Institute of Continuing Education

International Summer Schools
Interdisciplinary and Specialist Programmes
7 July – 17 August 2013

Contents
Welcome
International Summer Schools 90th Anniversary
Our programmes
Plenary lectures
Daily schedules
Our students
Studying at Cambridge
Living in Cambridge
Social life
Weekend excursions and visits

p2
p4
p6
p8
p10
p12
p14
p16
p18
p20

Interdisciplinary Summer Schools
Interdisciplinary Summer School Term I
Interdisciplinary Summer School Term II

p22
p24
p30

Specialist Summer Schools
Ancient Empires Summer School
Science Summer School
Literature Summer School
History Summer School
Shakespeare Summer School
Medieval Studies Summer School
English for Academic Purposes
IELTS Preparation Course

p36
p38
p44
p50
p60
p66
p72
p78
p80

Teaching staff
Accommodation
Programme calendar
Accommodation options and fees
Booking terms and conditions
How to apply and payment
What happens next?
Frequently asked questions
Also at the Institute
Image credits
Map of Cambridge

p82
p88
p92
p93
p94
p99
p101
p102
p103
p104
p105

Email: intenq@ice.cam.ac.uk |

1

Welcome
You will have noticed the silver banding on this brochure which proclaims our
90th anniversary year. Few Summer Schools can claim such longevity, and we
are immensely proud of a range of programmes that continues to blossom and
grow. A 1923 Summer School student would recognise some of our curriculum,
although the range and content of lectures on literature, politics, economics and
society in contemporary England from the 1923 offering have – of course – been
revised, revitalised and extended. Many of the beautiful old buildings that were
a feature of central Cambridge in the 1920s are still going strong, but this vibrant
and growing University is adding new buildings every year.
Just as in 1923, we invite you to study as part of a truly international community:
some 60 nationalities are now represented each year. As was the case in 1923,
we are able to draw upon a rich reserve of academic specialists, choosing our
teachers for their expertise, enthusiasm and ability to communicate, thereby
ensuring that the courses are both academically rigorous and immensely
enjoyable. Some two-thirds of your classmates are current undergraduate or
graduate students, and the rest are adults of all ages and backgrounds, who bring
other ‘life experience’ and interesting perspectives to the classroom. You will
discover like-minded people, eager to learn and expand their horizons.
The curriculum allows for this expansion, through literally hundreds of different
course combinations. (See page 10 for ideas.) You can study from one to six weeks
across a range of programmes. We have over 160 exciting courses to tempt you:
from Colourful physics to Ancient Egyptian language, and from Writing short stories
to Surrealism. Our plenary lectures explore subjects thematically: from Defining
Moments in History to Culture and Conflict in Ancient Empires and Travel and Trade
in Medieval Studies.
It will be a summer of study and of celebration, as we mark the achievements
of the past and explore visions for the future. We plan a host of activities
and events, and a few surprises. Join us!

Sarah J Ormrod
Director of International Programmes

2

| www.ice.cam.ac.uk/intsummer

Germany Email: intenq@ice.ac.cam.uk | 3 .“Cambridge Summer Schools – probably the best way to spend your summer holidays!” Sebastián Barschkis.

” Rita Santos.cam.uk/intsummer .“My experience at the Summer Schools completely changed my perspective on life.ice.ac. Portugal 4 | www.

focused period of time in small group.International Summer Schools By the early 1900s. living in Selwyn College and Newnham College. to study language.cam. We are very keen that you enjoy the social side of the programmes. Become part of the Summer Schools’ long history and our future: add your own comments to our visitors’ book. enthusiastic students. who in 1873 helped to extend Cambridge learning beyond the University to people of all backgrounds. 90th anniversary year Our 90th Anniversary International Summer Schools have a tremendous line-up of academics to deliver 165 courses and some 145 plenary lectures. enter our 90th Anniversary competitions and join the celebrations! Email: intenq@ice. We continue to add new programmes and subjects in response to interest and demand. and – in this digital. face-to-face learning. excursions and parties will help foster the friendships that are such an important feature of our programmes. overseas students were already participating in ‘Summer Meetings’ in Cambridge. too: ceilidhs (folk dances). though teaching now also takes place in Mill Lane. Enduring appeal Our longevity against the background of an ever-changing world (wars. 90 years later.uk | 5 . Then and now 122 students from 19 countries came in 1923. lectures were held on the Sidgwick Site: 45 years later. The curriculum and student numbers have grown rapidly in the past 30 years. James Stuart. arranged by the fore-runner of the University’s Institute of Continuing Education. The programmes were finally renamed ‘the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools’ in 1983. fascinating courses. would see how – 140 years on – his vision still informs our work: the Summer Schools attract people aged 19-90 from some 60 countries. By 1967. highspeed age – the chance to spend an intensive. we still book accommodation in these Colleges. This summer you can read about the memories of past and returning lecturers and students. institutions and music. we are still there. literature. discover our plans for the future. Time immersed in a Summer School is a ‘rare privilege’ that is still open to everyone meeting the entrance criteria. crises and rapid technological growth) stems from expert and committed teachers.ac. The first dedicated ‘Vacation course for foreign students’ was held in 1923.

cam.uk/intsummer . India 6 | www.“I had always dreamt of studying in Cambridge and this was a dream come true! The classes and the plenary lectures were fabulous.ac.” Shreya Roy.ice.

Term I runs for four weeks. our English for Academic Purposes programme would be ideal for you. or Interdisciplinary Summer School Term II. English for Academic Purposes (EAP) If you are a second language student already proficient in English but are looking to develop your skills. This intensive programme includes a full mock test. History. You can also combine programmes to build your own schedule. We offer programmes focusing on: Ancient Empires. Teaching blends classroom study with a series of theme-related plenary lectures and/or evening talks that will extend your knowledge of your chosen subjects and explore new ideas.uk | 7 . Medieval Studies. three or more weeks in order to meet your needs and interests. Term II for two weeks. our specialist programmes may interest you. You select two or three courses from a wide range of topics. a week before the final examination. Email: intenq@ice. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Preparation Course The primary focus of the IELTS programme is to prepare participants for the Academic Training Module in the IELTS examination. but participants can opt to come for one week only. You attend classroom sessions in small groups which are complemented by a series of plenary lectures and/or evening lectures covering a variety of topics. you are sure to find something that suits your needs and interests.ac. Literature.Our programmes With a wide variety of subject areas to choose from. The programme combines a two-week intensive personalised language skills course with a two-week academic programme in either Shakespeare. Science. Interdisciplinary Summer Schools If you are keen to study a variety of subjects the Interdisciplinary Summer School Terms I and II would be the ideal programmes to choose. Each of our specialist Summer School programmes is two or four weeks in length.cam. You can also choose to combine two or three different programmes/terms to build your own schedule of two. Shakespeare and Medieval Studies. Specialist Summer Schools If you would prefer to study a specific subject area in more depth.

theme-related lectures also take place on some evenings.uk/intsummer from leading specialists associated with the University. Contributors include Professors Paul Cartledge. Judith Lieu. political and educational reformers. Prominent Cambridge scientists address Creation and Discovery in relation to fields as diverse as climate change.ac. Mark Thomson and Malcolm Burrows. stem cell research. which aim to enhance your understanding and enjoyment.Plenary lectures Most Summer School programmes include a course of morning plenary lectures. John Ray and Roel Sterckx. The series combines visions from the past and visions of the future. Interdisciplinary Summer School Term I: Vision A truly interdisciplinary series of lectures from invited specialists interprets our theme widely. Nicola S Clayton. and draw on the immense wealth of expertise in this University. Plenary lectures are held on weekday mornings. Ancient Empires Summer School: AE0 Culture and Conflict Invited speakers will include Course Directors and guest scholars drawn 8 | www.ice. Literature Summer School: GH0 Crossing Frontiers Plenary lectures bring fresh perspectives to familiar masterpieces and encourage exploration in new directions. Crossing Frontiers. the plenary lecture course series will appear on your certificate of attendance. Science Summer School: P01 Creation and Discovery Lectures focus both on current research and past discoveries. Speakers are experts in their field including leading Cambridge scholars and guest subject specialists from beyond the University. the culture of early China. entrepreneurship. Full details will appear in the daily timetable you receive on arrival. exploration.cam. Visit our website from January through to June to see the names of plenary speakers as they are added. If you attend a minimum number. All participants are registered for the plenary lecture course in their own Summer School. imagination. art. and innovation. and the ancient civilisations of Egypt and the Middle East. on subjects such as imperial Rome. Invited speakers include Professor Sir John Gurdon and Professors Jeremy Baumberg. the conquests of Alexander the Great. evolution and cosmology. Proposed subjects include the evolution of sight (human versus insect). this year's focus. will take in writers who mix .

uk | 9 . shipping. or challenges to convention. If travel broadens the mind. the infrastructure that made travel possible. and at how far it can be regarded as a watershed in human history. commodities.cam. at what made it so significant. and writing that deals with transgression. rites of passage. so will these lectures. Email: intenq@ice. You will encounter the latest research as academics approach texts and a range of contexts and the ideas explored here will add to the understanding and enjoyment of your special subject classes. There will be lectures on specific travellers. Let’s destroy the myth that no one travelled in the Middle Ages. Medieval Studies Summer School: KN0 Travel and Trade This year’s theme is focused upon the travelling medieval man or woman. History Summer School: LM0 Defining Moments Historians from the University and other leading institutions are amongst those being invited to contribute to this series. adventures and mishaps. Invited speakers include Dr John Maddicott and Professors Michelle P Brown.ac. like Marco Polo. Shakespeare Summer School: RS0 Time and Times In the morning plenary lecture series leading Shakespeare specialists from Cambridge and beyond will address the theme Time and Times. Jonathan RileySmith and Peter Spufford. works that have an international theme. Each lecturer will look at why a crucial episode came about. The lectures will examine how a series of key historical events have proved to be 'defining moments'.genres or break new ground.

For Science. and how many papers you should write. and philosophy courses in ISS II. you attend a plenary lecture. If you are a current undergraduate or graduate student wishing to gain credit. The same colour codes will help you to find your way through the programme calendar on page 92 and the accommodation options and fees on page 93. ask your advisors at your home institution how many weeks you need to study. and then have programme-related visits on two afternoons each week. Making your choices Look at the programme dates on page 92 and work out when you are available. Understanding the daily schedules The times of plenary lectures fall either before or after the first special subject class each day. Literature. you attend a morning class. Some programmes offer visits to museums and performances to complement the classroom learning. For the Interdisciplinary Summer School Term II. You are welcome to come for more than one programme or term. The EAP and IELTS programmes have their own daily schedules. For the Interdisciplinary Summer School Term I. Remember that some subjects appear in more than one programme: you will find literature courses not only in the Literature Summer School.uk/intsummer lecture then a morning class. we organise courserelated or general lectures. In the evenings. then a plenary lecture. but also in the Shakespeare. C) and attend the plenary lecture. you attend a plenary 10 | www. E. then an afternoon class. Science and Ancient Empires.ac. which falls between the A and B time slots. Medieval Studies and Interdisciplinary Summer Schools (ISS).) For Ancient Empires. There are history of science courses in ISS I and ISS II.ice. then a morning and an afternoon class. Finding your way through the brochure The coloured page edges separate the different programmes. For Literature and Shakespeare. B. F. (There is no morning plenary session. . History and Medieval Studies.cam. or events. you simply choose two or three daily classes: D.Daily schedules Each Summer School programme has its own individual schedule including special subject courses. plenary lectures and/or evening talks. you can take two or three daily classes (A.

You could. for example. followed by week one of History. attend week two of Ancient Empires. or whether you will need to move. but you can attend some programmes for just one week.You cannot choose courses from different programmes.cam.ac. check the accommodation section (pages 88-91) to see if it is possible to stay in the same College. followed by the whole of Interdisciplinary Term II.uk | 11 .) Email: intenq@ice. If you plan to attend more than one programme. we may have to advise you that the only option is to change accommodation between programmes. Or you could come to week two of Science Term II. (Please note. once the per College allocation of rooms is used.

” Kristy Herman.ice. United States of America 12 | www.“It was an honour to learn along with such a great blend of brilliant minds from all corners of the globe.cam.uk/intsummer .ac.

In addition to classroom contact hours. home-makers. Who are our students? Our students include teachers. from all walks of life. journalists. Email: intenq@ice. others still are retired and epitomise the values of ‘lifelong learning’. Many return year after year. All teaching for the Summer Schools is in English. as you build your own knowledge. Those currently attending university are often seeking to gain credit from their home institution. lawyers. a professional or are retired. executives. Who can apply? Students who have completed at least one year at an institute of higher education.Our students The International Summer Schools attract participants from all over the world. a teacher. An intellectual adventure What links all of our students is the quest for new knowledge: the chance to debate and to participate in the intellectual adventure the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools provide. Whether you are a university student. Students studying on these programmes must be able to understand and follow arguments presented in written and spoken English at university level. you will find like-minded people at the International Summer Schools. This preparation will increase your enjoyment and enhance your capacity for critical thinking. doctors and more.cam. Sharing classes with participants from such a wide range of backgrounds offers fresh perspectives. or adults who bring other 'life experience'. writers. scientists. researchers. Further information regarding language requirements can be found in the booking terms and conditions on page 94 at the back of this brochure. 35% are aged 25-85+.ac. Details can also be found on our website. bankers. Our programmes are academically rigorous and challenging. you need to prepare for your experience by reading and researching in advance of your arrival in Cambridge.uk | 13 . others with professions are looking to broaden their horizons and learn something new during their summer break. All are looking to expand their knowledge of a given subject or learn about a new topic entirely. Some 65% of participants are current undergraduate or graduate students.

Plenary lecture attendance is also recorded on your certificate. but also so that they assimilate the learning more fully. Attendance Your certificate of attendance will show the special subject courses you have attended.uk/intsummer Contact hours and credit Each programme offers a minimum number of contact hours (c45+ for two-week programmes. Essays will be graded by the Course Directors and participants receive a narrative report. c90+ for fourweek programmes). and judging how much you have learned. For more information about our Course Directors please see page 82. Many have taught on our programmes before. . This experience is unique. debate and develop your own understanding of the topics raised in class. close to the University Library. In either case. and encouraged to discuss. Teaching staff Our Course Directors. writing papers is a valuable way of responding to the courses you have taken.ice.ac. and one that we hope you will enjoy. and some return year after year. We can provide additional information for students who wish to earn credit from their home institution for the Summer School courses they attend in Cambridge. Evaluation Many students choose to write essays for evaluation by their Course Director – usually so that they can gain credit at their home university. a percentage mark and a grade report. Teaching for all other programmes takes place on the Sidgwick Site. The charge for evaluation is £40 per essay. close to the city centre. if you attend the minimum number agreed for each programme.Studying at Cambridge As a participant of the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools. You may complete one essay per special subject course. 14 | www. Teaching sites Teaching for the Science and Literature programmes takes place at the Mill Lane Lecture Theatres. because our students have recommended them so highly and because they enjoy the experience. Plenary and Evening Lecturers are chosen from amongst the best communicators at the University of Cambridge and beyond.cam. you will be guided by your Course Directors. and can be assessed against the University of Cambridge standard.

Online Resource Centre All course materials. Participants must select this programme on their general application form in order to register their interest and request further information. Information on how to use the Online Resource Centre will be sent to participants once they have enrolled. In addition. Please note that places on the Honours Programme are limited.cam.uk | 15 . you may also have the option to connect your own laptop to the University network. All Honours Programme application forms must be received by 19 April 2013. lecture schedules. useful information on travelling. reading lists. living and studying is available for all participants. Depending on the College you stay in. in addition to tuition and accommodation costs. Library and computer access You will have access to a variety of faculty libraries. timetables and handbooks can be downloaded from our Online Resource Centre before you arrive in Cambridge.ac. may want to enquire about our intensive Honours Programme. You will also be able to communicate with other participants prior to your arrival in Cambridge.Honours Programme Students of high academic standing who are planning to study with us for the full six weeks. including a small lending library set up for the exclusive use of Summer School students. which includes one-on-one Cambridge-style supervisions. Please see our website for further information. evaluation-takers also have reading rights at the main University Library. Email: intenq@ice. All students are given a University computer account in order to access the internet and write papers for evaluation. by combining consecutive Summer Schools. The fee for this programme is £425.

I will be back. United Kingdom 16 | www.” Nelson Mcmillan.ac.ice. It has opened my mind to new avenues in the academic world of education.“The Summer School experience has given me memories and friends I shall cherish for the rest of my life.uk/intsummer .cam.

Cambridge life Cambridge is a vibrant university city and benefits from a number of shops. or to choose one of the more modern accommodation options. that tourists to the city often only glimpse. to modern-day buildings. Every age has left its mark on this market town.ac.cam. and treasures. During the summer you will get to know the quiet back streets. Email: intenq@ice. These are University of Cambridge students who live alongside you in College and assist you with any queries you may have during your stay. some Colleges provide en suite facilities for an additional cost. College courtyards. Some accommodation is available on a room-only basis. pubs. You will have the opportunity to live in one of the historic Colleges and dine in the traditional halls. For more information about the accommodation options available to you please turn to the accommodation section on pages 88-91 at the back of this brochure.Living in Cambridge Cambridge is an ancient city. The city also retains great beauty and charm. Resident Assistants All Summer School participants are supported by a network of Resident Assistants.uk | 17 . restaurants. music venues. with its origins dating back to Roman times. Couples or friends are usually housed in adjacent rooms. unless otherwise stated. Your accommodation fee pays for a single College room. Accommodation is in College rooms normally occupied by Cambridge undergraduates. They are your first point of contact and are there to make sure that your summer is enjoyable and hassle-free. Rooms are basic with a single bed and washbasin. breakfast and evening meals. College accommodation As a participant of the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools you will become familiar with the city in a way that few are privileged to experience. such as the Wren Library and Kettle’s Yard. clubs and coffee houses. from Medieval to Georgian.

Those who arrive in Cambridge knowing no one quickly make friendships amongst their class and College companions. exhibitions and a season of Shakespeare plays performed in College gardens. Community Many of our participants are current undergraduate or graduate students. Our returning ‘alumni’ and groups from institutions from around the world help to foster a sense of community.uk/intsummer available to you and will be able to start communicating with fellow students even before you arrive in Cambridge. including University-run events. and friendships develop across age groups and nationalities. we organise a number of evening events to give participants the opportunity to relax and meet fellow students. Once you are registered you will receive more information about how to use the online resources 18 | www.Social life The Summer Schools also host a variety of social activities giving you the opportunity to make new friends outside of the classroom. Evening events In addition to our exciting evening lecture series.cam. Find out more on our website. music festivals.ice. ‘Stay connected’ network Summer School participants can also join our ‘Stay connected’ network. Online Resource Centre All registered students can take advantage of our Online Resource Centre. to stay in touch with us after the summer and receive regular updates about future programmes. These will include a range of events to celebrate the Summer Schools 90th Anniversary. but a significant proportion are professionals or retired.ac. and are reserved for students enrolled in the International Summer Schools. Social activities will include a special range of events to celebrate the International Summer Schools 90th Anniversary. Cambridge also offers a wide variety of evening and weekend activities during the summer. You will also find a range of other activities in and around the city. . Our programmes are unusual in bringing all ages together. Our own evening events are free.

“It was a great way to make new friends with similar interests.” Daniel Barabas. Australia Email: intenq@ice.cam.ac.uk | 19 .

“This Summer School was by far one of the best.uk/intsummer . United States of America 20 | www. if not the greatest experience I have ever had.ice.” Ellie Buhr.ac.cam.

explore beautiful gardens or experience a traditional Shakespearean play. and museums. castles. along with the booking form will be available on our Online Resource Centre from February once participants have registered. Venues for 2013 are likely to include: London. Prices The estimated cost of excursions ranges from £15 for a local walking tour and £45 for a short trip. first-served basis. museums and cathedrals. monuments.uk | 21 . These cultural activities allow students to enhance their stay. These visits offer participants the opportunity to discover more of Britain and experience British culture. Excursion venues complement some of the subjects covered in the academic programmes and are a good way to meet new people and explore England. Our optional weekend day trips include visits to heritage sites. such as stately homes. Excursion coaches leave from the Sidgwick Site.cam. Email: intenq@ice. We advise that you book early as places are limited and allocated on a first-come. Full details of our calendar of events.ac. near the main Summer Schools office. If you opt to go on a trip on your departure date you will need to arrange luggage storage. Students can also book tickets to see productions of Shakespeare plays. Please note the latter also includes the price of a theatre ticket. as well as local walking tours to discover the city of Cambridge. to £60 for a full day. Oxford. Canterbury and Blenheim Palace. All prices include travel. including those scheduled on your arrival and departure dates. make new friends and learn more about Britain. You will need to arrange time to register if you are booked on an excursion on your registration day.Weekend excursions and visits Participants can also benefit from a wide range of weekend excursions. Excursions Students can opt to buy tickets for one of our organised excursions. and return in time for dinner in College. giving them the opportunity to discover historical sites. Tickets can be purchased for excursions that take place during your programme dates. castles.

Lectures will interpret this theme widely. with a third course incorporating that time period: A history of medicine from the Ancients to the 19th century.ac. . with proposed talks on topics as wide-ranging as sight. including archaeology. Plenary lectures The theme for our major morning plenary series in Term I is Vision. economics. literature or archaeology. You choose either two or three courses. You may concentrate your studies on two or three courses in the same discipline or study more widely by choosing courses in differing subject fields.Interdisciplinary Summer Schools ISS Term I: 8 July – 2 August ISS Term II: 4 – 17 August Programme Director: Sarah J Ormrod Director of International Programmes The Interdisciplinary Summer School Terms I and II offer courses covering a wide variety of subjects. or take three on art history. F in Term II. B.uk/intsummer The academic programme • Major plenary lecture series (Term I only): Vision • Two or three special subject courses • Evening lectures Special subject courses Courses consist of classroom sessions which are held on each weekday. E. each from a different group: A. The two terms are independent: you may enrol for either or both. Or you could combine two courses on philosophy with one on psychology. history and international relations. or combine these programmes with specialist Summer Schools. or D. Almost all are limited to 25 participants. aspiration and innovation. In this multidisciplinary list there are hundreds of possible course combinations: you can devise a curriculum which precisely meets your interests. covering a wide range of subjects.ice. Evening lectures Invited speakers and members of the University will give a varied evening lecture programme. politics. literature. C in Term I. 22 | www. philosophy. Exciting new combinations in 2013 could be: Tudor kings and Tudor queens.cam.

cam.“Your own tailor-made programme. It’s a stimulating and very satisfying way to learn.uk | 23 .” Sarah J Ormrod.ac. Programme Director. Interdisciplinary Summer Schools Email: intenq@ice.

Particular attention is given to the ways in which political. Participants may choose two or three courses. Oakeshott and Berlin. The course takes an historical look at problems of international security after the Cold War.00am – 10. at the times shown. Please note: A01 can only be taken with courses B01 and C01. when there are no classes.uk/intsummer A history of British political thought. Enrolment for this option only is capped at 50. with the exception of Friday 19 July. Group A: 9. Political thinkers featured include Hobbes and Locke. C). led by specialists in a range of topics.15am A01 International politics in a global age Various speakers Experts from the University of Cambridge Department of Politics and International Studies and elsewhere help students to understand a complex and ever-changing world. forms a ‘programme within a programme’. one from each group (A.ice. A bold attempt to reshape an ancient kingdom along lines of reason quickly sank into bloody hysteria. the international politics and political economy of regionalism and globalisation. and the legal and institutional framework of international society. Hume and Smith.ac. Burke and Paine. B. Figures will be discussed in their own right and in the context of their The French Revolution and its enemies Dr Seán Lang 24 | www. from 1651 to the present Dr Graham McCann . Why were the hopes of 1789 dashed? Why did the Revolution provoke such bitter hatred at home and abroad? What happened when the French spread ‘liberty and equality’ to the rest of Europe – by force? This course introduces the most significant ideas. economic and legal aspects of international politics interact with and reinforce one another. strategic.cam. J S Mill and Walter Bagehot. issues and individuals associated with the history of British political thought. Mary Wollstonecraft. the Fabians. This combination of sessions. A02 A03 No event so shook history as the Revolution that burst over France in 1789.Interdisciplinary Summer School Term I Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Tuesday 9 July to Thursday 1 August.

It is all about the unexpected. Faraday. and ancient Greek sources through the wild ideas of the Renaissance and the convulsion of the scientific revolution. of reason and rivalry. serving science. and the traces of unimagined antiquity from 'missing links' to the Ice Man.ac. (Not to be taken with D05 in ISS Term II. art and politics From earliest times the poetry of landscape in the British Isles has always contributed significantly to how we. Archaeological detection and deduction developed with the modern West. These three kings the definitive English dynasty . Muslim. Henry VIII inherited one fortune. Archaeology and the discovery of the world Dr Nicholas James Email: intenq@ice. patriotism and local attachments. from the Middle Ages to the early 19th century Piers Bursill-Hall This course is a brief (and nontechnical) examination of how scientific thinking developed from medieval Christian.uk | 25 .cam. the course explores both rural and urban landscapes in British poetry from Shakespeare to the present day. Edward VI was a little Emperor involved in a big war for ‘hearts and minds’. A07 A05 Landscape. the inhabitants. how good early scientific ideas were. alike. imagery and national identity in the poetry of the British Isles John Gilroy Treasures. a usurper who married a Princess. in which the University of Cambridge plays a part.) A06 Tudor kings: the new deal Siân Griffiths Henry VII. but the course also explores common concerns that unite them.times. from lost cities to DNA. It is not as you think: you will be amazed. went from ‘rags to riches’ and ended civil war. down to the first steps in what we recognise as modern scientific theories (Darwin. The history of archaeology is a story of ingenuity and persistence. A04 The origins of modern science. stole another and spent both. and the often very odd origins of 'modern' ideas. have seen ourselves. Maxwell) in the middle of the 19th century. Examining aestheticism.shaped the England we know today. He made England a sovereign state.

Hamlet and Othello. We shall follow the characters in four of his plays: The Merchant of Venice. photos. broke all traditional boundaries and ventured beyond the physical limits of the image. betray their loved ones. The British shroud their wartime experience in mythology and pride. We consider both the imperial and post-imperial periods in an attempt to show how major decisions were made. including Picasso. B02 Embattled island: Britain in the Second World War Dr Seán Lang Modern Britain was forged in the Second World War. create nightmares. London) and how artists.45am – 1.00pm A08 Four plays of Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice. New York. . B03 20th-century art movements: from Cubism to Conceptualism Dr Karolina Watras and Mary Conochie This course examines the major visual and theoretical innovations of the leading 20th-century art movements from Cubism to Conceptualism. within an ever-changing socio-political landscape.ac. 26 | www. Marcel Duchamp. Measure for Measure. songs and visits we will examine the reality of how the British lived and loved through the Second World War. It also explores the reasons for the shifting centres of art over the decades (Paris. Salvador Dalí. and in pursuing dreams. A09 Britain and the world since 1900 Dr Jonathan Davis This course explores Britain’s place in world history in the 20th and 21st centuries. play games. Mondrian. what has altered and what has stayed the same. Measure for Measure.ice.uk/intsummer B01 International politics in a global age Various speakers This is a three-part course which can only be taken with A01 and C01.Group B: 11. but what was it really like? What was the truth of the Blitz? Did Britain really ‘keep smiling through’? Using film. and Andy Warhol. We assess how Britain changed from a leading global power to a key local power with global connections. Hamlet and Othello Simon Browne Shakespeare is fascinated by the way his characters manipulate each other.cam.

half Spanish. Elizabeth.uk | 27 . History has dealt harshly with Mary for unravelling her father's and brother's reforms. perhaps.) B06 Tudor queens: bloody and glorious Siân Griffiths Mary.) B07 Key moments in Shakespeare John Gilroy "With this key Shakespeare unlocked his heart". romances and ‘problem’ plays. Applying Wordsworth’s metaphor to a range of Shakespeare’s plays. histories. technological. and Mexico and the Maya. tragedies. the course examines ‘key’ moments which arguably ‘unlock’ for us ways of understanding their central issues and concerns. mathematics. Email: intenq@ice. to predict our future. its absorption and development of scientific ideas. (Not to be taken with E05 in ISS Term II. or was it forged through conflict? How stable was it? How fundamental were geographical. Did civilisation arise gradually. pledged solely to her country and was an enemy to Spain. sociological or ethical differences between civilisations? Comparing Egypt. This course is an eye-opener.ac. Iraq. Examples will be drawn from the comedies. Peru. (Not to be taken with D08 in ISS Term II.cam. We then look at the transmission of Ancient and Islamic science to the Latin west. medicine and technology) developed.B04 The other Middle Ages: the Islamic world and the Latin debt to Islam Piers Bursill-Hall This course examines the controversial history of early Islam and early Islamic culture. and how Islamic ideas shaped much of medieval Latin thinking. Elizabeth wove her name into an entire period of English history and culture. B05 The rise of civilisation Dr Nicholas James Ancient pyramids and ziggurats prompt big questions. married a Spanish Prince and was a friend to Rome. we appraise theories about these age-old issues – which could help. and the way Islamic science (natural philosophy. English to her bones.

A key theme is how far the Soviet Union influenced socialism in Britain.ac. and in what ways.cam. and what. What are Europe’s options. 28 | www.00pm – 3. Participants will examine a series of cases including some.Group C: 2. which did. carried out with her posing to him as a boy. if anything. that did not lead to war and others. But with this. and what are the implications of its current crisis for the governance of globalisation? C03 Socialism in the 20th century: Russia and Britain Dr Jonathan Davis We explore different interpretations of the idea of socialism and trace its development in Russia and Britain.uk/intsummer C01 International politics in a global age Various speakers This is a three-part course which can only be taken with A01 and B01. like the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait or the Argentine occupation of the Falkland Islands. like the Cuban missile crisis. and the Financial Services Action Plan with associated regulatory reforms. We assess the challenges to the British Labour party’s working class crown and their impact on Labour’s politics. C02 European economic integration – or disintegration? Max Beber The Single Market Programme (198792). Shakespeare will set the scene for us to pursue Austen's proud and prejudiced Elizabeth and Darcy and the many convoluted trails left by the centuries' other literary lovers. B09 Crises in world politics since 1945 Various speakers This course will explore why crises happen in international relations. how they are managed.ice.15pm B08 All you need is love. they have in common. and we explore the nature of socialism in a USSR where a socialist government was apparently in power. were supposed to transform Europe’s economic fortunes: yet currently the ‘European project’ stands on the brink of collapse. . Love in literature from Shakespeare to Lawrence Simon Browne Literary relationships are rarely as bizarre as Rosalind and Orlando's courtship. monetary union (1991-99).

Email: intenq@ice. together with the problems that they face. the Arabic and Western Middle Ages.) C06 A history of medicine from the Ancients to the 19th century Piers Bursill-Hall C05 British politics today: problems and solutions Richard Yates The course analyses the key British domestic and related international political events of recent years. and from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.the role of women. with a very brief look at the beginnings of modern medical thinking in the 19th century. exploring the essential issues they raise for a modern audience including . the social and intellectual context of the practice of medicine alongside scientific theories of life. Ancient Greece. especially those that The Cold War in the Third World: Latin America and Africa. 1950-90 Charlie Nurse This course examines the Cold War experience of two parts of the 'Third World' by focusing firstly on the Cuban Revolution and its aftermath in Latin America. no scientific or medical background is needed. (The course is not a technical treatment of medicine. physiology.ac. We also examine the social and artistic context in which plays were created.uk | 29 . discussing many of the key dramatists of this turbulent and transformative period. Particular emphasis will be placed upon contemporary political challenges. The political system will be explored through a study of the main institutions. and political parties.cam. following the 2010 General Election result. C07 The Dramatic Age: an introduction to modern British drama Paul Crossley We trace the development of British drama from the 1890s through to 2013.vitally . In these lectures we explore medical ideas. and disease starting with the pre-Classical world.C04 have arisen after the emergence of a coalition government. Angola and Mozambique. and secondly on the international conflicts which accompanied the ending of colonial rule in the Congo. and the overthrow of the Ethiopian empire.

psychology has changed direction. Shakespeare and Donne. we look at how Greek thinkers tried to understand the animate and inanimate world from the microcosm to the large scale structure of the world. From introspection and psychoanalysis. . Participants may choose two or three courses. We look closely at some outstanding sonnet sequences and other love-related poetry. Group D: 9. E. inclusive. glance. In its relatively short history.) About face: portraiture from Titian to Lucien Freud Mary Conochie D02 Elizabethan love poetry Dr Paul Suttie The Elizabethan Renaissance has left us some of literature’s most enduring and thought-provoking explorations of the experience of desire. mental process and behaviour Dr John Lawson D04 The sciences in the ancient world Piers Bursill-Hall Beginning with the Greeks’ new idea of gaining reasoned knowledge of nature. at the times shown. (Not to be taken with E03 in ISS Term II. Spenser.uk/intsummer Introducing psychology: mind.ice.cam. psychology remains one of the most fascinating areas of science. each from a different group (D.00am – 10. gesture and dress affect our interpretation of the subjects. focusing on five of the period’s greatest writers: Sidney. 30 | www. and how these ideas evolved over a millennium. focus and approach several times. through the ‘cognitive revolution’ to fMRI scanning.Interdisciplinary Summer School Term II Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday 5 to Friday 16 August.30am D01 D03 This course examines portraiture from the 15th to the 20th century. Marlowe. Symbolism within portraiture will also be discussed and how pose. Somewhere beyond the intuitive abilities that most of us have when dealing with other people lies the science known as psychology. It discusses how artists meet the challenge of depicting the individuality and status of their sitters and record society’s changing perception of itself. F).ac.

comparisons will be made with the development of other systems of education. pledged solely to her country and was an enemy to Spain. art and politics alike. Elizabeth wove her name into an entire period of English history and culture. from lost cities to DNA. of reason and rivalry. and considers Power and politics in Britain today Richard Yates This course analyses the nature of the contemporary British political system and evaluates the functions of the major institutions. Archaeological detection and deduction developed with the modern West. The history of archaeology is a story of ingenuity and persistence.) the relationship of educational policy and practice to social change.cam. History has dealt harshly with Mary for unravelling her father's and brother's reforms. and the traces of unimagined antiquity from 'missing links' to the Ice Man. (Not to be taken with A05 in ISS Term I. It will also explore the role of the political parties and other major contributors in order to assess the distribution of political power in Britain today. serving science.This is a powerful story: the ultimate origins of modern Western science and of Western civilisation. Where appropriate.) D06 The English education system: 1870 to the present Dr John Howlett This course provides a survey of significant moments in English educational history in the past 140 years. D05 D07 Archaeology and the discovery of the world Dr Nicholas James Treasures. D08 Tudor queens: bloody and glorious Siân Griffiths Mary.ac. (The course assumes no particular background in either classics or science. married a Spanish Prince and was a friend to Rome. It aims to develop students' understanding of education in its historical context. in which the University of Cambridge plays a part.) Email: intenq@ice. English to her bones.uk | 31 . half Spanish. (Not to be taken with B06 in ISS Term I. Elizabeth.

00am – 12.D09 E02 The conventional view of women cherished by many Victorians saw them as angels in the house. depression and anxiety. Saints or sinners? Three controversial Victorian literary heroines Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie Group E: 11. personal identity.ac. 32 | www.30pm E01 Thinking about thinking: an introduction to the philosophy of mind Jon Phelan What is a thought? Where is a thought? This introduction to the philosophy of mind looks at the canonical positions and problems posed by philosophers interested in the nature of consciousness.cam. (Not to be taken with D03 in ISS Term II. presiding over hearth and family.uk/intsummer Milton and the idea of freedom: Paradise Lost in context Dr Paul Suttie E03 The abnormal mind: an introduction to psychopathology Dr John Lawson This course introduces a variety of clinical conditions including schizophrenia.) . Eliot and Hardy to uncover some of the truths behind the façade. In his great poem Paradise Lost he aims to send a timeless message to posterity concerning the true nature and importance of freedom: let's learn to read it. the problem of other minds. It also aims to contrast differing models of explanation that in turn lead to differing approaches in treatment. It fell to novelists such as Gaskell.ice. We examine the mind-body problem. autism. AI (artificial intelligence) and free will. Overall. What kinds of freedom are worth fighting for? Should people be free even to do things that others consider wrong or evil. these were questions of life or death for Milton and his society. or is that a recipe for anarchy? In a time of revolutionary war. but respectable middle-class families ignored their existence. 'Fallen women' – and these could be innocents seduced by a false promise of marriage or kept mistresses – might inspire the philanthropy of Baroness BurdettCoutts and Dickens. the hope is to encourage a more critical conception of what constitutes abnormality.

Did civilisation arise gradually. sociological or ethical differences between civilisations? Comparing Egypt. pensions provision and public finance. Students will be required to undertake classwork. Email: intenq@ice. perhaps. epoch-making ideas.E04 about these age-old issues – which could help. and does not require any mathematical background. exploring a variety of public policy issues including healthcare. or was it forged through conflict? How stable was it? How fundamental were geographical. and little ideas that later change the world. and see the deeper origins of mathematical ideas and styles. we appraise theories The course explores the major social and political problems facing the government in Britain today. scientific. The story is full of drama and changing fashions. environment policy.uk | 33 . technological. and social context. Peru. E07 The rise of civilisation Dr Nicholas James Threats and challenges in contemporary Britain Richard Yates Ancient pyramids and ziggurats prompt big questions. We show how mathematics has changed and developed in its intellectual. and Mexico and the Maya. Emphasis will be placed upon both domestic and international issues especially perceived threats to national security.ac. debates over civil liberties and a range of other political demands that are currently being made upon politicians. (Not to be taken with B05 in ISS Term I.cam. (The course is about historical ideas and not technicalities.) E06 A history of mathematical ideas from the Ancients to the 19th century Piers Bursill-Hall E05 Economics of public policy Dr Nigel Miller We consider how economic analysis can guide the formulation and evaluation of public policy. to predict our future. with examples drawn from the UK.) This history of mathematical ideas in the European tradition is an introduction for non-mathematicians. Iraq.

grief and hope from literary fiction and that literature is uniquely placed above history.E08 Art and power: how value is made Siân Griffiths Cultural capitals are a defining feature of our world.uk/intsummer childhood. special needs. coffee houses and theatres. E10 Children. . This course investigates how Surrealist artists challenged traditional aesthetics through a variety of media: from painting.ac. and the Surrealist objects and exhibitions. teachers and education: contemporary issues. did we get the art that we deserved? E09 The world of Samuel Pepys and John Evelyn Dr Andrew Lacey The diaries of Samuel Pepys (16331703) and John Evelyn (1620-1706) provide a unique window onto the social life and the turbulent history of 17th-century England.00pm – 3. teaching methods. (Not to be taken with Ha3/Hb3 in Literature Term I. psychology and philosophy in providing such insight. This investigation into educational change during the 20th century focuses on 34 | www. formal curriculum. We spend some time in their company. But how did certain cities become so dominant as centres for art? And how did value systems form which define the kind of art we make and collect? From the Renaissance to the present day.30pm F01 Philosophy of literature: understanding other minds through literary fiction Jon Phelan Literature entertains and allows us to escape from everyday life but can we learn anything from it and if so what does literature teach us? This course explores the claim that we can gain an understanding of love. Surrealism transformed the way we think about art and its role in society. encountering kings and princes. 1924–69 Dr Karolina Watras One of the most revolutionary 20th-century movements. anger. teachers and education in the present. the role and status of teachers and alternatives to traditional schooling. historical perspectives Dr John Howlett Studying the processes of change over time helps us towards a deeper understanding of children. artists and scientists. through collage. photography. scientific understandings.) F02 Surrealism and the visual arts. Group F: 2.cam. wars and revolutions .as well as the peace of the study and the pleasures of the garden. prostitutes and mistresses.ice. fear.

ac. it was also about wild and wonderful developments in science and technology. past and present. Properties range from grandee properties such as Eltham Palace. and Chatsworth. and warfare. Hatfield House. yet twenty years later Europe was again on the brink of war. argumentative. F04 Renaissance engineering Piers Bursill-Hall The Renaissance wasn’t just about great art. This course charts the changes and innovations in technical crafts like engineering. the Ancient Maya. F05 The collapse of civilisation Dr Nicholas James Is decay inevitable? Do all civilisations bear the seeds of their own destruction or is it only enemy action or environmental change that brings them down? Hindsight offers perspective. and there were others. and thoroughly strange. and phenomena such as recessions. echoing the tastes and styles of wealthy families. and unemployment.cam. through royal country residences (Sandringham and Balmoral) to an eclectic 20th-century masterpiece (Kelmarsh). This course will explore the extent to which the seeds of World War II were planted in the consequences of World War I. Students will develop an understanding of the causes and consequences of the current macroeconomic crisis. Email: intenq@ice. Crathes Castle.uk | 35 . this is the story of the real Renaissance: rough. far more radical. Leonardo da Vinci you know (but will find a new way of looking at him). architecture. Students will be required to deliver group presentations.F03 The long Armistice: Europe 1919-39 Dr Andrew Lacey In June 1919 the signing of the Treaty of Versailles officially ended the ‘war to end war’. and comparing unrelated cases – Ancient Rome. and Medieval England – should show whether generalisation (and prediction) is feasible. F07 Historic country houses and gardens in England and Scotland Caroline Holmes We examine ten large country houses and gardens which survive and thrive. F06 An introduction to macroeconomics Dr Nigel Miller This course will develop simple macroeconomic models and use them to understand significant macroeconomic events. inflation.

Medieval Studies Combining programmes Each programme is two or four weeks in length. Literature Term I Weeks 3 and 4: 21 July – 3 August History. 36 | www. Each course has five classes.cam. Weeks 1 and 2: 7 – 20 July Ancient Empires. Science Term I. Science Term II. programme schedules vary. The cumulative knowledge gained by attending courses. Courses are complemented by daily plenary lectures which expand on course topics or introduce new ideas and themes.uk/intsummer Academic content Special subject courses are led by experts from the University of Cambridge and beyond. EAP We offer an English for Academic Purposes (EAP) programme for second language students who are already proficient in English.ice. three or more weeks. You can also choose to combine two or three different programmes/terms to build your own schedule of one. but who wish to develop their skills. All courses are limited to 25 participants. by building programmes together and writing papers you may be able to earn additional credit to put towards your studies at your home institution. Literature Term II Weeks 5 and 6: 4 – 17 August Shakespeare.ac. . offered over a six-week period. Additional evening lectures are scheduled throughout the programmes. you can choose how many weeks you would like to attend. The University of Cambridge International Summer Schools currently run six specialist programmes. If you are a current undergraduate or graduate student. Course Directors guide you in close study of your chosen topics. two.Specialist Summer Schools Choose from our wide range of specialist programmes which offer the opportunity to study your favourite subjects in greater depth than our interdisciplinary programmes. This gives you the flexibility to choose courses that suit your interests. plenary and evening lectures will enhance your appreciation and knowledge of your field.

The primary focus of the course is to prepare applicants for the IELTS examination taken at the end of the intensive three-week study programme (7 – 28 July).ac.cam. Email: intenq@ice.uk | 37 .The first two weeks of the course (21 July – 3 August) allow for intensive study at the University of Cambridge Language Centre. the Shakespeare Summer School or the Medieval Studies Summer School (4 – 17 August). IELTS We also run an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Preparation Course. The course also includes a full mock examination at the end of the second week. while the second two weeks are spent participating in one of three academic programmes: Interdisciplinary Summer School Term II.

ac.cam.uk/intsummer . Ancient Empires Summer School 38 | www.ice.“An exceptional programme that allows you to immerse yourself in the most recent thinking about the ancient world.” Dr Justin Meggitt. Programme Director.

The programme is intended primarily for undergraduate or graduate students. New courses on Athens and Sparta. Ethiopian Christianity. Institute of Continuing Education and Affiliated Lecturer. each has five sessions.uk | 39 . Plenary lectures All participants attend the series of daily plenary lectures. who focus this year on Culture and Conflict. the Ancient Empires Summer School builds on its early success and extends its reach this year. Fellow of Wolfson College Launched to great acclaim in 2012. covering a wide range of subjects. These talks offer a unique opportunity to hear from recognised experts from this University and beyond. Evening lectures Invited speakers and members of the University will give a varied evening lecture programme. New and returning students will have a wealth of choice. Egyptian religion. and power and religion in Ancient India add further richness to our existing offering. The academic programme • Four special subject courses (two per week) • Plenary course AE0: Culture and Conflict • Evening lectures Email: intenq@ice. You choose two per week. the Minoan and Mycenaean civilisations. Roman medicine. but is open to those with an interest in the subject matter.cam. the supernatural in Greece and Rome. Faculty of Divinity.ac. Special subject courses At the core of your programme of study are your four specialist-taught courses. Egyptian language. and college or university teachers. No prior knowledge of any particular region or discipline is expected. University of Cambridge. These special subject courses are led by recognised experts from the University of Cambridge and other British universities. Macedonia.Ancient Empires Summer School 7 – 20 July Programme Director: Dr Justin Meggitt University Senior Lecturer in the study of Religion and the Origins of Christianity.

the institution of slavery. one from Group A and one from Group E. This course will examine the response of Christian theologians and pastors to the challenges of the world around them. We shall examine burning issues such as social inequality. ideas and populations with Africa. The Ancient Egyptian Empire: treasures. political and military relationships with other states and peoples. treaties and conquests Dr Corinne Duhig 40 | www. and attitudes to the body. finally. more particularly.30pm Aa1 Aa3 The course will explore the achievements of Philip II and Alexander the Great against the context of their Macedonian heritage. the role of women.00am – 12. gradually opened up to share and exchange goods.uk/intsummer Church and society in late Antiquity Dr Marcus Plested . at first isolated in its river valley. covering the rediscovery of Assyria and the rich history of its rise and fall together with a look at the great cities of the imperial heartland. western Asia and. from the writings of the Greeks and Romans. Week 1 (7 – 13 July) Group Aa: 11. the archaeology of the provinces and an introduction to Assyrian literature and cuneiform writing. Alexander and the Macedonian superpower Dr Paul Millett Archaeology in the crucible of civilisation: the rise and fall of the Assyrian Empire Dr John MacGinnis Aa2 Aa4 Ancient Egypt. Philip. In this course we explore the achievements of this astonishing empire. The rise of Christianity and its establishment as the official religion of the Roman Empire entailed a sustained confrontation with the modes and mores of pagan society.Ancient Empires Summer School Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. approaching their achievements through modern accounts and.ice. The course will use history and archaeology to examine Egypt's changing trade. Greece and Rome.cam. Participants choose two courses per week.ac. We will assess the realities behind the myth and romance of these colossal figures. the Mediterranean world.

uk | 41 .ac. How did their empires work and how were their subjects affected? Visionary leadership. artistic masterpieces and ideological agendas aligned or collided. Ea4 Magic. social and spiritual needs in Egypt for more than three millennia. the Romans and the Chinese dominated almost half of the world. demons and ghosts in the Greek and Roman worlds Dr Justin Meggitt What did the Greeks and Romans believe about the supernatural and how did it affect their everyday lives? From witches to curse tablets. sociology.in classical antiquity.00pm – 3. 2000 years ago. Email: intenq@ice. dynamic politics. Ea2 'Ra has placed the king on his throne forever': Ancient Egyptian religion Dr Corinne Duhig Ancient Egyptian religion seems exotic and inaccessible. ultimately co-creating the dawn of Ancient Greece. bureaucracy. this course is an introduction to magic and its critics . geography: were there common factors to explain the rise and fall of these powers? Comparison clarifies the issues. This course will make sense of the bewildering number and form of the Ancient Egyptian gods and explain how this religion and its institutions fulfilled the state’s and individuals' political.Group Ea: 2. ideology. haunted houses to baby-eating ghosts. Join us as we discover how their complex societies.cam. Ea3 Rome and China Dr Nicholas James Between them.30pm Ea1 The first Aegean empires: the Minoan and Mycenaean civilisations Dr Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw The Minoan and Mycenaean civilisations developed and flourished in the Aegean during the Greek Bronze Age (3rd .2nd millennia BC).

uk/intsummer Ab3 Imperial building in the ancient world Dr Francis Woodman Ambitious architectural projects have always been a potent weapon in the armoury of Empire. From Egypt to Peru.cam. religion and the occasional megalomaniac ruler. 42 | www. . as well as its responses to Islam.ice. We will examine some of the most revealing buildings of the ancient world from the Mediterranean to the Pacific. So far as is possible.30pm Ab1 Athens and Sparta: rivals for Greek domination Dr Paul Millett The course will compare the achievements of the very different Athenian and Spartan states. building depends on local materials. Ab4 Ethiopian Christianity Dr Erica C D Hunter Ethiopian Christianity traces the rich trajectory of Christianity in Ethiopia from its origins in the 4th century. culminating in their drawn-out struggle to control the Greek world in the later 5th century BC. Judaism and Roman Catholicism. we will base the assessment on what the Greeks wrote about themselves.00am – 12.ac.Week 2 (14 – 20 July) Group Ab: 11. The course explores the major theological. social organisation and of course money. Ab2 Medicine and miracles in the Roman Empire Dr Justin Meggitt What was it like to be sick in the Roman Empire and who did you turn to for help? Doctors or gods? And how effective were they? The course will examine the experience of illness and healing from the perspective of the 'patients' in the Roman world. to consider the ways in which the Ethiopian Orthodox Church provides an indigenous paradigm of African Christianity. technical skills. political and literary factors that have shaped its identity. They also speak of hierarchy.

The difference helps to illustrate principles and mechanisms of imperialism and the range of evidence now available. We will discuss Egyptian texts written in hieroglyphs and hieratic as well as in the later Demotic and Coptic scripts. but what were the conditions in which they emerged? In particular. from Pharaonic to Christian times Dr Siân Thomas This course traces the trajectory of the written Egyptian language from its predynastic origins to the Christian era. This course is an introduction to some of the key elements in their thought. 'first philosophy' or 'wisdom'.cam. Eb3 Inca and Aztec Dr Nicholas James Both the Inca and Aztec Empires were forged by conquest but where the Incas' was like ancient Old World empires in obvious ways. It will consider among other things Plato on the ideal state and Aristotle on language. how did the religions influence Indian political development? This course asks us to consider how the religious and 'secular' worlds. and in turn. Students will be introduced to the basics of reading Middle Egyptian hieroglyphic.30pm Eb1 The Ancient Egyptian language.00pm – 3. rather than opposed entities. and will explore literacy as a social phenomenon. Email: intenq@ice. logic. and effective choice and action. Aztec imperialism eludes more familiar methods of historical research. Eb4 The power of religion and the religion of power in Ancient India Dr Robert Harding Hinduism and Buddhism exert enormous influence over a huge percentage of humankind.Group Eb: 2.uk | 43 . Eb2 Great Ancient Greek philosophers: Plato and Aristotle Dr Karim Esmail The greatest of Ancient Greek philosophers are Plato and Aristotle. have always been inseparable. how did power shape these religions.ac.

ice.cam.” Dr Rob Wallach. Programme Director.ac. Science Summer School 44 | www.uk/intsummer .“A chance to experience science teaching at its best: big issues and up-to-the minute responses.

Science Summer School Term I: 7 – 20 July Term II: 21 July – 3 August Programme Director: Dr Rob Wallach University Senior Lecturer in Materials Science and Metallurgy. although we strongly advise that you prepare well. during the mornings. University of Cambridge. The Science Summer School draws on the expertise of a range of senior academics to teach across a variety of scientific fields. reading the books and articles suggested by the Course Directors. but with little formal science training. Programme-related visits Programme-related visits to museums and institutes in Cambridge may offer an insight into ‘cutting edge’ research.ac.cam. but an interdisciplinary approach is also encouraged. Plenary lectures All participants are registered for a course of plenary lectures entitled Creation and Discovery. Evening lectures Evening lectures extend the plenary series.uk | 45 . Vice-Provost and Fellow of King’s College Cambridge is recognised world-wide for the quality of its scientific research and science education. or a chance to reassess subjects with which you are already familiar. The Summer School is aimed at a broad audience: undergraduates and graduates in sciences as well as teachers and other professionals. These talks constitute a unique opportunity to hear from acknowledged experts about current developments. Email: intenq@ice. You may choose to follow a particular track by selecting courses in related subject fields. to learn about the impact of current (and past) discoveries and research. Each course meets five times. The programme is also suitable for those with a strong interest. and to consider the responsibilities faced by scientists and policy-makers. providing introductions to additional aspects of science at Cambridge and beyond. The academic programme • Plenary course P01: Creation and Discovery • One special subject course per week • A choice of programme-related visits • Evening lectures Special subject courses You choose one course for each week. combining breadth and flexibility with the opportunity to study in depth at the frontiers of knowledge.

This course explores a number of differing contexts (small groups. Participants choose one special subject course per week. In this course we will explore data supporting evolution and discover the amazing explanatory power of Darwin’s beautiful idea. mechanical and physical properties. Applications from everyday life show how diverse materials are optimised for transportation.uk/intsummer Introduction to social psychology Dr John Lawson P05 Themes in the philosophy of science Dr Emily Caddick This course addresses some central questions in philosophy of science. including ourselves.cam. We will investigate how it can be used to explain the morphology and behaviour of all species. Within the realm of psychology.00am – 12. Evolution evidence Dr Ed Turner P03 Our evolving world: the contribution of materials science Dr Rob Wallach Our evolving world relies on new materials to facilitate innovation. social psychology is concerned with how the behaviour and thoughts of an individual are influenced by the social context. 46 | www. and efficiency. This introduction to materials science provides an overview of atomic structure. many people don't believe in evolution. authority figures) and examines the evidence that seeks to explain how this context shapes what we do and how we think. anisotropy and corrosion. structures. ie other people around them. Week 1 (7 – 13 July) 11. P02 P04 Despite evidence from all branches of biology. crowds.Science Summer School Term I 7 – 20 July Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown.ice. change.30pm power generation.ac. communication and health care. What are laws of nature? In what sense can they explain the events which take place in the world? What does it mean to say that one thing caused another? Why is past data able to justify predictions about future data? And is the data really neutral between different theories? .

ac. we take a closer look at our sun and Solar System and consider if we are alone in the Universe. We will explore how embryos construct their nervous systems and we will look at how our brains have evolved. dark matter and vacuum energy that make up our Universe and then discover how everything was created out of hydrogen that emerged from the Big Bang. because the way the brain is organised depends on its origins deep in our evolutionary past.cam.30pm P06 From atoms to galaxies: the astronomer's view Dr Robin Catchpole FRAS First. P08 Autism: a modern epidemic? Dr John Lawson Despite 60 years of research. the interventions and treatments available. galaxies. P09 Building a brain: the organisation and development of the nervous system Professor Michael Bate FRS We have all built a brain and in this course you will find out how we did it and how the brain is organised. autism remains a puzzle: many people remain unclear about what it actually is. we meet the stars. Even a leading researcher in the field has called it ‘the enigma’. This course provides an introduction to autism and Asperger syndrome.Week 2 (14 – 20 July) 11. finally. P07 The mathematics of networks Professor Imre Leader Networks are all around us: from rail networks to computer networks and countless others. Finally.uk | 47 . some of the research currently taking place and. examining the diagnostic features that define the condition.00am – 12. But what are some good properties of a network? Why do some networks work better than others? The mathematics of networks is a fascinating topic: easy to understand and yet full of surprises. Email: intenq@ice.

We highlight the importance of protein biochemistry. with energy storage and the hydrogen economy. energy generation and sustainability Dr Rob Wallach Sustainable development is essential if the earth is not to be damaged irreversibly. and synthetic organic chemistry. nuclear power and conventional power.Science Summer School Term II 21 July – 3 August Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. Participants choose one special subject course per week. wind. the altered self. but technology must also provide solutions. P13 Early stage drug discovery Professor Chris Abell and Dr John Skidmore It takes over 10 years and $1bn to develop a new medicine. using examples from current research in Cambridge and the pharmaceutical industry. and wave).30pm P10 The captured thought: an experimental analysis of how minds work Professor Nicola S Clayton FRS and Clive Wilkins This course investigates fundamental features of the thinking mind. We explore the concepts behind the drug discovery process. 48 | www. Materials science has a pivotal role. P12 Keeping up with the Universe Dr Lisa Jardine-Wright During this course you will use real astronomical data and analysis techniques . P11 Materials science.you are the researchers and must draw your own conclusions about our observable. . We discuss the properties required of a drug and show how chemists discover the starting points for drug development. Attitudes have to change. briefly. the social self.ice. expanding Universe. Week 3 (21 – 27 July) 11. geothermal. We shall study the cognitive abilities of humans and animals using a variety of techniques to provide insight into how thinking works and has evolved. The course includes: the self.cam. structural biology.ac. perspective-taking and metacognition.uk/intsummer We conclude. We study materials issues in renewable energy sources (solar power. See dark matter.00am – 12. dark energy and general relativity reveal themselves in the data.

ac.00am – 12. nucleic acids and metabolites. we will explore how light interacts with matter to create the myriad of colours we see around us. and are leaves green or orange? In this course. P16 Colourful physics: nature's paintbrush Nicola Humphry-Baker Why is the sun sometimes yellow. sometimes red. ranging from butterflies to electricity generation. Different types of memory initially are considered. we conclude with how we remember. Topics range from simple substitution ciphers and the Enigma machine of World War II. This course examines the phenomenon of memory on many different levels.cam.30pm P14 Complex networks: insights into the organisation of biological systems Dr M Madan Babu The cell is a highly crowded environment that is made up of different kinds of biomolecules such as proteins.Week 4 (28 July – 3 August) 11. from psychological to molecular biological. ciphers and secrets: an introduction to cryptography Dr James Grime This course on the mathematics of cryptography introduces some of the most important codes and ciphers. How can one understand such a complicated system as a whole? This course introduces the concept of complex networks and their use to gain insights into the organisation of biological systems. Email: intenq@ice.uk | 49 . We will also look at how nature and different technologies. P17 Codes. P15 Memory: psychological and neurobiological perspectives Dr Amy Milton Memory is a critical function of the brain. and how we forget. harness these phenomena. After assessing physiological and molecular models of memory. to modern cryptography such as RSA used in internet encryption. before addressing individual memory types and their neurobiological bases.

uk/intsummer .ac. Literature Summer School 50 | www. We do change lives!” Dr Fred Parker.“I’m delighted to see that a former Literature Summer School participant and mature student is now thriving as a Cambridge full-time undergraduate. Programme Director.ice.cam.

Literature Summer School
Term I: 7 – 20 July
Term II: 21 July – 3 August

Programme Director: Dr Fred Parker
Senior Lecturer in English, University of Cambridge;
Fellow and Director of Studies in English, Clare College
The Literature Summer School, now
in its 28th year, attracts participants
from all backgrounds - teachers and
students, retired people and busy
professionals in other areas, those
who are already well-read in literature
and those who are just starting out.
Our Course Directors and lecturers
are chosen not only for their expertise
but also for their enthusiasm for
their subject. The lively exchanges
of views and poolings of experience
which take place, both inside and
outside the formal teaching sessions,
make these brief, intense periods
of study, exploration and debate
an extraordinarily stimulating and
enriching experience.
Among the new courses this year
is one on writing short stories,
complementing others which reflect
the Cambridge tradition of 'practical
criticism' or close reading. In all
courses, expect to have texts open
for continual reference, illustration
and analysis: the discipline of close
attention to the words on the page
is fundamental to our classes.

The academic programme
• Plenary course GH0:
Crossing Frontiers
• Four special subject courses
(two for each week)
• Evening lectures
Special subject courses
The core of your programme will be
your chosen special subject courses,
each meeting five times. (Double
courses meet ten times.) Classes allow
for close and continuing discussion,
and you will be expected to have done
substantial preparatory reading before
you arrive in Cambridge.
Plenary lectures
Daily plenary lectures by distinguished
guest speakers, largely from within
the University, draw on literature of
many different kinds and periods.
You will hear a rich variety of voices,
and critical approaches. Plenary
lectures bring fresh perspectives to
familiar masterpieces and encourage
exploration in new directions.
Evening lectures
Additional general lectures will add
to your enjoyment of your stay.

Email: intenq@ice.cam.ac.uk |

51

Literature Summer School Term I
7 – 20 July
Special Subject Courses

Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. Participants
choose two courses per week, one from Group G and one from Group H.

Week 1 (7 – 13 July)
Group Ga: 9.15am – 10.45am
Ga1

Greek and Shakespearean tragedy
Dr Fred Parker
‘Tragedy’ is an elusive, perhaps
indefinable category, but one which
it is hard to do without. It begins
with the Greeks, and by setting
some masterpieces of Greek tragedy
– Agamemnon, Antigone, Bacchae –
alongside plays by Shakespeare,
and attending to both similarities
and contrasts, we may bring some
of the enduring aspects of tragedy
into sharper focus.

Ga2

Making sense of poetry
Dr Stephen Logan
We examine what good poets have
traditionally wanted their readers
to know about such things as metre,
diction, syntax, rhyme, other sound
effects and figurative language. We
explore what sensitive, historicallyinformed and imaginative reading is
like and identify the kinds of literary
competence needed to make it more

52

| www.ice.cam.ac.uk/intsummer

fully possible. (This is a double course
which can only be taken with Gb2.)

Ga3

Russian sin: Anna Karenina,
Crime and Punishment, Lolita
Dr Elizabeth Moore
This course will examine three Russian
masterpieces – Tolstoy's Anna Karenina,
Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment,
and Nabokov's Lolita – and will focus
on the moral complexities that each
author explores in his fiction. In the
process of comparing these three
works, which have at their centre
adultery, murder, and paedophilia,
we will ask why the greatest Russian
authors have tended to invent
heroes and heroines who betray their
societies' moral codes in the extreme.
We will also consider the moral
position of each author in relation
to his characters.

Ga4

Adaptation and the Brontës
Dr Jenny Bavidge
This course will examine the afterlife
of the work of the Brontë sisters, with
a particular focus on Wuthering Heights

and Jane Eyre. We will also consider
the nature of Brontë criticism and
biographies, the Brontës in popular
culture, and the many film adaptations
of these works.

Group Ha: 2.00pm – 3.30pm
Ha1

Rubbing the lamp:
writing short stories
Dr Sarah Burton
Whether you are returning to creative
writing or just setting out, the short
story is an ideal genre in which to
discover and develop your literary
skills. This course uses an imaginative
range of classic examples to help
students identify and apply the
strategies and structures available
to us as writers generally.

Ha2

The emergence of Romanticism
Dr Stephen Logan
Romanticism is apt to be a comforting
illusion. We enjoy a sense of kinship
with Romantic writers which occludes
real differences between their period
and our own. Liking the Romantics, we

can feel more comfortably estranged
from their ‘Augustan’ predecessors.
But Byron (and Wordsworth)
admired Pope, though Wordsworth
didn’t admire Byron; and Cowper’s
antagonism to Johnson, like Keats’s
(occasionally) to Wordsworth, may
not be quite our own. This course
will explore how writers from Dryden
to Keats were creatively at odds with
each other and with themselves.

Ha3

Philosophy of literature:
understanding other minds
through literary fiction
Jon Phelan
Literature entertains and allows us to
escape from everyday life but can we
learn anything from it and if so what
kinds of things does literature teach
us? This course explores the claim that
we can gain an understanding of love,
fear, anger, grief and hope from literary
fiction and that literature is uniquely
placed above history, psychology and
philosophy in providing such insight.
(This is a double course which can only
be taken with Hb3. Not to be taken with
F01 in ISS Term II.)

Email: intenq@ice.cam.ac.uk |

53

ac.15am – 10.cam. and the tragic existential sensibility that so distinctively marks Southern literature.ice. may never have enjoyed the same popularity as the other novels. James Joyce.uk/intsummer Gb2 Making sense of poetry Dr Stephen Logan This is a double course which can only be taken with Ga2. Wyndham Lewis. . context. which nevertheless may be taken independently. avowedly Christian heroine. Futurism and Vorticism which played a significant part in Modernism’s development. Ezra Pound.45am Gb1 Jane Austen I: Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park Dr Alexander Lindsay This is the first of two complementary courses. we will examine the intricate relationship between race. but is arguably Jane Austen’s finest achievement and seems to have been her own favourite. T S Eliot. the Southern plantation myth. it will also introduce literary and artistic movements such as Imagism. with its serious-minded. and development of literary modernism via consideration of key writers of the period: Joseph Conrad. It will be shown how Pride and Prejudice develops the design and themes of Sense and Sensibility in a social comedy which is witty. and Richard Wright (Native Son). Mansfield Park. The location of Joyce’s novel both at the centre of modernism and within the historical and cultural context of his time is supported by close textual study facilitating an informed group reading of selected passages. 54 | www. but more critical and less light-hearted than at first apparent. Week 2 (14 – 20 July) Group Gb: 9. Gb3 The tragic South Dr Elizabeth Moore This course explores the remarkable literary renaissance that took place in the American South in the mid-20th century with a focus on three writers: William Faulkner (Absalom.Ha4 An introduction to James Joyce’s Ulysses: text and context Dr Mark Sutton This course focuses exclusively on Joyce’s controversial and highly influential masterpiece Ulysses. Absalom!). and Virginia Woolf. Tennessee Williams (A Streetcar Named Desire). Looking closely at these three works. Gb4 To ‘Make it New’: the Modernist revolution in literature from the 1890s to the 1920s Dr Mark Sutton This course will look at the form.

uk | 55 .00pm – 3. and what judgements of imperialism they offer. Not to be taken with F01 in ISS Term II. Hb4 Slamming the bedroom door: rights and roles of women in the Victorian novel Dr Ann Kennedy Smith In 1848 Anne Brontë’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall controversially suggested that a married woman should have basic rights. The Jewel in the Crown and The Siege of Krishnapur Dr John Lennard Representations of British rule in India vary widely. and are sharply contested. this course asks how good they really are. even once we know something of the term’s breadth. Email: intenq@ice. Yet madness has since Plato (and no doubt before) been strongly associated with the visionary power for which poets can be valued.30pm Hb1 Representing the Raj: Kim. while in North and South (1855) Elizabeth Gaskell questioned a woman’s place in the new industrial society. Wordsworth.ac. what kinds of bias they display. Hb2 Romantic madness Dr Stephen Logan Many of us like the idea of being romantic. Fewer would be happy to be thought ‘mad’ and the stigma of the term discourages investigation of its wider meanings.Group Hb: 2. Blake. how historically accurate they are. Hb3 Philosophy of literature: understanding other minds through literary fiction Jon Phelan This is a double course which can only be taken with Ha3. Coleridge and Clare. A Passage to India. This course considers how two such different novelists reflected the all-important ‘woman question’ in Victorian times. Taking the four greatest novels to depict the Raj. the conception of poetic excellence shifted so as to make madness (variously understood) seem a condition for achieving it.cam. and during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This course will examine conceptions of enabling madness in Cowper.

Week 3 (21 – 27 July) Group Gc: 9.ice.45am Gc1 Shakespeare’s strange last plays Dr Fred Parker Tall stories of losing and finding.15am – 10. With Emma.uk/intsummer Jane Austen offers once more the emotional education of a handsome and witty heroine. exploring them as a group and as distinct and incomparable individual works. . which nevertheless may be taken independently. We shall discuss Cymbeline. but this time enjoying a unique financial independence. disguises and recognitions. The Winter’s Tale. Thomas More imagines in captivating detail an alternative to the systematic greed and brutality of his own society. family reunions. Gc2 Jane Austen II: Emma and Persuasion Dr Alexander Lindsay This is the second of two complementary courses.cam. 56 | www. But at what human cost? And with what degree of plausibility? We look closely at Utopia. Persuasion reveals the novelist’s awareness of the decline of the landed gentry. as well as key scenes from Pericles. the Navy. a work that has inspired debate and imitation for nearly 500 years. private property. consequently the heroine finds happiness and security in marrying into a service profession.ac. one from Group G and one from Group H. Gc3 More’s Utopia Dr Paul Suttie In one of the greatest of all imaginary worlds in European literature. and The Tempest. depicting a land without kings.Literature Summer School Term II 21 July – 3 August Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. Participants choose two courses per week. shipwrecks and wanderings… in Shakespeare’s final plays such traditional elements of romance narratives are transformed into something ‘rich and strange’. hunger or exploitation.

Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy. when daylight consciousness grows dim under the influence of memory or imagination.30pm Hc1 Romantic reverie: Wordsworth and Keats Dr Fred Parker Some of the finest Romantic poetry is introspective. not only in interpretation but even in its different texts. This course will focus on two of Smith’s novels.cam. This survey course will be a condensed introduction to Dante’s early book the Vita Nuova. Classes will also consider the play’s sources. has become one of the most important voices in contemporary literature. is widely regarded as the greatest poem in a modern European language. impulses. including its debt to the first great Elizabethan revenge play. to the three books of the Comedy. Email: intenq@ice. especially the Odes. recording the movements of the mind. and will also look at examples of Smith’s short stories and literary criticism. its subtle drifts. a Cambridge English graduate. Hc2 Hamlet: the play. its sources. This course will explore Wordsworth’s The Prelude (in the short two-book version) and the poetry of Keats. its legacy Dr Alexander Lindsay Of all Shakespeare’s great tragedies. Hamlet remains the most problematic.Gc4 An introduction to Dante Clive Wilmer The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri.00pm – 3. Group Hc: 2. Hc3 Reading Zadie Smith Dr Jenny Bavidge Zadie Smith. written in the early 14th century. White Teeth (2002) and NW (2012).uk | 57 . from that point of view. and how in turn Hamlet itself pervades subsequent Jacobean revenge tragedy. and meanders. The texts used will be in English. and to Dante the man in his historical context.ac.

ac. each session focusing closely on a single key canto.cam. Gd4 Dante’s Inferno Clive Wilmer The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri. justice. some American. (This course is not a double course. or whose stories so notoriously fail to deliver it. . The text used will be in English.uk/intsummer autobiographical and sensational elements. or of the world? We will look closely at Measure for Measure and King Lear with these questions in mind. examining the writing of environment and ecology in a range of texts in a range of different periods and forms. All the texts will be poems or extracts from poems in English. but you are encouraged to take it with Hd4 as the material covered will be different.45am Gd1 Ecocriticism: reading inside and out Dr Jenny Bavidge This course will form an introduction to ecocritical approaches to literature. Members of the class must be willing to participate fully in extended discussion. Why does Shakespeare disappoint their expectations. some British. addresses social issues such as the causes of crime and the question of what constitutes a gentleman. and presents his most enigmatic female character. should there be such expectations of a play. The poem will be discussed in five sessions.ice. the first of the poem’s three books or cantiche. justice!" Never have there been plays whose central characters yearn more passionately for justice. in the first place. Gd3 Shakespearean justice: Measure for Measure and King Lear Dr Paul Suttie “Justice. and ours? And why. justice. There are thirty-four cantos in the Inferno (ie Hell). Gd2 Dickens and the Victorian underworld: Great Expectations Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie One of only two of Dickens’s many novels with a working-class hero.15am – 10.Hc4 What does it feel like to read this? I Clive Wilmer A programme of close readings of short poems conducted in the tradition of Cambridge Practical Criticism.) Week 4 (28 July – 3 August) Group Gd: 9. written in the early 14th century. Great Expectations is one of his most exciting works: it contains both 58 | www. is widely regarded as the greatest poem in a modern European language.

Masters of irony Dr Fred Parker Hd2 Romantic poetry and science Melissa Lloyd This course will consider the interweaving of poetry and science during the Romantic period. while seeking guidance also from Socrates. (This course is not a double course.) Email: intenq@ice. Key figures considered will be Coleridge. Keats. Marlowe the dramatic poet Dr Alexander Lindsay Hd4 What does it feel like to read this? II Clive Wilmer A programme of close readings of short texts conducted in the tradition of Cambridge Practical Criticism.uk | 59 . fictional prose and non-fictional prose. and to his likely impact on the early Shakespeare. all in English. We will read Romantic texts alongside selected chapters from Richard Holmes’s The Age of Wonder. of being in two places at once.30pm Hd1 Hd3 Irony. Members of the class must be willing to participate fully in extended discussion. The texts. Davy and the Herschels. Particular attention will be given to Marlowe’s poetic and intellectual originality. before the rigid boundaries of ‘two cultures’ began to take hold. The course explores its interests and pleasures in a range of 18th-century writing from Swift and Pope to Fielding and Sterne. to his move in a new direction with Edward II. will be taken from a variety of literary genres: poetry.Group Hd: 2. exhilarating ways. drama. at its best. but you are encouraged to take it with Hc4 as the material covered will be different. beginning with the highly successful Tamburlaine and The Jew of Malta.00pm – 3.ac. This course will concentrate on Marlowe’s four major plays. through his masterpiece Doctor Faustus. in order to explore how scientific and poetic voyages of discovery interacted in creative. It is a way of living with ambiguity and contradiction.cam. of reaching beyond the limits of language. is something more interesting than using words that say one thing but mean another.

uk/intsummer .ac.ice.” Dr David Smith FRHistS. and who are genuinely enthusiastic about studying the human past. History Summer School 60 | www.“For all those who love history. this programme has an immense amount to offer. Programme Director.cam.

History Summer School 21 July – 3 August Programme Director: Dr David Smith FRHistS Affiliated Lecturer. led by members of the University’s Faculty of History and visiting academics. Director of Studies in History. The theme of this year’s morning plenary lectures is Defining Moments.ac.cam. Email: intenq@ice. Selwyn College The History Summer School gives you the chance to study in detail specific historical figures. applications are welcome from anyone with a real commitment to the subject. These lectures are intended to extend your historical knowledge into areas not covered by the special subject courses. The format of the programme allows a wide choice of subject area: you may wish to attend courses which most obviously complement one another or you may opt to make a selection which covers the broadest historical period possible. periods or events. or who have been engaged in historical study at some stage. Faculty of History. You can choose courses that complement one another or you may wish to select ones that address the broadest possible historical period. However. and no prior knowledge of the history of any particular period or reign is expected. This programme is intended primarily for those who are currently students or teachers of history. The academic programme • Four special subject courses (two per week) • Plenary course LM0: Defining Moments • Evening lectures Special subject courses Much of the teaching is given in special subject classes. Plenary lectures and evening talks Each year. The core of your programme will be your chosen special subject courses. Fellow. eminent historians from the University of Cambridge and beyond are invited to contribute plenary lectures related to a chosen theme. each of which meets five times. University of Cambridge. Collectively. European and global history. the speakers will explore a range of historical events chosen from various periods and different parts of the world. and to develop your understanding of the causes. Tutor for Graduate Students. A team of eminent historians offer courses that cover a wide range of problems and themes in British. nature and consequences of a series of crucially significant episodes.uk | 61 .

He was a philosopher-king. long after the death of General Franco in 1975. 1936-39 Charlie Nurse La4 Britain and Europe. the use that he made of his powers.ac. 62 | www.uk/intsummer The Spanish Civil War. and Gorbachev’s breaking of the Soviet Union. the Soviet Union went through various stages. whose historical reputation has been rehabilitated in recent decades. This course examines the war and its causes. his career as King. 1688-1815 Dr Andrew Thompson This course looks at major events that affected Britain's relationship with continental Europe through the lens of foreign policy and diplomacy from the Glorious Revolution to the end of the Napoleonic Wars. economic and social factors to enable a consideration of the extent to which they can justifiably be considered as defining moments. This course assesses how Lenin and Stalin made the Soviet system. events are placed in a broader context of changing political. It will focus particularly on his personality. beliefs and policies through a range of primary sources. one from Group L and one from Group M.00am – 12. Participants choose two courses per week. Week 1 (21 – 27 July) Group La: 11. seeing it as a Spanish conflict with Spanish origins and with consequences for Spain which. .ice. King James VI and I Dr David Smith FRHistS La2 Making and breaking the Soviet Union Dr Jonathan Davis During its 74-year history.30pm La1 La3 James VI and I is one of the most interesting and controversial of British monarchs.History Summer School Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. an intellectual in politics.cam. While each class considers a particular moment. The Spanish Civil War is frequently seen merely as part of the wider struggles of the 1930s. This course will investigate James’s personality. the ‘stable’ era of Krushchev and Brezhnev. are still controversial in Spain. and the nature of his achievements.

her triumphs and her decline. ‘the people’s Winston’ is a mass of contradictions: the saviour of his country in 1940. from artists to architects: all were steeped in history. contemporary documents and personal profiles all of which contribute to a fascinating study and an insightful view of what makes a 'defining moment' in military history. descendants of the earliest European settlers. a defender of a declining Empire. We look at some of the heroes and some of the villains. From politicians to preachers. what was at stake.Group Ma: 2.00pm – 3.ac. and how did they change the way the British thought about their Empire and about themselves? (This is a double course which can only be taken with Mb4.cam. or is his status a measure of Britain’s nostalgic fixation on Second World War glories? Churchill’s career spanned the century: he took part in the last cavalry charge in British history and lived to authorise the atomic bomb. A child of aristocracy. The course will examine in depth four First and Second World War events and culminate in a contemporary analysis of the situation in Afghanistan. they were obsessive about the past. Winston Churchill – the greatest Briton? Dr Mark Goldie FRHistS Ma2 Heroes and villains: the Victorians and history Dr Gareth Atkins If the Victorians thought a great deal about the future. Tyrants. from two very different peoples. The scene will be set for all of these studies using battle maps. a radical liberal.uk | 63 .30pm Ma1 Ma3 Recently the British voted Churchill the greatest Briton. a reactionary conservative. heroes and long-dead martyrs gained new life as commentators ransacked history books for guidance on presentday problems. Defining moments in modern British military history Dr Diana Henderson FSA Scot Ma4 The Zulu and Boer wars: Britain in southern Africa.) Email: intenq@ice. In 1879 Britain took on the might of the Zulu Empire and was caught out by the strength of Zulu resistance. 1879-1902 Dr Seán Lang The Victorian Empire faced its most formidable challenge in southern Africa. Why did the British embark on these wars. illustrations and examples. Shortly afterwards the British were humiliated by the Dutch-speaking Boers. Why? Was he the colossus of the 20th century. asking why the past was so significant in a rapidly-changing society. He epitomised Britain’s confused identity in the modern world.

cam.ac. Conflict archaeology considers the experience of living through war and how this shapes the archaeological record in specific ways. 1625-49 Dr David Smith FRHistS The archaeology of 20th-century European conflict Dr Gilly Carr Lb4 Lb2 The Holy Roman Empire. and consider how far he brought his own fate upon himself. The classes will make use of an extensive selection of primary sources. This course will concentrate on the second half of this remarkable but neglected institution – from the Reformation to its termination by Napoleon – and the significance of the Empire for modern European history. 64 | www.30pm Lb1 Lb3 This course will investigate the personality. It seeks to explain how the authority of the French monarchy. . 1500-1806 Dr Andrew Lacey The Holy Roman Empire. evaporated so quickly in 1789. The reign of Charles I. This course will look at sites of conflict.ice.00am – 12.uk/intsummer 1789-99: the revolutionary rubicon Tom Stammers This course explores why the final decade of the 18th century has long been identified with the birth of modern Europe. the only king in English history to have been put on trial and publicly executed.Week 2 (28 July – 3 August) Group Lb: 11. dominated central Europe from 800 AD until 1806. and why it proved so difficult in the ensuing years to find any stable alternative regime. it will explore the extent of his responsibility for the outbreak of the English Civil War. beliefs and policies of Charles I. and the ethical and political dilemmas faced by heritage managers in presenting such work to the public today. one of the oldest and most successful in history. victimhood and perpetration. the Thousand Year Reich. In particular.

Group Mb: 2.00pm – 3.30pm
Mb1

The Bandung Moment and the
making of the postcolonial world
Dr Emma Hunter
In 1955, leaders of the newly
independent states of Africa, Asia and
the Middle East gathered in Bandung in
Indonesia for a conference which they
hoped would mark the beginning of a
new world order. This course explores
the 'Bandung Moment' as a moment
in global history which sheds light on
decolonization, the global Cold War
and the birth of the post-colonial world.

Mb2

The Fall of Eagles: the Romanovs,
Habsburgs and Hohenzollern,
1848-1920
Dr Andrew Lacey
19th-century Europe was dominated
by the ambitions and rivalries of three
imperial families – the Romanovs, the
Habsburgs and the Hohenzollern. We

examine these dynasties and how they
all came to grief in the catastrophe of
the First World War – a war created by
those very ambitions and rivalries.

Mb3

When Hitler invaded Britain
Dr Gilly Carr
From 1940-45, the Germans invaded
the Channel Islands, the only British
territory to be occupied during World
War II. This caused such embarrassment
to Churchill that the story of this
occupation is still marginalised in
history books. This course will unveil the
tutor’s recent archive discoveries which
have made an international impact.

Mb4

The Zulu and Boer wars: Britain
in southern Africa, 1879-1902
Dr Seán Lang
This is a double course which can only
be taken with Ma4.

Email: intenq@ice.cam.ac.uk |

65

“Embrace the opportunity to study
the world’s greatest dramatist in one
of the world’s greatest universities.
For a unique educational experience
join us in Cambridge in 2013.”
Dr Catherine Alexander,
Programme Director, Shakespeare Summer School
66

| www.ice.cam.ac.uk/intsummer

Shakespeare Summer School
4 – 17 August

Programme Director: Dr Catherine Alexander
Honorary Research Fellow of the Shakespeare Institute,
University of Birmingham
Since it began in 1994 the Shakespeare
Summer School has established a
reputation for the highest quality
tuition in classes and lectures and
the productive sense of community
that comes from shared endeavour,
enthusiasm and commitment to study.
Participants come from all over the
world and contribute their experience,
knowledge and ideas to the study of
Shakespeare in Cambridge.
The University has the distinction of
nurturing some of the greatest talents
in Shakespearean scholarship and
performance, and you will work with
leading academics in an intensive
programme that includes two classes
and two lectures each day.
The academic programme
• Four special subject courses
(two for each week)
• Plenary course RS0:
Time and Times
• Evening lectures

Special subject courses
You will be sent course descriptions
and reading lists for your chosen special
subject classes and are expected to
engage in preparatory work to gain
the greatest benefit from your studies.
Some students opt for complementary
courses while others go for a more
eclectic mix. You choose two courses
per week, each has five sessions.
Plenary lectures
The theme of the morning lecture
programme is Time and Times and
scholars from Cambridge and beyond,
all published experts in their fields, will
take a range of approaches to the topic
including biography, the language and
plot of the plays and historical shifts in
reception, criticism and performance.
Evening lectures
The evening, after dinner, lectures
are broader in scope and include
performances and introductions
to the optional excursions.

Email: intenq@ice.cam.ac.uk |

67

15am – 10. nature. 68 | www. The Winter’s Tale. sometimes called ‘problem plays’. Week 1 (4 – 10 August) Group Ra: 9. Romeo and Juliet on page. Structurally they are comedies. parents and children. especially fathers and daughters.ice. one from Group R and one from Group S.Shakespeare Summer School Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. and to Shakespeare's evident awareness of poetic tradition.cam. Some attention will be given to Shakespeare's contemporaries (in some cases rivals). are dark in tone and preoccupied with ethical and intellectual issues. but there is very little in them that could be called ‘comic’. But catastrophe is evaded through the agency of the supernatural and through the passage of time. and The Tempest Dr Alexander Lindsay In these three plays Shakespeare uses the non-naturalistic form of the Jacobean romance drama to revisit some of the themes of his tragedies and history plays: kingship and legitimacy.45am Ra1 Ra3 This course will explore the history of Romeo and Juliet as a text and edition (from quarto to comic). verbal texture and literary context of Venus and Adonis and Lucrece. All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure. Morally and aesthetically they give rise to ‘problems’ which can only be resolved in the minds of their readers or audiences. sexual jealousy. stage and screen Dr Catherine Alexander Ra2 Shakespeare: the narrative poems in their context Dr Charles Moseley FSA FEA FRSA FRGS We explore in detail the design. and nobility. and how patronage might affect both the writing and the reception of poetry. We will consider the enduring popularity of the play despite the difficulties it presents to readers and performers.uk/intsummer Two problem comedies: All’s Well That Ends Well and Measure for Measure Clive Wilmer Ra4 Shakespeare’s late romances: Cymbeline. like Marlowe. .ac. as a stage performance (including influential and enduring 18th-century adaptations) and as the basis of successful films. We will also consider Shakespeare's relationship to his patron. nurture. Participants choose two courses per week.

showing how the political intrigues and ambitions of the nobility are counter-pointed by the lowlife comedy of Falstaff.cam. Where do power and wonder come from. which requires competence and confidence in spoken English.00pm – 3. that Iago is able to persuade Othello of something that is evidently not true? How far can it be said that appearances represent reality? Hamlet in performance: "Who's there?" Vivien Heilbron An essence that’s not seen: appearance and reality in Othello Clive Wilmer Sa4 Sa2 Shakespeare’s comical histories Dr Alexander Lindsay This course will explore the sequence King Henry IV. and King Henry V. Pistol. and the supernatural. Moving freely between both worlds is Prince Hal. psychological and dramatic. in which the playwright returns with extraordinary sharpsightedness to his great intertwined themes of politics.30pm Sa1 Sa3 This course.uk | 69 . Parts 1 and 2. for example. How is it. ethical. (This is a double course which can only be taken with Sb1. Students must be prepared to explore the play from the actor's point of view. how and in whose interests are they used and abused. will consist of ten practical workshops. and why do we seem to need them so? Email: intenq@ice. Large questions and small ones will be raised. theatre. Power and wonder in The Tempest Dr Paul Suttie In this class we look in depth at Shakespeare's late masterpiece. both physically and vocally. and others. later Henry V. always focusing on Shakespeare's dramatic language with the aim of ‘letting the words do the work’.ac. The Tempest.) Othello will be explored – one act per day – through the great questions it gives rise to.Group Sa: 2. consciously laying the foundations of his own legend.

and how far these affect its interpretation. a bold innovator in comedy. Throughout attention will be drawn to differences between the Quarto and the Folio texts of the play. Stage and screen history (including Ralph Fiennes’ recent film of Coriolanus) will be central. and considering them as experiments that showed him what he wanted to pursue and what he would subvert or reject in creating his astounding mature work. This course asks where he started. psychology and performance Dr Paul Prescott Rb4 We will explore Shakespeare’s two greatest political plays. the course will explore how far King Lear is a Christian play of redemptive love.ac. is this?" Vivien Heilbron This course of five practical workshops. 70 | www. or whether it expresses a scepticism which calls providence into question. requiring good spoken English skills. taking his earliest comedies as a study in contrasts. Concentrating on important scenes and themes. significance Dr Alexander Lindsay .ice. and class discussions will be complemented by practical workshops.cam. Two Gentlemen of Verona and The Taming of the Shrew Dr John Lennard Shakespeare was. throughout his career. friends.15am – 10.uk/intsummer King Lear: sources.45am Rb1 Twelfth Night: "What country. The play is packed with lyrical blank verse and robust comic prose and the emphasis of each workshop will be on Shakespeare's use of language which helps the actor make convincing choices in performance. texts. Rb2 Rb3 Shakespeare’s early comedy: The Comedy of Errors. analysing their topical force in Shakespeare’s time and the ways each has subsequently been appropriated to serve a range of political ends from Restoration England to Nazi Germany and beyond. will explore the world of Illyria and its characters.Week 2 (11 – 17 August) Group Rb: 9. Julius Caesar and Coriolanus: politics.

Group Sb: 2.cam.uk | 71 . This course will look at the way that key stage productions focus on the different worlds and the inspiration that they have provided for those working in other media. This course asks how experiments in a new genre taught him how to fit history on stage and to build a theatrical role actors still love to play. the mechanicals and the supernaturals) have fascinated artists and musicians as well as actors.30pm Sb1 Hamlet in performance: "Who's there?" Vivien Heilbron This is a double course which can only be taken with Sa1. Sb2 A Midsummer Night’s Dream and its afterlife Dr Catherine Alexander The three ‘worlds’ of A Midsummer Night’s Dream (the court. disputatious reign of Henry VI led to his mesmerising Richard Crookback. Email: intenq@ice.00pm – 3. and from one perspective. Sb4 Justice and fortune in The Merchant of Venice Dr Paul Suttie In romantic comedy we expect the plots of the wicked to be thwarted and good fortune to go to the deserving.ac. Sb3 Shakespeare’s first tetralogy: King Henry VI. Parts 1 .3 and Richard III Dr John Lennard Shakespeare’s account of the long. such 'poetic justice' is just what The Merchant of Venice gives us. But at whose expense? We will look closely at a play which pushes the comic form to its limits to disturb moral complacency and show that 'all that glisters is not gold'. and audiences love to hate.

Medieval Studies Summer School 72 | www.ac.“The Medieval Studies programme is. unique.cam.uk/intsummer . quite simply.” Dr Rowena E Archer FRHistS. Programme Director.ice.

The academic programme • Plenary course KN0: Travel and Trade • Four special subject courses (two singles or one double each week) • Evening lectures Email: intenq@ice. each has five sessions. University of Oxford The University of Cambridge Medieval Studies Summer School is without parallel.Medieval Studies Summer School 4 – 17 August Programme Director: Dr Rowena E Archer FRHistS Fellow of Brasenose College. architecture. offering a unique opportunity to learn from recognised experts from this University and beyond. The Course Directors encourage you to form your own arguments about big historical issues. literature or politics. concentrating on particular aspects of medieval art. Since its establishment in 1996. You choose two per week. These special subject classes are led by recognised experts from the University of Cambridge and other British universities. Evening lectures Additional evening lectures extend the range of subjects addressed. You will find it challenging but also accessible. The plenary lectures add a specially chosen theme which acts as a virtual fifth course. Others with knowledge or genuine interest in any related discipline are also welcome. The Medieval Studies Summer School is intended primarily for current undergraduate or graduate students. The plenary lectures are designed to form an additional integrated course spread over the two-week programme and include some practical sessions and demonstrations. but also help you to understand the complexities of your chosen topic.uk | 73 . and are open to participants in other Summer Schools. It presents a valuable opportunity for anyone with a primary interest in any one area of medieval studies to undertake interdisciplinary study. Plenary lectures All participants attend the series of plenary lectures focusing on Travel and Trade. who are on hand to discuss their area of expertise.cam. it has offered a unique opportunity for students to work with the finest British medievalists. Special subject courses At the core of your programme of study are your four specialist-taught courses. and college or university teachers. history.ac.

how the churches at their heart were built and maintained. The course will conclude by examining the character of English religion on the eve of the Reformation. In England almost half the population died in eighteen months. and Henry III).uk/intsummer Ka3 The Black Death Dr Rosemary Horrox FRHistS The plague. its audiences and its relationship to liturgy. which swept through Europe in the late 1340s. We consider the craft of the art. We place this ‘Devil's Brood’ 74 | www.cam. . the English ‘kingdom’ stretched from Hadrian's Wall to the Pyrenees.) Ka2 The Devil's Brood: the Angevins and their rivals. John. one from Group K and one from Group N. This course explores how contemporaries reacted to the disaster and looks at its immediate and long term consequences within England.ice. how they were used.00am – 12. Participants choose two courses per week. Ka1 Pillars of faith. ruled by a family of kings claiming descent from the house of Anjou. A brief history of the English parish church in the Middle Ages Professor Nigel Saul FRHistS The thousands of medieval parish churches to have survived in England constitute a remarkable repository of fine art and architecture. Week 1 (4 – 10 August) Group Ka: 11.30pm (Henry II.Medieval Studies Summer School Special Subject Courses Classes are held from Monday to Friday at the times shown. The course will examine how parishes came to be formed. was of unparalleled violence. Ka4 Painting with light: stained glass and the medieval church Sarah Brown Recent art historical scholarship has reinforced the importance of stained glass as one of the central narrative media of the Middle Ages. 1158-1224 Dr Hugh Doherty Between the succession of Henry II in 1154 and the fall of La Rochelle to Louis VIII in 1224. within the context of their many allies and enemies. devotion and the other arts of the church in the medieval period. its patronage.ac. (This is a double course which can only be taken with Na1. Richard I. and who the staff were who served them.

Group Na: 2. Na3 often overlooked. These seminars will examine the strategies developed by English men and women for preserving health and coping with sickness. and it is precisely because of its eclectic and idiosyncratic character that Beowulf can also prove a perfect companion to the wider world of Old English literature. it is eccentric in both narrative and language. an aspect that this course will explore. The shared story of Beowulf Professor Andy Orchard FRSC Beowulf is the greatest literary relic from Anglo-Saxon England. English society was far from passive in the face of disease. Na2 Healing and health in late medieval England. matter and the measure of all things Dr Spike Bucklow This course considers medieval paintings as physical objects that embody craft skills and cultural values.00pm – 3.30pm Na1 Pillars of faith.uk | 75 .ac. Yet while Beowulf is of evident excellence. both individually and at a collective level in towns and cities. 1300-1500 Professor Carole Rawcliffe FSA FRHistS Although the long 15th century has memorably been described as 'a golden age of bacteria'. thus integrating construction and iconography. A brief history of the English parish church in the Middle Ages Professor Nigel Saul FRHistS This is a double course which can only be taken with Ka1. It will look at the artist as homo faber (man the maker) and will consider artists’ creative processes and created products as reflections of God’s creative process and His creation. but it so far surpasses the other surviving texts.cam. its links with the rest of the corpus are Email: intenq@ice. Na4 Making paintings – man.

30pm Kb1 Kb3 In spectacular fashion Henry V renewed the Hundred Years’ War in 1415 but the conquest of France was not complete by his death in 1422 and in 1429 a young maid threatened to evict the English from their French territories. and will explore the dynamic figures of Wallace. 76 | www. But who were the saints that the English themselves produced and venerated? We will look at five cults including St Cuthbert and Thomas Becket to illuminate the English contribution to medieval popular religion and ritual. politics. especially with regard to Scottish and Welsh political identity.) This course commences with an overview of makers and users. circumstances and techniques of medieval manuscript production from late Antiquity to the Renaissance.Week 2 (11 – 17 August) Group Kb: 11.uk/intsummer Medieval English saints Dr Philip Morgan FSA . Joan of Arc and the end of the Hundred Years' War Dr Rowena E Archer FRHistS Kb2 Making and 'reading' medieval manuscripts Professor Michelle P Brown FSA Conquest and rebellion in Scotland and Wales Richard Partington Kb4 Medieval history remains extraordinarily current. Henry V. Luttrell Psalter and Holkham Bible. Bruce and Glyn Dwr. chivalry and intrigue which continues to raise intense debate amongst historians. powerful and capable of patronage and punishment.cam. (This is a double course which can only be taken with Nb1.00am – 12.ice. This is a tale of piety. This course will examine how the struggle for independence in late medieval Scotland and Wales fitted into a European context of burgeoning sovereignty and imperialism. and will consider ways of 'reading' them as cultural artefacts today. Medieval saints represented the very special dead. It will go on to present some detailed case studies illustrating different approaches to major projects.ac. including the Lindisfarne Gospels.

uk | 77 . Nb3 The architecture of pilgrimage Dr Francis Woodman Pilgrims were a common sight on the roads of medieval Europe. Nb2 Towns and trade in medieval England Professor Mark Bailey FRHistS Commercial activity in medieval England grew substantially. both of which laid the foundations of civic life. Towns grew in number and size. and England around 1400 to explain its contemporary meanings. some venturing as far as Jerusalem and the Holy Land. including discussing documents provided by the Course Director. fostered an extensive pilgrim culture with its own Holy Places. with important implications for welfare and society. We consider these great survivors of the Middle Ages and travellers’ accommodation along the route. and their inhabitants gained greater autonomy to run their affairs.30pm Nb1 Henry V.ac. too. often re-edified as splendid monuments. Email: intenq@ice. Nb4 Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Dr Philip Morgan FSA Gawain is honour-bound to find the Green Knight whom he has beheaded in a Christmas ‘game’ and from whom he must receive a return stroke. In both religions.cam.Group Nb: 2.00pm – 3. shrines and other cult objects were housed in special buildings. and what was the historical context? We will explore the poem itself. Who were the poet and audience. Islam. Joan of Arc and the end of the Hundred Years’ War Dr Rowena E Archer FRHistS This is a double course which can only be taken with Kb1. This course will explore these impressive developments.

ac.uk/intsummer .cam.” Dr Karen Ottewell. providing you with the skills and confidence to gain the most from your chosen academic programme.“Our experienced EAP instructors and expert support will enhance your listening and speaking proficiency.ice. Director of English for Academic Purposes 78 | www.

it is possible that your home university may award you credit towards your degree for these courses.cam. writing and reading. Shakespeare. You will also be able to attend evening lectures given by leading academics and experts in a variety of subjects. Email: intenq@ice. You can choose one of the following programmes: Interdisciplinary Summer School Term II. Activities will include: listening to lectures and taking notes. More information on the writing workshop will be available once applicants have been accepted. personalised English for Academic Purposes (EAP) programme offered by the University of Cambridge Language Centre. as well as the chance for academic study at the University of Cambridge. Please note: you can only opt to take courses from one of the Summer Schools listed above and cannot mix courses from other programmes. You can write papers for the Summer School courses – these will be graded by the Course Directors and you will be given a narrative report.0-6.0 in speaking. If you are attending a degree course in your home country. In weeks three and four you take academic courses as a member of the University of Cambridge International Summer Schools. The primary goal of this two-week course will be on the listening process. or Medieval Studies.uk | 79 . Participants on the EAP programme will also have the opportunity to join an optional writing workshop which will take place during the programme.ac. listening. guided discussions. The minimum requirement for admission to the EAP programme is an overall IELTS band score of 6. Successful applicants will be invited to join the EAP course on the basis of an assessment. the secondary focus of the course will be on speaking. seminars. helping students to cope effectively with academic English. These programmes provide the opportunity for putting into action some of the skills learned previously.English for Academic Purposes (EAP) 21 July – 17 August This programme is for second language students already proficient in English who wish to develop their language skills.0 with not less than 6.5. a percentage mark. The programme is designed around learners’ specific needs and is delivered through a range of face-to-face and learning activities. The focus is on learner support. debating and solo and pair presentations. The first two weeks are spent taking the intensive. a grade report and certificate of attendance. It is aimed at those who already hold an overall IELTS band score of 6.

cam.ac. participants deepen their understanding of academic language and maximise their abilities in the IELTS exam.” Dr Karen Ottewell.ice.“By working with specially designed academic skills materials and with teachers expert in IELTS preparation. Director of English for Academic Purposes 80 | www.uk/intsummer .

Mock examination: Saturday 20 July (all day) IELTS examination: Saturday 27 July (all day) The course includes a full mock IELTS examination taken at the end of the second week. participants who wish to can sit the full IELTS examination in Cambridge. such as presentation skills and academic authoring.5-6. but in many ways the far more important one. The minimum requirement for admission to the IELTS programme is an overall IELTS band score of 5. The course draws upon many successful factors of the EAP programme. is the strengthening and development of English for Academic Purposes (EAP) and the associated key transferable skills.0 level required. It is aimed at students who already hold an overall IELTS band score of 5. The course is designed to prepare candidates for the Academic Training Module in the IELTS examination.5 in speaking.ac.IELTS Preparation Course 7 – 28 July The University of Cambridge also offers an exciting alternative to its successful English for Academic Purposes Summer School – a threeweek intensive International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Preparation Course taught at the University’s Language Centre. but is aimed towards those who have not yet achieved the 6. Email: intenq@ice.cam. If you do not have the required qualification please contact the Summer Schools office. At the end of the three-week course. writing and reading. The secondary focus of the course. It is hoped that IELTS students will return to participate in the EAP programme next year. This aspect of the course will be drawn from the Language Centre’s own English for Academic Purposes (EAP) programmes which are tailored to the needs of Cambridge undergraduate and postgraduate students. which are the abilities required of any student going into UK Higher Education.0 and who wish to upgrade their score in order to gain admission to a British university.uk | 81 .5 with not less than 5. listening. Successful applicants will be invited to join the IELTS course on the basis of an assessment.

University of Cambridge. Anglia Ruskin University Dr John Lawson – Research Associate. Director of Studies in Politics. Former Member of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. Department of Psychiatry. Senior Lecturer in Psychology. Affiliated Scholar in Archaeology. Anglia Ruskin University.ac. Lecturer for the Department of German. Faculty of Education. University of Cambridge.uk/intsummer . University of Cambridge Dr John Howlett – Lecturer. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Mary Conochie – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Paul Crossley – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Jonathan Davis – Principal Lecturer in Russian and Modern History.cam. University of Cambridge. University of Cambridge Dr Nicholas James – Consultant. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Andrew Lacey – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education. University of Cambridge Dr Seán Lang – Senior Lecturer in History. Autism Research Centre. Psychology and Sociology. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Siân Griffiths – Freelance Lecturer in History and History of Art Caroline Holmes – Garden Historian. Sidney Sussex College Simon Browne – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Piers Bursill-Hall – Lecturer for the Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.Teaching staff Interdisciplinary Summer Schools Term I and Term II Max Beber – Senior Tutor and College Lecturer in Economics. Anglia Ruskin University John Gilroy – Lecturer in English. Oxford Brookes University 82 | www. Girton College.ice.

University of Cambridge. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr John MacGinnis – Research Fellow. University of London Dr Nicholas James – Consultant. Anglia Ruskin University Ancient Empires Summer School Dr Corinne Duhig – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education. Royal Holloway and Birkbeck College. University of Cambridge. University of Cambridge Dr Justin Meggitt – University Senior Lecturer in the study of Religion and the Origins of Christianity. Department for the Study of Religions. Economic Advisor to Defra UK (Department for Environment. Institute of Continuing Education and Affiliated Lecturer. University of Cambridge. Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. Cambridge Theological Federation Email: intenq@ice. University of Cambridge Richard Yates – Former Senior Lecturer. Food and Rural Affairs) Charlie Nurse – Research Associate. Centre of Latin American Studies.uk | 83 . Vice-Principal and Academic Director. Fellow of Wolfson College Dr Paul Millett – Senior Lecturer in Ancient History. Faculty of Divinity. McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.ac. Institute for Orthodox Christian Studies. Fellow in Classics and Admissions Tutor. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Karolina Watras – Affiliated Lecturer. University of Cambridge. Senior Member. Downing College Dr Marcus Plested – Affiliated Lecturer. Wolfson College Dr Karim Esmail – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Robert Harding – Affiliated Researcher in the Indian Languages and Cultures Research Programme. King’s College Dr Nigel Miller – Lecturer. Affiliated Scholar in Archaeology.Dr Graham McCann – Former Lecturer in Social and Political Theory. University of Cambridge. University of Cambridge Dr Erica C D Hunter – Lecturer in Eastern Christianity.cam. Open University Jon Phelan – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Paul Suttie – Former Fellow of Robinson College. University of Cambridge. University of London. School of Oriental and African Studies. Department of History of Art. Associate Lecturer in History. Faculty of Divinity.

University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Robin Catchpole FRAS – Institute of Astronomy. University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Science Summer School Professor Chris Abell – Professor in Biological Chemistry. Scientist in Residence. Director of Studies in Politics. Director of Studies. University of Cambridge.uk/intsummer . Psychology and Sociology. Autism Research Centre. University of Cambridge 84 | www. University of Kent Dr Siân Thomas – Centenary Research Fellow. University of Cambridge. MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. University of Cambridge Dr Lisa Jardine-Wright – Astrophysicist and Educational Outreach Officer at Cavendish Laboratory. Rambert Dance Company. Department of Mathematics and Theoretical Physics. University of Cambridge.ac. Director of Studies in Natural Sciences (biological). Department of Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. Department of Chemistry. University of Cambridge. Todd-Hamied Fellow of Christ’s College Dr M Madan Babu – Programme Leader. Ferreras-Willetts Fellow in Neuroscience.cam.ice. University of Cambridge. Trinity College Professor Michael Bate FRS – Emeritus Professor of Developmental Neurobiology. Oxford Brookes University Professor Imre Leader – Professor of Pure Mathematics. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Francis Woodman – University Lecturer in Art History and Architecture. Millennium Mathematics Project. University of Cambridge. Senior Lecturer in Psychology.Dr Anna Simandiraki-Grimshaw – Associate Lecturer in Classical and Archaeological Studies. Fellow and Director of Studies in Developmental Biology. Fellow of Trinity College Dr Amy Milton – University Lecturer. Selwyn College. University of Cambridge Dr John Lawson – Research Associate. Department of Psychiatry. Downing College Dr John Skidmore – Senior Research Associate. King’s College Dr Emily Caddick – Academic Director and Teaching Officer in Philosophy. Girton College. Clare College Dr James Grime – Enigma Project Officer. Department of Zoology. University of Cambridge. Department of Physics. Department of Experimental Psychology. Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute. University of Cambridge Professor Nicola S Clayton FRS – Professor of Comparative Cognition. University of Cambridge Nicola Humphry-Baker – Postgraduate Researcher in the Department of Physics.

Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Alexander Lindsay – Associate Lecturer. Clare College Jon Phelan – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Paul Suttie – Former Fellow of Robinson College. Lecturer for the Department of German. University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Sarah Burton – Course Director of Creative Writing MSt. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Mark Sutton – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Clive Wilmer – Affiliated Lecturer. University of Cambridge. Vice-Provost and Fellow of King’s College Clive Wilkins – Creative Artist Literature Summer School Dr Jenny Bavidge – Academic Director and University Lecturer in English Literature. Trinity Hall and Professor of British and American Literature. University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Rob Wallach – University Senior Lecturer in Materials Science and Metallurgy. Fellow and Director of Studies in English.ac. Freelance Writer Ulrike Horstmann-Guthrie – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education. Fellow of Sidney Sussex College Email: intenq@ice. University of Cambridge.uk | 85 . Faculty of English. Mona. Wolfson College Dr Elizabeth Moore – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Fred Parker – Senior Lecturer in English. University of the West Indies. University of Cambridge Dr Ann Kennedy Smith – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr John Lennard – Formerly Fellow and Director of Studies in English. University of Cambridge. Clare College.Dr Ed Turner – Academic Director and Teaching Officer in Biological Sciences. Lecturer in English. University of Cambridge. Open University Melissa Lloyd – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr Stephen Logan – Principal Supervisor in English.cam.

Social Sciences and Humanities. Former Member of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. Senior Research Fellow and Director of Studies in History. Gonville and Caius College Dr Andrew Thompson – Fellow. University of Cambridge. University of Cambridge Dr Seán Lang – Senior Lecturer in History.History Summer School Dr Gareth Atkins – Postdoctoral Fellow. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Dr John Lennard – Formerly Fellow and Director of Studies in English. Fellow of Churchill College Dr Diana Henderson FSA Scot – Fellow. Open University Dr David Smith FRHistS – Affiliated Lecturer. Selwyn College Tom Stammers – Junior Research Fellow. Queens’ College Dr Emma Hunter – Fellow and Director of Studies in History. University of Cambridge Dr Gilly Carr – Academic Director and University Senior Lecturer in Archaeology.ac. Fellow of St Catharine’s College Dr Jonathan Davis – Principal Lecturer in Russian and Modern History. Centre of Latin American Studies. College Lecturer in History and Admissions Tutor. Gonville and Caius College Dr Andrew Lacey – Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education. Faculty of History. Associate Lecturer in History. University of Cambridge. Anglia Ruskin University Charlie Nurse – Research Associate.uk/intsummer . Fellow. Tutor for Graduate Students. University of Cambridge.cam. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education 86 | www. Director. Director of Studies in History. University of Birmingham Vivien Heilbron – Actor. Magdalene College. Anglia Ruskin University Dr Mark Goldie FRHistS – Reader in British Intellectual History. Centre for Research in Arts. Affiliated Lecturer. University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education. Trinity Hall and Professor of British and American Literature. Queens’ College Shakespeare Summer School Dr Catherine Alexander – Honorary Research Fellow of the Shakespeare Institute. University of the West Indies. Mona.ice. Faculty of History.

Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies. University of Oxford Professor Mark Bailey FRHistS – High Master of St Paul's School. Hughes Hall Dr Paul Prescott – Associate Professor. University of East Anglia Professor Michelle P Brown FSA – Professor Emerita. University of Keele Professor Andy Orchard FRSC – Provost and Vice-Chancellor. University of East Anglia Professor Nigel Saul FRHistS – Professor of Medieval History.cam. University of Toronto.ac. Faculty of English. Open University Dr Charles Moseley FSA FEA FRSA FRGS – Fellow and Director of Studies in English. Fellow of Sidney Sussex College Medieval Studies Summer School Dr Rowena E Archer FRHistS – Fellow of Brasenose College. University of Cambridge Dr Hugh Doherty – Hugh Price Fellow. University of Warwick Dr Paul Suttie – Former Fellow of Robinson College. Churchill College Professor Carole Rawcliffe FSA FRHistS – Professor of Medieval History.Dr Alexander Lindsay – Associate Lecturer. University of Cambridge. St Edmund’s College Dr Philip Morgan FSA – Senior Lecturer. Professor of Later Medieval History. Fitzwilliam Museum.uk | 87 . University of London Sarah Brown – Lecturer in History of Art and Course Director for MA in Stained Glass Conservation and Heritage Management. Jesus College. Fitzwilliam College. University of Oxford Dr Rosemary Horrox FRHistS – Fellow and Director of Studies in History. School of Advanced Study. University of York Dr Spike Bucklow – Senior Research Scientist and Teacher of Theory at the Hamilton Kerr Institute. Trinity College. Professor of English and Medieval Studies. London. Director of Studies in History. University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Email: intenq@ice. University of Toronto Richard Partington – Senior Tutor and Director of Studies in History. University of London Dr Francis Woodman – University Lecturer in Art History and Architecture. Panel Tutor for the University of Cambridge Institute of Continuing Education Clive Wilmer – Affiliated Lecturer.

although this may be possible in some cases.ac. available for download.uk/intsummer it ends. Please note that we are unable to offer accommodation from Saturday 17 August onwards. . Each College varies in character and history. For information on guest houses and lodgings please contact the Cambridge Tourist Information Centre. Couples are normally housed in adjacent rooms. the information overleaf should help you to decide where to stay if multiple options are available. Non-residential attendance at the Summer Schools is also possible if you would prefer to find your own accommodation. Accommodation is in very basic. Participants from more than one Summer School will be housed in the same College – this gives you the chance to meet fellow students studying on other programmes. The Colleges are not like hotels and it is not normally possible to accommodate you if you arrive before your Summer School starts or want to stay on after 88 | www.ice.Accommodation All Summer School students have the opportunity to live in the Cambridge Colleges. A range of options is available.cam. The University can accept no responsibility for finding accommodation for those applying for non-residential places. depending on programme choice. The Colleges available to you depend on the programme(s) you are attending. Those attending two consecutive programmes or terms who intend to stay for the night(s) between Summer Schools may book accommodation for an additional charge. You may stay at Madingley Hall if space permits (see page 103 for further details). More information is available on our website. Please note there is no standard room size. space permitting. so you will be living like a Cambridge student. single bed-sitting rooms normally occupied by undergraduates. from simple room only accommodation through to comfortable en suite rooms including breakfast and evening meals. Please note that this option is subject to availability and bookings must be made by 1 June. Further information about early arrival and late departure is available on our website and in the student handbook.

Literature. Great St Mary’s Church. Computer room.Gonville and Caius College St Michael's Court Accommodation available for: Ancient Empires. Wireless internet access in reception area.uk | 89 . Science and History Facilities include: Wired laptop connections in room. Laundry room. who now account for half of its student numbers. students will be staying in accommodation in St Michael's Court right in the heart of the city centre.ac.cam. Shakespeare. In 1924 Girton received its formal College charter. In 1869 the educational reformer Emily Davies set up a female establishment on the Cambridge collegiate model. Science. Wi-fi access is only available in the public areas of the college including the bar Location on map: E/G Gonville Hall was founded in 1348 by a Norfolk priest. Courtyards Location on map: A Wolfson Court is part of Girton College. and the new College of Gonville and Caius received its charter from Mary I in 1557. Wolfson Court is 1. In 1979 Girton started to admit men. Edmund Gonville. TV room.4km from the city centre. History. Please note that there are no en suite rooms available. Public telephone. It was enlarged by John Caius. within Old Court). Please note that there are no ground floor rooms available. to prepare students for the Cambridge tripos. Internet access is not available in guest bedrooms. All of the rooms are traditional single shared-facility rooms. Literature. close to the market.2km from the Sidgwick teaching site. Email: intenq@ice. Breakfast and evening meals will be served in Old Court's Dining Hall. This summer. Situated around six inner courts. Medieval Studies and EAP Facilities include: Telephones (public. 1. Laundry room. Girton College Accommodation available for: Ancient Empires.9km from the Mill Lane teaching site and 1. it provides a pleasant and relaxed setting for studying. Students could also opt to take public transport as Wolfson Court is on a bus route. Bar. The Wolfson Court site was built in 1969. the Senate House and the main shopping area. Wolfson Court. All are accessible on foot. an eminent physician.

with a turreted gate-tower and a chapel reminiscent in shape of King’s College chapel built 400 years earlier. Laundry room.ice. well suited to its setting around extensive lawns and flower beds.ac. Old Court is set in large secluded gardens very close to the teaching rooms and not far from the town centre. the first Bishop of New Zealand. scientists and intellectuals. contributing greatly to feminist reform and producing many leading women writers. Students living in Cripps Court and Ann’s Court take their meals in the main dining hall in Old Court. Telephones (public). its first principal. Shakespeare* and Medieval Studies* *Ann's Court only Facilities include: Wired laptop connections in room (wireless not available). A number of the student rooms are in more modern buildings which blend well with their older counterparts alongside. the moral philosopher and promoter of women’s education and Anne Jemima Clough. C (Cripps Court). Selwyn’s Old Court architecture is in the red-brick neo-Tudor style of the 1880s. Ann’s Court is a newlybuilt facility offering en suite rooms. EAP*. Chapel/Prayer room. Cripps Court and Ann’s Court Accommodation available for: ISS Term I. Bar/Common room. ISS Term II and EAP Facilities include: Wireless internet access (in some public areas). Cripps Court is the more modern residential accommodation situated close to Old Court.cam.Newnham College Accommodation available for: ISS Term I. Gardens Location on map: F Newnham College is one of the most important and influential College foundations since the 16th century. Gardens Location on map: B (Ann’s Court). Telephone (public). its early mentors were Henry Sidgwick. D (Old Court) Selwyn College was founded in 1882 in memory of George Augustus Selwyn. 90 | www. Laundry room.uk/intsummer Selwyn College Old Court. ISS Term II. Founded in 1871. . K and L. Newnham received a College charter in 1917 and in 1948 its women finally received University degrees. Please note that Cripps Court has building works on staircases J. The original series of buildings were designed by Basil Champneys and built in the graceful Queen Anne style with Dutch red-brick gables and white woodwork. Please note that the en suite rooms available are not on the ground floor.

St Catharine’s College Clare College Accommodation available for: Ancient Empires. The College was rebuilt in the 17th century with work on the main court beginning in 1674 and the chapel completed thirty years later. Laundry room. Chapel/Prayer room. Gardens Location on map: H Location on map: J/K St Catharine’s College was founded in 1473 by Robert Woodlark.ac. Grumbold also built Clare’s unique bridge. Computer room. History. The imposing Memorial Court. Computer room. Shakespeare. reached by crossing Grumbold’s famous bridge. College bar Facilities include: Wired laptop connections in room. Science. Literature.uk | 91 . Sports facilities. Laundry room. was designed by Gilbert Scott in the 1920s and helped to accommodate women undergraduates when Clare became one of the first colleges to become co-residential in 1972. Bar/Common room. Grumbold and son. Today the College is an intriguing mix of the old and the new and is set in the heart of the ancient city of Cambridge. Chapel/Prayer room. Shakespeare and Medieval Studies Facilities include: Wired internet access (wireless is not available). now the oldest on the Cam. History. between 1638 and 1715. Founded in 1326 as University Hall and re-founded in 1338. Clare is the second oldest Cambridge College. Literature. Telephones (public). a wealthy granddaughter of Edward I who endowed the foundation of 1338. Originally established for the study of ‘philosophy and sacred theology’. former Chancellor of the University. Gardens. Email: intenq@ice.cam. Medieval Studies and IELTS Accommodation available for: Science. The College takes its name from Lady Elizabeth de Clare. Woodlark also left elaborate instructions with regard to the prayers to be said for the benefit of his soul following his death. The present main court was built by local architects. where you will be living. Wireless internet access (public areas only). Breakfast and dinner will be a fiveminute walk away in Clare College Old Court.

| www.uk/intsummer Select one of the above for weeks 3 and 4 History English for Academic Purposes Ancient Empires IELTS Preparation Course Medieval Studies Literature Term II Literature Term I Shakespeare Science Term II Interdisciplinary Summer School Term II Science Term I Interdisciplinary Summer School Term I 16 Aug Fri 15 Aug Thurs 14 Aug Wed 13 Aug Tues 12 Aug Mon 11 Aug Sun 10 Aug Sat 09 Aug Fri 08 Aug Thurs 07 Aug Wed 06 Aug Tues 05 Aug Mon 04 Aug Sun 03 Aug Sat 02 Aug Fri 01 Aug Thurs 31 July Wed 30 July Tues 29 July Mon 28 July Sun 27 July Sat 26 July Fri 25 July Thurs 24 July Wed 23 July Tues 22 July Mon 21 July Sun 20 July Sat 19 July Fri 18 July Thurs 17 July Wed 16 July Tues 15 July Mon 14 July Sun 13 July Sat 12 July Fri 11 July Thurs 10 July Wed 09 July Tues 08 July Mon 07 July Sun Programme calendar 17 Aug Sat 92 .cam.ice.ac.

740 £1.005 £2.055 £1. Full programme fees Gonville and Caius College Standard Accommodation options and fees Clare College En suite £88 £1.685 £2.705 £1.140 £2.475 Literature Term I £1.825 £1.970 £2.070 £1.060 Literature Term II £1.050 £1.055 £1.135 £1.965 £2.040 £3.960 Wolfson Court Standard Ancient Empires £3.705 History Shakespeare £1.970 £1.035 £1.090 £1.715 Newnham College Standard (Room only) £2.085 £1.000 £2.495 1 week tuition fees only .000 £1. bed.965 £1.000 £1.015 Selwyn College Old Court Standard £1.250 £1.040 £1.000 £1.050 £3.825 £1.175 Clare College Standard £75 £1.965 £1.000 £1.710 £1.035 £1.705 £2.675 £2.970 £1.005 £1.000 £1.450 Selwyn College Cripps Court Standard £1.140 £2.085 £80 Extra nights between programmes/terms £73 £63 £54 £56 £940 £940 £930 Literature Term I or II or History Shakespeare or Medieval Studies £975 £940 £930 £965 Science Term I or II 1 week only fees £3. breakfast and evening meals unless otherwise indicated.140 £2.325 £1.710 Ancient Empires £61 £2.970 £1.800 £1.970 £1.965 £1.745 £1.000 £1.040 Medieval Studies IELTS £2.140 £2.140 £2.795 Selwyn College Old Court En suite Science Term I £73 Newnham College Standard £3.825 £1. £1.825 £3.000 St Catharine’s College En suite £75 £1.cam.230 EAP £1.825 Full programme tuition fees only n/a n/a £605 £605 £605 £605 £605 £640 £640 £605 n/a n/a All fees correct at the time of print.050 £1.000 £1.710 £1.360 Selwyn College Ann’s Court En suite Science Term II £1.170 £2.175 £2.ac.745 £1.710 £1.020 £1.135 £1.Email: intenq@ice.705 £1.860 £1.825 £1.740 £3.860 £1.825 £1.710 £1.020 £985 £3.965 £1.325 Interdisciplinary Term II Newnham College En suite Interdisciplinary Term I All prices include tuition.710 £1.545 £1.960 £3.970 St Catharine’s College Standard £64 £985 £985 £1.uk | 93 £36 £53 £4.

and from teachers. Applicants must satisfy themselves and the organisers of the Summer Schools that their English is of a standard high enough for them to be able to understand and follow arguments presented in written and spoken English at university level. The minimum requirement is an overall band score of 6. The minimum requirement is 600 in the paper-based TOEFL test with 5.uk/intsummer Language requirements for interdisciplinary and specialist programmes All teaching for the Summer Schools is in English. Applications are welcome from undergraduate and graduate students who have completed at least one year of academic study in a university or other institute of higher education. students should always check current requirements for themselves. The minimum . rather than the internet-based test. achieved in the same sitting and no more than two years before the start of the programme. lecturers and other adult learners with an interest in the subject. Applicants must be fluent in English (please see the language requirements section below). 94 | www. since regulations may change and additional documents may be required.ac. Those who opt for the paper-based TOEFL test (PBT).uk Students must ensure they allow sufficient time for the processing of appropriate visas so that they are in a safe legal position to complete their course of study in Cambridge. regardless of their educational background or profession. Details can be obtained from local British Council offices. A paper-based TOEFL score without the TWE is not acceptable.ukba. the minimum requirement is an overall score of 100.homeoffice.Booking terms and conditions Who should apply? These are university-level programmes.0 in the TWE. We require all applicants whose first language is not English (except those opting to do EAP or IELTS. Visas At the time of going to print. must take the Test of Written English (TWE) at the same time. please see below) to have one of the following test results: IELTS (International English Language Testing System) is the University’s preferred test. the programmes are not open to high school or pre-university applicants. However. Please consult the Home Office website for more information about making a visa application: www.5 with not less than 6. with a minimum score of 25 in each element.gov.5 in each element.cam.ice. Regrettably. In the TOEFL internet-based Test (iBT). All of the programmes (unless otherwise stated) are open-access. the Student Visitor Visa is the relevant document for international students accepted on Summer School programmes.

0 and who wish to upgrade their score in order to gain admission to a British university. Literature Term II. achieved in the same sitting and no more than two years before the start of the programme. If you pay your balance of fees by bank transfer you must inform us and send proof of payment to us.0 in speaking. Our institution code for TOEFL is 7207. below. It is aimed at students who already hold an overall band score of 6. If the full fee is not paid by the balance of payment date the University reserves the right to cancel the application and allocate places to those who may be on waiting lists for courses or accommodation. Medieval Studies: Monday 10 June Email: intenq@ice. IELTS: Monday 13 May ISS Term I: Tuesday 14 May Science Term II.5 in speaking. Literature Term I.cam. You need to include original or certified copies of these results with your application form. The remainder of the fee must be paid by the balance of payment date. listening. achieved in the same sitting and no more than two years before the start of the programme.0 with not less than 6.uk | 95 . Language requirements for IELTS The IELTS programme is aimed at students who already hold an overall band score of 5. Shakespeare. Applications sent after the balance of payment date and before the application deadline must be accompanied by the full fee payment. Without these documents. The minimum requirement for admission to the programme is an overall band score of 6. or £400 for a four-week programme must accompany all applications received before the balance of payment date for the relevant programme (see below). EAP: Monday 27 May ISS Term II.0-6. we will not be able to process your application. Balance of payment dates Science Term I. The minimum requirement for admission to the IELTS programme is an overall band score of 5.ac.5.requirements must be achieved in the same sitting and no more than two years before the start of the programme. writing and reading. Language requirements for EAP This programme is for second language students already proficient in English who wish to develop their language skills. This registration fee is part of the full fee for the programme quoted on page 93. writing and reading.5-6. Applications will not be processed until the registration fee is received. listening. Fees A registration fee of £200 for each one-/two-/three-week programme or term. Ancient Empires.5 with not less than 5. History. The registration fee is nonrefundable (after acceptance) and is not transferable to other participants or other years. Students with Cambridge CAE are required to achieve grade C or above.

Any student who wishes to change from one week to another within the same 96 | www. Should a course have to be cancelled due to very low enrolment or last-minute unforeseen circumstances. and an alternative course place arranged. Any registered student who wishes to change from one Summer School or term to another must pay an administration fee of £25. Please note that there is a difference in accommodation costs charged by Colleges and the tiered pricing system reflects this.cam. couples will be assigned to adjacent single rooms. fees cannot be refunded if a student decides to drop an evaluation. Appeals Appeals procedures are in place for participants on the University’s Summer Schools who undertake written work for evaluation. Evaluation An evaluation fee of £40 is charged for the assessment of written work in one special subject course. If requested. Certificates and grade reports We reserve the right to retain certificates and grade reports if fees are still outstanding on completion of programmes. Any student who wishes to change from one week to another in a different programme/ term will be charged an administration fee of £25. we would endeavour to provide a substitute of equal standing. Course change Any registered student who wishes to change from one course to another (where places are available) must pay an administration fee of £10 for each course change made. The University can .uk/intsummer programme or term must pay an administration fee of £20. where possible. Accommodation The accommodation fee pays for a single room. Programme/term change Administrative costs are incurred in changing programmes/terms. Non-residential attendance at the Summer Schools is also possible if you prefer to find your own accommodation. breakfast and evening meals. for three courses £120 and for four courses £160. The charge for evaluation in two courses is £80 and. Information on guest houses and lodgings in Cambridge is available from the Cambridge Tourist Information Centre. or if library books have not been returned. Details of these are in the student handbook available to download from our Online Resource Centre.ice.Programmes and courses We reserve the right to alter details of any course should illness or emergency prevent a Course Director from teaching. Places in all Colleges will be allocated on a first-come. Please note: course changes cannot usually be made once your course has started. Please note that once an application has been accepted. any participant enrolled on that course would be contacted immediately. firstserved basis once accepted to the programme.ac. unless otherwise stated. where applicable. In such circumstances.

we shall offer you accommodation in a different College. Please note that the specific room allocations are not finalised until the week before the start of the Summer Schools and we ask that you do not contact us or the Colleges to find out your room allocation in advance of your arrival in Cambridge. first-served basis in order of acceptance and can fill up very quickly. Please note that room sizes may vary considerably.cam. Accommodation between consecutive programmes/terms and early and late departures Those attending two consecutive programmes or terms and intending to stay for the night(s) between these may book accommodation for an additional charge. This helps us to allocate you a College place. Building works We endeavour to inform you of any major building works scheduled when the Summer Schools are in progress but can accept no responsibility for Email: intenq@ice. we shall assume you will not need this accommodation and you will be asked to clear your room. If you do not indicate this.uk | 97 . Please mark on the application form if you want to book your room for the night(s) between the two programmes. You are welcome to express preferences for particular rooms in Colleges on your application form. Please indicate on your application form whether you have any special requirements and we will contact you for further information.ac. you will be allocated to your second or third choice. it is important to note that rooms are allocated in order of acceptance and the Colleges cannot guarantee to fulfil every request. If you are away from Cambridge between your programmes and leave luggage in your room. Bookings must be made by 1 June 2013. You might also consider staying at Madingley Hall for these extra nights instead (see page 103 for details). These requests are passed on to the Colleges.accept no responsibility for finding accommodation for those applying for non-residential places. Whilst every effort is made to ensure that you receive the room you have requested. You are asked on the application form to confirm that we may charge your debit/credit card for the difference. Early arrivals and late departures can usually be accommodated subject to availability. Special requirements We make every effort to accommodate the needs of those with special dietary or medical requirements. whose staff allocate the rooms in the weeks leading up to the Summer Schools. without the need to ask you again or delay the application process. If the College to which you have been allocated cannot meet your needs. It is important that you complete your alternative choices of accommodation on your application form as College places are allocated on a first-come. if your second or third choice is more expensive than your first choice. you will be charged the room fee for the night(s) that the luggage is left. Accommodation allocation When your first choice of College is full.

• Cancellations received less than two weeks prior to the start of the programme/non arrivals are not eligible for a refund. etc. particularly if students have known medical needs that may require attention. Cancelled bookings are subject to the fees set out in the cancellation policy above. or cancellation due to unforeseen circumstances. Accommodation refunds will be processed after the summer. The Summer Schools and the University accept no liability for loss or damage to student property. late arrival.ac. • Payment of the balance of tuition and accommodation fees is due in full eight weeks before the programme start date (see page 95). any student cancelling up to eight weeks before the programme starts will be eligible for a full refund of the balance of payment (excluding the registration fee). . early or delayed departure. Prescription charges are additional. Medical insurance Your home country may have a reciprocal arrangement with the UK so that medical care is free. • Applications will continue to be accepted. Insurance should cover any expenses incurred as a result of lost or stolen property. where places are available. we will endeavour to provide an alternative course. Cancellation policy and fees • There is a non-refundable registration fee of £200 for each one-/two-/three-week programme or term. Travel insurance It is essential that all visitors take out travel insurance before travelling to Cambridge to cover themselves for their return journey and the duration of their stay. up to the start of the programme. • In the unlikely event that we have to cancel a course at the last minute due to a lecturer's illness. it is essential that students take out medical insurance to cover them during their stay. • Cancellations due to an unsuccessful visa application are not eligible for a refund. Students may be charged £47 or more for an appointment.ice. 98 | www. • If balance of payment has been made in full before the due date. Medical and hospital costs are expensive and payment is often needed at the time of treatment.uk/intsummer • All fees are non-transferable to another year or another student.cam. If it does not.unscheduled or unexpected works which the Colleges or University may undertake. • Cancellations between the balance of payment date and two weeks before the start of the programme are eligible for a 50% refund of the balance of tuition fees and the full evaluation fee (if selected) and may be eligible for a refund of the accommodation fee depending on College policy. once College invoices have been received. or £400 for a four-week programme.

this is not always possible.How to apply and payment Applications Early application is advisable as places on courses and in the Colleges are limited and allocated on a first-come. Course and accommodation availability can be found on our website or obtained from the Summer Schools office.ac. you should send your application form to your group contact. second and third choices in courses and.ac. Print your full name and the Summer School for which you are applying. non- transferable registration fee must be received with your application. as places are limited. clearly on the back of each photograph. if required. UK Fax: +44 (0) 1223 760848 www. however you can apply online via our website.4” x 1. and for College and office records. Please ensure that you check these folders regularly once you have applied. Madingley Cambridge CB23 8AQ. We try to place people in their first choices. Please note: if you are applying as part of an institutional group.cam.uk/intsummer Please note: some emails sent from our office are occasionally redirected to junk or spam folders. For more information please visit our website. We are unable to accept applications by email. if you are applying after the balance of payment deadline) by post or fax to the below address or fax number. Paper-based application Applicants can also apply by completing the application form at the back of the brochure or by downloading a copy from our website. Once you have completed the relevant sections send the form with your registration fee (or with the full fee. first-served basis.8”) of yourself: these will be used for your ID card during the summer. Course/accommodation selection Indicate your first. • Original or certified copy of language proficiency test results (IELTS/TOEFL/ Cambridge CAE) for those whose first language is not English. University of Cambridge International Programmes Institute of Continuing Education Madingley Hall.ice. however. Additional materials For each programme/term you are applying for please include: • Three small.uk | 99 . • The non-refundable. recent colour photographs (maximum size 35mm x 45mm/1. Please ensure that you have read the terms and conditions before applying. Email: intenq@ice. accommodation.cam. Online application Applicants who wish to pay by card have the option to apply and pay online.

IELTS: Monday 24 June If paying by credit card. Shakespeare. please complete your payment details on the application form • Bank transfer receipt (if necessary) • Travellers’ cheques in sterling. Application check list • Signed application form • Photographs • Proof of language proficiency • The non-refundable registration fee*. Cheques or postal orders should be made payable to ‘University of Cambridge’. Applications will continue to be accepted.ice. After the balance of payment date fees must be paid in full at the time of registration. Applications should reach the Summer Schools office by the deadlines specified below. please ensure that you have sufficient credit limit. Personal cheques drawn on banks outside the United Kingdom cannot be accepted in any circumstances. If you are paying the full fees. where places are available. Medieval Studies: Monday 22 July *If applying after the balance of payment date. Ancient Empires. EAP: Monday 8 July ISS Term II. fees must be paid in full 100 | www. Literature Term I. • Cheque drawn on a UK bank.The balance of payment is due by the relevant date (see page 95). • VISA or Mastercard/Eurocard/JCB card (please note that we do not accept American Express). The University reserves the right to retrieve from applicants any bank charges or exchange costs which arise from payments.cam. Please do not send cash.ac. History.) at the time of registration. and that your bank or credit card company have been notified of the transaction to avoid delays in payment.uk/intsummer • Bank transfer (copy of transfer receipt must be sent with application). . Before the balance of payment date you may choose to pay the full fee when you apply. Application deadlines Science Term I. Methods of payment Payment of fees must be by one of the following methods: • Sterling banker’s draft drawn on a UK bank (applicants should speak to their own bank to arrange this). (Applications cannot be processed without this. If you are paying by bank transfer you must include your transfer receipt. up to the start of the programme. Literature Term II. made in other ways (including Eurocheques). please calculate the full fee according to your first choice of accommodation and complete your payment details on the application form. ISS Term I: Tuesday 25 June Science Term II.

Your application will be assigned as 'pending'* until the issue is resolved.uk | 101 . course materials.ac. unless we are informed otherwise. your acceptance letter will be sent directly to the group contact for them to distribute to you. your application will be assigned as 'pending'. Email: intenq@ice. your application will be processed and accepted.cam. your application will be processed and accepted. Until this time. • If requested. * If applications are assigned as pending. an invoice or receipt showing the fees you have paid and (if applicable) the balance to be paid. course materials etc. • If your application is incomplete (eg missing language documentation. Your application will be assigned as 'pending'* until the issue is resolved. • If you have paid by bank transfer we will process your application once receipt of your payment has been confirmed. etc) you will be contacted via email. • If your application is incomplete (eg missing language documentation. etc) you will be contacted via email. You will also be able to communicate with fellow participants via the student forum prior to your arrival. will be sent by standard post. or.*** • You will be emailed login details for the Online Resource Centre where you should access the student handbook. Once your application is accepted: • We will send you. information about your College. Applications received online: • Automatic emails** are sent to all applicants who complete the online process to: 1. paper copies of your acceptance letter. Confirm online payment • Your application is automatically sent to our database for processing. ** Please note that these emails are not confirmation of acceptance on to the Summer Schools.What happens next? Applications received via fax or post: • Confirmation of receipt of your application will be sent via email. • If all requirements are met/all documents are received.* This may take two weeks or more. invoice/receipt. *** If you have applied through an institutional group. for an additional £25. excursions. Confirm online booking 3. your acceptance letter (including allocated courses and accommodation). room and course allocations will not be made. via email. Confirm online order 2. they are just confirmation of your online booking. by express courier. • If all requirements are met/all documents are received. etc.

Please note. Please note that we are unable to offer accommodation from Saturday 17 August onwards. rooms may not be available before 2pm. Can I do this? If you are staying in one of the Colleges and wish to book an extra night before the start or after the end of your programme.cam. (See page 94. and applications we receive each year the fairest way of ensuring this is to ask all applicants for whom English is not their first language to meet our minimum requirements on one of the approved language tests. but it is not my first language. The last date of the programme is the departure date. English is not my first language but the language of instruction at my home institution is/was English. Scandinavia. There is a supplementary charge for extra nights (see page 93).Frequently asked questions When should I arrive? The start date of each programme is the arrival date. I am fluent in English. Do I need to take one of the approved language tests? All applicants whose first language is not English need to provide an original or a certified copy of language proficiency test results. This option is subject to availability and bookings must be made by 1 June. Pakistan.ice. I do not have a formal English qualification. At the end of each full programme or term there is a closing dinner. Classes begin the following day. Classes finish the day before the departure date. You should aim to arrive and register between 11am and 5pm on that day. . when certificates of attendance will be distributed. Do I still need to take one of the approved language tests? Yes. Indicate this on your application form or contact us if you have already applied. Why do I need to take one of the approved language tests? We have a responsibility to all of our students and academic staff to ensure that all participants are able to operate at a specific level of English language proficiency.) 102 | www. Do I need to take one of the approved language tests? See above.ac. and includes applicants from India. This applies to everyone whose first language is not English. this might be possible. as admission standards vary from institution to institution. Given the thousands of enquiries. All applicants in this category need to provide an original or a certified copy of language proficiency test results. the Netherlands and Turkey. I need to arrive one day early/ depart one day late because of travel restrictions.uk/intsummer I am not a native English speaker but my education was completely or partially in English.

the spectacular 16th-century country house on the outskirts of Cambridge which is home to the Institute of Continuing Education. Our growing list of disciplines includes law.ice. coaching. investment and international development.madingleyhall. meaning you get to explore a variety of perspectives on each topic. international development to philosophy and many more.ac. Many are taught through a combination of online learning and occasional teaching blocks in Cambridge. Each course lasts seven weeks and is open to anyone with an interest in the topic. Diplomas and Advanced Diplomas and a growing number of postgraduate qualifications. between January and May.uk/courses www. accommodation at Madingley Hall and the opportunity to join 'the Friends of Madingley Hall': www. Madingley Weekly Programme Classes meet at Madingley Hall once a week for five weeks. including Master of Studies (MSt) degrees. architecture.cam. Madingley Hall Bed and breakfast accommodation may also be available at Madingley Hall. featuring over 150 courses on subjects ranging from New Testament Greek to the challenges of globalisation. Options range from weekend courses right up to part-time Master's programmes.cam. You can choose from a huge range of subjects. Online courses You can now study at Cambridge wherever you are in the world.ac.uk/friends Email: intenq@ice. Students can choose to stay at Madingley Hall. Weekend residential courses Our popular weekend programme runs all year round. so can easily be studied from a distance. Find out more about all ICE courses. You can try out one of our free ‘taster’ courses before you enrol. taught by leading Cambridge experts. which tend to focus on a particular academic field.uk | 103 .ice. classics to creative writing. Unlike traditional short courses.Also at the Institute The Institute of Continuing Education The Institute of Continuing Education (ICE) also offers hundreds of other short and part-time courses for adults of all ages.co. or attend as a non-resident. with our new range of fully online courses.uk www.ac.cam. Part-time undergraduate and postgraduate qualifications At ICE you can study part-time for a Cambridge qualification. from archaeology to architecture. teaching. Professional development Progress your career with our professional development courses. much of the programme is multidisciplinary. We offer over 20 undergraduate-level Certificates.

p80: © Anna Barker. Carlo (1625-1713) / © The Trustees of the Weston Park Foundation. We make every effort to ensure that the information in this brochure is correct at the time of going to print. Library. Serov. Maclise. 60AD. p47: X-ray image of the brain computed tomography. (Harry) (1868-1940) / Private Collection / The Stapleton Collection / The Bridgeman Art Library. Valentin Aleksandrovich (1865-1911) / Tretyakov Gallery. p55: Virginia Woolf (b/w photo) / Private Collection / The Bridgeman Art Library. France / The Bridgeman Art Library. p37: © Laurence Ghier. p88: Clare Bridge by kind permission of Clare College.uk/intsummer .1750 (panel).ice. c. © University of Cambridge. p70: King Lear. p78: © Alexander Fraser. Paul Mellon Fund. Maratta or Maratti. Valley of Mexico. 200 BC 0 AD / Teotihuacan. Encounter between Dante and Beatrice / Photo © Tarker / The Bridgeman Art Library. p38: Boadicea’s attack upon Camulodunum. (19th century) / Private Collection / Ken Welsh / The Bridgeman Art Library. Selwyn College. bodycolour and gum over graphite on paper). 1910 (oil on canvas). p31: Entry of Queen Mary I with Princess Elizabeth into London in 1553. to Ferdinand VI of Spain. Brontë. courtesy of Shutterstock. 104 | www.1865-91) / Private Collection / Ken Welsh / The Bridgeman Art Library. Scott. (18th century) / Musée de la Ville de Paris. CERN / Science Photo Library. by kind permission of Ben Wiley. p49: Sunrise at the beach. Musée Carnavalet. Jack (1907-99) / Private Collection / © Look and Learn / The Bridgeman Art Library. Henry A. © Underwood Photo Archives / SuperStock. p12: © Maiko Ishida. France: c. 1912 (oil on canvas). Robert (fl. c. 264. (13th century) / Carcassonne Cathedral. p20: © Louise Gutteridge. City of London / The Bridgeman Art Library. Nata-Lia. p44: ATLAS detector. p42: Pyramid of the Sun. Act IV. Gilbert. University of Cambridge © Laurence Ghier. Maximilien Brice. 1884 (oil on canvas). Paris. City of London / The Bridgeman Art Library. p69: Hamlet. p72: The Bodleian Libraries. MS. p91: St Catharine’s College by kind permission of St Catharine’s College. Dudley. Paris. courtesy of Shutterstock. p3: © Vanessa Garrett. UK / The Bridgeman Art Library. Sir John (1817-97) / © Guildhall Art Gallery. p60: Dunkirk. p16: © Laurence Ghier. p25: Foundation of the Republic. French School. 218r. Keay. p4: © Maiko Ishida. p23: Open Cambridge 2009. USA / The Bridgeman Art Library. France / The Bridgeman Art Library. 1890 (litho). The Evacuation of Dunkirk as painted by Charles Cundall (1890-1971).2400 BC (terracotta). p59: Dickens's Great Expectations.Image credits Front Cover: Senate House. UK / The Bridgeman Art Library. p57: Dante Alighieri (1265-1321). by kind permission of Newnham College. English School. The University of Oxford. Armet Portanell. c. p15: © Maiko Ishida. June 1. Gris. Mexico / Ken Welsh / The Bridgeman Art Library. José (1843-1911) / Private Collection / © Look and Learn / The Bridgeman Art Library. p11: © Amanda Wilks. Russia / RIA Novosti / The Bridgeman Art Library. c. fol. p53: Portrait of the Brontë Sisters.ac. p75: The north rose window (stained glass). (18th century) / Nuestra Senora de Copacabana. p77: Morning of the Battle of Agincourt. p6: © Maiko Ishida. the first Inca king. Patrick Branwell (1817-48) / National Portrait Gallery. Clare College © Jessica Browner. France / Giraudon / The Bridgeman Art Library. UK / The Bridgeman Art Library. Juan (1887-1927) / Private Collection / The Bridgeman Art Library. 10th August 1792 (coloured engraving) French School.1834 (oil on canvas). Leighton. p76: The Trial of Sir William Wallace at Westminster (oil on canvas). London. Mesopotamian / Louvre. p66: The Reconciliation of the Montagues and the Capulets. p19: © Calvin Chui. Lima. 25th October 1415. p41: Education of Alexander the Great by Aristotle.1854 (w/c. ArtisticPhoto. William Bell (1811-90) (attr. Daniel (1806-70) / Roy Miles Fine Paintings / The Bridgeman Art Library. p33: Accounts Table with cuneiform script. illustration from ‘The History of the Nation’ (litho). 'Is that the law?'. 1940.cam. p90: Newnham College. p89: Dining Hall by kind permission of Gonville and Caius College. to) / © Guildhall Art Gallery. p27: Mother of the Artist. from 'The Illustrated Library Shakespeare'. Shaw. published London 1890 (colour litho). London. p50: Odysseus and Nausicaa (oil on canvas). courtesy of Shutterstock. Spanish School. p71: Shylock speaks in The Merchant of Venice. John Byam Liston (1872-1919) / Palace of Westminster. Moscow. Bodl. Institute of Continuing Education. Scene I. p9: University of Cambridge. Mervas. Payne. p65: Charles I in Three Positions (1600-49) Painting after Van Dyck. p43: Genealogy of the Inca rulers and their Spanish successors from Manco Capac. p29: British Commonwealth and World national flags all over the world. Frederic (1830-96) / Yale Center for British Art. Peru / The Bridgeman Art Library.

Cambridge City Centre A14 ON GD IN NT HU A14 04 A6 VICTO RIA RO AD AD RO A1303 E EN NUE IA AVE TOR VIC AD N RO ERTO EST H C AL GD MA To Madin gley Hall M11 A130 3 MA To DINGL Cavend EY ROA ish Lab D oratory Science Park ST ET RE 6 E TR ES IDG BR MALCOLM STREET ET JESUS TR ET T EE HOBSON STRE YS BUSES 7 8 ST POLICE STATION AN T DR ST STR D OA TR EET UR ET RE ST NE WN H 7 A130 1 Summer Schools’ Office & Teaching Rooms 2 Great St Mary’s Church A Wolfson Court. Girton College 3 University Library B Selwyn College Ann’s Court 4 Senate House & Old Schools C Selwyn College Cripps Court 5 Mill Lane & The University Centre D Selwyn College Old Court 6 Kettle’s Yard E Gonville & Caius St Michael’s Court 7 Grand Arcade/Lion Yard/Public Library F Newnham College 8 Post Office G Gonville & Caius Old Court 9 Guildhall & Tourist Information Centre H St Catharine’s College 10 Computing Service & Zoology Museum J Clare College Memorial Court 11 University Language Centre K Clare College Old Court 12 Botanic Garden ROAD 309 AD A1 GTON RO TRUMPIN RO AD SEW AY HILLS AM LENSFIELD ROAD CAU 12 Taxis Parking STA TIO NR OA D N U PI NG TO N FITZWILLIAM MUSEUM FEN NT CO NIS TR M F ST AT IO RE 5 GE RE ST TE N ER SILV Anglia Ruskin University PARKER’S PIECE ET 11 T ’S S DOW EW NING 10 NE L LA HOO H E SC 1 UE N ROAD TREE E’T S SIDGWICK SITE SIDGWICK AVEN BARTO 9 MANOR STREET FRE GRANGE RO AD A603 2 BEN WEST ROAD B D NE QUEENS’ ROAD C E MARKET PLACE K SID 3 G 4 TRINIT Y STREET KING’S PARADE J LANE KING STREET A1 4 A .

cam.cam.ac.uk/intsummer .ac.ice.International Programmes Telephone: +44 (0) 1223 760850 Fax: +44 (0) 1223 760848 Email: intenq@ice.uk Website: www.