PM Fiction Burns Response to Horkheimer/Adorno

ADM 20 February 1994

These  people  are  paranoid.    Digging  deep   into  the   notion  of Donald  Duck  as  analog   to the  proletariat is a fundamentally paranoid way of looking at these things.  Mickey Rooney does not  neccesarily mean the end of art, the death of the individual.  Betty Boop is neither more nor less  culturally significant than any of Disney’s characters.  The idea that popular culture will kill high  art is alarmist and arrogant.  Jazz is a freedom, not a slavery, and it does not pollute “higher”  forms of music.  Hierarchies in general, I think, are paranoid, since they give the low end reason  to suspect a loss of control, and give the higher end a reason to suspect revolution.  Adorno and  Horkheimer are no exception to this.  They, as critics of high art, are naturally fearful of a lower  art that is more difficult to critique.  Contrary to what they suggest, lower art forms are not plots  executed by masters; they are means of empowerment for those who are traditionally robbed of  a culture of their own.  Adorno, as a Marxist, is too quick to see the persecution of the proles in  all the texts he reads.  Were he a little more relaxed, a little more open­minded, he might enjoy  the comedy of Donald Duck, rather than look for dialectics. The ills of technology, according to Adorno and Horkheimer, are related to the commodification  of culture.  The culture industry, they argue, reproduces flat copies of art already achieved, or it  modifies the art with some kitsch variation such as jazz.  This collapses the aesthetic sensibility  of millions into a single, unquestioning taste for whatever the industry puts forward.   Such a  sweeping idea, put in the form of this sytem, is also paranoid.  The masters are not in complete  control of either art or the masses.     Adorno and Horkheimer believe the culture industry can take away indiviudual identity.  “The  public is catered for with a hierarchical range of mass­produced products of varying quality,  thus   advancing   the   rule   of   complete   quantification.     Everybody   must   behave   (as   if  spontaneously) in accordance with his previously determined and indexed level, and choose the 

category of mass product turned out for his type” (123)  The pair fails to realize that no one is  holding a gun to the head of the consumer.  To the contrary, manufacturers provide a wide array  of choices, perhaps marketed to certain tastes, but certainly not bland or without variation. Their  argument  that  “mechanically  differentiated  products  prove  to  be  all alike  in the  end,”  whether an types of automibiles or movies does not work.  Too many choices, made available by  too many  companies, as a practical matter, eliminate  the  possibility.   Products differ beyond  their marketing campaigs.  Certain cars run better, certain movies offer more enjoyment.