areas up to meet existing code
requirements.
 Require auto shops and service garages to
bring sites up to code compliance.
 Employ/enforce property maintenance
regulations

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 Review initiatives in cities such as Delray that have successfully implemented beautification
code regulations with extended timelines and incentives to the affected businesses.
 Review and evaluate our existing land development and code regulations periodically and/or
as needed. This ideally should be done very 5 years to ensure land development use,
landscaping, and code regulations are cohesively meeting the needs of the community.
 Perform a code enforcement blitz to bring non-conforming businesses and properties up to
existing code regulation. This blitz should be to issue warnings only of infractions and
provide specific timeframes to comply. This initial campaign of “warnings only” should be well
publicized and fully communicated to property owners and businesses to enlist and encourage
positive support to clean up certain areas. Recognizing that this could impose financial stress
on some businesses, it is recommended that guidance on available resources within the City
be offered as well. This is especially recommended after any review, and amending of,
existing code regulations.

 Address the elimination of visual clutter by reviewing, and amending if necessary, existing
code regulations that deal with:
a) Limitations on merchandise placed outside of a business
b) Illegal Signage
 Assess the overall issue of sites that have a change of use to a more parking intensive use
but are not currently required to provide additional parking. Currently, the City’s Zoning and
Land Development Regulations do not require an increase in the number of parking or loading
spaces if the gross square footage of the existing structure is not increased. The reason for
this provision of the code is that it could be very onerous for the new business and it would be
difficult to accommodate the additional parking spaces in small parcels or on sites where the
existing buildings occupy most of the parcel. However, this allowance of the code has
resulted in some new businesses that have high parking demands which are not being met
onsite sometimes creating a hardship on surrounding business or residential areas with their
“spillover” of parking. Therefore, the Committee recommends that the City allow Planning
staff to further evaluate this complex issue with the possibility of creating guidelines that could
result in additional requirements along the corridor for businesses that have higher parking
demands than those who preceded them on the site.
 Offer guidance and assistance to property owners and tenants seeking to redevelop or
renovate their commercial properties.
 Encourage window treatment of some kind in vacant windows similar to downtown
requirements.
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Financing and Implementation

A harsh reality of this report is that without viable financing there will be little or no implementation for many of
the recommendations found herein. Therefore, it is imperative that the City, along with the local business
community, research and develop practical financing options in order to facilitate real change. Financing
projects can be done by qualifying for grant money, borrowing, or bonding. Exploring these elements, there
are several options to be considered for financing projected improvements.
The establishment of a Community Redevelopment Agency (“CRA”) has been widely discussed in many
circles throughout the years but in order to create a CRA, the City must declare area conditions as “slum and
blighted”. While there may be some portions of South Dixie Highway that may qualify, the overall conditions
are not favorable for such a designation and therefore, a CRA is not practical.

Other financing vehicles to consider include a Business Improvement District (BID), or a Municipal Service
Taxing Unit (MSTU). Both of these funding vehicles impact property owners by asking for a financial
commitment of additional funds to the improvement of the area. Owners with long term commitments to the
area may be willing and able to contribute as they realize that an increased value to their property should
result from the efforts. Both the BID and the MSTU require a commitment of over 50% of the property owners
who will be asked to vote on their creation.
Community Development Block Grants (“CDBG”) of which the City is a recipient, are funds derived from the
state’s budget and can be a valuable asset to the revitalization of an area. Establishing different grant
programs for businesses that meet certain criteria such as the façade grant program being introduced, should
continue to be explored.
The Sunshine State Governmental Financing Commission (SSGFC) is another avenue to explore for
financing. This is a consortium of municipalities within Florida that was created to provide common financing
to a limited number of qualified governmental entities. This joint venture enables entities to participate in a
pooled, cooperative composite loan program with pricing and cost structures not normally available to
governmental entities acting individually.


A budget (i.e. funding) needs to be tied to a plan for the corridor.
Incentives are also needed to encourage businesses to come to and invest
in the corridor.

ULI TAP Report
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The Committee recommends that the City:
 Aggressively pursue any and all grants.
 Authorize a Grants Coordinator Position or team to actively pursue the above
recommendation. Many grant writing professionals will work on proposals and submit grant
requests while accepting compensation after the grant is awarded.
 Begin the process of burying the utility lines
along the entire Corridor. This will be a long
but necessary process and so should begin
immediately. Look to the Orange Blossom
Trail Development Board Municipal Services
Taxing Unit referenced in ULI.
 Research ways to allow businesses to
sponsor items or sections of the corridor.
Tasteful placement of potted plants or
planters could be an enhancement to an
area but current City regulations prohibit
showing a sponsor’s name on signs or
amenities.
 Create an incentive program that
recognizes businesses making voluntary
aesthetic improvements. Supplements such
as painting and landscaping can visually
enhance the appeal of an area and should
be encouraged.
 Partner with the City’s Police Department to secure grants for Innovative Policing techniques
such as bicycle, Segway, and special events.
Seek out and apply for federal grants such as:
o Strong Cities, Strong Communities Visioning Challenge – (EDA and HUD) - A
local challenge competition promoting vision and approaches to stimulate local
economic development.
o Planning and Local Technical Assistance Programs – (EDA) - Geared towards
stimulating and guiding economic development efforts of a community or region.
o Alternatives Analysis Program – Discretionary Livability Funding – (DOT, FTA,
MAP-21: TOD Planning Grants) - Assistance for identified transportation needs in a
particular travel corridor.
o Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Program – (DOT, FHWA) (Allocated by
State/MPO) - Conducts research and develops guidelines, tools, and safety
measures to reduce pedestrian and bicycle fatalities.


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o Surface Transportation Program – Transportation Enhancement – (DOT,
FHWA, MAP-21: STP) (Allocated by State/MPO) - Enhance surface transportation
activities, such as pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure and safety programs,
landscaping beautification, historic preservation, and environmental mitigation.
o Transportation, Community & System Preservation – (DOT, FTA) - A very flexible
program aimed at projects improving relationships among transportation, community,
and system preservation plans and practices.
o Transportation Investments Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) –(DOT)
Competitive grant program funding projects such as those that improve the safety,
quality-of-life and working environments in communities.
o Smart Growth Technical Assistance Grants – (EPA) - Competitive application
open to governments that want to incorporate smart growth techniques into their
future development.
o Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities – (EPA) - For approaches that
protect the environment, improve public health, create jobs, expand economic
opportunity, and improve overall quality of life.
o Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) – (HUD) - Continue to find new
ways to apply for these community and economic development activities.
o Section 108 Loan Guarantees – (HUD) - Provides CDBG- eligible communities with
a source of financing for economic development, public facilities, and other large-
scale physical development projects.

There are non-financial ways in which the City can assist businesses as well:
 Encourage Palm Beach County to limit the use of collected impact fees to use within the
same collection area.
 Provide an outline of expenses, city incentives, and a blueprint of the Corridor vision to
businesses to encourage membership in, and contribution to, a self-taxing plan such as a BID.
 Explore and encourage businesses and residents to support the involvement of the
Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in design and transportation initiatives for all
sections of the Corridor.

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Okeechobee Boulevard to Belvedere Road
Area 1
This neighborhood is the closest to the urban core of downtown West Palm Beach and contains some of the
City’s most active historical and desirable residential districts; El Cid, Flamingo Park, Grandview Heights,
Sunshine Park, and Mango Promenade to name a few. It is also home to the City’s art museum - the Norton
Museum of Art, the City’s historic Woodlawn Cemetery, Palm Beach Atlantic University (PBAU), and a
beautiful open-space Flamingo Park. The district is characterized by its historic commercial building fabric,
thriving new restaurants, and interior design shops.


The Norton Museum of Art is undergoing a significant private capital campaign for renovation with its important
new entrance, designed by internationally renowned architect Sir Norman Foster, to be located on South Dixie
Highway. This will restore the east/west axis of the original Marion Sims Wyeth designed building, and bring a
greater appearance to its Dixie frontage. Ground breaking is anticipated for late 2015. Now the State’s largest
art museum, the Norton is a considerable economic and cultural asset to the City with over 100,000 visitors
and 13,000 school children each year.

The City’s planned improvements to the Woodlawn Cemetery, with a new historically appropriate fence and
landscaping, will also enhance this section of South Dixie. The newly forming Park and Cemetery Foundation
is a private nonprofit fundraising group that will be tasked with ongoing improvements to the cemetery and
adds an exciting element to the area’s beautification. Between the Norton’s numerous visitors and the 4000
students at neighboring Palm Beach Atlantic University, a large group of potential pedestrians for South Dixie
will enjoy and benefit from these changes.

PBAU recently announced a major landscaping project that includes all of its property that faces Dixie. This is
an energizing element that will complement the work being done at the neighboring museum and cemetery.

Further south in this section are the Carefree Theater site and the old Mazda dealership. Both of these sites
will eventually be redeveloped and present exciting opportunities to improve not only the beauty and
walkability of this area, but the functionality as well for both South Dixie and Flamingo Drive.

Of note, there is a group of interested parties that have approached the Palm Beach Metropolitan Planning
Organization to seek funds for a design initiative in this area.

Overall, the planned improvements of this area strengthened by the following recommendations will see a
dynamic district unfold that is truly worthy of its potential.

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While many of the recommendations for this area are addressed under the Corridor-Wide Section, further
enhancements can be made that are unique to Area 1.

Parking and Traffic Flow

Most of the parking and traffic flow issues along Dixie Highway can and should be addressed on a corridor-
wide basis and those recommendations are found in that section. There are, however, specific needs in Area
1 which require more focused attention. This section secures the gateway that regulates traffic between
Downtown and South Dixie Highway at the north end (Okeechobee Boulevard). Therefore, the Committee
makes the following recommendations for Area 1:

 Work with FDOT and traffic engineers to re-evaluate the entire traffic pattern at the
combined intersections of Okeechobee Boulevard/Dixie Highway intersection and
Lakeside/Dixie Highway intersection. As a gateway to the downtown area from south Dixie,
the current configuration and traffic signals result in severe bottlenecks that can sometimes
equate to a 10 minute or more delay. During events at the Convention Center and bridge
openings, this can be a 15 minute or more delay. As the construction of the North Bridge to
Palm Beach continues, this congestion only worsens. One suggestion is to eliminate the
southeast turn lane from Dixie onto to Okeechobee, thus allowing for 2 lanes leading from
south Dixie to the westbound turn at Lake and Dixie. Subsequently, instead of having two (2)
southbound lanes of Dixie in that section, turn one lane into a combined
southbound/eastbound lane.
 Work with FDOT and Palm Tran to move/eliminate the bus stop currently on Lakeview
between Dixie and Quadrille to a safer less congested area. Buses that stop at that spot
further compound the congestion addressed above and can tie up traffic that is making the
immediate right turn onto Quadrille.
 Restrict turns at Pembroke (1 block south of Okeechobee on east side of Dixie) to right turn
only from and onto Dixie and eliminate the southbound left turn onto Pembroke.
 Install more speed limit signs, especially on the west side.
 Enhance and embellish the beauty of the existing pedestrian crossings at the Norton and
on Flamingo Road with a stamped asphalt treatment, pedestrian lighting, and landscaping.
 Approach Property Owner of the Cross-Fit Gym (2400 S. Dixie and 3234 S Dixie) to
determine if closing/combining driveways to create parking spots on Dixie is feasible.
 Parking –
1) Look for available private parking lots such as 2100 S Dixie to determine the
feasibility of leasing these lots for pocket parking areas
2) Encourage shared parking of private parking lots during non-utilized times
such as at the Norton Museum parking lot on the west side of Dixie by other
businesses in their proximity.




19

Streetscape Improvement Plan

It is essential to the beautification and unity of the Corridor that improvements are made to the overall
streetscape texture of South Dixie. While plans for the renovations to the Norton and the Cemetery are being
put into action, other basics and refinements are still needed in this area. The Committee recommends the
following:
 Enhance the Belvedere intersection with streetscape/landscape improvements and utilize
the traffic calming design of stamped and colored asphalt.
 Improve the walkability of the Cemetery/Norton area with more shade trees (on west side).
Due to limited width, planters may be a practical option for trees on the west side, as long as
irrigation needs are accounted for.
 Make burying the power lines in this area a high priority. This is for both safety and
aesthetics. Suggestions include discussing this with the FEC as some of these power lines
fall within its ROW behind the cemetery and could be linked to All Aboard Florida
discussions. Working with The Park and Cemetery Foundation group, once it is established,
is also recommended.
 Establish a wide sidewalk with shade trees along both South Dixie and Flamingo Drive as
the Carefree Theater and Mazda Dealership sites redevelop.
 Embellish and enhance the crossing at Flamingo Drive and Dixie Highway.
 Irrigate existing bulbouts and re-landscape where necessary.


Marketing and Branding

Covered under the Corridor-wide section.

Zoning and Code Enforcement

Covered under the Corridor-wide section.

Financing and Implementation

 Work with FPL to find funding for burying the power lines.
 Explore bonds and/or taxing avenues for burying the power lines such as The Orange
Blossom Trail Development Board did in Orlando. They created two Municipal Services
Taxing Units to finance such projects.
 Work with the Park and Cemetery Foundation to see what fundraising can be done to
raise money to bury utility lines and other beautification efforts.




20

Belvedere Road to Southern Boulevard
Area 2



Following Area 1 and its strong entrance to South Dixie is Area 2, found between Belvedere Road and
Southern Boulevard. This area holds such landmarks as the Palm Beach Post, Rich’s Ice Cream and most
notably, the world famous Antique Row.

Founded over thirty-years ago by a handful of dealers, Antique Row's vast number of shops are almost all
within walking distance of each other. While many other cities lay claim to an “Antiques Row,” this district is
unique, featuring the largest concentration of high-end stores situated within a very small area. This is Antique
Row’s "point of difference,” and unique to West Palm Beach.

The remarkable accomplishment of Antique Row has not gone unnoticed by local and national media.
Publications such as Architectural Digest, The New York Times, House Beautiful, and others, have written
editorials and features highlighting the unique enclave of antiques and specialty shops. Most recently, Conde'
Nast Traveler magazine specifically mentioned Antique Row as its #4 choice of Best Shopping
in the US (attachment 2).


The success of the Antique Row district has been the
driving force behind economic development seen both
inside and outside its boundaries. Capitalizing on the
moniker of the famous shopping district, The Villas of
Antique Row has brought new construction of 46
townhomes, and 11 retail spaces to South Dixie
Highway. Antiques dealers, designers, and tradesman,
unable to rent space on “The Row,” have latched onto
the reputation of the area, and have opened in close
proximity, either north of Belvedere, south of Southern,
or now, on Georgia Avenue. Much of this growth
can be attributed to the reputation that the Antique Row
Art and Design District has established, the customers
it attracts, and business it generates.

21

While many of the recommendations for this area are addressed under the Corridor-wide Section, further
enhancements can be made that are unique to Area 2.

Parking and Traffic Flow

The importance of parking and traffic flow are especially important to this area and its business retailers. The
businesses that shape Antique Row and enhance the recognition and tax base of our City line both sides of
the corridor and work well as complementary shopping sites. Better enabling customers to safely traverse
South Dixie will further strengthen this area.

 Approach Property Owner of the vacant lot behind the Sherwin-Williams store to access
viability of off-street pocket parking.
 Enhance and embellish the beauty of the existing pedestrian crossings at Albemarle and
Belvedere Road with stamped asphalt treatment, pedestrian lighting, and landscaping.
 Strongly encourage FDOT to add a pedestrian crossing in the area between Roseland and
Conniston. As with the other pedestrian recommendations, this should be uniform with a
stamped asphalt treatment, pedestrian lighting, and landscaping.
 Strongly encourage FDOT to add a pedestrian crossing at Monceaux Road. As with the
other pedestrian recommendations, this should be uniform with a stamped asphalt treatment,
pedestrian lighting, and landscaping.
 Evaluate the viability of changing the one way direction of Central Drive from westbound to
eastbound in order to potentially allow for additional parking on Dixie both north and south of
Central Drive. Currently on-site parking on either side of the east intersection of Dixie and
Central is prohibited due to visibility triangle regulations.
 Evaluate the effects on traffic of adding a landscaped median to replace the striped area in
the middle of Dixie north of Albemarle in the vicinity of Prospect Place.

Streetscape Improvement Plan

As previously stated, it is essential to the beautification and unity of
the Corridor that improvements are made to the overall streetscape
texture of South Dixie. Antique Row has a thriving business
association that has diligently worked on streetscape improvements
on its own. However, there is still much that can be done in this
area. While most of the recommendations have been addressed in
the Corridor-wide section, the Committee recommends the
following for Area 2:

 Enhance the Southern Boulevard intersection with streetscape and landscape improvements
and utilize the traffic calming design of stamped and colored asphalt.
 Encourage the use of pedestrian-oriented building design and placement strategies to foster
pedestrian activity, i.e. wide shaded sidewalks and windows and doors facing the street.
 Consult with Rich’s Ice Cream on the possibility of adding a tall shrub to cover the back
fence separating the truck parking for better aesthetics in keeping with the area.

22

 Approach and guide residents with the
parcels fronting the east side of Dixie in the
vicinity of Marlborough and Albemarle to
create a solution to fix or rebuild the fence wall
so that it is functional and aesthetically
pleasing and symbiotic with the surrounding
area.
 Make burying the power lines in this area a
high priority. This is for both safety and
aesthetics. As the row of decorative lamps
and buried power lines stop just south of this
area, it is highly recommended that the City
continue burying the power lines and add the
decorative street lamps to area 2.
 Irrigate existing bulbouts and re-landscape where necessary.


Marketing and Branding

Covered under Corridor-wide section.

Zoning and Code Enforcement

Covered under Corridor-wide section.

Financing and Implementation

Covered under Corridor-wide section.









23

Southern Boulevard to Forest Hill Boulevard
Area 3

Continuing along the Corridor, just past Antique Row begins the South end of the City. The South end section
begins at Southern Boulevard and ends at the City Limit Spillway and, depending on who is asked, is called
either the South End or SoSo (South of Southern). Regardless of the name, this region is broken into two
sections for this report - Areas 3 and 4, but share the same Neighborhood Association (South End
Neighborhood Association - SENA) and Business Association (Southside Business Association). Therefore,
there will be some overlap and similarities for the following two Sections of the Report.

At the entrance of Area 3 is the new Walgreens at Southern Boulevard and Dixie that transformed a previously
bleak corner to a more inviting entrance to this strong section of the City. This Area has many attributes such
as buried power lines and decorative street lamps, the beautiful and highly utilized Phipps Park, as well as
many popular restaurants and other businesses along the way. There are also landmarks such as Carvel Ice
Cream and the renovated Howley’s Diner where neighbors and children can always be found catching up and
having fun.

The Businesses and Organizations that dot this section of the Corridor are neighborhood friendly and can
count on the neighboring residents for a long-standing customer base, as demonstrated by Hatfield Rug
Cleaners, est. 1926. From an eclectic mix of retail establishments and restaurants to dental, veterinary, and
medical practices, this area offers just about everything. The West Palm Beach Fire Station #2 is also located
here and contributes solid ties to the community by availing community rooms for group and public meetings,
joining with the neighborhood groups for events and festivities, as well as being front and center with their fire-
fighting duties!

The Southside Business Association, which covers Areas 3 and 4, is working with the City to establish a
Business Improvement District (BID). They have also recently adopted a trellis with a bougainvillea as a
streetscape and branding amenity.
24

All these valuable characteristics were considered when evaluating the recommendations for this Section and
while many are addressed under the Corridor-Wide Section, further enhancements can be made that are
unique to Area 3.

Parking and Traffic Flow

Parking seems to be especially important to the residents and businesses in the area south of Southern
Boulevard. While many of the parking and traffic flow needs have been addressed as relevant to the entire
corridor, there are specific spots unique in Area 3 that the City can look at. Therefore, the Committee makes
the following recommendations for this Area:

 Approach and work with the Property Owner at the Commercial Plaza located at 5900 S.
Dixie (Little Caesars) to conduct an engineering analysis to evaluate closing 2 curb-cuts on
Dixie. This would allow additional parking on Dixie and create a flow of traffic via the side
streets of Churchill and Palmetto Roads, similar to the Plaza in the 5130 block between
Pilgrim and Plymouth.
 Approach the Property Owner of the service station at Plymouth Road to determine if
closing the driveway on Dixie to create additional parking is prudent and viable.
 Strongly encourage FDOT to add pedestrian crossings at Phipps Park near Ruslyn Drive
and the area between Churchill Road and Colonial Road (near the Carvel Ice Cream Store).
As with the other pedestrian recommendations, this should be uniform with a stamped
asphalt treatment, pedestrian lighting, and landscaping.
 Work closely with and encourage FDOT to analyze the feasibility of lane reductions in this
area for safety as well as aesthetics to accommodate more greening of the area – such as
medians with plantings, more shade trees, etc.
 Close the obsolete curb-cut on Dixie at 4700 S. Dixie (Howley’s) to create more parking.


Streetscape Improvement Plan

This area already has decorative streetlamps and buried power lines that run from the spillway to Pine Terrace
just south of Southern Boulevard. However, this section needs greater attention to other streetscape
amenities such as landscape greening and consistent street furniture such as trash receptacles, bus benches,
bus shelters, and uniform publication holders. Therefore, in addition to the corridor-wide suggestions
concerning Area 3, the Committee further recommends that the City:

 Enhance the Southern Boulevard intersection with
streetscape/landscape improvements and utilize the traffic calming
design of stamped and colored asphalt.
 Replace the shade trees that were removed from the front of St.
Juliana’s with trees matching other nearby trees.
 Widen the sidewalk in front of Phipps Park to better accommodate trees,
and pedestrian traffic.
 Irrigate existing bulbouts and re-landscape where necessary.

25

 Provide smaller decorative trees in potted planters at locations where the planting of large shade
trees is not feasible. This has been done quite well on Antique Row and for consistency; similar trees
can and should be utilized.

Marketing and Branding

Covered under the Corridor-wide section.

Zoning and Code Enforcement

Although covered under the Corridor-wide section, Area 3 needs more direct attention given to address code
enforcement and zoning issues. Area 3 and 4 have a larger number of thrift shops that often show their
merchandise on the sidewalks, thus posing a safety hazard and creating visual clutter that works in opposition
to efforts to beautify the area. While the Committee recognizes that displaying some items outside of a store
can be done tastefully, when overdone and not controlled, will oppose beautification efforts and drive business
away. Therefore, the Committee emphasizes that the City:

 Analyze and revise existing code regulations to better address the visual clutter in this area.
Suggested regulations to review deal with:
a) Limitations on merchandise placed outside of a business
b) Illegal Signage



 Employ and enforce property maintenance regulations
 Perform a code enforcement blitz to bring non-conforming businesses and properties up to
existing code regulation. This blitz should be to issue warnings only of infractions and
provide specific timeframes to comply. This initial campaign of “warnings only” should be well
publicized and fully communicated to property owners and businesses to enlist and encourage
positive support to clean up certain areas. Recognizing that this could impose financial stress
on some businesses, it is recommended that guidance on available resources within the City
be offered as well.

Financing and Implementation
Covered under Corridor-wide section.
26

Forest Hill Boulevard to City Limits
Area 4




Area 4 is a continuation of the South end of the City and, as in Area 3, is represented by SENA (South End
Neighborhood Association) and the Southside Business Association. Although this is the smallest of the Dixie
Corridor sections, it offers the greatest potential for revitalization and has the distinction of being the southern
entrance to the City.

Currently this entrance has, most notably, an empty lot cornering Dixie Highway and the C-51 canal (the
undeveloped 8111 site), a used car lot, and Palm Coast Plaza which is sorely in need of repair. The area has
struggled for many years and while some businesses strive to maintain code compliance and attractive
businesses, there are also many vacant areas and struggling businesses that do not adhere to current code
regulations let alone aesthetic enhancements.

The Palm Coast Plaza was Palm Beach County’s first shopping mall and for many years drew people from
other cities to this section. As it has fallen into decline, so has the surrounding area and the City has lost a
valuable tax base. Many of the native Floridians and those in West Palm Beach that remember the Plaza
during its prime, feel strongly that the restoration of the Palm Coast Plaza is imperative to the survival of Area
4 businesses. Add the development of the 8111 site to the restoration of the Plaza and Area 4 will experience
an economic boon.

This Area is fortunate to already have underground utility lines and decorative street lamps as well as a strong
neighborhood commitment and solid business leaders. It also neighbors the West Palm Beach Golf Course
and the South Olive Park and School.

Of note, Treasure Coast Regional Planning is conducting a feasibility study on the viabi lity of creating a lift
system for the C-51 canal to open a passageway for inland water traffic to the Intracoastal Waterway.
27













While many of the recommendations for this area are addressed under the Corridor-Wide Section, there are
additional issues requiring attention that are unique to Area 4.


Parking and Traffic Flow

The Committee makes the following recommendations for Area 4:
 Strongly encourage FDOT to add a pedestrian crossing in
the Summa Road area. This area is northeast of the Palm
Coast Plaza and west of the South Olive School and South
Olive Park complex. There have been numerous
pedestrian related accidents in this vicinity. As with the
other pedestrian crossing recommendations, this should be
uniform with a stamped asphalt treatment, pedestrian
lighting, and landscaping.
 Add a raised landscape median in area fronting the Palm
Coast Plaza while maintaining sufficient turn lanes for the
area. This median should be developed as a terminal vista
point for the southern end of the City.
 Remove the traffic signal at 7810 S. Dixie Highway. This
signal was put in place when Lighthouse for the Blind was
housed at that location. As Lighthouse for the Blind has
moved on, this signal has become unnecessary and
interferes with traffic flow.







28

Streetscape Improvement Plan

Since this Area already has decorative streetlamps and buried power lines, the streetscape improvements
needing attention are amenities such as landscape, greening, and consistent street furniture, i.e. trash
receptacles and publication holders.

Therefore, the Committee recommends the following for this Area 4:

 Develop a striking gateway for the City Limits
southern end at Dixie and the C-51 canal.
 Enhance the Forest Hill intersection with
streetscape/landscape improvements and utilize the
traffic calming design of stamped and colored
asphalt.
 Open the access and view between South Olive Park
and Dixie Highway at DeSota Road. This concept
originated with the Glatting Jackson study of the
South End circa mid 1990’s and there is currently an
open field at this location presenting an ideal
opportunity for this vision.
 Irrigate existing bulbouts and re-landscape where necessary.









Marketing and Branding

 Market the distinct sub-districts such that people are motivated to visit this area. Although
mentioned in the Corridor-wide section, this is especially true in Area 4 as without a current
strong anchor at the south city limit (spillway), this area needs greater incentives to draw
more people to it.









“Create a gateway with landscaping that is inviting to those entering from
Lake Worth so we look like a City seeking sustainable business.”

ULI TAP Report Nancy Proffitt
South End Neighbor

29

Zoning and Code Enforcement

Area 4 has a multitude of code enforcement violations including, but not limited to, signage, landscaping, and
on street displays. These exist in intense pockets as individual business owners gravitate to the level of
violations of their neighbors instead of compliance with existing Code Regulations. One business with
violations is unattractive, but pockets of violations establish a visual clutter that borders on blight and urban
decay. While the recommendations for Area 4 of zoning and code enforcement are already covered under the
Corridor-Wide Section, Area 4 will see a dramatic aesthetic improvement by working with businesses in this
area.
 Perform a code enforcement blitz to bring non-conforming businesses and properties up to
existing code regulation. This blitz should be to issue warnings only of infractions and
provide specific timeframes to comply. This initial campaign of “warnings only” should be well
publicized and fully communicated to property owners and businesses to enlist and encourage
positive support to clean up certain areas. Recognizing that this could impose financial stress
on some businesses, it is recommended that guidance on available resources within the City
be offered as well.


Financing and Implementation

Covered under the Corridor-wide section


30

Compilation of Committee Members Priorities

At the Public Comment Meeting, held on 6, August 2014, the Committee was asked to prioritize the
recommendations in the report. Below are the comments and priorities submitted by the Committee Members.
Asterisks denote number of Members listing that recommendation as a priority. The highlighted
recommendations found in the report reflect the priorities below.
 Continue the path of decorative street lamps and buried utility lines that begin at the C-51 canal south city
limit throughout the Corridor. ******
 Encourage FDOT to add all 5 recommended pedestrian crossings. The 2 being considered at
Roseland/Conniston and Churchill/Colonial, as well as the additional Monceaux Road, Russlyn Drive, and
Summa Road areas. ****
 Develop a focused Marketing and Branding program with a City point person identified and utilized. ****
 Determine a visually unifying crosswalk treatment to be used at all crosswalks throughout the Corridor.
Stamped asphalt is recommended over brick for safety and longevity reasons. ****
 Green the striped no parking locations – Currently there are many areas along the corridor that have painted
striping to designate No Parking. As an alternative to this barren view, the Committee recommends adding
landscaping elements where this can be done safely. ***
 Create a striking gateway at the City Limits southern end at the spillway and Dixie Highway. ***
 Establish a landscape plan that includes planting consistent shade trees along the Corridor. Placement of
trees should be distanced between light poles so as not to interfere with lighting. **
 Installation of Public Art would ideally be suited along the main intersections and especially at the two
gateways. **
 Perform a code enforcement blitz focusing initially on education and assistance for non-conforming
businesses and properties. **
 Remove the obsolete traffic signal at 7810 S. Dixie. **
 Assess and if viable, act on, the potential of installing a landscaped median to replace the
striped area in the middle of Dixie north of Albemarle. **
 Evaluate measures to slow traffic, install medians, establish parking spaces and create landscaped areas. **
 Consult with Rich’s Ice Cream on the possibility of adding a tall shrub to cover the back
fence separating the truck parking for better aesthetics in keeping with the area. **
 Develop pocket parking program on private and city owned lots, if any, and incentivize cross parking
programs **
 Require all streetscape amenities be consistent and uniform.
 Add irrigation to existing bulb outs and re-landscape where necessary.
 Replace the shade trees at St. Juliana's.
 Address the elimination of visual clutter by reviewing and amending if necessary, existing code regulations
dealing with:
A) limitations on merchandise placed outside of a business
B) illegal signage
 Employ/enforce property maintenance regulations.
 Approach and guide residents with parcels fronting Dixie in the vicinity of
Marlborough and Albemarle to create a solution to fix/rebuild the fence.
 Authorize a Grants Coordinator position or team.
31

 Enhance and embellish all main intersections (Belvedere Road, Southern Boulevard, and Forest Hill
Boulevard) with streetscape and landscape improvements and utilize the traffic calming design of stamped
and colored asphalt.
 Work with Property Owners along the Corridor to close and fill in as many unnecessary curb-cuts and
access points as possible to provide additional parking.
 Open the access and view between South Olive Park and Dixie Highway at
DeSota Road.
 Develop a focused marketing and branding program with a City point person or
responsible party identified and utilized. This person would facilitate marketing and
branding efforts and activities to better establish a sense of place along the corridor
 Enforce existing speed limits.
 Work with FDOT and traffic engineers to re-evaluate the entire traffic pattern at the combined intersections of
Okeechobee Boulevard/Dixie Highway and Lakeside/Dixie Highway.
 Aggressively pursue any and all grants.
 Sell the program to the businesses because without financing, none of this works
 Develop crosswalk improvement program with FDOT using modern lighting and stamped concrete to soften
each major intersection.
 Encourage clusters of commercial property owners and tenants to implement small improvement clusters for
beginning of marketing and branding program. City needs to get involved here with its facade improvement
program.
 Encourage the Cemetery Committee to work with Norton and utilize parking lot at Norton for cross purposes
 Enhance and embellish the beauty of the existing pedestrian crossings at the Norton and on Flamingo Road
with a stamped asphalt treatment, pedestrian lighting, and landscaping.
 Improve the walkability of the Cemetery/Norton area with more shade trees (on west side).
 Visually narrow the roadway with landscaping, and adding on-street parking in as many areas as feasible.
(See additional comments in Parking and Traffic Flow).
 Require that all crosswalks are well-lit with consistent lighting.
 Evaluate where street and crosswalk lighting along the Corridor needs to be enhanced and unified.
 Review initiatives in cities such as Delray that have successfully implemented beautification code regulations
with extended timelines and incentives to the affected businesses.
 Light all pedestrian crosswalks effectively and consistently. Encourage FDOT and the County to update
and replace pedestrian signals with pedestrian countdown signals.
 Create a road diet with beautiful and consistent landscaping and stamped crosswalks.
 Create a marketing plan to brand the corridor and create events
 Establish crosswalk at Summa and S Dixie for people using South Olive Park and attending South Olive
Elementary
 Establish crosswalk at Roseland Dixie for Antique Row consumers
 Enhance crosswalk at Carvel and S Dixie
 Maintain and enforce minimum aesthetic requirements such as landscaping and painting in code regulations.


32

Addendum
Public Comments from Presentation of South Dixie Implementation Report 6,
August 2014

 A concern regarding the proposed branding of the corridor as The South Dixie Historic Corridor. The
concern being with the name not the branding. The preference would be to look at possible names to
brand Dixie Highway.

 Replace the chain link fence at the Woodlawn Cemetery with a decorative fence or wall

 Remove the front fence at Woodlawn Cemetery and widen the sidewalk instead of installing another
fence

 Some projects such as Villas on Antique Row have a small quantity of landscape in front of the
buildings

 Set back buildings 5 feet to provide more landscaping for the buildings

 Questions on how the recommendations would be implemented and whether the Committee was
asking the City to provide funding for them

 Establish some priorities among the multiple recommendations, even if some of them are not price
feasible

33

South Dixie Highway Corridor TAP Recommendations


Corridor Areas



ULI RECOMMENDATION
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4 NOTES

PARKING AND TRAFFIC FLOW (PROVIDE AND
ADEQUATE SUPPLY OF PARKING IN THE
RIGHT PLACES)
1
On-street parking - Determine where closing
or combining driveways will result in creating
increased on-street parking spaces

2
On-street parking - Determine and institute a
minimum driveway width that could result in
more curbed area for increased on-street
parking spaces
3
Off-street parking - Look for locations and
ways to provide additional public parking

4
Off-street parking - look for opportunities to
provide shared parking between different
uses
5
Off-street parking - determine if regulation
amendments are desired to require that any
change in use meet current parking
requirements
6
Traffic speed (design) - work with FDOT to
determine viability and locations for colored
pavement to give the feeling of narrowing the
roadway and pedestrian safety
7
Traffic speed (design) - determine areas for
providing additional landscaping and street
trees to visually narrow the roadway

8
Traffic speed (design) - determine locations
and design for bulb-outs and raised medians
to provide safe pedestrian crossings

34

9
Traffic speed (design) - provide terminal vistas
through median landscaping and other
streetscape features
10
Traffic speed (capacity) - determine viability of
lane width reduction to reduce speeds

11
Traffic speed (improved pedestrian crossing) -
determine proper locations for safe, well
marked and conveniently placed crosswalks

12
Traffic speed (improved pedestrian crossing) -
determine proper types of pedestrian crossing
treatments for each location


STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENT PLAN WITH A
COMPLETE STREETS APPROACH

13
Determine ways to reduce traffic speeds
through use of traffic calming design and/or
capacity solutions
14
Increase where feasible on-street parking
spaces to buffer pedestrians from vehicles

15
Install Conveniently Placed Crosswalks and
Raised Medians
16
Install appropriate street trees and vegetation
plantings
17
Provide where appropriate and feasible wide
and attractive sidewalks

18
Determine appropriate and feasible locations
for installation of bulb-out planting islands

19
Determine locations of where lighting
improvements are needed

20
Determine locations of where street furniture
amenities (i.e., seating, trash receptacles,
water features, etc.) should be placed to
provide pedestrian comfort
21
Determine types and locations of public art
(gateway/district identifiers and visual interest
pieces) to contribute to a strong sense of place
35

22
Installation of underground utilities to reduce
visual clutter, open vies of buildings and low
for space of tree growth
23
Employ pedestrian-oriented building design
and placement strategies to foster pedestrian
activity
24
Determine where additional bicycle parking
should be installed along the corridor

25
Identify locations and means to enhance
pedestrian and vehicle connections to
neighborhoods
26
Utilize Parks and gathering spaces to enhance
the vitality of the corridor

27
Provide good wayfinding signage for ease of
identification and travel within the corridor


MARKETING AND BRANDING (MARKETING
TASK FORCE)

28
Create a marketing task force to initiate a
marketing and branding process, and activities

29
Create a clear vision statement with a
memorable catch phrase

30
Establish a strong brand for the master
corridor and corridor districts

31
Create a sense of place for the distinct
subdistricts by highlighting their character

32
Create an events program to give people a
reason to visit the corridor

33
Get the word out through social media,
mailings, loyalty passport and buy local
programs, cross marketing, city publications
and TV
36

ZONING
34
Address current uses that are visually
unpleasing through property maintenance
regulations
35
Address sites that are visually unpleasing due
to outdated parking and landscaping that is
grandfathered but does not meet current
regulation requirements
36 Encourage mixed use
FINANCING AND IMPLEMENTATION
37
Develop metrics to evaluate performance and
effectiveness
38
Identify and seek funding through means such
as forming partnerships with utilities, city
funding, special taxing district
39
Create a governance structure through the
creation of a MSTU or BID

40
Collaborate with FDOT on a corridor
pedestrian crossing study

41
Collaborate with FDOT on a colored pavement
feasibility study

42
Collaborate with FDOT on parking/driveway
strategies