Michigan’s oldest college newspaper

Vol. 138 Issue 9- 6 November 2014

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

GOP takes
Senate

Walberg clinches
victory
Kate Patrick
Assistant Editor
JACKSON, MICH. —
Amid his supporters, close
friends, and family on the secCommerce Center in Jackson,
Republican Rep. Tim Walberg
talked about everyone but himthe U.S. House of Representatives for Michigan’s 7th District
on Tuesday.
“I’ve been making a lot of
phone calls to voters, thanking
[today],” Walberg told the Collegian. “I’ve been thinking about a
lot of grateful things.”
While friends snapped pictures on their iPhones, Walberg
praised his family and called up
various members of his staff to
the podium to thank them. He
then directed the focus of his
elected him, honing in on the importance of limited government.
“When American people are
great, and government is limited,
the entire nation is better,” Walberg said to cheering friends and
family members at his victory
Walberg successfully captured 53.5 percent of the vote
ocratic State Representative Pam
Byrnes, taking 41.2 percent, according to POLITICO. In the
coming term, Walberg said he

Vivian Hughbanks
Assistant Editor

the economy.
“Jobs and economy are key
and reducing unnecessary regulation – in this district energy is a
big thing,” Walberg told the Collegian.
Michigan’s 7th District is the
biggest provider of energy for the
state of Michigan, contributing
about 25 percent of Michigan’s
energy production, Walberg said.
The Michigan Farm Bureau
already indicated that they think

Republican victories painted the nation red on Tuesday
time since the 2006 elections
ity margin in the U.S. House of
Representatives.
With Republicans elected

dorsement of Walberg for Congress, said Jackson County Republican Party Chairman Hank
Choate, a supporter and friend of
Walberg.
-

Rep. Tim Walberg speaks at his victory party Tuesday night. (Courtesy of Tim
Walberg)

Professor of History Tom Conner casts
his vote Tuesday. (Anders Kiledal/Collegian)

supportive,” Choate told the Collegian.
With the Republican takeover
of the U.S. Senate, Walberg said

Montana, North Carolina, South
Dakota, and West Virginia, the
party holds at least 52 Senate
seats as of press time, according to CNN. Senate races in
Alaska and Virginia have yet to
hold a runoff in December.
“The American people voted
for a split government and handed the Republicans a huge vicsaid. “The Republicans should
differ from their progressive
political brethren. My hope is

more effectively.
more open, being in the hands of
Republicans,” Walberg told the
Collegian. “We’ll look to com-

continue to be really clear; that
seems to lead to more people
voting Republican. The Demospire hope in their base forever.”
In the House, Republicans

er Harry Reid’s leadership in
a left-leaning Senate, 400 bills
died, Walberg said.
“That’s a shame.”
But ultimately, Walberg ac-

the Truman Administration
nearly a century ago. Republi-

victory.

243 seats, according to CNN,
and some results are still being
called.

not because America is great, but
because the American people believe in principles that are timeless,” he said.

Race for judge
Attorney Sara Lisznyai
beats prosecutor Neal Brady
by more than 1,000 votes
in tightly contested District
Court judge race

Eric Leutheuser, who won the race for state representative of Michigan’s 58th
district Tuesday, stands with President Larry Arnn and Paul Shirke. (Anders

race ... that’s the race to turn the

See GOP A3

Kiledal/Collegian)

Macaela Bennett
City News Editor
Jonesville attorney Sara
Lisznyai defeated Hillsdale prosecutor Neal Brady by more than
1,000 votes for District Court
“I’m up to the task,” Lisznyai
said of her victory. “I’m excited,
apprehensive, and I have a great
deal of respect for our court sys-

sibility is great.”
Lisznyai captured 55 percent
of the vote to Brady’s 45 percent.
spired people to vote and I had
a record that inspired people to
trying to help me because they
because I asked them to. That
obviously.”

more than 41 percent of registered Hillsdale County voters
cast their vote Tuesday.
turnout,” said Stephenie Kyser,
chief deputy clerk for Hillsdale
According

to

Wednesday

election, she said she can’t name
the key to her success but attributes it partially to her campaign
strategy.
have the name recognition Neal

events as I could be,” Lisznyai

See Judge A6

position 6,741 to 5,485.

Renaissance school meets GOALs and expands
said.
alternative school. Most of the school’s students
have been kicked out of other schools and come
from unstable and rough backgrounds.
“A lot of their schooling is online because they
all come from different schools,” Ryskamp said.

high demand.
“To be honest, I don’t think that there’s such a
thing as an ideal college student volunteer,” Ryskamp said. “Anybody can be a volunteer. Anyone
can make an impact on these kids’ lives. You don’t
Seniors Sam Ryskamp and Annie Teigen work in alternative and special needs classrooms
through Renaissance. (Elena Creed/Collegian)

Micah Meadowcroft
Arts Editor
Senior Sam Ryskamp pulled up to the Parke
Hayes building on W. Bacon Street to a chorus of
“It’s Sam!” “Sam is here!” “Sam! Sam!” He unfolded himself from the driver’s seat as a small boy
trail of others.

“It’s probably Ebola!” Soon, Ryskamp, kids, and

volunteer program. The group of 35 students has
naissance School and plans to help more schools
panion in their lives as it expands. He and the proboth alternative institutions like Renaissance and
special needs classrooms and programs.
“Sort of the motto of our program is ‘life change
happens in the context of loving, godly relationships,’” Ryskamp said.
Students started volunteering at the Renaissance

These kids have already had so many people bail
events for the program and is helping Ryskamp
plan the expansion, expressed her changed heart
about the program.

-

need.
“They need positive examples,” Ryskamp said
of the alternative schools’ students. “They need
real relationships. They have a lot of people in their
they don’t have a lot of real friendships, and they
Senior Shelly Peters is helping Teigen and Ryskamp, and made clear that the motivation of the
community.
be at the Renaissance school and Lockhaven is
these kids have none,” she said.
She, too, said she is excited at the prospect of
the volunteer program expanding, especially at the
prospect of including special needs students.
from special education, but their love for life is so
from them,” she said.

more opportunities for volunteers interested in
both a traditional classroom environment experi-

interested in college student volunteers, email Ryskamp at sryskamp@hillsdale.edu.

INSIDE
Hillsdale’s student veterans

Who’s got $15k

‘Kind of retro’

served in the Armed Forces. A2

Michigan Central College into
Hillsdale College. B4

optic cables to increase bandA6

Opera Workshop
The student-directed production of “The Magic Flute” and

Football snaps losing streak

State University. A8
(Anders Kiledal/Collegian)

B1

(Elena Creed/Collegian)

News........................................A1
Opinions..................................A4
City News................................A6
Sports......................................A7
Arts..........................................B1
Features....................................B3

The reality of assisted suicide
Brittany Maynard’s choice to
A5

Check out articles online at
www.hillsdalecollegian.com

NEWS

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Student Fed to
hold elections

Student Federation nominees.
Katie Beemer
Collegian Freelancer
Last week Student Federation representatives nominated
sitions.
The nominees for vice president, secretary, and treasurer
are running unopposed, but
there are two candidates for
president: junior Marie Wathen
and junior Os Nakayama.
Wathen is a history major,
currently serving as the treasurer of Student Fed.
“I have so much enjoyed the
last couple of years that I have
been able to serve on Student
Federation, and it’s been exciting to see how we have been
able to serve the student body
in a number of different ways,”
Wathen said. “I would just hope
to be able to continue to do that,
to build on what past presidents
have done, and hopefully continue to make Student Federation more successful and help it
serve the students better.”
Nakayama is a biochemistry
major, currently serving as an
independent representative.
“I served on Student Fed this
past year as a representative,
and it was amazing,” Nakayama said. “As a representative,
of my peers and classmates.
Being involved socially and
with multiple organizations, I
believe that I can bring input
from a number of different
sectors on campus. It is an incredible privilege to serve as a
member of Student Federation.
Next year as president, I really
want to help promote and advocate more involvement with the
community and giving back.
Organizations like A Few Good
Men have great projects with
individuals and groups in the

(Elena Creed/Collegian)

community. Student Fed has a
philanthropic budget, and I really want to utilize that.”
Junior Lucy Rothhaas is running for vice president. She is
currently serving as an independent representative.
“I would like to be vice president of Student Federation because I would enjoy the added
responsibilities that come along
like to better represent the student body,” Rothhaas said.
Junior Lydia Ivkovich is
running for secretary. She is a
marketing/management major,
currently serving as the representative for Pi Beta Phi.
“I just have loved serving on
Student Federation so far, and
so I am just excited to have the
opportunity potentially to continue serving the student body,
just in any way I can,” she said.
Sophomore Jacob Thackston
is running for treasurer. He is a
politics major, currently serving as an independent representative.
“As treasurer, I would be in a
student body and its monies,”
he said. “I’m really in a position
to do what Student Federation
is called to do, which is spread
student fees across the student
body — and treasurer is the
position that deals most directly
with that.”
Elections will be held
Wednesday in the Grewcock
Student Union.
Students not currently serving on Student Fed, but interbiography and petition form
and return them to Director
of Student Activities Anthony
Manno by tomorrow.

A2 6 Nov. 2014

CCA on energy controversies to start Sunday
Sarah Chavey
Collegian Reporter
The second Center for Constructive Alternatives seminar
of the semester, Energy: Issues
& Controversies, begins on Sunday.
As America has increased
its energy production, fracking,
green energy, and global warming have become more pertinent,
according to Associate Vice
President for External Affairs
Timothy Caspar.
“Being Hillsdale, we like our
topics to have a timeless aspect,
but we also like them to have a
timely aspect. We believe energy
has both,” Caspar said.
Director of Programs for External Affairs Matthew Bell fully
agreed.
“We choose a timely topic
college,” Bell said.
Speakers this year include:

Peter Grossman, Ann McElhinney, Kenneth Green, Steven
Hayward, Robert Bryce, and
Mark Mills.
The faculty roundtable, which
will conclude the lecture series,
will include professors from the
chemistry, physics, politics, and
economics departments.
Associate Professor of Economics Charles Steele commented that, while he is excited
about all of the lectures, he will
not decide what he is speaking
on in the faculty roundtable until
after he has heard them all.
“I’ll comment on things
from an economic standpoint,”
he said.
While all of the lectures
speak to controversial issues,
Caspar believes McElhinney’s
Sunday night lecture “To Frack
or Not To Frack” may attract the
most outsiders.
“One of the most controversial topics of today is the fracking topic,” Caspar said. “Fracking touches a chord for many
people, whether they are pro or

against it.”
This series is co-sponsored
by the Ludwig von Mises Lecture Series, an endowed program
which supports free market economics. Once a year, this institution co-sponsors a Hillsdale
CCA, and Hillsdale agreed to
relate the topics to free market
economics.
“We’re always kind of kicking around ideas for CCAs all
the time,” Caspar said. “We
thought about energy for years.
It’s perennially interesting, and
more relevant with recent developments such as fracking, the
search for oil, and the big energy
boom in North Dakota.”
After choosing a topic, the
“Once we think of the main
theme, the usual process is to
break it into lecture topics,” Caspar said. After that, they search
for speakers who have written
books or performed studies on
these topics. According to Bell,
they watch videos to make sure
the lecturers are good at public

Board of Trustees member Jack E. Stalsby dies at age 88
Macaela Bennett
City News Editor

Hillsdale College Board of
Trustee member Jack E. Stalsby,
88, died Oct. 15.
“I liken him to a grandpa that
you love seeing because he always had that tidbit of wisdom
from some unexpected place,”
said senior Noah Bader, recipient of a scholarship funded by
Stalsby.
Stalsby made the college and
his scholarship recipients his
family after his wife Greta Sue
Wright passed away and no other family remained.
Stalsby was born on Aug. 3,
1926, in Conroe, Texas. After his
father was killed in an automobile accident in 1928, his mother
raised him alone. Bader said
Stalsby’s resulting close relationship with his mother largely
attitude that made him so successful.
“He’d say, ‘She couldn’t give
me money, but she gave me
something more valuable — a
mindset,’” Bader said.
Stalsby’s self-appointed creed,
which was originally written
by Dean Alfange, an American
statesman who served in the
U.S. Army during World War II.
After reading the creed, Stalsby
much that he adopted it for his
own life and included it with his
self-written obituary.

“I do not choose to be a common man. It is my right to be
uncommon — if I can, I seek
opportunity — not security. I
do not wish to be a kept citizen,
humbled and dulled by having
the state look after me. I want to
take the calculated risk; to dream
and to build, to fail and succeed,”
it says. “It is my heritage to stand
erect, proud and unafraid, to
think and act for myself, to worship as I please, to enjoy the benthe world boldly and say, ‘This
I have done,’ All this is what it
means to be an American.”
applicability to Stalsby.
“Jack was a self-made man,”
Péwé said. “He was enthusiastic
about everything and delightfully witty. It was always enjoyable
to be with him.”
After serving in the Army Air
Forces during WWII, Stalsby
earned a business administration
degree and majored in economics at the University of Houston
in 1949.
He plunged into the oil business with Conoco Inc. in 1955,
moved to Texas Eastern Transmission in 1967, then Oil Daily
in 1970 before beginning his
own business, Stalsby, Inc., in
1974.
“Finding his stride as an oil
marketer, he developed as an entrepreneur, investor, publisher,
and banker,” Stalsby said in his
obituary.
His other accomplishments
included founding the Stalsby’s

“Who’s Who’s in Petroleum
Supply” series of directories
commonly used in the oil industry, now known as “OPIS/Stalsby”; designing the Stalsby Petroleum Supply and Accounting
computer software program; and
serving as the chairman of the
board for Ashford Bank when it
merged with mBank in 1981.
While Stalsby valued his education in helping him achieve
these things, one of his most
notable quotes was that a college diploma “did not make you
smarter than anyone else, but it
did make you equal.”
He later founded the Stalsby
Foundation to give students the
their own education goals. The
University of Houston, Hillsdale, and Hope College all receive scholarship grants from
the foundation.
Despite his diversity of donations, President Larry Arnn said
Hillsdale was Stalsby’s favorite.
“Jack was a Texan through
and through,” Arnn said. “He
attended the University of Houston, and loved that college, but
his deeper affection was here.”
Bader agreed, saying that
Stalsby held Hillsdale students
in high regard because they hold
the same mindset that motivated
him throughout his long life.
“He loved Hillsdale because
students are challenged to be
more than just a certain speciality. They have to go through all
the other disciplines, even the
ones they might not be comfortable with, because that’s the

Tonight, Hillsdale College
will have the chance to hear from
a real-life CSI agent.
Kristin Schelling, laboratory
manager of the Michigan State
Police forensic science division,
will speak at 7 p.m. in Strosacker
200 on “Fact vs. Fiction” in the
world of forensic science.
“She will speak about what’s
on TV and how what they do is
quite a bit different,” Professor of
Biology Dan York said. “When I

reagents, and that is a major cost.
Dr. Steiner got in touch with their
forensics lab, and we got invited
to tour their labs,” York said.
“They’re working with straight
DNA, and have to have all sorts
of protocols, so we could learn
from them and their techniques.”
York has implemented many
of the Michigan lab’s procedures
for testing things like dry blood
samples in his own research of
microscopic DNA.
Senior Markie Zimmer, a premed biology major and treasurer
of Beta Beta Beta, said all students, especially fans of crime

Men’s dorms and fraternities to hold
blood drive
Sarah Albers
Assistant Editor

Voters proudly wore stickers on Nov. 4, indicating that they had gone to the polls. Want another sticker? Donate blood on Nov. 12 in the
Grewcock Student Union, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The Red Cross blood drive occurs every sepersonnel, and long lines of students awaiting
their turn to donate. Most years, the Red Cross has
eight hours to accept appointments and donations.
This year, students must donate blood within a
pointments — and less blood.
“Our [donations] goal for the drive is a little
lower because we know we’ll have less people,”
junior Eli West, coordinator of the upcoming
blood drive, said. “But it’ll be hard to walk away
without 80-100 pints of blood.”
West said that Associate Dean of Men Jeffery
Rogers is leading the men’s dormitories in a collaborative effort to organize the event. Delta Sigma Phi has long been involved with campus Red

Cross blood drives in the past, but this semester it
hosted a haunted house instead and will present
the funds raised directly to the Red Cross. According to junior Paul Wendt, DSP chapter president,
it will resume its direct role in organization next
semester.
Rogers mentioned that Hillsdale blood drives
often have excellent turnout.
“The proportion of students who give here, in
comparison to larger state schools, is impressive,”
Rogers said. “There are typically over a hundred
students, staff, faculty that donate.”
One unit of blood can save three lives, according to Rogers. And every three seconds, someone
needs blood.
“If everyone procrastinated [about giving
blood] like Hillsdale students do on their papers,
we’d have a lot of dead people,” Rogers said,
laughing. “Somebody has to give. Why not let it
be you?”
“Don’t be afraid to make an appointment,”
West said, adding that information is readily available on the Red Cross website. “You’re saving a
lot of lives by doing a simple thing.”

shows like CSI and Criminal
Minds, will enjoy the event.
“I think it’s really interesting to see what traces we leave
behind, and CSI-type shows
would always touch on that, but
it didn’t seem authentic,” she
said in an email. “By having this
speaker come, it will be exciting
to see how those shows actually
measure up to reality.”
Hillsdale has not produced
many forensic scientists in the
past, although York said Hillsdale students would do a great
job.
“I think you see a lot more in-

liberal arts, and it gives us that
mindset that we can do it,” Bader said.
“For him, watching us grow
up and be successful was better
than his own success.”
Director of Student Records and Financial Aid Rich
Moeggenberg further attested to
this sentiment.
“He had an expectation that
his recipients not only meet the
scholarship’s stringent grade
point requirement, but also encouraged them to get involved
on campus,” Moeggenberg said.
“He wanted them to make a difference in their world.”
After serving on the college’s
Board of Trustees since September 2007, many say Stalsby’s
work ethic, passion, and humor
will be missed.
“He listened carefully and
made good comments. He loved
the college, understood its mission, and helped in every way
he could,” Arnn said. “He supported that with all his heart and
a serious portion of his assets.”
After forming a close relationship with Stalsby and even
ness ventures from his advice,
Bader expressed his thankfulness for Stalsby’s generosity.
“From my second meeting with him, we were absolute
bros,” Bader said. “Since he had
no family, we were his family,
and it was beautiful to be a part
of that.”

Online
exclusive

Michigan State Police forensics lab manager to speak tonight at 7 p.m.
walked through [the Michigan
lab], though, it reminded me a
lot of a CSI lab. It was absolutely
amazing.”
The speech came about because York, Biology Department
Chairman Francis Steiner, and
Hillsdale Biology Laboratory
Technician Jeannie Lama toured
the Michigan State Police lab in
Lansing over the summer.
“We were having trouble getting decent lab results because of
contamination. In a genetics lab,
contamination can shut down the
lab. To eliminate contamination,
sometimes you have to get rid of

“We want students not only to
learn, but to enjoy CCAs and to
consider them part of their experience here.”

‘I do not choose to be a common man’

‘Fact or Fiction’: CSI debunked
Morgan Delp
Editor in Chief

speaking.
Bell took this position this
ished his thesis at Hillsdale’s
Van Andel Graduate School of
Statesmanship. He had some obstacles thrown at him right away,
but he’s excited to be able to
learn so much from attending the
series and helping students out.
“I really want the students
to be able to come talk to me,”
Bell said. “We love to hear from
them. Moss Hall is not a castle
that can’t be breached. My motto
is ‘my door is open.’”
One of his goals is simplifying the attendance process.
Students who suffered from the
complex waiver process before
will love the automatic system.
“We’re looking to make sure
the mission of the college is re-

terest in that type of work with
schools that are more vocationally oriented,” he said. “Our
students would be incredibly

Lincoln historian
speaks at Kirby Center
in Washington, D.C.

application if they were to apply
for it because of the types of research and work they’re doing.
Their technical skills are pretty
high.”

Casey Harper, Washington Bureau Chief,
reports on a talk given
by one of the Spring
2015 journalism CCA
lecturers.
Check out
hillsdalecollegian.com
for the whole story.

Stomp or Trot: Academy and Kappa 5K
Laura Williamson
Collegian Reporter
Runners can choose to avoid the obstacles or
tackle them all in the 5K put on by Kappa Kappa
Gamma and Hillsdale Academy.
While Kappa usually hosts the Swamp Stomp
this time of the year, Kappa and the academy have
come together to put on the Turkey Trot due to the
large amount of events happening in Hayden Park.
The run will be on Nov. 8. at the park. Registration begins at 9 a.m. and the race starts at 10
a.m. Participants will have the option of running a
normal 5K or running a 5K like the Swamp Stomp
with obstacles and a mud pit. There are also shorter
runs for younger children.
Both Kappa and the academy are hoping for a
great turnout for the event. All proceeds will go to
St. Peter’s Free Clinic in Hillsdale.
“I think joining efforts will make both our fundraising better,” Mike Roberts, athletic director and

assistant headmaster of the academy, said. “It’s a
busy time of year. There are other races. This is a
way to combine forces and have a bigger and better
event for both of us and hopefully raise even more
money.”
Roberts is spearheading the event along with Ellen Condict, who teaches at the academy and the
college, and junior Katie Leymaster, Kappa’s philanthropic chair.
“It’s actually been really nice to combine with
the academy,” Leymaster said. “We’re trying to
pool our resources and try to get a bigger pool of
participants just so we can give more back to the
medical clinic.”
Condict is also excited for the opportunity to
raise more money for the clinic.
“It’s a truly charitable effort and a time for people to have fun and compete,” she said.
“It’s a great way for Hillsdale College, Hillsdale Academy, and Hillsdale community to come
together,” Roberts said.

NEWS

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

A3 6 Nov. 2014

Honoring Hillsdale’s student servicemen
Thank you to all those who have served and continue to serve
Michael Aavang

Eric Hodgdon
Hodgdon served as a mortarman and a section leader.
He has been in the Marine

Aavang was enlisted in active
duty in the United States Marine Corps from 2007-2012.
He has been a machine gunner, radio operator, machine
gun instructor, a Marine
Corps martial arts instructor,
a platoon sergeant, tactical
network administrator, and
a battalion data chief for the
31st Marine Expeditionary
Unit.

half years, and has served at
Camp Leatherneck in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.
“Veterans’ Day is important
to me because I don’t want
it to be about me. It’s about
the guys that went before
me. They went through a lot
worse than we do, so I think
it’s proper to honor them.”

Nathan Seither

Woody served as an Enworking with bulldozers
and other heavy equipment
with the Marine Corps, and
he worked in Alaska to help
improve the bases there.

his enlistment, he was stationed in Yorktown, Virginia
with the 2nd Fleet Antiterrorism Security Team. He then
served in 29 Palms, California
with the 2nd Battalion 7th
Marine regiment weapons
company as a machine gunner. He has been deployed to
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Afghanistan, and on the USNS
GYSGT Stockham.

for us all the time.”
- Staff Sgt. Frank Beranek

Frank
Beranek
Army Reserve

Marshall
Gobba
Marine Corps

Zach Woody
Seither was in the Marine

combat as we speak. It’s easy to gloss
over that, grab our coffee from A.J.’s,

Mike LaFountain
Navy

Marine Corps
Corporal

Marine Corps
Sergeant

“I think in times like these, it’s easy to
forget that there are multiple theaters

Mitchell
Irmer
Navy
Jared
Jordon
Army Reserve
Daniel
Pierce
Army
SteveAirJohnson
Force

Marine Corps

Compiled by Amanda Tindall

Marine Corps

New courses enhance pursuit of Hillsdale mission
Breana Noble
Collegian Freelancer
Hillsdale will offer two new courses
next semester: Introduction to Midrash
and Classical Logic and Rhetoric. Both
Greek History and Case Studies in the
Origins of War will be resurrected in
the spring.
The class of 2019 will have to take
Classical Logic and Rhetoric as part of
next year’s new core curriculum. Professor of Speech Kirstin Kiledal will
be an instructor of the class.
“The focus of the course is to provide students with an overarching understanding of the worth and interactiveness of classical logic and rhetoric
in the expression of ideas and their
place in public deliberation,” Kiledal
said.
Kiledal added her aim is for students to look at individual pieces of arguments in primary sources, comparing their validity to the truth.
“It’s one thing to learn rhetorical devices, just cold things you can
point to that’s aesthetically pleasing,”
Kiledal said. “We hope to ground the
students on the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings to really build

GOP
From A1
country around,” probable Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch
McConnell told cheering supporters in his victory speech in
Louisville, Kentucky Tuesday
evening.
Whether Republicans won
due to change in public sympathy toward conservative ideals
or to discontent with policies of
the Obama Administration remains to be seen.
“I think this election wasn’t
as much about loving Republicans as being angry at Democrats,” Professor of Politics
Adam Carrington said. “You
shouldn’t assume that just because someone hates the other
person so much that they will
accept you means that now they
love you. That’s a trap they
shouldn’t fall into.”
Incoming members of congress include several historic
represent Iowa in the Senate,
veteran ever to be elected to the
woman to represent the state in

an applied skill set.”
Classical Logic and Rhetoric is
listed under interdisciplinary study,
but is not managed under any particular department yet. The college intends
to not limit it to instruction by one department’s professors.
“The faculty for it will come from
the faculty at large,” Kiledal said. “I
think it could be energizing seeing
ourselves as a liberal arts faculty. Can
you imagine being a science person
and having a science faculty member
as your instructor and suddenly seeing
your world of chemistry as an expansion of your worldview?”
While not required for classes prior
to next year’s incoming class, the class
is being offered next semester in order
to test it in a classroom setting before
implementing it as a required course.
Although the class is currently labeled as a 393 class because it is experimental, Kiledal emphasized that
it is geared toward freshmen, sophomores, and anyone interested in improving persuasive skills.
Carl Kinbar, director of the Messianic Jewish Theological Institute
Rabbinic Program, will teach the onecredit religion seminar Introduction to
Midrash.

Congress. Tom Cotton, Arkansas’ newest elected senator, will
eran elected to the Senate. Rep.
Tim Scott of South Carolina will
from the South elected to the
Senate since Reconstruction.
“This win is huge for the
Republican Party and conservatives overall,” Young Americans for Freedom President
junior Savanna Wierenga said.
“We can prove to America that
our actions will be the turning
factor to get our country back
on the right track. We are on
the right track to seeing something good happen in the White
House in 2016. This is just
what we needed.”
In Michigan, Democrat Gary
Peters defeated Republican
Terri Lynn Land with a 55 to 41
margin and more than 400,000
votes. Peters has led in polls
by between eight and 15 points
since early last month.
“Even though Terri Lynn
Land lost, the Republicans did
take the Senate overall, and
Governor Snyder got reelected,” College Republicans President junior Sam Holdeman said.
“Snyder pulled out a nice solid

The class is part of the Gershom
Program, a program created in the
religion department last year after a
donation in the summer of 2013. The
program, which the donor named after
Moses’ son, was established to provide
greater focus on Jewish culture and Judeo-Christian relations. Since last fall,
the program has sponsored lectures
each semester, and is now sponsoring
Kinbar’s two-week course.
In Introduction to Midrash, students
will look at Old Testament scriptures
and subjects such as creation, ethics,
and the purpose of mankind from a
comparative standpoint.
“Our religion curriculum is woefully lacking in Jewish studies, and this
program is a way of supplementing
the study of Judaism and its history,”
Professor of Religion and Humanities
Thomas Burke said.
“Judeo is in our mission statement,”
Assistant Professor of Religion Don
Westblade added.
ing the Midrash because of its symbolism and hyperboles. Diving deeper
into it and returning to college, he was
able to gain a better understanding of
Midrash, and he said it enlightened
him on his perspective of Scripture as

win, which shows that Michiganders want four more years of
Snyder.”
Governor Rick Snyder defeated democratic challenger
Mark Schauer by a 51 to 47
margin.
With Republicans holding
a majority in both houses of
Congress, legislative action will
likely include passing a budget.
“We need to have a budget,”
Sen. Mike Lee told the Collegian during his Oct. 24 visit_.
“We haven’t passed a budget
the reasons that’s so important
is that a budget is the predicate
ordered appropriations process.
Because we haven’t had a budhaven’t had a regular ordered
and a half years: it’s that function-by-function appropriations
process that really gives Congress control over the executive
branch and makes the executive branch accountable to the
people’s elected representative
in Congress.”
Lee also included regulatory
reform, repeal of the Medical
Device tax in the Affordable

a whole.
“First it was a puzzle, then it became life-giving,” Kinbar said. “It’s
like opening a fourth dimension in a
3-D world. You see more connections.
It’s a new way of looking at things.”
Kinbar encouraged those interested
in religion, Judaism, the Old Testament, and cultural comparisons to take
the course.
He said he is excited to have the
opportunity to share his passion with
Hillsdale students, but said he is also
eager to learn for himself, since the
class will be discussion-based.
“It’s a great model for how it could
be done elsewhere,” Kinbar said about
the program. “I’m excited to be a part
of it. It’s a larger part of an initiative
that’s important.”
Both Greek History and Case Studies in the Origins of War will be threecredit courses taught by Professor of
History Paul Rahe.
Last taught two years ago, the
200-level Greek History class will
introduce students to ancient Greek
history, archaeology, political culture,
and philosophy from the Mycenaean
period to the time of Alexander the
Great. In his instruction of this class,
Rahe plans to place greater emphasis

Care Act legislation, tax reform,
and the approval of the Keystone XL Pipeline among his
priorities.
Whether or not Republicans
will be able to push legislation
through the White House is less
certain. In a press conference
Wednesday, Obama addressed
the issue of gridlock on the issue of immigration in an opposing majority in Congress.
“Congress will pass some
bills I cannot sign,” he said,
according to the Washington
Post. “I’m pretty sure I’ll take
some actions that some in Congress will not like. That’s natural. That’s how our democracy
works.”
He added, “So, before the
end of the year, we’re going to
take whatever lawful actions
that I can take, that I believe
will improve the functioning
of our immigration system,
that will allow us to surge additional resources to the border,
where I think the vast majority
of Americans have the deepest
concern.”
Students at Hillsdale celebrated Republican victories,
cheering as results rolled in in
the Grewcock Student Union.

on Greek literature, including philosophical writings, Homer’s works, and
comedies and tragedies.
“It’s an old bottle with new wine,”
Rahe said. “They’ll be reading the
greatest books ever written. They can
get an understanding of the challenges
of our way of life posed by the way
of life of the ancient Greeks and of the
disputed questions within Greek culThe 400-level Origins of War, last
taught three years ago, will be focused
sulted in war, and one that didn’t. The
course will focus on the origins of the
Peloponnesian War, World War I, the
Second Punic War in comparison to
World War II, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and an examination of the Cold
War.
“If you’re a citizen, you have to
be concerned with war,” Rahe said.
“They’ll be able to follow international diplomacy and have a better sense of
polities get themselves into wars is a
question of prudence of statesmen. If
there’s any school in the United States
that’s interested in prudence and stateship it ought to be Hillsdale.”

Many predicted Republican victory early on.
“I would be really surprised
if Joni Ernst didn’t win,” senior
Maddie Overholtzer said Tuesday evening. “She smashed it in
the primary and if she wasn’t up
That side of Iowa is almost tailor-made for her.”
“I was very optimistic for
Republicans,” senior Bronte
Wigen said Wednesday. “Primarily because Obamacare has
ola outbreak, and on immigration, they’re pushing amnesty
and people are not happy about
it.”
As the election day hype
dies down, students look to the
victories of Tuesday with high
hopes for presidential elections
in two years.
“This past election has really
riled me up for 2016,” Wierenga
said. “I am going to campaign
my heart out during the next
few years. I need to make sure
that I’m informing my generation and persuading them to
take a side on issues and get out
the vote.”

Hayes on
greenhouse
Nathanael Meadowcroft
Assistant Editor
Professor of Physics Kenneth Hayes said he wants to clear
up misrepresentations about the
greenhouse effect.
Tonight, Hayes will speak on
the physics of the greenhouse effect at 8 p.m. in Lane 125.
“There’s a huge amount of misinformation about the science of
the greenhouse effect in media,
books, and on the Internet,” he
said. “If someone wants to try to
educate themselves on the subject,
there’s a problem between reality
and the non-reality presented in
books and on the Web.”
Hayes said the physics behind it
are really quite “simple.”
“Students, by going to this talk,
will have a good understanding of
the science behind the greenhouse
effect issue and what climatologists and physicists have to say
before going to the energy CCA,”
sophomore Joshua Ramette, who
will be introducing Hayes, said.

The Place for Fun
& Great BBQ

Open at 11 a.m. Tuesday
through Saturday
205 East Chicago Street
Jonesville, MI 49250
517-849-FOOD (3663)

We are open Tuesday
through Thursday from
11:00 am to 9:00 pm, Friday and Saturday 11:00 am
to 10:00 pm and Sunday
from 12:00 to 8:00 pm. We
are closed Mondays.
212 E. Chicago St. (US-12)
Jonesville, MI 49250
517-849-BBQ2 (2272)

OPINION
6 Nov. 2014 A4

33 E. College St.
Hillsdale, MI 49242

Newsroom: (517) 607-2897
Advertising: (513) 256-9279

Online: www.hillsdalecollegian.com
Editor in Chief: Morgan Delp
News Editors: Natalie deMacedo | Amanda Tindall
City News Editor: Macaela Bennett
Opinions Editor: Jack Butler
Sports Editor: Sam Scorzo
Arts Editor: Micah Meadowcroft
Spotlight Editor: Bailey Pritchett
Washington Bureau Chief: Casey Harper
Web Editor: Evan Carter
Photo Editor: Anders Kiledal
Design Editor: Hannah Leitner
Circulation Manager: Phil DeVoe
Ad Managers: Isaac Spence | Rachel Fernelius | Matt Melchior
Assistant Editors: Sarah Albers |Vivian Hughbanks | Nathanael
Meadowcroft | Kate Patrick | Ramona Tausz | Emma Vinton
Photographers: Elena Creed | Gianna Marchese | Ben Block |
Carsten Stann | Ben Strickland | Hailey Morgan
Faculty Advisers: John J. Miller | Lauren Fink

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

There was always an england
The opinion of The Collegian ediTorial sTaff

The Collegian recently published a tribute to Hillsdale
resident Aimee England, who
died last week. England was a
dedicated advocate of Hillsdale,
even creating her own news site
on Facebook, Hillsdale Community News, in which she
published statuses and pictures
of local and college events. She
rarely missed a city council
merous times. We know England would have had a lot to say

Campaign ads
mask truth

grown from her past experiences and that there are far
more important issues.
Apparently the Michigan National Republican Conventions thinks nursing home bed taxes are Michigan’s biggest
concern, since it devoted an entire commercial to blasting
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mark Schauer for
raising taxes on Nursing Care Beds. Schauer did vote for
the Medicaid Quality Assurance Program, which increases
a nursing home bed fee that the state used to increase
nursing home reimbursements. But incumbent Republican
Gov. Rick Snyder, Schauer’s opponent, also supports the
program, recently extending it until October 2015.
More incredible yet is the National Republican Congressional Committee’s commercial opposing Democratic
candidate for Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District, Brad
Ashford, which argued that a vote for Ashford is a vote for
convicted murderer Nikko Jenkins. It condemns Ashford
for opposing reforms to the Good Time law that would
victs like Jenkins, to receive time away from prison. The
ad does not reveal, however, that Ashford opposed reforms
to the law because it is not being enforced. He explained
that prison overcrowding and expensive incarceration
compelled the early release of Jenkins and other killers.
But you won’t hear that in the ad.
By far the most misleading political commercial this
Republicans saying the words “spending cuts,” and even
just the word “cuts” while images of dying health workers
The point? Republican spending cuts to the National
Institutes of Health and Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention caused the Ebola epidemic.
These supposed “cuts” to NIH and CDC budgets actually refer to reduced increases in spending. This year’s
CDC budget increased from last year’s, but not by as much
as it had expected. The CDC called this increased funding
a cut. Actual funding to the CDC has increased since 2011,
growing from $5.7 billion in 2011 to $5.8 billion in 2014.
Some cuts.
Ebola has something to do with its budget priorities. Acrequest, the CDC requested $564 million for “Monitoring
Health and Ensuring Laboratory Excellence,” and $1.3 billion to “Protect Americans from Natural and Bioterrorism
Threats.” However, it spent only $464 million to “Ensure
Global Disease Protection.” That means the CDC spends
far more updating its laboratories than on global disease
prevention, and even more yet on bioterrorism prevention,
Perhaps rather than blaming Republican cuts for Ebola
outbreaks, voters should reevaluate the CDC.
Every election season, citizens must make decisions
about their leaders. Well-informed voters should ignore
political clichés and ad hominem attacks, focusing on canbest leadership decisions.
Kristiana Mork is a sophomore studying politics.

profanity to promote female empowerment. The f-word (no, not
“feminism”) was thrown around
carelessly to advance a simple
thesis: The war on women is
more offensive than children
constantly repeating the f-word.
Other feminists are much less
severe. In her September United
Nations speech, Emma Watson
provided a more reasonable form
of feminism. But regardless of
its intensity, feminism possesses
an inherent paradox that tries to
empower women in a way that is
actually destructive. The “PottyMouthed Princesses” video demonstrates this paradox.
On one hand, feminism por-

Hillsdale needs advocates
like England. Her passion for a
town that took her in as a young
18-year-old is admirable. She
worked to bring free Internet to a
part of downtown and fought to
keep Monroe Street a two-way
be missed, and we at the Collegian hope others will carry on
her devotion to Hillsdale.

- give them their appropriate social
ures. Women do not need men; goods.
women are fully equal to men;
My heart aches for these
women possess their own person. young girls. In these formative
The video showed this asserted years of their lives, they have
independence through the brash been taught that foul language is
attitudes of the young girls. Girls empowering, that they can dress
cannot be princesses because however they want, and that their
princesses need a knight in shin- empowerment will ultimately
ing armor to save them. Instead, come from outside of themselves.
the video argues that girls must They are starting to believe that
employ vulgar words and sassy society must change for women
attitudes to assert their indepen- to reach their full potential. Yet
dence.
this video — and feminism genOn the other, feminism por- erally — lacks actual measures to
trays women as victims of a sex- advance female empowerment.
ist, male-dominated
The video
society and, thus,
commands
worthy of multiple
following
Relying on both the
consolatory
benreform: “Stop
dependence and telling girls
stream view of jusindependence is a how to dress,
tice, as articulated
start
shaky foundation and
by John Rawls’ “A
teaching boys
for feminist ideol- not to f---ing
Theory of Justice,”
seeks to elevate the
rape.” Though
ogy.
least advantaged in
rape is cersociety. They must
tainly a heireceive
equality
nous crime,
through the redisthis
femitribution of goods
nist teaching
such as wealth and respect. Be- doesn’t empower women. Incause women are oppressed, the stead, it turns women into vicfeminists say, they deserve these tims without any constructive
social goods. Women need men advice on the problem of sexual
to ignore immodest clothing; assault. What, then, is empowerwomen need equal pay; women ing? Women can exercise their
need society to pay for the con- 2nd Amendment right and dress
sequences of unrestrained sexual in such a way that protects their
activity. Thus, the empowerment dignity. Both of these measures
of women comes through the sat- are empowering because they are
isfaction of these needs.
things women themselves can
Relying on both dependence control.
and independence is a shaky
On a more decent note, the
foundation for feminist ideology. video urges society to value
Nevertheless, the little potty- women’s intellects more than
mouthed princesses cite skewed their bodies. Though I agree with
statistics about pay inequality this thinking, I fear that when
and rape, calling on society to these young girls become older,

there is a good chance that they
will be highly pressured to pursue
science, technology, engineering,
and mathematics (STEM). As a
female pursuing a STEM major,
I am supposed to be in favor of
this movement. But pushing girls
their true good. Young women
and men — for this is in no way
limited to women — should pursue careers that interest them, satisfy them, and comport with their
abilities. These decisions must be
made on a case-by-case basis. If
miserable, then why should they
give in to society’s pressures?
Instead, these girls should know
that they have the power to cultivate their talents and pursue
disciplines in both the arts and
the sciences. More important, a
woman’s career is not the sole
panacea of society’s oppression;
marriage and family life bring
happiness.
If the feminist movement actually wants to empower women,
then it must focus on the things
which women can actually control. Though I am not a feminist,
I certainly support educating girls
about respecting themselves, protecting their dignity, and cultivatcom demands that society must
conform to feminist ideals, especially with an unnecessary bombardment of profanity, they only
advance anger, frustration, and
hate, not empowerment.
Sarah Onken is a junior studying politics and mathematics.

SOCIAL MEDIA: A TOOL, NOT A TYRANT
and say that it dehumanizes us?

Jennifer Matthes
Look at what social media, in
Special to the Collegian their most basic form, intend to
Against the tide proclaiming
how vital social media are in our
personal and professional lives,
a sudden backlash against social
media has occurred. Viral videos
showing how preoccupied
we are with social media and
modern technology are rapidly
shared across Facebook. People
post statuses declaring their
decision to delete their social
media accounts, only to reappear a few weeks later. It’s now
become popular to blame social
media for a number of society’s
vices, including extreme bullying, our preoccupation with ourselves, and even, as a previous
Collegian op-ed (“Social media
make us less human,” Oct. 16)
asserted, our own dehumanization.
But aside from all the misuses
of social media and the distraction that they present, can we
actually examine social media
independent from human usage

McClatchey

character for events she admits occurred, but long before

dressed as princesses spewing

Arts Education

indicate that Peters returned Duhanaj’s campaign contributions immediately after Duhanaj’s conviction.
Though not as creative, commercials in Ohio condemned Democratic Secretary of State hopeful Nina
Turner for not paying taxes as a landlord. The ads focus

A branch of the feminist
movement has a new marketing
strategy: Exploiting young girls.
pany that promotes human rights,
recently released an appalling

by Forester

commercials can mislead at best, and bamboozle at worst.
Consider, for example, an advertisement by Ending
Spending against Democrat Gary Peters, who won Michigan’s contested Senate seat. The ad mimics “Sharknado,”
depicting a cartoon Peters dancing across the screen,
chased by an animated tornado and sharks. The commercial condemns Peters for accepting funding from convicted
loan sharks. However, it conveniently ignores the fact that
Peters accepted funds from convicted felon Tomo Duhanaj
because Duhanaj donated to Peters’ campaign before his

Sarah Onken
Student Columnist

The Uses of A Liberal

Everyone with a television or radio knows when campaign season is in full swing. Commercial breaks contain
smiling politicians, promises they can’t keep, and — of
course — mudslinging. Yet the well-trained mind must
endeavor to transcend these persuasive images and clichés
to elect the best leaders — not the ones that sound best on
TV.
While political advertisements can give busy voters a
glimpse of their options, they should not be the end of voters’ political research, but rather the beginning until a voter

“oracle,” as friend Jeff King so
fondly described her. England
was actually one of the Collegian’s harshest critics. She was
never afraid to post responses to
our City News pieces, usually
commenting on a student’s ignorance of Hillsdale culture. When
we published a satirical cartoon

depicting the humorous food
options available at the County
Fair, England reposted the cartoon to her page and started a
debate.
Critics are a part of every paper, and they keep us in touch
with our audience. England
challenged us to take a closer
look at our content and tone.
She read our work and took it
seriously. We appreciate that,
whether we always agreed with
her comments or not.

Feminism fails to empower

The editors welcome Letters to the Editor but reserve the right to
edit submissions for clarity, length, and style. Letters should be 450
words or less and include your name and number. Send submissions
to jbutler@hillsdale.edu before Saturday at 6 p.m.

Kristiana Mork
Special to the Collegian

about Tuesday’s election results.
The Collegian was fortunate
enough to talk to England just
days before her death for a long-

do: Provide a new and different
way for people to interact with
each other. What could be more
human than that? And while
interacting via social media is
obviously not the same as (or
preferable to) face-to-face interaction, social media allow individuals to interact with others in
ways that they simply would not
have been able to 25 years ago.
In its essence, social media
are not an entity forcing us to
bing us of our humanity but a
tool for human use. This tool can
be used for wonderful things,
like keeping up with distant
family members or sharing moments of your life with people
who are genuinely interested in
it. This tool can also be used for
terrible things, like sending hateful messages to people we’ve
never even met or feeding into
our vanities. But both of these
things, good and bad, are a result
of the way the tool has been
used, not the tool itself. Claim-

ing that social media dehumanizes us reveals an inability to
understand how misusing a tool,
while dangerous, does not mean
the tool itself is bad. In misusing
social media, we are not dehumanizing ourselves but rather
revealing our inability to always
is distinctly human.
Instead of blaming Facebook
or Twitter for taking away our
humanity, we need to learn how
to properly use social media and
keep ourselves from using it
improperly. However, doing that
requires discipline, a skill that a
large number of people lack. Too
often social media are used to
feed an Internet addiction, to indulge one’s vanity, or to perpetuate bullying. Social media can
augment our vices, making disciplining our usage of social media
especially important. But social
media don’t create these vices in
people; they’re simply used in a
problems. And social media certainly don’t always have this effect on people. Is it fair to assert
that everyone should stop using

social media because some users
can’t discipline themselves?
These issues, while concerning, do reveal a few simple
truths: Social media, at their
core, provides a platform for us
to share things about ourselves
and about the world. The use of
that platform should not be taken
lightly, but using the platform in
ently bad thing, nor is it dehumanizing. If we can’t discipline
ourselves properly while using
this platform, then we need to
have the willpower to stop using
social media. But we also need
to acknowledge that the problem in that situation is not in a
website, but in us. It’s up to us to
exercise discretion in the usage
of social media, and this need to
exercise discretion, rather than
robbing us of our humanity,
reveals it.
Jennifer Matthes is a GW
Fellow studying politics.

A5 6 Nov. 2014

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

‘Death with dignity’ is undigni
Lily Carville
Special to the Collegian
Almost everyone knows someone
who has fought cancer. Many people
even know someone who has lost the
battle to cancer, but not many know
someone who gave up to cancer.
I certainly don’t, but Brittany Maynard’s family does. Last week at the
age of 29, Brittany, a terminal brain
cancer patient from California, chose
to commit suicide rather than die of
her cancer.
On Nov. 1, she drank a lethal
mixture of water, a sedative, and a
respiratory system depressant. In doing so she joined approximately 750
people from Oregon who chose the
same end since the Death with Dignity
Act became law in October 1997.
In a glorifying interview with
People magazine, Maynard called her
choice to commit suicide “brave and
son is outlandish. Committing suicide
is giving up. Fighting cancer is brave.
My friend Jess fought, and I know she
didn’t regret it.
Almost exactly one year ago, on
Oct. 26, my friend Jess passed away
from bone cancer at the age of 26.
She had been diagnosed the previous
May and the prognosis was not good.
We were told that we had only a few
months left with her and that chemotherapy would extend her time, but

that she would be very sick.
Although Jess’s health progressed
after extensive chemotherapy, within a
few months the shrinking tumor in her
with cancer continued.
As a runner, the day Jess found
out she would never walk again was
heartbreaking. But she did not give
up. Not for one second. She was in

Fighting is brave.
Leaving a legacy of
strength and determination is digninard did neither of
those things.

a wheelchair that whole summer but
somehow she managed to get a better
tan than I did.
In the fall when I went off to
college, Jess and I stayed in touch
through letters. She never complained
or even expressed her fears, so when
the call came that she had taken a turn
for the worse, I couldn’t have been
more surprised.
When I got home I went to the
hospital to say goodbye. Jess’s pain
was so severe that doctors had to keep
her in the ICU in order to deliver the
strong pain medication she needed.

Don’t stress registration

all that I needed to see that my friend
was still there.

As pre-registration for spring
semester classes starts, students

ment can unlock new ways of seeing
the world. In the end, it will be more
about what you do with the material
than whatever legends past students
have put in your head. It’s probably
better to pursue this truth, the next

in her sleep surrounded by her loved
ones. She never gave up. She was

on a class will not end their academic
worlds. Excitement marks the entire
class selection process (at least for the

our imaginary post-graduation heads.
ule, read the books over the summer.

can resemble pre-prom excitement

anyway, and ask when he or she will
offer it again. Our passion over nailing
a perfectly curated transcript that will
sail us into adulthood can make us lose
sight of the actual work of learning. A
single class won’t grant you mastery
over everything there is to know about
vice and virtue.
We must learn to accept that we
can’t take two classes at once, and stop
being so afraid of missing out that we
lose sight of goods that aren’t part of
our master plan. Semesters bury all
our ambitions, and following an end
we’ve set ourselves like some point
on the horizon will make us impatient
when we build that life for ourselves
and somehow it isn’t the same as our
starry-eyed dreams. At the end of our
time in college, we’ll be able to look
back and proudly tell our own stories
about high points and low points, but
what will have made all the difference
is the way we approached each moment, not a completed check list.

worsened, they would induce a coma
with Jess that day and she was only

Fighting is brave. Leaving a legacy
of strength and determination is dignithose things. She would not let herself
suffer, not even to give her family
more time with her. She left a legacy
In lieu of all of the coverage surrounding Brittany’s choice, many

Chris McCaffery
Student Columnist

students who took classes that literally,
literally, changed their life, and peers
caught up in the same whirl of crucial
life decisions being made color us.
We no longer need to line up in the

19-year old who is not expected to live throw elbows to secure our ideal section, but the running around before and
of her college career at her season
after our WebAdvisor deadlines can
opener this past weekend. Journalbecome frantic and our despair real if
ist Joan Lunden has documented her
everyone’s been there, especially when
can see the details of her struggle to
the student portal spits back an error
show other women that cancer is not
message.
the end.
Remember that classes are really,
By comparing something as weak
totally, Collegian-editorial-levels of
as assisted suicide to the bravery reearnest not all we do at school and
not the only way we learn. Classes are
takes something away from everyone
very important, worth being excited
who survived and succumbed to canabout, and a class can doubtless have
cer. She cheapens the struggle of those the life-changing effect we talk about,
but that’s almost impossible to know
from course listings. One class that
Lily Carville is a sophomore study- looks wonderful might not click, and
ing biology.
another, unglamorous major require-

Chris McCaffery is a junior studying history.

Republicans need moderates to win
Dominic Restuccia
Special to the Collegian

I believe the answer to this is based on the art
of statesmanship. We must recognize that there
establish as principles and circumstantial truths

Former Senator Jim Demint once said that he
would rather have 40 conservatives true to their
principles in the Senate rather than have a majority of 60 unprincipled Republicans. In theory,
I understand what he is saying. What is the
purpose of having power if you do not have the
will to do good, such as limit government and
It’s a good point.
In reality, however, that is not the kind of
choice we faced. We all woke up to a Republican majority Wednesday morning that is neither
both constitutional conservatives like Marco Ru-

these two truths as best as he can.
ment, adherence to the Constitution and rule
of law, the dignity of life and the family, etc.

-

that there is strong support among the people

-

the ground in purple Colorado and purple North
Carolina is that the people there are somewhat
chilly to our values and only slowly warming up
to our principles as they begin to see the results
of their principles and see the value in ours.
Right now, the kind of candidates who can win

be true to our principles without being a party of

We need to bide our time as we direct hearts,
minds, and souls towards the values and principles of this nation. It doesn’t mean we have
men like Scott Brown forever. Fruit has already
been borne in liberal New England as the liberal
the more conservative Patriots fan and pro-life

shire in 2010. I want our principles to become
reality, and in order to do that we must also win.
Not at the cost of abandoning our principles, but
by recognizing that it will take time to get there
and we need people who do not fully agree with
our values to stand with us. We do not need to
need to be a conservative party that has room for
people of all stripes.
Do not have unfair expectations for this
Republican Congress. It is not going to establish
conservative principles throughout society. We,
the American people, must choose to adopt these

conservative principles in our society. What
this Republican majority can do though is stop
President Obama’s overreaching administration
from further undermining the Constitution and
our religious freedoms. It can paint a vision of
a better path forward. Perhaps not a bold pastel
of a city on a hill, but a nation of laws with a
respectful desire for liberty and a beginner’s
understanding of the Constitution. I hope we can
build off of this. We must take what we are given
and run with it.
We must stem the tide of liberalism that is
threatening to wash away the very foundations
of our republican democracy and our values
from this nation. We must win with the right
candidates in the right place at the right time and
slowly, through prudent and inclusive application of principle, we will bring this nation closer

Dominic Restuccia is a junior studying politics.

West’s political solution goes in the wrong direction
Emily Runge
Special to the Collegian
Last week, Garrett West argued
that we should abandon the discourse
of “human rights” and instead adopt
the language of “human goods” (“The
unappealing politics of universal
rhetoric, Oct. 30). His solution makes
it seem that we have only two options: Franklin D. Roosevelt or John
Rawls. Considering the consequences
from these two lines of thought, this
seems like a sick game of “Would You
Rather?” for conservatives.
Yes, there is a problem with
modern political discourse, especially
“human rights” talk. Yet West’s article
fails to address the real problem:
The rejection of a permanent human
nature. Instead of speaking in terms
of “human goods,” with no standard
other than public opinion, politics
should shift back to what policies best
secure our natural rights.
First, to address the problems with

his presentation of human rights. He is
wrong to assume that modern politicians’ “ultimate criterion for the justice” is “human nature.” Mainstream
politics abandoned that standard long
ago.
Due to the rejection of a permanent human nature, human rights and
goods seem to come from government. FDR helped popularize “human
rights,” which, he explained, we must
“gain” and “keep.” Natural rights, on
the other hand, we already possess;
government’s purpose is to protect
these rights.
It is true that modern political discourse invites bitter discussions, but
its problem does not lie in rights language. Without any standard grounded
in nature, factions compete for more
rights from government. Contrast
that with the founders, who debated
the means of protecting pre-existing
rights. Most know of the heated debates between Hamilton and Jefferson,
but they argued over what particular
policies would best secure citizens’

rights, not principles.
While human rights are a bad standard, the alternative of human goods
and most obvious problem with human
goods is that they lack an objective

Returning to
natural rights
is the most just
solution to our
failing political
discourse.

standard, which means that majority
preference becomes law. The second
problem is with West’s example of
welfare. What part of the standard of
human goods limits the redistribution of property? Is that left to messy
public discourse? If so, that seems
dangerous for those whose property is

Dear Editor,
I recently paid $5 to ensure my ballot would arrive in time to be counted in the midterm elections. I

Evaluating this from a natural
rights standpoint, the law of selfpreservation and the right to life offer
only to preserve a person’s life. This
protects the property rights in general,
it does not allow individuals to be
comfortable on welfare, and it encourages individuals to be industrious and
productive.
Rawls’s “Theory of Justice” rejects
this idea of a limited welfare state in
among us.” Along with liberty and
wealth, and self-respect as “social
primary goods.” I agree that discourse
should consider, as West says, “the
well-being of all,” but we must return
to natural rights for this to be just. If
not, how do we refute Rawls’s formulation that social goods should be
“distributed equally unless an unequal
distribution of any or all of these
goods is to the advantage of the least
favored”?

Instead of talking in terms of
human rights or goods to arbitrate
between claims of justice, returning to
natural rights is the most just solution
to our failing political discourse. But
between human rights or goods, which
government grants, and natural rights,
which government protects.
This distinction is important for
several reasons. First, it means rights
are not subject to public opinion.
Second, natural rights are the standard
to which we hold all public policy: Is a
policy protecting rights or not? When
we agree on these principles, political discourse centers on the “how” of
protecting rights, not the “what” of
human rights or goods.
Granted, this requires a consensus
on natural rights, which is unlikely.
But if we are going to shoot for reforming political discourse, we should
at least aim at the right principles.
Emily Runge is a junior studying
politics.

Dear Editor,
incorrect. I will make no claims as to the overarching validity of the Catholic/Protestant debate,
but I do feel compelled to set the record straight on this matter of Catholic doctrine.
Catholics do not believe that man is saved by works. Ramona cited paragraph 2010 of the Ro-

Dismal statistics on voting are plentiful, but let me give you some numbers from my own life. I
live in the third largest city in Minnesota. Nevertheless, whenever I’ve voted in primary elections, my
with my family, we quickly add up to 5 percent of the total vote. Few of us participate in the political
Mere statistics misses the element of human action in voting.
of know-how, yet his or her part is crucial to the production of a pencil. If anyone withholds their

As Ramona quoted only the second half of this passage, much of its meaning was lost. She
of conversion.

magnitude, but, like the price system which provides feedback to producers, consumers, and entreour expectations.
remind us that our votes have the greatest impact in local elections. My mother tells a story about a
Kentucky man running for city council who lost to his rival by one vote. Ironically, his wife never
throughout these 50 states.

other is a convicted criminal who has truly repented near the end of his life. Which of these two

this ability comes to that man in no small part because of his Christian works.

coordinates knowledge. Is it not likewise wondrous that we can impact local government and offer
we allow ourselves to be led by it, when we participate in society, not when we sit back, analyze it,
and then exempt ourselves by concluding that because we understand the workings of society we are
above participating.
Ashley Wright

David Raney

-

CITY NEWS

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

A6 6 Nov. 2014

Fiber optic cables are ‘kind of retro’
If Hillsdale gets more bandwidth, it may attract more entrepreneurs

Kate Patrick
Assistant Editor
If Hillsdale City Council

in Industrial Park manufacture
-

cilperson Patrick Flannery said.
-

-

-

-

limits of Hillsdale.

-

Hillsdale could get faster Interpreneurs.

-

trand said.
-

-

trepreneurs are often attracted
As opposed to using electric-

Flannery said.

community and solicit entre-

nesses and residents. Hillsdale
-

people from Hillsdale going to

A map of the current fiber loops in the city of Hillsdale.
(Courtesy of the Merit Network)

-

Hillsdale College is an in-

-

State Street Market makes sandwiches ‘outside of the box’

Michigan re-elects
Snyder as governor

Tom Novelly
Collegian Reporter

-

Evan Carter
Web Editor

pickle, and a mint.

cally Democratically leaning
counting on for strong support,

-

-

-

state.

-

-

-

-

-

gan a culinary transformation

-

educational reforms.

State Street Market owner Vivian Frudakis showcases a freshlymade sandwhich. (Tom Novelly/Collegian)

-

Judge

-

From A1

Frudakis started remodeling
and indoor seating, and decorat-

-

case.
-

mural of a gas station storetorney.

-

-

-

-

and dinners for people and

-

said.

people of Hillsdale County ap-

-

are unfounded.

prosecutor. I met a great deal of

The exterior of State Street Market painted as a gas station.
(Tom Novelly/Collegian)

culinary creations, and many

WIC cuts milk choices to promote healthy eating
Andrew Egger
Collegian Reporter

-

-

fat milk in recipes.

-

Agar said.

nity.

Associates.

-

-

- and resources.

a national policy decision, is part

paign.

-

-

release Oct. 28.

1 percent milk.

sions in question.

in fat.
-

-

-

-

-

-

and promoting smart eating

-

ducted.

-

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Behind the scenes, on the sidelines
Head athletic trainer Lynne Neukom cares about student-athletes

Jessie Fox
Collegian Reporter
There is no off-season for the
athletic trainers.
Fortunately, Lynne Neukom
has both a love and a passion for
Hillsdale College that fuels her
through every jam-packed day as
the college’s head athletic trainer.
“I can always say that if you
leave with a smile on your face,
you might be tired but you’re always happy,” Neukom said.
Neukom was hired as the
head athletic trainer in 2008.
Since then, she has arrived as
early as 3:30 a.m. to the empty
Roche Sports Complex on somedays. These precious morning
hours are the only time the traintling with athletes. In these quiet
hours, mounds of paperwork are
completed, Neukom said.
“This has been my week,” she
said motioning to her desk piled
high with papers. “These are all
of the kids I’ve seen this week.”
Neukom works every day including weekends. Daily tasks
include scheduling doctor’s appointments for athletes, working
on injury prevention, treating
present injuries and leading athletes through rehabilitation. In
addition to this work in the training room, she also covers practices in the afternoons.
Neukom also serves as the
Athletic Training Program Director, teaching at least six credit
hours a semester and advising
many students pursuing an exercise science degree.
Neukom’s staff includes her
two “outstanding” assistant
trainers, Peter Benjamin and
Katelyn Terrazas, and a group
of “hardworking” student trainers. Neukom views them as her
teammates, and believes that she
should do as much work as everybody else, even if that leaves
her doing her least favorite taskcleaning the whirlpools.
“There’s three of us, and it
kind of spreads you a little thin in

places,” Neukom said. “You just
have to be able to just roll with it
and be really positive and keep a
good attitude.”
Neukom explained that keeping this positive attitude isn’t
hard when she gets to work in her
favorite place. This 1991 graduate’s connection with Hillsdale
College runs deep, as her grandfather was a Hillsdale professor
and both of her parents are alumni. Neukom was raised in Hillsdale and met her husband, also
a Hillsdale native, in the third
grade at a piano lesson in town.
Neukom knew there was no other
school for her. Today, her passion
for the college remains strong
and she would choose no other
path for her own children: Hannah, 13, Jacob, 11, and Keturah,
9.
“My kids know they have to
be a Charger,” she said with a
smile. “I want them to reap the
to be really good people, that’s
what Hillsdale really does produce.”
It’s these “good people” who
bring constant conversation,
plenty of laughter, and new perspective into the training room
each afternoon, making it Neukom’s favorite time of the day.
“Our college kids have a lot to
say,” Neukom said. “I think that
we are very blessed to be in a
school that has very talented athletes as well as scholarly athletes.
Conversations are really interesting in here, it’s never boring.”
Because of her actions and her
constant presence, athletes know
that Neukom genuinely cares
about their well-being.
“She almost acts like a mother in a sense, you know she is
going to do whatever she can to
help you out,” senior basketball
player Megan Fogt said. “It’s really comforting having a support
system in the training room.”
However, Neukom’s genuine
of the training room or on the

brings athletes home with her, allowing them to receive treatment
her job’s hefty time requirement
with the time requirement that
student athletes commit to their
sports. She said she sees being an
athlete as a full time job.
“It’s a huge commitment, on
our part, and on the part of our
families,” she said.
Neukom has developed this
opinion over a lifetime of being involved with sports. In high
school, she played volleyball and
golf, but was at a loss for what to
do when she arrived at Hillsdale
College in 1987 as a freshman
non-athlete.
“I wasn’t good enough to be
a collegiate athlete, and one day
one of my girlfriends said to me
‘Oh, just come down to the training room this afternoon,’” Neukom said.
It was there, in Hillsdale’s old
training room, that she met Paul
Beachler, Hillsdale’s head athletic trainer at the time, who would
guide her through her career as

an athletic trainer.
“Paul Beachler took me under
his wing he has literally mentored me since 1987,” Neukom
said. “I owe so much to him.”
Beachler remembers Neukom
years shadowing him in the training room.
“Every year she got better and
soaked up more information,”
Beachler said. “She turned out
to be better at it than I was and
that’s the accomplishment that
any mentor wants.”
Years have passed and tables
have turned; today Neukom is
a mentor to her staff of student
trainers.
“Since I walked on campus
she’s been nothing but helpful
and understanding,” said senior
Faith McCoy, a student trainer.
“And she’s really taught me that
you have to pay attention to every single little thing that an athlete needs in order to treat them
completely.”

The Hillsdale College Shotson this weekend.

-

place for Division-II sporting
clays and wobble trap, and second place for the 5-stand, and
third for skeet shooting at the
Scholastic Clay Target Program
“Spooktacular” Collegiate Regional Championship hosted in
Sparta, Illinois.
Sophomore Casey Inks reladies trap shooting, and junior Anna Pfaff received sec-

Volleyball
From A8

stands on Halloween could see
how effectively the Chargers’
front row stopped Malone’s offense. Senior Lindsay Kostrzewa
got the block-high for the night
at six blocks, assisting on another four.

Volleyball
Hillsdale: 3
Malone: 0

Scoring Plays
Bennett Lewis 14 yd run (Steven Mette kick)

Hillsdale: 3
Walsh: 1

John Haley 6 yd pass from C.J.
Mifsud (Mette kick)
Wade Wood 1 yd run (Mette
kick)
Weekly Leaders
Rushing:
Jack Wiseman 9-43
Passing:
Mifsud 21-28-1-172
Receiving:
John Haley 3-41

Head athletic trainer Lynne Neukom on the sideline at
“Muddy” Waters Stadium. (Anders Kiledal/Collegian)

an All-American trap shooter.
“Adding new team members
to such a small team is always
a challenge, but it was a very
smooth adjustment this year,”
Pfaff said. “While we are shooting individual scores, we help
coach and encourage each other
at practice and at competitions,
so the dynamic is actually very
important.”
Though this tournament
marked the end of the season
for the team, Moniot, senior Joe
Kain, and junior Jordan Hintz
will be competing Nov. 6-15 for
international skeet and bunker
trap in the USA Shooting Fall
Selection Match in Tillar, Arkansas.
The rest of the team is preparing for the ACUI Collegiate

Malone came in with a superior conference record, but the Pioneers didn’t play like the superior
team. The Chargers consistently
threw Malone “out of system,”
meaning that, due to Hillsdale’s
hard hits and well-placed serves,
the Pioneers played a mostly reactionary game.
“Thursday we did not have
a great practice by any means,”

gers their edge on Friday. “I
think in a way this helped give us
a greater sense of urgency going
into the weekend. Every win is
crucial at this point.”
Against Malone, Hillsdale
weeks and achieved its best hitting percentage in six weeks.
“I think our success this
weekend was due to our focus
on hitting different shots in practice,” Booms said. “We’ve been

Clay Target Championship in the
spring in San Antonio, Texas.
“Overall this year, we’ve
seen a lot of tough targets at
competitions, so while scores
aren’t as high as they have been
in the past, our team has done
a great job of adapting to situations and pulling through despite
tougher conditions,” Pfaff said.
“This should pay off when we
get to nationals in San Antonio
this spring where the weather is
usually a lot nicer for better target presentations.”
The team will continue with
a reduced practice schedule at
Hillsdale’s newly renovated
Halter Shooting Sports Center
to prepare for the spring tournaments.

running a lot of different plays at
the start of practice, and I think it
paid off this weekend.
The Chargers are now 10-12
overall and 9-7 in conference
play, tied for sixth with Malone,
Ashland, and Ohio Dominican in
the GLIAC. Because of last Friday’s game, however, a tiebreaker game with the Pioneers may
be needed to determine which
tournament.

Season Leaders
Kills:
Emily Wolfert (211)
Jordan Denmark (190)
Haylee Booms (185)
Assists:
Marissa Owen (822)
Digs:
Brittany Jandasek (302)
Jordan Denmark (211)
Jessie Kopmeyer (202)

CROSS-COUNTRY’S
SOLID SIX
Savanna Wierenga
Collegian Freelancer
The past four years have
bonded seniors Joshua Mirth,
Matt Perkins, Kevin Frost, John
Wierenga, Jack Butler and Luke
Hickman.
The six seniors make up the
only fully intact class to have
existed in the past four years: No
one quit the team, no one else in
their year joined it. This is also
the last class that the previous
head coach Bill Lundberg recruited.

about half the team,” Mirth said.
“The next season, we were
thrust into leadership roles,” Butler said. “We were just sophomores. I think we changed the
culture of the team. Us six,

ond place for individual ladies
5-stand shooting.
The team traveled together
on college buses for almost eight
hours to achieve their second
place overall accolade despite
the windy and cold weather conditions.
“Growth for the team has
been good this year, and they
will be a top contender at the
National Championship next
March,” head coach Bartley Spieth said.
The team added three new
members this year: freshman
Drew Lieske, an All-American
sporting clays shooter; sophomore Clayton Moniot, member
of the Junior Olympic Development Team for USA Shooting;
and sophomore Emanuel Boyer,

what it was that gave the Char-

BOX SCORES

Football
Hillsdale: 24
Saginaw Valley: 17

group of men bonded over was
Lundberg’s retirement. Many
upperclassmen quit the team or
graduated after Lundberg’s last
season.

SHOTGUN TEAM STRONG IN ILLINOIS TOURNEY
Kelsey Drapkin
Senior Reporter

SPORTS
A7 6 Nov. 2014

sophomore year. We had to.”
Since then, the team has
achieved great success. This year
the team climbed to an impressive thirteenth place ranking in
NCAA Division-II.
“When I joined our ranking
was no where close to where it is
now,” Butler said.
Looking back at their freshman year, a lot of things have
changed — and probably for the
better, thinks Frost.
“I remember thinking John
was a toolbag,” said Frost,
now one of Wierenga’s closest
friends. “He was wearing a hoodie, hat backwards, white belt and
white shoes.”
met,” Butler said. “Mirth and
Hickman said nothing. I hear
Kevin speak and I thought, well,
he must be a southerner.”
living together in the Niedfeldt
dorm and long hours practicing
together ignited their friendship. After freshman year, half
the guys moved to the “threeway,” an off-campus house that
has been home to cross-country
runners for several years. The
following year two others joined
the house.
During afternoons, however,
chilling there. It’s practice time.
“There’s that whole block of
time, 3-7 p.m., that I never see
during the week,” Butler said.
“I couldn’t see myself doing
anything else during that time

though.”
“Cross-country keeps us more
productive,” Hickman said. “Our
average GPA between us six runners is 3.4.”
These athletes have to be disciplined to keep up with their
sport’s schedule and Hillsdale’s
grueling academics. A typical
weekday consists of morning run
and lift, class, practice, homework, and a bedtime around
10:30 p.m.
The guys’ weekends consist
of running anywhere from 12 to
18 miles, making big breakfasts,
studying, watching some football, and hanging out, Wierenga
said.
As dedicated as they are, they
have all had their doubts about
their running careers at times
over the past four years. But
through injuries, frequent changes in coaches, and overall weariness, they have prevailed.
“It’s safe to say that we have
all had our downfalls in the last
four years. Lots of challenges,
and we have all thought about
the question of why we spend so
much time doing what we do,”
Wierenga said.
“I think about quitting every
time it snows,” said Frost, a native Texan.
“There is something special
about the fact that none of us
have quit,” Mirth added.
The six seniors continue to
be the leaders on the team. Four
of the six are consistently in the
team’s top seven runners. These
guys, however, not only set an
example when it comes to running, but by how they live.
“I think our relationship with
the younger runners is very important,” Frost said. “We give
them advice on not just class and
running, but on how to better live
life.”
“We make sure to tell them
about the dumb things we did
and hope that they learn from
them,” Perkins added.
Over the past four years, all
six have learned to truly enjoy
running and being on a team.
The average mileage per person
over four years totals around
8,500.
“Once I graduate, I’ll realize
how much we are going to miss
each other,” Frost said.
They all plan on recreationally running after college.
“We are not sick of it yet,”
Perkins said. “I’ve never been
sick of running, just some days.”
Mirth wants to make at least
one run at the Olympic trials
marathon. Next year is a qualifying year.

CHARGER UNIFORMS THROUGH THE YEARS
Below: B. Mack
Dorsh in 1927.

Compiled by Stacey Egger
Design by Hannah Leitner

Below:
Game day in
1983.

Hillsdale’s sports teams have
a long heritage in the last two
centuries, and just as the sports
themselves have evolved over
the years, their uniforms have
undergone some major changes.
Here are some snapshots of what
our football players have worn in
decades past.

Left: Verne
G. Myers in
1897.
Above: Jesse
Roberts 1914.

Above: Tom Ward (left) and Bill
Young (right) in 1947.

Above: Patrick Brown
in 1965.

Above: 2010
quarterback Troy
Weatherhead.

6 NOVEMBER 2014

Charger Sports
(Anders Kiledal/Collegian)

FOOTBALL SNAPS LOSING STREAK Wild card system:

Nathanael Meadowcroft
Assistant Editor

redshirt junior quarterback CJ
Mifsud led the Chargers offense
in place of injured quarterback
Mark LaPrairie to a gritty victory
over Saginaw Valley, 24-17.
“He did a nice job,” head

coach Keith Otterbein said on
Mifsud’s play. “I’m really happy
for him and happy for our team.”
“I was really impressed by CJ
and the way he stepped up,” offensive lineman Justice Karmie
in the offensive line which is
huge for us because it makes us
feel great and makes us play better.”
LaPrairie missed
the game with a sore
knee suffered in a
Oct. 25. He is dayto-day according to
Otterbein.
“If he can run our
offense he’s going
to play,” Otterbein
said.
Mifsud is making
the most of his opportunity as starting
quarterback.

time I’ve started in a
long time. I was just
excited for the opportunity,” Mifsud
said. “I’m just really
happy that we won
most of all.”
Mifsud
completed 21 of his 28
passes on the day
for 172 yards and
a touchdown, with
several of those incompletions coming
Senior Michael Carter prepares to stiff- on long balls that
arm a defender. (Anders Kiledal/Collegian) were pushed by

the wind just out of the reach of
his receivers.
The Chargers dominated the
time of possession battle, holding the ball for 37:10, in large
part because of their 67 percent

got into a lot more manageable
third downs,” Karmie said. “I
think it came down to the offensive line. In past weeks we
weren’t buckling down to get
those short yardage plays like we
needed to and I think we made
some of those plays this week.”
Hillsdale’s offensive line also
opened up some big holes for
the Charger tailbacks, as Bennett Lewis, Wade Wood, and
Jack Wiseman combined for 122
yards on the ground.
“I thought they did a really nice job stepping up in the
amount of blitzes that we were
getting,” Otterbein said in praise
of his running backs. “When
you’re taking on 230 pound linebackers coming full speed when
you’re smaller you’ve got to be a
pretty brave soul to do that.”
The win snapped Hillsdale’s
ing their record to 3-6 on the season and 3-5 in GLIAC play.
“When you’re in one of those
funks the pressure builds whether you try to ignore it or address
it,” Otterbein said. “Now any
kind of pressure is gone and now
we can just get ready to go play
Northwood.”
Northwood shares the same

GLIAC record with the Chargers, but run a unique offensive
scheme.
The Timberwolves employ
a spread option offense, which
for a long time was unique in the
GLIAC.
“It’s option football so you’ve
got to be assignment sound,”
Otterbein said. “You’ve got to
control the line of scrimmage
and you’ve got to take the option
away from the dive, to the quarterback, and then to the pitch. It’s
got to be done in that order or
they’ll take the dive and they’ll
ram it right down your throat and

A grand slam

Shane Armstrong
Collegian Reporter

The 2014 World Series featured two teams with some of
the worst regular season records
in postseason history, and it was
awesome for Major League
Baseball.
The San Francisco Giants
won 88 games in the regular season while the Kansas City Royals won 89. This marks the fourth
lowest combined win total between World Series participants
in the history of the Fall Classic.
Two of those seasons (1981 and
1918) were shortened due to the
players’ strike in ‘81 and World
War I in 1918. That means this
year was the second worst World
Series in which a full schedule
was played record-wise behind
the 1973 series between the Oakland A’s and the New York Mets.
This season was also the
second time in league’s existence that two wild card teams
matched up in the Fall Classic.
In 2002 the Anaheim Angels and
San Francisco Giants matched

Defensively, Northwood is
similar to any other team in the
GLIAC: strong, fast, and athletic.
“They’ve got dudes that can
run around and that are active,”
Otterbein said. “They like to
crowd the line of scrimmage on
defense, so they’re not afraid to
go man-to-man across the board
and bring the heat.”
Saturday is also Senior Day,
so there will be a special pregame
ceremony honoring the Charger
seniors before kick-off at 1 p.m.
“It’s always emotional in the
last game of the season at home
with it being senior day,” Karmie Series ever. The wild card was
introduced in 1994 but not used
up for a game like that because until 1995 because a players’
it’s the last time those guys are strike canceled the 1994 playgoing to get to play in front of offs.
their home crowd.”
The wild card gives an opportunity to teams that do not win
their division to continue their
season and have a crack at the
World Series. The rule was instituted because MLB expanded to
three divisions per league and the
format in place excluded some
reps after practices.
middles and outsides [hitters] good teams. Under the original
“Some of the team will come during games makes me look wild card format, the team with
in after dinner a few nights a good because the other team’s the best win percentage that did
week, and we’ll work on what- blockers will stick with them, not win a division earns a spot
ever area of our game needs im- giving me a single block most of in the playoffs against the division winner with the most wins,
provement,” Booms said.
the time.”
She also links her stellar perThough the Chargers’ block unless the two teams were in the
formances to her teammates.
total for its Friday game against same division. If that was the
“The ball is contacted by the Malone wasn’t nearly as high as case, the wild card team plays
defense and setter before me, so Saturday’s, any one of the more the division winner with the second most wins.
their success sets me up nicely,”
See Volleyball A7
In 2012, MLB changed the
she said “Also, the success of our
playoff format to include a
second wild card team in each
league. The two wild cards play
a one-game playoff to earn a
spot in the division series. The
reaction to the change in the
playoff format was a positive
one by fans. With the new rule
more teams were playing in the
postseason and the regular season became more important.
Once proud ball clubs that
were
experiencing
playoff
droughts suddenly found themselves back in the playoffs and
electrifying their cities and fans.
The 2013 Pittsburgh Pirates had
not been to the playoffs since
1992 and struggled to compete
Junior middle hitter Haylee Booms spikes the ball against consistently. At the end of the
the Pioneers on Friday night. (Anders Kiledal/Collegian)
2013 season they made it to the
wild card game against divi-

Charger volleyball dominates weekend
Morgan Sweeney
Senior Reporter
Thanks to two wins over the
weekend, the Chargers propelled
themselves to a four-way tie for
6th place in the 16-team GLIAC
and secured a good chance of
making the postseason tournament.
Hillsdale played with poise
against Walsh College on Saturday, earning a 3-1 win. On Friday, Hillsdale beat the Malone
University Pioneers, a team that
entered the game with a 9-5 season record compared to the Chargers’ 7-6 record.
After honoring the three senior Chargers— something that’s
done annually at the last home
game of the season — the team
against the Walsh Cavaliers. The
Cavaliers gained a two-point lead
but lost it when freshman Jessie Kopmeyer served a six-point
run with one ace. Kopmeyer has
proved to be a clutch server this
season.
“In practice, we have put a
lot of emphasis on having solid
routines for different aspects of

the game, including serving,”
Kopmeyer said. “We serve a lot
every day and coach has placed
a big emphasis on making sure
we all have aggressive college
serves that we can consistently
bring into games.”
Senior Kat Vael, who has
played sparingly this season due
to serious back injuries, made
four kills in two sets on Saturday.
“Playing in Saturday’s game
was just a tremendous blessing,”
Vael said. “Getting to represent
[my team] and contribute on the
court for senior night was a gift.”
The team procured a season
block-high against Walsh. By the
end of the four sets, Hillsdale had
racked up 17 blocks compared
to Walsh’s seven. Sophomore
Erin Holsinger was responsible
for nearly half of the team total,
blocks.
Junior Haylee Booms walked
away with eight kills and a .727
hitting percentage— the highest
of the entire season. According
to head coach Chris Gravel, any
hitting percentage above .300 is
noteworthy. To strengthen her
hitting, Booms has done extra

Shane Armstrong ’15
sion rival Cincinnati. Pittsburgh’s PNC Park was completely sold out with fans wearing all
black in one of the most exciting
playoff atmospheres ever in a
non-World Series game.
For this season’s Royals it
was even more: nearly three decades had passed since their last
trip to the playoffs when they
won the World Series in 1985.
They clinched a wild card berth,
won and took that momentum
through the American League
Division Series and the American League Championship Series, sweeping both opponents,
in 29 years.
This season, it was obvious
how joyful the Royals faithful were about their team and it
brought the city together. This
the teams and cities that make it.
More games means more revenue for the team, people who
work at the games get to keep
their jobs longer, and fans get to
watch with hope and hold on to
the season longer.
The wild card rule that began in 2012 allows more worthy
teams to participate. The 2014
World Series shows that the
teams with the best regular season records are not always the
best when the calendar turns to
October.
Because of the expanded wild
card, baseball fans were introduced to the young and fast Royals who led the league in stolen
bases and were dead last in home
runs, a style of play that has been
lost since the steroid era. Viewers also witnessed a dynasty in
the making with the San Francisco Giants winning their third
ries MVP Madison Bumgarner
displayed his dominance on the
mound in one of the best single
series pitching performances in
history.
The wild card rule seems to
have staying power as indicated
by the past three seasons. There
have been more meaningful
games because of the expanteams. What more could a baseball fan want?

Charger Chatter: cj mifsud

Redshirt junior CJ Mifsud, Hillsdale College football team’s
backup quarterback, made his
collegiate debut in the Oct. 25
after starting quarterback Mark
-

nancial management.

-

What was it like making your

do that.

game?
Being a backup quarterback,
it’s my job to always be ready
in case something happens. So
when our starter Mark got injured and had to come out, I just
had to be ready to go in. There
really wasn’t much time to get
nervous or anything like that. I
just had to go in and had to keep
us in the game because we had
the chance to come back and tie.

Will you be playing more in
the future?
Mark’s a year younger than me,
and next year will be my last
year, so I’m sure we’ll see how
it goes. We’ll play spring ball,
and you know our coaches are
going to put the best players on

How did you feel leading your
team to a touchdown for the

When did you begin your
football career?
I’ve been playing football since
I was eight years old, in 3rd
grade. This is my 14th year playing football and 14th year being
a quarterback, so I’ve been doing it a long time. I love playing
football. I played all four years
in highschool — I started two
years on varsity my junior and

I knew we were down two
scores when I went in, and then
we needed to go in and at least
get another touchdown, and
then hopefully, an outside kick.
I just wanted to put myself in
a position to give our team a
chance and I just did my best to

on this year right now. I haven’t
thought too much into the future
about it.

senior year, and my dad was actually my head coach.

For two seasons you played
with your older brother Anthony Mifsud ’13. What was
that like?
It was really cool. It’s an opportunity that most collegiate
athletes don’t get, to play the
same sport with a sibling. He’s
my best friend and I just really
enjoyed the unique opportunity
to play on the same team with
him for a couple years.
How did you end up playing
football at Hillsdale?
Well, both my parents went here
— my dad was on the 1985 national championship team. Then
my brother went here. I knew I
wanted to play college football,
and I was getting recruited by a
handful of teams in our conference, the GLIAC, and Hillsdale

was just the best option for me.
I felt I was going to get the best
education while playing football
with a group of really good guys
— not just good football players, but genuinely good people.
I thought that would be the best
thing for me. So, when it came
down to it, it was a pretty easy
decision.

Hillsdale football team?
It’s really just the camaraderie
and brotherhood of the team.
We all really love each other
and it’s really like a family.
Nothing gets better than that,
just to know that there’s a hundred plus other guys out there
that have your back and that you
have their back too.

What do you love about the

Seasonal
Inspection
&

Preparation

$49.95

Glory To God
146 Lewis St. - 517-439-1323

Includes

FREE

Oil Change!

B1 6 Nov. 2014

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

( Meg Prom/Collegian)

Tears, laughter, love, death, and song
Student-directed Opera Workshop performing “The Magic Flute,” more, this weekend
Madeleine Jepsen
Collegian Freelancer
This weekend, audiences
of the Opera Workshop performance will be dazzled by
enchanted instruments, daring
princes, and magical sorcerers.
This year’s performance will
include an abridged version of
Mozart’s “The Magic Flute,” as
other well-known operas. The
performances, which are free to
the public, will be held Friday,
Nov. 7 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday,
Nov. 8 at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday,
Nov. 9 at 3 p.m. in McNamara
Rehearsal Hall of the Howard

Music Building. Tickets can be
reserved through the Sage Center

Opera Workshop, lovingly
dubbed “Op-shop” by participants, can be taken as a onecredit music course, or simply
enjoyed as an intensive extracurricular activity. Although Opera
Workshop typically extends into
the spring semester, this year’s
schedule was shortened to allow
interested participants to be involved in the spring musical.
The groundwork for this
year’s workshop began over the
summer, while junior Faith Liu
participated in a theater class in
Oxford. As a part of this class,
she created a variation of Mo-

Senior Claire Ziegler performs as Pamena in “The
Magic Flute.” (Elena Creed/Collegian)

zart’s two-act opera, “The Magic
Flute,” which she set during the
Cold War.
“I had liked the ideas of deception prevalent during the Cold
War, when people were trying to

said.
The opera features a prince
lost in a distant land on a mission
to rescue the queen’s daughter,
held captive by a supposedly evil
sorcerer. A bird-catcher named
Papageno accompanies the
prince on the perilous mission,
to guide him.
Near the beginning of the
school year, Liu volunteered to
direct a shortened version of her

adaptation as a part of Opera
Workshop. Melissa Osmond, the
faculty advisor, liked the idea,
and Faith set to work preparing
the script for Opera Workshop.
This entailed reducing the script
nessing the translations of small
sections from German to English.
alongside of “Magic Flute” are
directed by senior Claire Ziegler.
Over the summer, Ziegler perused various works, choosing
which scenes she wanted to include in Opera Workshop.
-

some of the classic gems of opera
repertoire,” Ziegler said. “I also

Junior Haley O’Brien and freshman Jonathan Edelblut perform in “The Magic Flute.” (Elena Creed/Collegian)

looked for scenes which would
provide a challenge for our singers.”
rects include the waltz duet from
“The Merry Widow,” by Franz
Lehár, a quartet from “Rigofrom “Der Rosenkavalier,” by
Richard Strauss, the letter scene
from “The Marriage of Figaro,”
by W.A. Mozart, and the Finale
Trio from “Faust,” by Charles
Gounod.
Opera Workshop began this fall,
when the music department began selecting singers to cast as
characters. Osmond selected
music students from her studio

and from other voice instructors’ studios. Osmond was also
tasked with organizing props,
posters, and programs for the
performances. Each director was
responsible for the scheduling
and management of rehearsals
for their respective scenes.
Osmond is proud of the effort
Liu and Ziegler have put into directing, especially in light of the
shortened time frame.
“These young women have
done an amazing job,” Osmond
said. “It’s hard to get everything
to put together so fast.”
The performances also involve piano accompaniment. Junior Katrina Bopp, accompanist

See Opera B2

Senior Maran McLeod and freshman Jonathan Henreckson perform in a scene from “Rigoletto.” (Elena
Creed/Collegian)

Making it in today’s big, bad art world
The economics of the arts from the Hillsdale community perspective
Breana Noble
Collegian Freelancer
Artists are entrepreneurs; they
have to market themselves and
their work, and experiment and
people like. Art as an industry has
transformed alongside culture
and the contemporary economy.
Our Internet age has changed the
market and artists have to be creative as they navigate that new
frontier.
Gallery 49 in Reading, Michigan allows local artists to exhibit, sell, receive feedback on,
and gain inspiration for their
art, ranging from woodcarvings
and mosaics to paintings and
photography. Gallery 49 artist
Rhonda Peters creates polymer
clay sculptures and has written
the children’s story “What Does
the Monkey Know?” based on
a piece she submitted to Grand
Rapids’ Art Prize.
“Social media is big for me,
how to use it and manipulate it
to your advantage,” Peters said.
“There’s a knack to using Facebook and being friendly about
putting your art on there. There’s
ways to intrigue people to play
with your art as you’re making
it and being part of that process.”
It is not just the sculpting arts
that receive help in marketing

from the Internet, but also actors,
designers, and musicians.
“More and more of the business is becoming self-promoting,” Professor of Theatre
George Angell said. “Your success as a performer is a self-made
thing. Every actor needs to have
a website, a Twitter account, the
online—see what they do online.
If you’re in the voice-over business, people put out samples of
their voices online and the kinds
of voices they do.”
While there is a growing focus on self-promotion online,
physical galleries aim to help
artists transition from promoting
themselves as a business to forming a co-op that shares costs.
“It’s a lot easier having people
coming through the door to us
than me loading a trailer and going to the various shows,” handmade paper artist Jan Heckenlively said.
Pastel artist Jamee Carpenter
agrees.
“Being with the gallery provides an opportunity I couldn’t
have on my own,” Carpenter
said. “I couldn’t afford a gallery
this size. The support of having
the building, the people doing the
work, that’s a big part of it.”
The structure of art opportunities has also been transformed
by governmental involvement,
according to sculpture professor

Anthony Frudakis.
Frudakis said in the late 19th
and early 20th century, projects
like war memorials were made
available by private money, coming from people like J.P. Morgan
and Andrew Carnegie. They supported philanthropic missions
and felt the social responsibility
to give back.
In the past 50 years, however,
projects like these have become
institutionalized by state, local,
and federal organizations, like
the National Endowment for the
Arts and the General Services
Administration, through the
“Percent for Art” program.
“The danger I see with that is
you have people in one region of
the country commissioning art
for parts of the country which
they know very little about,”
Frudakis said. “We have a disconnect very often between what
the general population’s taste
may be and what’s being chosen
for them.”
There may be a distance-driven disconnect where government and art is concerned, but
for the individual, with the help
of the Internet, the world of accessible art is growing.
“Internet sales have helped
artists present and market their
fessor of art Sam Knecht said.
“We require art majors to establish personal websites. We know
of many artists who are enjoying
sales of work through the Internet.”
Renee Surprenant, technical
director in theatre arts, echoed
this idea, saying for designers
especially, an online portfolio is
essential for exposure to potential employers.
For theatre, Actors’ Access
will personalize opportunities to
job-seekers based on their age
and interests, according to Angell.
However, the Internet has
completely transformed the art
industry and the opportunities

available to them.
For actors, most people performing are working across mediums, not just in theater, but
acting.
Angell said the greatest challenge for actors is the travel. It’s
hard for them to settle down because if they want employment,
they’ll probably have to go to
different places, unless they live
in a place where there is a large
market for it, like New York or
Los Angeles.
Especially for voice-overs and
podcasts, the Internet has made it
possible to record and work from

home.
“If you get a job doing that,
you end up doing your recording
at home on your computer and
sending it in via the Internet instead of going into a studio,” Angell said. “The business is changing. All that stuff is online.”
Growth in technology has
completely transformed the music industry as well.
Chris McCourry is a professor of music and also a part of
the McQ5 jazz band that plays
for Broad Street Market’s Underground. McCourry lamented the
loss of artists making money for
their music due to the transition

to digital downloads.
“Nowadays there’s no such
thing as CD sales anymore,” McCourry said. “It wasn’t that long
ago there was such a thing as record sales. People made money
selling CDs. All that money went
to the artist. That just doesn’t exist anymore. Then how do musicians make money? That’s what
it opens up new and better things,
but right now there’s a lot of unknown to it.”
Musicians can record their
work and upload it to YouTube

See Art Econ B2

Things

To do and see
This week

November 6
Count Brady and McQue 5
Broad Street Underground
9:30 p.m.
Hillsdale’s own Count Brady Jazz
combo featuring the talented Amelia
Stieren, vocalist.
November 7, 8, and 9
Hillsdale College Opera Workshop
McNamara Rehearsal Hall
November 7 & 8, 7:30 p.m.,
November 9, 3 p.m.
Come see Mozart’s “The Magic Flute”
set in the cold war era.
Ticket Reservations Required.
November 8
Craft and Gift Bazaar
Hillsdale Assembly of God
(4075 Beck Road, Jonesville)
“Join the craft and gift bazaar!”
Unique Handcrafts, Baked Goods,
Jewelry & Much more!
Lunch will be available from
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
For more information call 517-849-2187.

November 8
“Stories in Song” by Sigma Alpha Iota
8 p.m.
McNamara Rehearsal Hall
The women of Sigma Alpha Iota present
their semesterly concert.
November 8
Junior Achievement Crazy Bowl
Hillsdale Lanes
10 a.m. or 1 p.m.
Supporting our Superheroes
Crazy Bowl: Hillside Lanes.
“Get involved in the Craziest Bowling
Event of the season!!”
Call Junior Achievement at 517-866782-7828 for more information.
November 11
Master Plan Charrette
11 E. Bacon Street
6 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Do you live or work in the City of
Hillsdale? Come and help the City
Planning Commission update the future
vision of our City. For more information
contact Alan Beeker at 517-437-6449.

(Compiled by Vivian Hughbanks)

ARTS
6 Nov. 2014 B2

(Laura Williamson/Collegian)

IN FOCUS

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Bryan
Morey

Prog Rock and
the Liberal Arts:
They belong together
One of the most overlooked
musical genres among students
here at Hillsdale is progressive
rock. Prog rock is by far the most
profound musical genre of the
socially conservative people
over the past half-century have
claimed rock music is merely Satanic and sexualized, in actuality,
progressive rock is some of—if
not the—best music ever composed. Indeed, progressive rock
should be considered a part of the
liberal arts, as the supreme form
of music, and be studied and enjoyed as such.
Some of you might be wondering what exactly is “progressive” rock. Let me reassure you,
it has absolutely nothing to do
with political progressivism.
It is only progressive in that it
deviates from traditional rock
rhythms and themes. Prog rock is
characterized by abnormal time
signatures, incredible musicianship, thought provoking lyrics,
and long songs that often tell a
story. You may be familiar with
many of the more “popular” prog
bands, such as Rush, Genesis,
Muse. Prog rock had its heyday
incredible resurgence in the last
several years, with bands such as
Big Big Train, Transatlantic, and
The key difference between
prog rock and other forms of rock
is the exceptional level of musicianship. Many of the best rock
musicians in the world play proPeart, the drummer and lyricist
for Rush, is widely considered to
be the best drummer in the world.
Guitarists like Steve Howe (Yes)
are two of the best to ever play
the instrument. Bassists like
Chris Squire (Yes) and Geddy
Lee (Rush) are unequalled in
their talents, and Keith Emerson
(Emerson, Lake, and Palmer) and
Rick Wakeman (Yes) could rival
Van Cliburn on the keyboards
and piano. Progressive rock combines the classical traditions of
music with the upbeat rhythms of
rock music. Add in thought proclassical liberalism, and you have
a winning combination.
The biggest connection between progressive rock and the
liberal arts is the lyrics. The
classical traditions established
by writers such as Augustine,
Shakespeare, William Blake, and
Charles Dickens are continued in
ample, Neal Peart of Rush has
often been called a modern day
stoic (he is even mentioned in our
Western Heritage reader as such).
Ayn Rand and libertarianism have

“Anthem,” “Something for Nothand many others. Rush lyrics
often tell a story while expounding the classical liberal ideals of
freedom and personal responsibility. The chorus of “Something
for Nothing” says, “You don’t get
something for nothing / You can’t
have freedom for free / You won’t
get wise / With the sleep still in
your eyes / No matter what your
dream might be.” This song could
be Hillsdale’s theme song.
Another prominent example
of libertarian, or anarchist, lyrics
larly on their album, “The Wall.”
“The Wall” screams against overpowering governments, mindcontrolling curriculum, and encroachments on freedom. The
album can be summed up in this
lyric: “Mother, should I trust the
government?” Roger Waters, the
bassist, vocalist, and lyricist for

tained a hit song heard on the radio with another song on the opposite side. Soon, whole albums
were on vinyl. This brought about
the rock and roll tours that promoted the album. Tickets would
be sold at inexpensive prices so
that the tickets would sell fast.
“You wanted the show to sell
out right away,” Wolfram said.
“You set the price where the demand would exceed supply. So
then people say, ‘Oh my gosh,
Rolling Stones tour. Wow, it’s
should be a good album.’”
The introduction of digital
CD’s, however, led the way to
property rights issues.
“You guys would have no
qualms copying that CD onto
somebody else’s computer, but
they would not steal the same CD
from Checker Records,” Wolfram said.
Spotify and Internet downloads only increase the amount
of free music, one of the reasons
singer Taylor Swift pulled all her

Artists are as unique as the
very work they create. That’s
why this coming spring, Hillsdale College art department looks
to give the students a chance to
showcase and present their work
in the ninth annual Art Thematic
Competition.
This year’s department picked
theme will be “Stages of Life.”
With this title as a guideline,
students are free to interpret the
meaning however they choose
and let their imaginations run
wild.
“We concentrate our classes
so much on teaching people
proper technique and craftsmanship in the course so that they
can become artists, but this is
kind of a way of allowing people
to bring more of their personality into their work,” Art Department Chair Barbara Bushey said.
“That’s why we started it.”
Along with the new theme
for the year comes the new format for the competition. While in
previous years all mediums were
judged in bulk, this year, judges

plan on splitting the entries into
three media sections: drawings
and paintings, photography and
graphic design, and sculpture.
The winner of each section will
Students looking to enter the
competition must be enrolled in a
studio art class either currently or
in the spring. All entries are due
Art major senior Kinsey Devenport said she looks forward to
working with the theme and seeing what she and other students
can come up with.
“There are so many options
with this theme,” Devenport said.
“Whether it’s a stage of life or the
various stages, it could be a series of images or even one powerful image. I’m wondering how
the other competitors will take
this subject and apply their own
creativity as well as their own
knowledge and create an image,
painting, photograph, graphic design or sculpture that represents
life.”
The professors in the art department will judge the competition. As a result, students are not
allowed to consult the teachers
for ideas for the show and will

work completely independently.
“We wanted the production to
be entirely on their own, because
we meddle with their work in
class all the time. So this is an opportunity for them to make whatever decisions they want to make
– mistakes or glorious work – all
on their own.”
“I think its important to push
yourself as an artist to do private
work and not just your class assignments,” Ahern said. “Competitions are unique opportunities
that you don’t get all the time,
so we should take advantage of
them.”
Students are already looking
for the unique twist and outlook
that will spark the judges’ interest. Ahern said she looks to take
a very different approach both in
the interpretation of the theme as
well as her use of glasswork for
a medium.
“I have this picture in my head
that I have tried to draw over and
over again, but I can’t quite get it
what I want it to be yet,” Ahern
said.
Devenport said she plans on
doing a photographic piece for
the show to display but doesn’t
want to give too much away.

“These competitions give us
as student’s subject matter that
we have to use our creativity to
come up with something that we
think would impress our professors,” Devenport said. “It makes
it a more interesting competition
knowing that the professors are
going to be the ones to decide
who wins. They are the ones who
see our work constantly and we
are forced to do something that
they haven’t seen before.”
Bushey said she encourages
everyone interested to enter the
competition.
“It just seems to me that it
would be foolish not to enter,
because if you’re an artist you
should be making art all the time,
and when you hand it in even if
you don’t win it’s not like we will
just throw it out the window,”
she said. “This is supposed to be
a learning experience ultimately.
So you have this opportunity to
have our input, even if you didn’t
win, to sort of get into the habit of
for a different theme and just seeing how good you are.”

“Alexander”: A very bad day, in review

and tripping on his skateboard as
England by the Pound,” the band he climbs out of bed. But when
embraces their English heritage
while exploring new frontiers
musically, lyrically, and thematically. The album, along with

Alexander tells his upbeat family about the misadventures of

sympathy. He begins to wonder
if bad things only happen to him:
his brother is dating the cutest
girl in the whole school, his sister
is a rising theatre star, his father is
and his mother is about to be promoted. He soon learns that he’s
not alone when his brother, sister,
living through their own terrible,
horrible, no good, very bad day.
Alexander discovers he isn’t the
only one who ever has the bad
other side of luck sometimes.

gins in Alexander’s bedroom,
where we see the familiar mishaps that kicked off his bummer
day. Through much of the beginning, the movie follows the book

with only minor changes. What
make’s the movie a potential
blockbuster is it’s continuation
of Viorst’s story. The viewer is
taken past Alexander’s horrible
day and continues on to the next
day, when it’s able to get clever
and change things up a bit.
With Steve Carell and Jennifer Garner heading the cast, as
dad and mom, the movie stays on
par. Throughout the story, family
proves to be the most important
thing in life, although it often acts
as a double edged sword. There
are constant situations in which
the family integrity is damaged,
but it is always accompanied by
an attempt to hold the family together. Carell, the forever-optimistic glue that holds the family
together, at one point is forced to
admit his own defeat and submit
to the fact that everyone has bad
days once in a while. It’s a classic

scenario that many families have
experienced before—that’s why
the message sticks.
Not only is Carell trying to
keep the family together like a
good father should, Alexander is
constantly battling his own popularity in his elementary school
with another kid in his same
grade. A classic elementary battle
unfolds consisting of who’s got
the coolest stuff, or the newest
toy, or the most rad parents: a
thing many young children can
relate to.
Alexander is a movie that anyone who has ever had a family or
been a part of one can relate too.
It’s a classic children’s story that
contains lessons and familiar humor anyone can enjoy.

War, hell, and heroics in “Fury”

Broadway,” is pure poetry in a
very classical sense of the word.
Their albums tell a story in a
moving way that few bands have
been able to approach.
In the end, progressive rock
embraces philosophy, history, literature, and musical virtuosity in
a way unlike any other genre of
music. It combines all aspects of
the liberal arts in a profound way,
and it begs the listener to experience the western heritage in a
completely new way. Join me in
appreciating the truly wonderful world of progressive rock,
and prepare to be blown away by
some of the best music ever recorded.
Bryan Morey is a junior studying history. He is from Chicago.

art econ
easily today, which increases
competition, according to Gary
Wolfram, a professor of economics whose son works in the music
industry.Wolfram explained how

Hannah Leitner
Design Editor

in-your-face anti-establishment
Nathan Prigmore
lyrics.
Collegian Reporter
Not only do prog bands embrace the ideas of classical liberalism, but they also feature the
“Alexander and the Terrible,
great works of the liberal past in Horrible, No Good, Very Bad
their music. Emerson, Lake, and Day” by Judith Viorst is the clasPalmer used William Blake’s sic children’s story chronicling a
most unfortunate series of events
album, “Brain Salad Surgery.” one day in Alexander’s life. Now
Rush based their song “Xanadu” a major motion picture, Disney
on Samuel Coleridge’s poem, has made Viorst’s beloved story
“Kubla Khan,” and Iron Maiden’s song “Rime of the Ancient such as Steve Carell and Jennifer
Mariner” was derived directly Garner to continue the tale for
from Coleridge’s poem of the today’s children.
same name. Examples abound of
- exander experiences the most
cal liberal backgrounds.
terrible and horrible day of his
Genesis is probably the best young life. Mirroring the book,
example of the connection be- the story begins with Alexandar
tween prog and the liberal arts.

is blatantly clear in Rush’s lyrics,

From B1

Art department competition continues for ninth year

Chandler Ryd
Collegian Freelancer
er and director David Ayer (“End
of Watch”) explores familiar
war-movie territory: the brotherly bonds of soldiers in combat.
While a few questionable directing decisions disrupt the tone of
off an affecting WWII drama due
to compelling acting on all fronts
and religiously-charged cinematography that combine to subvert
the prevalent war-movie stereotypes.
many, as the Allies make one
the Nazi forces. Brad Pitt plays
Don ‘Wardaddy’ Collier, a paternal tank-commander with the
heavy burden of his soldiers’
lives upon his scarred shoulders,
while big-name actors like Shia
LaBeouf, Michael Peña, and Jon

Lerman portrays the naive Normusic from Spotify Monday.
man Ellison, a typist forced into
Since music is now essential- front-lines combat with little
ly free, the music sells the tour.
Listeners enjoy the songs they
download, which makes them
want to see the performance live.
Consumers purchase experiences
today.The tour is not duplicable,
so musicians can sell tickets for
Rachel Solomito
“Now you can buy single
Collegian Reporter
songs, like they were doing in

training. The emotional tension
namic between Ellison and Collier, while the plot follows an
its crew, as it battles through Germany against the technologically
superior Nazi tanks, ending in an
overtly-heroic sequence taking
place at a rural intersection that
evokes religious imagery.
Ayer nails his tone from the
opening shot when Collier wrestles to the ground and brutalizes
a Nazi commander riding a white
tank carcasses. It’s a poignant
intentionally dirty color palate
while painting Pitt’s character as
a tormented soul broken by the
horrors of war. Collier returns
to his tank and together the crew
leaves as the sole survivors of the
such engagements in no small
part due to Collier’s no-manleft-behind attitude. When Ellison joins the squad, the group is
afraid his inexperience will lead
to all of their deaths.
Lerman, playing the narrative

SAI offers “Stories in Song”

what’s coming back? Records.
Go down to Checker Records.
You can buy a vinyl right now.
Now that’s the new thing again.
You have a vinyl record you can
look at, you can hold it. Where
now we’re saying the experience
not digital, so it’s going to sound
a little bit different, and you have
a physical object.”
Perhaps this cycle of everything old is new again will continue to persist, but one thing is
for sure: with the advances in
technology, the business of art
will never be the same.
“In the old days, there were
barriers to entry,” Wolfram said.
“Today, there’s lots of ways to
enter the industry.”

On Saturday, the women of
SAI music fraternity will host
their bi-annual music concert at
8pm in McNamara Hall.
The concert is held every semester and is free for all to attend. This semester’s theme is
Stories in Song. The concert features individual or group acts as
well as an opening and closing
number by the women of SAI.
This year, the opening feature is
an original acapella medley com“I noticed that a lot of other
acapella groups in other colleges have someone who writes
their arrangements.” said Liu. “I
thought that was really exciting
and it was something I wanted
to try. I wanted to put together
something that would capture
how much music does and that

could be sung by the girls in SAI.
one’s needs was kind of a chalhearsals were just glorious.”
Past SAI concert themes have
included “Women in Music” and
“American Music”, but the director —or song mistress— of the
concert, senior Anna Schumacher, chose “Stories in Song” because it represents a wide range
of music that everyone can enjoy.
“They like to sing songs from
musicals or movies or Celtic ballads, a lot of songs that tell stories,” Schumacher said. “So I
thought this theme would cover
that.”
Schumacher said that the effort put into preparing for the
concert took weeks but that attendance is always strong.
The SAI concert is on Saturday, November 15th, at 8 p.m. in
McNamara Hall. Tickets are not
required.

a transformative performance.
We see him break his pretty-boy
typecast as he grows throughout
tant to heroic under the harsh tutelage of ‘Wardaddy’ Collier and
the teasing of Grady ‘Koon-Ass’
Travis (Bernthal). Pitt gives a
characteristically strong performance when we see silent torment in Collier’s eyes, who is simultaneously reminiscent of both
But Travis, Swan (LaBeouf), and
Garcia (Peña) all contribute to
Ellison’s transformation. Seeing
Swan, a scripture-reciting Christian, praying over dead bodies at
the end of a battle is especially
moving.
The cinematography consistently incorporates slow-pans
and zooms around the word
the tank to emphasize the brotherhood of the soldiers. Tension
builds through methodical battles
by juxtaposing the danger of war
with the safety of the tank, like
in a high-point of action when

third act, the squad becomes one
with each other and with the tank
as Ellison proves his worth as a
soldier.
soldiers stop in a neutral German town and they interact with
the German women. The scene
gives character development for
the main crew, but the foreigners ultimately prove expendable
and are written off as cheap plotdevices rather than actual characters, which sullies the dramatic
tone. And, even though conclusion is affecting in its own right,
it feels gratuitously heroic when
compared to the dark atmosphere
post-climax moments, however,
tie the ending to the beginning in
a way that makes the whole endeavor feel complete.
feels cohesive and properly emotional, with many scenes—inclimactic battle—haunting us
long after the fade to black.

a stronger German tank. By the

opera
From B1
important balance between the
instrumental and vocal components of opera.
“Singers take their cues from
accompaniment, so the piano
part has to be heard,” Bopp said.
“The singers also need to project
over the piano so that the audience can hear their voices.”
Between group rehearsals and individual practice, the
twenty singers participating in
Opera Workshop put in many
hours each week honing their
vocal skills. In addition to the
blocking, learning character, and
memorizing lines, opera provides additional challenges for
the singers involved. Several of
in foreign languages, requiring
the performers to be especially
creative in their performances.
son, who plays the lead in “The
“Rigoletto,” notes the challenge

foreign language poses for the
singers. In addition to learning
pronunciation, the singers must
effectively perform the opera for
an English-speaking audience.
“Only a few people in the
audience will understand the
ally have to portray the words
through the emotion in our voice
and our body posture,” he said.
Months of hard work have
prepared for the performances,
with many of the actors rehearsing several times a week for their
scenes. Overall, the work-intensive process has been rewarding
for those involved.
“My casts have been fantassaid. “I’ve been blown away
by the the huge strides they’ve
made from week to week. It’s
been fun to see how they’ve taken my direction and run with it.”

Spotlight

B3 6 Nov. 2014

www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Hillsdale takes care of vets

Best Liberal Arts Colleges for Veterans

U.S. News and World Report ranked Hillsdale College as
the nation’s best liberal arts school for veterans
Phil DeVoe
Collegian Reporter
In a list created by U.S. News
and World Report this year, Hillsdale College was ranked as the
best liberal-arts college in the
country for veterans to attend.
Currently, 11 men who are
veterans or in the reserves attend Hillsdale College; two of the
men have spent their fall semester in Washington, D.C. for the
Washington-Hillsdale Internship
Program.
“Hillsdale has a good relationship with veterans, mostly because of our school’s history with
the Civil War and the men we
philosophy,” Director of Admissions Doug Banbury said. “That’s
a big reason I feel that veterans
want to come here.”
For Jared Jordan, a paralegal in the U.S. Army Reserves,
studying economics at Hillsdale
was just as important as living
close to his family.
“I have given thought to law
school after Hillsdale because of
Hillsdale’s history with outstanding LSAT performances,” Jordan
said.
Jordan is grateful to Hillsdale
for the option it provides in lieu

of the GI Bill.
“The reality is we’re replacing
the GI Bills for these folks,” said
nancial aid. “Eight or nine years
military scholarship. Since that
time donors have come forward
with the funding for military
scholarships. We can guarantee
vets free tuition, room, board, and
even books for some.”
Students like Jordan appreciate these scholarships because it
allows them to save their GI Bill
Eric Hodgdon, a reserve corporal in the U.S. Marine Corps
said that once he decided Hillsdale was the school for him, the
only obstacle was money. Since
the college does not take GI Bill
ey, he was concerned about paying his way through school.
“I didn’t know how much
they’d make up for the GI bill
aid letter telling me that I didn’t
owe the college anything, I was
overjoyed,” Hodgdon said.
Daniel Pierce, an Army infantryman in the 82nd Airborne
from Fort Bragg, North Carolina,
knew he wanted to attend Hillsdale from the alumni connections

and his Michigan home.
“I had heard lots of great
things about the education and
due to some very generous donations I was able to come here
without any of my military ben-

drills. While Hodgdon’s teachers
give him extremely generous due
dates and gratuitous leeway, other
students must deal with instructor
disinterest in helping military students.
“Once, a teacher let me turn in
a paper two days after the semester ended, because drill forced
me to miss the due date,” Hodgdon said. “This is something you
don’t see many other places.”
Although they all come from
different backgrounds, Hodgdon
said that there’s something special about their shared experiences serving their country.
“I don’t need a fraternity,”
Hodgdon said. “I already have
my brothers in the military.”

The ultimate bribe
In 1844, Hillsdale locals bribed trustees to move the
college from Spring Arbor for $15,000

Many wonder why Hillsdale
College resides in the middle of
nowhere. While our small, southcentral city of Hillsdale, boasting
a population of 8,000, can hardly
be considered a metropolis today, it was formerly considered a
prime location, a leading reason
why the college moved in 1853.
“The college was fortunate in
its location,” Hillsdale College
alumnus H.M. Ford said in 1910.
The college was originally
founded under the name Michigan Central College in 1844 by
a group of Freewill Baptists and
then moved to the village of Hillsdale in 1853. Other than those
simple facts, few realize that the
college’s trustees deliberately

“More towns failed
than survived and
more colleges failed
than survived.”
chose to move the school to Hillsdale for both its ideal location and
the town’s bribe of $15,000.
As described in college historian Arlan K. Gilbert’s book,
“Historical Hillsdale College: Pioneer in Higher Education 18441900,” Michigan Central College
was formed as a frontier college,
only seven years after Michigan
entered into the Union, and overcame many obstacles before settling in its present location.
Gilbert describes the environment in which the college was
founded: “People were few and
they were poor. Travel was hard,
as life was hard. Every institution of frontier society was conditional; more towns failed than
survived, and many more colleges failed than survived. They
hung on by threads — often the
threads of accidental politics,
as whether a railroad decided to
build through the town — but
mostly they hung on by the will
of the founders,” he said.
In 1850 more than 98 percent
of Michigan’s population lived in
the southern quarter of the state,
which directed considerations for
sites to build the college.
Spring Arbor extended the
most appealing offer to the college: 210 acres of land. The trustees chose to name the institution
Michigan Central College (over
Spring Arbor Seminary) and
opened the school in Spring Arbor.
Despite its humble beginnings, Michigan Central outgrew
Spring Arbor’s resources, and
college president Edmund Fairhalf miles separating Spring Arbor from the railroad stinted the

2

Lewis and Clark College
Portland, Ore.

Laura Williamson
Collegian Reporter
Although she hails from Los
Angeles, California, new Assistant Professor of Psychology
Jeri Little isn’t dreading the impending winter. After three years
of living in St. Louis, Missouri,
she is used to seeing snow on the
ground.
“I’m an optimist,” she said.
“We have snow in St. Louis. Last
winter was hard on us, just as it
a normal Michigan winter. I think
that I can become more prepared
for a hard Michigan winter.”

John P. Cook, a college trustee, was among the group
that chose Hillsdale as the school’s new location.
(Photo Courtesy of the Hillsdale Historical Society)

school’s growth.
On Jan. 5, 1853, the board
of trustees voted 9 to 2 to move
the college to a better location
and formed a committee to begin
the search. Following the decision, the board selected Jackson,
Adrian, Coldwater, Hillsdale, and
Marshall as potential places to
move.
It was by accident that Hillsdale became the forerunner. One
moving process, Professor Ransom Dunn, was traveling through
Hillsdale during a snowstorm on
Jan. 14, 1853 when he stopped at
the Hillsdale House and asked for
names of citizens “interested in
education.”
By the next day, three citizens took Dunn to examine four
potential building sites for the
college. When Dunn overlooked
what is now campus, he saw a
“half-cleared pasture surrounded
by a split-rail fence.”
Although Dunn was convinced, the site committee stipulated that the new college community must contribute $15,000
toward the school’s construction.
While many at Michigan Central
favored Jackson because it was
one of the four largest towns in
the state, the committee rejected
its bid because locals did not
align with the college’s abolitionist values.
When Coldwater only offered
the college $10,000, the committee turned to Hillsdale, which
agreed to the desired $15,000.
Also attractive to the site committee was Hillsdale’s prime location on the Michigan Southern
$1 million in 1853. Hillsdale was
terminus with large warehouses,

the village became the shipping
point for three counties,” Gilbert
said. In 20 years, it would also
become a stop on the trunk line
from New York to Chicago. In
addition, Hillsdale County boasted the Chicago Military Road,
now U.S. 12, the primary route
into southern Michigan.
A “gentlemen’s agreement
based on honor” on Feb. 16, 1853
tion. By May, the county’s residents raised their goal contribution, a large part of which came
from congressman Esbon Blackmar. He gave 25 acres for campus
property and $500 in cash, but he
stipulated that the land must always be used for education and
that Hillsdale County residents
compose the majority of college
trustees.
In total, township citizens contributed $22,500 to the construction and another $7,000 came
from village residents.
The village reaped immediate
Land as far as seven miles from
Hillsdale” rose in value by $2
per acre and population doubled
between 1850 and 1860. Yet, as
received “is not to be estimated
by the magnitude of buildings
or endowments, but by the increase of mental power and moral
force.”

Hillsdale College
Hillsdale, Mich.

Albion College
Albion, Mich.

Psych picks up new prof

year in the Psychology department, and she has already nestled
into campus life.
“I like Hillsdale a lot. I really
thought I would like it a lot but I
like my job more than I thought,”
Little said.
While Hillsdale is Little’s
tion, she has taught before. Little
taught at her alma mater, University of California Los Angeles, right after graduate school.
Little said that she appreciates the
smaller classes here. At UCLA
her classes were at least 50 students.
“I just really like the change
to get to know students better and
to have more interactive classes,”
Little said.
This semester Little is teaching two introductory classes and
one cognitive psychology class,

Macaela Bennett
City News Editor

5 1
4
St. Norbert College
De Pere, Wis.

Pierce loves that Hillsdale
has an accepting community for
veterans, something that other
schools seem to lack. Some of the
men in Hodgdon’s care face problems with paper due dates and

3

her speciality.
“I’m interested in the education aspects or implications of
cognitive psychology. So cognitive psychology is the study of
how we perceive, remember, how
we think about the world, how we
make decisions about the world
on the basis, largely, of our prior
experiences. The implications
of that for education are pretty
clear,” Little said.
Even though cognitive psychology is her area of concentration, Little said that she still loves
teaching introductory psychology
classes.
“The topics that we explore
in intro are a little more broad
and we get to explore nature vs.
nurture and determinism vs..
free will, these kinds of broader
things. That’s kind of fun and interesting,” she said.
In addition to teaching, Little
is also conducting research. She
is working with four different
students, exploring her interests
in cognitive psychology and its
implications for education. The
students also had a hand in choosing and developing the projects.
Senior Elisabeth Wolcott is
conducting research with Little
and has enjoyed the process.
“I’ve had a great experience
working with Dr. Little. She’s
fun to work with and is passionate about her research. I’m really
thankful for the opportunity to
gain more experience and to work
with someone with a background
in both teaching and professional
research,” Wolcott said.
Kari McArthur, head of Hills-

Jeri Little
dale’s psychology department, is
also glad that Little is here.
“She’s a great asset to the department,” McArthur said.
Professor McArthur also said
that Little’s research is not just
relevant to the department but
is also applicable to other disciplines.
Little has found things about
Hillsdale that she loves.
“I like to run and I found the
Baw Beese trail that goes past the
lakes and I love it. When I was
living in St. Louis, I didn’t have
anything, any running place, that
I liked as much as that,” Little
said.
Even though Little doesn’t
mind the snow and has found
a running route, there are some
things that she misses about big
city living. Three of which she
can list off immediately:
Target, Trader Joe’s, and
Whole Foods.

Climb

From B4

Cross did not begin climbing
until after he graduated from his
undergraduate studies. Parell
has a unique reason as to why
she began climbing.
“I really got interested when
I watched Princess Diaries, because in the beginning when she
goes and she climbs this wall I

thought, ‘Wow, that’s so cool,
I want to be like her’,” Parell
said. “She’s also the princess of
Genovia, so she’s a really strong
and powerful woman, so ever
since I watched that movie I always wanted to climb.”
No matter your skill level,
climbing presents more than
simply a physical challenge.

“There’s a lot of puzzling
and a lot of thinking involved,”
Cross said. “You’re trying to
use your strength, but your body
position to get up the wall.”
So if you’re up for a mental
and physical challenge, try to
conquer Hillsdale’s new climbing wall.

Now Featuring!

Pumpkin
Pancakes
and
Waffles!

Now Featuring!

during his cornerstone laying
speech that July 4, “The cordiality, the unanimity, and the liberality with which they [Hillsdale
residents] have contributed to the
erection of the building whose
cornerstone is now to be laid,
have not often been paralleled in
the history of such institutions.”

Pumpkin

Like us on Facebook or find us online!
www.FinishLineRestaurant.net

B4 6 Nov. 2014

Spotlight
www.hillsdalecollegian.com

Nathanael Meadowcroft
Assistant Editor

Climb On

Student climbers scale the new rock wall in the
Roche Sports Complex.

Climbing isn’t just a means of
exercise. For many, it’s a passion.
Although rock climbing in Michigan can be tough, the addition of
a rock climbing wall in the Roche
sports complex has given student
climbers an easy way to continue
doing what they love.
The rock climbing wall, which
opened this semester, is open seven days a week. It is supervised
by students who have a passion
for climbing.
“I grew up climbing everything there was to climb,” said
freshman Cassidy Syftestad, wall
logistics supervisor for the climbing wall. “I live in California, so
I’m near Tahoe and there are a lot
of mountains, rocks, and boulders to climb. I started bouldering
when I was pretty young.”
Bouldering is a form of outdoor climbing. As the name implies, it generally takes place on
boulders or other smaller rocks,
so climbers are closer to the
ground. There are no harnesses or
ropes involved. The only equipment needed is a crash pad to prevent injury from falls and climbing shoes if wanted.
“It’s the cheapest form of
rock climbing,” said junior Taylor Flowers. “I’ve done that in
Colorado up in Rocky Mountain
National Park near Colorado
Springs, and also a little bit in
Montana.”
gan prevents climbers from beclimb around Hillsdale, but they
make do with what they have.
The closest climbing gym to
Hillsdale is Planet Rock in Ann
Arbor.
“That’s a really good place to
go if you want something more
advanced,” said sophomore Cecily Parell, special events supervisor for the climbing wall. Parell
started a rock climbing club at
her high school and is eager for
the opportunity to possibly start
one here.

“I would like to at some point
go forward with making a rock
climbing club here,” she said. “I
would be sure that we had outings.”
Student workers at the wall
also are in charge of creating new
scale called the Yosemite Decimal Scale to describe a route’s
of the scale ranges from 5.4 to
5.14. A 5.4 route is a route that is
protected and has good holds for
both hands and feet. A 5.14 route,
on the other hand, has yet to be
climbed.
“I just put up a 5.11 route
which is pretty dang tough,”

“I get to the wall
as often as studies
will allow.”
Parell said. “It stumped our best
climber so that’s really exciting.”
Graduate student Peter Cross,
however, was able to conquer
Parell’s 5.11 route.
“I get [to the climbing wall] as
often as studies will allow,” Cross
said. “Climbing is more than
just a workout. It requires both
thought and physical strength
which I really like.”
While climbers can enjoy
attempting new routes on the
climbing wall here, indoor climbing simply doesn’t compare to
the real deal.
the wall here but it would be
good to make a trip to Ann Arbor,” Parell said. “The wall here
is pretty small and there’s not a
lot of variety, but we’ll be setting
and resetting routes.”
“Outdoor sport climbing
is ideal,” Cross said. “There’s
nothing like trying to ascend an
80-foot rock, especially if it’s
exposed and you’ve got a great
view.”

See Climb B3

Pens and pearls
Amanda Tindall
News Editor
Driving along U.S. 12, going into Allen, Michigan, a little
green sign reads, “Antique Capital.” Here, I began my adventure
to search for antiques.
Antiquing becomes increasingly fascinating, even with everyday things, when the seeker
realizes that each little thing — a
strand of glass pearls, a fountain
pen, or a pair of bifocals — has
a distinct story behind it. In some
sense, it gives a glimpse of a
world past.
As I walked into Pastiche Antiques in the Preston Gaslight Antique Village just outside of Allen,
Mary Parrett, the owner, sat in the
middle of what seemed like a
somewhat cluttered, but still lovely home. All the kitchen supplies
had a home in the kitchen, a small
living room with vintage furniture
Parrett said she has worked
with antiques almost her whole
life. She and her business partner
do estate sales, which often adds
to the Pastiche collection.
“Antiques are anything that is

more than 100 years old,” Parrett said. “Vintage is more than
around 50 years old, or something
like the things from the ‘40s and
‘50s. Retro is from the ’60s and
’70s. Collectables can be things
from businesses that even still
produce, like Coca-Cola, BigBoy
dolls, or M&M products.
In the other building, Coke
the shelves.
Because of the close proximity
to campus, some students enjoy
the search for vintage things on
the weekend.
“Antiquing has all the opportunity of thrifting, but with the
added curiosity of what century
your great buy just came from,”
junior Meg Prom said. “An old
watch, fake pearls, anonymous
stereographs, even just plain silverware are all imbued with the
dignity of their continued survival
through forgotten years. Maybe
that’s a little melodramatic, but
it’s also a fascinating way to pop
some tags.”
Unfortunately, I can’t specialize in $3,000 mint-condition
carriages, but for now, the large
collection of pearls and fountain
pens will work.

(From left to right) Senior Annie Teigen, Anna Saewert, and senior Caroline Green pose before chasing down the
living for the Zombie Run 5k at Hayden Park on a wet Halloween evening. (Anders Kiledal/Collegian)

CHRISTY ALLEN, JUNIOR
Describe your fashion sense.
Pretty classic over all. Nothing too extreme in any direction.
What is your most embarrassing item of clothing?
A Justin Bieber “My World” T-shirt.
What is your biggest fashion pet peeve?
When girls get all dressed up and wear a workout headband.
What is your favorite item of clothing?
My Kate Spade nude pumps that look like Kate Middleton’s.
Who inspires your wardrobe?
I try to look as much like the people inside the J. Crew catalogue
as possible. No shame.
Photos by Anders Kiledal

CAMPUSCHIC