Modeling and rotor field-oriented control of faulty three-phase induction motor

based on GSA for tuning of PI controllers

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M. Jannati1, A. Monadi1, N. R. N. Idris1, A. A. M. Faudzi2* and F. Blaabjerg3
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UTM-PROTON Future Drive Laboratory, Faculty of Electrical Engineering,
Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, MALAYSIA
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Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIRO), Universiti Teknologi
Malaysia, Johor Bahru, MALAYSIA
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Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg East,
Denmark

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Abstract:

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This paper discusses d-q and Winding Function Method (WFM) for modeling and
Rotor Field-Oriented Control (RFOC) system for controlling faulty three-phase
Induction Motor (three-phase IM when one of the phases is disconnected). In the
adapted scheme for controlling faulty IM, it is necessary for the PI controller
coefficients to change. For this purpose, Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA) is used
for tuning of PI controllers. Results display the strength and ability of the technique to
improve the performance of the faulty IM control.

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Keywords: Faulty three-phase Induction Motor, Gravitational Search Algorithm,
Modeling, Rotor Field-Oriented Control, Tuning of PI controllers

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1- Introduction
Variable speed drives can provide reliable dynamic systems and important savings in
energy custom and costs of the Induction Motors (IMs). Developing high performance
control methods for IM drive systems need an accurate motor model. Recently, various
techniques of modeling induction machines have been presented [1-9]. In [1,2] dynamic
mesh reluctances, in [3,4] d-q model, in [5,6] enhanced equivalent circuit and in [7,8]
Winding Function Method (WFM) has been reported for modeling induction machines.
One of the most commonly models which is used for IMs is the d-q model [9],
presented by Park. This method is based on the assumption that the stator windings are
sinusoidal distributed. This supposition caused the harmonics of the windings
distribution to be removed in the machine analysis. A method based on the real
distribution of stator winding for modeling and calculation of mutual inductances,
which is called the WFM, was proposed by Toliyat and Lipo [7,8]. One of the
advantages of WFM is the ability to model the fault conditions such as cut-out fault in
IMs. In [10-14], the WFM is used to analyze some common faults in IM such as broken
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Corresponding Author: A. A. M. Faudzi
athif@fke.utm.my Tel.: +607-5535291 Fax: +607-5566272

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rotor bars, cracked rotor end rings, shorting, opening, and abnormal of the stator
winding circuit. Several methods have been also presented to develop detection of
faults in IM such as stator winding fault [15,16] and rotor bar fault [17,18]. One of the
major failures in IM is open-phase fault. Opening-phase fault is occurred by the
opening of windings, blown fuse and etc. Based on IM equations, in [19], with
comparison between current space phasor and measured value, In [20], Extended
Kalman Filter (EKF) and unknown input observer, In [21], neural networks and look
up table, in [22], negative sequence current estimation have been shown for detection of
the windings fault of stator in the motor. In [23], a small amplitude three-phase high
frequency signal has been employed for detection of fault in stator windings for
permanent magnet synchronous motor. This method gave fast detection of open-phase
stator winding and is supposed in this work. Field-Oriented Control (FOC) is one of the
best techniques for controlling the torque and speed in IMs. This method separates
motor current into torque and flux producing components. The torque of motor is
proportional to the product of these two perpendicular components and they can be
treated independently. This means that by using this method, the IM control is
transformed to an easy control system similar to the DC motors [24]. Faulty IM control
is clearly different from the balanced three-phase IM control. By using the usual
balanced IM control, for faulty IM, considerable ripples in the torque and speed
response will be present [3,4]. In 1996, Zhao and Lipo presented a method for modeling
and controlling of a multi-phase IM based on FOC when one of the stator phases is cut
off [25,26]. In addition to that in [27] presented an approach for modeling (d-q model)
and controlling (FOC method) of a dual three-phase IM when two stator phases are cut
off. In [3,4], Jannati et al. showed how conventional FOC technique can be used for
faulty three-phase IM control. The authors showed that with some changes in the
conventional vector control, unbalanced three-phase IM control is possible. In the
process of obtaining the FOC equations however, the backward components of the
stator voltage equations have been neglected [3,4]. In this paper, d-q and WFM are
discussed for modeling of faulty IM (three-phase IM under open-phase fault).
Moreover, a new method for vector control of faulty three-phase IM based on the Rotor
Flux Oriented-Control (RFOC) method is checked by simulations. In the proposed
controlling method, two new rotational transformations are used to the equations of
faulty IM. By using these matrixes, the faulty motor equations become similar to the
balanced equations. The research potential of the presented drive system for faulty
motor is particularly towards the development of PI controllers. Therefore, optimization
of the PI controllers for having high performance of the presented controlling method is
essential. Some important optimization algorithms techniques are as follows:

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Central Force Optimization (CFO) [28], Genetic Algorithm (GA) [29], Artificial
Immune Systems (AIS) [30], Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) [31,32], Simulated
Annealing (SA) [33], Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) [34], Bacterial Foraging
Algorithm (BFA) [35,36] and Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA) [37], are
evolutionary algorithms which have been proposed for global optimization e.g.
complex nonlinear problems. These methods are increasingly analyzed or improved by

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Besides. Rotor and stator flux winding's flux axes under open-phase fault can be presented as Fig. d-q model of faulty three-phase IM with unequal stator windings is presented. the main idea of using rotational transformations for faulty three-phase IM control and RFOC equations for faulty motor by using novel transformations is expounded in this part. PSO and CFO. A brief overview of the GSA algorithm is presented in part 5. It models the masses that attract each others in search space based on gravity lows which means that heavy mass has greater gravitational force and move slowly. Each mass is a problem solution so heavier mass is related to good solution. starting from some solution points called population and determination of a global solution for problem based on the nature's rules. Based on Fig. These algorithms are inspired by nature. The simulation results are shown in part 6 and part 7 concludes the paper. Some efforts have been made to compare the performance of these algorithms with each other [37. PI controller gains are obtained off-line by GSA based on the speed error. θr is the angle between “as” and “ar” axes and θo is the angle between “as” and “ds” axes. 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 2. 43-47]. GSA is based on the Newtonian laws of gravity and was first introduced by Esmat Rashedi et al [37]. After that. The proposed method in this paper not only can be used for critical industrial applications where we need to have a faulttolerant drive system but also can be employed for vector control of single-phase IM (the single-phase IM can be considered as an unbalanced two-phase IM).d-q Model for Faulty Three-Phase IM The faulty IM drive can be shown as Fig. 106 107 In Fig.researchers in different areas [38-42]. 2. the vector control equations for faulty IM by using conventional transformations are presented in part 4. 2. The presented method in [37] has been compared with some familiar heuristic search approaches such as GA. 104 105 Sinusoidal waveform is considered for spatial distribution of the windings. 108 109   o  r (1) According to Fig. This paper is organized as: In part 2. 1 (assume that a phase cut out happened in phase “cs”). the normalized transformation for the stator and rotor components is obtained as [4]: TS   1 / Tr   1  1 2  1 1  cos  cos  2 / 3 cos  4 / 3 2 / 3   sin   sin   2 / 3 sin   4 / 3 110 111 112 (2) 113 (3) 114 . In this research. 2. 2. The WFM model of faulty three-phase IM is presented in part 3. In [37] the authors showed the GSA is more accurate and lead to greater benefits in finding a global minimum point.

λsds and λsqs are the stator d-q axes fluxes and λsdr and λsqr are the rotor d-q axes fluxes.5Lms 134 M q  3 / 2 Lms . the difference between d-q model of the balanced and faulty three-phase IM equations are summarized in Table (1). isds and isqs are the stator d-q axes currents isdr and isqr are the rotor d-q axes currents. τl.  sqs  Lqs i qss  M q i qrs (6) 119  sdr  M d i dss  Lr i drs . In the analysis using WFM. Actually.WFM Model for Faulty Three-Phase IM An alternative method that can be used to model IMs is by using the WFM. M d  1. Lds = Lqs = Ls and Md = Mq = M in the equations of the faulty motor. rqs and rr indicate the stator and rotor resistances. Lqs. we can obtain the familiar equations of balanced motor. J and F are electromagnetic torque. 3. d-q model for faulty motor in the stator reference frame (superscript “s”) are obtained as follows (see Appendix A): d dsds s . Lr  Llr  1.5Lms In summary. rds. For three-phase IM with balanced stator windings in the faulty mode. the equations of the three-phase IM under open-phase fault have the same structure faulty with the equations of the balanced three-phase IM. Lds.5Lms Lqs  Lls  0. Md. As can be seen from equations (4-9). Lds  Lls  1. load torque. Mq and Lr indicate the stator and rotor self and mutual inductances. the actual spatial distribution of windings is considered. by substituting rds = rqs = rs. vsds and vsqs are the d-q axes voltages. In this method. τe. we have [4]: 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 rs  rds  rqs .5Lms . vqs  rqs iqss  qs dt dt 115 116 s vdss  rds idss  (4) 117 dsqr dsdr s s 0 ri   r qr . the following assumptions are normally applied: 135 136 137 138 139 140  Uniform air gap 141  Same rotor bars 142  Skew effect is neglected 143 .Applying the transformation vectors ([TS] and [Tr]). inertia and viscous friction coefficient and r is the motor speed.  sqr  M q i qss  Lr i qrs (7) 120 Pole ( M q i qss i drs  M d i dss i qrs ) 2 (8) 121 (9) 122 s r dr e  d Pole  e   l   J r  F r 2 dt where. 0  rr iqr   r sdr dt dt (5) 118  sds  Lds i dss  M d i drs .

Lss. Ir   0 T   i I s  i1s  149 T 0  0 T Rs. “nB” is the turn function of the winding “B” and “NA” is the winding function of the winding “A”. 5 and equation (11).  s  Lss I s  Lsr I r . Lsr and Lrr can be calculated for balanced three-phase IM. 3. T sr s d r dt Lsr Te  I Ir  r (10) 145 146 147 T s . z. z. z. From Fig. 144 Saturation is negligible The equations of balanced three-phase IM with “m” rotor bars can be written as follow [7. 6 respectively. 4 show the turn function for the stator phases and the first rotor bar for the simulated balanced motor respectively (for the second rotor bar. Lrr and Lsr are defined in Appendix A. the waveform of Fig. where. 3 and Fig. n(φ) is the turn function and ˂ n(φ) ˃ is the average value of turn function. 4. 3 and Fig. The mutual inductance between windings “B” and “A” (LBA) in terms of turn function and winding function is calculated by following equation [7]:  2 LBA  rm   o r   0  n  . Fig. 4.8]: d s dt d Vr  Rr I r   r dt Vs  Rs I s  . “l” is the length of tack.  T  vmr  T i2s i3s r 1 i2r  imr . Equation (10) can be written as: s v1s  v2s  v12  rs   s  s  s v2  v3  v23   0  rs rs i1s  0   s d i2   rs   s  dt i3     s1  s2   s s   2   3  (12) 165 166 where: s s  s1  s2   L11  Ls21 L12  Ls22  s   s s s s s  2   3    L21  L31 L22  L32  0   1 1    161 162 163 164 s sr L13  Ls23  i1s   L11  Lsr21     Ls23  Ls33  i2s    Lsr21  Lsr31 1  i3s   0  ir  sr sr L12  Lsr22  L128  Lsr228   1r   i Lsr22  Lsr32  Lsr228  Lsr328   2     0  0  ir  28  167 .< n(φ)>. Therefore. the winding function is defined as: N(φ) = n(φ) . based on Fig. 2. dzd  l 1 B rm A rm rm (11) 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 0 where “r” is the average radius of the air gap. The motor that is investigated in this paper has 28 rotor bars and 36 stator slots. “g” is the air gap function. g  . Rr. 5 and Fig. N  . 148 where:     V  v Vs  v1s s 1 s r 1 r v2s s2 v1r  T v3s s3 . 4 is shifted to the right by 2π / 28 = π / 14). In WFM. the winding function of the stator phases and the first rotor bar are shown in Fig.  r  Lrr I r  L I r  . Lss.

the following equations are obtained: 175 176 177 Stator d-axis voltage equation: 178 (14) 179 180 Stator q-axis voltage equation: (15) 181 182 Rotor d-axis voltage equation: (16) 183 . The only difference is that.Equations of faulty motor have the same formation to the balanced motor equations. in the faulty mode.RFOC for Faulty Three-Phase IM In the RFOC method. 171 4. by using following matrix. θe is the angle between the stationary reference frame and rotating reference frame By using conventional transformation to the faulty motor (equations (4-9)). machine equations are transferred to the rotating reference frame [24]:  T   cos sin  e s e  e sin  e  cos  e  168 169 170 (13) 172 173 174 where. the row and column for the phase “c s” are eliminated.

qr   sin  e  sin  e  idss . there are not the backward terms).qr  idse. jIf. If and jVf. By applying equation (18). In this case. All the parameters in Fig. rotational transformations for the stator variables that resolve this problem are proposed.dr   cos  e sin  e  idss . Vb  Vm  j a  2 a 2 a 1 1 I f  I m  jaI a  . The backward components are generated because of different inductances in the faulty IM model equations (Md ≠ Mq and Lds ≠ Lqs). 8 are defined in [48].qr  187 In general.dr    cos  e  iqss . The faulty IM control can be done by controlling forward and backward components independently but the control scheme will be very complex. Vf are the currents and voltages of the balanced IM. 8 [48].dr   e     s  iqs . this figure can be changed into a balanced circuit. equations (14-17) include two terms. 9. 9. 9. a simplified circuit can be shown as Fig.dr  cos  e  e    iqs . “+e”: forward components and “-e”: backward components as shown in Fig. In this paper. I b  I m  jaI a  2 2 (18) 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 From Fig.qr   sin  e cos  e  iqs . which are displaced from each other by 90. with neglecting of Zd. if we ignore Zd. The main idea of this transformation is obtained from the steady-state equivalent circuit of the single-phase IM. Equation (18). V  V  1 1 V f  Vm  j a  . The equivalent circuit of single-phase IM is shown in Fig. This motor is generally unbalanced with two unequal main and auxiliary windings. can be re-written as: 204 205 206 207 .184 Rotor q-axis voltage equation: (17) 185 186 where: ids e. 1Z  Z d   la2  Z lm  2 a  (19) Based on Fig. Each of these terms (forward or backward terms) is like a balanced motor which turns in the forward or backward direction (in the equations of balanced IM. 7.

Lds = Lls + 3/2 Lms. By considering Lqs / Lds = (Mq / Md)2 (in d-q model of faulty IM: Md = 3/2 Lms. rotor voltages. flux and torque equations become like balanced IM equations (the only difference is that in the balanced mode we have : M = 3/2 Lms and in the faulty mode we have Mq = √3/2 Lms). Va  vds . From equation (20): 209 210 Proposed rotational transformation for stator voltages: 211        e  T      vs        e ds e qs   s ds s qs Lqs cos  e Lds Lqs Lds sin  e  sin  e  s   ds    qss  cos  e     (21) 213 Proposed rotational transformation for stator currents: i  i e ds e qs  i e   Tis   i   s ds s qs          Lds cos  e Lqs Lds sin  e Lqs  sin  e  s  ids   iqss  cos  e     (22) N 1 Nm   q a Na Nd 214 215 In our deduction following substitutions is used: 1  cos  e . rotor voltage and stator voltage without supposition of Lqs / Lds = (Mq / Md)2 are given in Appendix B). RFOC equations for faulty IM are gained as: (24) 229 230 .        f   j 1  Vm   I b   ja 1   I m   a  (20) 208 Equation (20) indicates transformation matrixes for changing the variables from unbalanced mode to balanced mode (e. Mq = √3/2 Lms. Lqs = Lls + 1/2 Lms and Lms ˃˃ Lls ) which is equivalent to neglecting inductance of Zd in Fig. by simplifying the single-phase IM equivalent circuit. jI f  ids . 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 In the RFOC method [24]: 228 edr  r . Va and Vm to Vf and jVf). 212 Lqs Lds e e s s V f  vqs . the equations of stator voltage include forward terms and backward terms (equations of flux. eqr  0 Consequently. jV f  vds . I m  iqs As it is shown. 1  j  V   jI   a  jV f   a j Ia  a f V  1   . 9. Vm  vqs (23) 216 e e s s I f  iqs .g. However. two novel rotational transformations are obtained. It is expected by using of these matrixes (equations (21. equations of faulty IM became like to balanced equations.. j  sin  e . I a  ids .22)) to the faulty IM equations. torque.

Tr (Tr = Lr / rr) is the rotor time constant. we have: rs. the PI controllers should be changed from the balanced mode to the unbalanced 247 248 249 . 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 In conclusion. Based on equations (25) and Table (2). the red colors illustrate the sections of the conventional controller which require to be changed for faulty motor control. the only difference between equations of conventional RFOC and modified RFOC is that in the modified RFOC equations it is obtained: rs = ((Mq2 + Md2) / 2 Md2) rs) = 2 / 3 rs. vds-e and vqse as above but in the conventional RFOC equations. M = 3 / 2 Lms. 10. Fig.GSA Algorithm It can be observed that in the modified block diagram for RFOC of faulty three-phase IM. The comparison between stator voltage equations of the conventional RFOC and modified RFOC is summarized in Table (2). In Fig. Moreover. Ls = Lqs = Lls + 1 / 2 Lms. Therefore. vdsd and vqsd is generated using Decoupling Circuit and vdsref and vqsref is generated using PI controller in the vector control block diagram of the faulty IM. the comparison between two vector control techniques is summarized in Table (3). 245 246 5. Ls = Lls + 3 / 2 Lms).M q idse r  1  Tr d / dt e   r  M q iqse Tr r pole M q r iqse 2 Lr e  (25) 231 e d ref e vds  vds  vds  vds e d ref e vqs  vqs  vqs  vqs 232 where: d vds  eiqse ( Lqs  ref vds ( ref vqs ( Lr rds M q2  rqs M d2 2M d2 v   i ( Lqs  d qs M q2 e e ds M q2 Lr M q M qidse  r )( ) Lr Tr )idse  ( Lqs  )  e M q rds M q2  rqs M d2 2M d2 )( M q2 didse ) Lr dt r 233 Lr )iqse  ( Lqs  e vds  rds M q2  rqs M d2  cos 2 e )  e   ( 2M d2 vqs   sin 2 e M q2 diqse ) Lr dt  sin 2 e  idse     cos 2 e  iqse  In equation (25). 10 can be recommended for RFOC of faulty IM. M = Mq = √3 / 2 Lms.

Go and α are user defined constant and T is the total number of iterations and t is current iteration.2.…. xin  for i=1. The outcomes of the total force on agent “i” in dimension d.….. the velocity and position of each agent is updated as follows: 250 251 252 253 254 255 256 257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 vid (t  1)  randi  vid (t )   id (t ) (30) 266 xid (t  1)  xid (t )  vid (t  1) (31) 267 268 The masses of the agents are updated by equations (32-34). 1].. M  i  M pi  M ii  M i mi (t )  i=1.N } (35) 271 272 273 274 . randj is a random number in the interval [0. GSA is employed for optimization of the PI controllers. j i j d ij (29) (t ) where.. worst(t) and best(t) are worst and best solution in iteration t and can be defined for minimization as follows: best (t )  min fit j (t ) j{1. The GSA algorithm starts with position of masses (agents) given by equation (26):  X i  xi1 .2. After each iteration. ε is a small constant and Rij(t) is the Euclidian distance between “i” and “j” agents. In this paper. N fit i (t )  worst(t ) best (t )  worst(t ) M i (t )  mi (t )  j1 m j (t ) N (32) 269 (33) 270 (34) fiti(t) represents the fitness value of the agent “i” at iteration t......mode. G(t )  Go e  t T (28) In equation (28). Ma and Mp is the active and passive gravitational mass related to agents “i” and “j” respectively.... xid is the position of ith mass in the dth dimension. N (26) where. is equal to: Fi d (t )  N  rand F j 1. At the specific time t the force between mass “i” and mass “j” is defined as equation (27): Fijd (t )  G(t ) M pi (t )  M  j (t ) ( Rij (t )   )( x dj (t )  xid (t )) (27) where. G(t) is a gravitational constant which is updated by equation (28). xid ..

by using conventional controller. the proposed controller produces fewer ripples in the speed and torque with superior acceleration (in this case. a step change in the load torque is then introduced (based on [49]. 12 it can be seen that with the conventional RFOC. with the proposed RFOC it only took about 0. The performance of the proposed faulty IM drive system varies according to the PI controller coefficients and it is indicated by the value of the Integral Time Absolute Error (ITAE).5 s.. Then a fault (cut-off in phase “cs”) is employed at t = 0. At the same time. then a load torque equal to 1 N. 10 at the instance the fault is introduced. a vector control drive system according to Fig. The simulated motor is fed by a PWM 3-leg VSI.. the motor is started under healthy condition.Simulation Evaluations 288 To confirm the usefulness of the presented drive system for a faulty IM. 14 (c). whereas in Fig. When t = 4 s. after the fault is introduced. From Fig. The ITAE is considered as an objective function. 12 and 14 shows the simulation results of the conventional RFOC that is utilized even after the faulty condition is introduced.N } During each iteration. the speed oscillation after applying load torque and at steady state is ~ 12 rpm at rotor speed of 500 rpm but by using proposed modified controller 307 308 309 310 311 312 . the conventional RFOC is also simulated. GSA reduces the number of agents based on fitness evaluation and finally one agent remains as the best solution of problem. as can be seen in Fig. WFM is considered for modeling of the unbalanced motor. it is supposed that the fault is happened before the motor is run (like single-phase IM). 13 and 15 shows the simulation results where the control is swap to the one as shown in Fig. However. However Fig. In Fig.m at t = 2. important decrease in the torque and speed ripples can be views in Fig. 14 and 15. The ratings and parameters of the motor used in the vector control are given in Appendix C. the maximum permissible torque in three-phase IM under open-phase fault. The purpose of GSA is to minimize the objective function or maximize the fitness function (fitness function is 1 / (ITAE+1)). the time for the speed to recover to its reference value after a fault is introduced is about 2 s. 289 290 291 292 293 Fig.worst(t )  max fit j (t ) (36) 275 j{1.1 s. 10 is simulated using the MATLAB. However. is about 30% of the rated motor torque). 13. 12 and 13. Results demonstrate that the conventional RFOC method (Fig.5 s is applied to the machine. The principle of GSA is presented in Fig. 11 [37]. 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 In Fig.. 13.. 12) is not capable to control the faulty IM accurately. The parameter settings for the GSA are considered as: 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283  Population size or number of agents: 50 284  Maximum iteration: 50 285  In equation (27): ε = 0 286  In equation (28): α = 20 & Go = 100 & T = 50 287 6.

Then. significant oscillations in the electromagnetic torque and speed on motor are observed. the motor speed can not reach to the reference speed). 17. it is observed that the real speed can not follow the reference speed after applying load torque at t = 3 s). a load torque equal to 0. 15 (c)).8 rpm at rotor speed of 500 rpm).(Fig. 315 316 317 318 319 320 321 322 323 Figs. the speed oscillation after applying load torque and at steady state is ~ 8 rpm at rotor speed of 500 rpm but by using proposed modified controller the speed oscillation reduced notably ~ 0.5 rpm at rotor speed of 500 rpm. In Fig. 18 and 19 that the dynamic performance of the proposed system for vector control of faulty three-phase IM is extremely acceptable. Fig. It can be seen from Figs. from Fig. At the same time. when the speed reference changes from 100 rpm to 700 rpm. It is evident from Fig. phase “cs” of stator is opened at t = 1 s and the IM becomes unbalanced. 19. 20 displays simulation results of the proposed modified vector control for faulty IM in the difference values of reference speed.m is applied to the machine. 20 (b) shows the speed error between reference speed and actual speed. 18. the motor is starting in balanced condition.Conclusion In this paper. In the presented technique.m is applied at t = 0. as can be seen in Fig. the modified method (Fig. 17. It can be shown that under fault condition. 19 (c-left). shows that proposed modified controller decreases the torque ripples noticeably. 18 and 19 show the comparison between conventional and modified controller (left: conventional. Moreover. In Fig. the speed oscillation reduced notably ~ 0. In starting. two load torque equal to 0. Simulation illustrates that the conventional RFOC unable to control the faulty IM correctly (In this condition.5 N. the motor is starting in balanced condition. In Fig. 16 demonstrates the conventional RFOC simulated results. right: modified). two methods for modeling (d-q and WFM) and a novel approach for RFOC of a faulty three-phase IM fed by PWM. 339 340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 7. Simulation results of conventional RFO controller show that the conventional controller is unable to control the IM under open-phase fault properly (e.5 N. a GSA is implanted for tuning PI controllers. by using conventional controller. the similar process is done but this time after open-phase fault. Fig. In Fig.4 s. 20 (a) and (b) that the faulty IM can follow the reference speed without any overshoot and steady-state error.4 s and t = 3 s respectively. by using some changes in the block diagram of conventional 348 349 350 351 352 . 313 314 Fig. Then a phase cut-off is introduced at t = 1 s. It can be seen from the presented results that the dynamic performance of the proposed drive system is highly satisfactory. Moreover.05 s. In this figure a fault cut-off is occurred at the starting. a load torque equal to 0. Fig 20 (c) shows the electromagnetic torque of the motor in the faulty condition. 18. IM is healthy.5 Nm and 1. 324 325 326 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 Fig. 10) is employed. Then a phase cut-off is introduced at t = 0.. 20 (a) shows the reference and actual rotor speed. Simulation results in Fig. three-leg VSI is recommended.g.5 Nm is applied at t = 0. 19. Especially.

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14: Simulation results of the conventional vector controller. 13: Simulation results of the modified vector controller. (b) Stator a-axis current. (a) Rotor a-axis current.Fig. (d) Electromagnetic torque 511 512 Fig. 9: Simplified single-phase IM equivalent circuit 494 Fig. (b) Speed error. 11: Principle of GSA [37] 496 Fig. (a) Rotor a-axis current. (b) Stator a-axis current. (a) Rotor a-axis current. (b) Stator a-axis current. backward and stationary reference frame 492 Fig. (b) Stator a-axis current. (b) Stator a-axis current. 19: Simulation results of the conventional (left) and modified (right) controller. 16: Simulation results of the conventional vector controller. (d) Electromagnetic torque 497 498 Fig. (a) Rotor a-axis current. (b) Stator a-axis current. 10: Proposed block diagram for faulty IM 495 Fig. (b) Stator a-axis current. (c) Speed. (d) Electromagnetic torque 505 506 Fig. 7: Forward. (c) Speed. (d) Electromagnetic torque 509 510 Fig. 20: Simulation results of the modified controller in the difference values of reference speed. (c) Speed. (d) Electromagnetic torque 503 504 Fig. (c) Electromagnetic torque 513 514 Table Caption 515 Table (1): Comparison between d-q model of the balanced and faulty three-phase IM equations Table (2): Comparison between stator voltage equations of conventional RFOC and modified RFOC Table (3): Comparison between two vector control methods 516 517 518 519 520 521 522 523 524 525 . 17: Simulation results of the modified vector controller. (d) Electromagnetic torque 507 508 Fig. (c) Speed. (b) Stator a-axis current. (a) Rotor a-axis current. (c) Speed. (a) Rotor a-axis current. (a) Rotor a-axis current. (d) Electromagnetic torque 501 502 Fig. (c) Speed. 15: Simulation results of the modified vector controller. (c) Speed. 18: Simulation results of the conventional (left) and modified (right) controller. (a) Speed. (d) Electromagnetic torque 499 500 Fig. 8: Single-phase IM equivalent circuit 493 Fig. (a) Rotor a-axis current. (c) Speed. 12: Simulation results of the conventional vector controller.

[RR] and [LRR]. the equations of faulty motor with different stator windings in a stationary reference frame (superscript “s”) can be expressed as equations (4-9): The matrixes Rs. Lss. [iabS]. Obtaining equation of faulty motor in the d-q frame Applying the transformation vectors ([TS] and [Tr]). stator and rotor voltages and fluxes can be written as following equations: By simplifying above equation. Rr. [LSR] and [LRS] have the similar formation to the balanced IM. [RS]. are identical to the balanced three-phase IM. It is because the structure of rotor has not changed. [abS]. [LSS]. Lsr and Lrr in the WFM are defined as follows:  Rb 0 2Rb  Re   R 2Rb  Re   Rb b  Rr        0 0 0    Rb 0 0    0 0   2Rb  Re    Rb 536 537 538 539 540 541 542 543 544 545 546 547 548 549  Rb 0        Rb  2Rb  Re  550 . [vabcR]. flux and torque equations for faulty three-phase IM in the “abc” frame can be written as following equations: Stator and rotor voltage equations: 527 528 529 530 21  vabS   RS22  31    32 vabcR   0 21 1  d  2abS  0 23   iabS      3  1 3  1  33 RR  iabcR  dt abcR  531 532 Stator and rotor flux equations:    21 abS 31 abcR  L   L 21 SS 23T SR L  i  L  i 23 SR 33 RR 21 abS 31 abcR    533 534 Torque equation: e  Pole L [iabS ]T [ SR ][iabcR ] 2  r 535 where. The [vabS]. The only different in these matrixes are the row and column for the phase “cs” is removed.Appendix A 526 Obtaining equation of faulty motor in the “abc” frame: Voltage. [iabcR]. [abcR].

Lmr is the magnetizing inductance of each rotor loop. [Rs] is a diagonal m by m consists of resistances of each coil. I 33 rs   0  0 0 rs 0 0 0  rs  s s  L11 L12 Lss    Ls21 Ls22  Ls31 Ls32  s  L13 s  L23  Ls33  sr sr  L11 L12  L1srm  Lsr    Lsr21 Lsr22  Lsr2m   Lsr31 Lsr32  Lsr3m    Lr1r2  Lb Lr1r3  Lr1rm  Lb  Lmr  2Lb  Le    L L  Lmr  2Lb  Le  Lr2r3  Lb  Lr2rm r2r1 b    Lr3r1 Lr3r2  Lb Lmr  2Lb  Le   Lr3rm Lrr              Lr r  Lb    L L  L  2 L  L rmr2 rm r3 mr b e  m1  In these matrixes. The matrix [Lss] is a symmetric m by m matrix. [Rr] is n+1 by n+1 symmetric where. Lb is the rotor bar leakage inductance.Rs   rs . Rb is the rotor bar resistance and Re is the end ring segment resistance. Appendix B 551 552 553 554 555 556 557 558 559 560 561 562 Equations of faulty IM by using proposed rotational transformations: Torque equation: Rotor voltage equations: 563 Stator voltage equations: 564 . The mutual inductance matrix [Lsr] is an m by n matrix comprised of the mutual inductances between the stator coils and the rotor loops. Le is the rotor end ring leakage inductance and Lri rk is the mutual inductance between two rotor loops.

0038 kg.m2. f = 50 Hz.15 .851 H 571 572 573 . Lms = 0. rs = 20. Power = 475 W. rr = 19.6 . J = 0.565 where: 566 567 Appendix C 568 569 570 The ratings and parameters of three-phase IM are: Voltage: 125 V.0814 H. Llr = Lls = 0. of poles = 4. No.