Postgraduate

Course Guide 2015

Law

Australia

CHINA

india

italy

Malaysia

south africa

monash.edu/law

A message from the Associate Dean
Education (Postgraduate)
Our extensive post graduate program is refreshed each year to maintain
its contemporary relevance. We offer five badged Masters courses, as
well as generalist LLM and a Graduate Diploma course, enabling both
law and non-law graduates to study areas of law that complement their
existing employment or career plans.
The diverse curriculum and flexible course structures allow students
to craft their own programs of study to reflect individual interests.
Students are also welcome to enrol on a single unit basis. Our course
units are timetabled to accommodate the needs of working professionals,
with many offered on an intensive or semi intensive basis.
The Monash University Law Chambers offers a purpose-built environment
in an unrivalled location in the heart of Melbourne’s legal district. Should
you wish, there are also opportunities for students to complete selected
units at our Monash Prato Centre, Italy and Monash University Malaysia.
These units are taught by local and international experts, including
leading academics and legal practitioners, and have been tailored to
provide students with a professional edge in today’s fast evolving legal
and regulatory environment.
We welcome your enquiries and hope that you will consider joining
us in 2015.
Associate Professor Moira Paterson
Associate Dean Education (Postgraduate)

2

Welcome
Welcome to an overview of the Monash Faculty of Law postgraduate
coursework program. If you choose to study with us, you will be
joining a world-class law school with a proud history and demonstrated
record of excellence in teaching and research. At Monash Law,
we educate lawyers for careers across the globe and undertake
research that makes a difference to Victoria, Australia and the
world at large.

As Dean of the Faculty of Law, I am confident a law degree from
Monash University will provide you – from day one of your studies –
with a first class legal education. We offer our students opportunities
to acquire the finest skills of legal literacy, including legal knowledge,
analysis, research and advocacy. A Monash postgraduate law
qualification will provide graduates with knowledge of the concepts and
language of law and justice and their institutional and social dimensions.
Along the way, you will have tremendous education and lifetime
experiences with us and across the international network of Monash
University campuses and partner universities. Our law students have the
opportunity to study at Prato in Italy and in Malaysia at our campuses.
As a Monash postgraduate law student, you will have extraordinary
and unique opportunities. You will be taught by some of the experts
who write the leading legal text books, advise or work for governments,
contribute to public policy and advocacy, consult to the legal
profession and business, train the next generation of lawyers, and
make a difference to social justice globally, nationally and at home.
We hope you will join the Monash Faculty of Law and become part
of a vibrant Law School whose alumni occupy some of the most
prominent positions amongst the judiciary, bar, law firms and other
occupations in Victoria and across the world.
Best wishes in your studies!

Professor Bryan Horrigan,
Dean, Monash Law Faculty

3

Why Monash Law?
Make a difference to social justice globally,
nationally and at home.
Prestige and quality
Monash University is a member of Australia’s Group of Eight universities
recognised for excellence in research, training and scholarship, with many
of our graduates becoming leaders in business, government and of course
the legal profession.
Monash prides itself on producing successful graduates. Within the legal
fraternity alone, Monash graduates have held some of the most senior
judicial positions in Victoria, including the Chief Justice of the Supreme
Court, Chief Magistrate, Chief Judge of the County Court and Chief
Justice of the Family Court. In Australia and around the world, other
notable Monash alumni have held senior positions in government, the
media, entertainment industries and governing bodies, including the
United Nations and World Bank.

Expert teaching staff
Our expert teaching staff bring a mix of talent, experience and specialist
knowledge to the Monash Law Faculty. Units are taught by outstanding
local and international academics, senior members of the judiciary and
the legal profession, and other leading experts in their fields.
The combination of expert academics and practitioners enables students
to acquire both the academic and practical knowledge of the law.

Career opportunities
A Monash postgraduate degree provides you with practical and transferable
skills which enable you to pursue a career not only in the legal industry,
but also in a vast range of other professional fields. Holding a Monash
postgraduate qualification will assist you in staying ahead of the crowd
and your colleagues, by giving you a leading edge and furthering your
professional career.

Professional recognition
Undertaking a postgraduate law degree from Monash offers a range
of opportunities to gain professional recognition. Legal practitioners are
also eligible to apply to fulfil their continuing professional development
requirements for the Law Institute of Victoria or the Victorian Bar.

Convenient Location
Monash law postgraduate courses are taught at the Monash University
Law Chambers, a dedicated postgraduate study centre in the heart of
the city and Melbourne’s legal district.
The Monash University Law Chambers provides modern teaching and
computer facilities ideal for group interaction and learning. Students have
access to the Monash Law Library via the library node and a vast array
of electronic learning material.

4

Conveniently located
Conveniently located in the heart of
Melbourne’s legal precinct, Monash Law
Faculty’s postgraduate courses are taught
at the Monash University Law Chambers,
555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne

5

Courses on offer
L6004 Master of Laws page 8
L5001 Graduate Diploma in Law

page 9

L6001 Master of Commercial Law

page 10

L6002 Master of Human Rights Law

page 11

L6003 Master of Intellectual Property Law

page 12

L6006 Master of Regulatory Studies

page 13

L6007 Master of Workplace and Employment Law

page 14

L6005 Master of Laws (Juris Doctor)

page 15

6

Research centres
Monash Law School has earned an international reputation
for the work of its dedicated research centres.

Australian Centre for Justice
Innovation (ACJI)
The Australian Centre for Justice Innovation (ACJI) supports an
overarching Australian approach in respect to research and evaluation
into the important fields of court administration, operation, innovation and
non-adversarial justice. ACJI is a research and teaching centre that is a
joint initiative between the Faculty of Law at Monash and the Australasian
Institute for Judicial Administration (AIJA). The centre has a strong focus
on innovation in the justice system and non-adversarial justice, providing
exceptional research and evaluation and educational programs. It marries
an overarching Australian approach to research into and evaluation of
court administration, operation and innovation and non-adversarial justice
with strong links to international centres, including the Center for Justice
Innovation (New York). This dual focus ensures that ACJI’s research and
evaluation framework is informed and relevant to modern dispute and
justice settings.
monash.edu/law/centres/acji

The Castan Centre for Human Rights Law
The Castan Centre seeks to promote and protect human rights through
its world-renowned public scholarship. In pursuit of this mission, the
Centre works in the key areas of research, teaching, public education,
policy and student programs. The Centre is a trusted voice on human rights.
It regularly advises governments, is active in the media and on social media
and mentors many of the human rights leaders of tomorrow. The centre
is named after Ron Castan AM QC (1939-1999), who was a passionate
advocate for the recognition and protection of human rights and a
distinguished member of the Victorian Bar.
monash.edu/law/castancentre

The Centre for Commercial Law and
Regulatory Studies
The Monash Centre for Commercial Law and Regulatory Studies (CLARS)
seeks to foster innovative research in commercial law and regulatory
theory and practice, exploring contemporary questions from a variety
of perspectives (including legal and regulatory theory, empirical research
and case studies). CLARS has two major and related research program
areas that represent core units – Commercial Law and Practice and
Regulatory Theory and Practice – with demonstrable research mass and
scale from the governmental, health, and other areas integrated with either
or both of them. Many of the Centre’s members also sit on Monash Law
Faculty’s postgraduate advisory boards where they review units within
their area of specialisation, provide advice regarding relevant offerings
for the following year and make recommendations on the creation of
new units.
law.monash.edu/centres/commercial-law-group

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Master of Laws
The program has been developed to offer maximum flexibility
and choice for law graduates, with a broad range of subjects
that enables students investigate contemporary legal issues
from both international and local perspectives and to tailor
the masters degree to their interests and professional needs.
Students have the opportunity to choose units from nine different
areas of specialisation – as further outlined in this brochure.
The Master of Laws (LLM) is designed exclusively for law
graduates and is ideal for those who want to develop in-depth
knowledge of a particular legal area or for more experienced
practitioners wanting to advance their professional expertise in a
current area of practice. This course also provides opportunities
for independent legal research.
L6004 Master of Laws
Duration
One year full time, or two – four years part time
Entry requirements
1. A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law, or an equivalent
qualification; or
2. A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma
in Law, a graduate certificate in Law, or an equivalent postgraduate
qualification; or
3. A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus sufficient relevant workbased or other learning to together constitute the equivalent of one of
the above qualifications
4. A bachelor degree in Law (or equivalent) plus admission to practice as
an Australian lawyer.*
Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record, with a credit
average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not
have a credit average will need to have at least two years of relevant work
experience, although the required period may be shorter where the work
experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

For the purposes of satisfying these requirements, other learning may
include, but is not confined to, learning in the context of other non-law
degrees. Please ensure that you provide results transcripts (where
applicable) and an explanation of how this learning has advanced your
knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

Rebecca Gunn
Before commencing the Master of Laws at
Monash University, I completed a Bachelor
of Arts/Law (Hons) and then completed
postgraduate studies in Education. I have been
teaching VCE students Legal Studies and
Politics, and have now returned to complete
my Master of Laws.
I have completed all of my tertiary studies at
Monash University and feel comfortable and
supported. The teaching staff within Monash
Law Faculty are very approachable, and I have
been fortunate to have been taught by academics
who are recognised internationally as being
experts in their field. Completing the Master of
Laws at Monash University is convenient, due
to its inner city location and the classes that run
outside of working hours.
The wide variety of options at a postgraduate
level allow you to tailor your studies to areas
of law in which you are interested. I have been
encouraged to explore areas of law of specific
interest to me when completing assessment
tasks, which ensures that the course is engaging
and somewhat personalised.
Monash Law Faculty has a strong reputation,
and I have found that employers and the legal
community highly regard a degree from Monash
Law Faculty.

*See English and extra requirements page 19

8

Graduate Diploma
in Law
The Graduate Diploma in Law is open to both law graduates and selected
non-law graduates. Students have the opportunity to choose from nine
different areas of specialisation – as further outlined in this brochure.
This course is designed to enable students to build on their existing
experience to acquire advanced legal skills and expertise, adding to their
value in the workplace. It also provides an entry point into masters courses
(via articulation) for students who currently lack the necessary qualifications
for direct entry. While this course normally comprises eight coursework
units, applicants may be eligible to obtain credit for up to four units for
recognised work experience or prior learning.

L5001 Graduate Diploma in law
Duration
One year full time, or two – four years part time
Entry requirements
1. A bachelor degree in law (or equivalent); or
2. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in any other discipline plus
sufficient work based or other learning in a cognate (related) field
which together constitute the equivalent of a bachelor degree in
a cognate (related) discipline.*
Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record with a credit
average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not
have a credit average or are relying on relevant work experience to satisfy
entry requirements will need to have worked for at least one year, although
the required period may be shorter where the work experience has been
supplemented by other relevant learning.
Applicants must provide academic transcript/s and evidence of completion
of their degree. Where applicable, provide CV, work reference letters and
a personal statement.

*See English and extra requirements page 19

9

Commercial Law
The Commercial Law specialisation focuses on areas that
include corporate law, competition law, banking and finance
law, and tax law and allows students to choose from an
extensive range of domestic and international commercial
law units. Our offering of units is designed to cater to a variety
of career aspirations and interests.
The Master of Commercial Law specialisation provides a formal
course of training for lawyers working in commercial law and
non-lawyers working in law-related fields (e.g. accountants,
company administrators, management personnel, etc). It provides
students with the opportunity to obtain a specialist qualification
in commercial law and provides a springboard from which
to launch or further your career in this complex and evolving
professional area.
L6001 Master of Commercial Law
Duration
One year full time, or two – four years part time
Entry requirements
1. A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law or a cognate discipline,
or an equivalent qualification; or
2. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline or a graduate certificate
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline; or
3. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline plus
sufficient relevant work-based or other learning to together constitute
the equivalent of one of the above qualifications; or
4. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law plus admission to practice
as an Australian lawyer.*
Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record, with a credit
average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not
have a credit average will need to have at least two years of relevant work
experience, although the required period may be shorter where the work
experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

For the purposes of satisfying these requirements, other learning may
include, but is not confined to, learning in the context of other non-law
degrees. Please ensure that you provide results transcripts (where
applicable) and an explanation of how this learning has advanced your
knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

*See English and extra requirements page 19

10

Human Rights Law
The Human Rights specialisation allows students to choose from
an extensive range of units covering topics across the domestic
and international arenas. Covering a wide range of traditional
and emerging topics, from indigenous and children’s rights to
issues relating to terrorism, migration and encroachments on
privacy. This specialisation enables students to focus on topical
human rights issues confronting governments, international
bodies, individuals and corporations and allows students to
critically engage in and debate these issues. It draws on the
strengths of the Castan Centre for Human Rights Law, which
has put Monash Law Faculty at the forefront of the movement
to create a human rights law culture in Australia.
The Masters of Human Rights Law is particularly relevant
for those who wish to pursue a career in human rights law
and related work. This specialised degree provides in-depth
theoretical and practical knowledge of the international human
rights legal framework, the organisations that promote and
protect it and the mechanisms and processes by which it
is enforced. Students will also develop high-level skills in
interpreting and analysing primary and secondary human
rights materials, including treaties, treaty body decisions,
domestic jurisprudence and scholarly commentary.
L6002 Master of Human Rights Law
Duration
One year full time, or two – four years part time
Entry requirements
1. A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law or a cognate discipline,
or an equivalent qualification; or
2. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline or a graduate certificate
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline; or
3. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline plus
sufficient relevant work-based or other learning to together constitute
the equivalent of one of the above qualifications; or
4. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law plus admission to practice
as an Australian lawyer.*
Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record, with a credit
average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not
have a credit average will need to have at least two years of relevant work
experience, although the required period may be shorter where the work
experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

For the purposes of satisfying these requirements, other learning may
include, but is not confined to, learning in the context of other non-law
degrees. Please ensure that you provide results transcripts (where
applicable) and an explanation of how this learning has advanced
your knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

*See English and extra requirements page 19

11

Intellectual Property
The Intellectual Property specialisation allows students to
choose from a carefully selected offering of units covering
key areas of intellectual property law and topics relevant to
emerging technologies and to learn to apply them in practical
settings. These units cater to a variety of career aspirations
and interests and provide opportunities to develop expertise
and enhance existing skills and knowledge in this complex
and evolving professional area.
The Masters of Intellectual Property provides law and non-law
students with a rigorous grounding in the fundamental principles
of intellectual property law and also addresses advanced issues,
including local and international developments of laws relating to
the protection of intellectual property rights. It provides students
with specialist qualification from which to commence or further
a career in this fast changing area of professional practice.
L6003 Master of Intellectual Property Law
Duration
One year full time, or two – four years part time
Entry requirements
1. A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law or a cognate discipline,
or an equivalent qualification; or
2. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline or a graduate certificate
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline; or
3. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline plus
sufficient relevant work-based or other learning to together constitute
the equivalent of one of the above qualifications; or
4. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law plus admission to practice
as an Australian lawyer.*
Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record, with a credit
average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not
have a credit average will need to have at least two years of relevant work
experience, although the required period may be shorter where the work
experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

For the purposes of satisfying these requirements, other learning may
include, but is not confined to, learning in the context of other non-law
degrees. Please ensure that you provide results transcripts (where
applicable) and an explanation of how this learning has advanced your
knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

*See English and extra requirements page 19

12

Regulatory Studies
The Master of Regulatory Studies was specifically designed to
address the nature, extent and implications of the regulatory
environment in a broad, cross-disciplinary approach. The study
of regulation is a relatively new discipline which links and
transcends the boundaries between economics, law, politics,
criminology, sociology, psychology, organisational theory and
public administration. The Master of Regulatory Studies is a
unique degree which provides practitioners and scholars with
a core set of ideas, theories and skills to manage regulatory
challenges and to apply to their activities either as regulators
or in roles which involve regular interactions with regulators.
L6006 Master of Regulatory Studies
Duration
One year full time, or two – four years part time
Entry requirements

Brian Yeom
After completing my LLB/BBiomedSc in 2012, I started
working as a policy adviser at the Victorian Department
of Premier and Cabinet. I have provided advice to the
Premier on the potential policy and legal impacts of
infrastructure and planning issues. With this experience,
I have decided to return to university with a refreshed
perspective, to pursue my interest in public law and policy.
I chose the Monash Faculty of Law because it is one of
the best in Australia, and is ranked among the top 20
law schools in the world. The Monash LLM provides
flexibility to design your own course. You can focus on
one or more areas of law, and have the opportunity
to think about how to relate your studies back to your
interests and professional development.
The centrepiece of studying law is gaining advanced
skills in critical thinking. The Monash LLM has enabled
me to learn from experts in relevant fields and to logically
present my views. In particular, lecturers have given
constructive feedback and challenged me to examine
topics from a different angle.

1. A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law or a cognate discipline,
or an equivalent qualification; or
2. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline or a graduate certificate
(or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline; or
3. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline plus
sufficient relevant work-based or other learning to together constitute
the equivalent of one of the above qualifications; or
4. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law plus admission to practice
as an Australian lawyer.*
Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record, with a credit
average (or equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not
have a credit average will need to have at least two years of relevant work
experience, although the required period may be shorter where the work
experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

For the purposes of satisfying these requirements, other learning may
include, but is not confined to, learning in the context of other non-law
degrees. Please ensure that you provide results transcripts (where
applicable) and an explanation of how this learning has advanced your
knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

I will be completing the LLM while continuing my work
with the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet as
a policy adviser. To enhance and strengthen my critical
analysis within law and policy, in order to support my
professional development as a policy adviser, I plan to
specialise in regulatory studies and administrative law.
In the long-term, as I intend to pursue my interest
in research and teaching, I would like to return to
university and share my knowledge and experience
with students.guest lectures, explore your passions
and areas of interest, and give it your all. However most
importantly, enjoy your time at what truly is a first-class
Australian law-school.

*See English and extra requirements page 19

13

Workplace and
Employment Law
Effective, equitable and safe workplace practices are a growing concern in the
global workforce. This area of specialisation includes a diverse range of units,
covering topics such as collective bargaining agreements, individual contracts,
occupational health and safety, electronic workplace law, international human
rights and economic torts.
The Master of Workplace and Employment Law is designed to provide
graduates with a thorough grounding in labour law and is relevant for those
working or who aim to work in the area of workplace and employment law
or a related area such as human resources management.
L6007 Master of Workplace and Employment Law
Duration
One year full time, or two – four years part time
Entry requirements
1. A JD or a bachelor honours degree in Law or a cognate discipline, or an equivalent
qualification; or
2. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) plus either a graduate diploma (or equivalent) in Law or a
cognate discipline or a graduate certificate (or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline; or
3. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law or a cognate discipline plus sufficient relevant
work-based or other learning to together constitute the equivalent of one of the above
qualifications; or
4. A bachelor degree (or equivalent) in Law plus admission to practice as an Australian lawyer.*
Applicants will be assessed on their entire academic record, with a credit average (or
equivalent) preferred. As a general rule, students who do not have a credit average will need
to have at least two years of relevant work experience, although the required period may be
shorter where the work experience has been supplemented by other relevant learning.

For the purposes of satisfying these requirements, other learning may include, but is
not confined to, learning in the context of other non-law degrees. Please ensure that
you provide results transcripts (where applicable) and an explanation of how this learning
has advanced your knowledge and skills for professional or highly skilled legal work.

*See English and extra requirements page 19

Other areas of specialisation
Areas of specialisation additional those provided in the specialised masters courses outlined on
pages 10 – 14 are as followed.
Government Law and Regulatory Practice embraces
a suite of units relevant to middle and senior management
in local government and the public sector more generally.
These include units relating to government and administration,
local government law, regulation and compliance, privacy
and FOI, planning and environmental law, and domestic
human rights obligations.
International and comparative law provides what lawyers
increasingly need – advanced knowledge across a broad
spectrum of global issues, from human rights law, criminal
law and commercial law to EU and Chinese law.

14

Dispute resolution is integral to the work of practising
lawyers and non-lawyers working in the growing field of
alternative dispute resolution. Our program includes units
on negotiation, mediation, arbitration, collaborative practice
and advocacy.
Media and communications law is an area of practice
that is subject to constant change due to the impact of
technological developments. We provide a diverse range of
units covering the fields of intellectual property, defamation,
privacy and FOI, freedom of expression, law of the Internet
and entertainment law.

Master of Laws
(Juris Doctor)
The Monash JD is specifically designed for graduates from nonlaw backgrounds and provides an opportunity to pursue a career
change or follow an ambition to practise law, enabling graduates
to meet the academic requirements for admission as a legal
practitioner. Taught by leading academics who are experts in the
teaching and practice of law, Monash graduates are held in high
regard within the legal community. Experienced local practitioners
and internationally recognised academic visitors also teach in this
program to enrich the educational experience.
L6005 Master of Laws (Juris Doctor)
Duration
Three years full time, or four – six years part time
Entry requirements
For Master of Laws (Juris Doctor) entry requirements, please visit
monash.edu/study/coursefinder/course/L6005
The Monash JD comprises 24 units (16 compulsory and eight elective
units) taught via small seminar-style classes that facilitate interactive
learning and lively class debate. After completing the compulsory core unit
component, students choose from the elective units from the Monash Law
Masters programme.
For more information on the Monash JD please refer to law.monash.edu/
future-students/jd

Jee Wee Ong
I chose to undertake postgraduate study at Monash Law Faculty because
of its reputation as one of the top law schools in Australia and the world.
Having previously completed my undergraduate degree at Monash, I also
was familiar with the high standard and quality of teaching.
Currently I am a legal aid volunteer at Monash Oakleigh Legal Service.
This provides me with real world opportunities to engage with a wide spectrum
of the public, providing legal advice. The benefits of my engagement include
exposure to potential legal problems that clients regularly face, as well as
providing me with the chance to utilise knowledge gained within the classroom
in a manner that contributes to society as a whole.

15

Single units
Single unit enrolment

Applications

Monash Law Faculty offers law graduates and non-law graduates the
opportunity to advance their professional knowledge in the legal field
without enrolling in a full degree course. All single units offered form
part of the Monash Law Master’s program and students have the option
of completing these units with or without assessment. Students who
complete a unit with assessment may seek credit for that unit towards
a graduate diploma or master’s degree.

Applications must be submitted approximately
one month prior to the commencement of the
relevant unit to ensure a place. International
students are not eligible to undertake single unit
enrolments due to visa restrictions. Applications
are submitted online at the following link
law.monash.edu/future-students/postgraduate/
single-unit-application-form.html

All units offered can be undertaken as a cross-institutional enrolment.
This allows students enrolled in a course at another university to complete
a Monash Law unit and have it credited towards their course. Enrolment is
subject to approval of both the home institution and Monash Law Faculty.
Prospective students are encouraged to enrol as early as possible,
to ensure a place in the chosen unit.
For the most current unit information, please visit monash.edu/law/
future-students/postgraduate/singleunits.html
It is recommended that non-law students who have not previously
completed the Australian legal system or an equivalent introductory law
unit seek advice before enrolling in individual units, especially those with
Australian law content. Students enrolling in international human rights
units should also seek advice if they have not previously completed
Overview of International Human Rights Law or an equivalent introductory
human rights unit.
For a full range of units on offer go to
monash.edu/law/future-students/postgraduate

Continuing Professional
Development
The Continuing Professional Development (CPD)
Schemes, established by the Law Institute of
Victoria and the Victorian Bar Inc, requires all
Victorian legal practitioners to complete ten hours
of CPD activities every CPD year which runs from
1 April to 31 March. Units of postgraduate study
may count towards this requirement. For more
information on rules and requirements see
liv.asn.au/Professional-Development/CPD/
CPD-Rules-and-Requirements.aspx
vicbar.com.au/uploads//publications/Victorian_
Bar_Incorporated_Practice_Rules.pdf
Legal practitioners can earn CPD points via

16

Enrolment in single units (as above)

Attendance at Faculty of Law seminars,
conferences and other educational events,
many of which take place at 555 Lonsdale
Street, in the heart of the legal precinct. More
information about our events can be found at
law.monash.edu/about-us/events/index.html

Units on offer
The electives offered by Monash Law Faculty for 2015 may include

Advanced commercial negotiation skills

International banking and finance: Law and practice

Advanced evidence and proof in litigation

International criminal justice

Advanced mediation: Skills and theory A

International entertainment law

Advanced mediation: Skills and theory B

International human rights law and development

Advocacy: Theory and practice

International human rights law and women

Arbitration of international commercial disputes

International humanitarian law

Australian legal process and research

International investment law

Australian legal system

International refugee law and human rights

Banking law

International trade law

Children’s rights in Australian law

Language and the legal process

Collaborative practice

Law of employee relations

Commercial alternative dispute resolution

Law of workforce management

Comparative bills of rights

Managing high conflict personalities in legal disputes

Comparative competition law

Negotiation: Essential skills for dispute resolution

Competition law

Occupational health and safety

Consumer protection: Regulation and compliance

Overview of international human rights law

Copyright

Principles of family law

Corporate finance law

Principles of taxation

Corporate governance and directors’ duties

Privacy and surveillance: Law, policy and governance

Corporate insolvency

Professional practice (JD unit only)

Corporate law

Protecting commercial innovation: Patents and trade secrets

Current issues in sports law

Psychiatry, psychology and law

Current issues in torts law

Racial, ethnic and linguistic minorities and human rights

Current issues in workplace law

Regulatory methods

Cybercrime

Regulatory performance: evaluating what works

Design law and practice

Sentencing

Discrimination law and human rights at work

Sexual minorities and human rights

Economic social and cultural rights and international law

Takeovers

Electronic workplace law

Terrorism and human rights

Energy law, regulation and policy

Trade mark practice

European Union law and policy

Trade marks and commercial designations

Federal labour law

Transitional justice

Foundations of regulation: Policy, principles and practice

Victorian charter of rights and responsibilities

Freedom of speech – law, theory and policy

Workplace investigations and misconduct

Genocide in international law

World Trade Organisation (WTO) law

Globalization and international economic law

Health law

Intellectual property

Intellectual property and the internet

17

Research degrees
3379 Master of Philosophy (MPhil)

0069 Doctor of Philosophy

3380 Doctor of Juridical Science

The Master of Philosophy in the Faculty
of Law requires the completion of a major
thesis of about 50,000 words in length, which
may be undertaken in any area of research
offered by the faculty. It is particularly
suited to students seeking to undertake
an inter-disciplinary research project. It is
expected that the thesis will meet a standard
comparable to legal writings found in learned
journals, and demonstrate the student’s ability
to carry out independent research and to
analyse and synthesise legal concepts.

From 2015 the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
program in the Faculty of Law will consist
of the research thesis and will require the
completion of research training activities.

The Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD) is a
professional doctorate program offered by
the Faculty of Law that enables students
to complete a significant research thesis
together with a selection of coursework units
in a specific area of interest. The program
is suited to those who wish to pursue an
academic career or a major academic
study project such as an area of law
reform, or to develop policy or theoretical
perspectives in an area where they have
recognised expertise. The coursework units
allow students to develop some expertise
in the area in which they intend to pursue
their research before commencing work
on their thesis of 50,000 words.

For more information monash.edu/study/
coursefinder/course/3379

The thesis component may be undertaken
in the principal areas of research offered
by the faculty, including commercial law,
comparative law, criminal law, administrative
law, eLaw, family law, health law, human
rights law, environmental law, equity and
property law, intellectual property law,
international trade law, public law and torts.
It is particularly relevant to those contemplating
an academic career in law. Candidates for
the PhD are required to complete a thesis
of up to 100,000 words which must be of
a standard comparable to legal writings
found in scholarly law journals. The thesis
must demonstrate an ability to carry out
independent research and to analyse and
synthesise legal concepts. The research
training component can be chosen from a
range of activities throughout the candidature
from the ‘Graduate Research Education
and Development’ and ‘Advanced Discipline
Development’ modules.

For more information monash.edu/study/
coursefinder/course/3380

For more information monash.edu/study/
coursefinder/course/0069

Course fees
Domestic fees (AUD)

Domestic course per 48
credit points (AUD)

International unit fees
(AUD)

International course per
48 credit points (AUD)

Masters programs

$3,613

$28,900

$4,713

$37,700

Master of Laws
(Juris Doctor)

$4,438

$35,500

$4,963

$39,700

Graduate Diploma

$3,613

$28,900

$4,713

$37,700

Single unit (assessed)

$3,613

Single unit
(non-assessed)

$2,713

Single unit enrolments
Applications are accepted throughout the year

Single cross-institutional
unit

$3,613

n International

students are not eligible to enrol in single unit enrolments. The course fees reflect a standard full-time year of study, which is equivalent to 48 credit
points. If you enrol in less than 48 credit points your fees will reflect the reduction in your enrolment and an increase in your enrolled credit points will reflect an
increase in your overall fees.
n For future years of your course, Monash University reserves the right to adjust annual tuition fees. Note: International students must maintain a full-time study
load at all times to meet visa requirements. For up-to-date information on postgraduate fees please visit monash.edu/law

18

Key dates and application
Masters programs and Graduate Diploma
Applications are accepted throughout the year for law graduates. For domestic graduates from disciplines other than law the following applies:

Domestic

International

Semester one intake

2 February 2015

12 January 2015

Semester two intake

26 June 2015

8 June 2015

For information on JD dates please refer to law.monash.edu/future-students/jd/applications-domestic.html

How to
apply

Domestic applications

International applications

Australian and New Zealand citizens and Australian
permanent residents (subject to providing evidence
of your visa) must:

International students should apply directly through
Central Admissions. Single unit enrolments are not
available to international students. To apply online,
please go to: monash.edu/study/international/apply

1. Apply online at: law.monash.edu/future-students/
postgraduate/domestic-apply-now.html

English requirements

2. Provide original copies OR certified copies of your
academic transcripts for any current or successfully
completed tertiary studies. Any hard copy
applications and supporting documentation require
a cover page, which can be downloaded from
intranet.monash.edu/student-services/
admissions/assets/docs/domestic-hard-copycover-sheet-2013.pdf and should be sent to:

English Language requirements for Master of Laws,
specialised master’s and Graduate Diploma in Law:

Central Admissions
Monash University
Building A, ground floor
900 Dandenong Road
Caulfield 3145
Victoria, Australia

Master of Laws Juris Doctor requirement: Overall IELTS
of 7.0 with no individual band score under 7. Refer to the
JD brochure for further information.

3. Applicants must also supply a detailed Curriculum
Vitae (CV). To adequately demonstrate your
experience, please ensure that you have outlined
your job title, the organisation name and department
and the type, the number of employees, the duration
of your tenure and the type (e.g. full-time, part-time,
casual), a description of the tasks for which you were
responsible. You are required to submit one original
employment reference which supports your CV (if
you were self-employed, you should submit original
references from two clients). You should also provide
a URL of your organisation.

Overall IELTS of 7.0 with no individual band score
under 6.5. Listening 6.5, Writing 6.5 and Speaking
6.5 Paper-based TOEFL 587 (TWE of 4.5); or Internetbased TOEFL 94 Overall (with Writing 24, Listening and
Speaking 20 and Reading 19)

Extra requirements
To qualify as a bachelor honours degree for the purpose
of admission, a degree must generally be a minimum
of four years duration and include a semester length
research component.
A cognate discipline is a related discipline relevant
to the specific area of specialisation. (For example a
student applying to enrol in the Master of Workplace
and Employment Law specialisation would need to
have completed a degree which includes an area
of specialisation or groups of units relevant to the
workplace and employment context.)
Work-based or other learning is relevant to establish
advanced knowledge and skills for professional or highly
skilled legal work. This includes learning in the context of
completion of legal professional admission requirements.
To adequately demonstrate your work experience,
please ensure that you have outlined your job title, the
organisation name and department and the type, the
number of employees, the duration of your tenure and
the type (e.g. full time, part-time, casual), a description
of the tasks for which you were responsible and the
nature and extent of the skills they require, including
any research skills. You are required to submit one
original employment reference which supports your
CV (if you were self-employed, you should submit
original references from two clients). You should also
provide a URL of your organisation.

19

Law
Postgraduate Course Guide 2015
Further information
For further information, please visit the Monash
postgraduate website at:
monash.edu/law/postgraduate
Postgraduate Coursework Degrees
Monash University Law Chambers
555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne 3000
Victoria, Australia
Phone 1800 Monash (1800 666 274)
Phone (outside Australia) +613 9902 6011
Email law-postgraduate@monash.edu
International Students
Central Admissions
Monash University
Building A Ground Floor
900 Dandenong Road
Caulfield East 3145
Victoria, Australia
Australia Freecall number 1800 181 838
Phone +61 3 9903 4788 (outside Australia)
Email study@monash.edu
monash.edu/law/study/international
twitter.com/MonashLawSchool
facebook.com/monash.law.school

monash.edu/law

Information sessions are held throughout
the year. Register at law.monash.edu/
future-students/information-sessions/
postgraduate/info-sessions.html

Disclaimer: The information in this brochure was correct at the
time of publication. Prospective students should carefully read
all official correspondence, and other sources of information
(such as websites) to be aware of changes to the information
contained in this document. This information was published
correct as at September 2014.

14P-0895

CRICOS provider code: Monash University 00008C