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ISIS LEADER HIT

2 SOAR AT
BOX OFFICE
DATEBOOK PAGE 19

IRAQI OFFICIALS: AL-BAGHDADI INJURED IN AIRSTRIKE

DAWSON KICKS
NINERS TO WIN

WORLD PAGE 7

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula


www.smdailyjournal.com

Monday Nov. 10, 2014 Vol XV, Edition 73

Housing boom has school district officials worried


Already overcrowded schools may get worse, they say; developer fee increase proposed
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

With student enrollment growing in Foster City and San Mateo,


elementary school district officials are thinking outside of the
box to compensate for the impact
of new housing developments on
already overcrowded computer
labs, classrooms, increased traffic
and new Foster City students hav-

ing to attend
schools in San
Mateo.
A potential
way of helping
with funds for
ex p an di n g
schools in the
San
MateoFoster
City
Ed Coady
El e m e n t a r y
School District would be raising

developer fees for the impact on


school districts. At its Sept. 18
meeting, the Board of Trustees
voted unanimously to ask the
State Allocation Board to raise the
maximum rate that could be
charged to developers. The combined San Mateo Union High
School District and San MateoFoster City Elementary School
District School Impact Fees for
the cities of San Mateo and Foster

City are $3.29 per square foot for


residential and $0.53 square foot
for commercial, according to Lisa
Ann Wolfskill, facilities specialist for the high school district.
We see the increased housing
units everywhere we look, said
Trustee Ed Coady, who also sits on
the elementary districts committee focused on overcrowding. You
can see it in the constant congestion and worsening traffic.

Unfortunately, it seems like a lot


of this development is happening
without much regard for the impact
on the school district.
Currently, if the cities were to
raise the developers fees itself, it
would be on a go-forward basis;
developments already underway
would not be affected by change,
Coady said. And theres also the

See SCHOOLS, Page 23

Patient care,
Ebola stirring
nurse protest
Officials at Kaiser, target of possible
strike, disappointed but prepared
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL

Supervisor Dave Pine, right, lauds the overwhelming passage of Proposition 47 while Pastor Paul Bains, organizer
Jennifer Martinez and others listen outside the county courthouse Friday morning. Supports say the change in
law will save money and help people redeem themselves by clearing their criminal record.

Proposition 47 passage
draws praise, concern

Kaiser nurses at two San Mateo


County facilities will join 18,000
others striking Tuesday to protest
what they say is the organizations erosion of patient care
including a lack of proper Ebola
protections.
Nurses at the Redwood City hospital and San Mateo clinic are
among those scheduled to participate, according to Sheila Rowe, a
nurse at the Redwood City site.
A Kaiser official said he is disappointed in the nurses plan to
strike and their voiced reasons.
Our point of view is that the

unions, and I underscore the


unions, use of Ebola as rationale
for a strike is simply not justified, said Frank Burn, senior vice
president and area manager of
Kaiser San Mateo which includes
Redwood City and South San
Francisco.
The Tuesday strike will be followed Wednesday by an international day of action including
pickets, candlelight vigils and rallies in at least 16 states, the
District of Columbia and the
Philippines,
according
to
National Nurses United which is
sponsoring the events along with

See STRIKE, Page 22

Downgrading felonies to misdemeanors a big change Water wasters in Foster City


population, ignored arrest warAct, will free
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The huge Election Day victory


of a measure downgrading several
felony crimes to misdemeanors is
a step in the right direction,
according to local supporters who
gathered Friday to praise the outcome but inside the County Center
behind them public safety officials were less sure about the
logistics.
Proposition 47, touted as the
Safe Neighborhoods and Schools

up
prisons,
redirect money
to
programs
and services
and give some
convicted of
those crimes a
chance
at
ex p un g emen t Steve Wagstaffe
and a future free
from a criminal record, according
to the proponents.
But the immediate legal sea
change also means a changed jail

rants, stretched courts and possibly more local expense.


District
Attorney
Steve
Wagstaffe and Sheriff Greg Munks
both outspoken critics before
the Nov. 4 election say they
accept voters decision but think
they might not have been well
educated about the domino effects.
Presiding Judge Robert Foiles,
who took no public position on
the measure, said the local courts,

See PROP. 47, Page 22

Phones Cameras Watches


Cars Hearing Aids Tools

Just South of Whipple Avenue

may receive fines up to $500

By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Starting Wednesday, Foster City


residents who ignore the drought
and waste water outdoors could
face penalties as the City Council
voted last week to enact fines for
violating the states water shortage emergency regulations.
Residents could be fined
between $100 and $500 if they

water landscape between 10 a.m.


and 6 p.m. on any day of the week,
water landscape to the point of
runoff, wash cars or vehicles without a shutoff hose nozzle and use
water to wash, sidewalks, buildings or hard surfaces, according to
a city staff report.
The councils actions reflect the
State Water Resources Control

See WATER, Page 21

FOR THE RECORD

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day


Hypocrisy is a fashionable vice, and
all fashionable vices pass for virtues.
Moliere, French dramatist (1622-1673).

This Day in History

1944

During World War II, the ammunition


ship USS Mount Hood (AE-11)
exploded while moored at the Manus
Naval Base in the Admiralty Islands in
the South Pacific; the blast annihilated the Mount Hood and damaged nearby vessels, leaving 45 confirmed dead
and 327 missing and presumed dead.

In 1 7 7 5 , the U.S. Marines were organized under authority


of the Continental Congress.
In 1 8 7 1 , journalist-explorer Henry M. Stanley found
Scottish missionary David Livingstone, who had not been
heard from for years, near Lake Tanganyika in central
Africa.
In 1 9 1 9 , the American Legion opened its first national
convention in Minneapolis.
In 1 9 2 8 , Japanese Emperor Hirohito (hee-roh-hee-toh)
was formally enthroned, almost two years after his ascension.
In 1 9 3 8 , Kate Smith first sang Irving Berlins God Bless
America on her CBS radio program. Turkish statesman
Mustafa Kemal Ataturk died in Istanbul at age 57.
In 1 9 4 2 , Winston Churchill delivered a speech in London
in which he said, I have not become the Kings First
Minister to preside over the liquidation of the British
Empire.
In 1 9 5 1 , customer-dialed long-distance telephone service
began as Mayor M. Leslie Denning of Englewood, New
Jersey, called Alameda, California, Mayor Frank Osborne
without operator assistance.
In 1 9 5 4 , the U.S. Marine Corps Memorial, depicting the
raising of the American flag on Iwo Jima in 1945, was dedicated by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in Arlington,
Virginia.
In 1 9 6 9 , the childrens educational program Sesame
Street made its debut on National Educational Television
(later PBS).

Birthdays

Actor-comedian
Sinbad is 58.

Actress Ellen
Pompeo is 45.

Rapper-producer
Warren G is 44.

Film composer Ennio Morricone is 86. Blues singer Bobby


Rush is 80. Actor Albert Hall is 77. Country singer Donna
Fargo is 73. Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., is 71. Lyricist Tim
Rice is 70. Rock singer-musician Greg Lake (Emerson, Lake
and Palmer) is 67. Actress-dancer Ann Reinking is 65. Actor
Jack Scalia is 64. Movie director Roland Emmerich is 59.
Actor Matt Craven is 58. Actress Mackenzie Phillips is 55.
Author Neil Gaiman is 54. Actress Vanessa Angel is 51. Actor
Hugh Bonneville (TV: Downton Abbey) is 51. Actor-comedian Tommy Davidson is 51. Actor Michael Jai White is 50.
Country singer Chris Cagle is 46.

REUTERS

A group of protesters set fire to the wooden door of Mexican President Enrique Pena Nietos ceremonial palace during a protest
denouncing the apparent massacre of 43 trainee teachers, in the historic center of Mexico City. The group, carrying torches,
broke away from what had been a mostly peaceful protest demanding justice for the students, who were abducted six
weeks ago and apparently murdered and incinerated by corrupt police in league with drug gang members.

In other news ...


Ohio firefighters rescue
dog stuck on roof 3 days

Florida preacher tries


to break speaking record

YOUNGSTOWN,
Ohio

Firefighters in northern Ohio came to


the rescue of a dog that neighbors say
had been stuck on a roof for three days.
Dozens watched as Youngstown firefighters and police officers brought
the Rottweiler to safety on Saturday.
It took them about an hour to rescue
the dog that had escaped from a hole in
the attic of the three-story house.
A man who lives across the street
told The Vindicator newspaper in
Youngstown that he had called authorities about the dog a couple of times.
The dogs owner showed up during
the rescue. He told authorities that
hed been staying with a friend the
past week and didnt know the dog had
gotten out.

LEESBURG, Fla. A central


Florida preacher is trying to break a
record for the longest speech.
The Leesburg Daily Commercial
reported on Saturday that Zack Zehnder
of the Cross Church in Mount Dora
hopes to speak for more than 48-hours
and 31 minutes to break the world
record.
Zehnder is raising money for a new
addiction recovery program during his
speech. He plans to give an overview
of the Bible and hopes to speak for 50
hours.
According to rules by the Guinness
Book of World Records, Zehnder gets a
five-minute break every hour.
He told the newspaper that the
recording-breaking speech attempt is
a creative way to spread Gods world.

Twins now sheriffs in


2 Washington counties
CENTRALIA, Wash. Things could
get confusing when people talk about
Sheriff
Snaza
in
southwest
Washington.
Twin brothers will have the title in
neighboring Thurston and Lewis counties.
With this weeks election, The
Chronicle reports Lewis County sheriffs office veteran Rob Snaza won the
top job.
His twin brother, John Snaza,
already is sheriff in Thurston County.

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Nov. 8 Powerball

2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC


All Rights Reserved.

USISE

DEYMAR

19

33

15

Nov. 7 Mega Millions


31

35

41

66

65

5
Mega number

Nov. 8 Super Lotto Plus


19

21

24

25

12

15

31

39

Daily Four
8

Daily three midday


4

32

18

Daily three evening

Mega number

The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,


in first place; Hot Shot, No. 3, in second place; and
Whirl Win, No. 6, in third place.The race time was
clocked at 1:40.42.

FRIDAA
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

A:
Saturdays

54

38

(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: ONION
MOMMY
INDIGO
EXCEED
Answer: When they found gold in the cavern, the
owner of the land said MINE, MINE, MINE

The San Mateo Daily Journal


800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com
jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com
twitter.com/smdailyjournal

Man arrested after calf


found in back seat of car
RIVERSIDE Police in Southern
California have arrested a suspected
calf rustler after the animal was found
in the back seat of his car.
Riverside
Animal
Services
spokesman John Welsh says an officer
approached Cesar Zamora Santana
early Wednesday when the man was
spotted loitering outside an auto shop.
When the officer looked inside
Santanas vehicle, he saw the calf
lying in the back seat. Santana told
police that he bought the animal for
$200 at a gas station.
Animal control officers found that
the bovines ear identification tag had
been forcibly removed.
Welsh says the 150-pound female
calf was turned over to a farmer to be
fostered while authorities try to find
its owner.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
Powerball

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LEEBV

BURLINGTON, Vt. The grand


opening of an L. L. Bean store in
Vermont has ruffled some feathers,
with an owl attacking a hawk in a
shopping mall display.
Officials say a European eagle owl
attacked a Harriss hawk Friday in
Burlingtons Town Center Mall.
The Burlington Free Press reports
witnesses said the owl squeezed the
hawk in its claws for several minutes,

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles,


one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

Owl attacks hawk at


Vermont L.L. Bean store display

causing the hawk to shriek.


Workers at the mall display for the
Freeport, Maine-based outdoors outfitter separated the birds.
The birds are from Talons! A Bird of
Prey Experience. Master falconer
Lorrie Schumacher says the birds had
known each other for six years and had
never gone after each other before.
She says theyre always in close proximity and workers make sure their
leashes arent too close. But she adds
they are predators.

scribd.com/smdailyjournal
facebook.com/smdailyjournal

Mo nday : Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog.


Highs in the mid 60s. Southeast winds 5
to 10 mph...Becoming southwest in the
afternoon.
Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog. Lows in the lower 50s. South winds 5
to 15 mph.
Veterans Day : Cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle in the morning. Highs
in the lower 60s. South winds 10 to 20 mph.
Tues day ni g ht: Partly cloudy. Patchy fog. Lows in the
lower 50s.
Wednes day : Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Wednes day ni g ht and Thurs day : Mostly cloudy. A
chance of rain. Lows in the lower 50s. Highs in the mid 60s.
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

Ferry boats of the North Bay

Police reports
Pretty in pink
A man wearing a pink scarf and pink
jeans was seen yelling at customers as
they walked by at a pet store on
Chestnut Avenue in South San
Francisco before 10:01 a.m. Tuesday,
Nov. 4.

BURLINGAME

he transportation system in the


North Bay became very disjointed
and frustrating to understand due to
the topography of the coast from the tip of
their peninsula near Sausalito and up the
coast.
The mountainous terrain and numerous
valleys that have been formed did not
encourage a large population due to the high
cost of any transportation system. The rst
attempt of settling Marin County was taken
by William A. Richardson who obtained a
rancho in Sausalito. Richardson was the
captain of the Yerba Buena Port and he built
the rst dwelling for his family in Yerba
Buena (San Francisco). He received the
19,500-acre land grant, Rancho Sausalito,
in 1838.
His motivation was available fresh water
he could collect and sell for $1 a bottle in
water hungry San Francisco. This Bay had
much to offer it for boats and a ferry service
was started later. Further north, up the
shore, was a number of fair potential boat
landings along with a river, the Petaluma
River that held a potential for passenger and
cargo boats. The continuation of the San
Pablo Bay to the east presented another
problem that ties in with the ferry and cargo
boats, as well as the newly completed rail
service from Sacramento and the
Transcontinental Railroad completed in
1869. Continuing south from the Carquinez
Strait to Oakland, the development of populations was slow and most of the concentra-

The paddlesheel tugboat, Eppleton Hall, was perfect for bays with shallow bottoms. Now it is
preserved at the Hyde Street Pier.
tion for service was in the Port of Oakland
area. Competition for ownership of ferry
service around the Bay became erce mainly
due to the aggressive behavior and attitude
of the rail giant, Southern Pacic Railroad.
They proved to be important in almost all of
the transportation problems of the Bay.
Before 1876, the Central Pacics San
Francisco-bound passengers transferred to
riverboats in Sacramento. Benicia became
Central Pacics base after absorbing
another short railroad. In 1879, the train
ferry Solano was built to transfer trains
across the Carquinez Strait to Port Costa. In
1914, the SP built the Contra Costa, the
worlds largest ferry boat at the time. In
1927, the Carquinez Bridge was built, put-

Presented by Health Plan of San Mateo and The Daily Journal

Senior Showca

2014

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ADMISSION

Senior Resources and Services from


all of San Mateo County over 40
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nicoarse
Sew
Sho tion Fair
Informa

Friday, November 21, 2014


9 am to 1 pm
Foster City Recreation Center

650 Shell Blvd., Foster City


Free Admission, Everyone Welcome

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

'PSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPODBMMtXXXTNEBJMZKPVSOBMDPNTFOJPSTIPXDBTF
* While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change.

ting many of the ferries in danger of being


scraped, sold, or their routes changed.
Passengers wanting more than a spartan
ride from Vallejo, took the Monticello
Steamship Companys ferries. Their boats
had everything: restaurants, salons, news
stands, washrooms, smoking rooms and
places to relax. Not bad for 75 cents.

See HISTORY, Page 21

Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . A resident


reported someone rang her doorbell twice on
Escondido Way before 6:39 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 4.
Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . A mother
reported a man approached her daughter and
asked if she smoked marijuana at El Camino
Real and Adeline Drive before 3:44 p.m.
Tuesday, Nov. 4.
Petty theft. Tools were taken from an
unlocked car on Carlos Avenue before 11:16
a.m. Monday, Nov. 3.
Re c k l e s s dri v i n g . Drivers were seen
speeding and racing each other on
California Drive and Broadway Avenue
before 4:52 p.m. Monday, Nov. 3.
Drug s . More than five people were seen
smoking drugs in a parked car on the 1200
block of Old Bayshore Boulevard before
5:56 p.m. Monday, Nov. 3.

REDWOOD CITY
Di s turbance. A man was cited for using a
skateboard to break a window on Madison
Avenue before 10:24 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 5.
Sus pi ci o us pers o n. A resident contacted
police about a man and a woman in orange
vests selling windows door to door at
Camberly Way and Danbury Lane before
6:25 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 5.

LOCAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

S.F. Zoo mourning tragic


death of young gorilla
DAILY JOURNAL WIRE REPORT

One of the youngest members of


the Jones Family Gorilla Preserve
at the San Francisco Zoo died Friday
in what staff described as a tragic
accident, a spokeswoman said.
Staff was carrying out its nightly
post-closing routine of moving
animals into their night quarters
when the gorilla, named Kabibe,
unexpectedly darted under a closing
hydraulic door, said spokeswoman
Abbigail Tuller.
Another zoo spokesman said the
hydraulic door that killed the zoos
youngest gorilla had a manual offswitch but workers did not get to it
quickly enough to keep the door from
crushing the 15-month-old ape.
Tuller said the death was particularly difficult for zoo staff who provided 24-hour postnatal car for
Kabibe until she was 6 months old.
This kind of accident is extremely
rare, she said.
Officials said the zoo is investigating how and why this accident happened, and will review zoo policies,
procedures and training in the days
ahead to see if changes are necessary.
Veterinarian Elliot Katz, who
founded the nonprofit group In
Defense of Animals, says the
national organization that sets
standards for zoos can prevent
future accidents by requiring power
doors to have sensors or other
mechanisms that will stop them
when they come into contact with
objects.
Kabibe, whose name means little lady in Swahili, was born on
July 17, 2013 to parents Nneka,

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Police investigate
armed robbery in Pacifica
Pacifica police are investigating a Saturday armed robbery of a business.
Officers responded at 2:32
p.m. to Advance America at 756
Hickey Blvd. for a report of an
armed robbery, according to the
Pacifica Police Department.
Witnesses told investigators
a man entered the business, said
he had a gun and demanded
money.
Police said employees gave
the suspect an undisclosed
amount of cash, and the man
fled the business and drove
away in an older model gray
Honda or Toyota with a faded
hood.
The suspect is described as an
adult male and about 5 feet 7. He
was wearing a black ski mask, a
puffy green jacket, jeans and
white and blue athletic shoes.
Police said the last three digits of the suspects vehicles
license plate were possibly 221.
Anyone with information
about the robbery is asked to
call the Pacifica Police
Department at (650) 738-7314.

Kabibe, a 15-month old gorilla, died at the San Francisco Zoo Friday. Kabibe,
left, was 5-months old at the time of this December photo.

Loaded guns, fake


bomb found in bags at SFO

Some animal deaths are more difficult to process than others, and
this tragedy has struck us all in the
deepest way imaginable, San
Francisco Zoo executive director
Tanya Peterson said in a statement.
Peterson urged the public to be
patient as the gorilla family and zoo
staff mourn the loss of the gorilla.
The Jones Family Gorilla
Preserve will remain open to the
public, but officials said it may be
closed periodically in the days
ahead as the need arises.

Illegal firearms in carry-on


bags continues to cause significant delays and legal complications in airports nationwide,
and Transportation Security
Administration officials said
Saturday the San Francisco
International Airport is no
exception.
TSA officials found two
loaded firearms in carry-on
bags at SFO over the past week,
including one with a bullet in
its chamber, and found a realis-

ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL

16, and Oscar Jonesy, 33, according to zoo officials. When she was
6 months old, zoo staff gradually
introduced her to the gorilla troop,
beginning with the family matriarch,
Kabibes
grandmother,
Bawang, 34.
Tuller said Bawang and Kabibe
bonded instantly and had been
inseparable ever since. Officials
described Kabibe as a beloved
member of the zoo family who
brought great joy to the lives of
the gorilla troop.

Local briefs
tic replica of a Claymore antipersonnel mine in a checked
bag,
according
to
TSA
spokesman Bob Burns.
Each time we find a dangerous item, the line is slowed
down and a passenger that likely had no ill intent ends up with
a citation or in some cases even
arrested, Burns said in a statement.
Burns said passengers with
firearms could face fines as
high as $7, 500 for their
offences.
While firearms are allowed in
checked baggage, TSA officials
said they must be declared to
the airline ahead of time.
Travelers are also advised to
familiarize themselves with
state and local firearm laws for
each destination since firearm
possession laws vary by state
and locality.
Last week, a total of 40
firearms were discovered in
carry-on bags nationwide, 37 of
which were loaded, and 13 had a
bullet in the chamber, according
to TSA officials.
In many cases, people simply forgot they had these
items, Burns said in a statement.

2-alarm fire at San


Carlos apartment complex
Fire crews responded to a twoalarm fire in San Carlos
Saturday afternoon, according
to a dispatcher.
Crews were battling the
blaze at 1810 San Carlos Ave.
as of 3:30 p. m. Satuday at the
Riviera Apartments complex,
the dispatcher said. She would
not say if any injuries had
been reported.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

American freed by North Korea wanted pizza


By Donna Blankinship
and Josh Lederman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SEATTLE Kenneth Bae


arrived home after years of imprisonment in North Korea, expressing his gratitude to the U.S. government for securing his release
and revealing that his time there
offered lessons.
And his sister said he had one
stipulation for his first meal back
home: No Korean food.
He said, I dont want Korean
food, thats all Ive been eating
for the last two years, Terri
Chung said Sunday outside her
Seattle church. We had a late
night eating pizza.
Bae and Matthew Miller, another American who had been held
captive in North Korea, landed
Saturday night at a Washington
state military base after a top U.S.
intelligence official secured their
release.

REUTERS

U.S. citizen Kenneth Bae, right, accompanied by his sister Terri and his
mother Myunghee Bae, left, speaks to the media in a news conference
after he and fellow American prisoner Matthew Todd Miller, not pictured,
landed aboard a U.S. Air Force jet at McChord Field at Joint Base LewisMcChord, Washington.
Its been an amazing two years,
I learned a lot, I grew a lot, I lost a
lot of weight, Bae, a KoreanAmerican missionary with health

problems, said at Joint BaseLewis-McChord Saturday night.


Asked how he was feeling, he said,
Im recovering at this time.

Bae, surrounded by family members, spoke briefly to the media


after the plane carrying him and
Miller landed. He thanked
President Barack Obama and the
people who supported him and his
family. He also thanked the North
Korean government for releasing
him.
I just want to say thank you all
for supporting me and standing by
me, Bae said. His family has said
he suffers from diabetes, an
enlarged heart, liver problems and
back pain.
Chung said Bae was in better
shape when he arrived than his
family expected. She said he had
spent about six weeks in a North
Korean hospital before he
returned.
That helped. As you know, he
had gone back and forth between
the labor camp and hospital, she
said.
She said he was checked out by a

Massachusetts town weighs


nations first tobacco ban
By Amy Crawford
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WESTMINSTER, Mass. The cartons of


Marlboros, cans of Skoal and packs of
Swisher Sweets are hard to miss stacked near
the entrance of Vincents Country Store, but
maybe not for much longer: All tobacco
products could become contraband if local
health officials get their way.
This sleepy central Massachusetts town
of 7,700 has become an improbable battleground in Americas tobacco wars. On
Wednesday, the Board of Health will hear
public comment on a proposed regulation
that could make Westminster the first
municipality in the United States to ban
sales of all tobacco products within town
lines.
To my knowledge, it would be the first in
the nation to enact a total ban, said
Thomas Carr, director of national policy at
the American Lung Association. We commend the town for doing it.
Town health agent Elizabeth Swedberg
said a ban seemed like a sensible solution to
a vexing problem.
The tobacco companies are really promoting products to hook young people,
she said, pointing to 69-cent bubblegumflavored cigars, electronic cigarettes and a
new form of dissolvable smokeless tobacco
that resembles Tic Tac candies. The board
was getting frustrated trying to keep up with
this.
Citing a report from the U.S. surgeon
general, Swedberg said that if tobacco use
continues unabated, 5.6 million American
children who are younger than 18 today will
die prematurely because of smoking.
Change, she said, has to start somewhere.
Brian Vincent would rather it not start
with his family-owned grocery on Main
Street. Tobacco products, he said, make up
more than 5 percent of sales.
A quarter of his customers purchase tobac-

co, Vincent said, and while theyre there,


they often pick up a gallon of milk or one of
the fresh-baked maple-candied bacon
chocolate chip cookies that are displayed
by the check-out aisle.
Its going to send business five minutes
this way or five minutes that way no
ones going to quit, said Vincent, who
admits to enjoying a cigar himself now and
then.
Encouraged by the New England
Convenience Store Association, Vincent
has been asking customers to sign a petition against the proposal. He has gathered
more than 800 signatures so far, and other
merchants are on track to deliver hundreds
more to town officials this week.
David Sutton, a spokesman for
Richmond, Virginia-based Altria Group
Inc., owner of the nations biggest cigarette
maker, Philip Morris USA, called the proposal a bad policy that will harm local
employers.
We believe businesses should be able to
choose which products they carry, Sutton
said. If the ban were to be implemented,
adult tobacco and e-vapor consumers could
shift their purchases to neighboring stores.
The proposed regulations, if enacted, would
fundamentally alter these businesses and
would likely cost Westminster jobs.
So many people have called Town Hall
about the proposal, the Board of Health
whose meetings about septic system
updates and mosquito control rarely attract
an audience will hold Wednesdays public
hearing in an elementary school cafeteria
rather than in its usual second-floor conference room.
Colleen Conner, who pops into Vincents
nearly every day to pick up a pack of
American Spirits, is among those who
signed the petition. Should the measure
pass, she said, shell drive 25 miles north
to New Hampshire and buy her cigarettes
there in bulk.

doctor on the flight back to the


United States.
His plans for the near future
include rest and food and reconnecting with friends and family.
Neither his wife nor his children
could make it back to Seattle in
time for Baes homecoming, his
sister said.
They plan to gather the whole
family
together
for
Thanksgiving, she said.
Members of Baes family, who
live near the sprawling military
base south of Seattle, had met him
when he landed. His mother
hugged him after he got off the
plane. Miller stepped off the U.S.
government aircraft a short time
later and also was greeted with
hugs.
U. S. officials said Miller of
Bakersfield, California, and Bae
of Lynnwood, Washington, flew
back with James Clapper, the
director of national intelligence.

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NATION

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Higher bar for health law in 2nd sign-up season


By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON With a bright


look to its rebuilt website, version 2. 0 of President Barack
Obamas health insurance overhaul represents another chance to
win over a skeptical public.
But more than possible computer woes lurk as HealthCare.govs
second open enrollment season
begins Nov. 15.
The risks include an unproven
system for those renewing coverage and a tax hit that could sting
millions of people. Those tax
issues are the result of complications between the health care law
and income taxes, and they will
emerge during next years filing
season.
Things will not be perfect,
said Health and Human Services
Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell, trying to set expectations. We are

REUTERS

U.S. President Barack Obama, right, talks next to Secretary of Health and
Human Services Sylvia Burwell before the start of a Cabinet Meeting in
the Cabinet Room at the White House in Washington.
aiming for a strong consumer
experience, and it will be better.
The Obama administration can-

not afford to repeat last years


online meltdown. Congress will
be entirely in Republican hands in

2015, and GOP lawmakers will be


itching to build the case for
repeal. The Supreme Courts decision Friday to hear another challenge to the law is also casting a
shadow.
The health insurance exchanges
offer taxpayer-subsidized private
coverage to people who do not
have access on the job.
HealthCare. gov will serve 37
states, while the rest run their own
markets.
This new sign-up period will be
the first time that renewal has
been tried for current customers,
and also overlaps with the first
tax-filing season that the laws
requirements are in effect.
On t h e p lus si de, premium
i n creas es are ex p ected to b e
modest in many, though not all,
states. New insurers have come
i n t o t h e market, promoting
competition, and regulators now
take a close look at anything

above a 10 percent increase.


The online application for most
new customers is down to 16
screens from 76. Website security
is better, thanks to aggressive
monitoring. The government and
insurers have added call center
staff.
The administration had said last
week that consumers would be able
to get an early peek at 2015 plans
and premiums this weekend. It
looked like that early goal was
slipping. Officials said Sunday
that window shopping would be
available overnight, without giving a specific time.
This year, the bar will be higher.
The Congressional Budget
Office has projected that 13 million people will be covered
through federal and state insurance
markets in 2015. That means
retaining most of the 7 million
people now covered and adding 6
million more.

Ebola nurse to remain a voice against quarantines


By David Sharp
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PORTLAND, Maine The


Maine nurse who defied quarantine
attempts after treating Ebola
patients in West Africa is looking
forward to stepping out her front
door like normal people.
Kaci Hickoxs plans for the end
of the deadly diseases 21-day
incubation period include a dinner
out with her boyfriend, but she
told The Associated Press shes
worried about what type of a reception shell get after being hailed

by some and vilified by others


after battling state-ordered quarantines in New Jersey and Maine.
Most people have been supportive, she said, but others have been
hateful. She received a letter from
one person who said he hoped she
would catch Ebola and die.
Were still thankful weve had a
lot of great support in this community but Id be lying if I said
that it didnt make me a little bit
nervous thinking about people
from the other side of the debate
and how they might react to me,
she said.

Monday will mark the 21st day


since Hickoxs last exposure to an
Ebola patient, a 10-year-old girl
who suffered seizures before dying
alone without family.
On Tuesday, Hickox will no
longer require daily monitoring for
Ebola symptoms, and even those
who sought to isolate her agree
that she will no longer be a threat.
Hickox she said she doesnt
intend to stop speaking out on
behalf of public health workers, nor
would she let her experience deter
her from returning to West Africa.
Something like quarantine is

not going to scare me from doing


the work that I love, she said
from her home in Fort Kent in
northern Maine. I would return to
Sierra Leone in a heartbeat.
The Texas native never intended
to become the public face of a
fierce debate over how U.S. health
care workers volunteering in West
Africa are treated upon their return.
Volunteering
for
Doctors
Without Borders, she spent a
month at a hospital where there
were never enough beds for all of
the Ebola patients who needed
help. It was so hot that volunteers
could only spend about an hour at

a time treating patients in their


protective suits. They were
drenched in sweat when they finished their shifts, she said.
On the morning she left Sierra
Leone, the weary nurse learned
that the girl shed treated hours
earlier had died. She was
debriefed by Doctors Without
Borders in Brussels before flying
to the U.S.
It was after three hours of questioning at the Newark Liberty
International Airport that she
resolved that shed have to make
a stand on behalf of all returning
health care workers.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

Iraqi officials say IS group In China, Obama tests


leader wounded in airstrike global clout post-election
By Josh Lederman

By Qassim Abdul-Zahra
and Vivian Salama

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIJING His influence at home quickly


fading, President Barack Obama is looking
east to China, the opening stop of a threecountry tour that will test his ability to play
a commanding role on the world stage during his final two years in office.
Once treated like a global superstar,
Obama arrived Monday in Beijing under far
different circumstances, with his most powerful days behind him.
At home, Republicans are still rejoicing
at having pummeled Obamas political party
in the midterm elections, relegating
Democrats to the minority in both chambers of Congress. His counterparts in Asia
surely have noticed.
In the Chinese capital, Obama will give a
speech Monday about U.S. ties to Asia at a
high-level
Asia-Pacific
Economic
Cooperation summit. Hell also join key
Asian leaders for dinner before taking in a
performance and fireworks at the Beijing

BAGHDAD Iraqi officials said Sunday


that the head of the Islamic State group, Abu
Bakr al-Baghdadi, was wounded in an
airstrike in western Anbar province.
Pentagon officials said they had no immediate information on such an attack or on the
militant leader being injured.
Iraqs Defense and Interior ministries
both issued statements saying al-Baghdadi
had been wounded, without elaborating, and
the news was broadcast on state-run television Sunday night.
The reports came at a time when President
Barack Obama said the U.S.-led coalition
was in a position to start going on the
offensive against the Islamic State militants.
Al-Baghdadi, believed to be in his early
40s, has a $10 million U.S. bounty on his
head. Since taking the reins of the group in
2010, he has transformed it from a local
branch of al-Qaida into an independent
transnational military force.
He has positioned himself as perhaps the
pre-eminent figure in the global jihadi
community. His forces have seized large
parts of Syria and Iraq, killed thousands of
people, beheaded Westerners and drawn the
U.S. troops and warplanes back into the
region, where Washington is leading a campaign of airstrikes by a multinational
coalition.
An Interior Ministry intelligence official
told The Associated Press that al-Baghdadi
was wounded by an Iraqi airstrike that came
during a meeting Saturday with militants in
the town of Qaim. The official, cited
informants within the militant group. A
senior Iraqi military official also said he
learned in operational meetings that al-

REUTERS

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi during a video of a


sermon he gave in an Iraqi city ISIS captured
in July.
Baghdadi had been wounded.
The operation was carried out by Iraqi
security forces, both officials said,
although they did not know how seriously
al-Baghdadi was hurt. The officials spoke
on condition of anonymity because they
were not authorized to discuss confidential
material.
A statement posted Sunday on the official
Facebook page of Defense Minister Khalid
Obeidi also said al-Baghdadi was wounded,
but added that he was targeted in the northern city of Mosul, currently the groups
biggest stronghold in Iraq. A senior U.S.
defense official said Saturday that the coalition conducted a series of airstrikes targeting a gathering of Islamic State leaders near
Mosul, but he could not confirm whether alBaghdadi was part of the gathering.
Reports circulated Saturday that alBaghdadi may have been wounded in an
airstrike, but there was no confirmation
at that time from either U. S. or Iraqi
officials.

National Aquatics Center. During his three


days in China, Obama will also meet with
Chinese President Xi Jinping. The leaders of
the worlds two largest economies will
address reporters before the state visit draws
to a close Wednesday and Obama flies to
Myanmar.
The trip marks one of Obamas final
opportunities to deliver on his goal to
amplify U.S. influence in Asia. In China,
Myanmar and Australia, leaders will be rendering judgment on whether Obamas lofty
ambitions in Asia-Pacific have been sidetracked by festering crises in Eastern
Europe, Africa and the Middle East.
This is going to be a tough trip for the
president, said Ernest Bower, an Asia
expert at the Center for Strategic and
International Studies in Washington. He
said Asian leaders were viewing Obamas
trip with a key question in mind: Who is
Barack Obama after the midterm elections?
Theyll be trying to discern whether he
has the commitment and political capital to
follow through, Bower said.

WORLD

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

U.S. racing against time, Congress on Iran nuke deal


By Lara Jakes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MUSCAT, Oman The Obama


administration is facing its last
best chance to curb Irans nuclear
program not just to meet an
end-of-the-month deadline for a
deal, but also to seal one before
skeptical Republicans who will
control Congress next year are
able to scuttle it.
Years of negotiations to limit
Tehrans nuclear production
entered the final stretch Sunday as
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry
met with Iranian Foreign Minister
Javad Zarif and European Union
senior adviser Catherine Ashton
in Omans capital. With no immediate agreement in sight, officials
said the discussions were expected
to continue into Monday.

REUTERS

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, and Iranian Foreign Minister Javad
Zarif, left, shake hands as Omani Foreign Minister Yussef bin Alawi, second
right, and E.U. envoy Catherine Ashton watch in Muscat.
The stakes are high as the Nov.
24 deadline approaches. A deal
could quell Mideast fears about

Irans ability to build a nuclear


bomb and help revive the Islamic
Republics economy.

It also would deliver a foreign


policy triumph for the White
House, which is being hammered
by prominent Republican senators
over its handling of the civil war in
Syria and the growth of the Islamic
State militancy in Iraq. Those same
critics seek to put the brakes on
U.S.-Iranian bartering, if not shut
it down completely, once they
seize the majority on Jan. 3.
The Obama administration
needs to understand that this
Iranian regime cares more about
trying to weaken America and
push us out of the Middle East than
cooperating with us, Republican
Sens. John McCain of Arizona,
the incoming chairman of the
Senate
Armed
Services
Committee, and Lindsey Graham
of South Carolina, said in a statement last week.

President Barack Obama told


CBS Face The Nation that his
administrations unprecedented
sanctions on Iran are what forced
Tehran to the negotiating table.
Our number one priority with
respect to Iran is making sure they
dont get a nuclear weapon, he said.
But Obama also cited a big
gap between Iran and world powers as they try for a final agreement. We may not be able to get
there, he said in the interview
broadcast Sunday.
Over the past year, congressional Republicans have made little
secret of their skepticism of
Obamas outreach to Tehran. They
say it has alienated Israel and kept
the U.S. from maintaining a hard
line on a number of foreign policy
fronts, including Irans detention
of three Americans.

Balloons symbolize
fall of Berlin Wall
By Frank Jordans
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BERLIN The citizens of


Berlin on Sunday released
almost 7,000 balloons into
the night sky, many carrying messages of hope to
mark the 25th anniversary
since the fall of the wall that
once divided their city.
The symbolic act recalled
the giddy night of Nov. 9,
1989, when thousands of
people from the communist
East streamed through the
Berlin Wall to celebrate freedom with their brethren in
the West.
For peace and freedom,
Berlin
mayor
Klaus
Wowereit told a crowd of ten
thousands that had gathered
at
the
citys
iconic
Brandenburg Gate as he gave
the signal to release the balloons, which has been
placed, illuminated, along a
15-kilometer
(9-mile)
stretch of the former border.
Earlier he thanked the former leaders of Poland,
Hungary and the Soviet
Union Lech Walesa,
Miklos Nemeth and Mikhail

Gorbachev for having


helped set the stage for
Germanys peaceful revolution.
Gorbachev who is still
a popular figure in Germany
was greeted with affectionate shouts of Gorbi,
Gorbi by the crowds.
Hours earlier German
Chancellor Angela Merkel
had honored the memory of
the 138 people who died
along the Berlin Wall, and
the countless others who
suffered during its 28-year
existence.
The
latter
included
Dorothea Ebert, a violinist
who was imprisoned in East
Germany after a failed attempt
to escape. On Sunday, Ebert
played a piece by Bach that
she had practiced over and
over during her imprisonment on an imaginary
violin, because the communist authorities refused to let
her have a real one.
Merkel also paid tribute
to those who helped bring
down the wall, calling its
co l l ap s e an ex amp l e o f
t h e h uman y earn i n g fo r
freedom.

Syrian air raids kill at


least 21 in IS-held town
By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT Syrian government helicopters and warplanes carried out a series of


airstrikes overnight on a
northern town controlled by
the Islamic State group,
killing at least 21 people,
activists said Sunday.
The air raids struck the
town of al-Bab in Aleppo
province late Saturday and
lasted through early Sunday
morning. The Aleppo Media
Center activist collective
and the Britain-based Syrian
Observatory for Human
Rights both reported the
attacks.
Observatory director Rami
Abdurrahman said there were
10 strikes in total, including
seven
so-called barrel
bombs dropped from helicopters. He said at least 21

people were killed and more


than 100 wounded.
The Aleppo Media Center
put the death toll at 30, with
85 wounded. Differences in
casualty figures are common
in the chaotic aftermath of
attacks in Syria.
President Bashar Assads
air force routinely bombs
towns held by the Islamic
State group, as well as areas
controlled by mainstream
rebel brigades.
A U.S.-led coalition also
is conducting an aerial campaign against the Islamic
State group and other
extremists
in
Syria.
Washington says it does not
coordinate its airstrikes
with Damascus.
The international coalition has recently focused
much of its firepower on
Islamic
State
fighters
attacking the predominantly
Kurdish town of Kobani.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

Remembering Al Teglia

Letters to the editor


Bike cars are needed on Caltrain
Editor,
Every day I commute by bike and
by Caltrain from San Francisco to
work in Menlo Park. Commuting
with my bike is a must because I
cant afford a car right now and live
far enough from San Franciscos
Caltrain stations that I must cycle
to Fourth and King streets.
I strongly urge Caltrain to make
its newly purchased cars into bike
cars to help alleviate crowds during
the commuting hours. As it is, with
only two bike cars per train, my
fellow cyclists and I are often
bumped. In fact, I was bumped not
once but twice one evening at the
Menlo Park station and was late to
a client dinner in San Francisco
because of it. Im bumped at least
once a week, though I often try to
change up which train I catch to
avoid it.
Making the new cars into bike
cars would also help the environment, by encouraging more passengers to cycle, rather than drive, to
their station stops. That would
reduce traffic congestion and pollution and by extension, garner a
good reputation for Caltrain and for
the Bay Area in general.

Andrea Minarcek
San Francisco

Increase bike
capacity on Caltrain
Editor,
As a regular Caltrain commuter
for more than six years, Ive certainly noticed how crowded the
trains are now. I read that Caltrain
is buying new Bombardier cars and
appreciate this effort to cut down
on overcrowding. Bikers are some
of Caltrains most dependable customers, but were already routinely
stranded during peak commute
hours. As a loyal customer, Id
appreciate adding a third bike car to
all Bombardier trains to increase
their capacity to 72 bikes. Anyone
who has ridden the Caltrain during
peak hours knows that 48 bike
spaces simply doesnt cut it for
Caltrains customers.
Ryan Garrett
San Francisco

Tips for bike riders on Caltrain


Editor,
As someone who in the past has
taken both full-sized and folding
bikes on Caltrain, I follow the controversy in your letters to the editor
section with some interest. I knew
when I saw the op-ed piece The

Jerry Lee, Publisher


Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Angela Swartz, Samantha Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

Other Side of the Story (in the


Sept. 23 edition of the Daily
Journal), a lot of frustrated cyclists
would take aim at Mr. Oberg.
Though the piece did come off as a
bit harsh, I think its hard to dispute that a person who brings a
full-size bike on a train essentially
gets two seats for the price of one,
often when lots of other people
without bikes are standing. I
believe that was his point. Its also
true that it comes at the cost of
great uncertainty about not getting
on the train at all, or at least the
one you want.
As we all know, Caltrain is
packed now. Here a few things that
might help:
Ive never been denied access to
even the most crowded train when I
got on with a folding bike. If timing is really critical for your commute, consider getting one.
There still seems to be decent
bike capacity on the local trains,
especially the early ones.
Its true, as one reader pointed
out, that its great to have your
bike on the train to be able to get
off at different stations. But is that
a necessity for you, or a convenience? If the latter, the two-bike
system (one on each end) can work
really well, especially with the new
bike sharing program and the
expanded free and super cheap bike
parking.
Obviously these ideas wont work
for everyone, but may for you.
Good luck.

Joe DeFelice
San Mateo

Caltrain should
add a third bike car
Editor,
I bring my bike on Caltrain from
San Mateo to San Francisco five
days a week and have done so for
the past six years. Ive been
bumped from trains many times,
especially on my northbound trip
from Hillsdale to San Francisco.
The frequency of bumps has been
increasing as ridership has grown; I
was bumped from my usual northbound train three times in the past
month. On one occasion eight
other cyclists were bumped along
with me. Having to wait 30 minutes
for another train, or having to take
a local train instead of an express,
is a very poor option on the occasions when Ive been bumped. I end
up missing meetings and generally
having a negative experience that
also impacts my team at work.
I believe strongly that adding a

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Kathleen Magana
Kevin Smith

Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:


Mari Andreatta
Robert Armstrong
Arianna Bayangos
Sanne Bergh
Kerry Chan
Caroline Denney
Darold Fredricks
Mayeesha Galiba
Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung
Dave Newlands
Jeff Palter
Nick Rose
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Samson So

Ricci Lam, Production Assistant


Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

third bike car to commute hour


trains is fitting, considering ridership trends, and would also encourage continued ridership growth. I
very much hope that Caltrain will
add bike capacity as part of the
move to six-car trains.

Phil King
San Mateo

The importance of
smoke-free housing laws
Editor,
Thank you for covering the Board
of Supervisors support for smokefree multi-unit housing (Smoking
in apartments, condos banned in
unincorporated areas in the Oct.
22 edition of the Daily Journal).
This law is essential to protecting
residents health and quality of life
and I hope the countys other jurisdictions will be quick to follow the
supervisors lead.
Smoke-free workplace and restaurant laws have saved tens of thousands of lives in California alone.
But many are still at risk where
they should be most safe their
homes. Banning smoking indoors
and near windows and doorways is
the only way to protect residents in
multi-unit buildings. Tobacco
smoke travels through hallways and
doorways, ventilation systems and
even electrical outlets.
Without personal experience, it is
difficult to imagine the daily suffering of sharing a wall or
ceiling/floor with a smoker. The
home becomes a chronically
uncomfortable and unsafe place:
exacerbating asthma, increasing
risk of heart disease and cancer,
hurting family and kids.
Smoke-free housing laws are
important for everyone, but especially for low-income residents who
often rent and cannot afford to
move. My office receives calls
weekly from residents in distress.
Sadly, there often isnt much they
can do without a law.
This isnt about property rights
or the right to do what you want in
your home. Like laws around loud
music, hoarding and asbestos, it is
about ensuring neighbors can safely live in their homes. Smokers can
go outside to smoke, but nonsmoking neighbors are just stuck.
Their only choice is to move.
Nobody should have to make that
choice.

Olga Radom
Foster City

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celebration of Al Teglias life was held at Daly


Citys City Hall last Monday. Teglia was known
as Mr. Daly City but he was much more than that.
Behind the scenes, he was Mr. San Mateo County, with a
major role in the schools, the cities and the county. He
was the old-school politician who combined political
smarts with a genuine generous nature. He received as
much joy from collecting and giving teddy bears to a
favorite childrens charity as counting the vote tallies for
a favored elected ofcial.
I rst became acquainted with Al when I was running for
the San Mateo Union High School District board in 1983.
He was the head of maintenance and facilities for the district while at the same time serving on the Daly City
Council. Teglia became my unofcial campaign manager.
He would call me every day to make sure I was out campaigning. The district includes six high schools and a
continuation school, students from San Bruno, Millbrae,
Burlingame, Hillsborough, Foster City and San Mateo.
There was a lot of ground to cover. And Teglia made sure I
touched bases in each community.
***
When I became a member
of the board, Teglia insisted I tour Crestmoor High
School with him.
Crestmoor was the newest
school in the district but
had been closed because the
high school population
was declining. There was
not a need for four high
schools Crestmoor,
Capuchino, Mills and
Burlingame in the
northern half. One of these
schools had to go. In a
heated and legendary
school board meeting, it
became a contest between
Burlingame, one of the oldest schools in the district after
San Mateo High, and Crestmoor, the newest in San Bruno.
I missed out on these reworks but Teglia wanted to make
sure I knew the history and the frustration of people in the
northern part of the district. He showed me the empty
swimming pool which was already showing signs of nonuse and the many vacant classrooms.
Over the years, the school district has tried a variety of
tenants to keep the school inhabited. At one time, it
served as a courtroom for a major case. Nonprots rented
out some of the classrooms for ofces. During my time on
the board, we tried to sell the site but Crestmoor is located
on prime real estate in San Bruno in a neighborhood
where several city councilmembers lived. They and the
community liked to use the schools recreational facilities. When those efforts failed, Peninsula, the districts
continuation school, moved in. At last there were students
on site. But as readers of the Daily Journal know, the location of Peninsula and the sale of the Crestmoor site are
still hot topics. The continuation schools present location on a remote site in the San Bruno hills is far away
from where most of its students live and work.
***
Teglia also served as Mary Grifns aide when she was
on the Board of Supervisors. He was heavily engaged in
county politics behind the scenes. He knew everyone and
it was important to have him on your side if you wanted
something done. Nothing explains Teglias far-reaching
inuence then what happened one night at a Council of
Cities dinner meeting in Daly City. The Council of Cities
is made up of the countys mayors but its monthly meetings are also attended by councilmembers throughout the
county. The Council of Cities also serves as the venue for
selecting councilmembers to serve on several boards and
commissions such as SamTrans, the Transportation
Authority, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission,
etc. Historically there had been no term limits for these
appointees and some councilmembers decided they were
needed. That way, more councilmembers could be
involved. Under the system as it then existed, a councilmember could serve for years and years in the same
position and expect to stay on forever. The by-laws committee recommended a two four-year term limit to the full
Council of Cities for a vote. It was very close and then
someone suggested an amendment. Instead of limiting
terms, a councilmember would have to seek reappointment at the end of his or her term. It wouldnt be automatic. That compromise, which passed, was engineered by
none other than Al Teglia, who had no desire to give up
his seat on SamTrans. And his compromise avoided what
could have been a bitter ght.
***
We dont have many old-fashioned politicians like Al
Teglia today. We could especially use his skills and generous spirit in Washington, D.C. He was able to bring people with different views together and remain friends.
Sue Lempert is the former may or of San Mateo. Her column runs ev ery Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdaily journal.com.

10

BUSINESS

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks that could benefit from a GOP-led Congress


By Ken Sweet

votes to override him.


Peabody Energy was up 12 percent, Arch
Coal rose 32 percent and Alpha Natural
Resources was up 49 percent for the week.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK Lower taxes for medical


device makers. Lighter regulations for coal.
If the new Republican-led Congress manages to push through these policy changes
it could lift stocks in the health and energy
industries, market strategists say.
To be sure, President Obama still has two
years left in the White House and can use his
veto power to stop legislation. A
Republican Congress cant repeal the entire
Affordable Care Act. Any big tax or immigration reform ideas will have to be reached
through compromise.
Those big issues are off the table and on
hold until after the presidential election in
2016, says David Lebovitz, global market
strategist at JPMorgan Funds.
Still, specific industries that could benefit from successful Republican legislation
include:

Medical device companies


The
GOP-controlled
House
of
Representatives has tried to repeal the
Affordable Care Acts medical device tax
several times only to see their efforts die in
the Democratically-controlled Senate. With
the Senate under Republican control starting next year, the 2.3 percent excise tax is
likely to be on the chopping block, market
strategists and Washington watchers say.
The nations biggest medical device makers Johnson & Johnson, Boston
Scientific, Medtronic and others could
benefit from the elimination of the tax.
Boston Scientific had $73 million in
expenses related to this tax, while Johnson
& Johnson paid approximately $200 million in 2013 in expenses related to the tax.

Banks

REUTERS

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.


Removing the tax could give a modest
boost the industrys bottom line, investors
say.

Energy
The GOP-controlled House and Senate
will likely put pressure on the White House
to approve TransCanadas Keystone XL
Pipeline next year. The pipeline, which
would help carry crude from Canada to
refineries along the U.S. Gulf Coast, has
been in regulatory purgatory for several
years, awaiting approval. While the State
Department has the authority to greenlight
the pipeline, Congress can adopt a bill that
would overrule it by approving the project.
TransCanadas stock was up 2.4 percent
the day after the election. Suncor Energy, a

Canadian oil sands company, rose 4 percent.


Coal stocks might also do well, analysts
at Brunswick Group say. Sen. Mitch
McConnell, R-Kentucky, will almost certainly become the Senate Majority Leader,
and a big energy supporter, Sen. James
Inhofe, R-Oklahoma, is likely to become
chairman of the Senate Environment and
Public Works committee.
Coal companies have faced strict pollution regulations under the Obama
Administration. Congress could take up
legislation to pull back some of those regulations.
Obama, however, is likely to veto any
legislation related to coal plants and carbon
and its unclear if the Senate has enough

Smaller, regional banks may benefit


under the new Congress, analysts say. There
is talk of pulling back some of the DoddFrank regulations for banks under $10 billion in assets.
However, big banks are unlikely to see
any significant regulatory changes, analysts at Keefe, Bruyette & Woods say. The
Dodd-Frank financial reform act is unlikely
to be repealed while Obama remains in
office. Also the too big to fail regulations, which require the big banks to hold
higher amounts of capital because of the
crucial role they play in the economy, are
generally popular among both Democrats
and Republicans.
A regional bank, Zions Bancorporation,
climbed 2.4 percent for the week.

Midterm boost
Its not just new legislation that could
help stocks; history also favors the market
right now. In the past, U.S. stocks have
done well in the quarter that includes
midterms. Data by Strategas Research
Partners shows that the Standard & Poors
500 index, going all the way back to 1930,
rose an average of 2.1 percent in the fourth
quarter of a midterm election year. That
compares with a return of 0.4 percent for the
entire year.
Bob Doll, chief equity strategist at
Nuveen Asset Management, says the gain is
because elections remove uncertainty for
investors and help provide clarity on which
way the country might be headed.

Why many arent celebrating low U.S. unemployment


By Josh Boak
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON The unemployment rate


no longer seems to reflect Americas mood.
Fridays strong jobs report showed that
the jobless rate the most closely watched
gauge of the economys health is down
to 5.8 percent. A year ago, the rate was 7.2
percent. Five years ago, it was 10 percent.
Its the kind of sustained decline that
would normally suggest a satisfied public.
Not so much anymore. After Tuesdays
midterm elections, exit polling showed how
little falling unemployment has resonated.
Most voters said they cast their ballots out of
fear for the economy, stripping the
Democrats from the Senate majority and
implicitly rejecting President Barack Obama.
Many Americans dont feel theyve benefited from falling unemployment any more
than they have from a sustained rise in the
stock market or from solid U.S. economic
growth.
So me h i n t s o f t h ei r di s co n t en t can
b e fo un d wi t h i n an o t h erwi s e g l o wi n g
j o b s rep o rt fo r Oct o b er: Wag es t h at are
b arel y g ro wi n g an d a s t ub b o rn l y l o w
p ro p o rt i o n o f adul t s wh o ei t h er h av e a

j o b o r are l o o k i n g fo r o n e.
Underneath the surface, things are not
good, said Michael Mandel, chief economic strategist at the Progressive Policy
Institute. Both Democrats and Republicans
would be making a mistake if they looked at
the unemployment numbers and didnt
understand why voters are angry.
Is there solid evidence that the economy
is better? Definitely.
Home values have recovered from their
recession-induced lows, according to real
estate groups. Government figures show
that fewer and fewer workers are being laidoff. Consumers punched the accelerator on
auto sales this year. And the stock market
has kept up its stampede to record highs.
But the jobs report contains clues to why
many voters shrugged off those positive
trends.
Consider wages. Workers pay usually
outpaces inflation once the unemployment
rate dips beneath 6 percent. Thats because
when fewer people need to look for jobs,
employers must raise pay to attract the most
desirable among them.
Even with 5.8 percent unemployment and
even though more than five years have
passed since the Great Recession officially

ended, this phenomenon has yet to take


hold. Most workers pay is barely keeping
up with historically low inflation.
People arent looking at the statistical
aggregates, said Bill Galston, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. They
care about their standard of living, and most
Americans think their standard of living
has declined.
Look, too, at the percentage of adults
either working or searching for work. Its a
measure called labor force participation.
The government counts people without
jobs as unemployed only if theyre seeking
work. If more people stop looking, labor
force participation falls.
At 62.8 percent, the U.S. participation
rate hasnt budged over the past 12 months.
And its down a sharp 3.6 percentage points
from 2007. That means a lower proportion
of Americans are engaged in the job market
and benefiting from the economic upswing.
Some of the decline in participation
stems from retirements by the oldest of the
vast baby boom generation. But not all.
Mandel reasons that much of the decline
is due to people who want to work but are no
longer actively searching. As long as a
large such pool of potential workers exists,

it will put downward pressure on wages.


Since 2007, the participation rate has
fallen disproportionately in three critical
states where Democratic incumbents lost
Tuesday, costing their party control of the
Senate: Arkansas (-5.9 percentage points),
Colorado (-5.3 points) and North Carolina
(-4.7 points), each of which will now be
represented in the Senate by a Republican.
Voters feel firsthand the consequences of
these statistics, Mandel said. Members of
their family and friends dont have a great
choice of jobs, let alone well-paying jobs.
Julie English, a 54-year-old office manager from suburban Denver, voted for all of
Colorados Republican candidates, including the winning Senate challenger, Cory
Gardner. She said the country was headed the
wrong way economically.
What the Republican candidates were
saying is more the direction I want the
country to go in, she said.
This year, employers have added more
than 2 million jobs, including 214,000 in
October.
Yet meaningful pay raises remain scarce.
Wages averaged $20.70 an hour for most
workers last month, a tepid 2.2 percent gain
over the past 12 months.

On the move
The Mag no l i a o f Mi l l brae was a
gold winner for advertising in the 2 3 rd
an n ual Nat i o n al Mat ure Me di a
Awards program. The program, presented
by the Mat ure Mark e t Re s o urc e
Center, a national clearinghouse for the
senior market, recognizes the nations
finest marketing, communications, educational materials and programs designed
and produced for older adults.

***
Co upa So ftware, a leading provider of
cloud-based finance applications located
in San Mateo, appointed Tara Ry an as its
new chi ef marketi ng o ffi cer. Ryan is
responsible for the global structure, strategy and execution of Coupas communications and marketing efforts. Ryan brings
more than 20 years of experience in managing global marketing programs.

WARRIORS FINALLY FALTER: LOSS TO PHOENIX FIRST BLEMISH ON KERRS COACHING RECORD >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 15, CSM victory


sets stage for epic finale
Monday Nov. 10, 2014

PAL cross-country finals end in flourish


By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Cross-country running wasnt on Clara


Fassingers radar upon her arrival at Half
Moon Bay, let alone the notion of being a
Peninsula Athletic League champion.
Upon transferring from Oceana prior to
her sophomore year, Fassinger was just discovering the sport during a summer spent
trying to raise money for charity. According
to Fassinger, her father was diagnosed with
cancer. So, among her familys fundraising
efforts to put money towards his treatment,

Fassinger turned to running.


Specifically, Fassinger
and her mother Maria
Ontiveros got into shape
to run the San Diego
Rock n Roll Half
Marathon a 13.1-mile
event which has benefitClara Fassinger ted charitable causes
since its inception in
1998. Now, Fassingers father is cancer
free, she said. And she has been running
ever since.

In P.E., when we had to run the mile, I


dreaded it, Fassinger said. When I saw my
P.E. teacher a few weeks ago, he was like,
What happened?
At Saturdays PAL Cross Country
Championships at Belmonts Crystal
Springs Cross Country Course, Fassinger
claimed the PAL individual title with a personal record 19 minutes, 15.9 seconds on
the rigorous 2.95-mile course. She also led
her team to second place in the team competition as the Cougars finished 41 seconds
off the pace of first-place Menlo-Atherton.
Fassinger finished nearly 12 seconds

ahead of Mills sophomore Sarah Gayer who


took second place with a 19:27.7. Half
Moon Bay junior Carmen Zafra took third
place with a 19:34.8. Menlo-Athertons
junior tandem of Katie Beebe and Cat DePuy
finished fourth and fifth, respectively.
Beebe and DePuy fronted the M-A team
which took first place with a cumulative
1:40:22. Bears junior Annalisa Crowe finished with a 19:58, junior Madeleine Baier
a 20:14, sophomore Olivia Tai a 20:45,
sophomore Kelly Woods a 21:17 and

See X-COUNTRY, Page 16

Capuchino tackle
Tumanuvao-Hata
a big hit on O-line
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

end was called for pass interference after


appearing to shove defensive back Perrish
Cox to the turf.
Denitely not a push off. Im running
down the eld and Im telling myself not to
push off. Whatever you do, dont push off.
Just go up and get it, Graham said. Its
interesting, you know, how guys grab me
everywhere on the eld and I put literally two
ngers on somebody and you make that kind
of call. Thats why I switched. Thats why I
left basketball, so I could stop being penalized for hitting people.
Brooks decisive blow on his sack of Brees
had to feel like poetic justice to the Niners
defensive stalwart. His unsportsmanlike

Talk about an impact player.


Last Friday marked the first varsity start at
offensive tackle for Capuchino senior Josiah
Tumanuvao-Hata. The Mustangs rambled to a
35-9 win over Jefferson. Senior running back
Gabe Campos came off the bench to run for a
career-high 185 yards on 14 carries, including
his first three carries of 60, 80 and 5 yards
which all went for touchdowns.
All three runs were to the left side, where
Tumanuvao-Hata
anchored the line
in tandem with
junior left guard
Jason Fukuta to
provide key
blocks on the
two long touchdown scores Campos broke.
I was proud of [Campos], Tumanuvao-Hata
said. He does that type of stuff when he gets
the right blockers. When he gets big blocks
he finds the hole and aims for glory.
Tumanuvao-Hatas natural position is on the
defensive line. He started the year at defensive
end but admittedly struggled through three
games at the position early in the season.
Since moving to the interior line as a defensive tackle, he has helped the Mustangs
rebound from a 1-2 start through three tough
nonconference opponents.
Capuchino has since gone 4-2, with those
two losses coming at the hands of Peninsula
Athletic League Ocean Division champion
Aragon and PAL Lake Division champion
Kings Academy the Knights wrapped up
the title Friday night with a 47-14 win over
Carlmont.
I loved it, Tumanuvao-Hata said of the
switch to defensive tackle. I loved the
instant contact with the rush. At defensive
tackle you dont have much of a job to do. You
just have to apply pressure and make plays.
The 6-2, 230-pound senior has impressed
with a number of key sacks this season.

See NINERS, Page 14

See OTL, Page 18

On the
Line

CHUCK COOK/USA TODAY SPORTS

Anquan Boldin, left, had 95 yards on six catches including this second-quarter touchdown reception in the 49ers 27-24 overtime win.

Niners hold on for OT win


By Brett Martel
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW ORLEANS A reprieve for mercurial


quarterback Colin Kaepernick. Redemption
for indomitable linebacker Ahmad Brooks.
Kaepernick completed a 51-yard pass on
fourth down to sustain a tying drive in the
nal minutes of regulation, Brooks sacked
and stripped Drew Brees in overtime, and
Phil Dawson kicked a 35-yard eld goal to
cap San Franciscos stirring 27-24 victory
over New Orleans on Sunday.
The victory snapped a two-game skid for the
Niners (5-4) and marked the rst home loss for
the Saints (4-5) in more than a season.
It was paramount for us to come out with a
win, San Francisco left tackle Joe Staley

said. You dont like to say must-win, but it


was a must-win game. We looked at that game
as a playoff game, and we had that mindset
coming in.
New Orleans had won 11 straight in the
Superdome 20 straight at home in games
coached by Sean Payton, who was suspended
in 2012. It looked like that streak would continue after New Orleans erased an 11-point
halftime decit and took a lead on Brees 2yard scoring pass to Jimmy Graham with
1:52 left.
Even after the Niners tied it on Dawsons
45-yard eld goal with 44 seconds left, the
Saints nearly won on the nal play of regulation. Brees heaved a long toss that Graham,
who played college basketball, leaped up and
caught in the end zone but the star tight

Menlo claims PAL Tournament title


By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Menlos Chris Xi had 5 goals in Saturdays PAL


Tournament championship game.

Menlo School looked like a team on a


mission in the Peninsula Athletic League
Boys Water Polo Tournament championship.
Just over a week since falling to MenloAtherton in an overtime thriller to close out
the regular season, the Knights exacted
their revenge Saturday night at Burlingame
High School by giving a dominant second-

half performance to prevail 12-10.


Menlo striker Chris Xi flourished in the
spotlight, scoring a match-high five goals.
The junior is poised to front the Knights
attack next year when the teams two leading scorers this season seniors Andreas
Katsis and Nick Bisconti graduate to the
Division-I collegiate ranks.
The prolific trio, which accounted for
over 150 goals this season, still has work
to do though, as the Knights ready for their
Central Coast Section playoff opener this

coming Saturday. Menlo will shoot for its


sixth all-time CCS championship and its
first since 2010.
From Day 1, thats what weve been
looking for, Xi said.
Menlo (21-6) seemed to be in control
throughout Saturdays PAL tourney finale.
Even though the Knights jumped ahead 8-7
just one minute before halftime, they never
allowed M-A (16-11) to lead throughout.
And in the second half, Menlos defense

See TOURNEY, Page 13

12

SPORTS

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Witte one in a line of great Menlo GKs


By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

It is Spencer Wittes time to shine at


Menlo School.
The senior goalkeeper for the Knights
boys water polo team was named the
Peninsula Athletic League Most Valuable
Goalie last week after his first full season in
the cage. Not that he wasnt a valuable
weapon his two previous varsity seasons. It
was just that he was in the mix with another
dynamic goalie, the now graduated John
Wilson who has since moved on to the collegiate ranks.
As a senior, Brown anchored the Knights
during their Central Coast Section Division
II runner-up season of 2013. For his efforts,
he earned his second consecutive PAL Most
Valuable Goalie nod.
Even in waiting, however, Witte was
already making waves as a goalkeeping talent. Splitting time with Brown in 2012,
Witte still managed to earn first-team AllPAL honors.
Spencer had been one of the best goalies
in CCS behind THE best goalie in CCS,
Menlo head coach Jack Bowen said.
Bowen, himself a former goalkeeper and
two-time national champion at Stanford,
helped mentor Brown into a collegiate-caliber goalkeeper.
Brown is currently wrapping up his freshman season at Johns Hopkins, where he
recently cracked the starting lineup as the
Blue Jays entered the Collegiate Water Polo
Association Southern Championship playoffs Saturday. After tabbing a tremendous
second-half performance with nine saves in
Johns Hopkins final regular-season game
against Navy, Brown was informed hed be
making his first collegiate start in the
teams playoff opener.
In that game, the Blue Jays defeated
George Washington University 16-11. It

TERRY BERNAL/DAILY JOURNAL

Menlo senior Spencer Witte was named the Peninsula Athletic League Most Valuable Goalie
this season. He is committed to attend Johns Hopkins University in the fall.
was the only win in three starts for Brown,
though he would total 18 saves in an 8-6
loss to Princeton in Saturdays nightcap. In
Sundays third-place game, Johns Hopkins
fell 11-10 to Navy with Brown tabbing 14
saves.
Until the Blue Jays revamped their lineup
over the weekend, Brown played behind junior goalkeeper Erik Henrikson all season.
Brown has forged a strong relationship with
the Laguna Beach native.

I think Erik and I have been pushing each


other all season, Brown said. Ive learned
a lot from him. Watching him play earlier
this season, I think I was able to translate
that into what I did this weekend. And overall I think our defense did a great job.
Making friends in the cage is old hat for
Brown, who considers Witte one of his best
friends. The two paired together as teammates or training partners around the calendar for three straight years. Not only did

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they play together at Menlo, they belonged


to the same Stanford Water Polo Club.
But when Brown arrived at Menlo, he had
never previously played goalkeeper. He said
when Witte showed up a year later, the
younger keeper was already a natural. So,
Brown used the pairing to learn all he could;
and the two found an intrinsic friendship
along the way.
I learned to play goalie. He was already
really good, Brown said.
Come next season, the two should get the
opportunity to continue their symbiotic
brilliance as Witte is one of three current
Menlo players set to play at Johns Hopkins
next season. Menlos leading scorer this
season, Andreas Katsis, and fellow senior
Tegan Nibby are the other two.
Brown, who has watched most of Menlos
games from this season via web stream, said
he is still impressed with Wittes ability to
consistently improve.
(Witte has a) tremendous work ethic,
Brown said. The biggest improvement Ive
seen him make is his mental toughness.
Theres been multiple games where [the
Knights] came from behind or stuck it out in
overtime. Thats what differentiates the
good goalkeepers form the great goalkeepers is when theyre able to step up. And I
think Spencer embodies that.
Wittes current teammates concur.
Hes been a rock, junior striker Chris Xi
said. Weve been doing some of the blocking and defending up front and it has helped
him play out of his mind this season.
Johns Hopkins continues its postseason
Nov. 21 with the opening of the CWPA
Championship tourney in Annapolis,
Maryland.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Warriors handed first loss of season


Suns halt new Golden State coach Steve Kerrs win streak at five games
By Jose M. Romero
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PHOENIX Isaiah Thomas scored 15 of


his 22 points in the fourth quarter to lead
the Phoenix Suns to a come-from-behind
107-95 victory Sunday over the Golden
State Warriors, leaving the NBA with no
unbeaten teams.
Fellow reserve Gerald Green added 16 of
his 19 points in the final quarter, when the
Suns surged ahead after trailing by eight
through three.
Stephen Curry scored 28 points but just
six in the second half, when he was plagued
by missed shots and foul trouble. Curry,
who entered tied for the NBA scoring lead,
added 10 assists for his fourth double-double of the season.
Draymond Green added 22 points and nine
rebounds for the Warriors (5-1), who played
without Klay Thompson (sprained right
hand).
The Suns took an 83-82 lead on three free
throws by Green with 8:55 to go, and led
90-86 on a 3-pointer by Green with 6:07
left. The key basket came from Marcus
Morris, who drained a 3-pointer with 3:41
remaining to give the Suns a 100-89 lead.
Goran Dragic finished with 19 points and
Marcus Morris 17.

TOURNEY
Continued from page 11
put on a dazzling display by holding the
Bears scoreless throughout the third quarter
returning the favor from the Knights 1411 loss Oct. 29, when M-A outscored them
3-0 in the six-minute overtime period.
We played really well, Xi said. Last
time it was a combination of M-A playing
the best game theyve ever played and us
not having it all together.
Menlo jumped out to a quick 2-0 lead in
the opening minutes. Bisconti got the
Knights on the scoreboard by driving on a
fast break to prevail in a 1-on-1 matchup
with M-A sophomore goalkeeper Cameron
Raff. On the Bears following possession,
Katsis took a pass three meters off the right
side and fired a skip shot for a score.
M-A started the second quarter with a
three-point deficit, but battled back to tie it
at 6-6 when Matheus Santos scored on an
impressive left-handed shot after a 180degree spin move on the inside. The
Knights and Bears traded goals to run the tie

Phoenix and Golden


State were the top two
teams in fast-break
points entering the
game. They got off to a
blistering
pace
on
offense, running the
court back and forth. The
Suns trailed by as many
Isaiah Thomas as nine points in the
first quarter, with Curry
and Green combining for 20 points in the
first 12 minutes.
Dragic had 13 first-quarter points but the
Warriors led 30-28 going into the second.
Dragic did much of his early scoring
against former teammate Leandro Barbosa,
who started for Thompson. Thompson averages 23.8 points.
Curry scored five points in a matter of
seconds when he hit a 3-pointer, then stole
the inbounds pass for a layup to give the
Warriors their largest lead of the first half,
54-41 with 2:31 to go until halftime.
The Warriors led 58-47 at halftime.
The Suns (3-4) cut the lead to 62-59 on a
3-pointer from Marcus Morris with 8:47 to
go in the third quarter and could have cut
into the deficit more, but Markieff Morris
missed four straight free throws.
The Warriors went back up by 12, but

Curry picked up two


quick fouls in the final
seconds of the third after
scoring only two points
in the quarter. He had to
exit with four fouls, and
Golden State led 79-71
heading into the fourth.
The Suns scored 36
fourth-quarter
points to
Steph Curry
run away with the victory
and are 137-88 all-time against the Warriors,
the highest win total against any opponent
in team history.
First-year coach Steve Kerr and Barbosa
received warm welcomes from the crowd at
the US Airways Center. Kerr is the Suns former general manager and Barbosa spent
eight seasons with Phoenix, most recently
2013-2014.. Kerr, on his NBA career as
player, broadcaster, GM and now coach:
Now my kids dont care where Im at every
day so I might as well coach. . The
Warriors committed 27 turnovers (10 by
Curry), giving them a total of 53 in their
last two games.
Coach Jeff Hornacek was called for a technical foul for arguing a non-call against the
Warriors Andrew Bogut, who challenged
Dragics drive to the basket with 8:27 to
play in the first quarter.

to 7-7, but Katsis gave Menlo the lead just


before the half by powering through a
defender on the inside on the scoring drive.
After the break, senior goalkeeper
Spencer Witte showed why he was named the
PALs Most Valuable Goalie this week by
shutting out M-A for first nine minutes of
the second half. Witte produced 10 saves in
the contest, but none were more impressive
than his display midway through the third
quarter when M-A senior John Knox was
rejected from point-blank range.
That doesnt happen a lot, Xi said.
Spencer really got up. I dont know how he
stopped that. I was pleasantly surprised.
Menlo reeled off three unanswered points
in the third quarter. M-A made it interesting
in the fourth when Knox converted his only
goal of the match to close the Knights lead
to 11-9. With three minutes remaining in
the game, M-A had another offensive
opportunity, but Witte produced another
clutch save to keep the two-goal advantage
in check. Then on Menlos following possession, Xi barreled through the middle to
exact a quick score for an insurance goal.
Xi is a third-year varsity starter who, in
2012, became just the third freshman to

play as a regular starter in Jack Bowens 15


years as Menlos head coach.
Menlo-Atherton also readies for the CCS
playoffs in an effort to bring home the programs second all-time title. The Bears last
won it all in 2007.
From what I saw today, we are pretty
ready, M-A head coach Giovanni
Napolitano said.
Napolitano dismissed the importance of
the PAL championship game, which is more
a matter of pride than anything, as it has no
bearing on CCS seeding. On Saturday morning, prior to the tourney finale,
Napolitanos team swam 5,000 yards each
as though it were a practice day as opposed
to a game day, he said.
Both the Knights and the Bears advanced
to the CCS championship rounds in their
respective divisions last season. Menlo
lost to Sacred Heart Prep 12-9 in the
Division II bracket. M-A fell to Bellarmine
12-6 in the Division I bracket.
In the girls PAL Tournament final
Saturday, Castilleja (16-5) overcame
Carlmont in the final minute to claim the
title with an 8-7 victory.
Castillejas Alex Zafran shared the match-

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

13

Former NBA player


Ernie Vandeweghe,
father of Kiki, dies
By Beth Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES Ernie Vandeweghe, a New


York Knicks player in the post-World War II
era and father of former NBA star Kiki
Vandeweghe and three other top athletes, has
died. He was 86.
The death was confirmed Sunday night by
Kiki Vandeweghe, who said his father died of
natural causes at his home in Newport Beach.
Vandeweghe averaged 9.5 points and 4.6
rebounds in 224 regular-season games for the
Knicks from 1949-56. In college, he averaged 19.1 points in four seasons at Colgate.
Ernie Vandeweghes wife, Colleen, died in
2010. She won the 1952 Miss America pageant.
Born in Montreal, Vandeweghe went to
medical school while in the NBA and was a
physician in the U.S. Air Force. He was chairman of the Presidents Council on Physical
Fitness and Sports and served on the Olympic
Sports Commission. He also was the Lakers
team physician when the team moved to Los
Angeles from Minneapolis.
Ernie Vandeweghe grew up on Long Island
and played football, basketball and baseball
at Oceanside High School.
high with three goals. Her third one proved
the game-winner when she floated a lob
shot into the net with 48 seconds remaining. The pivotal score was preceded by a
Carlmont attempt, which saw Castilleja
junior defender Maddie Macdonald produce a
clutch block to preserve the tie and give
possession back to the Gators.
Castilleja had to go it without PAL Bay
Division Player of the Year Anna Yu for a
majority of the match, as the senior fouled
out in the first half.
We knew it would be a tough game,
Castilleja head coach Brenda Villa said. It
was just a battle.
Carlmont was paced by Katelyn
McGraths three goals. Elise Dimick added
two goals while Lauren Ralioppi and Lauren
Rio had one apiece.
In the third-place games, the MenloAtherton girls topped Woodside 8-4; the
Burlingame boys edged Half Moon Bay 9-8.
In the fifth-place games, the Burlingame
girls downed Aragon 5-3; the Mills boys
went to overtime to defeat Carlmont 8-7. In
the seventh-place games, Half Moon Bays
girls prevailed over Sequoia 7-4; the
Woodside boys beat Sequoia 11-9.

14

SPORTS

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NFL briefs
Cardinals win game, lose Palmer
GLENDALE, Ariz. Carson Palmer went
down with a fourth-quarter knee injury, then
backup Drew Stanton and the Arizona
defense rallied the Cardinals to a 31-14 victory over the St. Louis Rams on Sunday.
John Browns diving grab of Stantons
48-yard touchdown pass put the Cardinals
(8-1) up 17-14 with 7:40 to play. The pass
came on the first series after Palmer hurt his
left knee while trying to avoid the rush.
He was able to walk off the field but a
short time later was taken to the locker
room on a cart.

Lynchs 4 TDs pace Seahawks


SEATTLE Marshawn Lynch rushed for a
season-high 140 yards and career-best four
touchdowns and the Seattle Seahawks overcome their own sloppiness for a key 38-17
win over the New York Giants on Sunday.
Russell Wilson threw two interceptions,
the Seahawks committed three total
turnovers, and Eli Manning picked apart
Seattles secondary for the first half. It all
didnt matter because of Lynch leading
Seattles unstoppable run game.
The 350 total yards rushing by Seattle (63) were a franchise record and the most in
the NFL this season.

Vick first QB to rush for 6,000 yards


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. Michael
Vick has become the first quarterback in
NFL history to reach 6,000 yards rushing,
getting the milestone in the third quarter of
the New York Jets game against the
Pittsburgh Steelers.

CHUCK COOK/USA TODAY SPORTS

Colin Kaepernick was 14 of 32 for 210 yards led the Niners downfield for three first-half TDs.

NINERS
Continued from page 11
conduct penalty on a vicious sack and strip in
the Superdome a year ago allowed the Saints
to pull out a late comeback victory.
This time, Brooks play set up Dawsons
winning kick with 5:14 remaining in overtime.
God smiled down on me today, Brooks
said. I was rushing and turning the corner
thinking, Dang, is he going to throw the
ball yet? But he didnt, and I was able to
make the play.
Brees wanted to throw over the middle to

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Travaris Cadet, but the running back had


tripped, so Brees waited and re-cocked his
arm as Cadet got up.
Its a game of inches and split seconds,
and they got it out just before my arm was
coming forward, Brees said.
New Orleans defense, which sacked
Kaepernick four times, dominated nearly the
entire second half, allowing the Saints to
come back. All New Orleans needed was a
stop on fourth-and-10 to close the deal.
Kaepernick rolled right to buy time, spotted
Michael Crabtree deep down eld and unloaded
his game-saving pass to the Saints 27.
Crabtree was about the third or fourth guy
I looked at when I was scrambling,
Kaepernick said. I wasnt expecting it, but

Im happy it happened that way.


Brees was intercepted twice, the second
time by Chris Culliver late in the rst half on
a pass intended for Graham, who was at the
Niners goal line but had three defenders
around him. The squandered scoring chance
drew boos.
I cant turn the ball over at the rate that Im
turning it over and I certainly cant turn it over
in the situations that Im turning it over, said
Brees, whos thrown 10 interceptions. I
would have booed myself on that one.
Brees also passed for three scores, and
began the Saints second-half comeback
spectacularly, spinning away from blitzers
Michael Wilhoite and Eric Reid before nding Graham for an 11-yard TD. Brees later
marched New Orleans 80 yards in 12 plays,
hitting Marques Colston for a fourth-down
conversion before punishing a Niners blitz
with a quick 2-yard TD pass to Graham.
Kaepernick nished 14 of 32 for 210
yards. Anquan Boldin had six catches for 95
yards, including a touchdown. Frank Gore
scored on a 4-yard run set up by Antoine
Betheas interception.
Brees nished 28 of 47 for 292 yards,
including 10 connections with Graham for
76 yards and a 31-yard TD to rookie Brandin
Cooks.
NOTES: San Francisco nose tackle Ian
Williams left the game with an injured leg
and receiver Bruce Ellington left with an
ankle injury. Saints cornerback Keenan
Lewis was carted off in the rst half, then
returned in the third quarter, after the Saints
had said he would not return. Saints safety
Vinnie Sunseri left with an arm injury and
running back Edwin Baker left with a concussion that occurred on a special teams play.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

15

CSM eyes winner-take-all finale Raiders drilled by

Manning, Broncos

By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The season finale between College of


San Mateo and City College of San
Francisco this Saturday will be for all
the marbles.
The winner will win the Bay 6
Conference title. The loser as both
CSM and CCSF have lost to wild-card
favorite American River will likely
be eliminated from the Northern
California playoff bracket.
CSM (4-0 in Bay 6, 8-1 overall) put
itself in position to play for the conference title with its 50-21 victory over
third-place Diablo Valley College (2-2,
6-3), quashing the Vikings postseason
hopes Saturday at College Heights
Stadium.
We thought it was a big game
because they were tight in our playoff
race, CSM safety Taylor Mayshack
said. We know what time it was in the
season. So we had to come out and play
as hard as we could.
Mayshack made the first defensive
play in a dazzling defensive performance for the Bulldogs.
After CSM took its first lead of the
game with a 33-yard field goal by Justin
Watts, Mayshack hit the field with fire
on the first play of DVCs following
drive. The sophomore out of MenloAtherton flew in on a draw play to DVC
running back Marquis Waters and met
him at the line of scrimmage to hold
him to no gain. And even though
after going three-and-out DVC would
score on its following drive, it would be
all the offense the DVC offense would
muster in the first half.
We had to generate some kind of
momentum coming out, Mayshack
said. The first drive is always the most
important, so we had to stop them. If
they score on that first drive, you never
know how the game is going to go on.
That first stop solidified how we went
about it for the rest of the game. So,
thats important.
CSM went into the halftime locker
room with a 31-14 lead, outgaining the
Vikings 318-126 in the first half. The
Bulldogs went on to surpass the 500yard in overall offense by the end of the
third quarter and totaled 588 yards in the
game.
The Bulldogs defense took center
stage though, holding the Vikings to
239 total yards and just seven total
yards rushing. CSM came up with five

By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PATRICK NGUYEN

CSM defensemen Mosa Likio, left, and Adam Sagapolu drill DVCs quarterback to
cause one of four interceptions on the day.
turnovers including four interceptions,
including Mayshacks second of the
year. He also paced the team with five
tackles.
CSM got cooking on offense though.
Freshman quarterback Justin Burgess
was 8-of-15 passing for 239 yards and
two touchdowns and saw his receivers
put on a highlight-reel worthy exhibition throughout. Elias Vargas had a season-high 134 yards on four catches,
including a 34-yard touchdown catch to
end the first quarter, which gave CSM a
10-7 edge after DVC jumped out to its
only lead of the game three minutes previous.
While CSM held a substantial halftime lead, DVC came out in the second
half to close it to 31-21 on a 52-yard
touchdown pass from Adam Wood to
C.J. Cromwell.
Then the Bulldogs receivers cued up
the highlight reel.
They are absolutely awesome,
Burgess said. I can throw just about
any ball to them and they will go get it.
It doesnt matter where its at. These
guys are willing to compete for anything and I love it.
With three minutes remaining in the
third quarter, sophomore Kevin
Kutchera made a dazzling 34-yard catch
to move the ball into DVC territory.
Not to be outdone, two plays later,
sophomore Raeshawn Lee came up with
a 27-yard reception on a sideline fly
route in blanket man-to-man coverage.

Two plays after that, running back


Durell Crooks bulled into the end zone
for a 1-yard score to improve CSMs
lead to 38-21.
Kutchera later added a 33-yard catch to
start the fourth quarter with a headlong
dive out from an all-out sprint to show
off the strength and grace of his hands.
Burgess was levied after releasing the
ball DVC would actually be called for
roughing the passer and only heard
the crowd erupt when Kutchera came up
with what stood as Burgess favorite
catch of the game.
I took a shot and I knew he was
going to be open. I knew he was going
to catch it if I got him the ball, Burgess
said. But I got hit and I had no idea if he
caught it or not. That was probably the
highlight.
With CCSF defeating De Anza on
Saturday, the Bulldogs and the Rams
own identical 4-0 records in conference.
American River fell to Butte 31-28 in a
key Nor Cal Conference matchup. With
the win, Butte (4-0 in Nor Cal, 7-2 overall) locked up the Nor Cal Conference
crown, pushing American River (3-1, 81) into the frontrunner of the wild-card
race. Only an American River loss to
Sacramento City College (2-2, 6-3) this
Saturday would open the door for a wildcard berth out of the Bay 6 Conference.
CSM and CCSF collide this coming
Saturday at CCSF. Kickoff is scheduled
for 1 p.m.

OAKLAND All the good work the Oakland Raiders did


on defense in the first 26 minutes was erased in an instant
when C. J. Anderson broke three tackles and weaved
through the entire unit on the way to a long touchdown.
Peyton Manning followed that score with another four touchdown passes on the next four drives and the Denver Broncos
handed the Raiders their 15th straight loss, 41-17 on Sunday.
There seems to be a play every game that happens to us
and then everything kind of snowballs from there, safety
Charles Woodson said. There were a couple missed tackles,
mine included, which I feel like, man, Im part of the play
that really turned the game around. Thats one Ill be thinking about all night.
Manning had looked rather ordinary before that touchdown, throwing two interceptions and failing to lead
Denver (7-2) into the end zone.
But he was his usual self after it, throwing two passes to
Julius Thomas and two more to Emmanuel Sanders as the
Broncos rebounded from last weeks loss at New England by
beating up on the Raiders (0-9).
Manning threw for 340 yards and extended his record with
at least two touchdown passes to 15 straight games.
Anderson, who grew up in nearby Vallejo and attended
college at California, finished with 90 yards rushing and 73
receiving. Demaryius Thomas had 11 catches for 108 yards.
Derek Carr threw for 192 yards on 47 attempts, most of
the production coming on a meaningless touchdown drive
in the closing minutes. He also had two interceptions. The
running game was limited to 30 yards on 15 carries and the
defense was completely overmatched after a spirited start.
Theyre looking for the gold at the end of the rainbow
and it hasnt been there, Sparano said. We have to stay
the course and believe in the things that were doing and
were getting better as a football team. I know this is not an
indicator of that.

16

SPORTS

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sharks cant overcome big first period by Blackhawks


By Jay Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO Defensemen Trevor van


Riemsdyk, Brent Seabrook and Niklas
Hjalmarsson scored in the first period, and
the Chicago Blackhawks beat the San Jose
Sharks 5-2 on Sunday night.
Bryan Bickell added a big goal in the third
as the Blackhawks stopped a three-game
home losing streak. Corey Crawford made 32
saves, including a nice stop on Patrick
Marleau with Chicago nursing a one-goal
lead with 7:30 left.
Joe Pavelski had two goals for San Jose,
which was coming off a 5-3 victory at Dallas

X-COUNTRY
Continued from page 11
sophomore Sophia Goland had a 22:12.
Half Moon Bay finished with a cumulative
1:41:03. Aragon placed third with a 1:44:49.
In the boys section, Carlmont senior Owen
Lee took the individual title with a 15:42.8 in
a hotly contested finish which saw the top
three runners cross the finish line all within
two seconds of one another.
Lee topped each second-place finisher Anwar
Alghaithy of Westmoor and third-place Johain
Ounadjela of Carlmont by two seconds.
Alghaithy and Ounadjela finished so closely
that their placement was determined by computer chips worn by the competitors. Each registered a final time of 15:44.1 seconds.
I feel great, Alghaithy said following the
race. I had a [personal record] and I missed my
school record by five seconds.

on Saturday night. The Sharks seven-game


road trip continues on Tuesday night at Florida.
The Sharks trailed 3-2 after two periods and
had a chance to tie the game when David
Rundblad was sent off for holding at 9:06 of
the third. But the Blackhawks killed off the
penalty, and Bickell put it away with his second goal of the season with 3:42 remaining.
Jonathan Toews added an empty-netter
with 1:57 left. The captain also had an assist
on van Riemsdyks first career NHL goal.
Antti Niemi finished with 32 stops for
San Jose.
Chicagos scoring spree in the first started
when Toews sent a faceoff back to van
Riemsdyk, who blasted a slap shot by a

screened Niemi 8 minutes into the game.


Seabrook extended the lead to 2-0 at 14:10
when he scored on a one-timer off a pass from
Brad Richards. With the sellout crowd of
21,489 still celebrating Seabrooks third goal,
Hjalmarsson used a nicely placed wrist shot to
record his first goal of the season at 14:34.
It was the first time three defensemen
scored in a single period for Chicago since
Frantisek Kucera, Igor Kravchuk and Steve
Smith scored in the third period of an 8-1 victory over Edmonton on Nov. 27, 1992.
The fast start also came with coach Joel
Quenneville trying a couple of new defensive
pairings. The 23-year-old van Riemsdyk
played with two-time Norris Trophy winner

Duncan Keith, and Seabrook, who struggled


in Friday nights 3-2 loss to Washington,
was alongside Rundblad.
San Jose bounced back quickly after
Hjalmarssons goal. Pavelski had a nice redirection on Justin Brauns slap shot, trimming Chicagos lead to 3-1 at 15:32, and the
Sharks outplayed the Blackhawks for much
of the second period.
San Jose center Joe Thornton was shaken
up after Andrew Shaw hit him on his nose
with his stick in the second period. But
Thornton got his revenge after Shaw was
sent off for high sticking, making a nice
pass through the crease to set up Pavelskis
seventh goal of the season at 4:51.

In fact, Alghaithy
missed the Westmoor
record at Crystal Springs
held by Mohammad Abaad
by a mere four seconds.
But after finishing in 10th
place at the PAL championships last season,
Alghaithy was determined
not to miss qualifying for
Anwar
the Central Coast Section
Alghaithy
finals again. The top
eight finishers at the PAL finals each receive
an automatic bid to CCS.
Alghaithy said the toughest part of running
at Crystal Springs is after the 800-yard mark
of a mile-long lap, where a big bend in the
course doesnt allow runners to see the finish
line until the last 300 yards. He was trailing
Ounadjela for most of the race. But when he
finally caught sight of the finish line, he made
his decisive move.
It was crazy. At that last turn, I made my
move. There was pain everywhere,

Alghaithy said.
But Ounadjela a junior who excels on the
Carlmont track team at both the 800 and
1,600-meter dash seemed to hold off
Alghaithy. The reason for Ounadjelas strong
finish was his past experience.
Ive always had problems with this
course, Ounadjela said. I always end up
dying at the end. But today I went out slow to
save energy and I saved energy for the last
straightaway.
Ounadjela said he didnt see Alghaithy until
he caught him out of his periphery when the
two were side-by-side with approximately 30
meters to go.
If I would have started sprinting two seconds earlier, I would have beat him,
Ounadjela said.
The day belonged to Lee though, who was
determined to learn from experience as well.
Lee has had to contend with the unsettling
memory of last years race, which didnt go
his way. His summation was he cost his team
first place in 2013.

I ran terribly last year, Lee said. That was


part of the reason we got second.
So, Lee and his teammate Michael Bereket
who finished in fourth place with a 15:51.6
ran in tandem up the toughest incline the
hilly course has to offer which is notoriously
known by competitors as Cardiac Hill.
I worked with Michael until the top of
Cardiac Hill, Lee said. I picked it up. Then I
had one of the best kicks ever. I cruised the [first
400 meters] and knew I could kick the last 400.
Carlmont took first place in the team competition with a cumulative time of 1:21:41.
The Scots squad was rounded out by Mark
Vingralek with a 16:35, Mark Palladino with
a 17:49, Mario Valenzuela with an 18:26 and
Juan Quinonez with a 22:47.
Half Moon Bay took second place with a
1:23:50. Menlo-Atherton took third place
with a 1:24:35.
The Half Moon Bay boys finish was
good enough to wrap up the PAL team title
for the season. Menlo-Atherton claimed the
girls season title.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

November Nine resume WSOP today


By Kimberly Pierceall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS This years World Series of


Poker final table is a young mans game.
When nine players take their seats around
a studio-lit poker table at the Rio All-Suite
Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas starting
Monday night to vie for a $10 million top
prize playing Texas Hold em, they will be
among the tournaments youngest and
greenest in recent history, with none having
won a title before.
One is a foosball champion who had never
competed in the World Series of Poker.
Another gets a second chance in a rare backto-back appearance after an early knockout
last year. The rest of the table is made up of
poker players from all over the world
none older than 32.
The average age is 28, not as young as in
2010 but even that year, the oldest player
was 37. Not a one of them has a gold
bracelet, the signature award for the top winner in any of the individual World Series of
Poker events.
The tournament spans seven weeks in
June and July and has attracted close to

PGA briefs
Bubba Watson wins in Shanghai
SHANGHAI Bubba Watson holed a
bunker shot for eagle on the final hole
Sunday, and then made a 20-foot birdie putt
in the playoff to win the HSBC Champions.
Watson defeated Tim Clark, who had made
birdie on the 18th to get in the playoff.
It was the first World Golf Championship title
for Watson, and he wont soon forget the finish.

80,000 people who


played (and paid with
hefty buy-ins) to win in
65 events.
The main event, culminating this week, is just
one of the series events
but certainly the most
watched.
Jorryt van Hoof Dubbed the November
Nine, the finalists have
returned after a four-month break since they
outplayed nearly 6,700 other players who
paid $10,000 each up front to play, among
them some of pokers biggest names. In
addition to the $10 million pot of winnings,
the last player standing also wins one of the
World Series of Pokers coveted gold
bracelets.
There are a few firsts heading into
Monday.
Itll be the first time viewers watching at
home will see every players cards at the
start of the hand. In past years, ESPN would
only reveal everyones cards after the hand
was completed.
Its also the first time a Brazilian has made
it to the tournaments final round. Bruno
Politano, 32, has received characteristically

enthusiastic support from his native country, Palansky said. The player starts with the
lowest chip count, though.
Hes got the toughest climb ahead of
him, Palansky said.
Billy Pappaconstantinou is easily the
first foosball champion to make it to the
final table after entering the World Series of
Poker for the first time. Now hes eight
opponents away from $10 million, the only
amateur at a table of pros.
Sitting a few seats away from
Pappaconstantinou will be 29-year-old
Mark Newhouse, the only player who has
experienced the final table before and, to
add to the distinction, did so in back-to-back
years a feat unheard of since 2004. He was
the first player knocked out last year.
Norwegian Felix Stephensen, 24, got to
the tournament after making an unlikely
and lucky bet, putting down $1,000 at
60-to-1 odds that Netherlands would beat
Australia 3-2 in a World Cup match. After
becoming $60,000 richer, he and a friend
who joined the bet left London for Las Vegas
to enter the World Series.
The nine final players will compete to be
one of two or three players vying for the top
prize Tuesday evening.

The two-time Masters champion had control until a sloppy bogey on the 16th hole
and a double bogey on the 17th hole when
he took two shots from the bunker. That left
him one shot behind, and he appeared to be
destined for a runner-up finish at best until
his bunker shot left of the 18th green rolled
the final 25 feet into the cup.

Sanderson Farms Championship, shooting


a 6-under 66 on Sunday for a two-stroke victory over Boo Weekley and Jason Bohn.
The 26-year-old Taylor, the first Canadian
winner on the PGA Tour since Mike Weir in
2007, played the front nine in 4 under to
pull even with the leaders and took control
with birdies on Nos. 13, 14 and 15.
Taylor three-putted for bogey on No. 18 after
taking a three-shot lead into the final hole. He
finished at 16-under 272 at the Country Club of
Jackson and earned $720,000.

Taylor shoots 66 at Sanderson Farms


JACKSON, Miss. Nick Taylor overcame a four-shot deficit to win the

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Monday Nov. 10, 2014

17

Federer wins
at ATP Finals
By Samuel Petrequin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON Experience prevailed over


youth as Roger Federer tamed Milos Raonic
6-1, 7-6 (0) in his opening round-robin
match at the ATP Finals Sunday after Kei
Nishikori started his maiden campaign at
the season-ending tournament with a win.
Federer, the most successful player at the elite
championship, produced
a flawless performance
against the 23-year-old
Raonic, the youngest
player of the field at the
indoor tournament.
The 17-time Grand
Roger Federer Slam champion, chasing
a seventh title, saved all
four break points he faced to avenge his loss
to the big-serving Canadian in the quarterfinals of the Paris Masters last week.
Raonic did not play as freely as he did in
the French capital while Federer, who is ten
years older than Raonic, returned much better
to break his opponent twice in the first set.
Raonic hit 10 aces to Federers five and
gave the Swiss a tougher challenge in the
second set as both players held until the
tiebreak after Federer saved a set point with
a service winner in the 12th game.
Earlier, Nishikori started his campaign
with a 6-4, 6-4 win over home favorite Andy
Murray, who is now facing an uphill task to
reach the elite tournaments semifinals.

18

SPORTS

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

OTL
Continued from page 11
And he does have ambitions of
playing defense at the next level.
He works out at the same gym in
Millbrae as do several College of
San Mateo coaches. So,
Tumanuvao-Hata said he intends
to play there where he will
likely convert to outside linebacker with hopes of eventually transferring to a four-year program.
In the meantime, Tumanuvao-Hata
is closing his high school career by
making his mark on the offensive
side of the ball. And the merits of
performance showed up in the box
score big time in Campos gamehigh rushing column.
The left tackle position became
available when several Cap linemen
became academically ineligible
prior to last weeks game. So, to fill
the void, Tumanuvao-Hata went
from occasionally filling in on the
O-line as a backup to making his
first start on offense Friday.
I noticed our team needed it, so
someone had to step up and play the
position right, Tumanuvao-Hata
said.
That he did. The second-year varsity player joined the likes of
fourth-year varsity offensive linemen Sione Moala (right tackle),
Enrique Grajeda (center) and
Anthony Vazquez (right guard). But
after the Mustangs jumped ahead 7-0
on a first-quarter Tony Pellegrini
touchdown pass to Juan Rodriguez,
the team went to the ground attack
by running two of the next four
plays to the left side.
Both of those left-side runs went
for long touchdowns.
Campos first score came at the
end of the first half. On third-and-8
from the Capuchino 40-yard line,
Campos exploited a seam through
the left side to go untouched into
the open field before sprinting up
the left sideline with a key downfield block from Rodriguez.
Capuchinos defense stopped
the early momentum of Jeffersons
next possession, forcing the

Indians to punt
just shy of midfield. Less than
a minute into
the second quarter, on
Capuchinos
first play of the
ensuing drive,
Josiah
Campos sprung
Tumanuvao- another run
Hata
through the left
with help from a pulling block by
right guard Iloilo Amataga.
Jefferson defensive back Ahmed
Esmail caught up with Campos
inside the 10-yard line, but
Campos was able to tumble across
the goal line as Esmail brought
him down.
Once Campos had gotten 10 yards
past the line of scrimmage though,
Tumanuvao-Hata enjoyed the fruits
of his blocking labor as a birds-eye
spectator, and said he never doubted
Campos known as one of the
fastest players on the Mustangs
roster would reach the end zone.
He was in open field and I knew
that he was going home,
Tumanuvao-Hata said.
Campos would go on to add his
third touchdown run midway
through the second quarter on a 5yard blast through a wall of left-side
blockers.
The win was a crucial one for the
Mustangs. Currently 5-4 overall and
3-1 in PAL Lake Division play, the
victory guarantees them of finishing with at least a .500 overall
record and above the .500 mark in
league. That is an epic turnaround
under first-year head coach Ben
White after Capuchino went winless
in league and 1-9 overall a year ago.
I felt really bad for the seniors
(last year) because we went 1-9
that we went out like,
Tumanuvao-Hata said. I thought we
could have done better.
Tumanuvao-Hata proved to be correct this season with Capuchino
turning around its fortunes with
much of the same personnel.
Terry Bernal can be reached by email:
terry@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
344-5200 ext. 109.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OSAKA, Japan Boston Red


Sox manager John Farrell is looking forward to seeing Japanese
pitching sensation Shohei Otani
during Major League Baseballs
all-star postseason tour of Japan.
Farrell and 29 major league players arrived in Osaka on Sunday night
ahead of their five-game series
against Japan starting Wednesday.
The MLB all-stars will also play two
exhibition games during their tour.

Farrell, who
is managing the
MLB squad, singled out Otani
as the player he
is most interested in.
The 20-yearold right-hander
John Farrell went 11-4 with
179 strikeouts
and a 2.61 ERA this season for the
Nippon Ham Fighters. Otani also
plays the outfield for the Fighters
and posted a respectable .274 batting average with 10 home runs and
31 RBIs in 87 games. He is expected
to pitch Game 5 at Sapporo Dome.

NHL GLANCE

NFL GLANCE

MLB briefs
Farrell eager to see Otani
on MLB trip to Japan

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Tampa Bay
Montreal
Detroit
Boston
Toronto
Ottawa
Florida
Buffalo

Atlantic Division
GP W L OT
15 11 3 1
15 10 4 1
15 7 3 5
15 9 6 0
15 8 5 2
14 7 4 3
12 4 4 4
16 3 11 2

Pts
23
21
19
18
18
17
12
8

GF
58
37
40
43
47
38
20
20

GA
41
42
37
35
42
34
30
54

Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT
Pittsburgh 13 10 2 1
N.Y. Islanders14 9 5 0
Philadelphia 14 7 5 2
Washington 14 6 5 3
New Jersey 14 6 6 2
N.Y. Rangers 14 6 6 2
Carolina
13 4 6 3
Columbus 14 4 9 1

Pts
21
18
16
15
14
14
11
9

GF
55
42
45
45
38
39
31
36

GA
27
42
43
42
45
46
43
51

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W
Nashville
14 9
St. Louis
14 9
Winnipeg 15 8
Chicago
14 7
Minnesota 13 7
Colorado 16 4
Dallas
14 4

L
3
4
5
6
6
7
6

OT
2
1
2
1
0
5
4

Pts
20
19
18
15
14
13
12

GF
35
35
30
36
37
40
40

GA
28
28
32
26
29
50
50

Pacific Division
GP W L
Anaheim 16 10 3
Vancouver 16 11 5
Calgary
16 9 5
Los Angeles 15 8 4
Sharks
15 8 5
Arizona
14 6 7
Edmonton 15 6 8

OT
3
0
2
3
2
1
1

Pts
23
22
20
19
18
13
13

GF
41
49
49
37
48
34
38

GA
32
44
41
30
41
47
51

Saturdays Games
Winnipeg 2, Ottawa 1, SO
Calgary 6, Florida 4
Pittsburgh 6, Buffalo 1
Toronto 5, N.Y. Rangers 4
Montreal 4, Minnesota 1
Philadelphia 4, Colorado 3
Tampa Bay 7, Columbus 4
Washington 4, Carolina 3, OT
Nashville 2, St. Louis 1
San Jose 5, Dallas 3
N.Y. Islanders 1, Arizona 0
Los Angeles 5, Vancouver 1
Sundays Games
Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 3, SO
Edmonton 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
Toronto 5, Ottawa 3
Chicago 5, San Jose 2
Vancouver 2, Anaheim 1
Mondays Games
New Jersey at Boston, 4 p.m.
Calgary at Carolina, 4 p.m.

AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T
New England
7 2 0
Buffalo
5 4 0
Miami
5 4 0
N.Y. Jets
2 8 0

Yankees sign ex-As OF


Young to 1-year contract
NEW YORK The New York
Yankees have signed outfielder
Chris Young to a one-year contract,
rewarding him after his strong run
in September. The Yankees
announced the deal Sunday.
The 31-year-old Young started
this year with the New York Mets
and was released in early August
after a season-long slump. He
made his debut with the Yankees in
early September and homered in
three straight games, then stole
home in another game.

NBA GLANCE

Pct
.778
.556
.556
.200

PF
281
191
227
174

PA
198
182
171
265

South
Indianapolis
Houston
Tennessee
Jacksonville

W
6
4
2
1

L
3
5
7
9

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
.667
.444
.222
.100

PF
290
206
144
158

PA
211
197
223
282

North
Cleveland
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Baltimore

W
6
5
6
6

L
3
3
4
4

T
0
1
0
0

Pct
.667
.611
.600
.600

PF
209
197
261
261

PA
172
211
239
181

West
Denver
Kansas City
San Diego
Raiders

W
7
6
5
0

L
2
3
4
9

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
.778
.667
.556
.000

PF
286
217
205
146

PA
202
151
186
252

NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T
Philadelphia
6 2 0
Dallas
7 3 0
N.Y. Giants
3 6 0
Washington
3 6 0

Pct
.750
.700
.333
.333

PF PA
234 177
261 212
195 247
197 229

South
New Orleans
Carolina
Atlanta
Tampa Bay

W
4
3
3
1

L
5
5
6
8

T
0
1
0
0

Pct
.444
.389
.333
.111

PF
251
177
219
167

PA
225
236
238
272

North
Detroit
Green Bay
Minnesota
Chicago

W
7
5
4
3

L
2
3
5
5

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
.778
.625
.444
.375

PF
182
222
168
180

PA
142
191
199
222

West
Arizona
Seattle
49ers
St. Louis

W
8
6
5
3

L
1
3
4
6

T
0
0
0
0

Pct
PF
.889 223
.667 240
.556 195
.333 163

PA
170
191
202
251

Thursdays Game
Cleveland 24, Cincinnati 3
Sundays Games
San Francisco 27, New Orleans 24, OT
Kansas City 17, Buffalo 13
Detroit 20, Miami 16
Baltimore 21, Tennessee 7
N.Y. Jets 20, Pittsburgh 13
Atlanta 27, Tampa Bay 17
Dallas 31, Jacksonville 17
Denver 41, Oakland 17
Seattle 38, N.Y. Giants 17
Arizona 31, St. Louis 14
Chicago at Green Bay, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Houston, Indianapolis, Minnesota, New England, San Diego, Washington
Mondays Game
Carolina at Philadelphia, 5:30 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
6
Brooklyn
4
Boston
3
New York
2
Philadelphia
0
Southeast Division
W
Miami
5
Washington
5
Charlotte
3
Atlanta
2
Orlando
2
Central Division
W
Chicago
5
Milwaukee
3
Cleveland
2
Detroit
2
Indiana
1

L
1
2
3
5
7

Pct
.857
.667
.500
.286
.000

GB

1 1/2
2 1/2
4
6

L
2
2
4
3
5

Pct
.714
.714
.429
.400
.286

GB

2
2
3

L
2
4
3
4
6

Pct
.714
.429
.400
.333
.143

GB

2
2
2 1/2
4

Pct
.857
.857
.600
.571
.400

GB

2
2
3

Pct
.571
.429
.333
.286
.167

GB

1
1 1/2
2
2 1/2

Pct
.833
.714
.667
.571
.167

GB

1/2
1
1 1/2
4

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Memphis
6
1
Houston
6
1
New Orleans
3
2
Dallas
4
3
San Antonio
2
3
Northwest Division
W
L
Portland
4
3
Utah
3
4
Minnesota
2
4
Oklahoma City
2
5
Denver
1
5
Pacific Division
W
L
5
1
Warriors
Sacramento
5
2
L.A. Clippers
4
2
Phoenix
4
3
L.A. Lakers
1
5

Sundays Games
Brooklyn 104, Orlando 96
Utah 97, Detroit 96
Oklahoma City 101, Sacramento 93
Toronto 120, Philadelphia 88
Miami 105, Dallas 96
Phoenix 107, Golden State 95
Portland 116, Denver 100
L.A. Lakers 107, Charlotte 92
Mondays Games
Utah at Indiana, 4 p.m.
New Orleans at Cleveland, 4 p.m.
Atlanta at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

DATEBOOK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

19

Big Hero 6, Interstellar soar at box office


By Derrik J. Lang

said Paul Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for Rentrak. By opening a diversity of
product against each other, the industry can
expand the marketplace. Its a perfect example of counterprogramming. It paid off for
the industry, and it just doesnt happen that
often.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES A team of animated


Marvel characters rocketed past a group of
wormhole-bound astronauts at the weekend
box office.
Disneys animated adventure Big Hero
6, featuring the inflatable robot Baymax
and his prodigy pal Hiro from the Marvel
comic book, debuted in first place with
$56.2 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. Paramounts space saga
Interstellar,
starring
Matthew
McConaughey and Anne Hathaway as astronauts, took off in second place with $50
million, estimates said.
Before launching in more than 3,500 theaters this weekend, writer-director
Christopher Nolans Interstellar played
Wednesday and Thursday in about 250 theaters equipped to project the movie on film
The Dark Knight filmmakers preferred
method of showcasing his creations.
Interstellar opened below Nolans last
film,
the
mind-bending
thriller
Inception, which conjured up $62.8 million when it debuted in 2010. Nolans sci-fi
odyssey also wasnt in the orbit of last
years $55. 8 million opening for
Paramounts
previous
space
epic,
Gravity. Interstellar has a hefty running
time of 169 minutes, while Gravity

any San Mateo County residents probably think of


PHS/SPCA as the dog and cat
place. Dogs and cats are our most common
visitors, but not our only ones, by far. For

Top 10 movies

REUTERS

REUTERS

Directors of the animated movieBig Hero 6


Don Hall, right, and Chris Williams pose for a
portrait at Disney Animation Studios in
Burbank.

Actors Anne Hathaway and Matthew


McConaughey arrive for the European
premiere ofInterstellarin Leicester Square in
London.

clocked in at 91 minutes.
The difference is Interstellar isnt in
3D, and certainly the running time on our
film does change the play pattern in that
you lose an evening show, said Megan
Colligan, Paramounts head of domestic
marketing and distribution. Given those
factors, we did spectacularly well. Gravity
also opened by itself. We had another big
film in the marketplace.
If the estimates hold up, this weekend will

mark the fourth time in box office history


that a pair of films both opened with $50
million or above. The previous matchups
were Monsters University vs. World War
Z in 2013, Madagascar 3: Europes Most
Wanted vs. Prometheus in 2012, and
WALL-E vs. Wanted in 2008. In each
instance, the animated option came out on
top.
Both movies were able to do well without cannibalizing each others audiences,

example, we do quite a bit with birds, both


winged pets and wildlife. On the pet end,
we receive owner-surrendered pet birds for
many of the same reasons we receive
unwanted dogs and cats. Though one reason given at the time of relinquishment is
a classic. A man surrendered his cockatoo
because the bird kept saying his ex-wifes
name, which didnt sit well with his new
wife! On the wildlife end, we receive sick,
injured and orphaned songbirds,
ducks/ducklings, gulls, geese, red-shouldered and red-tailed hawks, several kinds
of owls, even occasional pelicans. The
goal with the wild birds is to make them
better as soon as we can, not imprint on
them (so they remain wild), then release

them back into their natural habitat once


they have healed or matured in our care. It
is this work with wild birds that led to us
hosting a special event this Thursday, 7
p.m.-8:30 p.m., at our Center for
Compassion in Burlingame. Were welcoming Stephanie Ellis, executive director
of the Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society.
In her talk titled Birds in the Big Cities,
Stephanie will discuss successful efforts to
reverse a decline of the Western Burrowing
Owl population. Then, shell switch gears
and talk about bird-safe building design.
Its estimated that hundreds of thousands,
if not millions, of birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions
with reective windows on buildings.

1.Big Hero 6, $56.2 million ($7.6 million


international).
3. Interstellar, $50 million ($80 million
international).
3. Gone Girl, $6.1 million ($8.5 million
international).
4. Ouija, $6 million ($3.2 million
international).
5.St. Vincent, $5.7 million.
6. Nightcrawler, $5.5 million ($1 million
international).
7. Fury, $5.5 million ($7 million
international).
8. John Wick, $4 million. ($1.8 million
international).
9.Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No
Good, Very Bad Day, $3.5 million ($1.7
million international).
10. The Book of Life, $2.8 million ($3.5
million international).

Stephanie will explain how her group has


been working with major cities and large
corporations in the San Francisco Bay
Area to encourage them to adopt bird-safe
building alternatives. Just before we introduce Stephanie, well share a few words
about PHS/SPCAs wildlife rehabilitation
work, including the kinds of injuries we
treat. Our event is free.
Scott ov ersees PHS/SPCAs Adoption,
Behav ior and Training, Education, Outreach,
Field Serv ices, Cruelty Inv estigation,
Volunteer and Media/PR program areas and
staff from the new Tom and Annette Lantos
Center for Compassion.

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20

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

On Oct. 27, the Rotary Club of Burlingame presented $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits
Apple Tree Dental, StarVista, Burlingame High Schools Camp Everytown program, Palcare
and CALL Primrose. Seen at the presentation are, from left to right, Terri Boesch, CALL
Primrose manager; Di Yim, Burlingame High School principal; Laurie Hudelson, Burlingame
High School teacher; Mary Murphy, Burlingame Rotary Club president; Chris Gallagher,
district governor of Rotary District 5150; Stacy Gephart, StarVista volunteer; Sara Larios
Mitchell, CEO of StarVista; Lisa Kiesselbach, executive director of Palcare; and Dick Gregory,
director of Apple Tree Dental. The Rotary Club of Burlingame, chartered in 1925, has been
in existence more than 85 of Rotary Internationals 100 years. For information, visit
burlingamerotary.org.

San Mateo County Supervisor Adrienne Tissier, with Elaine Pitts and Helen Long,
both 97, from San Carlos, and U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, at the 27th annual
Seniors on the Move conference in San Mateo Oct. 28. Pitts and Longs secrets to
longevity? Pitts said to pay attention to the things that matter and dont pay too
much attention to yourself. Long exercises three times a week at the San Carlos
Community Center.

Andrew Sweatt and Kirsten Regalia of San


Carlos, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 27, 2014.

of Palo Alto, gave birth to a baby girl at


Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 28,
2014.

Michael and Regan Musgrave of Alamo,


gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Oct. 27, 2014.

Ryan and Dianne David of South San


Francisco, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 28, 2014.

Michael Balestreri and Tara Jaramillo of


San Carlos, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 27,
2014.

Cesar and Marcella Garcia of Redwood City,


gave birth to a baby girl at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Oct. 28, 2014.

Robert Yan and Vu Trang of San Carlos, gave


birth to a baby boy at Sequioa Hospital in
Redwood City Oct. 31, 2014.

Andrew and Grace Ramos of San Mateo,


gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Oct. 30, 2014.

Jeremy and Marilyn Chan of Redwood City,


gave birth to a baby girl at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Nov. 1, 2014.

Jose Reza Ocampo and Ana Mata Venegas


of Redwood City, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 30,
2014.

Martin and Rebecca Frid-Nielsen of Menlo


Park, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Nov. 2, 2014.

Viacheslav Chernoy and Lena Leikin of


Redwood City, gave birth to a baby boy at

Paul and Vanessa Hughes of San Mateo,


gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Nov. 3, 2014.

Christian Eversull and Rebecca Brunson


of Palo Alto, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 27,
2014.
Gregory and Helene Dong of Redwood City,
gave birth to a baby girl at Sequioa Hospital
in Redwood City Oct. 28, 2014.
Seth Sankaran and Priya Rajasethupathy

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Sequioa Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 30,


2014.
Clifford and Natalie Whearley of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby boy at Sequioa
Hospital in Redwood City Oct. 31, 2014.

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birth to a baby boy at Sequioa Hospital in
Redwood City Nov. 3, 2014.
Juan and Amy Aranda of Redwood City,
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in Redwood City Nov. 3, 2014.
Terrance Dotsy and Sandra Rodriguez of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby girl at
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THE DAILY JOURNAL

WATER
Continued from page 1
Boards declaration of a water emergency
July 15 that required cities and agencies to
implement their individual conservation
plans to the point of enacting mandatory
restrictions.
Although Foster City along with other
Bay Area cities have succeeded in meeting
distributors
conservation
requests,
Councilman Herb Perez said its important
to acknowledge the statewide impacts of the
drought.
Its hard for people to understand were in a
drought. Im driving around Foster City and
we have these beautiful trees, beautiful land-

HISTORY
Continued from page 1
In 1868, the Sausalito Land and Ferry
Company organized to develop real estate
in Sausalito. They started a ferry service
that ran from Meiggs Wharf (North
Beach) to Princess Street in Sausalito. In
1907, the Northwest Pacific Railroad, or
NWP, was formed by merging seven railroads (Later, the Southern Pacific acquired
ownership of the NWP). Now passengers
could travel to Mount Tamalpais and to the
Russian River via railroad or electric train.
Sister ships San Rafael and Sausalito were
built in 1877. On Nove. 30, 1901, a foggy
day, the San Rafael was rammed and sank

LOCAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

21

scape. You dont really see the effects of the


drought because were not an agricultural community, Perez said. At some point we will be
affected by the drought. This is a social
statement, we as a community value our community as far as being environmentally sound
and environmentally sustainable.
Foster City has been cutting back on
water usage consistently over the last few
years and reduced consumption by nearly 30
percent, but it will become increasingly difficult to conserve as time passes, said
Public Works Maintenance Manager Norm
Dorias.
Weve already reduced a whole bunch, so
all the easy stuff is gone. So its in smaller
increments and were certainly conscious of
the water issues. Its a huge issue in our
community and in our state, Dorias said.
Foster City is not alone in implementing

mandatory outdoor water restrictions as


Redwood City, San Carlos, the San
Francisco and the California Water Service
Company, which services portions of San
Mateo and South San Francisco, have followed the states directives.
Police will be responsible for issuing
fines, however its unlikely they will patrol
for violators, Perez said. Instead, the city
will respond to complaints or reports, Perez
said.
A culprit could receive a $100 fine for
their first offense, $200 for breaking the
new law a second time and up to $500 for
each additional violation within a year,
according to the report.
Instead of jumping to penalizing residents, the city will first focus on education
and giving warnings, but it will follow
through on repeat offenders, Councilman

Gary Pollard and Dorias said.


Its more to stay in line with conservation to make sure people are aware and were
limited in water. So fines are there to just
keep pushing the message to watch the
water waste, because were not getting it
back, Pollard said. The key with any of
these fines, its no different than the [fines
for violating the smoking ordinance], is we
educate them first, make sure theyre aware,
and if theyre going to abuse the system
than they need to be held accountable.

near Alcatraz Island by the Sausalito.


Many members of the boat were killed and
this incident inspired Jack London to
write the novel, Sea Wolf.
Ferries, such as the steamer Requa, ran
between Tiburon, Belvedere and Sausalito.
Ferries ran from Richmonds Castro Point
to San Rafael and carried patrons as well as
Alcatraz prisoners destined for a vacation
at the prison. During World War II, the Key
Route was connected from Oakland to the
shipyards of Kaisers at Richmond.
Thousands of workers were able to get to
work on time due to this gesture by the
Key Line.
The Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and
Transportation District was formed to better serve the North Bay passengers to
Sausalito and Larkspur. It still operates its

ferry system, the only one owned and


operated by a bridge company. In 2001,
the company put into service the M.V.
Mendocino, the newest of its five ferries
for the North Bay. This is a high-speed
catamaran that operates regularly between
Larkspur and San Francisco. The Blue and
Gold Fleet operates to Tiburon. One of the
only family-owned ferries goes between
Tiburon and Angel Island. Ninety-oneyear-old Capt. Milton McDonogh,
although retired, helps out Capt. Maggie
McDonogh, the fourth generation to work
on the ferry. Passengers going across
Raccoon Strait to Angel Island find this is
the only and very short trip by a ferry in
the Bay.

to remember all. Oops, forgot the ferries


the go to Alcatraz Island for an afternoon.
The North Beach Pier 39 is constantly
busy with ferries coming in and out daily.
A new ferry service had been started from
South San Francisco in the last couple of
years. It services Alameda/Oakland and
will service travelers to San Francisco
soon.
To learn more about the ferry services of
San Francisco Bay, check out Ferries of
San Francisco Bay by Paul Trimble with
William Knorp. This is an Images of
America, Acadia Publishers book with
ISBN 13 978-0-7385-4731-2.

There are more ferry services to report if


I had enough time and energy and ability

For more information or to see a complete


list of forbidden outdoor water uses v isit
www.fostercity.org.

samantha@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106

Rediscov ering the Peninsula by Darold


Fredrick s appears in the Monday edition of
the Daily Journal.

22

LOCAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

PROP. 47
Continued from page 1
already burdened by budget cuts and truncated
hours, will also be pinch.
However, on Friday morning, members of
Peninsula Interfaith Action, local clergy and
Board of Supervisors President Dave Pine
one of two supervisors who disagreed with the
county formally opposing the measure
focused on what they said is a correct shift
toward redemption and the root causes of
crime.
Voters have said its time to give people a
second chance, Pine said.
The measure netted 58 percent statewide and
nearly 70 percent support locally on Election
Day, making San Mateo County sixth
statewide in overall approval.

Benefits
One of the people grateful for the propositions passage is Sara Glascock who in
September also shared with the Board of
Supervisors her story of wanting to become a
licensed architect but being hamstrung by
past drug convictions. Proposition 47 will
help people like her and her loved ones who
also are challenged by addiction-fueled crime,
she said.
When I look at family photos, I dont see
people who belong in prison, Glascock
said. My daughter deserves a stepfather who
is employable.
The crimes affected are shoplifting, grand
theft, receiving stolen property, check forgery, writing bad checks and drug possession
all with a $950 or less value cap.
Possession of drugs like cocaine and heroin
are also a misdemeanor. Anyone with convictions for certain violent crimes like murder or
sex offenses are not eligible.
The money saved from reduced prison and
parole populations, estimated between $100
million to $250 million, will be redirected
into programs for truancy, victim services
and mental health and drug abuse treatment in
hopes that they keep people from entering or
returning to the criminal justice system.
Individuals already convicted can have their
felony charges reduced to misdemeanors and
ultimately expunged off their record, opening
the door to housing, employment and financial aid that is otherwise prohibited.
This gives people an opportunity to pull
themselves up by their bootstraps, said
Milena Blake, of ballot sponsor Californians
for Safety and Justice,.
Teshone Jones, an organizer with the San
Francisco Organizing Project/ Peninsula
Interfaith Action, or SFOP/PIA, said one man
she knows has been unemployed for five
years because of a low-level drug conviction.

Hundreds of thousands of Californians will


be eligible to clean up their records and tens
of thousands fewer will be prison-eligible
annually, according to statistics provide by
Jones.

Local cost
One uncertainly is how fast any of this can
happen and how much it might cost.
Its hard for us. It will require more manpower in an already stretched system, said
Judge Foiles of the San Mateo County
Superior Court.
Foiles said the courts are already fielding
phone calls from people wanting to make
immediate modifications but that certain
groups must be prioritized. Those just coming
into custody can have their charges filed under
the new guidelines by the District Attorneys
Office thats the easy part although misdemeanors are an entirely different calendar than
felonies which means shifting already limited
resources.
Another category are those who havent yet
been convicted but have been charged as
felonies. They need to get to court quicker to
modify the complaint which in turn might
mean a lower bail amount or even release on
their own recognizance.
Felony probationers will need to move into
misdemeanor probation and those completely finished will want modification to a misdemeanor on their record for possible expungement.
Were going to see a surge of people coming in and wanting immediate relief. The question is how, already being so impacted with a
third fewer employees and few commissioners. Its more strain on the courts, Foiles
said.
Foiles said it is essentially an unfunded
mandate and hopes Gov. Jerry Brown will
restore more statewide court funding which
has taken significant hits in recent years.
We definitely have to do it, but nobody is
giving us any more money, he said.
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said he
may need to ask the county for money for the
manpower needed the first year or two. His
office files just under 3,000 felony cases a
year and the rough estimate is that about
1,000 may be affected. San Mateo County
will likely see more resentencings than
Alameda or San Francisco because those
counties have more violent crimes, he said.
Its an enormous change. Its probably
realignment quality, he said, referring to the
program that shifted state prisoners to county
jails.
Wagstaffe said the office is currently
reviewing individual case files to see which
ones qualify for resentencing, which ones
they might want and be able to oppose.
One beneficiary is Carlos Alberto Moo
Lopez, convicted by a jury of felony cocaine
possession in September. His crime is now a

THE DAILY JOURNAL

misdemeanor when he is sentenced in


December.

STRIKE

Impact on jail

Continued from page 1

Sheriff Greg Munks doesnt think the legal


shift will impact the already overcrowded jails
too significantly in the short term although
that may change down the road as inmates
that previously went to prison stay local. In
the present, Munks expects that many state
prisoners who qualify for resentencing will
have enough credit accumulated already so
wont need transfer back to the local jail.
Lower bail amounts or release will also ease
population.
After the measure passed, Munks said jail
staff looked at those arrested but not yet
arraigned. Six booked in on felonies now
qualify as misdemeanors and were cited out of
custody, he said.
Proposition 47 will also affect who gets
taken into custody at all.
Munks said law enforcement cant arrest for
misdemeanors that dont occur in their presence so, for example, credit card theft and
property crimes will require a case submitted
to the district attorney for consideration and
issuance of a warrant.
But warrants for misdemeanors dont typically justify the time and resources needed to
find and apprehend the suspects, Munks and
Wagstaffe both said.
Theres no point, Wagstaffe said.

Munks said he doesnt oppose making


change to the justice system such as increasing the value amounts of crimes to adjust for
inflation but still worries that the stick and
carrot approach to rehabilitation has now
lost its stick.
I think well see a big dropoff on those
accepting the programs and see more of these
guys cycling through, he said.
While Munks and Wagstaffe are concerned
that repeat criminals will receiving the same
punishment no matter how many times they
commit the same offense, measure proponents see it as a positive change for those facing draconian sentencing in crimes of need.
We no longer have to worry about those
mothers who stole diapers and went to
prison, said Paul Bains, pastor at St. Samuel
Church of God in Christ in East Palo Alto.
The law change is a benefit not only to
those whove committed a crime but to society as a whole, said Jennifer Martinez, codirector of SFOP/PIA.
Redemption and investment in our people
is better than investment in our jails,
Martinez said.

the California Nurses Association and


affiliates of Global Nurses United.
Burn said Kaiser is well prepared for a
strike and its contingency plan includes
the use of temporary nurses whove
already been trained on Kaiser equipment
and protocol.
Talks between the registered nurses and
Kaiser stalled Thursday, leading to the
announcement of the planned strike,
according to NNU.
Kaiser continues bargaining in good
faith but the union has not responded to
its offers, Burn said.
Rowe said in a prepared statement that
Kaiser has cut hospital services and
imposed sharp restrictions for admissions and discharges.
In our emergency department we are
holding patients who should be admitted
to the hospital. These elderly patients are
kept on uncomfortable gurneys for many
hours, unable to rest or sleep because of
the noise and influx of patients, Rowe
said.
Burn said he doesnt know to what shes
referring.
Kaiser has left 2, 000 RN and nurse
practitioner positions unfilled, according to NNU.
Kaisers staffing levels are different at
different facilities but all meet standard
nursing ratios, Ford said.
Along with overall patient safety standards, the nurses argue Kaiser needs to use
personal protective equipment and provide training in preparation for possible
Ebola patients. The equipment demand
includes a full-body hazmat suit that
exposes no skin and air purifying respirators approved by the National Institute
for Occupational Safety and Health.
Kaiser has different equipment for different safety levels up to suits that
expose no skin and the organizations
preparedness protocol has evolved along
with those from groups like the National
Institutes of Health and the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, Burn
said.
Kaiser spokesman Karl Sonkin also
said that the organization has a regional
command center operating every day.

michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102

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DATEBOOK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
MONDAY, NOV. 10
Candy Buy-Back. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Alborzi Orthodontics, 235 N. San
Mateo Drive, No. 300, San Mateo.
Participants receive $1 for every
pound of candy (limit 10 pounds),
plus Dr. Alborzi will donate $1
Coastside Hope. All Candy will be
donated to the Food Bank. For more
information
go
to
www.gotosmile.com.
Living Healthy. 10 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Little House Activity Center, 800
Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Weekly sessions offering practical techniques
and support for making the best
choices for health and well-being. To
register call 326-2025 or email knwachob@peninsulavolunteers.org.
Sons in retirement branch 91
monthly luncheon. 11 a.m. South
San Francisco Elks Lodge, 920
Southgate Drive, South San
Francisco. Cost for lunch is $16 to
$19. For more information call Lee
Severe at 595-1973.
Car Give Away to a Veteran. Noon.
Vans Restaurant, 815 Belmont Ave.,
Belmont. Belmont rotary will be giving a vehicle to a deserving veteran.
Free. For more information email
ralph@kirbergmotors.com.
Burlingame Music Club. 1 p.m.
Burlingame Womens Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. An afterrnoon of
classical music, art and refreshments. Free. For more information go
to www.burlingamemusicclub.net
or call 344-5213.
Crafting at the Library: Holiday
Cards. 6 p.m. South San Francisco
Main Library, 840 W. Orange Avenue,
South San Francisco. For more information email torres-volken@plsinfo.org.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free and open to the
public. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
TUESDAY, NOV. 11
Veterans Day Observance. 10:30
a.m. Golden Gate National Cemetery,
1300 Sneath Lane, San Bruno. The
program will include music, singers,
poetry, San Mateo County Sheriffs
Office Honor Guard and a Blue Star
family wreath presentation. Free.
Following the event, the public is
invited to an $8, no-host luncheon at
the American Legion Hall. To RSVP or
for more information call 355-5533.
Sip and Savor The Best of San
Mateo. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
College of San Mateo Bayview
Dining Room, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,
San Mateo. Local restaurants, wine
and spirits establishments, specialty
food stores and businesses associated with food and beverage are a
part of the food lineup and festivities. $25 for members, $30 for nonmembers. For more information go
to www.sanmateochamber.org.
Rotary Connects. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
SBM Fitness, 1019 El Camino Real,
Menlo Park. The business community invited to attend and connect
with other local business leaders,
community leaders and Rotary
Members. $20. Appetizers, wine, and
nonalcoholic beverages included.
RSVP to Yuhui Chen at yuhuifitness@gmail.com or Brett Caviness at
brettcaviness@gmail.com.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 12
Candy Buy-Back. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Alborzi Orthodontics, 235 N. San
Mateo Drive, No. 300, San Mateo.
Participants receive $1 for every
pound of candy (limit 10 pounds),
plus Dr. Alborzi will donate $1
Coastside Hope. All Candy will be
donated to the Food Bank. For more
information
go
to
www.gotosmile.com.
Medicare 2015: is it time to review
your drug coverage for 2015? 10
a.m. to noon. San Carlos Library, 610
Elm St., San Carlos. Free and open to
the public. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
E-book 101. 11 a.m. South San
Francisco Main Library, 840 W.
Orange Avenue, South San
Francisco. For more information
email torres-volken@plsinfo.org.
18th Annual Indicators for a
Sustainable San Mateo County
Fall Launch. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
San Mateo Main Library, 55 W 3rd
Ave., San Mateo. For more information contact advocate@sustainablesanmateo.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
4th Ave., San Mateo. Free admission,
but lunch is $17. For more information call 430-6500 or see www.sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Club Fox Blues Jam with
Noteman Jarvis Band. 7 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.
$7. For more information call 877435-9849.

Advance Directives for Health


Care and Durable Power for
Finances by Attorney Thomas P.
Feledy. 7 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610
Elm St., San Carlos. Free and open to
the public. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
THURSDAY NOV. 13
San Carlos Library Quilting Club.
10 a.m. to noon. San Carlos Library,
610 Elm St., San Carlos. Free and
open to the public. For more information call 591-0341 ext. 237.
Non-fiction book club. 11 a.m. to
noon. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free and open to the
public. For more information call
591-0341 ext. 237.
Free Amputee Clinic. Noon to 5
p.m. Courtyard Marriot, 550 Shell
Blvd., Foster City. Free food and
prizes. For more information and to
register, call Veronica Lopez at 561866-2018.
Novemberfest. 12:30 p.m. to 1:30
p.m. Portuguese Community Center,
724 Kelly St., Half Moon Bay. German
music and festivites led by E.J.
Dieterle. For more information visit
www.rotaryofhalfmoonbay.com.
National Novel-Writing Month
2014. 6 p.m. South San Francisco
Main Public Library, 840 W. Orange
Avenue, South San Francisco. Come
write in for reference help, power
outlets, refreshments and writing
space to work on your 50,000-word
novel. For more information call 8293860 or email torres-volken@plsinfo.org.
.
Staffing Services Roundtable. 6:30
p.m. 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Panelists will discuss
employment trends, current/future
openings and hiring processes. To
register
go
to
www.phase2careers.org.
Showing of No Turning Back. 8
p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway,
Redwood City. For tickets and more
information go to warrenmiller.com.
FRIDAY, NOV. 14
Matthew Anderson to present
Human Traffick ing Around the
World and in the U.S. 7:30 a.m.
Crystal Springs Golf Course, 6650
Golf Course Drive, Burlingame. $15.
Breakfast included. For more information call 515-5891.
Mollie Stones Market RibbonCutting Ceremony. 8 a.m. Mollie
Stones Market, 22 Bayhill Shopping
Center, San Bruno.
Marian Oaks Annual Holiday
Boutique. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 3200
Adeline Dr., Burlingame. Homemade
jams, baked goods, fudge, handcrafted items and perfect holiday gifts.
For more information call 340-7426.
San Mateo Harvest Festival. 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo Event
Center. There will be entertainment,
food, prize drawings and a KidZone.
For more information call 800-3461212.
Off the Grid. 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Devils
Canyon Brewery, 935 Washington
St., San Carlos. A curated selcection
of food trucks. For more information
visit www.OfftheGridSF.com
Natural solutions to headache
pains. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 620
Correas St., Half Moon Bay.
Interactive wellness lecture by local
chiropractor Dr. Sidhartha Jandial,
MPH. Free. For more information and
to register call 726-3110 ext. 101.
Fragile. Shatter. Pop. 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. Project 275, 275A Linden St.,
Redwood City. Highly eclectic collection of low tech paint on canvas. For
more information contact Denise
Donegan
at
denise@brannerSgallery.com or by
calling 665-0721.
Legends of Sleepy Hollow on
Stage. 7 p.m. Mustang Hall, 828
Chestnut St, San Carlos. San Carlos
Childrens Theater will be putting on
this production which is suitable for
all ages. For tickets, visit www.sancarloschildrenstheater.com.
For
more information contact Eve
Dutton at evedutton@aol.com.
Slip n Sort event for Fall Book
Sale. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Half Moon Bay
Library, 620 Correas St., Half Moon
Bay. Only open to current members
of Friends at the Ernest Hermingway
level or higher. For more information
email jbmell@pacbell.net or call 5758133.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

SCHOOLS
Continued from page 1
fact that developer fees can be used for
new buildings and land as long as it is
for growth. The fees cant be used for
modernizations or remodels unless it
covers the cost of classrooms only,
said George Kaufer, the districts director of facilities.
The district is already growing
steadily without new development, as
each year approximately 250 more students join its elementary and middle
schools. Last school year, enrollment
hit about 11,706 students, up 511 from
the 2011-12 school year. The recent
Bay Meadows development in San
Mateo has put extra pressure on the
districts enrollment, district officials
said, adding they are concerned about
the impact of green-lighted projects
like Station Park Green near the
Hayward Park train station in San
Mateo and the Pilgrim-Triton project
in Foster City.

Proposed developments
Station Park Green is slated to bring
in 599 residential units, while the
entire 160-plus-acre Bay Meadows site
is slated for 1, 170 housing units,
retail and office space, the Nueva private school and 18 acres of parks.
There are slated to be more than 166
units at Pilgrim-Triton. With the
Pilgrim-Triton project that began back
in 2007, Foster City worked with the
district to see if schools would be
impacted, said Foster City Mayor
Charlie Bronitsky.
This is before the current administration, he said. We specifically
requested from the school district a letter from them if they would be impacted and at time they said wouldnt be.
Part of the problem is that developments that were approved pre-recession and are being kickstarted again
now already have developer fees set,
but changes to the fees on future projects could help the district, Coady
said.
Realistically, it would have to be
dramatically higher, he said. It would
have to be 10 times that figure if we
were going to build a new classroom or
school site. Were fraught with challenges because the school sites are
built out. Were looking into expanding that conversation and looking for
other ideas in other school districts
other than just simply trying to say
lets raise the developers fees by x.
Still, Molly Barton, the districts
assistant superintendent of student
services, said , developer fees are not
enough income to make a huge impact
in the grand scheme of things.
Overall, if theres an understanding

Monday Nov. 10, 2014


in the community about the impact of
new developments, developer fees are
welcome, but do not resolve the lack of
space, she said. We cant solve the
problem with the developers.
The developer fees arent a great
place for the schools to get funding for
its growing enrollment, Bronitsky
said.
Generic fees dont ever get significant dollar numbers, he said. The
amount of impact fees were allowed to
charge are limited by law.
One way that the new developments
do help the school district is that the
property taxes attached to new homes
goes to schools, said San Mateo
Mayor Robert Ross.
Where appropriate, I have no problem looking at those (developer
fees), Ross said.

Ongoing space concerns


Insufficient classroom space has
resulted in considering shared planning spaces at middle schools,
a.m./p.m. kindergarten, talks of
reopening Knolls Elementary School
and increasing class sizes. This could
also mean adding portables that each
cost $300,000-$350,000 and dont
last forever, Coady noted. Another
result is some students are unable to go
to their neighborhood schools; those
moving into Foster City are now being
assigned to San Mateo schools. North
Shoreview Montessori no longer has
space to open another classroom.
Scheduling times for children to use the
playground, computer labs and lunch is
complicated, along with concerns
about traffic, which could lead to staggering school start and end times to
relieve traffic, Barton said.
To address the issue of an exploding
student population, with facilities
dwindling, the district put the $130
million bond Measure P on the
November 2013 ballot. The measure
only received 46.6 percent approval,
short of the 55 percent needed for passage. The district formed the Next
Steps Advisory Committee this spring
to help solve the enrollment problem.
The committee will most likely be
looking at having a recommendation
by August 2015 so a potential measure
could make it on the November 2015
ballot, Superintendent Cynthia Simms
said. Still, there is deliberately no
timeline for the committee because the
district wants to make sure to engage
the community, she previously said.

Partnerships
Another thought is setting aside
space on new developments for public
schools, said Audrey Ng, vice president
of the Board of Trustees and member of
the Next Steps committee. The space
set aside for Nueva High School on the
Bay Meadows development really

23

highlighted the consideration of developers allocating some of their land for


schools, Barton said. Still, she said
with limited land in San Mateo and
Foster City, this may not be possible.
A lot of developments happening
now dont have a big enough land footprint for a school, Barton said. At
Station Park Green, theres not enough
land to do what they want to do and
have a school. Some of the developments were seeing right now are vertical and dense. Bay Meadows was an
unusual one. Working with the city is
absolutely something we want to do in
the future.
There are other restrictions that
limit building locations. For example,
K-2 students are not allowed on a second floor unless they have their own
stairwells separate from the older children. Audubon Elementary School in
Foster City would have needed four
stairwells instead of the two, so
schools normally keep children on the
lower floors since it is more cost effective. Additionally, the California
Department of Education recommends
that schools start with 5 acres and then
add 1 acre for every hundred students.
For a 500-student school, the recommended size is 10 acres. However, the
district knows it is not realistic or possible with cost of land, or availability,
these days in the San Mateo and Foster
City area, so for a 600-student population it would be ideal to have a minimum of 6 to 7 acres, Kaufer said.
My understanding 20-30 years ago
is the city/school partnership
absolutely did happen, Barton said. I
think were at a very different place
right now with job opportunities and
the impacted space. Twenty to 30 years
ago there was more land available.
Now were looking at accommodating
our businesses to have housing for
their employees, rightfully so. How do
we do that when we dont actually have
land? We go up (in height) and it has
unintended consequences for schools.
Foster City and district officials are
trying to be more proactive at working
together to make sure the district is
ready for new housing projects. First,
the project goes to the City Council
for an advisory hearing to discuss the
housing, Bronitsky said.
The issue (of school enrollment)
exists whether we have more housing
or we dont, Bronitsky said. The
problem in Foster City (with growth)
has more impacts than just on
schools. Theres significant traffic
issues and issues of water and wastewater capacity.
The only way to really help the district with its growing enrollment is a
bond measure though, Ross said.
Ultimately theyre going to need a
bond, Ross said.

angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105

24

COMICS/GAMES

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

DILBERT

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

ACROSS
1 Capture
4 Passages
8 Sooner than anon
11 Mongol dwelling
13 Perched on
14 Convent dweller
15 Singer Adams
16 Naive (hyph.)
18 Colorful T-shirt (hyph.)
20 Fathers
21 Ego companions
22 Owned
24 Head cavity
27 Ancient scrolls
30 Mr. Sandler
31 Opening for air
32 Vane dir.
34 Ruby
35 Stool pigeon
36 Maintain
37 Made airtight
39 Windshield device
40 Herd animal
41 Shaggy beast

GET FUZZY

42
45
49
53
54
55
56
57
58
59

Kapow!
Spring blooms
Bugle call
Yawn-provoking
Exodus hero
Cruise
Stage award
Walk softly
Spore producer
Crestfallen

DOWN
1 Boris refusal
2 German import
3 Crusty cheese
4 Walks in water
5 Packed away
6 Ouch!
7 Scout
8 New Age singer
9 Felt remorse
10 Concludes
12 Monotony
17 Whirlpool
19 Fabric meas.

22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
31
33
35
36
38
39
41
42
43
44
46
47
48
50
51
52

Skein of yarn
Fitting
Droop
Bad time for Caesar
Point the finger at
Hang fire
Hosts request
Shrinks reply (2 wds.)
Regard
Do the wrong thing
Sitcom waitress
Japanese martial art
Peak
Armed conflict
Bond return
Bubble
Wife of Zeus
Eager
Hero sandwiches
Essay byline
Slide downhill
Belief
-tzu
Mae West role

11-10-14

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2014


SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) Your possessive
tendencies may be difficult for your mate to handle
today. Dont put demands on people you live with or
love. Take this time to work on your own issues and
give some space to those around you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) Inevitable
changes concerning your career may surprise you.
Stomach problems due to nervous tension are likely.
Try to remain calm and eat properly, and set up an
exercise program to alleviate stress.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Dont mix romance
with business. Gossip will damage your reputation. At

KenKen is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. 2014 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

WEEKENDS PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the


numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

this time, honesty and discrimination are your greatest


assets, so use them wisely.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) You can utilize your
discipline to accomplish your personal goals. You have
everything it takes to succeed in all your endeavors at
this time, so get started.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) Emotional problems
with family members could stifle your plans.
Residential moves or changes will be beneficial in the
long term. Follow your instincts. You will be right on
the mark with your decisions.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) Travel should be
on your agenda. You can obtain a vast amount of
knowledge if you keep an open mind and discuss
your opinions with established individuals. This is a

11-10-14

Want More Fun


and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

wonderful day for learning.


TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You should take some
time to do things for and with your colleagues. You
should be able to pick up additional knowledge or
skills through courses or apprenticeships. Its a
good time to learn.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) Your flippant nature will
surface if you let your emotions get out of control. You
need to get out and enjoy life. Look into activities that
will provide you with mental and physical stimulation.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) Added responsibilities
may be difficult for you to handle. Do your best to
make changes and improvements that will benefi t the
whole family. Make sure everyone knows that you
could use a little help.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Love connections could


solidify if you discuss your intentions with your mate.
Dont hesitate to set aside time and find a private place
where the two of you can share your dreams.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Emotions may flare up on
the home front. Take one step at a time and dont pick
sides. Your practical outlook will win out. Get sound
advice from someone you respect.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) Travel will lead to new
friendships and valuable information. Dont be afraid
to accept inevitable changes in your personal life. They
will ultimately be better for you in the long run.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

ATRIA HILLSDALE IS
NOW HIRING
Class B Passenger Driver
Full time position available!
M - F 8:30a - 5:00pm shift
Must have a Class B Passenger license
Starts at $14.00 per hour
Receptionist
Part position available!
Fri 4:00p - 8:00p, Sat - Sun 9:00a - 5:30pm shift!
Starts at $11.25 per hour
Activity Assistant
Part time position available!
Starts at $10.50 per hour
Servers/Dishwashers
Server 11:00a - 7:30pm and 3:30p - 7:30p shifts!
Part time positions available!
Starts at $9.75 per hour
Dishwasher 8:00a - 4:30p shift!
Full time position available!
Starts at $9.25 per hour
Maintenance Technician
Must have some knowledge of plumbing, electrical,
carpentry & HVAC
Part time position available!
Starts at $10.50 per hour
For all positions some experience working with seniors
a plus!
Apply in person at:
2883 S. Norfolk Street
San Mateo, CA 94403
650-378-3000
www.atriahillsdale.com

Complete Senior Living

NOW HIRING !
Join our upscale and established facility in San
Mateo. Seeking positive individuals with a
traditional work ethic.

104 Training

25

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS


The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS

t $BSFHJWFST  &YQFSJFODF 0OMZ


t .FE 5FDI  &YQFSJFODF 0OMZ
EOE, Division of Labor Standards Wage Order 5

Call 650.995.7123
Email - assistance@abigailcompletecare.com

NOW HIRING !
The Abigail welcomes applicants for our next
hiring phase. Join our new facility for the elderly, in
Redwood City. Seeking positive individuals with a
traditional work ethic.
t"DUJWJUZ$PPSEJOBUPS&YQFSJFODFEPOMZ
t$BSFHJWFST&YQFSJFODF0OMZ
t.FE5FDI&YQFSJFODF0OMZ
t)PVTFLFFQJOH-BVOESZ&OHMJTIOPUSFRVJSFE
t3FDFQUJPOJTU1BSU5JNF8FFLFOET
t.BJOUFOBODF)BOEZ1FSTPO0O$BMM
EOE, Division of Labor Standards Wage Order 5

Call 650.995.7123
Email - assistance@abigailcompletecare.com

2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000

CAREGIVERS
WANTED

in San Mateo and Redwood City. Call


(408)667-6994 or (408)667-6993.

CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA

Customer Service

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
SPECIALIST
Excellent Benefits
Systems administration,
TCP/IP knowledge,
Supervisory experience required
Apply to:

www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp/

Are you..Dependable, friendly,


detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have.Good English
skills, a desire for steady
employment and employment
benefits?
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: 650-342-6978
DRIVERS WANTED
Peninsula Taxi needs drivers make up to
$800. Per week please call
(650)483-4085
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

MAINTENANCE ENGINEER
$4500-$6250/monthly
Excellent Benefits
Maintenance of HVAC,
mechanical, plumbing and
electrical systems
Supervisory experience
required
Apply at:
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

NOW HIRING

Certified Nursing Assistants


(Must have Certificate)
$12 per hour
AM-PM Shifts available
Please apply in person
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014


110 Employment

110 Employment

NOW HIRING

THE ABIGAIL &


COMPLETE
SENIOR CARE

Kitchen Staff
$9.00 per hr.
Apply in Person at or
email resume to

info@greenhillsretirement.com
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)742-9150
No experience necessary
DOJ/FBI Clearance required

are seeking positive


individuals with a traditional work ethic for the
following positions :
Caregivers, Med Tech,
Housekeeping/Laundry,
Receptionist,
Maintenance/Handy Man
Call (650)995-7123 or email

assistance@abigailcompletecare.com

RAMP AGENTS LOOKING FOR EXTRA CASH for the


holidays? Total Airport Services is now
hiring for part-time, temporary ramp
agents. Start now and work through December 24. Schedules are: Monday to
Thursday from 5:00pm to 8:00 pm OR
Tuesday to Friday from 4:00am to
7:00am. You could work both shifts if you
like. If interested please apply at 900
North Access Rd., San Francisco Airport
or call (650)589-8588.

RETAIL -

WANTED!
KITCHEN & BATH DESIGNER with
some cabinet salesexperience. If you are
tired of working for an hourly and are
hungry to use your abilities & increase
your compensation in this occupation,
emailyour resume to:
focalpointkitchens01@yahoo.com.
We are a happening company that is
looking for you!

210 Lost & Found

jobs@jewelryexchange.com

SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

LOST CELL PHONE Metro PCS Samsung. Light pink cover, sentimental value. Lost in Millbrae on 9/30/14 Reward
offered. Angela (415)420-6606
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642

298 Collectibles

300 Toys

BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper


Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

LEGO DUPLO Set ages 1 to 5. $30


(650)622-6695

LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand


painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple


antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

PILGRIM DOLLS, 15 boy & girl, new,


from Harvest Festival, adorable $25
(650)345-3277

1980 SYLVANIA 24" console television


operational with floor cabinet in excellent
condition. $35. (650) 676-0974.

PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible


28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$49 (650)591-9769

2 VINTAGE Light Bulbs circa 1905. Edison Mazda Lamps. Both still working $50 (650)-762-6048

RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off


road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878

296 Appliances
BREVILLE JUICER good cond. great
but $45. (650)697-7862

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
50 SHADES of Grey Trilogy, Excellent
Condition $25. (650)615-0256
BOOK
"LIFETIME"
(408)249-3858

WW1

$12.,

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290


Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

NASCAR ANNUAL Preview 1998 - 2007


with race sechudules. $75
(650)345-9595
TIME LIFE Nature Books, great condition
19 different books. $5.00 each OBO
(650)580-4763

294 Baby Stuff


CRIB & Toddler Bed, white with mattress, like new, from lullybye ln, $75
(650)345-9595

295 Art
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648

The Daily Journals readership covers a wide


range of qualifications for all types of positions.

295 Art

POSTER, LINCOLN, advertising Honest


Ale, old stock, green and black color.
$15. (650)348-5169

Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

We will help you recruit qualified, talented


individuals to join your company or organization.

Over the Hedge

LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver


necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.

JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback


books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861

The best career seekers


read the Daily Journal.

Over the Hedge

LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shopping Center, by Lunardis market


(Reward) (415)559-7291

FOUND: KEYS (3) on ring with 49'ers


belt clip. One is car key to a Honda.
Found in Home Depot parking lot in San
Carlos on Sunday 2/23/14.
Call 650 490-0921 - Leave message if no
answer.

GOT JOBS?

Over the Hedge

LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT (415)377-0859 REWARD!

210 Lost & Found

Fictitious Business Name Statements,


Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.

Tundra

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,


clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME


STATEMENT #262894
The following person is doing business
as: Soles Without Holes, 725 Costa Rica
Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Abbie
Schultz, same address. The business is
conducted by an Indivdual. The registrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on February 12th 2013.
/s/ Abbie Schultz /
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 11/06/2014. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
11/10/14, 11/17/14, 11/24/14, 12/01/14).

LEGAL NOTICES

Tundra

FOUND: RING Silver color ring found


on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301

203 Public Notices

JEWELRY SALES
Full + Part +
Seasonal Positions
ALSO SEEKING
F/T ASST MGR
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400

Tundra

CHAMPION JUICER, very good, coral


color $75. Phone 650-345-7352

COIN HOLDERS, used. 146 plastic


tubes. 40 albums. Cost $205. Sell $95
OBO. (650)591-4141

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand


new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763

COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters


uncirculated
with
Holder
$15/all,
(408)249-3858

FOODSAVER MINI with storage cannister new $35. (650)697-7862

MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,


large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.

FRIDGE, MINI, unopened, plugs, cord,


can use for warmer also $40.00, (650)
578 9208
KENMORE VAACUM bagless good
cond. $35/obo (650)697-7862

MICKEY MINI Mouse Vintage 1997 Lenox Christmas plate Gold Trim, Still in
Box $65. (650)438-7345

PONDEROSA WOOD STOVE, like


new, used one load for only 14 hours.
$1,200. Call (650)333-4400

NUTCRACKERS 1 large 2 small $10 for


all 3 (650) 692-3260

RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,


1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621

SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta


graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,


(650)593-0893
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SEARS KENMORE sewing machine in a
good cabinet style, running smoothly
$99. 650-756-9516.
WHIRLPOOL DEHUMIDIFIER. Almost
new. located coastside. $75 650-8676042.

297 Bicycles
GIRLS BIKE 18 Pink, Looks New, Hardly Used $80 (650)293-7313

DRIVERS
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning for various
routes throughout Peninsula.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.

Contact us for a free consultation

Must have valid license and appropriate insurance


coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in downtown San Mateo between 3:30 -4:30 a.m.

Call (650) 344-5200 or


Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to


4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.

For the best value and the best results,


recruit from the Daily Journal...

ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pockets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858

OLD BLACK Mountain 5 Gallon Glass


Water Jar $39 (650) 692-3260

TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good condition, $10. each, (650)571-5899


UPPER DECK 1999 baseball cards #1535. $85 complete mint set Steve, San
Carlos, 650-255-8716.

299 Computers
DELL
LAPTOP
Computer
Bag
Fabric/Nylon great condition $20 (650)
692-3260

300 Toys
K'NEX BUILDING ideas $30.
(650)622-6695

SMALL WOOD dollhouse 4 furnished


rooms. $35. (650)558-8142
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, SOLD!

302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
73 HAPPY Meal toys. 1990's vintage, in
the original unopened packages.
$100.(650)596-0513
ANTIQUE CRYSTAL/ARCADE Coffee
Grinder. $80. 650-596-0513
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE OLD Copper Wash Tub, 30 x
12 x 13 with handles, $65 (650)591-3313
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72 x 40 , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024
OLD VINTAGE Wooden Sea Captains
Tool Chest 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65 SOLD!

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

27

302 Antiques

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

308 Tools

311 Musical Instruments

VINTAGE ATWATER Kent Radio. Circa


1929 $100. (650)245-7517

ALL NATURAL latex cal king mattress,


excellent cond. $75. 650-867-6042

SOLD WOOD TV Tables, set of 4 + rack,


perfect cond $29 650-595-3933

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa


1947. $60. (650)245-7517

HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296

303 Electronics

BATHTUB SEAT, electric. Bathmaster


2000. Enables in and out of bath safely.$99 650-375-1414

KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 metal base


kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061

SOLID WOOD BOOKCASE 33 x 78


with flip bar ask $75 obo (650)743-4274

WHEELBARROW. BRAND new, never


used. Wood handles. $50 or best offer.
SOLD!

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie


Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"


Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie


Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set


(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.

ROLAND GW-7 Workstation/Keyboard,


with expression pedal, sustain pedal, and
owners manual. $500. (415)706-6216

310 Misc. For Sale

WURLITZER PIANO, console, 40 high,


light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001

46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great


condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIC TURNTABLE Model 940.
Good Shape $40. (650)245-7517

Very

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50


OBO (650)345-5644
CHAIRS, WITH Chrome Frame, Brown
Vinyl seats $15.00 each. (650)726-5549

BLUE NINTENDO DS Lite. Hardly used.


$70 OBO. (760) 996-0767

CHANDELIER 3 Tier,
$95 (650)375-8021

COMBO COLOR T.V. 24in. Toshiba with


DVD and VHS Flat Screen Remote 06
$40: (650)580-6324

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer


Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
INFINITY FLOOR speakers ( a pair) in
good condition $ 60. (650)756-9516. Daly City.
JVC - DVD Player and video cassette recorder. NEW. $80. (650)345-5502
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PRINTER DELL946, perfect, new black
ink inst, new color ink never installed,
$75. 650-591-0063
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

made in Spain

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"


x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.00
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DISPLAY CABINET 72x 21 x39 1/2
High Top Display, 2 shelves in rear $99
(650)591-3313
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111

LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.


each, (415)346-6038
LIVING & Dining Room Sets. Mission
Style, Trestle Table w/ 2 leafs & 6
Chairs, Like new $600 obo
(831)768-1680
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021
MIRROR, SOLID OAK. 30" x 19 1/2",
curved edges; beautiful. $85.00 OBO.
Linda 650 366-2135.
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167

CLASSIC COUNTRY MUSIC" Smithsonian Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes,


annotation booklet. $20.
(650)574-3229

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429


TORCHIERE $35. (650) 631-6505

ESPRESSO TABLE 30 square, 40 tall,


$95 (650)375-8021

PIANO AND various furniture pieces,


golf bag. $100-$300 Please call for info
(650)740-0687

EXECUTIVE DESK 60, cherry wood,


excellent condition. $275 (650)212-7151
EXECUTIVE DESK Chair, upholstered,
adjustable height, excellent condition,
$150 (650)212-7151

PORTABLE JEWELRY display case


wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.

GRACO 40" x28"x28" kid pack 'n play


exc $40 (650) 756-9516 Daly City

304 Furniture

HIGH END childrens bedroom set,


white, solid, well built, in great/near
perfect condition. Comes with mattress (twin size) in great condition. Includes bed frame, two dressers, night
stands, book case, desk with additional 3 drawers for storage. Perfect for
one child. Sheets available if wanted.
$550. (415)730-1453.

ROCKING CHAIR Great condition,


1970s style, dark brown, wooden,
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337

PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858

VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches


W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
WALL CLOCK - 31 day windup, 26
long, $99 (650)592-2648
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent condition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720


ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061

GECKO GLASS case 10 gal.with heat


pad, thermometer, Wheeled stand if
needed $20. (650)591-1500
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300
(650)245-4084

315 Wanted to Buy

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x


17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

LITTLE PLAYMATE by IGLOO 10"x10",


cooler includes icepak. $20
(650)574-3229

Gold, Silver, Platinum


Always True & Honest values

MEDICINE CABINET - 18 X 24, almost


new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65.00 (650)504-6058

WOOD ROCKING chair with foam and


foot rest; swivels; very comfortable and
relaxing. $45 (650)580-6324

SOFA - excelleNT condition. 8 ft neutral


color $99 OBO (650)345-5644

306 Housewares
BISSELL Deep rug amd hard floor
cleaner. New cost $170 Sell New,
(650)345-5502
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037

NATIVITY SET, new, beautiful, ceramic,


gold-trimmed, 11-pc.,.asking: $50.
Call: 650-345-3277 /message
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PICTURES, FRAMED (2) 24x25, Thai
temple etchings blue figures on white.
$50 (all) SOLD!
POSTAL MAIL Bow. Classy metal locking box for pillar mounting.
$100.
(650)245-7517

HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.


Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

POSTAL MAIL Box. Classy metal locking box for pillar mounting.
$100.
(650)245-7517

NEW PORTABLE electric fan wind machine, round, adjustable $15


Cell phone: (650)580-6324

SEWING MACHINE Kenmore, blonde


cabinet, $25 (650)355-2167

PERSIAN TEA set


for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SHEER DRAPES (White) for two glass
sliding doors great condition $50 (650)
692-3260
SINGER ELECTRONIC sewing machine
model #9022. Cord, foot controller
included. $99 O.B.O. (650)274-9601 or
(650)468-6884
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VACUUM EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012

307 Jewelry & Clothing


LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436

308 Tools
BLACK AND Decker Electrical 17"
EDGE TRIMMER $20. (650)349-9261
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SKILL saw "craftman"7/1/4"
heavy duty never used in box $45.
(650)992-4544
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450


RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6" bench grinder $40.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
CRAFTSMAN BELT & disc sander $99.
(650)573-5269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
HAND TRUCK. 4 wheel wonder, converts to cart. $25. 591-4141 (650)5914141
HUSKY POWER inverter 750wtts.adaptor/cables unused AC/DC.$50.
(650)992-4544
HYDRAULIC floor botle jack 10" H.
plus. Ford like new. $25.00 botlh
(650)992-4544
METAL 20 foot extension ladder for sale
$99. (650)349-3205
MICROMETER
brake/drum
tool
$25.(650)992-4544

MEASUREMENT
new
in
box

NEW FOLDING Hand Truck, 100 lb capacity, compact. lite, $29, 650-595-3933

11/10/14

GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler $20.


(650)345-3840 leave a clear Message

DOG CRATE like new, i Crate, two


door, divider, 30"L 19"w 21"H $40.
650 345-1234

LIGHT GREEN Barbar Chair, with foot


rest good condition $80 Call Anita
(650)303-8390

CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet


stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045

By Teresa Colby
(c)2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never


used $8., (408)249-3858

DELUX"GLASS LIZARD cage unused ,


rock open/close window Decoration
21"Wx12"Hx8"D,$20.(650)992-4544

WHITE CABINETS (2) - each has a


drawer & 1 door with 2 shelves.
36x21x18. $25 each. (650)867-3257

SMALL JAPANESE style table "ozen"


with four floor cushions in excellent condition. $25 (650) 676-0974

3 Japanese
39 Former NBA
53 Parting words,
cartoon style
center __ Ming
perhaps after the
4 Premium
40 U.K. award
visit suggested
chocolate brand
by the starts of
42 Painting or
5 Walk laboriously,
sculpture
20-, 38-/40- and
as through mud
46 No argument
54-Across
6 Quotable Berra
from me
55 Twistable
7 The stuff of many 47 Electrical
cookie
postcard photos
capacitance units 56 Fail to mention
8 Burglaries
49 Dizzy with delight 57 Mythical birds
9 Hooded snake
51 Divided country
58 TV schedule
10 King beaters
52 Barely managing,
abbr.
11 Its not true!
with out
59 Actor Holbrook
12 Pants bottom
13 Decade tenths:
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Abbr.
21 Knucklehead
22 Chanted
26 Sch. with a
Chattanooga
campus
27 Subscriptionbased home
entertainment
29 Churchill of the
United Kingdom
30 Charitys URL
ending
31 Fight stopper, for
short
32 Cockeyed
33 Hidden supply
34 Free-spirited
socializer
37 Poise
11/10/14
xwordeditor@aol.com

FOLK SONG anthology: Smithsonian


Collection of Recordings, 4 audiotapes +
annotation booklet. $20 (650)574-3229

312 Pets & Animals


BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large, Excellent


Condition, $275 (650)245-4084

WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and


coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good


condition $50., (650)878-9542

YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,


$750. Call (650)572-2337

KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute cannon


$30. (650)726-1037

ROCKING CHAIR, decorative wood /


armrest, it swivels rocks & rolls
$99.00.650-592-2648

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

DOWN
1 Put into office
2 Insignificant

TEA/ UTILITY Cart, $15. (650)573-7035,


(650)504-6057

UPHOLSTERED SIDE office chairs (2).


3ft X 2ft, $85 each, (650)212-7151

FREE SOFA and love seat set. good


condtion (650)630-2329

ACROSS
1 Digital periodical,
briefly
5 Part of CBS:
Abbr.
9 Comics title
character who
married Irving
14 Kitchen floor
covering, in Kent
15 __ Ness monster
16 Earth pigment
17 Sooner State city
18 Architectural Scurve
19 Rays of light
20 Taking the top
spot
23 Roman fountain
24 Volcano in Sicily
25 Whats
happenin?
28 In the least
favorable case
31 Brits Bye-bye
32 Cleopatras
undoing
35 Slim and
muscular
36 Annie with a gun
38 With 40-Across,
remaining
focused
40 See 38-Across
41 Gold purity
measures
42 Brother of Cain
43 Item in a P.O.
box
44 This, in Seville
45 Fed up with
48 For what reason
49 Capricorns
animal
50 Creates
54 Betting it all
58 Hot corner base
60 Cowboys
quarterback Tony
61 R&B singer
India.__
62 Exposed
63 Explorer __ the
Red
64 Reject as false
65 Brass or bronze
66 CPR pros
67 Its a long story

ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,


full branches. in basket $55.
(650)269-3712

PATIO TABLE 5x5 round, Redwood,


with rollers, 2 benches, good solid
condition $30 San Bruno (650)588-1946

WESTINGHOUSE 32 Flatscreen TV,


model#SK32H240S, with HDMI plug in
and remote, excellent condition. Two
available, $175 each. (650)400-4174

ALL LEATHER couch, about 6ft long


dark brown $45 Cell number: (650)5806324

TABLE, OLD ENGLISH draw-leaf, barley twist legs, 36 square. $350


(650)574-7387

ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
with
shelves for books, pure oak. Purchased
for $750. Sell for $99. (650)348-5169

ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85.OBO 650 369 9762

3 PIECE cocktail table with 2 end tables,


glass tops. good condition, $99.
(650)574-4021l

TABLE, HD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at


each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions


$45. each set, (650)347-8061

QUEEN 3.5 " mattress FOAM TOPPER


byBeautyrest CLEAN/like new, $60.
San Carlos 650-610-0869 leave msg.

2 END Tables solid maple '60's era


$40/both. (650)670-7545

STURDY OAK TV or End Table. $35.


Very good condition. 30" x 24".
(650)861-0088

TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,


$40., (650)347-8061

FADED GOLD antique framed mirror,


25in x 33in $15 Cell number:
(650)580-6324

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

STEREO CABINET with 3 black shelves


42" x 21" x 17" exc cond $30. (650)7569516

POWER MITER Saw, like new, with


some attachments $150 (650)375-8021

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,


Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763

WE BUY

400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

316 Clothes
ALPINESTAR JEANS Tags Attached
Twin Stitched Knee Protection Never
used Blue/Grey Sz34 $65 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $65 (650)357-7484
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 SOLD!
NEW MAN'S Wristwatch sweep second
hand, +3 dials, $29 650-595-3933

VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the


Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720

PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless


size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059

VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving


Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$35. (650)873-8167

VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new


beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

WICKER PICNIC basket, mint condition,


handles, light weight, pale tan color.
$10. (650)578-9208

VINTAGE 1970S Grecian made dress,


size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

311 Musical Instruments


BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461

317 Building Materials


30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame $85. (650)348-6955

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,


Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290


Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014


379 Open Houses

317 Building Materials


CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29 x
19 $300 (408)744-1041
FLOORING - Carolina Pine, 1x3 T and
G, approximately 400+ sq. ft. $650. CAll
(415)516-4964
OYSTER WHITE 2 drawer BR vanity.
Excellent condition, 27 X 19 X 32
$175, (408)744-1041

318 Sports Equipment


BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.
(650)637-0930
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond.
$15.00. Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

GERMAN ARMY Helmet WW2, 4 motorbike DOT $59 650-595-3933


IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 SOLD!
NEW AB Lounger $39 (650) 692-3260
NORDIC TRACK
(650)333-4400

Pro,

$95.

Call

PENDLETON WOOLEN Mills Yakima


Camp Blanket MINT CONDITION List
$109. Sell $75.00. 650-218-7059
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

$99

380 Real Estate Services


HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.

Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.

440 Apartments

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly


Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

1 BR / Bath, Kitchen, Carpets, Carport,


Storage. $1550 per month. $1000 deposit. Call Jean (650)362-4555

TWO BASKET balls - $10.00 each


(hardly used) (650)341-5347

BELMONT 1 BR, 2 BR, and 3BR


apartments No Smoking No Pets
(650)591-4046

TWO SOCCER balls -- $10.00 each


(hardly used) (650)341-5347
TWO SPOTTING Scopes, Simmons and
Baraska, $80 for both (650)579-0933

470 Rooms

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for


info (650)851-0878
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

322 Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage


sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200

335 Rugs
AREA RUG 2X3 $15. (650) 631-6505

335 Garden Equipment


2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762

340 Camera & Photo Equip.


SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598

345 Medical Equipment


WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER HUGO Elite Rollerator, $50
(650)591-8062
WALKER WITH basket $30. Invacare
Excellent condition (650)622-6695

625 Classic Cars


90 MASERATI, 2 Door hard top and convertible. New paint Runs good. $4500
(650)245-4084
FORD 63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$6,500 /OBO (650)364-1374

630 Trucks & SUVs


98 FORD F150. 1 owner, clean body,
needs mech work. $2,000 obo SOLD!

Cabinetry

Concrete

Rambo
Concrete
Works

DODGE 01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1


owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

635 Vans
67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $1,950/OBO,
(650)364-1374
FORD E150 Cargo VAN, 2007, 56k
miles, almost perfect! $12,000 SOLD!

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
1964 HARLEY DAVIDSON FHL Panhead (motor only) 84 stoker. Complete
rebuild. Many new parts.Never run. Call
for details. $6,000. Jim (650) 293-7568
1966 CHEVELLE 396 motor. Standardbore block. Standard domed pistons,
rods, crank cam only. 360 HP, code
T0228EJ $600, (650)293-7568

t
Free showroom
design consultation & quote
t
BELOW HOME
DEPOT PRICES
t
PLEASE VISIT

bestbuycabinets.com
or call

650-294-3360
Cleaning

1973 FXE Harley Shovel Head 1400cc


stroked & balanced motor. Runs perfect.
Low milage, $6,600 Call (650)369-8013

Construction

by Greenstarr
www.greenstarr.net

t Walkways
t Driveways
t 1BUJPT
t $PMPSFE
t "HHSFHBUF
t #MPDL 8BMMT
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
t 4UBNQFE $PODSFUF
t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM

Tom 650.834.2365

BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call


650-995-0003

Licensed Bonded and Insured


License # 752250

Since 1985

Rooms For Rent


Travel Inn, San Carlos

$49.- $59.daily + tax


$294.-$322. weekly + tax

Clean Quiet Convenient


Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos

(650) 593-3136

Mention Daily Journal

620 Automobiles
'06 MERCEDES AMG CL-63.. slate
gray, great condition, 1 owner, complete
dealer maintenance records available.
8,000 miles of factory warranty left. car
can be seen in Fremont...Best offer. Call
(408)888-9171
or
email:
nakad30970@aol.com

Dont lose money


on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $42!
Well run it
til you sell it!
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car


loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
99 Van, Good Condition,
$3,500 OBO (650)481-5296
HONDA 96 LX SD all power, complete,
runs. $2700 OBO, (650)481-5296 - Joe
Fusilier
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461

MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with


mounting hardware and other parts $35.
(650)670-2888

650 RVs
COLEMAN LARAMIE
pop-up camper, Excellent
Condition, $2,250.
Call (415)515-6072

670 Auto Parts


1961-63 OLDS F-85 Engine plus many
heads, cranks, Int., Manifold & Carbs. All
$500 (650)348-1449
AUTO REFRIGERATION gauges. R12
and R132 new, professional quality $50.
(650)591-6283
CAR TOW chain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, 1
gray marine diesel manual $40
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRES 4 plus one spare. Finned rims,
165 SR15 four hole. $150 obo.
(650)922-0139
USED BIG O 4 tires, All Terrain
245/70R16, $180 SOLD!

680 Autos Wanted


Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Concrete
AAA CONCRETE DESIGN
Stamps Color Driveways
Patios Masonry Block walls
Landscaping

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

Decks & Fences

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

State License #377047


Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Electricians

Handy Help

Hauling

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

CHAINEY HAULING

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs


ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs

Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing

Call Ben (650)685-6617


Lic # 427952

INSIDE OUT
ELECTRIC INC
Service Upgrades
Remodels / Repairs
The tradesman you will
trust and recommend
Lic# 808182

(650)515-1123
Gardening

Fences Decks
Concrete Work Pebbles
Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling
Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

HANDYMAN

Electrical and
General home repair
(650)341-0100
(408)761-0071
License 619908

Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766

(650)740-8602
PLUMBING & HANDYMAN

Sprinklers and irrigation


Pressure washing, rock gardens,
and lots more!

(650)296-0568

Flooring

Flamingos Flooring

SHOP
AT HOME

WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.

CARPET
LUXURY VINYL TILE
SHEET VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Contact us for a
FREE In-Home
Estimate

650-655-6600

info@flamingosflooring.com
www.flamingosflooring.com
We carry all major brands!

Gutters

O.K.S RAINGUTTER

New Rain Gutter, Down Spouts,


Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Gutter & Roof Inspections
Friendly Service
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
CALL TODAY

(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS

Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170

Hardwood Floors

KO-AM

HARDWOOD FLOORING

Hardwood & Laminate


Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate

Plumbing
MEYER PLUMBING SUPPLY
Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal


Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up


www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Painting

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

&

by Greenstarr

Licensed Bonded and Insured

Window Washing

NICK MEJIA PAINTING


Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

(415)971-8763

Screens

Lic. #479564

DONT SHARE
YOUR HOUSE
WITH BUGS!
We repair and install all types of
Window & Door Screens

Licensed Bonded and Insured


www.yardboss.net

Free Estimates

(650)299-9107

PENINSULA SCREEN SHOP


Mention this ad for 20% OFF!

Since 1985

Tree Service

Lic. #794899

Hillside Tree

Service

Hauling

LOCALLY OWNED

AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

$40 & UP
HAUL

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured


Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

Family Owned Since 2000


Trimming

Lic# 910421

FREE ESTIMATES
(650)361-8773

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

Pruning

Shaping
Large

Plumbing
CLEAN DRAINS PLUMBING
$89 TO CLEAN ANY

CLOGGED DRAIN! SEWER PIPES


Installation of Water Heaters,
Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Gas, Water &
Sewer Lines. Trenchless
Replacement.

(650)461-0326
Lic.# 983312

FRANKS HAULING
Junk and Debris
Furniture, bushes,
concrete and more

Since 1985

A+ Member BBB Since 1975

Tom 650.834.2365
Chris 415.999.1223
License # 752250

www.greenstarr.net
www.yardboss.net

License # 752250

Lic #514269

Yard clean up - attic,


basement
Junk metal removal
including cars, trucks and
motorcycles
Demolition
Concrete removal
Excavation
Swimming pool removal

Yardby Greenstarr
Boss

Tom 650.834.2365

Interior & Exterior


Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

(650)368-8861

Chriss Hauling

Tree Service

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800-300-3218
408-979-9665

Gutters and downspouts Rain


gutter repair New Installation
Handyman Services
Free Estimates

(650)669-1453
(650)302-7791

Landscaping

HONEST HANDYMAN

CALL NOW FOR


AUTUMN LAWN
PREPARATION

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

29

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Removal
Grinding

Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal


to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

Accounting

ALAN CECCHI EA

Tax Preparation
& Representation
Bookkkeeping - Accounting

Phone 650-245-7645

Dental Services

Food

Financial

Housing

ALBORZI, DDS, MDS, INC.

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

UNITED AMERICAN BANK


San Mateo , Redwood City,
Half Moon Bay

CALIFORNIA
MENTOR

$500 OFF INVISALIGN TREATMENT


a clear alternative to braces even for
patients who have
been told that they were not invisalign
candidates
235 N SAN MATEO DR #300,
SAN MATEO

Because Flavor Still Matters


365 B Street
San Mateo

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking

(650)342-4171

www.sfpanchovillia.com

unitedamericanbank.com

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

PRIME STEAKS

alancecchi@yahoo .com

Art
PORTRAITS BY HADI
Beautiful portraits by
experienced sketch artist. Pen &
Ink on 18x 24 sketch paper.
Singles, couples, families.
Makes a wonderful gift. Can
create a sketch from any photo

(650)283-6836
Attorneys

Valerie de Leon, DDS


Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

RUSSO DENTAL CARE


Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

Law Office of Jason Honaker

BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13

www.russodentalcare.com

Call us for a consultation

Food

650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com

AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi &
Ramen in Town

Cemetery

LASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST
PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Clothing

$5 CHARLEY'S

Sporting apparel from your


49ers, Giants & Warriors,
low prices, large selection.
450 W. San Bruno Ave.
San Bruno

1070 Holly Street


San Carlos
(650)654-1212

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo
The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

(650) 295-6123

1221 Chess Drive Foster City


Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

SUPERB VALUE
BASHAMICHI
Steak & Seafood
1390 El Camino Real
Millbrae
www.bashamichirestaurant.com

RENDEZ VOUS
CAFE
Holiday Gifts and Cold Beer
until 9PM weekdays !

106 S. El Camino Real


San Mateo

Steelhead Brewing Co.


333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin

2833 El Camino Real


San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

SCANDIA
RESTAURANT & BAR

Lunch Dinner Wknd Breakfast


OPEN EVERYDAY
Scandinavian &
American Classics
742 Polhemus Rd. San Mateo
HI 92 De Anza Blvd. Exit

(650)372-0888

Financial
PROTECT YOUR ASSETS
Burt Williamson, MBA, CFP
Life and long Term Care
Insurance Specialist

(650) 730-6175
PlanPrep.com

RETIREMENT
PLAN ANALYSIS

401(k) & IRA & 403(b)


(650)458-0312
New Stage Investment Group
Hans Reese is a Registered Representative with, and securities offered
through, LPL Financial,
Member FINRA/SIPC

(650)771-6564

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos

Health & Medical


BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

SALES

The Daily Journal seeks


two sales professionals
for the following positions:

EVENT MARKETING SALES

TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES

Join the Daily Journal Event marketing


team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journals
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But rst and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.

We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,


who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer prociency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.

To apply for either position,


please send info to

jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call

650-344-5200.

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

(650)389-5787 ext.2
Competitive Stipend offered.
www.MentorsWanted.com

EYE EXAMINATIONS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

Train to become a Licensed


Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

HEALING MASSAGE
Newly remodeled
New Masseuses every two
weeks

$50/Hr. Special
2305-A Carlos St.,
Moss Beach
(Cash Only)

OSETRA WELLNESS
MASSAGE THERAPY

Prenatal, Reiki, Energy


$20 OFF your First Treatment
(not valid with other promotions)

(650)212-2966

1730 S. Amphlett Blvd. #206


San Mateo
osetrawellness.com

Real Estate Loans


REAL ESTATE LOANS

We Fund Bank Turndowns!

Insurance

AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Legal Services

LEGAL

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract

Equity based direct lender


Homes Multi-family
Mixed-use Commercial
Good or Bad Credit
Purchase / Refinance/
Cash Out
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979

650-348-7191

Wachter Investments, Inc.


Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Bureau of Real Estate

Retirement
Independent Living, Assisted Living, and Memory Care. full time R.N.
Please call us at (650)742-9150 to
schedule a tour, to pursue your lifelong dream.
Marymount Greenhills
Retirement Center
1201 Broadway
Millbrae, Ca 94030
www.greenhillsretirement.com

Jeri Blatt, LDA #11


Registered & Bonded

NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING


& CAREER COLLEGE

HELP WANTED

(near Marriott Hotel)

Please call to RSVP

Tons of Furniture to match


your lifestyle
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

CA Insurance License #0D33315

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6 M-F

Furniture

We are looking for quality


caregivers for adults
with developmental
disabilities. If you have a
spare bedroom and a
desire to open your
home and make a
difference, attend an
information session:
Thursdays 11:00 AM
1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.
Suite 230
San Mateo

Massage Therapy

(650)574-2087

Schools

"I am not an attorney. I can only


provide self help services at your
specific direction."

HILLSIDE CHRISTIAN
ACADEMY

legaldocumentsplus.com

Where every child is a gift from God

Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA

Marketing

GROW

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS


Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter

Massage Therapy

ASIAN MASSAGE

$55 per Hour

Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm


633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City

(650)556-9888

COMFORT PRO
MASSAGE
Foot Massage $19.99

Body Massage $44.99/hr


10 am - 10 pm
1115 California Dr. Burlingame

(650)389-2468

K-8
High Academic Standards
Small Class Size
South San Francisco

(650)588-6860

ww.hillsidechristian.com

Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

CARE ON CALL
24/7 Care Provider
www.mycareoncall.com
(650)276-0270
1818 Gilbreth Rd., Ste 127
Burlingame
CNA, HHA & Companion Help

Travel
FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP
(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

31

32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Monday Nov. 10, 2014

Paid Advertisement

Sciatica and Herniated Discs


May be to Blame for Pain
in Your Back and Neck

LOCAL CLINIC OFFERS FREE CONSULTATION TO THOSE SUFFERING FROM BACK AND NECK PAIN
Did you know that 30 million Americans suffer
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Are pain pills effective, long-term solutions
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The Solution: TDCTM Therapy


TDC Therapy Traction Decompression Combined Therapy is a proven treatment exclusive to Disc Centers of America doctors for the
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TDC Therapy is non surgical and
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Is Surgery the Answer?


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It is true that surgery may be the answer for
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If there is a solution to back pain that doesnt
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CONSIDER THESE FACTS BEFORE SURGERY


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TDC Therapy can isolate a specic vertebra


and distract the vertebrae surrounding an
injured disc 5 to 7 millimeters. TDC Therapy
treatment isolates the specic vertebrae that
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Dr.Thomas Ferrigno, D.C.


Member, DCOA Disc Centers of America
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Whiplash
Neck Pain

Bulged Disc
Herniated Disc
Sciatica
Pinched Nerves
Stenosis

relieving neck or lower back pain.


Why Bay Area Disc Centers
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C. and his team have
vast experience in treating patients suffering from severe disc disease. Dr. Ferrigno
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through extensive training that follow the
protocols set up by The International Medical Advisory Board on Spinal Decompression, and utilizes the protocols set forward
CZ%S/PSNBO4IFBMZUIF)POPSBSZ$IBJSNBO GPSNFS)BSWBSEQSPGFTTPS BOEQSPCably the most published doctor in the world
on spinal decompression therapy.
Get Your Life Back, Today!
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Campbell (855) 240-3472


San Mateo (855) 257-3472
Palo Alto (855) 322-3472
www.BayAreaBackPain.com
Disclaimer: Due to Federal Law, some exclusions may apply