‘HERO 6’ BIG

FAMILY FUN

HEATED LUNCH

IMMIGRATION DISPUTE ERUPTS AT WHITE HOUSE

DOWN, S&P SET
RECORD HIGHS

NATION PAGE 7

BUSINESS PAGE 10

WEEKEND PAGE 18

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014 • Vol XV, Edition 72

GOP blocks supermajorities
California Assembly seat flips, Democrats no longer hold two-thirds in state Legislature
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Republicans scored a
major election victory on Friday by blocking Democratic supermajorities in both
houses of the Legislature after flipping an
Assembly seat in the eastern San Francisco
Bay Area.
Friday’s win by Republican Catharine
Baker over Democrat Tim Sbranti in

Assembly District 16 follows GOP success
on Election Day in blocking a Democratic
supermajority in the 40-member state
Senate.
A two-thirds threshold is needed to give
the majority party power to raise taxes and
override gubernatorial vetoes without support from the minority party.
Baker secured 52 percent of the vote after
an updated tally by Contra Costa and
Alameda counties late Friday. That means

Republicans picked up the 27 seats needed
in the 80-member Assembly.
She cast her victory as a desire by voters
to provide a check to Democrats in
Sacramento, who still hold a solid majority
of seats in the Legislature as well as every
statewide office.
This year’s strike by unionized workers
for the Bay Area Rapid Transit system also
was a key issue in the campaign and brought
frustrated voters to the polls, she said. The

GATORS SHUT DOWN PANTHERS

district stretches from Lafayette to
Livermore, encompassing communities
heavily dependent on the mass transit system, and previously was represented by a
Democrat.
“It was a real example of when leaders
have an opportunity to choose what’s best
for the community over whatever prior loyalties or affiliations they might have. And
as I knocked on doors all across the district,

See GOP, Page 23

San Carlos looks at
bond for next fall
Measure would fund several projects
like new parks and recreation facilities
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Sacred Heart Prep shut down Burlingame’s potent offense in a PAL Bay Division showdown Friday night in Burlingame.The
Gators posted a 35-14 win to claim the Bay Division championship. SEE STORY PAGE 11

Norovirus confirmed
in Hotel Sofitel illness
Sixty sickened at three separate events
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The gastrointestinal illness that sickened 60 at three
Hotel Sofitel events last month including a NAACP banquet
is confirmed as norovirus, the San Mateo County Health
System announced Friday.
The Redwood City hotel’s kitchen, which closed Oct. 30,

See SOFITEL, Page 24

The possibility San Carlos voters will be faced with a
bond measure next November to fund several city projects
like new parks and recreation facilities will likely move one
step closer to reality Monday night when the council will
consider spending money for consultants and outreach.
The city, two weeks ago, already allocated $500,000 for
temporary staff to pursue those special projects and figure
out if voters would go for a bond. This newly proposed
$117,730 is for election consulting and polling services
and $30,542 will be spent on consulting group Community
Focus to facilitate community meetings.
Election consultant TBWB Strategies will subcontract the
surveying to Godbe Research if the council approves the
proposal at Monday night’s meeting.
While there is no guarantee right now that the council will
pull the trigger on a bond measure, if it does, the proposed
timeline calls for the November 2015 election. Ramping up
to that point, community meetings will be held between
Jan. 7 and Jan. 16 and in February the City Council will hear
survey results and public input to decide whether to go forward. If the council opts for pursuing a measure, more outreach will happen in March 2015 followed by a second survey and final council consideration in June or July. In

See BOND, Page 23

Big wave surfers catalog their lives, support each other
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Fifteen of the world’s most elite, but
overshadowed, big wave riders will to
join to celebrate their shared passion
at Half Moon Bay’s perilous surf break
during the new WickrX Super Sessions
Mavericks 2014.
Oh yeah, did we mention they’re all
women?
Instead of a one-day surf contest, the
Super Sessions Big Wave Women’s

Surf Invitational is
a conglomeration
of
personalized
videos documenting
these female athletes’ adventures in
the months leading
up to their convening at Mavericks in
Sarah Gerhardt December. These
top surfers from
Hawaii, California, Brazil and all over
the world will paddle out not to com-

Grant
Washburn

pete against one
another, but to share
in their unique passion and highlight
that girls can shred
too.
“I’m really excited
about this, for me
it’s about camaraderie. For 20
years, I’ve surfed

See SURF, Page 24

California Certified Acupuncturist & Herbalist

Acupunture Clinic

Natural Healing and Prevention

Mon - Fri 8am - 6pm
1720 So. Amphlett Blvd., #168
San Mateo, CA

Tel: (650) 572-1628
Fax: (650) 572-1628
Cell: (650) 389-4979

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“I think we look for the differences in
people because it makes us less lonely.”
— Carson McCullers, American author (1917-1967)

This Day in History
President Abraham Lincoln won reelection as he defeated Democratic
challenger George B. McClellan.
(Lincoln had seriously doubted he
would prevail, but the fall of Atlanta
to Union forces in September helped
ensure his victory.)
In 1 7 9 3 , the Louvre began admitting the public, even
though the French museum had been officially open since
August. Madame Roland, 39, an influential figure of the
French Revolution, was convicted of treason during the
Reign of Terror and sent to the guillotine (her last words: “O
Liberty, what crimes are committed in thy name!”).
In 1 8 8 9 , Montana became the 41st state.
In 1 9 2 3 , Adolf Hitler launched his first attempt at seizing
power in Germany with a failed coup in Munich that came to
be known as the “Beer-Hall Putsch.”
In 1 9 3 2 , New York Democratic Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt
defeated incumbent Republican Herbert Hoover for the presidency.
In 1 9 3 9 , the play “Life with Father,” based on the stories of
Clarence Day, opened on Broadway.
In 1 9 4 2 , Operation Torch, resulting in an Allied victory,
began during World War II as U.S. and British forces landed in
French North Africa.
In 1 9 5 0 , during the Korean War, the first jet-plane battle
took place as U.S. Air Force Lt. Russell J. Brown shot down
a North Korean MiG-15.
In 1 9 6 0 , Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kennedy defeated Vice
President Richard M. Nixon for the presidency.
In 1 9 7 4 , a federal judge in Cleveland dismissed charges
against eight Ohio National Guardsmen accused of violating
the civil rights of students who were killed or wounded in the
1970 Kent State shootings.
In 1 9 8 7 , 11 people were killed when an Irish Republican
Army bomb exploded as crowds gathered in Enniskillen,
Northern Ireland, for a ceremony honoring Britain’s war
dead.

1864

Birthdays

TV personality
Chef,TV personality
Actress Tara Reid is
Jack Osbourne is
Gordon Ramsay is
39.
29.
48.
Actor Norman Lloyd is 100. CBS newsman Morley Safer is
83. Actor Alain Delon is 79. Actress Virna Lisi is 78. Singeractress Bonnie Bramlett is 70. Singer Bonnie Raitt is 65. TV
personality Mary Hart is 64. Former Playboy Enterprises
chairman and chief executive Christie Hefner is 62. Actress
Alfre Woodard is 62. Singer-songwriter Rickie Lee Jones is
60. Author Kazuo Ishiguro is 60. Rock musician Porl
Thompson (The Cure) is 57. Singer-actor Leif Garrett is 53.
Actress Courtney Thorne-Smith is 47. Actress Parker Posey is
46. Rock musician Jimmy Chaney is 45. Actress Roxana Zal
is 45. Singer Diana King is 44.

REUTERS

Lightning strikes over Lake Maracaibo in the village of Ologa, where the Catatumbo River feeds into the lake, in the western
state of Zulia in Venezuela.

B

efore the introduction of tea
from China, the English drank
tea made from catnip.
***
Judy Garland (1922-1969) was the
lowest paid star in the 1939 movie
“Wizard of Oz.”
***
South Dakota is a leader in honey production. In recognition of its importance to the state’s farm economy, the
honeybee was adopted as the state
insect in 1978.
***
The United States devotes about 29
percent of its total land area to forests.
Alaska has 22 million acres of forest,
the most of all 50 states. California
has the second most forestland with
20.6 million acres. Idaho is third,
with 20.4 million acres of forest.
***
Do you know what is special about
this sentence? We promptly judged
antique ivory buckles for the next
prize. See answer at end.
***

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Nov. 5 Powerball

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

2

11

19

42

21

34

OMYMM

GIDOIN

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

Nov. 7 Mega Millions
31

35

41

66

65

5
Mega number

Nov. 5 Super Lotto Plus
1

15

21

24

5

16

17

22

36

4

1

0

Daily Four
2

Daily three midday
8

26

26

1

9

Daily three evening

Mega number

4

6

2

The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
6, in first place; Hot Shot, No. 3, in second place;
and Money Bags, No. 11, in third place. The race
time was clocked at 1:42.14.

XCDEEE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Yesterday’s

A:

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: STALL
HENCE
IRONIC
FUNNEL
Answer: Before DVD’s, the idea of putting a whole
movie on a disc seemed — UN-“REEL”-ISTIC

The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com
twitter.com/smdailyjournal

many U.S. cities. Each candy bar had a
tiny parachute attached to it .
***
The 10 story Wainwright Building in
St. Louis, Missouri, was the first skyscraper in the United States. The building was completed in 1891.
***
The word “assassination” was invented by William Shakespeare.
***
The green pigment in plants is called
chlorophyll.
***
There are over half a million species of
beetles.
***
Wooden baseball bats weigh between
2 and 3 pounds. Wooden bats are commonly made from ash wood, however,
maple, pine and hickory are also used.
***
Doris Day (born 1924) recorded the hit
song “Hooray for Hollywood” in
1959.
***
Ans wer: It is a holalphabetic sentence, which is a sentence that contains ev ery letter of the alphabet.
Another one is: The quick brown fox
jumps ov er the lazy dog.

Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
Powerball

INNOO

Automatic electric bread making
machines were introduced in 1992.
***
Each week, Americans spend $90 million playing Bingo.
***
Elvis Presley married Priscilla
Beaulieu on May 1, 1967, at the
Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas. Elvis was
32, Priscilla was 21.
***
More Kraft macaroni and cheese is
sold in Canada than in any other country.
***
The artwork of Pablo Picasso between
1901 to 1904 is called his “Blue
Period.” Picasso’s friend Casagemas
committed suicide. The artist was also
away from home for the first time, and
living in poor conditions. His paintings, done almost entirely in blue,
expressed his depression.
***
The turkey trot, popular in the early
1900s, was almost banned. Dancers
bob their heads like strutting turkeys.
Some people felt the dance was demoralizing.
***
You would weigh more than a trillion
pounds on a neutron star.
***
The Baby Ruth candy bar was named
for President Grover Cleveland’s
daughter Ruth (1891-1904), who was
born while Cleveland lived in the
White House. In 1923, as a promotional stunt, Baby Ruth candy bars
were dropped from airplanes over

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Saturday : Sunny. Highs in the upper
60s. Light winds.
Sunday : Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s.
Light winds.

Correction
The story, “Attorneys focus on legal disputes before they
hit court” in the Nov. 7 edition of the Daily Journal had an
error. It incorrectly referred to mediation rather than the
court system. The following line is correct: “Unlike the
court system in which an outside party ultimately makes a
decision for the parties, the collaborative process allows
disputing individuals to derive their own, mutually acceptable resolution and offers more confidentiality than the
court system.”
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Nutcracker performer returns to her roots
By Angela Swartz

3

Police reports
Why would you steal that?
An unknown person cracked a sliding
glass door to a house and stole a
garbage can on Casa Bona Avenue in
Burlingame
before
7:49
p. m.
Wednesday, Nov. 5.

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With hopes of one day using her dance
abilities to heal others, Anna Maravelias is
currently acting as the children’s ballet mistress for Peninsula Ballet Theatre.
Maravelias, a graduate of Carlmont High
School in Belmont, grew up on the
Peninsula with her younger brother and participated in the San Mateo theater group’s
production of the Nutcracker herself from
the age of 7 to 17. Now, she works to set up
all the choreography for this season’s performance of The Nutcracker.
“Since I started teaching here and had such
as unique insight, it was kind of an easy
transition,” said Maravelias, who lives in
San Mateo. “It’s just a real honor.”
She started rehearsing every weekend with
the 37 children in September and she said
it’s great because the children get a chance
to perform with the professionals.
Currently, Maravelias, 28, is wrapping up
her bachelor’s degree in dance from San
Francisco State University where she
focused on understanding physiology of
dance, while also taking electives in childhood psychology.
“I started dancing when I was 2 and a half,”
she said. “My parents just tried me in all the
normal sports and that’s where I found the
most joy, so I just kept dancing. As I’ve kind
of moved on, I’ve found that movement has
been the best way to articulate things that
don’t necessarily have words. I want to be
able to share that with anyone.”
She plans to move on to a graduate program in psychology where she wants to
concentrate on using dance and art as a
means to heal combat soldiers when they
return from active duty. This was born out of
her own personal experience, as she said
she is a widow of a special operations Army
ranger who was killed in the line of duty
back in 2012 after a battle with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression after he
did three tours overseas.
“It’s a key demographic,” she said. “I
want to open it up to anyone who can
move.”
People are becoming more aware of posttraumatic stress disorder and depression
post-war, she said. Treatment is still pretty
inaccessible though, she added.
“It extends to the point of what’s covered
by veterans benefits and what’s not,” she
said. “I would want to work with patients
knowing it’s helping people rather than
making a profit. … I think everyone can
benefit from it.”
In the future, she hopes to open a private
therapy practice and continue teaching
dance. She teaches 10 ballet classes at the
dance company’s school right now.

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

SAN MATEO
Burg l ary . A house was broken into on
Shoreview Avenue before 5:23 p. m.
Tuesday, Nov. 4.
Hi t-and-run. A driver backed into an SUV
and drove away after making threats to the
SUV’s driver on West 20th Avenue and El
Camino Real before 8:56 a.m. Monday,
Nov. 3.
Burg l ary . Several storage lockers were
broken into and a car was burglarized at
2000 Trade on West Fifth Avenue before
7:17 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 30.
Theft. Two people left Denny’s without
paying their tab on South Norfolk Street
before 12:47 a.m. before Tuesday, Oct. 28.
Arres t. A woman was arrested for stealing
at Sears in Hillsdale Shopping Center
before 12:48 p.m. before Tuesday, Oct. 28.

MILLBRAE
Burg l ary . A laptop and other items were
stolen from a vehicle on the 400 block of
Broadway before 5:30 p.m. Monday, Nov.
LANCE HUNTLEY 3.
Anjuli Mishra, 7, rehearses for her role in Peninsula Ballet Theatre’s 43rd annual Nutcracker in Petty theft. License plates were stolen on
the same costume worn by Anna Maravelias, children’s rehearsal mistress, when she performed the 1500 block of El Camino Real before 4
with the company as a child.
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4.
“The most rewarding thing is to see the Dec. 20, 2 p.m. Dec. 21 and 22 at the Fox DUI. A woman was cited for driving under
joy the kids have coming in,” Maravelias Theatre at 2215 Broadway in Redwood City. the influence on Magnolia and Victoria
said. “Being able to say, ‘this was the first Tick ets range from $30 to $65. For more avenues before 11:59 p.m. Saturday, Nov.
dress I wore,’ knowing how much it meant information, go to peninsulaballet.org.
1.
to me. … When I grew up, dancing was
always just for enjoyment and pleasure and I
realized I loved teaching and kids.”
A mantra of Maravelias’ is that any time
her students have a challenge, she tells
them to never to say they can’t do something, but rather she wants them to say,
“Miss Anna, I need help.”
“Everyone has a challenge and asking for
help is not difficult,” she said. “There’s
nothing wrong with it and it’s a really good
lesson to ask for help.”
Choreography for the upcoming shows
comes from Carlos Carv ajal and artistic
direction will be coming from Dav id
Fonnegra. The Nutcrack er Sweet, a 45minute abbrev iated v ersion of the show,
runs 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Dec. 6
and 7 at Peninsula Ballet Theatre at 1880 S.
Grant St. in San Mateo. The 11 a.m. Dec. 6
performance is sold out. Adult tick ets are
$25, while children’s tick ets are $20. The
full-length show runs 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.

4

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

Prisoners freed quickly
after voters OK measure
By Don Thompson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — A ballot measure passed by voters this
week is already freeing California suspects from jail as their
felony charges are reduced to misdemeanors, and people previously convicted of the charges receive reduced sentences as
they appear in court.
Sheriffs across the state immediately began implementing
Proposition 47, which calls for treating shoplifting, forgery,
fraud, petty theft and possession of small amounts of drugs,
including cocaine, heroin and methamphetamines, as misdemeanors instead of felonies.
Two-dozen suspects who were being held on those charges
walked out of Sacramento County jail two days after 58 percent of voters approved the initiative on Tuesday. They were
among the more than 400 Sacramento jail inmates expected
to be freed while they await trial on reduced charges that in
many cases will no longer keep people behind bars after
arrests.
Other sheriffs immediately changed arrest policies while
they reviewed which inmates qualify for release. Meanwhile,
inmates in state prison on the charges can petition for
release.
It appears the measure intended to save hundreds of millions of dollars a year in reduced prison and jail costs is
already having that effect. Under the initiative, savings will
be diverted to rehabilitation programs intended to reduce
crime, though the programs will lag far behind the criminals’
release.

LOCAL/STATE
Khanna concedes to Honda in
17th congressional district race
Challenger Ro Khanna called incumbent U.S. Rep. Mike Honda Friday
evening to concede the race for
California’s 17th Congressional
District.
Khanna’s concession follows a
statement by Honda Friday morning
declaring himself the race’s winner
after gaining “an insurmountable lead”
of more than 4,000 votes. Absentee
ballots are still being counted in
Alameda and Santa Clara counties.
Khanna said he was struck during the
campaign by the “passion” seen by
supporters on both sides and by the
“fundamentally fair, open-minded and
decent” nature of the voters in the district.
“I respect their judgment and decision,” Khanna said.
During the sometimes-bitter general
election campaign between Democrats
Honda and Khanna, Honda accused
Khanna of accepting donations from
several
wealthy
conservative
Republicans.
San t a Cl ara Co un t y el ect i o n s
o ffi ci al s s h o w Ho n da l eadi n g wi t h
mo re t h an 5 2 p ercen t o f t h e v o t e as
o f Fri day wi t h al l p reci n ct s rep o rt i n g , wh i l e i n Al ameda Co un t y h e
l ed b y a s l i mmer marg i n wi t h j us t

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the Bay
o v er 5 0 p ercen t o f t h e v o t e.

Cortese yet to concede
in San Jose mayor race
San Jose mayor candidate Dave
Cortese Friday showed no signs of
conceding Tuesday’s election despite
new vote tallies from absentee ballots
showing him still trailing rival Sam
Liccardo by more than 2 percent.
The Santa Clara County Registrar of
Voters revised vote totals Friday after
counting about 30,000 absentee votes
across the county, which included
around 15,000 from within the San
Jose city limits.
As of 5 p.m., Liccardo had 72,974
votes, or 51.29 percent, to 69,301
ballots, equal to 48.71 percent, cast
for Cortese.
The total votes counted in the
mayor’s race was 142,275, compared
to just over 127,000 tallied as of
Thursday, according to the registrar’s
website.
Registrar Shannon Bushey said there
were still 45,000 to 75,000 absentee,
or mail-in, ballots left to count from
voters across the county, after voters
dropped off a record 150,000 ballots at
precincts on Election Day.
“That was the highest we recorded in

one day,” Bushey said.
Liccardo, outgoing member of the
San Jose City Council representing
District 3, on Wednesday declared himself the winner, after leading by two
points, 51 to 49 percent, as of that
morning.
Cortese, a member of the county
Board of Supervisors, did not
announce he was conceding after the
new vote total Friday afternoon and
received kudos for it from supporters
on his campaign’s Facebook page.

Campos concedes to Chui in
District 17 Assembly race
San Francisco Supervisor David
Campos conceded the race for the
District 17 state assembly seat, his
rival Supervisor David Chiu said
Thursday evening.
According to the San Francisco
Department of Elections, Chiu led with
more than 51 percent of the vote as of
Thursday evening with all precincts
reporting.
Chiu and Campos both currently
serve on the 11-member San Francisco
Board of Supervisors.
Both men are Harvard Law School
graduates, 44 years old and liberal
Democrats.
Chiu has served as the president of
the Board of Supervisors since 2009.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

5

Consumers to get peek at 2015 health law premiums
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Starting this weekend,
consumers can get an early peek at 2015
premiums and plans under President Barack
Obama’s health care law, the administration
said Friday.
HealthCare.gov’s second open enrollment season starts Nov. 15, a week from
Saturday. But spokeswoman Lori Lodes said
that consumers will be able to “window
shop” for plans before then.
“Window shopping is ready to go,” said
Lodes. “There is no log-in or application
required.”
After answering a few questions, consumers can look at plans in their area and
get an estimate of how much their premiums
will be, including any financial assistance
they would be eligible for.
Consumers will later have to set up an
account — or go back to their existing
account — to actually enroll for 2015.
Current customers who do nothing will be
automatically renewed as of Jan. 1, but they
may well miss out on potential savings.
The lack of a window-shopping feature
was one of the initial problems last year for

HealthCare.gov’s second open enrollment season starts Nov. 15, a week from Saturday.
HealthCare.gov, and a puzzling one.
Most e-commerce sites — as well as
Medicare.gov— allow people to browse

anonymously and don’t require an account
until consumers are ready to buy. As originally designed, the Obama administration’s

website worked exactly the opposite way.
That contributed to overloading the balky
system because everybody got funneled
into creating an account, which overtaxed
the system to the point of crashes.
“Our top priority this year is to improve
the consumer experience,” said Lodes.
One important piece that’s still not clear
is the overall trend on premiums. Early
analyses of states that have published rates
show modest increases, with opportunities
for consumers to shop around for lower-premium plans. The catch with the low-cost
options is that people who have a serious
illness or injury will face higher out-ofpocket costs.
The health care law offers taxpayer subsidized coverage to people who don’t have
access on the job. HealthCare.gov is the
online portal for 37 states where the federal
government is taking the lead running the
insurance markets. The rest are operating
their own insurance exchanges.
About 7 million people are signed up this
year through the insurance markets. Even
more have gained coverage under the law’s
Medicaid expansion for low-income people, which so far has been implemented by
27 states and Washington, District of
Columbia.

A new Supreme Court challenge for ‘Obamacare’
By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court
agreed Friday to hear a new challenge to
President Barack Obama’s health care law
— a case that threatens subsidies that help
millions of low- and middle-income people afford their health insurance premiums.
The justices said they will review a federal appeals court ruling that upheld IRS regulations that allow health-insurance tax
credits under the Affordable Care Act for
consumers in all 50 states. Opponents
argue that most of the subsidies are illegal.
The long-running political and legal
campaign to overturn or limit the 2010
health overhaul will be making its second
appearance at the Supreme Court. The justices upheld the heart of the law in a 5-4

decision in 2012 in which Chief Justice
John Roberts provided the decisive vote.
The case probably will be argued the first
week in March, with a decision expected
by late June.
White House press secretary Josh
Earnest promised a vigorous defense
before the high court.
“This lawsuit reflects just another partisan attempt to undermine the Affordable
Care Act and to strip millions of American
families of tax credits that Congress
intended for them to have,” Earnest said.
In the appeal accepted Friday, opponents
of the subsidies argue that the court should
resolve the issue soon because it involves
billions of dollars in public money.
“The need for a quick and final resolution
of this question is undeniable. This ‘subsidies-for-everyone’ rule affects nearly every

person across the country, health insurance policyholders, workers and employers, taxpayers, and state and local governments,” said Sam Kazman, general counsel
of the Competitive Enterprise Institute,
which is paying for the legal challenges to
the health care law.
The health care law provides taxpayersubsidized private health insurance for
people who don’t have access to coverage
on the job. More than 7 million people are
currently enrolled and most are getting
help, which is keyed to household income
and the cost of a benchmark plan.
The issue at the Supreme Court is
whether the wording of the law limits
insurance tax credits only to consumers
who live in states that have set up their
own insurance markets, known as
exchanges.

Only 16 states have set up their own
exchanges, the Obama administration said
in court papers. In the other 34 states,
more than 4.5 million people are receiving subsidies to pay their insurance premiums.
And the aid is considerable, covering an
average of 76 percent of the premiums.
Customers now pay an average of $82 on
total monthly premiums averaging $346.
The federal subsidy of $264 a month makes
up the difference.
What made the court’s intervention on
Friday surprising was the lack of disagreement among federal appeals courts that
typically is a requirement for Supreme
Court review. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
cited the absence of conflicting rulings
when the justices rejected gay marriage
appeals last month.

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OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

Rise of independent voters

Verizon Wireless and privacy
Other voices

The Los Angeles Times

V

erizon Wireless, the country’s most popular mobile
phone operator, has been
quietly inserting into its customers’
Web browsing sessions an identifier
unique to each device they use, making it possible for websites and advertising networks to build profiles of
individual customers based on their
browsing habits. What’s worse, even
if Verizon’s subscribers happen to find
out about this and ask the company to
stop, it won’t.
Rather than inviting the rest of the
Internet to violate its customers’ privacy, Verizon should find a more
respectful way to generate advertising
dollars.
Ordinarily, Web-browsing apps
reveal little about the people using
them. The typical website tries to
pierce the anonymity by planting a
unique identifier called a cookie on

each visitor’s computer or smartphone, storing information about
what the visitor does while on that
site. So do online advertising networks, which can use the cookies to
track what individuals do on all the
sites that carry their ads. If that’s a
troubling prospect, you can set your
browser to erase cookies or prevent
them from being stored on your
machine.
Verizon Wireless, however, has
flipped the process on its head. It
inserts a unique code into the information that each device transmits
through Verizon’s wireless network as
it browses the Web. The company
then uses the code to sell demographic information (but not names or personal profiles) about that customer to
advertisers so they can make their
pitches more relevant to that person.
Meanwhile, those sites and associated

ad networks can collect and use the
code to build a profile of a user even if
he or she is blocking cookies.
Verizon says it changes the codes
regularly to guard against permanent
profiles, but that’s not much of a concession to its customers’ privacy
rights. To stop the company from
selling information gleaned about
them, its customers have to opt out of
a program they didn’t sign up for in
the first place. And even opting out
doesn’t stop the company from
inserting the identifier into their Web
browsing.
AT&T is exploring a similar technique, although it pledges to change
the code daily and let users stop it
from inserting the code at all. Verizon
should do at least that much. Ideally,
though, Verizon and other Internet
providers wouldn’t plant identifiers in
their customers’ data without their
explicit consent in advance. If
Verizon doesn’t see the problem with
its actions here, the Federal Trade
Commission should enlighten it.

Letters to the editor
Remember the
meaning of Veterans Day
Editor,
Ninety-five years ago, President
Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Nov. 11
Armistice Day to commemorate the
end of World War I and the veterans
who served in it. While the name has
changed to Veterans Day, the purpose
remains the same: to celebrate and
commemorate the bravery and sacrifice of all U.S. veterans.
While most people recognize veterans one day a year, veterans service
organizations such as the Veterans of
Foreign Wars strive to highlight the
importance of veterans all year round.
It is easy to overlook the role that
veterans play each day in America,
but impossible to forget the ones
who made the ultimate sacrifice.
So while you and your family enjoy
a day off, do not forget the real reason
you are able to relax. Take a moment
to stop and thank a veteran or contact
your local Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post for ways to make a difference in
veterans’ lives on Veterans Day and
throughout the year.

Howard Hagen
State Commander
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States
Department of California

The proof is in the party
Editor,
The news Wednesday morning was
full of self-congratulations for the

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Angela Swartz, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

winning party and I want to add my
encouragement to their declaration to
“get things moving.” I write to
remind the general public that a number of things have moved in the past
six years. To name a few: 1). The market has been brought to record highs
in 63 months of economic expansion; 2). Employment is up (the
unemployment percentage went from
10.2 to 5.9); 3). The deficit is down
by two-thirds; 4). A major depression
was averted; 5). A health plan was put
in place that is helping millions
reduce health costs; 6). Two women
have been placed on the Supreme
Court; 7). Bin Laden is dead (even
though GW had no more time to think
about him); 8). Gas prices are way
down.
So now, all you winners have to do
is promise not to shut down the government, not to take a two-month
vacation to cancel votes when your
help is needed, and to say “yes” to
further growth and good times.

June Lamb
San Mateo

I’m not acting
Editor,
When Gray Davis was recalled as
governor of California, he was very
gracious. He said, “The people have
spoken, I accept their word.” He went
on further to wish Governor-elect
Arnold Schwarzenegger well. Unlike
Gray Davis, our president refuses to
accept the word of the people. Instead

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Kevin Smith

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta
Robert Armstrong
Arianna Bayangos
Sanne Bergh
Kerry Chan
Caroline Denney
Darold Fredricks
Mayeesha Galiba
Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung
Dave Newlands
Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Samson So

Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

9

he claims to speak for those who did
not vote. Isn’t speaking for those
who did not vote like listening to
dead people? In a promo for a TV
series, a woman chastised a man for
acting childish. The man responded
with, “I’m not acting.” Could it be
that our president is not acting?

Keith De Filippis
San Jose

Kudos to David Newlands
Editor,
I wish to commend you on your
choice of Dave Newlands to write the
article, “The golden years of broadcast,” regarding the 50th anniversary
of Radio Station KCSM-FM and
KCSM-TV in the Nov. 3 edition of
The Daily Journal. It was a real pleasure to meet and talk with Newlands
and because of his very comfortable
approach and style of questioning
(and listening) as well as his evident
interest in the subject, the interview
was conducted without a hitch and the
resulting story was totally interesting
and accurate. I was very pleased with
the way in which the story was told in
your paper.
Again, thank you for sending
Newlands to cover the anniversary.

Dan Odum
San Carlos
The letter writer is a CSM faculty
alumnus and telecommunications
instructor.
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A

s I began to cast my ballot on Tuesday at the
Lomita Park School in San Bruno, my attention
was drawn to a young mother at the voting
booth to my right. She was accompanied by her son —
who could not have been more than 8. He repeatedly
tugged on her arm, anxious to leave the silent, cold gymnasium filled with taller, older men and women in voting
booths exercising their civic duty. Not very entertaining
for an 8-year-old, I thought to myself. Then, she stopped
him and said, “Shhh! This is one the most important
things you will ever have an opportunity to do when you
are an adult.” The boy shrugged his shoulders and stopped
pouting just long enough for his mother to cast her ballot.
I could not help but grab an “I Voted” sticker as I left
the polls in pride. Sure enough, on my way out, the
young woman apologized for any inconvenience her loud
son may have caused. I told her
it was no problem. Then, she
took a deeper look at me and
said, “didn’t you run for office
in the spring?” I smiled and
nodded, “yes.” She laughed and
said that she had actually voted
for me, but made it clear that
she was not a Republican. I
asked her if she was a Democrat
and she proudly replied, “I
serve no party. I am one of the
few and proud independent voters in California.”
Jonathan Madison
That made me think about
how many other Californians share her sentiment and
identify as independents. To my surprise, according to
the Secretary of State Debra Bowen, 2014 marks the
highest number of voters who claim no political party in
our state’s history. The Secretary of State’s Office reports
23.1 percent of California’s 17.6 million voters are registered independents. Some political pundits may call
this a mere trend or coincidence. I beg to differ and here is
why.
According to a 2014 Gallup poll, “42 percent of
Americans, on average, identified as political independents in 2013.” This is the highest in Gallup’s 25-year
history. As a result, both Republican and Democratic
party identification have declined. Democratic identification is now at 31 percent (down from 36 percent in
2008), while Republican registration is at 25 percent
(down from 28 percent in 2008).
Although it is not uncommon for the number of registered independents to rise during a non-election year, the
trend in recent years shows an uncommonly high trend in
voters separating themselves from both parties.
According to Gallup, the “rise in political independence
is likely an outgrowth of Americans’ record or near-record
negative views of the two major U.S. parties, of
Congress and their low level of trust in government.”
According to an ABC News article, when asked about
the impact of independent voters, Todd Eberly, an assistant professor at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, said,
“Independent voters are no myth — they matter — and
when you include among them independent partisans,
they absolutely sway elections. Indeed, the present and
highly competitive political era in which we are living is
a direct result of a decrease in partisan attachment among
a growing number of voters.”
Alongside the growing number of independents in
recent years is the uncommonly high trend of voter disengagement. It is true that many independent voters are
very informed and vote their hearts and minds, rather
than voting based on party affiliation or allegiance.
However, the trend in recent years shows that voter disengagement and independent voter registration run in tandem. Here is why it matters.
The trend tells us there is a sense of dissatisfaction
nationwide with the conduct of the two major political
parties driving our country. Some would call this a reflection of a dark time in our country, where few people prefer
to identify with a party, and in some cases, not vote at
all. However, I suggest that a sobering injection of reality is never a bad thing. Independent voters never fail to
indicate where our country’s ideology truly lies after the
polls close. Independent voters, in fact, are the linchpin
driving elections. Political parties know this. Both parties spend more money trying to sway independent voters
than any other voter demographic.
The fact is that without independent voices, our country
would be left in the hands of two ideologically split parties. Thus, along with the rise of independent voters
comes an essential check on our political parties —
something no Democrat or Republican should take for
granted.

Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.

Correction Policy

The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
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or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.

A nativ e of Pacifica, Jonathan Madison work ed as professional policy staff for the U.S. House of Representativ es,
Committee on Financial Serv ices, for two y ears. Jonathan
currently work s as a law clerk at Fried and Williams, LLP
during his second y ear of law school at the Univ ersity of
San Francisco School of Law.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

7

President chooses New York
prosecutor as attorney general
By Nedra Pickler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

REUTERS

Speaker of the House John Boehner, left, listens as Barack Obama hosts a luncheon for
bipartisan congressional leaders in the Old Family Dining Room at the White House.

Immigration dispute erupts
during a White House lunch
By Nedra Pickler and Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A White House lunch
aiming for cooperation boiled into a fresh
dispute with newly empowered Republicans
over immigration reform Friday, with GOP
leaders warning President Barack Obama to
his face not to take unilateral action. The
president stood unflinchingly by his plan
to act.
Republicans attending the postelection
lunch at Obama’s invitation said they asked
him for more time to work on legislation,
but the president said his patience was running out. He underscored his intent to act on
his own by the end of the year if they don’t
approve legislation to ease deportations

before then and send it to him to sign.
The Republicans’ approach, three days
after they resoundingly won control of the
Senate in midterm elections, “seemed to fall
on deaf ears,” Sen. John Cornyn of Texas
said in a telephone interview. “The president instead of being contrite or saying in
effect to America, ‘I hear you,’ as a result of
the referendum on his policies that drove
this last election, he seems unmoved and
even defiant.”
“I don’t know why he would want to sabotage his last two years as president by doing
something this provocative,” said Cornyn.
Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell
earlier this week said the president’s stance
was “like waving a red flag in front of a
bull.”

Obituary

June Field

Die on October 8th, 2014
30 Years - First Grade Teacher, Spring Valley School, Millbrae
20 years - Volunteer for Mission Hospice, San Mateo County
80 years - As a remarkable human being that enjoyed doing
things for other people, loved children, had a large capacity
for work and a talent for attending to details.
June: was respected for her hard work and soft heart. She
was always for the underdog, the poor, the discriminated
against. She liked sports and was great to have with you to
watch a ball game.
June: was beautiful inside and out, high school Homecoming
Queen, college Miss Personality, but the main reason she was
beautiful was because of the way she treated people and kept
her commitments to them.
June: was steadfast and stubborn when pursuing her goals. Her father wanted her
to be a secretary but she had always wanted to be a teacher so she worked her way
through college on her own and became an outstanding teacher.
June: was married to Bob Field for 58 years. She Formed long lasting relationships
with those that she lived with, worked with or played with. This became very evident
during her illness as relatives came great distances to aid and comfort. Teachers
and parents that she worked with long ago came to visit and talk old times. Golfers,
bridge players, book club friends, and especially Mission Hospice Auxillary members
came to visit, brought food and sent cards. This outpouring of affection was much
appreciated by and pleasing to June.
June: was a super wife, mother, grandmother, teacher, friend and volunteer worker
because she gave her help with love and almost boundless energy.”YOU GET WHAT
YOU MODEL” was a favorite bit of advice that June gave to her family members.
They now reply “You have set the model, and our love for you will continue to flow
for the rest of our lives. The hard part will be living up to the model”
Celebration of Life party will be in January 2015
In lieu of flowers please send donations to Mission Hospice 1670 S. Amphlett, Suite
300 San Mateo, CA 94402

WASHINGTON — In a second trail-blazing
pick for the nation’s top law enforcement
officer, President Barack Obama intends to
nominate a federal prosecutor in New York to
become the next attorney general and the
first black woman to lead the Justice
Department.
Obama’s spokesman said Friday that he
will announce his selection of Loretta Lynch
from the White House on Saturday. If confirmed by the Senate, she would replace Eric
Holder, who announced his resignation in
September after serving as the nation’s first
black attorney general.
Lynch, 55, is the U.S. attorney for Eastern
New York, which covers Brooklyn, Queens,
Staten Island and Long Island, a position she
also held under President Bill Clinton.

Obama authorizes
1,500 more troops for Iraq

“Ms. Lynch is a strong,
independent prosecutor
who has twice led one of
the most important U.S.
attorney’s offices in the
country,” Obama press
secretary Josh Earnest
said in a statement.
Obama had planned to
until after a trip to
Loretta Lynch wait
Asia next week to
announce the choice but then moved up the
decision after news organizations began
reporting that she was his choice.
The White House said Obama is leaving it
up to Senate leadership to determine whether
she should be confirmed this year while
Democrats are in control or next year after
Republicans take over. But the White House
said their hope is she will be confirmed as
soon as possible.

Around the nation

WASHINGTON — A senior military official says that American military advisory
teams will now go to Iraq’s western Anbar
province where Islamic State militants have
been gaining ground and slaying men,
women and children.
The teams are part of President Barack
Obama’s new directive to expand the U.S.

mission in Iraq by deploying another 1,500
U.S. troops to serve as advisers, trainers and
security personnel.
The official said it is likely that the bulk
of the additional troops will be in Iraq by
the end of the year. This would bring the
total U.S. forces in Iraq to about 3,100, and
would mark their first return to Anbar since
the war ended.

Obituary

Winifred “Wini” Gould Jecker Steiner
August 31, 1913 – October 21, 2014
“Wini” Steiner died peacefully in her sleep after visits
from her family and friends.
Wini was born in England and emigrated with her
family in 1920, eventually settling in Long Beach. Wini
graduated from UC Berkeley in 1935 with a degree in
English. There, she lived at International House where
she met Duroc Albert Jecker, whom she married in 1935.
Duroc died in 1940. Not wanting to teach English to
support their young daughter, Wini earned a BS degree
in home economics at Oregon State.
In 1944 Wini was hired as the first home economist for the U.C. Cooperative Extension
service for the counties of Santa Clara, San Mateo, and San Benito, where she organized
24 community groups of mainly farm wives to conduct workshops on food preservation
and streamlined garment making.
As Santa Clara County changed from rural to urban, she stayed there, where her focus
shifted to consumer information in all areas of home making, home furnishings, money
management, clothing and fabrics and food buying. She conducted short courses and
lecture demonstrations and pioneered a daily radio show on several radio stations, a
weekly column for the San Jose Mercury, and a show on KPIX-TV.
In the 1960’s Wini served as a cooperative resource to school nurses, teachers, social
workers, and dietitians. Later she initiated a nutrition program for low income families,
developing cultural and ethnic materials and recipes.
In 1957, Wini married Russell R. “Russ” Steiner, a local accountant. Shortly after their
retirement in 1972, they moved to Paradise, CA. They traveled everywhere. Both loved
Yosemite, taking their grandchildren on high country trips. Wini founded the Paradise
branch of AAUW, and led AAUW initiatives there and in Chico to benefit re-entry women
and research child care for working mothers. Russ died in 1988. Wini then returned to
the Bay Area, settling in the Sequoias Portola Valley in 1993.
Wini took leadership positions in St. Nicholas Episcopal Church in Paradise and St.
Bede’s in Menlo Park and was faithful at Christ Church Episcopal, Portola Valley. “Wini
the Walker” couldn’t be missed anywhere, and she celebrated her 80th birthday walking
across her beloved England.
Wini volunteered in many ways to care for students, international visitors, and the
elderly in nursing homes. She founded the Jessie Rau Anderson Scholarship at UC Santa
Cruz in 1965 in honor of her counselor at Long Beach Polytechnic, who lent her $100
so she could start at UC Berkeley in 1933. Wini would take the “Anderson Girls” out to
lunch for decades after that and maintain a correspondence with many of them. Wini
was known for her elegant style, in manner, clothes, and furnishings, her wide-ranging
travels, love of the outdoors, high energy, and storytelling.
Wini leaves her daughter, Mary Beth (Bruce) Train, two grandchildren, six stepgrandchildren, and five great grandchildren. A memorial service will be in November.
Memorial contributions may be made through the UC Santa Cruz Foundation.
Please direct your contributions to Jessie Rau Anderson Scholarship in memory of
Wini Steiner. Visit giving.ucsc.edu or send a gift to the UC Santa Cruz Foundation,
Dept. 44787, PO Box 44000, San Francisco, CA 94144-4787. You may also give to the
Friends of your local library or a charity of your choice.

8

NATION/WORLD

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Al-Qaida millitants
seize villages from
U.S.-backed rebels
By Diaa Hadid
and Bassem Mroue
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — Al-Qaida-linked
fighters captured at least three villages from Western-backed rebels
in northwestern Syria on Friday as
the militants continued their push
to assert control over an area once
held by more moderate groups.
The Nusra Front’s recent
advances have exposed the weakness of more moderate factions,
which the U.S. hopes to forge into
an effective fighting force against
President Bashar Assad’s troops.
Underscoring their strength, the
al-Qaida militants seized the three
villages just a day after U. S.
airstrikes hit one of their major
weapons storage compounds in
northwestern Idlib province.
In the past week, the al-Qaida
affiliate has been overrunning

strongholds in Idlib once held by
two prominent rebel factions
armed and trained by the United
States, the Syrian Revolutionaries
Front and Harakat Hazm.
The Nusra fighters on Friday
seized at least three more villages
in Idlib — Safuhan, Fatira and
Hazareen — and were pushing to
take others, according to a local
activist who goes by his first
name, Alaa al-Deen. The Britainbased Syrian Observatory for
Human Rights, which has a network of activists on the ground in
Syria, also reported the same
advances by the Nusra Front.
The capture of the villages may
allow the Nusra Front fighters to
advance onto the last Idlib strongholds held by the Syrian
Revolutionaries Front. It would
also pave the way for them to
seize more rebel-held areas in the
central Syrian province of Hama,

REUTERS

A Free Syrian Army fighter places a mortar shell into a mortar launcher during clashes with forces loyal to Syria’s
President Bashar Assad.
said Alaa al-Deen, who did not
provide his family name fearing
he’d be identified by the militants.
He told The Assocaited Press
over Skype that Nusra’s advances
were a sinister development and

could spell “the end of the Free
Syrian Army,” the Western-backed
moderate rebels fighting to topple
Assad.
The Nusra Front is a bitter and
bloody rival of the Islamic State

group, which has captured large
swaths of Syria and northwestern
Iraq, despite their shared extremist
ideology.
On Thursday, American aircraft
bombed a Nusra Front compound

U.N. nuclear agency report says Iran nuke probe stalled
By George Jahn
and Deb Riechmann
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

VIENNA — The U.N. nuclear
agency said Friday that its
attempts to probe allegations
that Tehran worked on nuclear
weapons were deadlocked — a
finding that all but rules out
hopes of full nuclear deal between
six world powers and Iran by the
Nov. 24 target date.
Iran agreed in February to work
with the International Atomic
Energy Agency, in what was seen

as a test of Tehran’s professed
new willingness to reduce tensions over its nuclear program.
Since then, the agency has
sought information on alleged
experiments with detonators that
can be used to set off nuclear
explosions; work on high-explosive charges used in nuclear
blasts, and alleged studies on calculating nuclear explosive yields.
Iran denies wanting — or ever
working on — nuclear arms.
Since February, it has provided
information only on the detonators, insisting that they were used

for oil exploration or nonnuclear military purposes. The
agency says interconnected
information suggests that they
were being tested for nuclear
weapons use.
“Iran has not provided any
explanations that enable the
agency to clarify the outstanding
practical measures,” said the confidential report from the IAEA
obtained by the Associated Press.
Th e fi n di n g i s s i g n i fi can t i n
reco rdi n g wh ere t h e i n v es t i g at i o n s t an ds fo r t h e U. S. an d
fi v e o t h er wo rl d p o wers n eg o -

t i at i n g wi t h Iran .
The U.S. and its allies say no
final agreement will be reached
until the IAEA says it’s satisfied
with its inquiry. With the IAEA
investigation stalled, the agency
has little hope of reaching final
conclusions by Nov. 24.
Diplomats have told the
Associated Press that — if agreement is reached constraining
Iran’s uranium enrichment program and other activities that
could be turned to making nuclear
arms — Washington was willing
to extend the IAEA investigation.

But they say the U.S. would set
a time limit on any such extension and keep some sanctions on
Tehran in place until the IAEA
delivers its ruling. That would
satisfy neither hardliners in Iran
who want a full lifting of sanctions nor U. S. congressional
critics, particularly after this
week’s Republican sweep of
Congress.
As part of its probe, the IAEA
has for years sought access to
Parchin, a sprawling military
establishment southeast of
Tehran.

Around the nation
VA chief: 1,000 workers face disciplinary action
Baptist

Lutheran

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

www.pilgrimbcsm.org

2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
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Non-Denominational

Buddhist

“A community of caring Christians”

SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650) 342-2541

Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

Church of the
Highlands

1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...

To know Christ and make him known.

901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223

Sunday services:

9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org

A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST

HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman

Worship Service
Sunday School

10:00 AM
11:00 AM

Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.

Call (650) 349-0100

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

WASHINGTON — The Veterans Affairs Department is considering disciplinary action against more than 1,000
employees as it struggles to correct systemic problems that
led to long wait times for veterans seeking health care and
falsification of records to cover up delays, VA Secretary
Robert McDonald said.
In an interview with the CBS News program “60 Minutes,”
McDonald said the VA is taking “aggressive, expeditious disciplinary action, consistent with the law” against more than
1,000 of its 315,000 employees.
McDonald said the disciplinary report given to the Veterans
Affairs committees in the House and the Senate “has about 35
names on it. I’ve got another report that has over 1,000”
names, McDonald said.
The interview with “60 Minutes” will be broadcast on
Sunday. An excerpt aired Friday on the “CBS Evening News.”
McDonald’s comments represent a departure from his previous public remarks. At a news conference Thursday, he said
the VA has proposed disciplinary action — up to an including
firing — against more than 40 employees nationwide since
June. Those cases are all related to a scandal over long patient
wait times and manipulation of records to hide the delays.

Judge approves bankruptcy exit plan for Detroit
DETROIT — A judge cleared Detroit to emerge from bankruptcy Friday, approving a hard-fought turnaround plan with
a fervent plea to the people of this one-time industrial powerhouse to “move past your anger” and help fix the Motor
City.
“What happened in Detroit must never happen again,” federal Judge Steven Rhodes said in bringing the case to a close
a relatively speedy 16 months after Detroit — the cradle of
the auto industry — became the biggest city in U.S. history
to file for bankruptcy.
The plan calls for cutting retiree pensions by 4.5 percent,
erasing $7 billion of debt and spending $1.7 billion to
demolish thousands of blighted buildings, make the city
safer and improve long-neglected basic services.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

Rise of independent voters

Verizon Wireless and privacy
Other voices

The Los Angeles Times

V

erizon Wireless, the country’s most popular mobile
phone operator, has been
quietly inserting into its customers’
Web browsing sessions an identifier
unique to each device they use, making it possible for websites and advertising networks to build profiles of
individual customers based on their
browsing habits. What’s worse, even
if Verizon’s subscribers happen to find
out about this and ask the company to
stop, it won’t.
Rather than inviting the rest of the
Internet to violate its customers’ privacy, Verizon should find a more
respectful way to generate advertising
dollars.
Ordinarily, Web-browsing apps
reveal little about the people using
them. The typical website tries to
pierce the anonymity by planting a
unique identifier called a cookie on

each visitor’s computer or smartphone, storing information about
what the visitor does while on that
site. So do online advertising networks, which can use the cookies to
track what individuals do on all the
sites that carry their ads. If that’s a
troubling prospect, you can set your
browser to erase cookies or prevent
them from being stored on your
machine.
Verizon Wireless, however, has
flipped the process on its head. It
inserts a unique code into the information that each device transmits
through Verizon’s wireless network as
it browses the Web. The company
then uses the code to sell demographic information (but not names or personal profiles) about that customer to
advertisers so they can make their
pitches more relevant to that person.
Meanwhile, those sites and associated

ad networks can collect and use the
code to build a profile of a user even if
he or she is blocking cookies.
Verizon says it changes the codes
regularly to guard against permanent
profiles, but that’s not much of a concession to its customers’ privacy
rights. To stop the company from
selling information gleaned about
them, its customers have to opt out of
a program they didn’t sign up for in
the first place. And even opting out
doesn’t stop the company from
inserting the identifier into their Web
browsing.
AT&T is exploring a similar technique, although it pledges to change
the code daily and let users stop it
from inserting the code at all. Verizon
should do at least that much. Ideally,
though, Verizon and other Internet
providers wouldn’t plant identifiers in
their customers’ data without their
explicit consent in advance. If
Verizon doesn’t see the problem with
its actions here, the Federal Trade
Commission should enlighten it.

Letters to the editor
Remember the
meaning of Veterans Day
Editor,
Ninety-five years ago, President
Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Nov. 11
Armistice Day to commemorate the
end of World War I and the veterans
who served in it. While the name has
changed to Veterans Day, the purpose
remains the same: to celebrate and
commemorate the bravery and sacrifice of all U.S. veterans.
While most people recognize veterans one day a year, veterans service
organizations such as the Veterans of
Foreign Wars strive to highlight the
importance of veterans all year round.
It is easy to overlook the role that
veterans play each day in America,
but impossible to forget the ones
who made the ultimate sacrifice.
So while you and your family enjoy
a day off, do not forget the real reason
you are able to relax. Take a moment
to stop and thank a veteran or contact
your local Veterans of Foreign Wars
Post for ways to make a difference in
veterans’ lives on Veterans Day and
throughout the year.

Howard Hagen
State Commander
Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States
Department of California

The proof is in the party
Editor,
The news Wednesday morning was
full of self-congratulations for the

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Angela Swartz, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

winning party and I want to add my
encouragement to their declaration to
“get things moving.” I write to
remind the general public that a number of things have moved in the past
six years. To name a few: 1). The market has been brought to record highs
in 63 months of economic expansion; 2). Employment is up (the
unemployment percentage went from
10.2 to 5.9); 3). The deficit is down
by two-thirds; 4). A major depression
was averted; 5). A health plan was put
in place that is helping millions
reduce health costs; 6). Two women
have been placed on the Supreme
Court; 7). Bin Laden is dead (even
though GW had no more time to think
about him); 8). Gas prices are way
down.
So now, all you winners have to do
is promise not to shut down the government, not to take a two-month
vacation to cancel votes when your
help is needed, and to say “yes” to
further growth and good times.

June Lamb
San Mateo

I’m not acting
Editor,
When Gray Davis was recalled as
governor of California, he was very
gracious. He said, “The people have
spoken, I accept their word.” He went
on further to wish Governor-elect
Arnold Schwarzenegger well. Unlike
Gray Davis, our president refuses to
accept the word of the people. Instead

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Kevin Smith

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Mari Andreatta
Robert Armstrong
Arianna Bayangos
Sanne Bergh
Kerry Chan
Caroline Denney
Darold Fredricks
Mayeesha Galiba
Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung
Dave Newlands
Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Samson So

Ricci Lam, Production Assistant
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

9

he claims to speak for those who did
not vote. Isn’t speaking for those
who did not vote like listening to
dead people? In a promo for a TV
series, a woman chastised a man for
acting childish. The man responded
with, “I’m not acting.” Could it be
that our president is not acting?

Keith De Filippis
San Jose

Kudos to David Newlands
Editor,
I wish to commend you on your
choice of Dave Newlands to write the
article, “The golden years of broadcast,” regarding the 50th anniversary
of Radio Station KCSM-FM and
KCSM-TV in the Nov. 3 edition of
The Daily Journal. It was a real pleasure to meet and talk with Newlands
and because of his very comfortable
approach and style of questioning
(and listening) as well as his evident
interest in the subject, the interview
was conducted without a hitch and the
resulting story was totally interesting
and accurate. I was very pleased with
the way in which the story was told in
your paper.
Again, thank you for sending
Newlands to cover the anniversary.

Dan Odum
San Carlos
The letter writer is a CSM faculty
alumnus and telecommunications
instructor.
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A

s I began to cast my ballot on Tuesday at the
Lomita Park School in San Bruno, my attention
was drawn to a young mother at the voting
booth to my right. She was accompanied by her son —
who could not have been more than 8. He repeatedly
tugged on her arm, anxious to leave the silent, cold gymnasium filled with taller, older men and women in voting
booths exercising their civic duty. Not very entertaining
for an 8-year-old, I thought to myself. Then, she stopped
him and said, “Shhh! This is one the most important
things you will ever have an opportunity to do when you
are an adult.” The boy shrugged his shoulders and stopped
pouting just long enough for his mother to cast her ballot.
I could not help but grab an “I Voted” sticker as I left
the polls in pride. Sure enough, on my way out, the
young woman apologized for any inconvenience her loud
son may have caused. I told her
it was no problem. Then, she
took a deeper look at me and
said, “didn’t you run for office
in the spring?” I smiled and
nodded, “yes.” She laughed and
said that she had actually voted
for me, but made it clear that
she was not a Republican. I
asked her if she was a Democrat
and she proudly replied, “I
serve no party. I am one of the
few and proud independent voters in California.”
Jonathan Madison
That made me think about
how many other Californians share her sentiment and
identify as independents. To my surprise, according to
the Secretary of State Debra Bowen, 2014 marks the
highest number of voters who claim no political party in
our state’s history. The Secretary of State’s Office reports
23.1 percent of California’s 17.6 million voters are registered independents. Some political pundits may call
this a mere trend or coincidence. I beg to differ and here is
why.
According to a 2014 Gallup poll, “42 percent of
Americans, on average, identified as political independents in 2013.” This is the highest in Gallup’s 25-year
history. As a result, both Republican and Democratic
party identification have declined. Democratic identification is now at 31 percent (down from 36 percent in
2008), while Republican registration is at 25 percent
(down from 28 percent in 2008).
Although it is not uncommon for the number of registered independents to rise during a non-election year, the
trend in recent years shows an uncommonly high trend in
voters separating themselves from both parties.
According to Gallup, the “rise in political independence
is likely an outgrowth of Americans’ record or near-record
negative views of the two major U.S. parties, of
Congress and their low level of trust in government.”
According to an ABC News article, when asked about
the impact of independent voters, Todd Eberly, an assistant professor at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, said,
“Independent voters are no myth — they matter — and
when you include among them independent partisans,
they absolutely sway elections. Indeed, the present and
highly competitive political era in which we are living is
a direct result of a decrease in partisan attachment among
a growing number of voters.”
Alongside the growing number of independents in
recent years is the uncommonly high trend of voter disengagement. It is true that many independent voters are
very informed and vote their hearts and minds, rather
than voting based on party affiliation or allegiance.
However, the trend in recent years shows that voter disengagement and independent voter registration run in tandem. Here is why it matters.
The trend tells us there is a sense of dissatisfaction
nationwide with the conduct of the two major political
parties driving our country. Some would call this a reflection of a dark time in our country, where few people prefer
to identify with a party, and in some cases, not vote at
all. However, I suggest that a sobering injection of reality is never a bad thing. Independent voters never fail to
indicate where our country’s ideology truly lies after the
polls close. Independent voters, in fact, are the linchpin
driving elections. Political parties know this. Both parties spend more money trying to sway independent voters
than any other voter demographic.
The fact is that without independent voices, our country
would be left in the hands of two ideologically split parties. Thus, along with the rise of independent voters
comes an essential check on our political parties —
something no Democrat or Republican should take for
granted.

Online edition at scribd.com/smdailyjournal
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.

Correction Policy

The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
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or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.

A nativ e of Pacifica, Jonathan Madison work ed as professional policy staff for the U.S. House of Representativ es,
Committee on Financial Serv ices, for two y ears. Jonathan
currently work s as a law clerk at Fried and Williams, LLP
during his second y ear of law school at the Univ ersity of
San Francisco School of Law.

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Dow, S&P eke out gains, set record highs
By Matthew Craft

“The market is priced
for perfection right now.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
17,573.93
Nasdaq 4,632.53
S&P 500 2,031.92

+19.46
-5.94
+0.71

10-Yr Bond 2.31 -0.06
Oil (per barrel) 78.47
Gold
1,176.00

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Humana Inc., down $9.29 to $130.58
The health insurer reported worse-than-expected third-quarter results
and tightened its full-year outlook.
Transocean Ltd., down 21 cents to $29.71
The company said lower demand for rigs is leading to more charges and
forcing it to delay its third-quarter financial report.
Genworth Financial Inc., down 25 cents to $8.41
Ratings agency Standard & Poor’s cut the financial services company’s
credit rating to junk status and Moody’s is performing a rating review.
Abercrombie & Fitch, down $5.88 to $29.50
The clothing and accessories retailer reported worse-than-expected
quarterly results on weaker sales.
Nasdaq
Salix Pharmaceuticals Ltd., down $47.08 to $91.47
The drugmaker reported weak results, cut its outlook and its chief financial
officer resigned in the midst of an inventory review.
Sears Holdings Corp., up $10.14 to $42.81
The retailer said it is considering forming a real-estate investment trust
and selling up to 300 buildings to boost liquidity.
First Solar Inc., down $6.12 to $50.29
The solar energy company reported weak quarterly results, cut its outlook
and said it will not spin off its solar power plants.
Bruker Corp., down $2.98 to $17.91
The scientific equipment maker reported lower-than-expected quarterly
results and its financial outlook fell short of forecasts.

NEW YORK — An encouraging
report on hiring barely fazed the stock
market Friday, leaving indexes with
the slightest of gains. For investors,
good is no longer good enough.
The Labor Department said that U.S.
employers added 214, 000 jobs to
their payrolls in October. That
knocked the unemployment rate down
to 5.8 percent, the lowest rate since
July 2008. But Wall Street wanted
more.
“This isn’t a bad report by any
means,” Dan Greenhaus, chief strategist at the brokerage BTIG in New
York, wrote in a note to clients. Nine
months of employers hiring more
than 200,000 workers is obviously an
encouraging trend. But he described
the 214,000 figure as “certainly disappointing.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
eked out a gain of 0.71 point to end at
2,031.92. The Dow Jones industrial
average gained 19.46 points, or 0.1
percent, to 17,573.93. Both indexes
closed out the week at record highs.
The Nasdaq composite fell 5. 94
points, or 0.1 percent, to 4,632.53.
“The market is priced for perfection
right now,” said Brad McMillan, chief
investment officer for Commonwealth

— Brad McMillan, chief investment officer for
Commonwealth Financial in Waltham, Massachusetts

Financial in Waltham, Massachusetts.
That’s Wall Street slang for a market
that’s so high it appears investors
think everything is going to keep getting better and better. “If it’s not fantastic, it disappoints,” he explained.
Similarly, bond traders were betting
that the government’s report would
show even stronger hiring last
month, said Tom di Galoma, head of
rates and credit trading at ED&F Man
Capital, a brokerage in New York. So
the actual report rattled the normally
staid Treasury market, pushing the 10year yield down to 2.30 percent from
2.39 percent late Thursday. Comments
from Janet Yellen, the Federal Reserve
Chair, that implied the Fed was in no
rush to raise interest rates helped
press bond yields down.
In other trading, Humana dropped 7
percent after turning in quarterly
results that fell short of forecasts. The
health-insurer attributed the sharp
drop in earnings to its spending on
health care exchanges as well as higher costs for prescription drugs.
Humana’s stock fell $9. 29 to

$130.58.
First Solar also turned in third-quarter earnings and sales that missed analysts’ targets. The maker of solar panels also pared its forecast for 2014
revenue, and its stock sank $6.12, or
11 percent, to $50.29.
Despite some misses, the third-quarter earnings season has turned out better than predicted. Profits are on
course to rise nearly 9 percent for
companies in the S&P 500, according
to S&P Capital IQ. Before results
began to roll in, analysts had forecast
a 6 percent increase.
Among other companies in the
news, Sears Holdings soared following the retailer’s announcement that it
may form a real estate investment
trust. The plan entails Sears selling up
to 300 buildings then leasing them
back. The store’s stock shot up
$10.14, or 31 percent, to $42.81.
In commodities trading, gold rose
$27. 20 to settle at $1, 169. 80 an
ounce, while silver picked up 3 cents
to $15.71 an ounce. Copper added 2
cents to $3.04 per pound.

Solid hiring provides little boost to wages — yet
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Healthy job growth in
the United States has reached a level of consistency unseen in nearly two decades.
In the same week that voters signaled discontent with the U.S. economy, the government issued a report that showed employers
have added at least 200,000 jobs for nine
straight months — the longest such stretch
since 1995.
Combine it with an unemployment rate
that has slid to 5.8 percent — the lowest
since 2008 — and the picture that emerged
Friday was of a job market gaining increasing distance from the recession that officially ended nearly 5 1/2 years ago.
The job gain for October was a solid

214,000, on top of a combined 31,000
more in August and September than the government had previously estimated.
The steady improvement contrasts with
the struggles of economies overseas, a key
reason the Federal Reserve is withdrawing
its stimulus just as other central banks ramp
up theirs. This week, for example, the
European Central Bank opened the door
wider for further help for a eurozone economy that may be on the brink of another
recession.
The U.S. job market is hardly without its
own weaknesses. Americans’ average
hourly pay rose only slightly last month, a
negative note in an otherwise solid report.
Stagnant wages have been a chronic weakness in the job market since the recession
ended.

Voters listed the economy as their top
concern in Tuesday’s elections, and the
sluggish pace of pay growth was a likely
factor. Average hourly pay rose 3 cents in
October to $24.57. That’s just 2 percent
above the average wage 12 months earlier
and barely ahead of a 1.7 percent inflation
rate.
Some economists say, though, that
they’re seeing early signs of rising pay,
especially as more jobs emerge in higherpaying sectors. If so, more workers could
begin to enjoy thicker paychecks in coming months. A broad measure of pay and
fringe benefits, which captures bonus pay
that the jobs report’s gauges miss, has risen
in the past six months at its fastest pace
since 2008.
“We think that there is plenty of evidence

Yellen pledges clear signals for rate policies
By Greg Keller
and Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS — Federal Reserve Chair
Janet Yellen said Friday that the Fed is
striving to clearly communicate its
intentions on interest rates in order to
minimize surprises that could disrupt
financial markets both in the United
States and globally.
She said central bank policymakers
understand that moving from a period
of very low interest rates to more normal rates will lead to more volatility in
financial markets.
But she said the normalization of
rates will be an important sign that
economic conditions are “finally

emerging from the shadow of the Great
Recession.”
Yellen’s comments came in a speech
at a conference sponsored by the Bank
of France. The Fed last week ended its
bond-buying program but its first
increase in rates is not expected until
mid-2015.
“As employment, economic activity
and inflation rates return to normal,
monetary policy will eventually need
to normalize too, although the speed
and timing of this normalization will
likely differ across countries based on
differences in the pace of recovery in
domestic conditions,” Yellen said.
“For our part, the Federal Reserve
will strive to clearly and transparently
communicate its monetary policy

strategy in order to minimize the likelihood of surprises that could disrupt
financial markets, both at home and
around the world,” Yellen said.
Yellen spoke after the Labor
Department in Washington reported
that the U. S. unemployment rate
dropped in October to 5.8 percent, the
lowest point since July 2008, while
the economy added a solid 214,000
jobs.
During a question-and-answer session following her remarks, Yellen
was not asked about Friday’s unemployment and she made no comments
during her appearance about the current
state of the U.S. economy or the possible timing of Fed interest rate
moves.

Berkshire’s earnings down 9 percent from year ago
By Josh Funk
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OMAHA, Neb. — Warren Buffett’s
Berkshire Hathaway reported a 9 percent drop in third-quarter profit versus
the same period a year ago, when the
company had large investment gains.
Berkshire said Friday it earned $4.62
billion, or $2,811 per Class A share.
That’s down from $5.05 billion, or

$3,074 per share, last year.
Revenue grew 10 percent to $51.2
billion. Buffett is chairman and CEO
of the Omaha, Nebraska-based conglomerate.
Berkshire wrote down the value of its
investment in British retailer Tesco by
$678 million. Buffett told CNBC in an
interview last month that the Tesco
investment was a mistake. Berkshire
cut its Tesco stake to less than 3 per-

cent last month, from 5.1 percent last
year.
The Tesco writedown was part of an
overall loss of $107 million on
Berkshire’s investments and derivatives.
Last year the company had $1.39
billion in investment and derivative
gains related mostly to deals made during the financial crisis, making for a
difficult comparison this year.

to suggest that ... wage growth is accelerating,” said Paul Ashworth, an economist at
Capital Economics.
The U. S. unemployment rate fell in
October even as more Americans began
looking for work. That suggests that more
out-of-work people were encouraged by the
brightening jobs picture.
“This was a great month for the American
labor market,” said James Marple, an economist at TD Bank. “The U.S. job engine is
not just chugging along, it is gaining
speed.”
Pay gains in some industries are outpacing the national average. For workers in the
hotel, restaurant and entertainment industry, hourly pay has risen 3.5 percent in the
past year. Retail pay has risen 2.6 percent.
So has construction pay.

Business briefs
AT&T says it will buy Mexico’s Iusacell for $1.8B
NEW YORK — AT&T is buying Mexican wireless company Iusacell for $1.8 billion and plans to grow in Mexico.
The Dallas company said Friday that Iusacell has 8.6 million subscribers under the Iusacell and Unefsn brand names.
AT&T had 116.6 million subscribers as of June 30.
AT&T values the deal at $2.5 billion when debt is included.
The company sees potential for growth in Mexico
because of its rising population and middle class, even as
the proportion of Mexican people with wireless service
lags other Latin American countries, according to AT&T.
““Mexico is still in the early stages of mobile Internet
capabilities and adoption, but customer demand for it is
growing rapidly,” said AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson in a
statement.
The acquisition could potentially lead to plans that
include free or reduced rates for Americans traveling in or
calling to Mexico, or the other way around. The need to dial
a country code for Mexico likely wouldn’t change, as
Mexico doesn’t participate in the North American system of
dialing 1 plus the area code.

Shopping apps offer cash back at the grocery store
NEW YORK — Preparing for your Thanksgiving meal? Be
aware that a new breed of shopping apps makes it easier to
save money at the grocery store: Take a picture of the receipt
and wait for the cash to roll in.
SavingStar, Snap, Checkout 51, and others, let users earn
money back if they buy certain products. Recent offers
include getting $5 back for buying a Jennie-O frozen turkey,
25 cents back on a jar of Peter Pan peanut butter and $1 back
on Dole pineapple juice.

12

SPORTS

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

PAL, WCAL polo finals set for Saturday
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT

Carlmont, which finished in a tie for third
place in the Bay Division with Woodside,
handed second-seeded Menlo-Atherton a stunning 9-4 loss in the semifinals of the
Peninsula Athletic League girls’ water polo
tournament Thursday night at Woodside.
The Scots, the No. 3 seed, will take on topseeded Castilleja in the championship match.
The Gators got a scare from Woodside, ultimately prevailing 9-6.
On the boys’ side, the top two seeds — No.
1 Menlo-Atherton and No. 2 Menlo School
— will meet for the PAL tournament title. The
Bears beat the Knights on the final day of the
regular season to secure the top seed. M-A

cruised past Burlingame 24-8 as the Bears
have outscored their opponents 46-10. Menlo
also waltzed in the finals with an equally
impressive 20-5 win over Half Moon Bay.
Nick Bisconti and Chris Xi each had four
goals for the Knights, while Andreas Katsis,
Daniel Chan and Griffin Scheinman all scored
twice. Goaltenders Spencer Witte and Will
Crouch combined for 11 saves.
The championship matches are Saturday at
Burlingame Aquatic Center, with the Carlmont
and Castilleja girls’ going off at 5 p.m., while
the M-A and Menlo boys will clash at 6:30
p.m.
Those title matches, however, will be preceded by the girls’ and boys’ seventh- through
third-place matches. The girls’ seventh-place

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combined for 15 blocks, including a pair from
No. 3 keeper Patrick Tandy.
St. Francis punched it ticket with a 10-6 win
over No. 4 Bellarmine.
The Bells will meet the Padres in the thirdplace match at 4:30 p.m.
It will be the Lancers and Gators meeting for
the girls’ title as well at Bellarmine Saturday.
No. 1 SHP moved into the championship
game with a 17-7 win over No. 4
Presentation, while No. 2 St. Francis cruised
by No. 3 Mitty, 13-3.
The Gators won the WCAL regular-season
title, beating St. Francis 8-5 along the way.
The girls’ championship match is scheduled
for 6 p.m., with the third-place match between
Presentation and Mitty goes off at 3:15 p.m.

Sports brief

office is Josh Byrnes, a former GM for
Arizona and San Diego who will supervise
scouting and player development while
Zaidi focuses on the major league roster.
“Both guys are going to touch everything,” Friedman said by phone from the
Dodgers’ spring training facility in
Arizona. “We’re adding an incredibly talented group.”
Zaidi is a proponent of advanced analytics, which makes him a solid fit with
Friedman’s reputation for building a roster
by crunching numbers.
“Farhan has an incredible mind for the
game,” Friedman said. “For us, information
is king and it’s about having people who
appreciate that.”
In leaving Oakland, where Beane’s use of
statistical analysis was portrayed in the
book and movie “Moneyball,” Zaidi joked:
“They actually cut out part of my brain on
that and kept it there.”
Zaidi stressed that the Dodgers will seek a
balanced approach between old-school
scouting and modern-day analytics.

Dodgers introduce
new GM Farhan Zaidi

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match — Sequoia-Half Moon Bay — begins at
8 a.m. and the matchups alternate girl-boy
leading up the finals.
In the West Catholic Athletic League tournament, No. 1 Sacred Heart Prep will face No. 2
St. Francis in the championship match
Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at Bellarmine. The
Gators advanced with a 16-4 win over No. 6
Serra in Thursday’s semifinal match.
The Gators jumped out to a 7-3 lead after just
one quarter and led 11-4 at halftime before
shutting out the Padres over the final two periods. Finn Banks paced the SHP offense with
four goals, while Nelson Perla Ward and
Jackson Enright each scored a hat trick.
Michael Swart and Alex Tsotadze had two
goals apiece as well. Three SHP goaltenders

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LOS ANGELES — The Dodgers are busy
revamping their front office, adding general
manager Farhan Zaidi and three more hires
in just more than three weeks since Andrew
Friedman took over as president of baseball
operations.
Friedman was eager to fill several positions ahead of the GM meetings in Arizona
next week.
Zaidi was introduced at Dodger Stadium on
Friday after 10 seasons as assistant GM of
the Oakland Athletics. The 37-year-old, who
holds bachelor’s and doctorate degrees in
economics, said he will have greater handson management of the Dodgers than he did
in Oakland, where he was more of a sounding board to GM Billy Beane.
“There’s such a great amount of potential,
that’s what excited me,” Zaidi said.
Joining him in the Los Angeles front

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

13

49ers need a win as they visit Saints
By Brett Martel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW ORLEANS — San Francisco 49ers
coach Jim Harbaugh is generally a man of
few words when speaking about his team.
Sometimes that’s all it takes to make a
point.
“We’re at the halfway point. We’re not
where we want to be, and we certainly have
to approach these games as single-game
seasons,” Harbaugh said this week, as the
Niners (4-4) prepared to visit the New
Orleans Saints (4-4). “Playing our best
football is our goal — and winning.”
After three straight trips to the NFC title
game, as well as one Super Bowl appearance
two seasons ago, San Francisco certainly
didn’t expect to be on the brink of sinking
below .500 at midseason.
The Niners probably can’t afford to,
either. Unlike the Saints, who have the luxury of sitting atop the anemic NFC South
despite a lousy start, the 49ers are already
three games behind NFC West Division
leader Arizona (7-1).
San Francisco also trails Dallas (6-3),
Seattle (5-3) and Green Bay (5-3) in the race
for one of the NFC’s two wild-card spots.
Another loss could be costly, which is why
Saints quarterback Drew Brees said New

Orleans needs to brace for the Niners’ best.
“In many cases it is not who you play, it
is when you play them,” Brees said, alluding to the way his own team rallied for two
straight convincing victories since their 24 start.
“They probably feel this week like we did
a couple of weeks ago where you are in desperate need of a win. Because of that, we
know the type of team that is going to come
in here.”
New Orleans could lose and still be in first
place if Carolina loses at Philadelphia on
Monday night.
Saints coach Sean Payton knows this, of
course, but he doesn’t want to hear it.
“There are two teams here that are 4-4,
that are battling,” Payton said. “We’re desperate as well.”
Here are some things to know about the
49ers’ visit to New Orleans:

Ingram’s inroads
Saints running back Mark Ingram has
done something in the past two games that
no New Orleans player at his position had
done since Deuce McAllister in 2006: Rush
for 100 yards in consecutive games. Part of
Ingram’s increase in production stems from
injuries to Pierre Thomas and Khiry
Robinson, forcing the Saints — who aver-

age about 130 yards rushing as a team — to
give their former Heisman Trophy winner
the bulk of the carries. But Ingram also
appears to be in top form. The running back
said he’s “just being confident, being decisive, just understanding what the line’s
going to do.”

Quiet ground game
San Francisco hasn’t scored a touchdown
rushing since rookie Carlos Hyde’s 6-yard
run in Week 3. While Frank Gore isn’t complaining about his lack of carries, he is calling on everyone to do their part. “It’s
always one person here or one person there”
causing plays to break down, said Gore,
who has rushed for 472 yards and just one
TD this season. “In the NFL, it’s just not
going to work. We’ve got to be real with
ourselves and go back to everybody taking
care of their job and we’ll be fine. ... It’s
real frustrating because have so many
weapons on the offensive side of the ball.”

Dome advantage
With Payton on the sideline, the Saints
have virtually unbeatable in the Superdome
for the equivalent of more than two full seasons. Payton has coached the Saints to 20
straight wins in the dome, going 9-0
(including playoffs) in 2011, 8-0 in 2013

and 3-0 so far this season.

Protecting Kap
Niners left tackle Joe Staley said it would
be too simplistic to cite a decline in the running game or a rookie center as reasons for
an increase of sacks taken, or turnovers
committed,
by
quarterback
Colin
Kaepernick. San Francisco’s third-year QB
took eight sacks and lost two fumbles in a
13-10 loss to St. Louis last weekend, when
rookie Marcus Martin was making his debut
at center. “We have to do a better job of executing what’s called. Watching the film, the
plays are there to be made,” Staley said.
“Speaking of the offensive line, we have to
do a better job protecting the quarterback.”

Graham’s gains
Saints tight end Jimmy Graham hasn’t let
his right shoulder injury limit him for long.
He did not have a catch in his first game
after the injury in Week 7, but during the
past two weeks, Graham has 12 catches for
142 yards and two TDs. “He is a tough guy.
He wants to be there for everybody. He is
the ultimate team guy, ” Brees said of
Graham. “His preparation throughout the
week in order to get himself ready, his body
ready, his mind ready to play the game is
pretty tremendous.”

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14

SPORTS

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

Carr looks to follow GATORS
in Manning’s path
Continued from page 11

By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — As trying as the
first half of Derek Carr’s first NFL
season has been with no wins,
rookie mistakes and the challenge
of adjusting to the pro game, he
can take some comfort when he
looks across the field Sunday.
Because as rough as these first
eight games have been for Carr,
Peyton Manning had it almost as
bad when he made his debut 16
years ago.
Instead of being discouraged by
a 3-13 season and 28 interceptions, Manning learned from it
and became the Super Bowl winning and record-setting quarterback that he is today.
“Experience was my best
teacher,” Manning said. “There’s
no question that I learned a lot of
things that I would not have

learned if I wasn’t in there playing. Learn from the good things
and of course you’ve got to learn
from the mistakes as well. But, I
do think that being in there facing
the live action is really the only
way to learn how to play quarterback in this league.”
Carr will get another chance at it
on Sunday when he looks for his
first win when the Raiders (0-8)
host Manning and the Denver
Broncos (6-2).
Carr’s first eight games have
slightly better than the start to
Manning’s career despite the lack
of team success. He completed a
higher rate of passes (60.7 percent
to 55.1), threw the same number of
TD passes (11), has less than half
of Manning’s interceptions (7 vs.
16) and has a superior passer rating (79.8 to 64.5).
The edge for Manning is that he

See RAIDERS, Page 17

behind the 8-ball,” Lavorato said.
“We saw it [that play] earlier. It
was there.”
The Gators added a third, secondquarter touchdown in the final
minute of the half when BurrKirven scored his second touchdown of the night, this one a 2yard plunge.
Turns out that would be enough
offense for the Gators on this
night, not that Burlingame (4-1,
8-1) went down without a fight.
The Panthers got a bolt of momentum when Griffin Intrieri took the
second-half kickoff and returned it
78 yards to the SHP 15-yard line.
Two plays later, the Panthers were
finally on the board following a
Palu 8-yard run.
Burlingame, however, just could
not get a stop when it was needed.
After seeing the Panthers score,
the Gators came right back with a
touchdown of it own, needing just
four plays to go 66 yards. On a
second-and-3 from the Burlingame
48, Randall and Daschbach
hooked up again on the same play

THE DAILY JOURNAL
they scored on in the first half.
The result was the same the second time around as Daschbach
grabbed the pass and rumbled the
rest of the way for a 48-yard touchdown and a 28-7 Gators’ lead.
The Panthers were forced to punt
on their next possession, but they
got the ball back when the defense
recovered a SHP fumble at the
Gators’ 26-yard line. SHP didn’t
give it up easily, but Burlingame
finally found pay dirt when Intrieri
bulled his way into the end zone
from a yard out to cap a eight-play
drive that saw the Panthers convert on fourth down along the way.
The Gators put the nail in the
coffin, however, on their next
drive, a possession that bridged
the third and fourth quarters.
Starting on their own 15, the
Gators methodically drove the
length of the field. SHP needed 15
plays to go 85 yards, overcoming
a number of penalties and converting a fourth-and-3 in the process.
Burr-Kirven culminated the drive
with his third score of the night
— this one a 7-yard run with 8:23
to play.
“They’ve been knocking on that
PAL Bay Division championship
door for the last few years, ”
Philipopoulos said. “That’s an

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excellent football team.”
Burlingame managed to rush for
only 74 —  nearly 200 yards off
their average production this season. Quarterback Avery Gindraux
did a good job of picking up the
slack as he completed 11 of 20
passes for 158 yards. His favorite
target was younger brother Cooper
Gindraux, who finished with eight
catches for 121 yards.
Sacred Heart Prep, on the other
hand, racked up 449 yards of
offense. Randall was efficient
throwing the ball, completing 6
of 7 passes for 196 yards and two
touchdowns. Daschbach was his
favorite weapon, catching four
balls for 125 yards and a pair of
scores.
But the Gators won this game on
the ground, rushing for 253 yards
— which is near their season average. Burr-Kirven got the maximum
from the minimum as he rushed for
a game-high 96 yards and three
touchdowns on just nine carries.
He was one of eight Gators to
carry the ball.
“[All our running backs] are
good, ” Lavorato said. “My
biggest challenge is finding the
right time to put them in.”
Seems any time is the right time
as far as the Gators are concerned.

16

SPORTS

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

ARAGON
Continued from page 11
And despite his weakened condition, not once did Tongamoa give
anything less than 100 percent
effort.
Sell said the plan was to use
Tongamoa mainly on offense to
help fill the void left when Ty
Stokman was lost for the season to
an elbow injury. Sell saw real quick,
however, Tongamoa was going to be
needed — big time — on defense as
well.
“If he didn’t play defense, we
would have had a hard time stopping
them,”
Sell
said.
Then there was tight end/defensive
end James Fononga. Not only was
he applying constant pressure on
the South City offense, he came up
with two huge catches on a pair of
second-half touchdown drives —
none bigger than a 19-yard gain on a
fourth-and-7 from the South City 40yard line. Aragon quarterback Billy
Mason threw to Fononga on a seam
pass, into double coverage. The pass
was put up high enough, however,
so that only Fononga could make
the play. Which he did. Three plays
later, Tongamoa bolted into the end
zone from 10 yards out to all but ice
the game, giving Aragon a 25-14
lead with 1:36 left to play.
“Our best players made plays when
they had to,” Sell said.
Those big plays started early for

the Dons. Facing a third-and-long
from their own 20 on the first drive
of the game, Mason took the snap
and rolled right. He unleashed a long
pass down the sideline on which
Devin Grant made a finger-tip catch
in stride and then out-ran his defender for an 80-yard score and a 7-0
Aragon lead less than two minutes
into the game.
That would be all for Aragon in the
first half, however, as the Warriors
slowly took control of the game for
the rest of the half.
South City fumbled the ball away
near midfield, but the defense
stopped the Dons on fourth down
deep in the Warriors’ territory. Then
it was the Warriors’ turn to dial up the
big play. Facing a first-and-5 at their
own 33, South City quarterback
Kolson Pua pitched the ball back to
Kamelamela. With pressure closing
on him, Kamelamela patiently waited for receiver Jose Galban to get
open. Galban caught Kamelamela’s
pass in stride and then he out-ran the
defense for a 67-yard, game-tying
touchdown.
The Warriors then caught a break
on the ensuing kickoff. The ball was
kicked hard on the ground, bounced
off the leg of an Aragon player and
ricocheted right back to South City,
which recovered it at the Aragon 36.
Six plays later, Kamelamela gave
the Warriors a 14-7 lead with less
than a second left in the first quarter.
The Warriors then picked off a
pass on Aragon’s ensuing possession and appeared poised to go up
two touchdowns before halftime, but

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Aragon’s Bubba Tongamoa pulls away from a South City defender and
heads toward the end zone for the first of his two touchdowns in the Dons’
25-17 win over the Warriors Friday afternoon.
Filimoehala-Egan intercepted a pass
in the end zone to snuff out a potential South City touchdown.
The game changed early in the second half, with Aragon scoring a pair
of quick touchdowns. First, South
City could not handle the second-

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

half kickoff. The returner bobbled
the ball and Aragon’s Chad Franquez
fell on it at the South City 14. Three
plays later, Tongamoa bulled his
way into the end zone from 12 yards
out. The Dons missed the extra point
and still trailed 14-13.

The Dons defense forced South
City to punt on its first second-half
possession and after an adventure
fielding the punt — the Dons recovered when the ball bounced off
Filimoehala-Egan’s helmet — the
Dons took over at midfield. Facing a
fourth-and-15 at the Warriors’ 25,
Mason took to the air again. He
rolled right again and was hit just as
he threw the ball. The ball was headed toward a double-covered
Filimoehala-Egan — and a bit
behind. But Filimoehala-Egan
reached back and over the trailing
defender, made the catch and went
into the end zone for a 25-yard score
and the lead for good, 19-14, with
just under five minutes remaining in
the third quarter.
South City had three more drives
the rest of the game. The Warriors’
ensuing drive was their most promising, driving to the Aragon 21
before fumbling the ball away. They
drove to Aragon 16 on their next
possession but, on fourth down, the
Warriors fumbled the snap and were
stopped.
The Dons then iced the game on
their next possession, driving 64
yards on nine plays and scoring on
Tongamoa’s 10-yard run.
South City got a 30-yard field goal
from Angel Nevarez on its final drive
with two seconds left in the game.
“That was a huge win,” Sell said.
“That’s one of the more gratifying
wins. Down 14-7 (at half), it was a
highly concerned team room at halftime.”

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

RAIDERS
Continued from page 14
won one of his first eight starts
instead of going winless. But Carr
feels he has made progress and it’s
only time until the wins come.
“A lot of people learn in different ways, but for me I need to be
out there and I need to see it,” Carr
said. “For me, it’s been great. I’m
looking forward to getting some
wins going on, going into the last
half of the season.”
Carr, obviously, has a long way
to go to reach Manning’s level.
Manning has won a record five
MVP awards, played in three Super
Bowls, won one title, and has a
record 515 TD passes.
“I’m glad that I don’t play
defense, because I don’t think I’d
help us much if I did,” Carr said.
“But, it’s cool. It’s one of those
things that early in the week,
you’re like, ‘Wow, that’s pretty
cool.’ But at this point, I’m trying
to beat him.”
Here are some other things to
watch when the Raiders host the
Broncos:

Class of ’98
This game features two of the
three remaining players from the
1998 draft in Manning and Raiders
safety Charles Woodson. Manning
was taken first overall by
Indianapolis that year, while
Woodson went fourth to Oakland
after beating out Manning for the
Heisman Trophy. Sixteen years
later, the two are still near the top
of their games.
“He looks the same as when he
got out of college,” Manning said.

Leery of letdown
One week after losing a showdown at New England, the Broncos
could be forgiven if they let their
guard down a bit against the winless Raiders.
“I don’t look at the record, I look
at the film,” Manning said. “I look
at how we’re playing. Your job

each week is to study the opponent
and also be sure you’re studying
yourselves and seeing what you
need to be doing to improve.”

Mack attack
When the Raiders drafted Khalil
Mack fifth overall in May, thencoach Dennis Allen compared him
to Denver linebacker Von Miller.
Mack has mostly lived up to the
expectations, playing dominant
run defense and providing consistent pressure on the quarterback.
The one thing lacking is sacks.
Mack is still looking for his first,
while Miller had 6 1/2 after eight
games.
“I know a lot has been made that
he hasn’t had a sack, but I think he
might lead the league in holding
penalties versus him, ” Denver
coach John Fox said. “He’s
tremendous and a guy that we’re
very aware of.”

Sack exchange
Miller and DeMarcus Ware form
one of the most feared pass-rushing duos in the NFL. Miller is tied
for second in the NFL with nine
sacks and Ware is just one behind
with eight. They are the eighth set
of teammates to each have at least
eight sacks in the first eight
games and will present quite a
challenge to Carr and his offensive
line.

Grounded
In a season of lows, the Raiders
running game is setting some
marks for futility. Oakland’s 18.9
rush attempts per game are the
lowest on record going back to
1932 and the team’s average of
65.5 yards rushing per game is the
lowest in the NFL since Detroit
averaged 42.5 yards in 1946. This
week, the Raiders will have to contend with the NFL’s stingiest run
defense, allowing just 71.6 yards
per game.

NHL GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W
Tampa Bay 13 9
Montreal 14 9
Detroit
14 7
Boston
15 9
Ottawa
12 7
Toronto
13 6
Florida
11 4
Buffalo
15 3

L OT
3 1
4 1
3 4
6 0
3 2
5 2
3 4
10 2

Pts
19
19
18
18
16
14
12
8

GF
47
33
37
43
34
37
16
19

GA
34
41
33
35
27
35
24
48

Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT
Pittsburgh 12 9 2 1
N.Y. Islanders13 8 5 0
N.Y. Rangers 12 6 4 2
Philadelphia 13 6 5 2
New Jersey 14 6 6 2
Washington 13 5 5 3
Carolina
12 4 6 2
Columbus 13 4 8 1

Pts
19
16
14
14
14
13
10
9

GF
49
41
34
41
38
41
28
32

GA
26
42
38
40
45
39
39
44

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W
St. Louis
13 9
Nashville
13 8
Winnipeg 14 7
Chicago
14 7
Minnesota 12 7
Colorado 15 4
Dallas
13 4

17

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

L
3
3
5
6
5
6
5

OT
1
2
2
1
0
5
4

Pts
19
18
16
15
14
13
12

GF
34
33
28
36
36
37
37

GA
26
27
31
26
25
46
45

Pacific Division
GP W L
Anaheim 15 10 3
Vancouver 14 10 4
Calgary
15 8 5
Los Angeles 14 7 4
Sharks
14 7 5
Arizona
13 6 6
Edmonton 14 5 8

OT
2
0
2
3
2
1
1

Pts
22
20
18
17
16
13
11

GF
40
46
43
32
43
34
35

GA
30
38
37
29
38
46
50

Friday’s Games
Arizona 3, Anaheim 2, SO
Edmonton 3, Buffalo 2
Carolina 3, Columbus 2, OT
Detroit 4, New Jersey 2
Washington 3, Chicago 2
Saturday’s Games
Calgary at Florida, noon
Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Winnipeg at Ottawa, 4 p.m.
Colorado at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Columbus, 4 p.m.
Carolina at Washington, 5 p.m.
Nashville at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 5 p.m.

NBA GLANCE

NFL GLANCE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T
New England
7 2 0
Buffalo
5 3 0
Miami
5 3 0
N.Y. Jets
1 8 0

Pct
.778
.625
.625
.111

PF
281
178
211
154

PA
198
165
151
252

South
Indianapolis
Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville

W
6
4
2
1

L
3
5
6
8

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
.667
.444
.250
.111

PF
290
206
137
141

PA
211
197
202
251

North
Pittsburgh
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Baltimore

W
6
6
5
5

L
3
3
3
4

T
0
0
1
0

Pct
.667
.667
.611
.556

PF
248
209
197
240

PA
219
172
211
174

West
Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Raiders

W
6
5
5
0

L
2
3
4
8

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
.750
.625
.556
.000

PF
245
200
205
129

PA
185
138
186
211

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T
Philadelphia
6 2 0
Dallas
6 3 0
N.Y. Giants
3 5 0
Washington
3 6 0

Pct
.750
.667
.375
.333

PF PA
234 177
230 195
178 209
197 229

South
New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay

W
4
3
2
1

L
4
5
6
7

T
0
1
0
0

Pct
.500
.389
.250
.125

PF
227
177
192
150

PA
198
236
221
245

North
Detroit
Green Bay
Minnesota
Chicago

W
6
5
4
3

L
2
3
5
5

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
.750
.625
.444
.375

PF
162
222
168
180

PA
126
191
199
222

West
Arizona
Seattle
49ers
St. Louis

W
7
5
4
3

L
1
3
4
5

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
PF
.875 192
.625 202
.500 168
.375 149

PA
156
174
178
220

Thursday’s Game
Cleveland 24, Cincinnati 3
Sunday’s Games
San Francisco at New Orleans, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Miami at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
Pittsburgh at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m.
Dallas vs. Jacksonville at London, 10 a.m.
Denver at Oakland, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Seattle, 1:25 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 1:25 p.m.
Chicago at Green Bay, 5:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis, Minnesota, New England, San Diego, Washington
Monday’s Game
Carolina at Philadelphia, 5:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
5
Brooklyn
3
Boston
2
New York
2
Philadelphia
0
Southeast Division
W
Washington
4
Miami
3
Charlotte
3
Orlando
2
Atlanta
1
Central Division
W
Chicago
5
Detroit
2
Cleveland
2
Milwaukee
2
Indiana
1

L
1
2
3
4
6

Pct
.833
.600
.400
.333
.000

GB

1 1/2
2 1/2
3
5

L
2
2
3
4
3

Pct
.667
.600
.500
.333
.250

GB

1/2
1
2
2

L
1
3
3
4
5

Pct
.833
.400
.400
.333
.167

GB

2 1/2
2 1/2
3
4

Pct
1.000
1.000
.667
.500
.500

GB


2
3
3

Pct
.600
.400
.333
.200
.167

GB

1
1 1/2
2
2 1/2

Pct
1.000
.833
.600
.500
.000

GB


1 1/2
2
4 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Memphis
6
0
Houston
6
0
Dallas
4
2
San Antonio
2
2
New Orleans
2
2
Northwest Division
W
L
Portland
3
2
Minnesota
2
3
Utah
2
4
Denver
1
4
Oklahoma City
1
5
Pacific Division
W
L
Warriors
4
0
Sacramento
5
1
L.A. Clippers
3
2
Phoenix
3
3
L.A. Lakers
0
5

Friday’s Games
Chicago 118, Philadelphia 115
Orlando 112, Minnesota 103, OT
Charlotte 122, Atlanta 119,2OT
Toronto 103, Washington 84
Detroit 98, Milwaukee 95
Boston 101, Indiana 98
Brooklyn 110, New York 99
Memphis 91, Oklahoma City 89
Sacramento 114, Phoenix 112,2OT
Dallas 105, Utah 82

PREP FOOTBALL RESULTS
Bay Division
Sacred Heart Prep 35, Burlingame 14
Terra Nova 42, Menlo-Atherton 35
Sequoia 28, Menlo School 21
Ocean Division
Aragon 25, South City 17
Half Moon Bay 36, Hillsdale 27
San Mateo at Woodside not reported
Lake Division
Capuchino 35, Jefferson 9
Mills at El Camino not reported
King’s Academy at Carlmont not reported
WCAL
Serra 35, Sacred Heart Cathedral 17

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“The

Lead the way
By Mari Andreatta

T

his week’s mid-term elections had
“winners” talking about how they
are going to do what they promised
and “get things back on track” and runnersup conceding with grace and humility, noting that the “people have spoken” but vowing they will be back. It
prompted thoughts about
leadership and what it
means when it comes to
representation and fulfilling duties. Voters this
week sent a strong message that they weren’t
happy, leading to lots of
changes in local, state
and federal governments, and made it clear
to the president that they feel promises
haven’t been delivered. This is democracy at
its finest, but it’s also disappointing. Those
who are elected are expected to do the things
they say they are going to do. As a student
leader, I take that responsibility seriously
— but what does the responsibility really
entail?
A leadership position in high school,
although the structures and functions of student government are different at every
school, is an impactful responsibility.
Student government positions cover many
aspects, including talking about issues with
faculty and staff on behalf of the student
body and participating in discussions at
council meetings, as well as planning rallies and other school-wide events. The
importance of these tasks is that you start
learning how to unite people for a common
goal and get people excited about a collective idea. Student government also allows
you to practice your communication skills
(through debates and speeches), gain selfconfidence and become a better listener. But
our constituents are the only real judges of a
good leader. As the old saying goes, you
aren’t a leader because you say so but
because people follow you.
When we see the word “leader,” we all
think of different things. Some may think
of a bold politician making tough decisions
about our economy and foreign affairs and
addressing our country from a podium; others may think of a tour-guide physically

See STUDENT, Page 20

Kid-friendly
superhero fun
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCITAED PRESS

As the Disney-Marvel mash-up “Big Hero 6”
moves toward its big-action finale, the images will
look strikingly familiar. A supervillain wreaks
havoc. A portal to another dimension looms. A
showdown goes airborne over a metropolis.
It could be the finale of a dozen superhero films,
with one difference: “Big Hero 6” is animated. But
the majority of comic-book films are also computergenerated, particularly their large set pieces. Never
has that been clearer than witnessing just how similar such scenes look as out-and-out cartoons. It’s a
little like seeing that the superhero has no clothes.
The 3-D “Big Hero 6” is loosely based on a littleknown Marvel comic about a team of superheros.
Crafting a more kid-friendly version, Disney (which

owns Marvel) has focused on one of
the heroes, the aptly named Hiro
Hamada (voiced by Ryan Potter).
With his older brother, Tadashi (Daniel
Henney) and their aunt Cass (Maya Rudolph),
the 14-year-old Hiro lives in San Fransokyo, a
beautifully rendered fusion of Tokyo and San
Francisco, full of both nighttime neon and steephilled, Bay-area panoramas.
Hiro, whose parents died when he was a toddler,
is an avid gamer happy to use his technical wizardry hustling unwitting competitors in underground “bot fights.” His tiny, gingerbread mansized robot makes mincemeat of more hulking
machines.
Tadashi disapproves but doesn’t lecture Hiro,

See HERO, Page 20

A brilliant Redmayne as Hawking
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Eddie Redmayne plays Stephen Hawking in ‘The Theory of Everything.’

The famed British physicist Stephen
Hawking has never had small ideas or small
ambitions, least of all his audacious youthful quest to find a “theory of everything” —
one that would explain the entire universe
in one simple equation.
He may not have found exactly that, but
what Hawking has accomplished, we learn
anew in James Marsh’s “The Theory of
Everything, ” featuring a superb Eddie
Redmayne, is staggering. Diagnosed with
motor neuron disease at 21, Hawking was
given two years to live. A half century later,
he remains very much alive at 72, and he
and his ideas are known around the world;
his “A Brief History of Time” has sold more

than 10 million copies.
It’s a daunting task to capture such a
remarkable life in one movie, and “The
Theory of Everything” doesn’t totally
escape the typical biopic trap of covering
so much time that no one idea is explored
deeply enough. Add to that the pressure of
having a subject as well-known as
Hawking.
On top of it all, there are the physical
challenges of portraying his progressive
disability, while also channeling the bold,
complex and often impish spirit underneath. All this makes the performance of
the youthful, freckled Redmayne, at 32
playing his first lead in a movie, so exciting, and reminiscent of another British

See THEORY, Page 22

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

19

‘Call of Duty’ multiplayer
tops its self-serious story
By Ryan Pearson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin Spacey can’t save “Call
of Duty” from itself. But perhaps
an Iron Man-like “exoskeleton”
can.
Spacey plays the egomaniacal
leader of a private military corporation in the single-player story
mode of “Call of Duty: Advanced
Warfare” (Activision, for the PC,
PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4,
Xbox 360 and Xbox One).
Despite often choppy animation
of his performance capture acting,
Spacey lends smarmy gravitas to
his character, the highlight of an
otherwise rote, self-serious,
globe-trotting campaign.
Longtime “CoD” fans may find
themselves yawning as various
commanders guide player-controlled soldier Jack Mitchell on
an overly familiar series of missions revolving around multiple
terror attacks and shifting allegiances.
The levels are built with
immense graphical polish and
meticulous attention to detail,

but too often feel like they’re
simply ticking boxes required for
a modern first-person shooter.
You’ll snipe from afar, get a
“sitrep” (situation report) and be
advised to “let them pass.” You’ll
fight on a bridge, on an aircraft
carrier, in a forest, at a fancy
resort. You’ll fly a plane, rappel
and zip line into battle, and command a turret gun.
Despite the futuristic setting —
the plot kicks off in 2054 —
players still get only minor iterations on core game mechanics
that have changed little since
2007’s “Modern Warfare.” I had
hoped for more from new lead
developer Sledgehammer Games.
The key innovation — an
“exoskeleton” armored suit — is
woefully underutilized in the single-player story. Fortunately, it’s
indispensable and highly customizable in the online multiplayer mode, where most people
spend the vast majority of their
time.
Movement through maps is fundamentally changed by the exosuit’s ability to swiftly double-

Kevin Spacey plays the egomaniacal leader of a private military corporation in the single-player story mode of
‘Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare.’
jump and dodge, both accompanied by a satisfying pneumatic
whoosh sound and cool on-screen
blur effects. Unlockable perks
now include temporary cloaking,
health or speed boosts. You can
toss out floating enemy-tracking
robots like grenades.
On the surface, it’s stuff that
space shooters like “Halo” have
been doing for years, but there’s a

weightiness and sheen to the execution here that more than makes
up for the less-than-stellar singleplayer mode.
Another interesting graphical
change stemming from the exosuit: Multiplayer is refreshingly
bloodless, with the bonus option
of spattering walls and other
players with paintball effects.
New colorful clothing choices

and random loot drops of modified
weapons also show developers
playing catch up to games like
“Borderlands,” but are welcome
tweaks for “CoD” loyalists.
“Advanced Warfare” is a big step
up from last year’s undercooked,
muddled “Ghosts.” Here’s hoping
for more innovation next time
around.
Three stars out of four.

Blizzard reveals shooter ‘Overwatch’ at BlizzCon
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANAHEIM — After tackling online strategy and role-playing games, the company
behind “World of Warcraft” is taking aim at
the shooter genre.
Blizzard Entertainment Inc. announced
plans Friday to release a multiplayer shoot’em-up PC game called “Overwatch.” The
reveal kicked off BlizzCon, the company’s
fan-centric celebration where more than
25,000 attendees are competing in game
matches, dressing in costumes and bagging
swag at the Anaheim Convention Center.
Blizzard’s chief of story and franchise
development,
Chris
Metzen,
said
“Overwatch” marks the first new franchise
in 17 years from the creator of such long-

running game series as the fantasy roleplaying saga “World of Warcraft,” gothic
slasher “Diablo” and sci-fi strategy game
“StarCraft.”
“You guys know that with Blizzard
games, we like to find genres and game
types that we’re in love with and take the
best elements of those and really amplify
it, ” game director Jeff Kaplan told the
BlizzCon crowd. “You saw us do that with a
strategy genre, a massively multiplayer
online game, and most recently a collectable card game.”
“Overwatch” will feature original superhero-like characters with various skills —
such as mechanized gorilla Winston,
winged healer Mercy and robotic monk
Bastion — blasting each other in six-versus-six matches on a futuristic, cartoony

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rendition of Earth.
“The story takes place something like 60
years in the future,” Metzen said. “It’s far
enough in the future that we have flying
cars, ray guns and all the technology you’d
want to have, but it’s not far enough that it
feels too exotic.”
A beta test for “Overwatch” will launch in
2015 and a demonstration of the game is
available at the convention this weekend,
Metzen said.
“Overwatch” will join Blizzard’s growing
game portfolio, which includes such newcomers as the “Warcraft”-themed collectable card game “Hearthstone” and the battle
arena game “Heroes of the Storm” featuring
characters from other Blizzard games.
Blizzard also announced plans Friday for
the first “Hearthstone” expansion and a ver-

sion coming to the Android devices.
The developers declined to specify
whether the business model of “Overwatch”
would be subscription-based like “World of
Warcraft,” free-to-play like “Hearthstone”
or stand-alone like “Diablo.”
Blizzard is a division of Activision
Blizzard Inc., which publishes the first-person shooters “Destiny” and “Call of Duty.”
The company said during its earnings call
Tuesday that strong sales of “Destiny” and
“World of Warcraft” led to better-thanexpected results for its third quarter and
raised its full-year forecast.
Blizzard said it had 7.4 million “World of
Warcraft” subscribers as of Sept. 30, ahead
of next week’s release of the “Warlords of
Draenor” expansion. At its peak, the game
had 12 million subscribers in 2010.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Robin Williams’ autopsy found no illegal drugs
By Kristen J. Bender
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Robin Williams’
autopsy found no alcohol or illegal drugs
were in his body when he killed himself at
his Northern California home in August,
sheriff’s officials said Friday.
The results released by the Marin County
sheriff’s office found that the actor had
taken prescription medications, but in
“therapeutic concentrations.”
The coroner ruled Williams’ death a suicide that resulted from asphyxia due to

HERO
Continued from page 18
instead casually exposing him to his college, San Fransokyo Tech. Though Hiro initially dismisses it as “nerd school,” he discovers it to be a vibrant breeding ground of
invention. He’s wowed by Tadashi’s schoolmates — Wasabi (Damon Wayans Jr. ),
Honey Lemon (Genesis Rodriguez), Gogo
(Jamie Chung) and Fred (T.J. Miller) — and
their gizmos.
None is more impressive than Tadashi’s
robot, a marshmallow balloon “personal

STUDENT
Continued from page 18
leading a group of people to their desired
destination. To me, a leader is someone who
is more concerned with doing the right
thing rather than doing things just right.
Not that doing things just right isn’t nice
too but, more importantly, leadership is

hanging.
Sheriff’s officials have
said Williams was found
in the bedroom of his
home in Tiburon on the
morning of Aug. 11. His
death had been preliminarily ruled a suicide,
with sheriff’s officials
Robin Williams saying he hanged himself with a belt.
Williams’ wife, Susan Schneider, has said
the actor and comedian was struggling with
depression, anxiety and a recent

Parkinson’s diagnosis when his personal
assistant found him dead.
Williams had publicly acknowledged
periodic struggles with substance abuse,
and he had entered a substance abuse program shortly before his death. According to
the coroner’s report, his wife told an investigator Williams did not go there because of
recent drug or alcohol abuse, but rather to
reaffirm the principles of his rehabilitation.
According to his wife, Williams was having trouble sleeping and had shown
increased signs of paranoia before he com-

mitted suicide, the autopsy report said.
Medical records confirmed he was diagnosed
with Parkinson’s disease in November
2013 but had symptoms since 2011, including a left arm tremor and the slowing of left
hand movements. Treatments with drugs in
May 2014 led to some improvement,
according to the report, and he remained
physically active until his death.

health care consultant” named Baymax
(Scott Adsit), created with a “non-threatening, huggable” design. He’s like an
Obamacare dream, had the president drifted
off during a Michelin commercial.
With a quick scan, he can diagnose any
ailment. Looking Hiro over and detecting
mood swings, he pronounces: “Diagnosis:
Puberty.” When his battery life wanes, he
loses air pressure and begins to drunkenly
slur his speech.
In short, he’s an irresistible Disney supporting player, one who will give Groot,
the soulful treelike alien of “Guardians of
the Galaxy,” a run for sidekick-of-the-year.
After a mysterious fiery accident at an
invention showcase, Hiro and Baymax set

off on an adventure that will gradually gather all the expected superhero conventions,
slowly draining the movie’s innovative
Silicon Valley spirit.
So buoyant is the first half of “Big Hero
6” and so colorful is its bright, Japanese
anime-inspired palette, that the film’s slide
into familiar comic book-movie ruts comes
as a disappointment. Could it not have
stayed in its rich robotics world as a hightech high-school tale? Are such Earth-bound
stories no longer possible for big-studio
animation? Can’t a kid grow up without flying up?
Directed by Don Hall (“Winnie the Pooh”)
and Chris Williams (“Bolt”), “Big Hero 6”
is a fine blend of sweetness and spectacle,

East and West. The meeting of Disney and
Marvel sensibilities, though, is a more
mixed union. When the young Hiro and the
lovable Baymax strap on the body armor,
girding for battle, the movie’s charms are
camouflaged.
“Big Hero 6” is preceded by a lovely little
short, “Feast,” a tale of a Boston Terrier’s
devotion to his owner, told exclusively, and
cleverly, through mealtime. It makes for a
tasty appetizer.
“Big Hero 6,” a Disney release, is rated PG
by the Motion Picture Association of
America for “action and peril, some rude
humor and thematic elements.” Running
time: 95 minutes. Two and a half stars out of
four.

about making honorable decisions to satisfy the most people possible.
Despite what I once believed, a leader’s
job is not to make everyone happy — that’s
impossible. Do you have to listen to your
constituents’ ideas, even when they don’t
line up with your own? Yes, but you can then
debate those, adjust your own idea and seek
a compromise, or go back and do more work
on solutions. That is what a representative
is expected to faithfully do.
When you get elected to an office, your

job is to do all the things you promised you
would try to do for voters. Bragging rights
or another line on your resume are not
acceptable reasons to run for a leadership
position: If you don’t work at it or don’t
care about the responsibility, you won’t
have a successful term. Just like student
government in high school, if you’re elected to a position in large-scale government
and don’t uphold the election promises,
people will notice (for example: President
Obama’s current voter approval rating). So

whether you are a current student leader or
thinking about getting involved in student
government in the future, always keep your
word, uphold your promises, lead by example and follow an honest, open process
when making decisions.

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Williams had two types of antidepressants in his system when he died, as well as
a Parkinson’s medication, caffeine and
another ingredient found in tea and cocoa,
the autopsy found.

Mari Andreatta is a senior at Notre Dame High
School in Belmont. Student News appears in the
weekend edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

21

By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

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QUEEN OF THE ADRIATIC REIGNS
IN LAS VEGAS . The Venetian Hotel
began with a honeymoon. Las Vegas Sands
Corporation’s founding chairman and CEO
Sheldon G. Adelson and his wife Miriam
were on their honeymoon in Venice, Italy,
when they came up with the idea to bring
the most famous aspects of that city to Las
Vegas. Keith Salwoski, executive director
of public relations for The Venetian and
The Palazzo Las Vegas, said, “The
Venetian was built by Mr. Sheldon
Adelson as a gift to his wife. The two honeymooned in Venice and Dr. Miriam
Adelson fell so in love with the city, Mr.
Adelson decided to recreate it for her here
in Las Vegas. Mr. Adelson was very careful
to ensure that the Las Vegas version was
created as accurate as possible, and not a
caricature of Venice. Designers spent a lot
of time in Venice to get it just right.”
Today, visitors to The Venetian can enjoy
taking a leisurely stroll through and by
architectural replicas of various landmarks
of the real Venice, including the Palazzo
Ducale, Piazza San Marco, Piazzetta di San
Marco, the Lion of Venice Column & the
Column of Saint Theodore, St. Mark’s
Campanile and the Rialto Bridge.
TAKE A WALK: S ELF- GUIDED
TOURS SHOW YOU THE SIGHTS.
Stop at The Venetian’s concierge desk in
the lobby and pick up a copy of a detailed
15-page illustrated self-guided tour of the
art and architecture of The Venetian. The
walk starts a few steps away at the glorious golden Armillary Sphere, of the type
used for centuries to study the sky and the
celestial system. As you stand next to the
Sphere, look up. Installed inside the dramatic dome directly above you is a dazzling reproduction of Giambattista
Tiepolo’s Four Heroic Episodes. The original was painted around 1725 for Palazzo

Sandi in Venice and the duplicate in the
hotel’s dome was hand painted by Italian
artisans. The tour leads through the hotel’s
expansive main colonnade, lined with 25foot-high columns of solid Botticino marble. And on you proceed, to The Bridge of
Sighs, the façade of the Doge’s Palace and
the Campanile, each of which faithfully
represents its original counterpart. Along
the way are reproductions of frescoes,
sculptures and bas reliefs by Paolo
Veronese and other Italian masters. At the
core of The Venetian is St. Mark’s Square,
or a carefully crafted semblance thereof,
complete with sidewalk cafes and a high,
arching sky spread with clouds that
change color, reflecting the time of day.
GLIDE IN A GONDOLA. No trip to
Venice — or The Venetian — would be
complete without a graceful and romantic
glide down the Grand Canal in an authentic
Venetian gondola. Float beneath bridges,
beside cafes, under balconies and through
the vibrant Venetian streetscape as a
singing gondolier takes you for a ride like
no other. Two gondola routes are available: the outside gondola goes under the
famous Rialto Bridge and by St. Mark’s
Campanile and the inside route crosses a
lake next to the Grand Canal Shoppes that
surround St. Mark’s Square. Both private
and shared rides are available. (Ask about
the white gondola for weddings.)
ENGINEERING WONDERS : DA
VINCI IN VENICE. In 1500, Leonardo
da Vinci offered the Senate of Venice engineering ideas that included a diving apparatus similar to modern scuba gear. Da

Prosecutors drop charge
against AC/DC’s Phil Rudd
By Nick Perry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WELLINGTON, New Zealand — New
Zealand authorities made an embarrassing
about-face on Friday when prosecutors
dropped a murder-for-hire charge against
AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd, saying there was
not enough evidence to proceed.
But the 60-year-old member of the popular
Australian band still faces a serious charge
of threatening to kill, which comes with a
maximum prison term of seven years. He
also faces charges of possessing methamphetamine and marijuana.
Police had initially accused Rudd of trying
to arrange for a hit man to carry out two
killings, and had charged him with attempting to procure murder, which comes with a
maximum 10-year sentence. But when prosecutors took over the case, they quickly
dropped the charge.

“The file was obtained
today and reviewed, ”
Tauranga Crown Solicitor
Greg Hollister-Jones said
in a statement Friday,
adding he had “made the
decision that there was
insufficient evidence to
proceed with the charge of
attempting to procure
Phil Rudd
murder.”
Rudd’s lawyer, Paul Mabey, said the damage to his client had been incalculable and
he was considering possible remedies.
“The charge alleging an attempt to procure murder should never have been laid,”
Mabey said in a statement, adding, “Mr.
Rudd has suffered unnecessary and extremely
damaging publicity as a result of widespread
and sensational reporting of a very serious
allegation, which on any basis was never
justified.”

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

A reproduction of Giambattista Tiepolo’s Four Heroic Episodes, painted around 1725 for
Palazzo Sandi in Venice, can be seen inside the lobby dome of The Venetian Hotel in Las Vegas.
The dome is one stop on a self-guided art and architecture walking tour available to visitors.
Vinci The Exhibition, located in a gallery
off The Venetian’s lobby, displays 60 lifesize models of his machine inventions and
spotlights the artist’s extraordinary early
concepts for the helicopter, tank, SCUBA,
crane, clock and submarine. Guests can
push, pull and crank some of the interactive displays, giving them a hands-on
understanding of the scientific principles
behind his creations. The exhibition also
investigates a collection of da Vinci’s
most renowned paintings, including
“Mona Lisa,” “The Last Supper,” “Portrait
of a Young Man,” “Virgin of the Rocks”
and “St. John the Baptist.”
VENETIAN PARTICULARS . The
Venetian (along with the adjacent Sands
Expo Convention Center and The Palazzo

Hotel and Casino Resort) is part of the
largest five-diamond hotel and resort complex in the world, with 4, 049 suites,
4,059 hotel rooms and a 120,000-squarefoot casino. It is located at 3355 Las Vegas
Blvd. South, Las Vegas, NV. More information may be found at http://www.venetian.com.
AND REMEMBER: A journey is like
marriage. The certain way to be wrong is
to think you control it. John Steinbeck.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine &
Travel Writers Association. She may be reached
at susan@smdailyjournal.com. More of her stories
may
be
found
at
http://ifwtwa.org/author/susan-cohn.

22

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Playing Hawking a complex equation for Redmayne
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO — Time is relative, especially
for young actors tasked with playing brilliant theoretical physicists.
Eddie Redmayne estimates that the euphoria of being cast as Stephen Hawking for the
film “The Theory of Everything” lasted a
millisecond. Then came the overwhelming
fear.
“And that fear remained the whole way
through the process,” Redmayne said in an
interview earlier this fall.
The gentle, freckled 32-year-old British
actor was asked to not only lead a film for
the first time, but to play a mathematical
genius across decades of physical degeneration - all under the watchful gaze of said
mathematical genius. Ahead of screening
“The Theory of Everything,” Hawking ominously told Redmayne: “I’ll tell you want I
think, good or otherwise.”
With such pressure, Redmayne could be
forgiven for quietly slipping into the nearest black hole.
But in the year’s most technically complex role, Redmayne gives what’s surely the
performance of his young career, one that
seeks to capture not only the step-by-step
disintegration of ALS that led Hawking
from healthy youth to paralyzed adulthood,
but (and more importantly) the scientist’s
unvanquished spirit, the unimpeded expansion of his imagination.
“He was given a death sentence,” says
Redmayne, referring to the diagnosis given
Hawking as a 21-year-old, when he was
expected to live only a few years more. Now
72, he went on to father three children,
marry twice and author significant discoveries in cosmology as in the best-selling “A
Brief History of Time.” “So you live every
single moment to the full, and that’s what I
wanted an audience to leave with. That’s
what I left this experience with.”

Eddie Redmayne poses during ‘The Theory of Everything’ premiere in Beverly Hills.
Director James Marsh (“Man on Wire”)
remembers well his first meeting with
Redmayne, a London native best known for
his Tony-winning turn in John Logan’s
“Red” and his tender revolutionary Marius
in “Les Miserables.” One pint turned to
five, the conversation going into the
night.
“He was just full of ideas and passion for
this,” says Marsh. “He knew somewhat
what this might entail in terms of preparation and physicality. Eddie’s crazily ambitious. He’s not ambitious for money or
fame. He’s ambitious to do great work. He’s
fearless, too. It was a real leap into the dark
for him.”
“The Theory of Everything” is based on

Jane Wilde Hawking’s 2007 memoir
“Traveling to Infinite: My Life With
Stephen.” Aside from a biopic, it’s a portrait of an uncommon marriage. Felicity
Jones pays Jane, whom Hawking met at
Cambridge University in the early `60s.
The film begins with their early
courtship, which coincided with the discovery of a motor neuron disease in Hawking.
Redmayne plays each stage of Hawking’s
increasing disability, going from a lame leg
to a walking stick, to two sticks, to a wheel
chair. Gradually he loses his voice, his
body language, his facial expressions.
“It felt like solving a puzzle, ” says
Redmayne.
Redmayne spent four months researching, working on the physicality and feebly
studying Hawking’s physics. He trained

THEORY
Continued from page 18
actor’s memorable performance at the same
age — Daniel Day-Lewis, in “My Left
Foot.”
We begin at Cambridge in 1963, with
Stephen, a young graduate student in cosmology, exuberantly racing his bike around
town, goofy and gangly, with huge black
glasses and an oversized grin to match.
At a party, he spies the winsome Jane
(Felicity Jones, thoughtful and touching
here), and sets about pursuing her. Love
blooms, and life’s possibilities appear as
boundless as the universe — whether or not
it has boundaries is a key question here —
until Stephen starts experiencing marked
clumsiness. After a bad fall, he’s diagnosed
with ALS, which will result in gradual muscular degeneration.
“What about the brain?” he asks. “You’ll
have the same thoughts,” comes the reply,
“only eventually, no one will know what
they are.”
Stephen falls into a deep depression,
saved only by Jane’s stubborn love. Thus
begins a marriage that will last a quartercentury, produce three children and test
Jane’s physical and emotional endurance to
the limits (the film is based on Jane
Hawking’s second memoir, adapted by
screenwriter Anthony McCarten.)
It will also survive Hawking’s near-death

with a choreographer, met with academics
(Redmayne also went to Cambridge), visited with many ALS sufferers and had an
expert study old photos of Hawking to trace
the disease’s effects.
“There were moments along the way
where I know he felt really, really defeated,”
says Marsh.
To guide him, Redmayne posted three
photos in his trailer: Albert Einstein, James
Dean (since Hawking was, Redmayne says,
“a ladies man”), and a joker playing card, to
capture Hawking’s playful side. “If you’re in
a room with him, he’s definitely running
the room,” says Redmayne.
But aside from all the technical challenges, Redmayne imbues Hawking with a
sly mischievousness. Much of the performance is in a glint behind his eyes.
“What emanates from him when you meet
him is this kind of wit and humor,” says
Redmayne. “Even though he can move so
few muscles, he has one of the most charismatic, expressive faces you’ve ever seen,
which is a weird irony. There were many
things I found out from meeting with him,
but one of the overall things I took away
was finding he does not live a disease. He
lives forward and has done since he was 21
years old. There’s an unerring optimism to
him. That meant every single scene, even
when obstacles are being through, find the
funny, find the glint.”
When Hawking saw the film a few weeks
before its premiere at the Toronto Film
Festival, he judged it “broadly true.” But he
offered a personal endorsement, giving
Marsh his unique computer-generated voice
to use in the film.
Redmayne, widely considered a lock for
an Oscar nomination, has plans to star in
the next film by Tom Hooper (“Les
Miserables,” “The King’s Speech”). But he
hasn’t worked since filming “The Theory of
Everything.” The gravity of the part, for
which he lost some 20 lbs., is slowly
falling off him.
He sighs. “I had many glasses of wine
after.”
from pneumonia. A tracheotomy saves his
life but deprives him of the ability to speak,
leading to his famous computer-generated
voice.
Redmayne, relying on less and less of his
body, succeeds in expressing more and more
— with his eyebrows, his eyes, and that
broad smile, showing what a humorous man
Hawking can be. He’s heartbreaking,
though, in the scene where he essentially
ends his marriage, informing Jane that he’s
asked his perky nurse, Elaine Mason
(Maxine Peake) to travel to America with
him.
Elaine will become Hawking’s second
wife. Jane, meanwhile, will marry a family
friend to whom she’s grown close over the
years. The various relationships feel somewhat airbrushed — perhaps not surprising
given that the film is based on one person’s
memoir.
What shines through loud and clear,
though, is the humanity in Hawking’s
incredible story. “However bad life may
seem, where there is life, there is hope,” the
physicist tells an audience, and that line
could seem hokey in some circumstances,
but not here. If anyone gets to say that, it’s
Stephen Hawking, so eloquently embodied
in this film.
“The Theory of Everything, ” a Focus
Features release, is rated PG-13 by the
Motion Picture Association of America “for
some thematic elements and suggestive
material. ” Running time: 123 minutes.
Three and a half stars out of four.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/NATION/WORLD

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

23

Easing of Saudi driving ban possible
By Abdullah Al-Shihri
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — It’s only for
women over 30, who must be off the road by
8 p.m. and cannot wear makeup behind the
wheel. But it’s still a startling shift.
The Saudi king’s advisory council has recommended that the government lift its ban
on female drivers, a member of the council
told the Associated Press Friday.

GOP
Continued from page 1
heard from voters of all political persuasion, they’d ask me the question, ‘Where
are you on BART strike? And what will
you do about it because that affected my
family, my ability to get to work and live
my daily life?’ It affected everyone in the
Bay Area. So it absolutely was an issue in
this race. ”
Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown ordered a 60day cooling off period for management and
the BART union to negotiate a new contract but did not support legislation proposed by GOP lawmakers to strip the union
of its right to strike. A strike ensued, disrupting commutes.
The Sbranti campaign did not immediate-

BOND
Continued from page 1
August, the council will finalize the ballot
language.
The bond money — the amount of which
is still to be determined — would be used

those, a brother or son. They would be
allowed to drive from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on
Saturday through Wednesday and noon to 8
p.m. on Thursday and Friday, the weekend
in the kingdom.

There have been small but increasingly
bold protests by women who took to their
cars over the past year. The driving ban,
which is unique in the world, is imposed
because the kingdom’s ultraconservative
Muslim clerics say “licentiousness” will

spread if women drive.
The council member said the Shura
Council made the recommendations in a
secret, closed session held in the past
month. The member spoke on condition of
anonymity because the recommendations
had not been made public.
Under the recommendations, only women
over 30 would be allowed to drive and they
would need permission from a male relative
— usually a husband or father, but lacking

ly respond to telephone and email messages left late Friday.
Assembly Minority Leader Kristin
Olsen, R-Modesto said Tuesday’s election
was the first time Republicans had unseated
an incumbent Democrat in the Legislature
in 20 years. With a handful of other races
remaining uncalled, the GOP could end up
unseating as many as three incumbent
Democrats in the Assembly alone.
“Californians believe in checks and balances,” Olsen said. “This is the first step
toward greater balance.”
Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, D-San
Diego, said despite a strong ground campaign, the results represented a worst-case
scenario of the various possibilities
Democrats considered before Election Day.
She downplayed the significance of the
threshold, saying the party didn’t use the
supermajority’s power even when it had it.
“At the end of the day, with the effort we

have, we can’t force people to vote, ”
Atkins said.
Another closely watched Assembly race
that
remained
uncalled
involved
Democratic incumbent Al Muratsuchi, who
was trailing Republican challenger David
Hadley in the 66th Assembly District,
which covers coastal Los Angeles County.
Republican Young Kim won the 65th
Assembly District seat in Orange County
from Democratic incumbent Sharon QuirkSilva with 56 percent of the vote. And
Democratic freshman Steve Fox lost his
36th Assembly District seat in the
Palmdale-Lancaster area to GOP opponent
Tom Lackey, who had 61 percent of the
vote.
Senate Minority Leader Bob Huff said the
GOP focused on matching candidates who
best reflect their communities and made an
effort to diversify the party’s bench.
Orange County Supervisor Janet

Nguyen, a Republican, becomes the first
Vietnamese-American woman elected to
the Legislature. She won 60 percent support in the 34th Senate District over former Assemblyman Jose Solorio.
In the Central Valley, Republican state
Sen. Andy Vidak overcame a voter disadvantage from Democratic candidate Luis
Chavez.
During the last session, Democrats in
the Senate fell below a supermajority after
two termed-out lawmakers were indicted on
federal bribery and corruption charges. A
third, Sen. Rod Wright, resigned in
September after he was sentenced to three
months in jail for lying about where he
lived when he ran for office.
Democrats had hoped to recapture supermajorities in both legislative houses. Of
the 120 legislative seats in the Assembly
and Senate, 100 were up for grabs in
Tuesday’s general election.

toward a list of seven goals compiled by
the City Council in September: coordinate
shuttle services like Uber and Lyft; create a
development on El Camino Real with public parking, housing and retail; move
most government services online; buy the
Black Mountain property for potential
open space; create park and recreation
facilities for skating or dogs, build an
aquatic center and create more office space.

Existing city staff is already stretched
with existing large-scale projects like the
Transit Village which is why City
Manager Jeff Maltbie asked for the halfmillion dollars toward extra staff.
Th e ci t y l as t wen t t o v o t ers i n 2 0 0 9
s eek i n g a quart er-cen t s al es t ax fo r
ci t y s erv i ces . Meas ure U fai l ed, l eadi n g t o t h e ci t y o ut s o urci n g o r merg i n g s ev eral dep art men t s i n cl udi n g i t s

fi re an d p o l i ce s erv i ces .

The Shura Council’s recommendations are
not obligatory on the government, but simply making the recommendation was a
major step after years of the kingdom
staunchly rejecting any review of the ban.

The conditions also require that a woman
driver wear conservative dress and no makeup, the official said. Within cities, they can
drive without a male relative in the car, but
outside of cities, a male is required to be
present.

The San Carlos City Council meets 7
p.m. Monday, Nov. 10 at City Hall, 600
Elm St., San Carlos.

michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

24

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

SURF
Continued from page 1
big waves with hardly any other
women around,” said Sarah Gerhardt,
the first woman to surf Mavericks. “I
just thought it was such an incredible
opportunity to be encouraged and
inspired and get to share something
that I really love and enjoy with a
female presence instead of a male presence, which is completely different.”
Although the event culminates in
Half Moon Bay, the real action is
being compiled by the women who are
inviting the public to take a personal
look at their lives as they film their
day-to-day activities, surf sessions,
workout routines and more. These
“Super Sessions” are being filmed by
the 15 invitees from all over the world
and offer compelling footage from
breaks like Jaws and Waimea Bay in
Hawaii, Ocean Beach, Mavericks and
more.
“There are amazing spots around the
world. But this idea of Super Sessions,
this idea of us women in our own
unique environment, feeling it, recording it, allowing people to come into
our world, that’s what the Supper
Session is about,” said Gerhardt, 40.
Local big wave surfer, Titans of
Mavericks competitor and cinematographer Grant Washburn, 46, said he
was instantly intrigued by the WickrX
concept and is thrilled to be working
on the project.
“This sport in particular is very visual. Motion picture is a great way to
share what we do,” Washburn said.
“You can get to know them and in any
of these things, when we do film, you
want to relate to the characters, the
person on screen, then when you
watch someone, it’s more vicarious,
you’re more invested.”
Perhaps the most influential aspect
of WickrX’s rendition of Mavericks is

SOFITEL
Continued from page 1
resumed operations Friday after environmental health staff verified containment and prevention measures like
cleaning and training were completed,
according to Health System spokeswoman Robyn Thaw.
An initial inspection of the hotel’s
food operations did not turn up any
suspicious health code violations
linked to food-borne illness and an
epidemiologist retained by the Sofitel
at that time said the symptoms indicated the possibility of norovirus.
The outbreak began Sunday, Oct. 26

WEEKEND JOURNAL
highlighting women who are already
outnumbered and often overshadowed
in the surfing sphere, Washburn and
Gerhardt said.
Organizers of the recently revamped
Titans of Mavericks invitational competition considered Gerhardt during the
first-round draft and Santa Cruz’s
Savannah Shaughnessy during the second round. Although there are still two
wild card spots they could take, the
WickrX event will highlight these rare
women who brave waves with the
boys.
“If you want to surf big waves, kind
of like if you want to climb big mountains or ski big hills or whatever, you
have to have a lot of surfing experience. It takes anywhere from five to 10
years to really have the confidence and
the strength and the knowledge of the
ocean,” Gerhardt said. “So you have a
small population in general that wants
to go into the ocean and feels exhilarated in those kinds of conditions. …
There are fewer women [surfers] in general, [but] I don’t know if that’s always
going to be the case.”
Making a living off of big wave surfing and sponsorships is difficult for
anyone and often these extreme athletes are paying their own way while
they travel the world chasing swells.
The WickrX event is providing these
women with exposure, a stipend and an
expenses-paid opportunity to meet
with their like-minded comrades.
“The idea was ‘How can we help
these girls? What can we do? What do
they like? What do they want to do?’...
My favorite part of big wave riding, as
much as it’s fun to ride waves by yourself, it’s more fun with your friends,”
Washburn said. “Everyone who rides
big waves is giving up a lot and mostly they’re spending money on it, not
making money. And that’s especially
true to women.”
Wickr, a messaging app that claims
it encrypts data shared by the users
making their exchanges untraceable,
is sponsoring the Mavericks event

through its newly created WickrX
Foundation. The organization is “dedicated to advancing, promoting and
supporting human greatness and evolution in all its forms,” according to
the
company.
Washburn
said
Mavericks could be a one-time event
for the company as the foundation is
considering branching out into other
sports.
The WickrX Mavericks invitational
won’t involve closing the waves or
the beach and the participants will
likely surf in small batches along with
whoever else happens to be in the
water, Gerhardt said.
In the meantime, the women of
Mavericks will continue to post their
personalized videos online and, after
convening to paddle out in Half Moon
Bay, nominate each other’s videos in
various categories, Washburn said.
There are cash prizes but there will be
no “winner” per se, Washburn said.
Eventually, the entire months-long
event will be edited and turned into a
live two-hour broadcast celebrating
the fearless women who invest themselves in big wave surfing.
Gerhardt, a mother of two and teacher
with a doctorate in chemistry, said
she’s thrilled to be provided with an
opportunity to promote and highlight
the exceptional women who ride
giants.
“There isn’t much support or much
sponsorship for women who are surfing big waves and want to pursue it as
a career and the really amazing thing
about the Wickr event, they’re going
to be supporting us coming to the
event and we’re all going to get to be
together and hang out,” Gerhardt said.
“It’s kind of a bigger project than just
a one-day event. So I think it’ll give a
bigger picture of the people involved
pursing their passions and surfing big
waves.”

when attendees at a NAACP conference
became ill from dinner the previous
night. At least a dozen were taken by
ambulance to emergency rooms and
other transported themselves. Two
other events at the hotel led to more
illness and the total now stands at 60
guests and employees as of Nov. 5,
Thaw said.
Highly contagious norovirus symptoms include nausea, vomiting and
diarrhea and is spread through food,
water or touching a contaminated surface. Several samples taken at the
hotel tested positive for norovirus and
they’ve been forwarded to the
California Department of Public
Health to determine if the three events
linked to the illness have a common
cause. State public health staff are also

helping interview those who reported
being ill. Results are expected back
within the next several weeks.
Norovirus is the most common cause
of acute gastroenteritis in the United
States, causing 10 million to 12 million illnesses, 56,000 to 71,000 hospitalizations and 570 to 800 deaths,
according to Thaw’s data.
Since the outbreak, county health
staff have worked with hotel management to frequently sanitize all common areas, post signs reminding
workers and guests about hand washing and teach staff about norovirus.
The hotel is also required to report any
new gastrointestinal illness and
require sick employees to stay home
until they are symptom free for 72
hours.

For more information about Wick rX
Super Sessions Mav erick s 2014 v isit
www.wick rx .org/WSS.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, NOV. 8
Alzheimer ’s Disease Circle of
Care 10th Annual Conference for
Families. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Crowne
Plaza Hotel, 1221 Chess Drive,
Foster City. This education conference is designed to fit the needs of
families caring for a loved one with
Alzheimer’s or dementia and for
professionals who want to know
more. For more information contact Bianca Vazquez-Arias at
bvazquez@alz.org. Registration
required,
go
to
http://www.alz.org/norcal/in_my_c
ommunity_professionals.asp#conferences.
San Bruno AARP Chapter 2895
Meeting. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. San
Bruno Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno. Chapter
board elections. Entertainment:
Peninsula Choraliers. For more
information call 201-9137.
Children’s Activity and Academic
Fair. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. St. Dunstan
Parish Center, 1133 Broadway Ave.,
Millbrae. Free and open to the public. Featuring area education programs and services, summer
schools and preschools, children’s
sports and recreation programs.
Face painting, jumphouse and
more.
Woodside High School Harvest
Festival. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Woodside High School, 199
Churchill Ave., Woodside. Unique
gifts, food, drinks, one-of-a-kind
jewelry, arts and crafts and bake
sale. Free. For more information call
346-3595.
Knitting 101. 11 a.m. Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. For ages 7 and up. For
more information email John Piche
at piche@plsinfo.org.
Holiday Boutique. 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. Get a
jump on holiday shopping while
supporting local artists.
Origami Time. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.
Reach and Teach, 144 W. 25th Ave.,
San Mateo. Join Derrick Kikuchi to
learn or share origami folding techniques. All ages. Free. For more
information
contact
craig@reachandteach.com.
Misty
Reddington,
SelfPublished Author. 3 p.m. South
San Francisco Main Public Library,
840 W. Orange Ave., South San
Francisco. As part of our National
Novel Writing Month programming, join us to hear local mystery
writer Misty Reddington, author of
the Molly Tinker mystery series, discuss her adventures in self-publishing and the process of selling her
books. Free. For more information
call 829-3860.
Buy One, Get One Free. Noon to 4
p.m. Book Nook, 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Children’s
books are two for 25 cents and up.
For more information call 5935650.
Introduction to Soap Making. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. Julianne Bunnet,
owner of Faire Goatmother Artisan
Soaps, will conduct a workshop.
RSVP before Nov. 1 by emailing
education@historysmc.org or calling 299-0104 ext. 231.
‘R iding My Way B ack ’ movie
Premier. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. NCEFT,
880 Runnymede Road, Woodside.
Tickets are $25 in advance at
nceft.org/ridingmywaybackmovie
and $30 at the door. For more information email events@nceft.org or
call 851-2271.
Fall Chamber Music Concert. 8
p.m. First Baptist Church, 305 N.
California Ave., Palo Alto. Variety of
compositions for instrumental
groups and voice. Tickets are $22
for general admission, $18 for seniors, and $10 for students. Visit
www.paphil.org for more information and to buy tickets in advance.
RIP-TiDEs Concert. 9 p.m. to midnight. Iron Gate, 1360 El Camino
Real, Belmont. For more information visit www.RipTidesBand.com.

and open to the public. Meet classical guitarist Peter Fletcher. For
more information call 591-0341
ext. 237.
Sing a story: Magic Flute. 2 p.m.
San Mateo Public Library, 55 W.
Third Ave., Oak Room, San Mateo. A
professional opera singer engages
children in the musical telling of a
classic opera story. For more information call 522-7838.
Jason Marsalis V ibes Quar tet.
4:30 p.m. Douglas Beach House,
Half Moon Bay. Doors open at 3
p.m. $40, $35 for youth under 21.
For tickets go to http://jasonmarsalis.brownpapertickets.com.
MONDAY, NOV. 10
Candy Buy-Back. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Alborzi Orthodontics, 235 N. San
Mateo Drive, No. 300, San Mateo.
Participants receive $1 for every
pound of candy (limit 10 pounds),
plus Dr. Alborzi will donate $1
Coastside Hope. All Candy will be
donated to the Food Bank. For
more information go to www.gotosmile.com.
Living Healthy. 10 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Little House Activity Center,
800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park.
Weekly sessions offering practical
techniques and support for making
the best choices for health and
well-being. To register call 3262025 or email knwachob@peninsulavolunteers.org.
Sons in retirement branch 91
monthly luncheon. 11 a.m. South
San Francisco Elks Lodge, 920
Southgate Drive, South San
Francisco. Cost for lunch is $16 to
$19. For more information call Lee
Severe at 595-1973.
Car Give Away to a Veteran. Noon.
Van’s Restaurant, 815 Belmont Ave.,
Belmont. Belmont rotary will be
giving a vehicle to a deserving veteran. Free. For more information
email ralph@kirbergmotors.com.
Burlingame Music Club. 1 p.m.
Burlingame Women’s Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. An afternoon of
classical music, art and refreshments. Free. For more information
go
to
www.burlingamemusicclub.net or
call 344-5213.
Crafting at the Library: Holiday
Cards. 6 p.m. South San Francisco
Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. For more
information
email
torresvolken@plsinfo.org.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free and open to the
public. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
TUESDAY, NOV. 11
Veterans Day Observance. 10:30
a.m. Golden Gate National
Cemetery, 1300 Sneath Lane, San
Bruno. The program will include
music, singers, poetry, San Mateo
County Sheriff ’s Office Honor
Guard and a Blue Star family
wreath
presentation.
Free.
Following the event, the public is
invited to an $8, no-host luncheon
at the American Legion Hall. To
RSVP or for more information call
355-5533.
Sip and Savor ‘The Best of San
Mateo.’ 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
College of San Mateo Bayview
Dining Room, 1700 W. Hillsdale
Blvd., San Mateo. Local restaurants,
wine and spirits establishments,
specialty food stores and businesses associated with food and beverage are a part of the food lineup
and festivities. $25 for members,
$30 for nonmembers. For more
information go to www.sanmateochamber.org.
Rotary Connects. 5:30 p.m. to 7
p.m. SBM Fitness, 1019 El Camino
Real, Menlo Park. The business community invited to attend and connect with other local business leaders, community leaders and Rotary
Members. $20. Appetizers, wine
and
nonalcoholic
beverages
included. RSVP to Yuhui Chen at
yuhuifitness@gmail.com or Brett
Caviness
at
brettcaviness@gmail.com.

SUNDAY, NOV. 9
Smiles For All. South San Francisco
Dental Care, 2400 Westborough
Blvd., Suite 205, South San
Francisco. Free examination and
cleaning, filling or extraction.
Patients will be treated on a firstcome, first-serve basis. For more
information go to www.southsanfranciscodentalcare.com or call
273-7309.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 12
Candy Buy-Back. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Alborzi Orthodontics, 235 N. San
Mateo Drive, No. 300, San Mateo.
Participants receive $1 for every
pound of candy (limit 10 pounds),
plus Dr. Alborzi will donate $1
Coastside Hope. All Candy will be
donated to the Food Bank. For
more information go to www.gotosmile.com.

Buy One, Get One Free. Noon to 4
p.m. Book Nook, 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Children’s
books are two for 25 cents and up.
For more information call 5935650.

Medicare 2015: Is it time to
review your drug coverage for
2015? 10 a.m. to noon. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free
and open to the public. For more
information call 591-0341 ext. 237.

Music Concert. 2 p.m. San Carlos
Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free

For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Weekend • Nov. 8-9, 2014

25

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Paramount rival
4 Nearest star
7 Computer fodder
11 Exist
12 Operator’s number
13 Pantyhose shade
14 Headed for sea
16 Take a quick look
17 Droplets
18 Linger
19 Casual greetings
20 Rainbow shape
21 Dalai Lama’s city
24 Extra levy
27 Uh-huh
28 Online activity
30 Hurried
32 Lohengrin’s bride
34 Surmounting
36 Call it quits
37 Shoe annoyance
39 Anwar of Egypt
41 Temper
42 Cooking spray brand

GET FUZZY®

43
45
48
49
52
53
54
55
56
57

Fjord port
Smart —
Whey-faced
Beachwear
Jacket style
Smoke detector output
Buzzing insect
Joyful shout
Destiny
Cato’s hello

DOWN
1 — Tse-tung
2 Chuck wagon fare
3 Allot
4 “If I Ran the Zoo” author
5 Coffee brewer
6 Gesture
7 Shows
8 Breezed through
9 It has rings
10 Puffin kin
12 Astrology chart
15 Derisive snorts
18 Chilly comment

20
21
22
23
24
25
26
29
31
33
35
38
40
42
43
44
46
47
48
49
50
51

Kind of insurance
Wood ash product
SOS response
Vaulted recess
Overfeed
Parroted
TV warrior princess
Comet — -Bopp
Banned pesticide
Chisholm Trail town
Choir selections
Good buddy
Iowa city
Work with oils
Pledge
Wild plum
Fidel’s country
Chicken style
Hard seat
RSVP word
Serenade, maybe
Unisex wear

11-8-14

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2014
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — A misunderstanding
or miscommunication between you and a partner will
have to be remedied if you are going to move forward.
A calm discussion will clear the air.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — A disagreeable
attitude will compromise your position. Be known
for your talents, not your irritability. Dependability
and consistency will bring personal and financial
rewards your way.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — No matter whom
you are dealing with, if an agreement is drawn up, you
must read the fine print. Don’t make impulsive deals

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2014 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

11-8-14

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

that might cause personal or family setbacks.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Compromise will be
called for when dealing with partners. Go out of your way
to reach a mutually beneficial agreement. Get whatever
you agree on in writing to avoid future problems.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Household matters
will take precedence. Make home improvements
that will increase your comfort, convenience and
family enjoyment. Host a gathering of friends and
family at your place.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Make an appointment
with a financial adviser to look over investment
possibilities. There are ways to improve your
monetary situation, and now is an opportune time to
alter your financial outlook.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Stubbornness will be
your downfall. Insistence on doing things your way
will have a detrimental effect on your personal and
professional partnerships. If you cannot agree, you’d
be better off moving forward alone.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Your dreams of
promotion will diminish if you get involved in office
politics or gossip. You may not agree with some rules
and regulations, but you need to follow them.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Frivolous spending
can damage your financial security. Before you
spend, question whether you really need to make
the purchase. You’ll feel better with less stuff and
more money in the bank.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Someone will not realize the

Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

advice they’re offering isn’t what you need. Don’t take
offense; just make it very clear that you don’t want
anyone interfering in your personal life.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Put your house in
order. Gather up instruction manuals and related
warranties or guarantees. Reorganize your
important papers and discard possessions or
records that are no longer relevant.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Friction and hostility
between family members will prey on your mind.
Scrutinize your own actions before putting blame
elsewhere. Criticizing is irritating, whereas finding a
solution and fi xing the problem is thoughtful.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8-9, 2014
104 Training

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000

110 Employment

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA

Customer Service
Are you…..Dependable, friendly,
detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English
skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978

ATRIA HILLSDALE IS
NOW HIRING
Class B Passenger Driver
Full time position available!
M - F 8:30a - 5:00pm shift
Must have a Class B Passenger license
Starts at $14.00 per hour

110 Employment

110 Employment

DRIVERS WANTED
Peninsula Taxi needs drivers make up to
$800. Per week please call
(650)483-4085
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

Apply in person at:
2883 S. Norfolk Street
San Mateo, CA 94403
650-378-3000
www.atriahillsdale.com

Apply to:

www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/

t .FE 5FDI  &YQFSJFODF 0OMZ
EOE, Division of Labor Standards Wage Order 5

Call 650.995.7123
Email - assistance@abigailcompletecare.com

NOW HIRING !
The Abigail welcomes applicants for our next
hiring phase. Join our new facility for the elderly, in
Redwood City. Seeking positive individuals with a
traditional work ethic.
t"DUJWJUZ$PPSEJOBUPS&YQFSJFODFEPOMZ
t$BSFHJWFST&YQFSJFODF0OMZ
t.FE5FDI&YQFSJFODF0OMZ
t)PVTFLFFQJOH-BVOESZ&OHMJTIOPUSFRVJSFE
t3FDFQUJPOJTU1BSU5JNF8FFLFOET
t.BJOUFOBODF)BOEZ1FSTPO0O$BMM
EOE, Division of Labor Standards Wage Order 5

Call 650.995.7123
Email - assistance@abigailcompletecare.com

info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150

RAMP AGENTS LOOKING FOR EXTRA CASH for the
holidays? Total Airport Services is now
hiring for part-time, temporary ramp
agents. Start now and work through December 24. Schedules are: Monday to
Thursday from 5:00pm to 8:00 pm OR
Tuesday to Friday from 4:00am to
7:00am. You could work both shifts if you
like. If interested please apply at 900
North Access Rd., San Francisco Airport
or call (650)589-8588.

Complete Senior Living

NOW HIRING !

Kitchen Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or
email resume to

No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required

No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required

t $BSFHJWFST  &YQFSJFODF 0OMZ

For all positions some experience working with seniors
a plus!

NOW HIRING

Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150

Activity Assistant
Part time position available!
Starts at $10.50 per hour

Maintenance Technician
Must have some knowledge of plumbing, electrical,
carpentry & HVAC
Part time position available!
Starts at $10.50 per hour

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
SPECIALIST
Excellent Benefits
Systems administration,
TCP/IP knowledge,
Supervisory experience required

NOW HIRING

Join our upscale and established facility in San
Mateo. Seeking positive individuals with a
traditional work ethic.

Dishwasher 8:00a - 4:30p shift!
Full time position available!
Starts at $9.25 per hour

110 Employment

Certified Nursing Assistants
(Must have Certificate)
$12 per hour
AM-PM Shifts available
Please apply in person

Receptionist
Part position available!
Fri 4:00p - 8:00p, Sat - Sun 9:00a - 5:30pm shift!
Starts at $11.25 per hour

Servers/Dishwashers
Server 11:00a - 7:30pm and 3:30p - 7:30p shifts!
Part time positions available!
Starts at $9.75 per hour

110 Employment

MAINTENANCE ENGINEER
$4500-$6250/monthly
Excellent Benefits
Maintenance of HVAC,
mechanical, plumbing and
electrical systems
Supervisory experience
required
Apply at:
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

RETAIL -

JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part +
Seasonal Positions
ALSO SEEKING
F/T ASST MGR
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

THE ABIGAIL &
COMPLETE
SENIOR CARE
are seeking positive
individuals with a traditional work ethic for the
following positions :
Caregivers, Med Tech,
Housekeeping/Laundry,
Receptionist,
Maintenance/Handy Man
Call (650)995-7123 or email

assistance@abigailcompletecare.com

WANTED!
KITCHEN & BATH DESIGNER with
some cabinet salesexperience. If you are
tired of working for an hourly and are
hungry to use your abilities & increase
your compensation in this occupation,
emailyour resume to:
focalpointkitchens01@yahoo.com.
We are a happening company that is
looking for you!

127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 530140
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Roberta Ironside
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Roberta Ironside filed a petition with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Roberta Ironside
Proposed Name: Roberta Wilson
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 5,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/24/2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/24/2014
(Published, 10/25/2014,11/01/2014,
11/08/2014, 11/15/2014)

THE DAILY JOURNAL
203 Public Notices
SUPERIOR COURT OF
CALIFORNIA
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO
ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF
CITATION #A15826
In the matter of the adoption request
of:
WILLIAM MINA VENGCO
On reading the declaration of William
Vengco on file herein and it satisfactorily appearing to me that the residence of Marco De Jesus, the father
of the minor who is the subject of the
of the petition filed herein, is unknown
to petitioner,
IT IS ORDERED that the service of
the citation in this matter be made on
Marco De Jesus may publication in
The Daily Journal, which is hereby
designated as the newspaper most
likely to give notice to Marco De Jesus. Publication is to be made at least
once a week for four successive
weeks.
IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a
copy of the citation be forthwith
mailed to Marco De Jesus if Marco De
Jesus's address is ascertained before
the expiration of the time prescribed
for publication if the citation.
Date: 10/05/14
/s/ Marta S. Diaz /
Judge of the Superior Court
(Published in the San Mateo Daily
Journal, 11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14,
11/22/14)

Weekend • Nov. 8-9, 2014
Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

27

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262494
The following person is doing business
as: JR Taylor & Associates DBA Taylor,
Appraisal Services, 1499 Bayshore
Hwy., Ste 116, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the following owner: Raymond Taylor, 355 Carmel
Ave., El Granada, CA 94018 and Grant
Taylor, 114 W. 41st, Ave., San Mateo,
CA 94403. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Raymond Taylor /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/03/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14).

CASE# CIV 530715
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Ruchi Sharma; Preminder Singh
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner Ruchi Sharma, Preminder
Singh filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Amalia Multani
Propsed Name: Amalia Multani Singh
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 4,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/07/2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/06/2014
(Published, 10/18/2014, 10/25/2014,
11/01/2014, 11/08/2014)

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262343
The following person is doing business
as: Myosotis Caffe, 1036 El Camino Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby registered by the following owner:
Joey Chan 80 Chicago Way, San Francisco, CA 94112 and Ying Li 2214 28th
Ave., San Francisco, CA 94116. The
business is conducted by a General Partnership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joey Chan /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/22/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/14, 10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262308
The following person is doing business
as: Pescadero Cottege and Bunkhouse,
827 North St., PESCADERO, CA 94060
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Marylou Ambinder-Heine and
Mark S. Heine, 3900 Willowside Ranch
Rd., PESCADERO, CA 94060. The business is conducted by a Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Marylou Ambinder-Heine /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 09/17/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/14, 10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262602
The following person is doing business
as: After School Music Academy, 150
Valparaiso Ave., MENLO PARK, CA
94027 is hereby registered by the following owner: David Victor Chiorini, 103
Lexington St., San Francisco, CA 94110.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ David Chiorini /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/15/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/14, 10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262588
The following person is doing business
as: Leanos Brothers Company, 501 S.
Fremont St. #4, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Pedro Leanos and Susana
Leanos, same address. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Pedro Leanos /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/11/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/14, 10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262458
The following person is doing business
as: Fashion Cuts Family Hair Salon, 215
Maple Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the following owner: Federico Argote Reyna,
1023 N. Idaho., Apt. 4, San Mateo, CA
94401. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Federico Argote Reyna /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/02/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/14, 10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262641
The following person is doing business
as: Agape Acupuncture Clinic, 3550 Carter Dr. #91, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the following owner: Merissa Tsang, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
June 2009.
/s/ Merissa Tsang /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262568
The following person is doing business
as: Z & S Threading Brow Bar, 2115
Broadway #27, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the following owner: Saman Einahmadi, 1321 Marshall St., Apt. 105, Redwood City, CA
94063 and Zahra Ojagh, 1321 Marshall
St., Apt 105, Redwood City, CA 94063.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Saman Einahmadi /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/10/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14).

DRIVERS
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning for various
routes throughout Peninsula.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in downtown San Mateo between 3:30 -4:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.

GOT JOBS?
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read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
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The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
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Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8-9, 2014
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

210 Lost & Found

296 Appliances

CASE# CIV 530780
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Bernadette Dionson Galvan
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Bernadette Dionson Galvan
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Bernadette Dionson Galvan
Proposed Name: Bernadette Galvan Torrejon
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December 2,
2014 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/14/2014
/s/ Robert D. Foiles/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2014
(Published, 10/25/2014,11/01/2014,
11/08/2014, 11/15/2014)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262636
The following person is doing business
as: Mints & Honey, 1524 EL Camino Real, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Mints
& Honey, LLC, CA. The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 4/1/14.
/s/ Dorothy Teng /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/17/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/14, 10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262709
The following person is doing business
as: Fortune House, 1050 El Camino Real, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sushi
82 & Ramen, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jian Hong Huang /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/23/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262623
The following person is doing business
as: Wes Liquors, 16 W. 25th Ave., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: WESBO, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Ling Xiong /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14, 11/29/14).

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

BREVILLE JUICER good cond. great
but $45. (650)697-7862

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262584
The following person is doing business
as: Saucery, 1081 Brunswick St., DALY
CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Saucery, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants commenced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Ellen Detweiler /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/14/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262901
The following person is doing business
as: Euro Autohaus 2 U, 154 Oxford Ln.
Apt. 3, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby registered by the following owner:
Robert Huiras, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on 10/06/2014.
/s/ Robert Huiras /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/07/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14, 11/29/14).

LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262616
The following person is doing business
as: Patio Coffee Shop 1, 25 West 25th
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby
registered by the following owner:Hossam Kaddoura, 82 Chestnut St., San
Carlos, CA 94070. The business is conducted by an individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Hossam Kaddoura /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/15/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262902
The following person is doing business
as: Greengreat Company, 3840 Coronado Way, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Angel Tang, same addeess. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Angel Tang /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/07/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14, 11/29/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262790
The following person is doing business
as: Deep Blue Linen Designs, 459 El
Granada Ave HALF MOON BAY, CA
94019 is hereby registered by the following owner: Donnalynn Polito, same address. The business is conducted by an
individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Donnalynn Polito /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/30/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/01/14, 11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14).

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262852
The following person is doing business
as: Video Amusement, 121 S. Maple
Ave. #11, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the following owner: Video Amusement, Inc,
CA. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
2000.
/s/ Roman Flodr /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/03/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/08/14, 11/15/14, 11/22/14, 11/29/14).

NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Natalino Marchi
Case Number: 124709
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: Natalino Marchi. A Petition for Probate has been filed by Peter
Marchi in the Superior Court of California, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Peter Marchi
be appointed as personal representative
to administer the estate of the decedent.
The petition requests the descedant’s will
and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the
court.
The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: November 18, 2014
at 9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Nazar A. Ghosseiri
Mary Therese MacGrath
177 Bovet Rd., 6th Flr
SAN MATEO, CA 94402
(650)341-2585
Dated: Oct. 23, 2014
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on October 25, November 1, 8, 2014.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #262628
The following person is doing business
as: Patricia Home, 988 Patricia Ave.
SAN MATEO, CA, 94401 is hereby registered by the following owner: Cottage
Grove Home Care, Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Alicia Paleracio /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 10/16/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/18/14, 10/25/14, 11/01/14, 11/08/14).

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 Staff leaders
11 Common rhyme
scheme
15 In top form
16 Wheels
17 Group with many
hits
18 Menlo Park
middle name
19 Fuse, as ore
20 Comic strip about
a high schooler
22 She plays
Watson in
“Elementary”
23 Fourth most
populous U.S.
island
26 Reach
28 Surveillance aid
32 Steelers
ownership family
name
33 Nanki-__
34 Prowler
36 Landlord’s
assets: Abbr.
37 “... men in __”
39 Locks that are
picked
41 Victoria’s Secret
spec
42 Longtime name
in baseball
broadcasting
44 Inset site
46 Valuable
elemento
47 “And wilt thou
pledge me this
for time __?”:
Aeschylus
49 Takes a powder
51 Goes south
53 Rested from flight
54 “He’s mine, __
am his”:
“Coriolanus”
55 Lases or tases
57 Verdi aria
61 Star followers
63 They go down to
the wire
66 Repeat
67 Revealing
68 Table tennis
club’s supply
69 Plots

31 Prepares for filing 50 Low clouds
DOWN
1 Apple array
52 Paint-spill sound
35 Grammy
2 It may be ionized
56 __ speak
category
3 Muralist Orozco
58 “Project Runway
eliminated in
4 Where a turtle
Canada” host
2009
might be seen
59 Commuting
38 Illegalizes
5 Some prom night 40 Zip (through)
leader?
wear
60 Doesn’t let sit
43 Santa __ Valley:
6 Brit. military
62 Cyclades island
California wine
award
64 Harp, e.g.: Abbr.
region
7 Delivery pros
65 Bridge expert
45 Catalog giant
8 City on the
Culbertson
48 Adopts
Moselle
9 “Hamlet” courtier
10 Electric generator ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
component
11 Celestial altar
12 Get romantic
13 Amy Dickinson,
e.g.
14 Mole, maybe
21 Stereotypical
status seeker
24 Rival of Martina
and Chris
25 Patriotic
nickname
27 Spoiled the
surprise
28 Some astronauts
29 Kid’s birthday
party contest
30 “No argument”
11/08/14
xwordeditor@aol.com

LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT (415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST CELL PHONE Metro PCS Samsung. Light pink cover, sentimental value. Lost in Millbrae on 9/30/14 Reward
offered. Angela (415)420-6606

LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers
belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301

FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,
can use for warmer also $40.00, (650)
578 9208
KENMORE VAACUM bagless good
cond. $35/obo (650)697-7862
PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like
new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR(415)346-6038

$40.,

297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18” Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

298 Collectibles
1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1980 SYLVANIA 24" console television
operational with floor cabinet in excellent
condition. $35. (650) 676-0974.
2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
COIN HOLDERS, used. 146 plastic
tubes. 40 albums. Cost $205. Sell $95
OBO. (650)591-4141

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
NASCAR ANNUAL Preview 1998 - 2007
with race sechudules. $75
(650)345-9595
TIME LIFE Nature Books, great condition
19 different books. $5.00 each OBO
(650)580-4763

294 Baby Stuff
CRIB & Toddler Bed, white with mattress, like new, from lullybye ln, $75
(650)345-9595

ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest
Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169

THE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday, November 18, 2014 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and take action on the
following items. All interested persons are invited to attend.
156 San Diego Avenue. Request for a Parking Exception to
allow tandem parking for an existing single-family dwelling per
SBMC Sections 12.100.120.A and 12.200 080.C. Recommended Environmental Determination: Categorical Exemption.

Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, November 8, 2014.

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

11/08/14

FOODSAVER MINI with storage cannister new $35. (650)697-7862

WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-8676042.

2322 Crestmoor Drive. Request for a Use Permit to allow operation of a private school, consisting of pre-Kindergarten and
Kindergarten through Grade 8 classes, at the former Crestmoor Elementary School, per SBMC Sections12.84.080.C,
12.96.060.C.1 and 12.96.170.C.2. Recommended Environmental Determination: Categorical Exemption.

By Bruce Venzke and Victor Fleming
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.

295 Art
210 Lost & Found

CHAMPION JUICER, very good, coral
color $75. Phone 650-345-7352

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345
NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for
all 3 (650) 692-3260
OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass
Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good condition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
UPPER DECK 1999 baseball cards #1535. $85 complete mint set Steve, San
Carlos, 650-255-8716.

299 Computers
DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695
LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30
(650)622-6695
PILGRIM DOLLS, 15” boy & girl, new,
from Harvest Festival, adorable $25
(650)345-3277
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished
rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, SOLD!

302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the original unopened packages.
$100.(650)596-0513
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

THE DAILY JOURNAL
302 Antiques

304 Furniture

308 Tools

312 Pets & Animals

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

PATIO TABLE 5’x5’ round, Redwood,
with rollers, 2 benches, good solid
condition $30 San Bruno (650)588-1946

CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65 SOLD!

PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

DELUX"GLASS LIZARD cage unused ,
rock open/close window Decoration
21"Wx12"Hx8"D,$20.(650)992-4544

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa
1929 $100. (650)245-7517

303 Electronics
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.
$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767
COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with
DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324
COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767

PIANO AND various furniture pieces,
golf bag. $100-$300 Please call for info
(650)740-0687
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
QUEEN 3.5 " mattress FOAM TOPPER
byBeautyrest CLEAN/like new, $60.
San Carlos 650-610-0869 leave msg.

METAL 20 foot extension ladder for sale
$99. (650)349-3205

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /
armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648

SOLD WOOD TV Tables, set of 4 + rack,
perfect cond $29 650-595-3933
SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33” x 78”
with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274
STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves
42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516
STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.
Very good condition. 30" x 24".
(650)861-0088
TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141
TABLE, OLD ENGLISH draw-leaf, barley twist legs, 36” square. $350
(650)574-7387

MICROMETER
brake/drum
tool
$25.(650)992-4544

MEASUREMENT
new
in
box

NEW FOLDING Hand Truck, 100 lb capacity, compact. lite, $29, 650-595-3933

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never
used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
SOLD!
WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

310 Misc. For Sale
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712

304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,
glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l

TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

ALL LEATHER couch, about 6ft long—
dark brown $45 Cell number: (650)5806324

UPHOLSTERED SIDE office chairs (2).
3ft X 2ft, $85 each, (650)212-7151

FOLK SONG anthology: Smithsonian
Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes +
annotation booklet. $20 (650)574-3229

VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858

WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26 “
long, $99 (650)592-2648

GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.
(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message

WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster
2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414
CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549

TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061

made in Spain

WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a
drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.00

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

DISPLAY CABINET 72”x 21” x39 1/2”
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and
foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

306 Housewares

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent
Condition, $275 (650)245-4084

CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC" Smithsonian Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes,
annotation booklet. $20.
(650)574-3229
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542

KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon
$30. (650)726-1037
LIGHT GREEN Barbar Chair, with foot
rest good condition $80 Call Anita
(650)303-8390
LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",
cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

316 Clothes

340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 SOLD!
NEW MAN'S Wristwatch sweep second
hand, +3 dials, $29 650-595-3933
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622
VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame $85. (650)348-6955
CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
FLOORING - Carolina Pine, 1x3 T and
G, approximately 400+ sq. ft. $650. CAll
(415)516-4964

NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,
gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message

318 Sports Equipment
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

POSTAL MAIL Bow. Classy metal locking box for pillar mounting.
$100.
(650)245-7517

EXECUTIVE DESK 60”, cherry wood,
excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151

HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270

POSTAL MAIL Box. Classy metal locking box for pillar mounting.
$100.
(650)245-7517

MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 SOLD!

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,
25in x 33in— $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324
FREE SOFA and love seat set. good
condtion (650)630-2329
GRACO 40" x28"x28" kid pack 'n play
exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,
white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483

PERSIAN TEA set
for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436

308 Tools
BLACK AND Decker Electrical 17"
EDGE TRIMMER $20. (650)349-9261
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

CIRCULAR SKILL saw "craftman"7/1/4"
heavy duty never used in box $45.
(650)992-4544

MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.

CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167
WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,
handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

311 Musical Instruments
BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

GERMAN ARMY Helmet WW2, 4 motorbike DOT $59 650-595-3933

NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
NORDIC TRACK
(650)333-4400

Pro,

$95.

WALKER HUGO Elite Rollerator, $50
(650)591-8062
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695

$99

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804
TWO BASKET balls - $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347
TWO SOCCER balls -- $10.00 each
(hardly used) (650)341-5347
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

625 Classic Cars
90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374

630 Trucks & SUV’s
98 FORD F150. 1 owner, clean body,
needs mech work. $2,000 obo SOLD!
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD E150 Cargo VAN, 2007, 56k
miles, almost perfect! $12,000 SOLD!

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568
1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568
1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc
stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

379 Open Houses

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

440 Apartments
1 BR / Bath, Kitchen, Carpets, Carport,
Storage. $1550 per month. $1000 deposit. Call Jean (650)362-4555
BELMONT – 1 BR, 2 BR, and 3BR
apartments No Smoking No Pets
(650)591-4046

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos

$49.- $59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax

Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos

(650) 593-3136

Mention Daily Journal

Call

PENDLETON WOOLEN Mills Yakima
Camp Blanket MINT CONDITION List
$109. Sell $75.00. 650-218-7059
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

345 Medical Equipment
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937

470 Rooms

PICTURES, FRAMED (2) 24”x25”, Thai
temple etchings blue figures on white.
$50 (all) SOLD!

SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde
cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167

335 Rugs

ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975

620 Automobiles
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

635 Vans

2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762

BISSELL Deep rug amd hard floor
cleaner. New cost $170 Sell New,
(650)345-5502

NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable— $15
Cell phone: (650)580-6324

Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

335 Garden Equipment

650-697-2685

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.

AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

400 Broadway - Millbrae

MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605

OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858

Make money, make room!

WE BUY

OYSTER WHITE 2 drawer BR vanity.
Excellent condition, 27” X 19” X 32”
$175, (408)744-1041

NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES

Call (650)344-5200

POWER MITER Saw, like new, with
some attachments $150 (650)375-8021

TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057

ALL NATURAL latex cal king mattress,
excellent cond. $75. 650-867-6042

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084

315 Wanted to Buy

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587

WESTINGHOUSE 32” Flatscreen TV,
model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174

HAND TRUCK. 4 wheel wonder, converts to cart. $25. 591-4141 (650)5914141

GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat
pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500

HYDRAULIC floor botle jack 10" H.
plus. Ford like new. $25.00 botlh
(650)992-4544

SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral
color $99 OBO (650)345-5644

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373

ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337

JVC - DVD Player and video cassette recorder. NEW. $80. (650)345-5502

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

DOG CRATE like new, i Crate, two
door, divider, 30"L 19"w 21"H $40.
650 345-1234

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762

SMALL JAPANESE style table "ozen"
with four floor cushions in excellent condition. $25 (650) 676-0974

SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436

CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269

322 Garage Sales

HUSKY POWER inverter 750wtts.adaptor/cables unused AC/DC.$50.
(650)992-4544

INFINITY FLOOR speakers ( a pair) in
good condition $ 60. (650)756-9516. Daly City.

PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063

29

Weekend • Nov. 8-9, 2014

620 Automobiles
'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,
with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owner’s manual. $500. (415)706-6216

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296

CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

HONDA ‘96 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $2700 OBO, (650)481-5296 - Joe
Fusilier

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
(650)670-2888

650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent
Condition, $2,250.
Call (415)515-6072

670 Auto Parts
1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRES 4 plus one spare. Finned rims,
165 SR15 four hole. $150 obo.
(650)922-0139
USED BIG O 4 tires,
245/70R16, $180 SOLD!

All

Terrain

680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8-9, 2014

Cabinetry

Concrete

Electricians

Handy Help

ELECTRICIAN

PLUMBING & HANDYMAN

Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing

(650)296-0568

For all your
electrical needs

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952

INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend

bestbuycabinets.com
or call

650-294-3360

Lic# 808182

(650)515-1123

Cleaning
Construction

SHOP
AT HOME

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

Concrete
AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

Gutters

(650)533-0187

O.K.’S RAINGUTTER

Lic# 947476

Hardwood Floors

KO-AM

HARDWOOD FLOORING

•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate

Hauling

Flamingo’s Flooring

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS

• Gutters and downspouts • Rain
gutter repair • New Installation
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates

(650)669-1453
(650)302-7791

Screens

Lic.#834170

CALL NOW FOR
AUTUMN LAWN
PREPARATION

Flooring

Landscaping

Free Estimates

800-300-3218
408-979-9665

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Plumbing

Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John

Gardening

Sprinklers and irrigation
Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!

Hauling

DON’T SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!

Lic. #794899

We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens

AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

Free Estimates

(650)299-9107

PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP
Mention this ad for 20% OFF!

$40 & UP
HAUL

Tree Service

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Hillside Tree

Free Estimates

Service

A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

Painting

JON LA MOTTE
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

PAINTING

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861
Lic #514269

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

by Greenstarr
www.greenstarr.net

t Walkways
t Driveways
t 1BUJPT
t $PMPSFE
t "HHSFHBUF
t #MPDL 8BMMT
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
t 4UBNQFE $PODSFUF
t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM

Decks & Fences

Handy Help

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Electricians

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

650-322-9288

Tom 650.834.2365

for all your electrical needs

Licensed Bonded and Insured

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

License # 752250

Since 1985

• Fences • Decks
• Concrete Work • Pebbles
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

HANDYMAN

Electrical and
General home repair
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071
License 619908

Chris’s Hauling

Tom 650.834.2365
Chris 415.999.1223
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
License # 752250

Since 1985

Lic.# 891766

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635

Licensed Bonded and Insured
License # 752250

Since 1985

Window Washing
Plumbing
CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY

CLOGGED DRAIN! SEWER PIPES
Installation of Water Heaters,
Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Gas, Water &
Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

(650)461-0326

HONEST HANDYMAN

(650)740-8602

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Tom 650.834.2365

Lic.# 983312

Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small

• Large

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by Greenstarr

• Yard clean up - attic,
basement
• Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
• Demolition
• Concrete removal
• Excavation
• Swimming pool removal

Pruning

• Shaping

www.greenstarr.net
www.yardboss.net

FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773

&

• Trimming

Yardby Greenstarr
Boss

FRANK’S HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more

Lic# 910421

Rambo
Concrete
Works

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000

MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Nov. 8-9, 2014

Accounting

ALAN CECCHI EA

Tax Preparation
& Representation
Bookkkeeping - Accounting

Phone 650-245-7645

Dental Services

Food

Furniture

Insurance

Real Estate Loans

ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.

PRIME STEAKS

Bedroom Express

AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!

$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT
a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO

PORTRAITS BY HADI
Beautiful portraits by
experienced sketch artist. Pen &
Ink on 18”x 24” sketch paper.
Singles, couples, families.
Makes a wonderful gift. Can
create a sketch from any photo

(650)283-6836
Attorneys

www.bashamichirestaurant.com

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE

Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

106 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo

RUSSO DENTAL CARE

SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

Call us for a consultation

Food

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi &
Ramen in Town

Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580

Holiday Gifts and Cold Beer
until 9PM weekdays !

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13

SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae

(650)342-4171

alancecchi@yahoo .com

Art

1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212

Lunch• Dinner• Wknd Breakfast
OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

(650)372-0888

PROTECT YOUR ASSETS
Burt Williamson, MBA, CFP
Life and long Term Care
Insurance Specialist

(650) 730-6175
PlanPrep.com

CA Insurance License #0D33315

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

$5 CHARLEY'S

Sporting apparel from your
49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

(650)771-6564

RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)
(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

UNITED AMERICAN BANK
San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking
unitedamericanbank.com

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
www.sfpanchovillia.com

SALES

2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Legal Services

LEGAL

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

(650)574-2087

legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.

EVENT MARKETING SALES

TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES

Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.

We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.

650-344-5200.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate

Retirement
Independent Living, Assisted Living, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your lifelong dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com

Schools
HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY

EYE EXAMINATIONS

Marketing

Seniors

GROW

AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE

Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Housing

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR
We are looking for quality
caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo
(near Marriott Hotel)

(650)389-5787 ext.2

jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call

Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

Please call to RSVP

To apply for either position,
please send info to

REVERSE MORTGAGE

Equity based direct lender
Homes • Multi-family
Mixed-use • Commercial

Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:

Loans

REAL ESTATE LOANS

Where every child is a gift from God

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo

HELP WANTED

Where Dreams Begin

Financial

www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing

31

Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

Massage Therapy

ASIAN MASSAGE

$55 per Hour

Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City

(650)556-9888

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr
10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

HEALING MASSAGE
• Newly remodeled
• New Masseuses every two
weeks

$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)

OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY

Prenatal, Reiki, Energy
$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)

(650)212-2966

1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206
San Mateo
osetrawellness.com

K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco

(650)588-6860

ww.hillsidechristian.com

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

32

Weekend • Nov. 8, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL