Salisbury University

Strength & Conditioning
Fall 2011 Manual

* CREATE AN ENVIRONMENT*
"I always look at this that we have a unit
here -- the coaches, the trainers, the guys
that handle your equipment, the person
that does your travel -- and all of us try
to create an environment where guys can
be as productive as their talent allows."

* BE RELENTLESS*
"You ask any coach, especially in sports
where your challenge is to be ready to
compete every day. You've got to have a
relentless kind of approach. You must
push day in and day out and strive for
better"

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Salisbury University Strength & Conditioning
Introduction

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Chain of Command

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Behavior Policies, Rules, Duties & Responsibilities

3

Warm-Ups

4

Testing Procedures

5

Exercise Philosophy, Drills & Technique

6

Special Programs / Speed & Agility Drills

7

Nutritional Information

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Appendix

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References

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The experiences you are about to endeavor will help you apply all of the knowledge gained in the classroom with the intent to further your career in the strength and conditioning field. but can be very rewarding. You must be willing to give your best effort each and every day to help our athletes reach their potential. The effort performed during this assistantship will not go unnoticed. Enjoy your time spent with the Salisbury University athletes as well as strength and conditioning staff and Welcome Aboard. the student athletes and coaches will recognize hard work and commend you for the effort put forth. Over the course of the semester you will see players grow as athletes.INTRODUCTION Welcome to the Salisbury University Strength & Conditioning Program. working with college athletes may not always be fun. You have been selected from various applicants to complete your assistantship with our prestigious athletic teams in our Strength and Conditioning Program. develop friendships with players and staff members. contacts. but the experiences. The position you have attained within our program takes hard work and dedication. and opportunities gained come far and few between in the field of strength and conditioning. You may be asked to work long days both in the weight room or on the field. 3 . and learn the finer points of strength and conditioning in the college setting. The ability to develop college athletes that play at such a high level is a very special honor. Despite the fact that the head strength and conditioning coach may not be in attendance all the time. Make no mistake. This may not be the life for everyone.

4 . questions. and injuries should be brought to the attention of the Strength & Conditioning Coordinator.XXXX All strength & conditioning information.CHAIN OF COMMAND Title Name Extension Athletic Director Dr. Michael Vienna x 83503 Assistant Athletic Director Jill Stephenson x 36357 Assistant Athletic Director Matt McGinnis x 36358 Strength & Conditioning Coordinator Matthew Nein x 36345 Graduate Assistant Strength Coach Andy Deck x 83541 Graduate Assistant Strength/Facilities Brian Bert x 83541 Graduate Assistant Strength/Facilities Mary Beth Krolikowski x 70003 Head Coaches Sport Name Extension Football Men’s Soccer Women’s Soccer Field Hockey Men’s & Women’s Cross Country Volleyball Sherman Wood Gerry DiBartolo Jim Nestor Dawn Chamberlain Jim Jones Margie Knight x 36356 x 64144 x 75338 x 82588 x 36337 x 36352 Men’s Basketball Women’s Basketball Men’s & Women’s Swimming Josh Merkel Kelly Lewandowski Jill Stephenson x 84163 x 36003 x 36357 Baseball Softball Men’s Lacrosse Women’s Lacrosse Men’s & Women’s Track & Field Men’s & Women’s Tennis Doug Fleetwood Margie Knight Jim Berkman Jim Nestor Jim Jones Randy Halfpap x 36034 x 36352 x 36389 x 75338 x 36337 x 36248 Powers Weight Room Coordinator/GA x 83541 Note: Phone Number = 410 – 54X – XXXX or 410 – 67X . Matthew Nein.

If each participant can continually do their best on the athletic field and work toward achieving task oriented goals. the athlete gains control over their own success. self-esteem. o Set Goals (See Goal Form) o Elicit one on one conversation about effort GOAL 3: A POSITIVE APPROACH DURING ATHLETIC COACHING - Athletes who play for coaches who use this positive style of being highly reinforced and encouraging have increased levels of fun. YOU MUST BRING FORTH THE BEST FROM THOSE WITH WHOM YOU WORK. When instructing. coaches should emphasize the good things that can happen from proper execution as opposed to the negative things that happen with poor performance.DETAIL "Success is peace of mind. Coaches who use the positive approach will begin to get to know the athletes as unique individuals and have an increased level of team cohesion." 5 . For every 1 negative statement. The atmosphere must begin before any athlete steps in the room. use the positive-negative-positive sandwich. If critiquing an individual. 2 positive reinforcement statements need to be made.COACHING PHILOSOPHY “A LEADER’S GOAL REMAINS THE SAME. o Meet the group in the Hall and get them excited o Continue the intensity in the room GOAL 2: GETTING THE VERY BEST OUT OF THE PEOPLE THAT WE TRAIN - Success must be seen in terms of exceeding personal goals as opposed to outperforming others. which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you made the effort to do your best to become the best that you are capable of becoming. o Use positive reinforcement often o Encourage athletes o Educate through sound Technical instruction .” GOAL 1: CREATE AN EVIRONMENT - We must create an atmosphere where the athletes want to come and put forth max effort each day. and positive personality development.

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Loyalty . And to get cooperation. Rarely will you find in working toward a common goal that others will be able to resist friendship if you offer it sincerely and openly. Friendship comes from mutual esteem. to move in the same direction instead of going off in different directions. knowing whom and what you have allegiance to. Enthusiasm brushes off upon those with whom you come in contact.Loyalty to and from those with whom you work is absolutely necessary for success. Enthusiasm ignites plain old work and transforms it into industriousness. Friendship takes time and understanding. Great loyalty was stressed on all successful teams.For success. Be brave enough to offer friendship.Industriousness . It means keeping your self-respect. Enthusiasm . It allows individuals to move forward together.You must truly enjoy what you are doing. either individually or for your team. This means working together in all ways to accomplish the common goal. Your heart must be in it. And you must have enthusiasm to prepare and perform with industriousness. There is no substitute for work. Friendship . as they often do when the challenge is great. Worthwhile things come only from hard work and careful planning.In order to reach the full potential of the group. All of this requires cooperation.Industriousness? Very simply. People who always try to cut corners will never come close to realizing their full potential. you must give cooperation with all levels of your teammates. 7 . Loyalty is very important when things get a little tough. Respect helps produce loyalty. Loyalty is a powerful force in producing one’s individual best and even more so in producing a team’s best. and only you really know if you’re giving it everything you’ve got. there must be a level of friendship. Hard work is essential. not in having your own way. Without enthusiasm you can’t work up to your fullest ability. respect and devotion. Be interested in finding the best way. Listen if you want to be heard. you have to work and work hard. Cooperation . Loyalty is a cohesive force that forges individuals into a team. It means giving respect to those you work with. there must be cooperation on all levels. Like marriage it must not be taken for granted but requires a joint effort.

Once you have decided on a course of action. Not careless or sloppy mistakes. Condition -You must be conditioned for whatever activity you’re doing if you’re going to do it to the best of your ability. Self-control is essential for discipline and mastery of emotions.the ability to observe.Constantly be aware and observing. Play to win rather than not to lose. Hesitancy brought on by fear of failure is not a characteristic of great leadership. alive. When you lose control of your emotions. It involves doing something often for a very long time. but not carelessly or in a fashion so hurried that a miscue is more likely. Rest. then your judgment and common sense suffer. Alertness. You must identify your conditioning requirements and then attain them. and life. when your self-discipline breaks down. absorb. Without proper conditioning in all areas. errors. and understand what is going on around you.The ability to resist temptation and stay the course. Intentness .Self Control -Practice self-discipline and keep emotions under control. business. Impatience is wanting too much too soon. A surgeon has different physical conditioning requirements from a food server. A deep-sea diver has different conditioning requirements from a sales person. exercise and diet must be considered. Moderation must be practiced. Initiate quickly. take action. Always seek to improve yourself and the team. You must add to physical conditioning mental and moral conditioning. Fouls. you will fall short of your potential.is a critical component for the individual in charge. Good judgment and common sense are essential to success. Alertness . and alert in evaluating yourself as well as the strengths and weaknesses of your organization and those of the competition.Have the courage to make decisions and the willingness to risk failure. 8 . You must constantly be awake. You cannot function physically or mentally unless your emotions are under control. Intentness doesn't involve wanting something. for discipline of self and discipline of those under your supervision. To do better in the future you have to work on the "right now. to concentrate on your objective with determination and resolve. Initiative ." That’s where self-control comes in. the leader. Strive to maintain self-control. There are different types of conditioning for different professions. It is impossible to attain and maintain desirable physical condition without first achieving mental and moral condition. and mistakes are part of the competitive process in sports. Self-control keeps you in the present. but those resulting from assertive action based on proper assessment of risk. as well as those he or she leads.

Yes. even very difficult. Confidence -You must have confidence. that’s fine. whatever your team is: sports. business. 9 . Team Spirit . You’re not pretending or trying to be something you’re not. something anyone can do? Not at all. Team spirit means you are willing to sacrifice personal considerations for the welfare of all.Skill . mind. It takes poise to accomplish this. You’re not acting. Poise -Poise is very simple: being yourself. Of course. Anybody could do them. you can’t have poise and confidence unless you’ve prepared correctly. Competitive Greatness -What is competitive greatness? It’s being at your best when your best is needed. You need both. It means being not just willing but eager to sacrifice personal interest or glory for the welfare of all. It’s enjoying the challenge when things become difficult.) Every block in the Pyramid of Success is built on the others. Skill means being able to execute the entirety of your job. not just part of it. True competitors know it’s exhilarating to be involved in something that’s very challenging. You don’t force them to happen. You understand that the goal is to satisfy not everyone else’s expectations but your own. Therefore. or anything else. You’d better be able to execute properly and quickly. a surgeon or a sales rep. family. They happen naturally from proper preparation.This means thinking of others. It means losing oneself in the group for the good of the group. or community. However. poise and confidence result. You give your total effort to becoming the best you are capable of being. Is it fun to do that which is ordinary. we all want to do well and receive individual praise. the ability to do it quickly and properly. When all are in place. simple. That defines a team player. They don’t fear it.You have to know what you’re doing and be able to do it quickly and properly. and spirit. You are being who you are and are totally comfortable with that. It’s true whether you’re an athlete or an attorney. That’s skill. They seek it. You must believe in yourself if you expect others to believe in you. (Remember that failing to prepare is preparing to fail. if you put it to use for the good of the team. Yet most of the tasks we do in our everyday lives are very simple. They will not produce the joy that comes from being involved with something that challenges your body. you’ll function near your own level of competence. easy.

Do not implement any of your own programming or philosophies. In this program manual are all of the exercises and techniques of everything that you will be exposed to during your assistantship with Salisbury University. Appearance: You should maintain a clean cut appearance at all times. prior to implementation. white. You are expected to get involved with the athletes workouts. maroon. your position. Do not add or subtract items within the program. Note: You are not a sport coach so do not act like one. Remember you are not a trainer so do not act like one. you may not sit/hang out in the office while there are individuals working out. If there is an inquiry please talk to the appropriate staff members.BEHAVIOR POLICIES All University and Facility rules apply to you as a Staff Member. and supervisors. This includes the start of you shift. Strength and Conditioning Coordinator. or yellow). You are also not an athletic trainer so do not act like one. All injuries should be communicated with Salisbury staff members. You are expected to carry out all programs to the best of your ability. Remember this position is designed for you to gain the valuable experience necessary to move on with your career in the strength and conditioning field. At no time will you share this information with anyone other than the Athletic Trainer and/or Strength and Conditioning Coordinator. You must be willing to jump out of your shell to get the point or exercise across while maintaining an attitude that invites athletes to feel comfortable to talk to you about anything. During training sessions you must be up on your feet communicating with the athletes. Attitude: You must possess an attitude that dictates hard work. black. Dress: You are to wear Salisbury University clothing and/or plain colored clothing without any writing (gray. any on-field workouts. Facility: When you are scheduled to work in Powers Weight Room. You may not workout when athletes are in the facility training. and/or speed and agility training sessions. First and foremost. As a staff member you will be exposed to private information. You are to respect yourself. If you have a suggestion on improving our program please contact Matthew Nein. If an athlete was prescribed anything by the athletic training staff then that is the way it will stand. 10 . you must be on time for everything. Disregard of any of the afore mentioned policies will result in your immediate dismissal from the program and internship. You may workout in the facility before or after your scheduled shift.

In addition. multi-plainer and multi-joint ground based movements. and core stabilization. 11 . From a psychological standpoint we strive to instill the concepts of teamwork. sport-specific. respect. Philosophy The Salisbury University Strength and Conditioning Program utilizes a periodized. step loading yearly plan that transcends all aspects of physiological and psychological development. movement effiency. plyometric training. dedication.STRENGTH & CONDITIONING MISSION STATEMENT AND PHILOSOPHY Mission The Salisbury University strength and conditioning program supports the missions of both the Athletic Department and the University. sport-specific training program we can adequately prepare our student-athletes to compete at a high level within the Division III system. The student athletes are trained through various measures designed to enhance performance while reducing the risk of injury: Including myofascial release. and individualized program will provide our student-athletes the underlying structure required to perform at their optimal level of play. By implementing these aspects along with a functional. mental toughness. and hard work through our training programs. Each aspect of the student-athletes training progresses in a systematic and sequential order to maximize potential through each phase of training. Salisbury’s Strength and Conditioning Program is committed to the development of student-athletes with the intention of maximizing their athletic potential while reducing their risk of injury. conjugate. mobility training. It is our belief that implementing a functional.

e. etc. If you must drop them they are too heavy. No spitting on the floor or in the water fountain. 5. For your safety and for the safety of others do not remove any signs from equipment. d. Students may bring music to Coordinator only to add to itunes 11. a. Street clothes (Jeans) are not allowed to be worn when working out. Salisbury University reserves the right to refuse service to any participant who violates any policy and procedure. tanktop. Appropriate attire must be worn at all times. Music will be played from itunes Only – Absolutely No Profanity. Salisbury University Clothing – Shirts. 12 . A Strength & Conditioning staff member must be present at all times during open hours of this facility. 7. 4. Plain Colored Clothing – Black. or hiking boots permitted. Practicing of safe exercise methods is recommended. Pant and/or b. Maroon.) are required to be worn at all times. Grey. Adhere to all posted guidelines. 12. Do not drop the weights. 8. Shirts (T-shirt. Use of collars is required on all free weight bars. Food and all tobacco products are not permitted in the weight room facility. 9. Salisbury University is not responsible for lost or stolen items. a.POWERS WEIGHT ROOM POLICIES The weight room and training programs have been designed to provide athletes the opportunity to enhance their athletic abilities while helping to reduce the risk of injury on the field of play. No open toe shoes. 2. or engages in any verbal and/or physical abuse of Staff or participants. ALL weights & equipment must be returned to the appropriate rack upon completion. 6. 1. At no time may anybody participate in training activities without the presence of a qualified Strength & Conditioning staff member. sandals. White. 3. Spotters are strongly encouraged and recommended when lifting weights. Yellow (No Writing) c. 10. Damaged or defective equipment should be reported to the Strength & Conditioning Staff. Shorts.

Program Implementation 4. Weekly Training Reports: Due Every Friday • Note: Be concise and on time with your paper work. Facility Supervision 2. Facility Maintenance. Late projects will not be tolerated. and Cleaning a. Cleaning – See Log in Office 5. Staff Training (Lifting & Education) 6. Continuing Education Projects & Competencies 7.DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES As a strength and conditioning intern here at Salisbury University there are few duties and responsibilities that you must assist the Strength and Conditioning Coordinator with. Repair. Testing and Evaluating Student Athletes 3. They include but are not limited to: Duties & Responsibilities 1. 13 .

deadlift. a self evaluation report is to be done that addresses the positives and areas of improvement. hang/power clean. Techniques can be found in Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning v. Nutrition. Video a coaching session where you directing the entire program. Each student will be required to demonstrate and be proficient in the responsibilities of a strength and conditioning practitioner.choose one: Pre or Post Workout ix. Weekly Training Reports a. Exercise Prescription vi.INTERNSHIP REPORTS 1. Due: October 7. Please be specific and detailed in your reports. Filmed Coaching Session with Analysis a. Program Introduction ii. questions. Core Training vii.choose one: Static. Once complete. Competencies a.Stretch. Warm-up iii. Mobility iv. Bands viii. These tasks are related to clinical experiences performed as a strength and conditioning professional. 2011 14 . The camera should follow you throughout the room during this session. 2011 3. push press/jerk 1. 1. equipment failure.squat. and cleaning status. injuries. bench press. Technique. i. Each week you will develop a report that will inform the Strength & Conditioning Coordinator of the athletes’ progress. PNF. Due: Dec. concerns. Post. Due: Every Friday 2.

Discussion E. CLOSING A. Comments 15 . Call group together B. Review Exercises & Organize Groups 3. New Quote D. Complex Progression I. POST-STRETCH A. Out-Door. Mobility Training C. Organize Warm-Up 2. TRAINING SESSION A. Work:Rest B. Review Training Session F. Bands. Linear then Lateral E. Ladder. WARM-UP A. Movement (Limit the flexion work) 5. Stability B. PROGRAM INTRODUCTION A. Racks I. or Foam Roll 6.SESSION ORGANIZATION 1. CORE TRAINING A. Review Previous Quote C. Movement Prep & Activation D. Auxiliary 4. Static. Foam Rolling B.

New Quote 4. Discussion 5.Program Introduction This section is intended to organize and initiate the training session. Call group together 2. Below is the program introduction progression. Organize Warm-Up Groups 16 . This part also serves as a discussion of the type of training which includes both psychological training as well as physical training that will occur within each training session. Review Training Session 6. Review Previous Quote 3. 1.

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During running mechanic drills. Slalom 28. Opposite Hand. Int. 2 In 1 Out 39. Left & Right Lateral Jab Step – Forward & Backward 42. Rotation – Walking 1 Per Box 70. Small Skip – Scapular Pinch Dynamic Flexibility Training 50. Squat – to – Stand 71. Scissors 43. Hurdle Walk – Out To In 1 Per Box 59. Lateral Triple Step 40. Cross Behind Step Out – F & B 15. Side Lunge – Alternate 1 Per Box 64. Lateral c. longer ladders. Right & Left Foot Jab Step – F & B 21. Figure 4 Squat 53. Leg Swings 72. 1 In 2 Out 37. This warm-up can also serve to improve running mechanics(*) and agility both linearly and laterally. Lateral Jump – 2 Per Box 45.DYNAMIC WARM-UPS Ladder Progression The dynamic warm-up series is designed to increase the body/muscle temperature and dynamically stretch ones muscles through their active range of motion. 33 . Step In Cross Behind – F & B 13. Reverse To add variety to the ladder warm-up: directional change. Dynamic Warm-Up Linear Drills – Begin w/ Bounce 1. Jumping Jack Steps – Forward & Backward 18. Swizzle Every Box – Forward & Backward 26. T – Forward & Backward 61. Quad Pull 51. Squat – Alternate 1 Per Box 65. Run – 1 per box – Forward & Backward * 2. Reverse Hurdle Walk – In To Out 1 Per Box 60. Over 2. Swizzle High Knee 25. High Knees Skip A Box 35. Linear. Back 1* 4. 2 In 2 Out 38. Hopscotch – Forward & Backward 19. Heel Flicks – 1 Per Box * 7. Karaoke Upper Body Drills 46. Forward Lunge & Rotate – 1 Per Box 62. Jump – 2 Per Box – Forward & Backward 30. Reach & Replace 33. Scapular Pinch – Walking 1 Per Box 69. Small Skip – Shoulder Slap 47.Forward and Backward b. Ankling – 1 & 2 Per Box * 6. Combination Hopscotch & Jumping Jacks – Forward & Backward 20. Inside/Outside Heel Up Movement Preparation 55. and the addition of other activities can all be added. Shoulder Touch – Walking 1 Per Box 68. Triple Step Bounds – Forward & Backward 11. Reverse Lunge – 1 Per Box 63. Heel Flicks – 2 Per Box 8./Ext. Toes – Walking 1 Per Box 56. Hop – 1 Per Box – Forward & Backward 29. Drop Step Jab – Forward & Backward 23. Lateral Hop – 1 Per Box 44. Small Skip – Arm Swings Front to Back 48. Triple Step Leg Swing 54. High Knees – 2 Per Box * 34. Shuffle – 2 Per Box 32. Heels – Walking 1 Per Box 57. The warm-up should generally last 10 to 15 minutes max and mirror each days training objective. Small Skip – Arm Swings Palms Down 49. In In Out Out 36. Pop and Squat – 1 Per Box 66. Quick Skips – 1 Per Box * 9. Jumping Jacks – Forward & Backward 17. Linear Scissors 27. Step In Cross In Front – F & B 14. Crossover Jab Step – Forward & Backward 22. Swizzle – Forward & Backward 24. toes up/foot up/knee up should be emphasized. High Knee Pull – Walking 1 Per Box 58. Quad Step – Forward & Backward 12. cones. Triple Step – Forward & Backward 10. Arm Circles – Walking 1 Per Box 67. Lateral Quad Step 41. Opposite Foot – Leg Swings 52. Triple Jump & Hop – Forward & Backward Lateral Drills – Begin w/ Bounce 31. Run – 2 per box – Forward & Backward* 3. Monster Walks a. Cross In Front Step Out – F & B 16. A Run – 1 & 2 Per Box * 5.

Squat & Turn – To First Cone. Shuffle – To First Cone. Opposite Elbow to Opposite Foot – To First Cone. T Forward & Backward – To First Cone. Small Skip With Scapular Pinch – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 5 yds. Jog to Last Cone x 2 29. Forward Lunge – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 17. Jog To Last Cone x 2 2. Jog To Last Cone x 2 28. Jog To Last Cone x 2 4. During running mechanic drills. Reverse Hurdle Walk – To First Cone. Lunge. Jog To Last Cone x 2 16. 5 yds. Jog To Last Cone x 2 31.DYNAMIC WARM-UPS Indoor/Outdoor Progression The dynamic warm-up series is designed to increase the body/muscle temperature and dynamically stretch ones muscles through their active range of motion. Heel Flicks* – To First Cone. Small Skip With Internal/External Rotation – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 23. Ankling* – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 14. Small Skip With Shoulder Touch – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 21. Dynamic Warm-Up – Begin w/ Bounce 1. Jog To Last Cone x 2 7. Jog To Last Cone x 2 24. Jog To Last Cone x 2 3. Jog To Last Cone x 2 20. Jog To Last Cone x 2 5. Jog To Last Cone x 2 15. Step & Squat – To First Cone. A March* – To First Cone. toes up/foot up/knee up should be emphasized. Backpedal Stride – To First Cone. 34 . Small Skip With Arm Circles – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 9. The warm-up should generally last 10 to 15 minutes max and mirror each days training objective. Forward Lunge & Rotate – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 12. Jog To Last Cone x 2 25. Hurdle Walk – To First Cone. Karaoke – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 Movement Preparation 19. Jog To Last Cone x 2 22. Jog To Last Cone x 2 26. A Skip* . Jog To Last Cone x 2 27. A Run* – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 13. Open & Drop – To First Cone. Small Skip With Reverse Arm Circles – To First Cone. Linear Side Shuffle – To Second Cone. Reverse Lunge – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 6. Figure 4 Glute – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 8. Jog To Last Cone x 2 11. This warm-up can also serve to improve running mechanics(*) and agility both linearly and laterally. Jog To Last Cone x 2 18. Jog To Last Cone x 2 30. Side Lunge – To First Cone. High Knee Pull – To First Cone. Opposite Arm Opposite Leg Swing – To First Cone. Drop Step to Side Lunge – To First Cone. Lunge to Quad Pull – To First Cone. Same Elbow to Same Foot – To First Cone. Jog To Last Cone x 2 Dynamic Flexibility 10.To First Cone. 5 yds.

Arm Circles Shoulder Slaps Arm Across Arm Behind Forearm Trunk Twist Lower Body Standing 1. 4. 4. 2. Calf 2. 3. 5. Straddle Stretch – Right. Ankle Pumps Hamstring Hold Leg Lifts x 10 Side – Groin Across Quad Standing 1. 6. 2. 4. 2. Left. 4. 3. 3. 6. Middle Hip Flexor Piriformis Lower Body Ground 1. Straight Down Straddle Stretch – Right. Left. Squat Groin 35 . 5. Middle Butterfly Right over Left – Twist Quad – Lying Stretch Band 1. 3.POST ACTIVITY TEAM STRETCH Upper Body Stretch 1. 2.

Leg Lift With Lower Back Press 2. Hamstring Stretch 5. Bent Knee Ham/Glute 6. Bent Knee Glute 9. Side – Groin: 3 Points 7. Opposite Leg – Same Process (2 – 10) Lying – Chest 1. Quad 2. Single Leg Shake 3. Hip Rotation 4. Single Leg Shake 11.Back 1. Bent Knee Lower Back 10.ASSISTED STRETCHING Lying . Hip Flexor Lying – Back 1. Across 8. Double Leg Shake 2. Double Leg Shake Notes: ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 36 .

Local Muscle Endurance Tests a. 400 meter run b. 5-10-5 Pro Agility c. Girth Measurements f. Test that tax the Glycolytic System 4. 3.TESTING PROCEDURES Day 1 1. Non-Fatiguing Tests a.5 mile run Pacer Test 37 . Vertical Jump Agility Tests a. a. Sit-Ups Per Minute b. Deadlift e. Edgren Side Step Test Day 2 1. Test that tax the Oxidative System Day 3 1. T-Test b. b. 60 yard d. Power Clean d. 60 yard shuttle Test Order 1. Fatiguing Anaerobic Capacity Tests a. Rotational Power 2. Non-Fatiguing Test 2. 300 yard shuttle 3. Strength/Power Tests a. 40 yard c. Push-Ups Per Minute 2. 20 yard b. Test that tax the Phosphogen System 3. Hip Range of Motion d. Sprint Tests a. Weight c. 2. Squat – 3 to 5 rep max b. Aerobic Capacity Test 1. A dynamic battery of screens that helps to both prevent non-contact injuries and facilitate more effective training techniques. Functional Movement Screen a. Height b. Percent Body Fat e. Bench – 3 to 5 rep max c.

FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT SCREENTM
FUNCTIONALMOVEMENT.COM

The FMS is a simple tool that is comprised of seven tests which categorize and rank functional
movement patterns. These movement patterns are specific to human growth and development
and are extremely important in athletics because they are fundamental to complex activities. This
screen attempts to pinpoint a weak area in these movement patterns, which will then allow for
improved exercise prescription and performance. This can be the first line of defense in injury
prevention.
This screen is the starting point for a system of evaluation and exercise prescription that attempts
to improve communication and collaboration between the sports medicine and exercise science
professions. The common goal is to create an objective assessment in order to improve human
functional movement.
Current literature in both rehabilitation and sports performance has an extreme lack of
information with respect to qualitative as opposed to quantitative data regarding functional
movement.
Quantitative data is easy to collect and is popular with entry-level research whereas qualitative
data is more involved and presents greater difficulty at the research level. The FMS is an attempt
to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of qualitative data collection with respect to human
functional movement. By doing this, we are identifying and tracking major limitations and rightleft asymmetries with respect to fundamental human movement patterns. These major movement
limitations and asymmetries can cause compensatory movement patterns which create weak links
in the normal movements. These weak links are what the system tries to identify and ultimately
correct. Hopefully, this will lead to a decrease in the chronic non-contact injuries that plague
today's athletes.

Scoring System
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Award a score of three when the athlete can perform the functional movement pattern.

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Award a score of two if the athlete performs the functional movement pattern with a
compensation.

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Award a score of one when the athlete is unable to perform the movement pattern

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Award a score of zero if the athlete encounters pain while trying to perform the
movement pattern.

Scoring Form - See Appendix

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TEST #1

DEEP SQUAT

Purpose - The Deep Squat is used to assess bilateral, symmetrical, mobility of the hips, knees, and ankles.
The dowel held overhead assesses bilateral, symmetrical mobility of the shoulders as well as the thoracic
spine.
Description - The individual assumes the starting position by placing his/her shoulder width apart. The
individual then adjusts their hands on the dowel to assume a 90-degree angle of the elbows with the dowel
overhead. Next, the dowel is pressed overhead with the shoulders flexed and abducted, and the elbows
extended. The athlete is then instructed to descend slowly into a squat position. As many as 3 repetitions
should be performed. The squat position should be assumed with the heels on the floor, head and chest
facing forward, and the dowel maximally pressed overhead.
If the criteria for a score of III are not achieved, the athlete is then asked to perform the subsequent test as
indicated in the FMS Manual.

Criteria To Score A III



Upper torso is parallel with tibia or toward vertical
Femur below horizontal
Knees aligned over feet
Dowel aligned over feet

Clinical Implications For Deep Squat
The ability to perform the Deep Squat requires closed-kinetic chain dorsi-flexion of the ankles, flexion of
the knees and hips, extension of the thoracic spine, as well as flexion and abduction of the shoulders.
Poor performance of this test can be the result of several factors. Limited mobility in the upper torso can be
attributed to poor glenohumeral and/or thoracic spine mobility. Limited mobility in the lower extremity
including poor closed-kinetic chain dorsi-flexion of the ankle and/or poor flexion of the hip may also cause
poor test performance.

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TEST #2

HURDLE STEP

Purpose - The Hurdle Step is used to assess bilateral mobility and stability of the hips, knees, and ankles.
Description - The individual assumes the starting position by placing his/her feet shoulder width apart.
The hurdle is then adjusted to the height of the athlete's tibial tuberosity. The dowel is positioned across
the athlete's shoulders below their neck. The individual then aligns their toes directly beneath the hurdle.
The athlete is then asked to step over the hurdle and touch the heel while maintaining his/her stance leg in
an extended position. Finally, the athlete is instructed to return to the starting position. The Hurdle Step
should be performed slowly and as many as 3 times bilaterally. If one repetition is completed bilaterally
meeting the below criteria a III is given.

Criteria To Score A III


The hips, knees and ankles remain aligned in the sagittal plane
Minimal movement in lumbar spine
Dowel and hurdle remain parallel

Clinical Implications For Hurdle Step
The ability to perform the Hurdle Step test requires both stance leg stability of the ankle, knee, and hip as
well as maximal closed-kinetic chain extension of the hip. The Hurdle Step also requires leg open-kinetic
chain dorsi-flexion of the ankle and flexion of the knee and hip. The athlete must also display adequate
single leg stance balance during this test.
Poor performance of this test can be the result of several factors. It may simply be due to poor stability of
the stance leg or poor mobility of the step leg. However, imposing maximal hip flexion of one leg while
maintaining apparent hip extension of the opposite leg requires the athlete to demonstrate relative,
asymmetric hip mobility

40

First of which is inadequate hip mobility of either the stance or step leg. knee. 41 . Description . Finally. The lunge is performed up to three times bilaterally in a slow controlled fashion. thoracic spine. The tester then measures the tibial length from the end of the individual's toes and a mark is made on the board. The athlete must also display adequate balance during this test. The athlete then places one foot on the end of the 2x6 board. The athlete then lowers their back knee enough to touch the board behind the front foot. an imbalance may be present between adductor weakness and abductor tightness about one or more hips. tightness of the rectus femoris on the stance leg may be the cause for poor performance. Poor performance of this test can be the result of several factors. The In-Line Lunge also requires step leg mobility of the hip adduction and ankle dorsi-flexion. The hand ipsi-lateral to the back foot should be the hand grasping the top of the dowel. The athlete is then asked to take a step and place their heel on the mark. If one repetition is completed successfully then a three is given.TEST #3 IN-LINE LUNGE Purpose . and sacrum.The tester measures the individual's tibial length with a tape measure. Thirdly. as well as ankle and knee stability. Criteria To Score A III • • • Minimal to no torso movement Feet remain in sagittal plane on the 2x6 Knee touches 2x6 behind heel of front foot Clinical Implications For In-Line Lunge The ability to perform the In-Line Lunge test requires stance leg stability of the ankle. The feet should be on the same line and pointing straight throughout the movement. and hip as well as closed-kinetic chain hip abduction. the stance leg knee or ankle may not have the required stability as the lunge is performed. The athlete places the dowel behind their back touching the head. the contra-lateral hand grasps the bottom.The In-Line Lunge is used to assess bilateral mobility and stability. Secondly.

Perform the Shoulder Mobility test as many as 3 times bilaterally. One of which is the widely accepted factor that increased external rotation is gained at the expense of internal rotation in overhead throwing athletes. If the athlete does receive a score of zero both scores should be documented for future reference. The tester then measures the distance between the two fist. They are then asked to assume a maximally adducted and internally rotated position with one shoulder. During the test the hands should remain in a fist and they should be placed on the back in one smooth motion. Finally a scapulothoracic dysfunction may be present resulting in decreased glenohumeral mobility. Poor performance of this test can be the result of several factors. There can also be postural changes of forward or rounded shoulders caused by excessive development and shortening of the pectoralis minor and/or latissimus dorsi muscles. and a maximally abducted and externally rotated position with the other. 42 . Clinical Implications For Shoulder Mobility The ability to perform the Shoulder Mobility test requires shoulder mobility in a combination of motions including abduction/external rotation and adduction/internal rotation. The athlete is instructed to make a fist with each hand.The tester first determines the athlete's hand length by measuring the distance from the distal wrist crease to the tip of the third digit.TEST #4 SHOULDER MOBILITY Purpose . Criteria To Score A III • Fist should be within one hand length * A shoulder stability screen should be performed even if the athlete scores a III. The athlete places his/her hand on the opposite shoulder and then attempts to point the elbow upward. Description . a score of zero is given.The Shoulder Mobility test is used to assess bilateral shoulder range of motion combining internal rotation with adduction and external rotation with abduction. It is recommended that a thorough evaluation of the shoulder be done. If there is pain associated with this movement. This screen should be performed bilaterally. placing the thumb inside the fist.

43 . inadequate passive mobility of the opposite hip may be the result of iliopsoas tightness associated with an anterior tilted pelvis. Secondly.TEST #5 ACTIVE STRAIGHT LEG RAISE Purpose . Next. Description . however.The Active Straight Leg Raise test is used to assess active hamstring and gastroc/soleus flexibility. which is most often assessed. asymmetric hip mobility. true active hamstring flexibility will not be realized. The 2x6 is placed under the knees of the athlete. the athlete is instructed to lift the test leg with a dorsi-flexed ankle and an extended knee. this test is more specific to the limitations imposed by the muscles of the hamstrings and the iliopsoas. During the test the opposite knee should remain in contact with the 2x6 and head should remain flat on the floor. as opposed to passive flexibility.The individual first assumes the starting position by lying supine with his/her arms at their sides. Poor performance during this test can be the result of several factors. The athlete is also required to demonstrate adequate passive iliopsoas flexibility of the opposite leg as well as lower abdominal stability. A combination of both these factors will demonstrate an athlete's relative bilateral. First.. This flexibility is the true flexibility an athlete has available during training and competition. Criteria To Score A III • Dowel resides between mid-thigh and ASIS Clinical Implications For Active Straight Leg Raise The ability to perform the Active Straight Leg Raise test requires functional hamstring flexibility. Once the athlete has achieved their end range position. The Active Straight Leg Raise test should be performed as many as 3 times bilaterally. If this limitation is gross. This is similar to the relative hip mobility revealed by the Hurdle Step. a dowel is aligned along the medial malleolus of the test leg. perpendicular to the floor. The tester then identifies the athlete's anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and mid-point of the patella. while maintaining a stable pelvis. palms up and head flat on the floor. the athlete may have poor functional hamstring flexibility.

Criteria To Score A III • • Males perform 1 repetition with thumbs above head Females perform 1 repetition with thumbs in line with chin * Lumbar extension should also be cleared after this test. Spinal extension can be cleared by performing a press-up in the push-up position. there should be no "lag" in the lumbar spine when performing this push-up. overhead blocking in volleyball. the hands are lowered to the appropriate position per the below criteria. Poor performance during this test can be simply attributed to poor symmetric stability of the trunk stabilizers. Description . If the individual cannot perform a push-up in this position. even if a score of III is given. kinetic energy will be dispersed. The body should be lifted as a unit. The Trunk Stability Push-Up can be performed as many as 3 times. Movements such as rebounding in basketball.The Trunk Stability Push-Up is used to assess trunk stability in the sagittal plane while a symmetrical upper extremity motion is performed. The individual is asked to perform one push-up in this position. If the trunk does not have adequate stability during these activities. Many functional activities in sport require the trunk stabilizers to transfer force symmetrically from the upper extremities to the lower extremities and vice versa. The hands are then placed shoulder width apart at the appropriate position per the below criteria. Clinical Implications For Trunk Stability Push-Up The ability to perform the Trunk Stability Push-up requires symmetric trunk stability in the sagittal plane during a symmetric upper extremity movement. knees fully extended. or pass blocking in football are common examples of this type of energy transfer. leading to poor functional performance as well as increased potential for micro-traumatic injury. a zero is given and a more thorough evaluation should be performed. If there is pain associated with this motion. and a push-up is performed.The individual assumes a prone position.TEST #6 TRUNK STABILITY PUSH-UP Purpose . 44 .

Description . The 2x6 is the placed between the knees and hands so they are in contact with the board. a zero is given and a more thorough evaluation should be performed. The individual then flexes the shoulder and extends the same side hip and knee. and knee that are lifted should all remain in line with the 2x6.The individual assumes the starting position in quadruped with their shoulders and hips at 90 degrees relative to the upper torso. If a III is not attained then the directions should be followed as indicated in the FMS text Criteria To Score A III • • Performs 1 unilateral repetition while keeping torso parallel to board Knee and elbow touch in line with the board * Lumbar extension should also be cleared after this test. The knees are positioned at 90 degrees and the ankles should remain dorsi-flexed. The leg and hand are only raised enough to clear the floor by approximately 6 inches. This is performed bilaterally for up to 3 repetitions. Many functional activities in sport require the trunk stabilizers to transfer force asymmetrically from the lower extremities to the upper extremities and vice versa.The Rotational Stability test is used to assess multi-planar stability while a combined upper and lower extremity motion is performed.TEST #7 ROTATIONAL STABILITY Purpose . The elbow. even if a score of III is given. If the trunk does not have adequate stability during these activities. Clinical Implications For Rotational Stability The ability to perform the Rotational Stability test requires asymmetric trunk stability in both sagittal and transverse planes during asymmetric upper and lower extremity movement. The torso should also remain in the same plane as the 2x6. 45 . The same shoulder and knee are then flexed enough for the elbow and knee to touch. kinetic energy will be dispersed. Spinal extension can be cleared by performing a press-up in the push-up position. Poor performance during this test can be simply attributed to poor asymmetric stability of the trunk stabilizers. If there is pain associated with this motion. Running and accelerating out of a down stance in track and football are common examples of this type of energy transfer. hand. leading to poor performance as well as increased potential for micro-traumatic injury.

If you do not. programs need variation in that the body will adapt to the repeated stress and the movement will become easier. To improve ones training effects for a given event they must be specific in the training in that it must utilize the same muscle and movements of the event. Characteristics of the daily life activity 1. Physiological Analysis a. Evaluations of the Daily Life Activity i. Principle of Progressive Resistance o States that to further training improvements. Agility. Principle of Overload o States that greater than normal loads or stress on the body are required for training adaptations to occur. Power. Energy System. Hypertrophy. Hypertrophy – as muscle cross-sectional area increase force production will increase 3.EXERCISE PHILOSOPHY Training Principles Principle of Specificity o States that training performed must be specific to the desired outcome. Flexibility 46 . the resistance must be periodically increased. Strength. Common joint and muscle injury sites and causative factors 4. Principle of Adaptation o States that for continuing training effects. Muscular Endurance i. Cardiovascular Endurance. Principle of Use/Disuse o States that in order to maintain or gain training effects you need to use that particular muscle. Needs Analysis a. Other a. Movement Analysis a. you will loose the training effects o “Use it or Lose it” Seven Program Design Variables 1. Speed. Body and limb movement patterns and muscular involvement 2. Injury Analysis a.

Recruit smaller muscle areas. Horizontal Pulling 5. physiological analysis. A structural exercise that is performed very quickly b. Traditionally 3 workouts per week 47 . Refers to the number of training sessions completed in a given time period – generally a 1 week period Considerations 1. Assistance Exercises a. Vertical Pushing 3. Look at level of preparedness i. Core Exercises a. Exercise Classification 1. and exercise technique experience b. Involve muscular stabilization of posture while performing the lifting movement 2.2. Training Status a. and are considered less important to improving sport performance b. Recruit one or more large muscle areas. Training Frequency a. Core exercises that emphasize loading the spine directly or indirectly b. Power Exercise a. Exercise Categorization 1. This will affect number of rest days needed between sessions b. Time in which we will choose exercises based off of the movement analysis. Vertical Pulling 7. Horizontal Pushing 6. Knee Dominant – Lower Body Pushing 4. involve only one primary joint (single-joint exercises). involves two or more primary joints. Exercise Selection a. The common application of assistance exercises is for injury prevention and rehabilitation Structural and Power Exercises 1. training status. and receives priority when selecting exercises because of their direct application to the sport 2. injury analysis. Explosive 2. Most involve primary muscle groups or body areas and fall into categories based on their relative importance to the athlete’s sport Core and Assistance Exercises 1. Hip Dominant – Lower Body Pulling 3. Structural Exercises a. Power exercises are assigned to clients with high velocity movement priorities c.

Note: Muscle can recover quicker from single joint exercises while multi-joint exercises recovery time is longer e. Exercise Order a. Note: Upper-body muscle recover more quickly from heavy loading sessions than lower-body muscles d. Other Core.and Lower-Body Exercises (Alternated) a. Then Assistance Exercises a. In-Season. Power. daily life b.Usually exercises are arranged so that an athlete’s maximal force capabilities are available to complete a set with proper exercise technique 4 Common Methods to Resistance Training Order i. speed-endurance training. Alternate upper and lower body exercises b. Clients who train with maximum or near maximum loads require more recovery time prior to their next training session b. Allows recovery time c. Multi-joint to single joint exercises b. Must consider speed. The ability to train more frequently may be enhanced by alternating lighter and heavier training days c. “Push” and “Pull” Exercises Alternated a. Muscle Area – Chest. Other Training a. Triceps 2. job.14-18 sets 3. Upper Body/Lower Body g. Reverse exercise arrangement ii. Split Routine f. Purposely fatigue a large muscle group 2. Shoulders. Total Body Training iv. sport skill practice.c.18-22 sets f. agility. plyometric training. Upper. Out of Season. it is appropriate to consider increasing the number of training days four plus d. As a client adapts to training and becomes better conditioned. Pre-exhaustion i. Training Load and Exercise Type a. Alternating pushing exercises with pulling exercises 48 . Rest and Recovery ii. Fatigue – prone to poor technique and at higher risk for injury c. Physical demand may be high and could play a factor in frequency of training 4. Sequence of resistance exercises performed during one training session b. Training iii. At least 1 day but no more than 3 between sessions that stress the same muscle groups e. Minimal Rest time – Circuit Training 3.

Utilized when 1RM testing is not warranted iii. You can estimate a 1 repetition max by utilizing a conversion chart based off of the number of repetition performed (Appendix) b.involves 2 exercises that stress 2 opposing muscles or muscle areas (agonist/antagonist) b. Assigning the load and repetitions will be based off of the needs analysis that was performed and the primary goal that was determined Progression of the Training Load 1. Superset . Advancing the exercise loads so that improvements will continue a. Goal Repetitions a. Relative load increases of 2. If an athlete can perform 2 or more repetitions over his/her assigned repetition goal in the last set in 2 consecutive workouts for a certain exercise. Timing Load Increases i.Repetition are inversely related to the load lifted i. Test for a 1 repetition max on a given exercise (Appendix) ii. Quantity of Load Increases a. weight should be added to that exercise for the next training session 2. Ex. Load – amount of weight assigned to an exercise set b. 2-for-2 Rule 1. Assigning Load and Repetitions Based on the Training Goal 1. Supersets and Compound Sets a. Estimated 1RM a. Allows rest time ensuring the same muscle groups are not being trained in succession 4. Ex. 1RM a. Compound Set – involves sequential performance of 2 different exercises for the same muscle group 5. More reps – less load ii. 10 reps @ 135lb : my 1RM = 180 lb i. Training Loads and Repetitions a. 6 reps (strength training phase) – can perform at 95 lbs – This then is the result of his/her test and the point of reference for that given exercise & reps. Less reps – more load Options for Determining Training Load i. Utilizing the number of repetition that will actually be performed i.5-10% 49 .b.

This will limit the athletes growth during their time in the strength and conditioning program ultimately reducing their potential gains in strength. 50 . endurance. Transition Active Rest Phase ii. Endurance. Power. Greater breakdown of the four phases of the Macrocycle – Length and phase choices depend on individual sport. Rest Periods a. Increase Flexibility ii. power. Volume a. Depends upon client goals and training status Periodization 1. Power.6. Training load increases followed by a phase of unloading during witch the athlete adapts and regenerates a. Planned variations or cycles that consider training specificity. Calculated by multiplying the number of sets by the number of repetitions times the weight lifted per repetition 7. Competitive Phase 5. a. Yearly training program broken into four phases – Length depends on individual sport. and volume within the overall program. Future yearly program will bank off of the qualities attained during subsequent yearly plans. Allow the Athlete to Perform with Peak Strength. and endurance b. Increase Strength. and Body Awareness b. c. and Body Awareness during their Competitive Season. 6. Preparatory Phase 3. Step Loading Approach 1. Program Goals Through Periodization 1. 2. The yearly training program is designed to achieve greater strength. We do not want the athlete to gain only to fall back during the season. Endurance. i. Mesocycles i. Transition Phase 4. Reduce the Risk of Injury a. intensity. Macrocycle i. and body awareness over the course of the year to avoid overtraining as well as injuries. power.

SU – Progressive Increase iii. Improves the ability to develop force b.20 ii. Low Impact a. SU – Last 2 Reps Need Spotter v. Intensity 1. Sets 1. Training Goal – Anatomical Adaptation i. Repetitions 1.5 min. Energy System 1. 2. Depends on Work:Rest iv. tendons. Work:Rest Ratio 1:1 – 3:1 vi. 6 – 12 Reps ii.1. Work:Rest = 1:3 .Preparatory a. 3 – 6 iii. Reps > 50 c. Exercise Number 1. Exercise Number 1. Repetitions 1. This will increase the risk of injury. ~ 80 – 100 Contacts b. Energy System 51 . Hypertrophy . 5 – 10 Sets 2.Preparatory a. Rest Interval 1. SU – Progressive Decrease 2. Involve all muscle groups. and ligament for the future training programs. 3 – 6 Sets 2. Training Goal – Hypertrophy i. Improves the ability of the muscle and muscle attachment to withstand heavier loads in subsequent phases d. Circuit Training Format a. Prepare the muscles. c. Plyometrics – 48 to 72 Hours Between Sessions 1. 1:5 vi. Sets 1. – 1. Enlargement of muscle fiber size i. Anatomical Adaptation . 30 sec. Intensity 1. 67 – 85 % of 1 RM 2. Jumping into vigorous strength training will develop the strength of the muscles trained too quickly not allowing the tendons and ligament to keep this same pace. 10 . Aerobic Oxidative System vii. 50 – 75% of 1RM v. Rest Interval 1. b. ~ 3 Exercises Per Muscle Group iv.

Low – Medium Impact a. ~ 2 or 3 Exercises Per Muscle Group iv. Repetitive Dynamic Contraction iii. Eccentric Contraction – Slow 2. Tempo Training – Varies 1. Ability of a muscle or groups of muscles to perform repeated contractions against a sub-maximal resistance. 2 – 4 Sets 2. Continuous Tension ii. < 67 % of 1 RM 2. Sets 1. i. SU < 30 sec. Prolonged Intense Contractions Coupled with Short Rest Periods b. Phosphogen System(ATP-PCr). 2. vi. Concentric Contraction – Fast ii. The maximal force that a muscle or group of muscles can generate at a specified velocity i. Maximum Strength – Preparatory a. ~ 80 – 100 Contacts b. Plyometrics – 48 to 72 Hours Between Sessions 1. 4 – 8 Sets 4. Training Goal – Muscle Endurance i. Repetitions 1. Reps < 35 c. Low – Medium Impact a. Exercise Number 1. Intensity 1. SU – Progressive Increase iii. SU – Progressive Decrease 2. Plyometrics – 48 to 72 Hours Between Sessions 1. Aerobic Oxidative System vii. SU – Reps: Varies ii. 4 – 8 Sets 3. 4:1 3.Preparatory a. SU – Must Get Minimum Number of Reps v. Energy System 1.1. ~ 80 – 100 Contacts b. Reps > 12 2. Isometric Hold – Long 3. < 30 sec. Work:Rest = 2:1 . Glycolitic System(Lactate) vii. Slow Tempo Training removes any bouncing action as well as decreases the elastic energy and stretch reflex associated with the 52 . Reps < 35 c. Rest Interval 1. Muscle Endurance .

SU – Reps: Varies ii. 2 – 6 Sets 2. 3 – 4 Sets 5. High force production is required to rapidly accelerate and decelerate. Reps < 25 c. Movements during this phase are explosive ii. ~ 2 or 3 Exercises Per Muscle Group iv. Work:Rest = 1:5 . i. Conversion to Power . In order perform the required movement pure muscle strength must take over enhancing this quality through training. Phosphogen System(ATP-PCr). Concentric Contraction – Fast iii.Preparatory a. sport related explosive strength. SU > 2 min.Slow to Fast 2. 1:12 3. Glycolitic System(Lactate) vii. Period where muscle strength is converted in to power and even more specific. SU – Must Get Minimum Number of Reps Following the Tempo v. vi. < 67 % of 1 RM 2. Training Goal – Maximum Strength i. Sets 1. Isometric Hold . Intensity 1. Eccentric Muscle contractions occur in all sports and need to be trained. Energy System 1. ~ 60 – 100 Contacts b. Medium – Low Impact a. SU – Progressive Decrease 2. Exercise Number 1. iii. Repetitions 1. 2. Rest Interval 1.None 3. Tempo Training – Varies: Progressively more explosive 1. 53 . Plyometrics – 48 to 72 Hours Between Sessions 1. This mesocycle is a great time to improve the eccentric strength of the major muscle groups b. Following the maximum strength mesocycle we set the athlete up to enhance their power development through previously training their ability to produce a maximal force. SU – Progressive Increase iii. Eccentric Contraction .stretch shortening cycle. Reps < 6 2. 2 – 5 min.

SU – Must Get Minimum Number of Reps While Following the Tempo vi. Plyometrics – 48 to 72 Hours Between Sessions 1. SU – Varies vi. SU > 2 min. Reps 4 . Repetitions 1. Exercise Number 1. Exercise Number 1. 3 – 6 Sets 2. 2. Sets 1. vii. 1:8 3. Explosive 2. Reps 10 – 20 2. SU – 2-5 2. Resistance is slightly exceeded by force production ii. Work:Rest = 1:5 . Phosphogen System(ATP-PCr) c. SU – Reps: Varies iv. SU – Reps: Varies iii. Work:Rest = 1:5 .10 2. Energy System 1.b.80 % of 1 RM 2. Training Goal – Power: Isotonic Method i. Training Goal – Power: Ballistic Method i. SU – 2-5 2. Training resembles more explosive movements for longer periods of time. Glycolitic System(Lactate). iii. Intensity 1. SU – Varies v. Rest Interval 1. 2 – 5 min. 3 – 5 Sets 2. Resistance is largely exceeded by force production ii. Energy System 1. 40 % . Glycolitic System(Lactate). SU – Varies v. Medium – High Impact 54 . Phosphogen System(ATP-PCr) ix. viii. SU > 2 min. 2 – 3 min. Also incorporates plyometric movements. Rest Interval 1. SU – Varies iv. Repetitions 1. 2. Intensity 1. 1:12 3. Sets 1. SU – Explosive vii.

During the active rest phase. ~ 30 – 50 Contacts b. c. All aspects of the sport are taken into consideration during this phase in order to avoid over-training. 55 . Transition 2 – Active Rest Phase a. variations in training and loading patterns occur with each microcycle. basketball. 8. b. light weight training. and endurance previously attained in past mesocycle phases. power. racquetball. athletes are instructed to remain active through general conditioning methods (i. c. c. This phase is designed to prevent any detraining from occurring during a time of rest and recovery for the body.e. b. variations in training and loading patterns occur with each microcycle. 7. During the competative. Training Goal: Maintain a highly level of strength. d. Note: At the completion of the Active Rest Phase the yearly cycle begins again. All aspects of the sport are taken into consideration during this phase in order to avoid over-training. Without this phase the athlete would be more susceptible to overtraining and/or injury. Movements are very specific for the sport and hit all previously trained mesocycle phases. Movements become very specific for the sport and hit all previously trained mesocycle phases. b. 2 – 3 Sets 6.). During the initial transition phase. Transition 1 – Transition Phase a. Reps < 15 c.a. etc. In Season – Competitive Phase a. The active rest phase is very important in that this time allows the athlete’s body time to recover from a long season.

2. 34. 10. 33. 5. 27. 40. Bosu Ball. 3. 19. 12. 8. 5. 2. 39. 10. 13. 6. Front Squat Back Squat Back Squat to Toes Squat Jump Squat Jumps w/ Sport Cord Sumo Squat Staggered Squat Box Squat Single Leg Squat Single Leg Squat Rear Foot Elev. 18. 28. Lateral Squat 17. 2. 4. Dyna Disc. 9. 6. 4. unstable surfaces can be added – Airex Pad. 7. 13. Squat & Explode Out w/ Sport Cord 16. 35. 11. 8. 2. Calf Raises Hip Dominant (LB Pulling) 1. Deadlift Trap Bar Deadlift Forward Lunge 4 Way Lunge w/ Sport Cord Side Lunge w/ MB Drop Explosive Side Lunge Transverse Lunge Transverse Lunge w/ Sport Cord Crossover Lunge Crossover Lunge w/ Sport Cord Lunge w/ Twist Lunge w/ Twist & Pass Lunge & Chop Lunge & Change Cross Over Lunge & Change Split Lunge Split Lunge Jump DB Front Step Ups DB Side Step Ups Quick Step Up Bar Step Ups (Front & Side) Crossover Step Ups Single Leg Box Explosion Single Leg Side Box Explosions Skater Jumps Skater Jumps w/ Sport Cord 43. 5. 3.SALISBURY UNIVERSITY EXERCISE LIST Lower Body Knee Dominant (LB Pushing) 1. 41. 26. 7. 32. 11. 4. Hang Shrug Hang Pull Hang Clean Power Shrug Power Pull Power Clean 1 Arm DB Snatch Snatch Split Jerk Push Jerk Clean Combo Jerk Combo Plyometrics (Single/Multiple Response) 1. 14. 36. 22. 3. 25. 6. 5. 8. 10. High to Low 45. 24. 42. 14. 20. 30. 12. 7. 29. 4. 11. 9. 9. 38. 31. Skater Jumps w/ Lunge 44. 56 . 21. 37. Line / Hurdle Jumps Line / Hurdle Hops Box Jumps Depth Jumps Reactive Jumps To increase intensity. RDL Single Leg RDL Hamstring Curl Physioball Hamstring Curl Towel Slide Hamstring Curl Glute Ham Raise Walking Lunge Towel Slide Lunge Hip Extension Hip Flexion Hip Abduction Hip Adduction Low to High Lateral Resistor Bands Explosive 1. 3. 23. 12. Squat & Touch Squat & Row Squat & Rotate 4 Way Squat w/ Sport Cord 15.

3. 4. Double Arm 2. Plank Series Roll-Out Series Towel Slide Series Anti-Extension Holds/Movement Anti-Rotation Holds/Movement Bridge Series Quadruped Series 57 . Lateral Resistor Bands – Stability Physioball Shoulder Stability Rotator Cuff Training Core: Anti-Ext/Anti-Lat Flex/Hip Stab 1. 7. 3. 13. 4. 8. 8. Single Arm Row 6. Single Arm b. 4. 3. Seated Row a. 7. 10. 2.SALISBURY UNIVERSITY EXERCISE LIST Upper Body Horizontal Pressing 1. DB Bent Over Row 8. 5. Lying Row 5.90* Alternate DB Bench Press Incline DB Bench Press Jammer Press Single Leg/ Arm Jammer Press Lying MB Chest Press Explosion Push-Ups Push-Ups w/ Resistance Plyo Push-Ups MB Push-Ups Lunge & Chest Press w/ Tubing Vertical Pulling 1. 3. 2. 6. Bent Over Row 7. Board. 2. 15. 6. 4. 13. 5. Lunge & Overhead Press Military Press DB Military Press Alternate Military Press Push Press Arnold Press Triceps Push Down Triceps Extension Lying Triceps Extension Shoulder Stability 1. 9. Lawnmower Row 11. 15. Iso) Incline Bench Press Bench Press w/ Tubing DB Bench Press DB Bench Press . 14. 6. 6. 5. 12. 6. 11. 9. 5. 5. 10. 14. 11. Tubing Row 10. 9. 4. 3. Single Leg. 7. 8. 2. 16. Band Pull Aparts Core: Anti-Rotation 1. Half Kneeling Chop Half Kneeling Lift Dynamic Chop Series Dynamic Slam Series Anti-Rotation Holds Landmine Towel Slide Anit-Rot. Landmine Row 9. 7. Bench Press (Reg. 2. 2. Lat Pull Down Alternate Lat Pull Down Pull-Ups Chin-Ups DB Pullover Shrugs Tubing Shrugs 3 Way Shoulders Shoulder Circuit Biceps Curls Reverse Curls Hammer Curl Straight Bar Curls Robo Curls 3 in 1 Curls Triceps Pull Down Horizontal Pulling 1. Vertical Pressing 1. Face Pulls 4. Alternate Seated Row 3. 3. 12. 7.

Shrug c. Back then Down b. Glute Squeeze c. Ascent a. Scoop i. Pull d. Movement a. Athletic Stance b. Body into Bench ii. Lockout – No Lean 3. Spread the Chest 2. Catch i. Setup a. Set the Hips 2. Ascent a. Descent a. Closed 2.Exercise Technique Ques Bench Press Squat 1. Drop Clean 1. Drive the floor b. Parallel & Perpendicular b. Drive 1. Sit Back 58 . Bottom of Thigh Parallel 3. Setup a. Nipple Line to Xiphoid 3. Push i. Hands Outside c. Setup a. Athletic Stance 2. Explode the Hips b. RDL b. Sit on the Box c. Below Knee. Grip – Parallel & Perpendicular b. Pre-Squat a. Explode the Hips b. Athletic Address just Off Bar b. Ascent a. Heel Toe Rock ii. Body Tight c. Floor. Above Knee b. Descent a. Descent a. To Extension Deadlift 1.

Above with Feet Elevated 2. Scorpion Under – Long Arm b. Single Leg – Long Lever e. Scorpion Under – Short Arm 3. Side Plank: Anti-Lateral Flexion a. Front Plank: Anti-Extension a. Front Plank: Anti-Rotation a. Side Plank Jack and Hold d. Side Plank – Short Lever b. Single Leg – Short Lever d.Core Training Exercises A: Plank/Bridge Series: Holds are 30sec Max 1. Side Plank – Long Lever c. Forearms and Knees – Short Lever b. Stability Ball: Anti-Extension c. Single Arm – Long Lever g. Knees w/ Roll Out d. Multi-Directional 59 . Side Plank w/ Movement e. Ab Wheel: Anti-Extension e. Single Arm – Short Lever f. Knees w/ Roll Out f. Forearms and Toes – Long Lever c. Above with Feet Elevated B: Roll-Out Series: 1. Feet w/ Roll Out 2.

Overhead Holds – Resistance Front a. Hands Out to In 2. Paloff Press b. Rotational Holds – Various Angles a. Feet Slides: Anti-Extension a.C: Towel Slide Series: 1. 1 Foot Hold d. Feet Out to In 3. Angles E. Angles 2. Single Leg Hold 2. Double Leg Hold c. Feet w/ Hands Walking c. Hands & Feet 4. Hands with Feet Walking Rotationally D. Double Leg Hold b. Rotation Slides: Anti-Rotation a. Knees b. Hand Slides: Anti-Extension a. Push Series – Various Angles a. 2 Foot Hold c. 1 Foot Hold d. Feet Walking c. Anti-Rotation Holds 1. Single Leg Hold 60 . Overhead Hold – Resistance Rear a. Combo Slides: Anti-Extension a. Feet Only b. Anti-Extension Holds 1. Paloff Press b. 2 Foot Hold c. Paloff Press b.

Diagonal Chop – Up 61 .F. Chop Series: Anti-Extension & Rotation 1. Diagonal Chop – Down 2.

Overhead Chop – Down 4. Same Side Rotation 13 62 .3. Overhead Chop – Up 5.

Up 63 . Overhead Toss . Overhead Slams .Down 2.G. Slam Series: Anti-Extension & Rotation 1.

Same Side Toss 64 .Down 4. Diagonal Slams .a.

Reverse Toss 65 . Angle Toss 6.5.

Internal Rotation 66 .ROTATOR CUFF. and muscle balance in the shoulder complex can lead to various shoulder and elbow injuries. External Rotation 2. With a long season ahead it is imperative to train the rotator cuff. With the added stress of the overhead motion. inadequate strength. scapula. SCAPULAR STABALIZATION. and forearms to help reduce your risk of injury. endurance. & FOREARM TRAINING Rotator cuff strength and scapular stabilization are extremely important to all overhead motion athletes. ROTATOR CUFF & SCAPULAR STABALIZATION EXERCISES 1.

Scapular Pinch 4. Row. Externally Rotate 67 . Scapular Pinch & Row 5. Pinch.3.

6. Diagonal Abduction 68 . Sagittal Adduction 8. Horizontal Abduction 7.

Tubing Punch 10.9. Scapular Depression 69 .

Wrist Flexion 12. Wrist Extension 13. Forearm Pronation 70 .FOREARM EXERCISES 11.

Ulnar Deviation 71 . Forearm Supination 15.14.

Radial Deviation 17.16. Grippers – 30 to 45 second hold 72 .

Warm-Up: Movement & Pattern Based 3. Advanced Patterns through Advanced Drills 1. It is true that no matter what your genetic disposition for speed and agility may be. and power are developed in the weight room. 3. Inside Turns 3. Line Stops 2.etc. Acceleration. Crossover Step. etc) 1. Improve Sprinting Form and Technique Improve Starting Ability – First Step Quickness Increase Stride Length – Distance covered heel to heel on 1 stride Increase Stride Frequency – Number of Steps Taken Per Second Improve Ground Contact & Flight Time Remember: Speed = Stride Length x Stride Frequency 73 . etc) 2. Crossover Step. Need Recovery 2. Speed Development: Periodization is based off of athletic ability 1. 4. 1. Inside Turns. Movement Mechanics: Periodization is based off of athletic ability 1. Zig Zag. AGILITY. Below is a yearly training progression followed by Salisbury University. Agility. Resisted Pattern Cone Drills (Post Activation Potentiation) 3. Drop Steps. Metabolic Conditioning: Periodization is based off of athletic ability 1. Wall Runs. Warm-Up: Movement & Pattern Based 2. Interval Based = 1:1 or 1:2 work:rest ratio 4. Drills 1. 2. Game Like Chaos Movements When looking to improve speed there are only five ways for this to occur. Advanced Patterns through Basic Drills to Advanced Drills 1. Zig Zag. size. Open Steps. 2. Rocker Step. Drills 1. CONDITIONING PROGRAM Speed. 1-2 step (Open. Progressive Steps. Work Load: 90% or Max HR Drills 1. Interval Based = 1:3 or 1:4 work:rest ratio 1. Pattern Cone Drills C. Cross. and Conditioning are three major components of sport that need to be trained just like strength. Deceleration 2. Drop Steps. A. Pattern Cone Drills 2. you can enhance these qualities to some degree with proper training. etc). Warm-Up: Movement & Pattern Based 2. Emphasis is Technique B. Open Steps. Warm-Up: Movement & Pattern Based 2. Training needs to progress to mimic patterns and energy systems that will enhance these three important qualities of sport. Falling Starts. Basics Patterns through Basic Drills 1. Basic Cone Drills (4 Cone. Rocker Step. Basic Cone Drills (4 Cone.SPEED. 5. Advanced Patterns through Basic Drills to Advanced Drills 1.

quick skipping action moving forward. Good stride frequency to length ratio .Quick knees drive. Rapid Ground Contact ii. Knee Up c. body angle slightly forward . Body weight evenly distributed b. Head Relaxed & Neutral 4.taking the heel to the hip . strong arm action – Drive elbow back 3. High Knees . Explosive push-off : Toes Up. Diminish synergistic dominance. Trunk Angle – moves to upright position c. Heels Up. Think step up and over other knee 11.Quick reps 8. Arms a. cycle one leg through the sprinting action 4.30 seconds each with 15 second rest between repetitions 2. stay tall through hips 9.Same as above. Good. 74 . knee up. quick recovery leg . add a run (High Knees) to each foot strike. add a hop to each foot strike.Same as above. 1. Max Speed a. Acceleration a. Hands move from hip to chin height at the shoulder and bent at 90* c. Trunk Angle ~ 45* from horizontal d. Football Players 5. Knee Up i. quick contact with the ground. Ankling . Knees Up *Allow body plenty of time to recover. Fast Claw – Standing. Relaxed and kept close to body b..Toes Up. grab the foot under the body. Performing these drills while tired will not help to improve technique and can lead to improper form and wasted motions.Forward quick shuffle of the feet with good running posture and steps over the opposite ankle as quickly as you can. Cue: Step back through the window. Heels Up. cycle one leg through the sprinting action 3. Backward Stride – Sprint mechanics backward. Heel Flicks . Drive elbows back a. Good arm action. Heels Up. Stride rate to length – Rapid Contact & Recovery Time b.Key quick repetitions 7. Get on the ground and off as quick as possible. Rapid Recovery Time b.Good. Skips – Good. toe up. 2 x 5 . A-Skip . quick contact with the ground 10. Start a.In a chair work on correct arm movement swinging from the shoulder moving hip to chin while bent at 90* and relaxed. Body relaxed SPRINT TECHNIQUE DRILLS – Toes Up. foot strikes under hip. A-Run . A-March . Cycling – Lying on your side.Heel to butt. . Facilitate leg action 2.KEYS TO IMPROVING SPRINTING TECHNIQUE 1. Seated/Standing Arm Swing .Key is quick repetitions 6.

Normal b. Doubles – Double leg movement iii. i. Drop Step – 10 step explosive movement turning your hips and stepping back and out. Doubles – Double leg movement iii. 1 As you feel comfortable 8 2 incorporate the crossover step. 2. facilitate a good leg drive and explode for ~ 10 yard. backpedal slow to center. Wall Runs a. a. Triples – Triple Leg Movement b. a. Sport Cord 6. open step and drop step techniques 7 3 into the wheel. i. Wheel – Utilizing straight ahead movements explode to cone 1. Falling Starts – Sit your hips back slightly. Singles – Single leg movement ii. when you feel as if you are going to fall.Pretend shoes are tied together: High foot speed 13. Linear 2 Arms – Facing the wall with 2 arm in contact with and feet behind the hips (45 to 47 degree angle). Triples – Triple Leg Movement c. Doubles – Double leg movement iii. Crossover Power Step – 10 step explosive movement crossing over with the left while pushing off with the right. Continue this pattern around the wheel until you get back to your original starting position. Lateral 1 Arm – Facing parallel to the wall with closest are in contact with the wall. feet behind the hips. Open Step – 10 step explosive movement stepping out with you lead foot in the direction you want to go in a quick fashion. Linear 1 Arm – Facing the wall with 1 arm in contact. Sport Cord 5. Shake-Ups . 6 4 5 75 . Feet are outside of the hips with other arm moving opposite of the lower body. a. Stride Starts – 10 step explosive movement over hurdles or cones that progressively increase in distance from one another forcing you to increase stride length correctly.12. Normal b. i. Normal b. Singles – Single leg movement ii. fall forward as far as possible. Sport Cord 4.Straight leg shuffle . with other arm moving opposite of the lower body. Triples – Triple Leg Movement FIRST STEP QUICKNESS DRILLS – Primary Energy System: ATP-PCr and LA 1. Singles – Single leg movement ii. 3.

5 degree slope. 8. This type of running will develop the increased stride rate and stride length by allowing you to carry the increased rate and length attained during the down hill phase over to the flat surface phase. finish by sprinting 15 yards on a flat surface. Sprint 20 yards on a flat surface.7. breakdown in 5 yards. Utilize the walk as your recovery time. Pick Up Sprints – Jog at 50% for 10 yards. Accelerate to the last cone and stop by the new deceleration cone that was added to the drill. walk back to beginning 3. The other partner. sprint 10 yards. Do not allow yourself extra rest time. and speed in short distance. ball passes you. Down Hill Running – Utilizes the same principles as assisted running if you are unable to use the cord or tubing. or close to full speed again and again. much like the demands found on the field. Begin to decelerate just after you pass the holder. and Accelerate Drill – Begin by running at full speed. walk back to beginning 2. Sprint for 10 seconds. Cut. Place a cone 5 yards from the previous ending point. have the partner holding the end of the cord walk back as far as possible. On their signal the runner will explode and take off running with good form in the direction of the holder. To modify. Visual cues can be given to make activity resemble sport 2. 5. have the partner wearing the cord walk out as far as possible. at the start line and in ready position. as you are training to improve our ability to accelerate while also improving your ability to recover at a faster rate. Sprint: Walk for 10 seconds. On the holders signal the runner will explode and take off running with good form in the direction of the holder. sprint (100%) for 15 yards. stride length. 6. break down. Assisted Running – Utilizing the sport cord or tubing. Begin to decelerate just after you pass the holder. sprint 15 yards downhill. add a deceleration aspect following the sprint training. one partner will drop a ball to the ground from head height. 76 . jog 10 yards. Jog for 10 seconds. Improving recovery rate will allow you to perform the required activity at. All sprint drills can involve deceleration training. DECELERATION/ACCELERATION TRAINING – Primary Energy System: ATP-PCr and LA 1. Ball Drops – Approximately 6 feet from the start line. will explode in the direction toward the ball and try to catch the ball before it bounces a second time. 10:10:10 – Walk. This drill will help to increase stride rate. Wall Ball – Facing away from the wall. 4. breakdown in 5yards. Stop. a partner throws a tennis ball off of the wall. Vary Starting Directions a. Attempt to find a 50 yard area with a hill that has a 1 to 2. Start. sprint 10 yards. Resistive Running – Utilizing the sport cord or tubing. Acceleration Sprints – Jog 10 yards. Repeat this activity for 15 repetitions. Once the ACCELERATION DRILLS – Primary Energy System: ATP-PCr and LA 1. and accelerate toward instructed direction. Jog. increase the pace to 75% for 10 yards. you must explode and get it within one to two bounces.

Rest 1 minute c. Walk 10 yards. 77 . 3 x 400 b. The program will tell you when to begin. Sprint 100 yards. Rest 1 minute e. Gauntlet a. when you get back – sprint up and back 10 yards for 10 repetitions. Repeat for 10 Repetitions c. from that point you must run to the 20 meter line prior to the next beep. Run ½ lap (220 yards) as fast as possible (Goal time is 45 seconds) h. Continue until you have reached the appropriate distance i. Power Alleys – Jog 15 yards. Hard Jog for 100 yards (50 up & 50 back) when you get back – shuffle up and back 10 yards for 10 repetitions. turn and jog back. When you here the next beep you will progress back to the start. 3 x 200 ii. Rest 1 minute i. Run ¼ lap (110 yards) 4. (Goal time is 1:30) f. If you reach the line prior to the beep you must wait until you hear the beep to progress back to the next line. The activity is complete as soon as you do not reach the intended line before the beep sounds. Run ¼ mile (440 yards) as fast as possible. mark off 21 yards and 32 inches (20 meters). Pacer Run a. Run 1 mile as fast as possible (Goal time is 6:00 to 6:15) b. b. Rest for 10 seconds c. 10 X 100 in 10 Minutes – Run ten 100 yard runs in ten minutes.SPEED ENDURANCE – Primary Energy System: ATP-PCr and LA Goal: To improve VO2max and increase lactate threshold 1. Rest 1 minute g. Keep track of your laps and record your final lap count so that you can see your improvements over the course of the summer. Each time you run 20 meters counts as 1 lap. Run ½ mile as fast as possible (Goal time is 3:00 to 3:07) d. Down & Back – Sprint 50 yards down and back (100 yards total) in 15 seconds or less. 10:10 – Sprint for 10 seconds. Two-Fers – Hard Jog for 100 yards (50 up & 50 back). Repeat for 10 repetitions. Gassers a. Is a progressive cardiovascular run that measures aerobic capacity. Utilizing cones or painted lines. Build to 3 x 300. Interval Drills a. Shuttle Run – Sprint 50 yards. stop and change direction. Sprint 30 yards. Continue running back and forth remembering the intensity will progressively increase. walk when 20 yards from start. Rest 30 seconds and run again 2. sprint 50 yards. The provided CD has the pacer cadence that increases in intensity as you run. Hard Jog for 100 yards (50 up & 50 back) when you get back – sprint up and back 10 yards for 10 repetitions 3. Should take 1 minute.

Do the same for the ten 30 yard sprints. and 100’s. Do 10 sets. 10. 40. 30. Rest time is 45seconds between each shuttle. Completion is 10 shuttles. Do ten of the 50 yard sprints. Not including your starting cone. 20. Place a cone at the starting line and out at 10. Rest 1:15 seconds between each shuttle. Goal time is 1:15. Place a cone at your starting point and then one at 10. Sprint from one cone to the other and back three full times without stopping to equal 300 yards. 40’s. 20. 150 yard shuttle a. walk back to it and sprint back to the start line. Rest time is 30 seconds between shuttles. Place a cone at your starting point and pace out 5 yards and place the next cone down. second cone and back. run through the line. Sprint out to the 50 yard cone. Place two cones 50 yards apart. Sprint from the starting cone to the first cone and back. second cone and back. Completion is 10 shuttles. you should have five cones in front of you at 5. Walk back to the end line for your rest time then sprint the second 50 yard sprint back to the start line. and 25 yards. Rest 15 seconds between each sprint. Do ten of the 40 yard sprints. 20’s. and so on. 80’s. Do the required number of 20 yard sprints then go immediately to the 40’s then immediately to the 60’s.5. 80’s. 60’s. 100’s a. Again run through the line. Sprint from the starting cone to the first cone and back. Walk back to the start line then sprint to the cone marking the 40 yard sprint. 50 Sprint Workout a. 20. 7. 15. 30. 200 yard shuttle a. 6. Do 10 sets. Goal time is 40 seconds on the first 5 shuttles and 45 seconds on the second five shuttles. ten 20 yard sprints. & 50 yards. and so on. 8. 300 yard shuttle a. 9. and ten 10 yard sprint. and 40 yards. Completion is 5 shuttles. Goal time is 45 seconds on the first 5 shuttles and 50 seconds on the second 5 shuttles. 78 .

Four. Three. This drill is designed to represent a series of plays on the field and the metabolic demands to perform at your peak each play. The drill begins at the goal line.10. Please see next page for the drill. Position Drill (Football) a. Two. you may stay at the yardage you sprinted to (completed pass) and rest 15 seconds. you may jog back to the line you started at (incomplete pass) and rest for 10 seconds. One. RB. QB Receivers & DB 14 yards 7 yards 8 yards 25 yards 12 yards 6 yards 35 yards 40 yards 15 yards 25 yards 10 yards 40 yards 40 yards 25 yards 10 yards 25 yards Recover: 1:45 week 3 & 4 12 yards 40 yards 20 yards 8 yards 10 yards 15 yards 12 yards 4 yards 6 yards 10 yards 15 yards 30 yards Recover: 1:45 week 3 & 4 5 yards 20 yards 15 yards 40 yards 8 yards 5 yards 50 yards 25 yards 20 yards Recover: 1:30 week 5 & 6 10 yards 15 yards 30 yards 10 yards 8 yards 15 yards 40 yards 30 yards 10 yards 20 yards 15 yards 50 yards Recover: 1:30 week 5 & 6 10 yards 10 yards 30 yards 20 yards 50 yards 10 yards 15 yards 25 yards 60 yards 79 . you may sprint back to the starting yard line with no rest (hurry up offense). any play of your series you may sprint back to the goal line and rest for 40 seconds (interception w/ return & tackle at goal line). In between each play you have a few choices as to your recovery time. O & D Line Series 1 Play 1 Play 2 Play 3 Play 4 Play 5 Play 6 Play 7 Play 8 8 yards 12 yards 4 yards 17 yards 10 yards 4 yards 3 yards 6 yards Recover: 2 minutes week 1 & 2 Series 2 Play 1 Play 2 Play 3 Play 4 Play 5 Play 6 Play 7 Play 8 Play 9 Play 10 Play 11 Play 12 4 yards 7 yards 12 yards 5 yards 5 yards 18 yards 4 yards 22 yards 9 yards 10 yards 3 yards 28 yards Recover: 2 minutes week 1 & 2 Series 3 Play 1 Play 2 Play 3 Play 4 Play 5 Play 6 Play 7 Play 8 Play 9 10 yards 5 yards 32 yards 11 yards 6 yards 4 yards 37 yards 4 yards 5 yards LB. K. The idea of the drill is to sprint at game speed the required yardage for your position each play of a series. The drill last for 3 series’. I highly encourage you to very your rest selections as the game will occur in a varied fashion.

Linear & Lateral 1. backpedal. shuffle.AGILITIES – Primary Energy System: ATP-PCr and LA 1. 4 Cone Box Drills a. 7 Cone Zigzag Drill a. Zigzag through the cones using various movement patterns. Ladder Drills a. Vary your directions and add diagonal movements across the middle. carioca. Movement patterns include: sprint. sprint & backpedal. shuffle. Various Drills – See Warm-Up Section i. Combination 2. Stager cones in two lines 10 yards from each other. i. Change Ladder Length 4. Movements include: sprint. Add Hurdles 2. etc. Move around the cones using any combination of movement you choose. Set up cone 10 yards apart in a box shape. Change Ladder Direction 3. carioca 10 yds 10 yds 10 yds 10 yds 3. backpedal. 10 yds 5 yds 80 .

backpedal 5. 5. sprint 10. backpedal 10 yd. backpedal 5. carioca 10. start at the middle cone perform a movement patter 5yards. 5 yds 5 yds 5 yds 81 . combination. shuffle. shuffle 10. carioca. shuffle 5 yd. 5 yds 6. turn. etc. 5-10-5 – With three cone set up 5 yards apart from one another in a straight line. etc. begin at the first cone. and finally sprint to the fourth cone and back. turn use a movement pattern 10 yards. “T” Drill a. shuffle 10 yd. backpedal 10 sprint 5.4. sprint all. Movement patterns include: sprint 10 yd. Use various movement patterns through the drill. sprint to the second and back. shuffle 10. 60 Yard Shuttle Run – In a continuous sequence. Cones should be set 5 yards apart and in a straight line. sprint 5. sprint to the third and back. Cones are in the shape of a T. shuffle 10. Movement patterns include: sprint. backpedal. and use a movement patter back to start.

acceleration. Triangle a. Rest for one minute after going around three times. Start standing in the middle touching cone 1. Keep your body facing the same direction at all times. Cone Toss a. Move laterally from cone 1 to cone 2 leading with your left shoulder (shuffle). Completion is found after 9 total scrambles. and deceleration that resembles movements found in the sport 8. Scramble Drill a. Completion is found after 9 total Triangles. then backpedal back to cone 1. When doing this drill do not use cross-over steps. Develop an agility drill that utilizes directional change. Sprint and touch cone 2 then back to cone 1. continue until you have gone completely around three times. Perform the triangle three times continuous then a one minute rest. Have athlete throw cones in any direction. 3 2 10 Yards 1 9.7. 2 2 yds 5 1 3 4 82 . then move laterally from cone 2 to cone 3 leading with your right shoulder (shuffle). then to cone 3 and back to cone 1.

Using a single jump (one turn in one jump. All fast footwork is done on a line a. hop backwards then hop forward back to the spot. Hop Sideways Over and Back: Left & Right iii. Rest 15 seconds i. Results should look like a clapper of a bell. Jump Forward and Back ii. b. Square: stand in a spot. like jogging. Note: Keep feet together and torso straight ahead. Basic Jump – Jump with feet together. Basic Jump – Jump with feet together Fast Footwork 1. + Jump – start in the center of the +. d. c. up. jump to the right then jump back to the spot. no double bounce) you will perform100 jumps of each type of jump. Bell Jump – Jump a few inches forward then back. jump forward then jump backwards back to the spot. A great goal to set would be to not miss less than 5 jumps. Left & Right v. right. e.Rope Jumping 1. You may use a piece of tape. hop to the left. i. Jump Sideways Over and Back iv. Square: stand in a spot. Time: Work 15 seconds. Jumping – 2 Feet Together c. a. Result should look like a skier’s slalom. Rest 30 seconds i. Hoping – 1 Foot e. Criss-cross: Back and forth over the line iii. The goal of the activity is for you to jump as fast as you can and as efficiently as you can. jump to the left. Alternate Foot Step – Jump with alternate foot. Alternate Foot High Step – Jump with alternate foot. jump backwards then jump forward back to the spot. If performed correctly. this activity should take 6 to 10 minutes. + Hop – start in the center of the +. jump left then jump right back to the spot d. Time: Work 30 seconds. back v. hop to the right then hop back to the spot. line on a floor – 2 yards b. up. f. hop forward then hop backwards back to the spot. Alternate. right. hop left then hop right back to the spot 83 . and high knees. then to the left. back iv. Skiers Jump – Jump to the right. Hop Forward and Back: Left & Right ii.

Length Kicks – Kickboard Needed a. 6 Lengths i. Shallow End Runs (Width Running) a. 40 sec off x 2 sets 35 sec. off r. i.1. Heel Flick Skip f. High Knee Run c. g. on 4. Shallow End Warm-Up a. on 20 sec. on s. Waist Deep (width Running) i. on 40 sec. Ankling – Quick short steps b. off l. 20 sec. 15 sec. j. Heel Flick Run d. off 20 sec. on m. 10 sec between every 2 reps b. 5 Sets of 6 Reps 1. 20 sec. Rest Between Lengths 84 . b. off 25 sec. on 20 sec. 10 sec. c. 25 sec. Up – Back = 1 2. off 60 sec. Skip Up and Over 2. 15 sec. d. on 15 sec. 10 sec between every 2 reps 3. off 30 sec. 5 Sets of 6 Reps 1. Knee Drive Skip e. on o. Up – Back = 1 2. Deep End Sprints – Float Belt Needed a. e. 30 sec. on q. 40 sec. f. Up – Back = 1 ii. 15 sec off p. h. off n. on k. 35 sec. Extreme Shallow i.

11.3 Low 4.2 x 10 Single Response 2-3 min 3 x week 7.Non-Box 3x10 .2. 8.4 High . 5.3 Drills . 15 .3 High -Med 3x10.High 2x10.Box 2-3x10 2 Single Resp 2 Multiple Resp Alternate – Linear & Lateral Plyometric Days 85 .3 Medium Sets x Reps Rest Interval Sessions .6 Medium .6 Low Intensity .2 x 10 Single Response 2 min 2 x week .3 Medium . 9 . 14. 6 .3 x 10 3 Single Resp 3 Multiple Resp 2-3 min 3 x week 10.Plyometric Program Weeks 1. MR . SR 2-3 min 3 x week 2-3 min 3 x week 13. 12 .

Off & Up .Single Leg Vertical Power Jump .Double Leg Zig-Zag Hop Jump .Line Hops .Double Leg Vertical Power Jump .Squat Jump .Split Squat Jump .Alternate Leg Bound .Box Jump : Under 12” .Lateral Box Touches .Tuck Jump .Quick Foot Taps .Single Leg Zig-Zag Hop High Intensity .Pike Jump .Off & Sprint .Box Jump 12” – 18” .Lateral Box Jump : 18- .Box Jump : Over 18” .Single Leg Box Jump .Plyometric Exercises Low Intensity Medium Intensity .Single Leg Tuck Jump .Lateral Box Jump : 18+ 86 .Line Jumps .Depth Jump Landing .Standing Long Jump .Reactive Jump .Off & On .Cycled Split Squat .Standing Triple Jump .

You as an athlete should make your nutritional intake a priority in terms of looking to improve your overall athletic ability and performance. electrolytes and/or water can hinder athletic performance. juice. they have no idea what high carbohydrate food is or how much they should eat. pasta. TARGET SPORTS DIET - 60 to 70 % Carbohydrates 20 to 25 % Fat 10 to 15 % Protein CARBOHYDRATES - - - Carbohydrates are one of the primary fuels used by muscles during exercise High intensity exercise use mainly carbohydrates as their energy source Carbohydrates are stored as glycogen which is stored in the liver and muscles During long intense workouts. You should replace these glycogen stores after completing your workouts within 2 hours after exercise with complex carbohydrates Two kinds of Carbohydrates o Simple Carbohydrates ƒ Fruits. This is very valuable to you because it can help eliminate any misconceptions you may have as well as allow you to design appropriate eating habits. cereal.SPORTS NUTRITION RECOMMENDATIONS Although many athletes and coaches are aware of the importance of nutrition. corn. nutrients. 87 . Poor eating habits both out of season and in season will hinder the body’s athletic performance possible resulting in poor performance on the field of play. soda. breads. For example. cookies. jellies. muffins. they know that carbohydrates are the primary fuel for exercising muscle. low fat milk Try and stay away from simple carbohydrates prior to working out or play as they can lower your blood sugar levels making you feel tired and unable to perform at your best. milk. Below is a planned overall view looking at sports nutrition. frozen yogurt. But when it comes to making food choices. rolls. syrups o Complex Carbohydrates ƒ Rice. peas. large amounts of these glycogen stores are depleted. they don’t know how to apply what they know. potatoes. fruit drinks. The off-season is the time when good nutritional habits are developed allowing one’s body to be ready to perform at its highest level possible come season time. waffles. Yet deficiencies in consumption of energy.

PROTEIN - The main role of protein in the body is tissue repair and growth. poached. CALORIC NEED Body Weight x 23 o Number of Calories needed per day 88 . Smaller amounts are required for many metabolic reactions.9 grams per 1 lb of body weight - Types of foods that supply protein o Cheese. oils. sour cream • Major contributor to heart disease o Unsaturated Fat ƒ Canola Oil - Quick Facts on Fats o Margarine is not any better than butter o Avoid Hydrogenated Fat ( Pre-Packaged Meals) o Remove Skin and all Visible Fat from Meats o Avoid Fried Foods o Choose foods that are baked.6 grams per 1lb of body weight o Adult Building Muscle = 0. NEEDS o Adults = 0. Only about 5 to 15% of energy used for exercise is supplied by protein. so dietary protein is spared for muscle growth. eggs. steamed. red meat. past. less protein is used for energy. chicken.6 to 0. tuna. This is preferred since tissue repair and growth will need to occur at optimal levels during our phases of training. If your diet is high in carbohydrates. boiled. or roasted FAT * The key to gaining muscle mass is to consume enough total calories from a diet high in carbohydrates to cover energy needs. milk. whole grain cereal.4 to 0. fried foods. rice with beans o Choose lean protein – low fat lean meats - Provides energy Protects Carbohydrate Stores Two Kinds of Fat o Saturated Fat ƒ Chocolate.

67 o Number of fluid ounces need per day When to Drink Fluids (H20) o 16 ounces before bed o 16 ounces as soon as you get up o 17 ounces 2 hours prior to workout/practice o 8-16 ounces 15 minutes prior to workout/practice o 4-8 ounces every 15 minutes during exercise o Post exercise/workout: 24 ounces for every pound lost during exercise DAILY EATING SCHEDULE MEAL TIME DESCRIPTION Meal 1** 8:00am Breakfast List Meal 2 10:00am Snack List Meal 3 12:00pm Lunch List Meal 4 3:00pm Snack List Meal 5 6:00pm Dinner List Meal 6 9:00pm Snack List ** Breakfast is the most important meal of the day - 6 meals a day will help to elevate your metabolism while maintain a high level of energy of the course of the day 89 .FLUID INTAKE Body Weight x .

Swordfish. Apple. etc) Lean Seafood (Crab. Shrimp) Lean Beef (Ground. Pancake. or Waffle Juice Low-Fat Muffin Lunch and Dinner List Proteins Carbohydrates Vegetables Chicken Breast Turkey Breast Lean Fish (Salmon. Tuna. Sirloin.MEAL LIST Breakfast List Proteins Carbohydrates Egg Whites or Substitute Low-Fat Cottage Cheese Lean Ham or Steak Protein bar or Drink Skim Milk Whole Wheat Bread or Bagel Non-Fat Yogurt Orange. or Berries Whole Wheat Cereal Oatmeal French Toast. Melon. Filet) Baked Potato Sweet Potato Steamed Rice Pasta Beans Corn Wheat Bread Squash Mashed Potatoes Non-Fat Crackers Pasta or Potatoes Salad Broccoli Asparagus Lettuce Carrots Cauliflower Green Beans Green Peppers Mushrooms Spinach Peas Onion Snack List Protein/Carbohydrate/Vegetable Meal Replacement Shake Protein Bar Low-Fat Muffin Cup or Piece of Fruit Vegetables Non-Fat Yogurt Non-Fat Crackers 90 . Lobster.

6. Serving size is equal to the palm of your hand or a clenched fist. 5. 8. 3. Eat whatever you want on your free day – once per week. 7.MEAL SCHEDULE EATING PROTOCOL 1. Try and eat at the scheduled eating times. Follow Daily Fluid Intake schedule. Select one serving from the protein and carbohydrate list for each meal. Make a grocery list from the meals you plan to make. 2. Select one serving of vegetable from the list for at least two meals. Plan or prepare meals in advance. 91 . 4.

ONE REP MAXIMUM (1RM) CONVERSIONS Pounds/Reps 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 105 110 115 120 125 130 135 140 145 150 155 160 165 170 175 180 185 190 195 200 205 210 215 220 225 230 235 240 245 250 255 10 7 13 20 27 33 40 47 53 60 67 73 80 87 93 100 107 113 120 127 133 140 147 153 160 167 173 180 187 193 200 207 213 220 227 233 240 247 253 260 267 273 280 287 293 300 307 313 320 327 333 340 9 6 13 19 26 32 39 45 52 58 65 71 77 84 90 97 103 110 116 123 129 135 142 148 155 161 168 174 181 187 194 200 206 213 219 226 232 239 245 252 258 265 271 277 284 290 297 303 310 316 323 329 8 6 13 19 25 31 38 44 50 56 63 69 75 81 88 94 100 106 113 119 125 131 138 144 150 156 163 169 175 181 188 194 200 206 213 219 225 231 238 244 250 256 263 269 275 281 288 294 300 306 313 319 7 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 55 61 67 73 79 85 91 97 103 109 115 121 127 133 139 145 152 158 164 170 176 182 188 194 200 206 212 218 224 230 236 242 248 255 261 267 273 279 285 291 297 303 309 6 6 12 18 24 29 35 41 47 53 59 65 71 76 82 88 94 100 106 112 118 124 129 135 141 147 153 159 165 171 176 182 188 194 200 206 212 218 224 229 235 241 247 253 259 265 271 276 282 288 294 300 5 6 11 17 23 29 34 40 46 51 57 63 69 74 80 86 91 97 103 109 114 120 126 131 137 143 149 154 160 166 171 177 183 189 194 200 206 211 217 223 229 234 240 246 251 257 263 269 274 280 286 291 4 6 11 17 22 28 33 39 44 50 56 61 67 72 78 83 89 94 100 106 111 117 122 128 133 139 144 150 156 161 167 172 178 183 189 194 200 206 211 217 222 228 233 239 244 250 256 261 267 272 278 283 3 5 11 16 22 27 32 38 43 49 54 59 65 70 76 81 86 92 97 103 108 114 119 124 130 135 141 146 151 157 162 168 173 178 184 189 195 200 205 211 216 222 227 232 238 243 249 254 259 265 270 276 2 5 11 16 21 26 32 37 42 47 53 58 63 68 74 79 84 89 95 100 105 111 116 121 126 132 137 142 147 153 158 163 168 174 179 184 189 195 200 205 211 216 221 226 232 237 242 247 253 258 263 268 92 .

ONE REP MAXIMUM (1RM) CONVERSIONS
Pounds/Reps
260
265
270
275
280
285
290
295
300
305
310
315
320
325
330
335
340
345
350
355
360
365
370
375
380
385
390
395
400
405
410
415
420
425
430
435
440
445
450
455
460
465
470
475
480
485
490
495
500
R 505
510

10
347
353
360
367
373
380
387
393
400
407
413
420
427
433
440
447
453
460
467
473
480
487
493
500
507
513
520
527
533
540
547
553
560
567
573
580
587
593
600
607
613
620
627
633
640
647
653
660
667
673
680

9
335
342
348
355
361
368
374
381
387
394
400
406
413
419
426
432
439
445
452
458
465
471
477
484
490
497
503
510
516
523
529
535
542
548
555
561
568
574
581
587
594
600
606
613
619
626
632
639
645
652
658

8
325
331
338
344
350
356
363
369
375
381
388
394
400
406
413
419
425
431
438
444
450
456
463
469
475
481
488
494
500
506
513
519
525
531
538
544
550
556
563
569
575
581
588
594
600
606
613
619
625
631
638

7
315
321
327
333
339
345
352
358
364
370
376
382
388
394
400
406
412
418
424
430
436
442
448
455
461
467
473
479
485
491
497
503
509
515
521
527
533
539
545
552
558
564
570
576
582
588
594
600
606
612
618

6
306
312
318
324
329
335
341
347
353
359
365
371
376
382
388
394
400
406
412
418
424
429
435
441
447
453
459
465
471
476
482
488
494
500
506
512
518
524
529
535
541
547
553
559
565
571
576
582
588
594
600

5
297
303
309
314
320
326
331
337
343
349
354
360
366
371
377
383
389
394
400
406
411
417
423
429
434
440
446
451
457
463
469
474
480
486
491
497
503
509
514
520
526
531
537
543
549
554
560
566
571
577
583

4
289
294
300
306
311
317
322
328
333
339
344
350
356
361
367
372
378
383
389
394
400
406
411
417
422
428
433
439
444
450
456
461
467
472
478
483
489
494
500
506
511
517
522
528
533
539
544
550
556
561
567

3
281
286
292
297
303
308
314
319
324
330
335
341
346
351
357
362
368
373
378
384
389
395
400
405
411
416
422
427
432
438
443
449
454
459
465
470
476
481
486
492
497
503
508
514
519
524
530
535
541
546
551

2
274
279
284
289
295
300
305
311
316
321
326
332
337
342
347
353
358
363
368
374
379
384
389
395
400
405
411
416
421
426
432
437
442
447
453
458
463
468
474
479
484
489
495
500
505
511
516
521
526
532
537

93

ONE REP MAXIMUM (1RM) CONVERSIONS
Pounds/Reps
515
520
525
530
535
540
545
550
555
560
565
570
575
580
585
590
595
600
605
610
615
620
625
630
635
640
645
650
655
660
665
670
675
680
685
690
695
700

10
687
693
700
707
713
720
727
733
740
747
753
760
767
773
780
787
793
800
807
813
820
827
833
840
847
853
860
867
873
880
887
893
900
907
913
920
927
933

9
665
671
677
684
690
697
703
710
716
723
729
735
742
748
755
761
768
774
781
787
794
800
806
813
819
826
832
839
845
852
858
865
871
877
884
890
897
903

8
644
650
656
663
669
675
681
688
694
700
706
713
719
725
731
738
744
750
756
763
769
775
781
788
794
800
806
813
819
825
831
838
844
850
856
863
869
875

7
624
630
636
642
648
655
661
667
673
679
685
691
697
703
709
715
721
727
733
739
745
752
758
764
770
776
782
788
794
800
806
812
818
824
830
836
842
848

6
606
612
618
624
629
635
641
647
653
659
665
671
676
682
688
694
700
706
712
718
724
729
735
741
747
753
759
765
771
776
782
788
794
800
806
812
818
824

5
589
594
600
606
611
617
623
629
634
640
646
651
657
663
669
674
680
686
691
697
703
709
714
720
726
731
737
743
749
754
760
766
771
777
783
789
794
800

4
572
578
583
589
594
600
606
611
617
622
628
633
639
644
650
656
661
667
672
678
683
689
694
700
706
711
717
722
728
733
739
744
750
756
761
767
772
778

3
557
562
568
573
578
584
589
595
600
605
611
616
622
627
632
638
643
649
654
659
665
670
676
681
686
692
697
703
708
714
719
724
730
735
741
746
751
757

2
542
547
553
558
563
568
574
579
584
589
595
600
605
611
616
621
626
632
637
642
647
653
658
663
668
674
679
684
689
695
700
705
711
716
721
726
732
737

94

95

M. CSCS – Major League Strength & Conditioning Coordinator: Milwaukee Brewers Leslie Bonci.H.References Matthew Nein. CA: 2010.D.O. MSPT. Periodization Training for Sports. R.P. IL: 1999. 96 . OCS. Advance in Functional Training. M.W.R. Baechle. CSCS – Functional Movement Screen & FunctionalMovement... Aptos. Champaign. IL: 2000. CSCS – Head Strength & Conditioning Coach: Salisbury University Donovan Santas. T. Earle. Bompa.com Loren Seagrave – Chief Performance Officer: Velocity Sports Boyle. MS. Human Kinetics. CSCS – Head Strength & Conditioning Coordinator: Toronto Blue Jays Chris Joyner. Human Kinetics. On Target Publications. R. – Director: Sports Medicine Nutrition – University of Pittsburg Medical Center Health System Gray Cook. T. Campaign. Essential of Strength Training and Conditioning.