You are on page 1of 46

Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security

1 Water and Cornhill Streets


Georgetown, Guyana
Tel: 223-7408, 22-68996

Website: www.mlhsss.gov.gy

Table of Contents...1
Acknowledgements .......3
Executive Summary.....4
Objectives of Statistical Unit..5
Mission and Functions of the Ministry of Labour- LOSH...5
Purpose of Survey.6
List of Acronyms ...7
Definitions ....8
Sample And Survey Methodology & Design....9
-

Training, Field Work & Sample Coverage

Coding & Data Processing

Chapter 1-Introduction and Background.....10


Chapter 2- Summary Facts on Respondents....12
Mode of Operation..................................13
Employees within Establishments- Gross.....15
Employees within Establishment Sample ......16
Occupational Types .............................17
Chapter 3- Educational Attainment and Experience..18

Chapter 4 Employment composition of workers by Industry and Ethnicity ...20

Chapter 5- Employment Costs: Occupational Wages, Hours of Work & Employment Costs..21
Chapter 6- Conclusion..35

Page 1 of 45

LIST OF TABLES
Table 1.1- Questionnaires distributed and returned 2007- 2009....11
Table 2.1 Types of Establishments in sample by Sector- 2007- 2009..12
Table 2.2 Establishments by Ownership, Market, Social Organisation. 2007- 2009.13
Table 2.3 Distribution of Gross staffing in organizations by Gender: 2007- 09.15
Table 2.4 Distribution of interviewees sampled by Gender: 2007-09.......16
Table 2.5 Occupational Classifications by Gender according to ISCO 88:2007-09........17
Table 3.1 Educational Attainment: 2007- 2009......18
Table 3.2 Experience on the job by Gender: 2007- 2009....19
Table 4.1 Sample of Employment Composition of Workers by Industry & Ethnicity: July 2009..20
Table 5.1 Average Employment Cost 2003- 2009.....21
Table 5.2 Comparative Annual Average Employment Expenses: 2007- 09.....22
Table 5.3 Gross Employees by Ethnicity, Labour Expenses & Average Employment Expenses 2007-0924
Table 5.4 Average Salaries and Hours of Work 2009......26
Table 5.5 Some Top Paying Jobs by Industry: 2009..34
LIST OF GRAPHS
Graph # 1.1- Distribution of Responses in sample : 2007- 2009....11
Graph # 2.1 Distribution of Responses by Sector: 2007- 2009.......12
Graph # 2.2 Distribution of Establishments in sample by Ownership:2007- 2009.....13
Graph # 2.3 Distribution of Establishments in sample by Market: 2007-09.........14
Graph # 2.4 Distribution of Entities by Social Organization: 2007-09......14
Graph # 2.5 Gross number of persons working in Establishments : 2007-09..15
Graph # 2.6 Employees in Organizations Sampled by Gender: 2007-09....16
Graph # 2.7 Distribution of Employees in Sample by Occupational Categories: 2007-09....17
Graph # 3.1 Distribution of Academic Attainment in Sample: 2007- 2009.....18
Graph # 3.2 Distribution of Experience in Sample: 2007- 2009......19
Graph # 5.1 Distribution of Comparative Average Employment Cost: 2003- 2009...21

APPENDICES
Appendix A. Permanent Secretarys letter to Interviewees & Organizations............36
Appendix B. Sample of OWS 2009 Questionnaire........37
Appendix C List of Personnel Involved In The Survey...45

Page 2 of 45

Acknowledgements
The ILO Caribbean Office was instrumental in initiating Occupational Wages and Hours of Work
Surveys in Caribbean Countries in 2003, during which the first such survey was implemented in
Guyana by Statistical Unit Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security. Thus, it is
important to acknowledge the initial training and technical support provided by ILO. Additional
relevant training in these regards was also obtained from Bureau of Statistics, for which we are
also grateful.

The report describes the key findings and combined efforts of many individuals, organizations
and institutions without which the successful completion of this project would not have been
possible. In these regards, we would like to thank the Minister of Labour, the Permanent
Secretary and staff of LOSH and CRMA Departments for their contributions. Sincere gratitude is
also expressed to all Institutions and Organizations Governmental, Private Sector and Trade
Unions for their invaluable assistance in completing our 2009 Occupational Wages and Hour of
Work questionnaires. The collaboration and cooperation of other Departments within the
Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security is also deeply appreciated.
Ivelaw Henry

Chief Statistical Officer


Ministry of Labour,

Human Services and Social Security

Page 3 of 45

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Guyana Occupational Wages and Hours of Work Survey (OWHWS) is an Annual Publication
of the Statistical Unit of the Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security. It provides
vital occupational hours and wages and salaries statistics which are collected from businesses,
government institutions, trade unions and private organizations among others.

The survey targeted 540 establishments. Of this amount 251 establishments responded in eight
regions, giving a response rate of 47%. The establishments had 9,263 employees consisting of
4,952 males and 4,311 females. A total of 227 Private organizations, 13 Public institutions and 11
Para-public institutions were sampled.

Approximately 58% of the workforce are on the job between 1 and 4 years. This indicates a serious
problem with retaining workers. Therefore, intensive efforts are needed for workers, while
providing reasonable compensation packages or conditions of services. Data indicates that 20% of
the workforce is stable. 10% of the workforce has 10-14 years of service, while 10% has more than
15 years on the job.
More than 90 % of labour force does not have an education above secondary level, and since the
quality of education relates to quality of service, there is need to improve academic abilities of our
workers. Hence, the need for persons to attain higher education. This issue has to be addressed in
order to have a more competitive economy in light of Guyanas recent ranking at 97 on an index of
198 in terms of having competitive economies.
Of the 251 establishments, 90 % were Guyanese owned, while 6 % and 4% were ownership with
foreign equity or completely foreign owned. This indicates the need to move towards increasing
foreign investment in the country since only 1 % of these businesses were solely in the export
sector.

Job categories such as Accountancy, Drug Manufacturing and Commercial Banking, just to name a
few, attracted the largest number of employees and higher salaries, while a significant number of
persons preferred to work in the heavy-duty machinery working environment on the basis of
receiving high paid salaries resulting in increased demand for training in the latter jobs from our
BIT department.
To improve productivity, Guyanese businesses need to ensure introduction of technology or should
work towards making technology a catalyst in developing their full potential. Employers should
take into account flexible working hours for employees which is inevitable in any modern
economy.

Page 4 of 45

OBJECTIVES OF THE STATISTICAL UNIT


The major functions of the Statistical Unit are aimed at ensuring collection, analysis and
dissemination of employment and social statistics which can form the basis of policies.
MISSION AND FUNCTIONS OF LABOUR OCCUPATION SAFETY HEALTH DEPARTMENT
To contribute to the economic and social development of Guyana by executing appropriate
policies and programmes that will:
Maintain a stable industrial relations climate;

Enhance the safety and health of workers by ensuring improved working conditions at work
sites;

Develop a social compact aimed at increasing the productivity and competitiveness of


enterprises in the production and service sectors and;
Provide a range of services to employers, trade unions and employees in order to create an
atmosphere of mutual trust and social justice between management and labour.

Page 5 of 45

Purpose of the survey


Major objectives of the survey include:
1. Provision of up-to-date salary statistics / information for Wages and Salaries Administration
in Guyana and to facilitate monitoring of trends and informing related policy.
2. Generation of annual workforce data for use by Tripartite Sectors of the economy: public,
private, trade unions, also students and international organizations among others.

3. Continuity of up to date labour statistics and surveys to facilitate upgrading Guyanas ranking
among other countries from Category 3 to Category 2.
4. Provision of data for monitoring progress towards achievement of related MDGs.
5. Providing data to assist with facilitating productivity analysis / assessment.
The Salary / Wage data gathered is useful for the following purposes:
Career Planning or Counselling: To provide youths with data required to make wise career
planning choices e.g. which are the higher paying jobs / industries and which are lower paying.
To assist Management with data required for counselling staff in making decisions relative to
career changes.

Educational Planning & Allocation of Educational Resources: To assist employer/investor


with making informed decisions relative to educational planning & allocation of educational
resources. Knowledge of the current salary levels could determine whether to invest in
education or hire from the job market; when employer is planning his / her educational
investment programme.

Industrial Differences: Provide investors with approximate cost of wages and salaries costs
and facilitate comparison of differences in remuneration between industries.

Differences in Educational Attainment & Experience: To sensitize all relative to the roles of
differences in educational attainment and experience and salary determination/ wage
comparisons.
Wage and Salary Negotiation: This data is important in setting wage rates and comparisons
for salary negotiation.
Comparison With Wages, Salaries in Other Countries: Many other countries conduct
similar surveys.
Policy Decisions Relative To Salary / Wage Levels: This is used by Policy Makers in
decisions relative to Salary and Wage rates and levels.
Page 6 of 45

LIST OF ACRONYMS
BIT:

Board of Industrial Training

CBA:

Collective Bargaining Agreement

BOS:

CRMA:
ILO:

ISCO:

LOSH:

MDGs:
MNC:

SPSS:

Bureau of Statistics

Central Recruitment & Manpower Agency


International Labour Organisation

International Standard Classification of Occupation


Labour Occupational Safety & Health
Millennium Development Goals
Multi National Cooperation

Statistical Package for Social Sciences

Page 7 of 45

DEFINITIONS
Average Employment Cost: is derived by accumulating employment cost for all the
establishments and dividing by the total number of employees in the establishments.
Clerks: This includes records clerks, accounts clerks and storekeepers.

Craft and Craft Related Workers: This comprises of occupations such as mechanics, joiners and
electricians.

Educational Attainment and Experience: Educational attainment refers to whether the worker
would have completed primary, secondary, technical or tertiary education. In terms of experience,
the survey was used to find out whether the worker would have finished one year on the job, two
to four years, five to nine, ten to fourteen years or worked in excess of fifteen years on the job.
Elementary Occupations: This includes occupations such as cleaners, labourers, maids, office
assistants, factory hand. For these occupations, skills are not required.

Employment Cost: Information on employment costs was also collected. Employment cost refers
to the total amount the employer expended on employees. This includes cost for training, welfare
assistance, National Insurance Scheme - employers contributions, uniform and housing
allowances, bonuses as well as wages and salaries.
Enumerator: Persons who collected data for survey from establishments.

Legislators, Senior Officials and Managers: Those employees classified in this group included
mainly senior managers, and directors within various establishments.

Para Public- Refers to NGOs and other semi Public institutions whose staff are not paid by
government, but might receive subvention and other forms of government assistance to execute
their functions.
Plant and machine operators, assemblers: This comprises of such occupations as drivers,
machine operators, plant operators and pump attendants.

Professionals: This includes accountants, pharmacists, agronomists, economists, computer


programmers, engineers and lawyers.
Reference Month: The reference month was July, 2009. This month was used in previous surveys
and for purpose of consistency the month ending 31st July is being maintained.
Sales and Service Workers: This includes stores attendants, security, cooks and waiters.

Skilled Agricultural Workers: Workers falling in this group included gardeners and planters.

Technicians: This category includes occupations such as electronic technicians, teachers, and
draughtsman.
Page 8 of 45

SAMPLE AND SURVEY METHODOLOGY & DESIGN:


TRAINING, FIELD WORK & CODING & DATA PROCESSING
The Survey was done based on models and standards developed by ILO designed to collect
information on occupational wages and hours of work. Additionally the Unit continuously updates
the establishment listing from which it draws the related samples.
The questionnaire attached was administered in order to collect the requisite data.
Training and field work
This lasted for approximately 2 months, from mid October to mid December 2009.
Data processing
Data was coded in accordance with International Labour Classification coding requirements and
key entered in our data base using SPSS and Excel by 2 members of staff, in 2 portions and internal
consistency checks were performed. Data coding and processing were executed in January to
February 2010 and report completed in March 2010.

Page 9 of 45

Chapter 1: Introduction and Background


The Statistical Unit, Ministry of Labour Human Services and Social Security, conducted its sixth
Occupational Wages and Hours of Work Survey during the period October 2009 to December
2009. Previously Occupational Wages and Hours of Work Surveys were executed in 2003,
2004, and 2006, 2007 and 2008.
During this survey, expanded coverage of a greater number of Regions was achieved due to the
invaluable interventions from the Minister and the Permanent Secretary and Heads of
Departments in Ministry of Labour. Additionally, important contributions by way of
enumeration were made by the Staff of LOSH and CRMA Depts.
The assignments of enumerators were as follows:
2007 - 10 Enumerators, 2008 - 3 Enumerators, and 2009 - 21 Enumerators.

For these years The Regional breakdowns of the questionnaires received are as follows:

Page 10 of 45

A total of two hundred and fifty-one (251) establishments participated in the survey in eight (8)
regions of Guyana. fourteen (14) in Region Two, twenty eight (28) in Region Three, one hundred
and twenty (120) in Region Four, five (5) in Region Five, forty (40) in Region Six, twenty (20) in
Region Seven, fourteen (14) in Region Nine and ten (10) in Region Ten. The regions were better
represented in the current survey.
In 2008, 130 questionnaires were dispatched and 59 returned as against 400 being dispatched and
218 returned in 2007. This shows a fluctuation between the years with the least questionnaires
dispatching in 2008.
GRAPH 1.1 Distribution of Responses in Sample 2007 to 2009

TABLE 1.1 QUESTIONNAIRES DISTRIBUTED & RETURNED 2007- 2009


Regions

Dispatched

2007
Returned

Region 1
Region 2
Region 3
Region 4
Region 5
Region 6
Region 7
Region 8
Region 9
Region 10

400

60
19
108
15
16
218

Total

Page 11 of 45

Response
Rate %

Dispatched

2008
Returned

55%

130

8
12
13
19
7
59

2009
Response
Rate %

Dispatched

Returned

Response
Rate by Region%

Response
Rate by
Sample
Pop.

45%

19
31
391
15
40
20
14
10
540

14
28
120
5
40
20
14
10
251

74
90
31
33
100
100
100
100
47%

6
11
48
2
16
8
0
5
4
100%

Chapter 2

Summary Facts on the Respondents

In 2009, two hundred and fifty-one (251) questionnaires were classified by sectors of which ninety
percent (90%) originated from the Private Sector, six percent (6%) Public Sector and four percent
(4%) Para-Public Sector. These represent general increases over 2008. Further, the private and
para public sectors portions of the establishments sampled in 2009 indicate significant increases
over the previous years. However, overall analysis might indicate the need to aim for improvement
in the numbers dispatched and returned in all sectors, but more especially the public and para
public sectors in future.
GRAPH 2.1 Distribution of Responses by Sectors 2007 to 2009

TABLE 2.1-TYPES OF ESTABLISHMENTS IN SAMPLE BY SECTORS- 2007- 2009


Private Sector

2007
195

2008
48

2009
227

Total

218

59

251

Public Sector

Para Public Sector

Page 12 of 45

18
5

9
2

13
11

Mode of Operation
Of the 251 establishments in 2009, ninety percent (90%) of the establishments are Wholly
Guyanese owned while six percent (6%) and four percent (4%) are Ownership with Foreign Equity
and Wholly Foreign owned respectively. There was fair representation of the institutions that were
foreign owned/ had foreign equity, operated in both markets and those that were unionized. With
the exception of export activities, all other entities realized increases in all aspects for 2009 above
those for 2008.

GRAPH 2.2 DISTRIBUTION OF ESTABLISHMENTS IN SAMPLE BY OWNERSHIP: 2007-2009

TABLE 2.2 ESTABLISHMENTS BY OWNERSHIP, MARKET AND SOCIAL ORGANISATION-2007-2009

ENTITIES BY LOCATION OF OWNERSHIP


Wholly Guyanese Owned
Foreign Owned Entities

ENTITIES BY LOCATION OF MARKET


Engaged solely in Export Activities

2007

2008

2009

197

57

226

21

25

Engaged solely in domestic market

194

38

219

Establishments whose workers are unionized

30

21

Engaged in both markets

ENTITIES BY SOCIAL ORGANISATION


Establishments with Collective Bargaining Agreements(CBA
Page 13 of 45

15
16

17
3

30
9

For 2009, of the organizations sampled, eighty seven percent (87%) operated in the domestic
market and twelve percent (12%) in both markets while one percent (1%) of these, engaged in
export market only. These represented increases in the first 2 markets categories for 2009 over the
previous years.

GRAPH 2.3 DISTRIBUTION OF ESTABLISHMENTS IN SAMPLE BY MARKET: 2007-2009

In 2009, eight percent (8%) of the sampled establishments are unionized and four percent (4%)
have Collective Bargaining Agreements (CBA).

GRAPH 2.4 DISTRIBUTION OF ENTITIES BY SOCIAL ORGANISATION- 2007- 2009

Page 14 of 45

Employees within Establishments - Gross


According to data below, women seem to be maintaining a substantial share of the working
population; even working to reduce the male- female gap in some instances. While 218
organizations in 2007 employed 9753 workers, in 2009, 251 organizations utilized 9263
employees. This could indicate that more proportionately smaller firms were used in the 2009
survey or that employers seem to be managing with relatively less staff. Data shows consistent
increase in both categories and total for 2009 relative to the previous years, despite being below
the figures for 2007.
GRAPH 2.5 GROSS NUMBER OF PERSONS WORKING IN THE ESTABLISHMENTS: 2007- 2009

TABLE 2.3: DISTRIBUTION OF GROSS STAFFING IN ORGANISATIONS BY GENDER 2007- 2009

Male
Female
Total

Page 15 of 45

2007
5299

2008
2047

2009
4952

9753

3741

9263

4454

1694

4311

Employees in Establishments - Sample


The total sample for 2009 was far in excess of the previous years, more than double that for 2007
and more than 4 times that of 2008; in most circumstances the higher sample would be preferred
since it might usually be expected to give a better indications.
GRAPH 2.6 EMPLOYEES IN ORGANISATIONS SAMPLED BY GENDER 2007-2009

TABLE 2.4 DISTRIBUTION OF INTERVIEWEES SAMPLED BY GENDER


Male
Female
Total

Page 16 of 45

2007
650

2008
294

2009
1176

1082

497

2246

432

203

1070

Occupational Types
The chart displays significant increases in the categories of legislators/ managers, associate
professionals, clerks, service workers, and elementary occupations recorded approximately 2
times or more in numbers for 2009 compared to 2007. There is also a great improvement over the
previous years in the numbers identified in the category as unclassified, there being none in 2009.
GRAPH 2.7 DISTRIBUTION OF SAMPLE BY OCCUPATIONAL CATEGORIES 2007- 2009

Table 2.5 Occupational classifications by Gender according to ISCO-88: 2007-2009


Occupational Classifications

Legislators, Senior
Officials, Managers
Professionals

M
61

Technical & Associate


Professional
Clerks

53

Service Workers, Shop &


Market Sales Workers.
Skilled Agricultural &
Fisheries Workers.
Craft & Related Trade
Workers
Plant & Machine
Operators & Assemblers
Elementary Occupations

2
4
6
7
8
9

10

Unclassified
Total

Page 17 of 45

33

F
17
42

2007
T
78

37

70

46

134

180

92

95

109

201

99

10

109

87

55

142

432

1082

93
86

650

19

112

95

%
7

M
16

2008
F
T
12
28

%
6

M
96

F
63

38

46

84

17

110

137

247

19

42

37

79

16

236

387

623

43

17
0

17
0

19

27

44

61

10

38

13

47

32

79

294

203

497

10
9

100

55
33

55

41

12
0

51

202
4

2009
T
159

38

89

150

352

115

15

130

16

197

250

447

11
8

100

165
0

28

193

1176 1070 2246

%
7
4

11
16
28
0
6
8

20
0

100

Chapter 3

Educational Attainment & Experience

The educational attainment level of the 2246 persons who were sampled from the 9263
respondents indicate that 29 % gained primary education, 52 % completed secondary school
education, 9 % obtained technical education, 8 % achieved a tertiary level education and 2% did not
indicate. Thus, tertiary and technical levels account for 17 %. More men than women have been
consistently noted in the total samples from these 3 yrs. Men out number women at primary,
technical and for those not stated for the 3 years. The exception to this trend was 2009 where
women attained higher numbers at secondary level and 2008 when more women at tertiary levels
than men were observed. For 2009, technical and tertiary percentages declined relative to previous
years, while 2% of the academic levels were not indicated.
GRAPH 3.1 DISTRIBUTION OF ACADEMIC ATTAINMENT IN SAMPLE: 2007-2009

Table 3.1 Educational Attainment: 2007- 2009


Educational
level attained

2009
T

Primary

393

251

110

73

203

Tertiary

130

16

51

Secondary
Technical

Not Stated
Total

Page 18 of 45

508
35

1176

644

652

1160

78

188

1070

2246

2008
T

29

116

50

166

36

26

62

12

32

52
8
2

100

93
29
20

294

72

165

43

72

203

497

2007
T

33

233

110

343

13

113

64

177

33
15
6

100

227
71
6

650

198

425

57

128

432

1082

32
39
16
12
1

100

In 2009, those with 1 yr experience accounted for 26%, 2 - 4 yrs amounted to 32 percent (%), 5-9
yrs experience totaled 19%, 10-14 yrs amounted to 10%, 15 yrs totaled 10 %, while 3% did not
state. That fact that 20 % for 2009 and 2007 had between 10-15 yrs experience is commendable
despite the mobility of employees and the attrition rate of some organizations. This has implications
for decisions relative to planning for training of staff versus efforts to retain staff.
Comparison of the 3 years showed men exceeding women in each category with the exception of
2008 at 1-14 yrs and 15 yrs categories and 2009 at did not indicate section. Approximately half of
the persons had less than 5 years experience generally. The highest number of males in 2009 was in
the 2-4 yrs experience category similar for females. For the other years the pattern was similar
indicating persons might not be staying too long in their jobs.
GRAPH 3.2 DISTRIBUTION OF EXPERIENCE IN THE SAMPLE: 2007- 2009

Table 3.2: EXPERIENCE ON THE JOB BY GENDER - 2007- 2009


YEARS
1 yr
2-4 yr
5-9yrs
10-14 yr
15 yrs
Did Not Indicate
Total

Page 19 of 45

2009
M
256
372
251
129
148
20
1176

F
329
343
186
85
77
50
1070

T
585
715
437
214
225
70
2246

%
26
32
19
10
10
3
100

M
72
92
48
19
23
40
294

2008
F
T
44
116
63
155
40
88
21
40
24
47
11
51
203 497

%
23.3
31.1
18
8
9.4
10.2
100

M
180
161
98
74
63
49
625

2007
F
T
%
128 308 28.5
131 292
27
76
174
16
34
108 10.3
48
111
10
40
89
8.2
457 1082 100

Chapter 4

Employment Composition Of Workers By Industry And Ethnicity

Based on the sample, Indo-Guyanese seem to prefer jobs in sawmilling, beverage retail, textile
retail, motor vehicle repair, quarrying, rice milling, furniture manufacturing. Etc while AfroGuyanese seem to prefer jobs in Hotels and restaurant, household items retail, telecommunication,
postal services, security among others.
TABLE 4.1 SAMPLE OF EMPLOYMENT COMPOSITION OF WORKERS BY INDUSTRY AND ETHNICITY JULY 2009
No.
Sawmill
Hotel
Restaurant
Wholesale/Retail
Beverage Retail
Textile Retail
Household Items Retail
Specialized Stores Retail
Machinery Sales
Automotive Sales
Motor Vehicles Repair
Quarry
Food Processing
Rice Milling
Stock Feed Mfg.
Bakery
Gold Mining
Paint Manufacture
Metal Fabrication
Furniture Manufacturing
Jewellery
Water Processing/Dis.
News Paper Pub/Adv.
Electricity Gen/Dist.
Taxi
Trucking Service
Shipping Service
Travel Service
Telecommunication
Banking
Postal Service
Credit Union
Pawn Brokery
Money Transfer
Insurance Service
Computer Repairs
Accounting & Auditing
Security Service
Primary Education
Secondary Education
Technical Education
Waste Disposal
Trade Unions
Funeral Service
Hospital
Other Health Care
HIV/AIDS Awareness
Government Service
Town/ Village Council
Gas Station
Drug Manufacturing
Optician
Total

Page 20 of 45

Sample-Industry and Ethnic Composition of Workers


Code
Omitted
Afro
Indo
Amerindian
2010
0
54
154
22
5513
0
104
47
9
5520
27
95
79
7
5123
0
7
6
1
5211
0
60
92
10
5232
7
27
78
6
5233
0
28
14
2
5239
0
10
11
2
5150
0
7
4
2
5030
23
9
39
2
5020
0
25
44
5
1411
0
8
20
3
1511
0
3
12
0
1531
0
3
37
0
1533
0
1
11
0
1551
0
13
39
3
1319
0
13
3
2
2422
0
5
8
0
2899
0
9
8
2
3610
15
7
31
1
3691
0
6
7
1
4100
15
7
7
1
7430
12
7
16
0
4010
15
0
0
0
6021
0
5
5
0
6030
0
1
4
0
6301
0
3
11
0
6304
0
9
4
1
6420
0
20
9
0
6919
15
0
0
0
6411
0
14
1
0
6592
0
10
0
0
6592
0
3
0
0
6599
0
3
0
0
6601
0
3
0
0
7250
0
9
0
0
7412
0
6
5
1
7523
0
10
2
2
8010
0
1
19
0
8021
0
12
7
1
8022
9
27
22
1
9000
0
3
6
1
9111
0
20
13
3
9303
0
4
1
0
8512
0
11
3
0
8519
0
3
0
1
8519
0
5
2
2
7511
6
25
12
2
7514
4
22
22
1
5050
12
29
37
3
2423
0
5
7
1
3320
0
2
3
2
160
773
962
103

Mixed
12
35
23
0
12
18
0
2
0
3
14
0
8
1
3
6
1
1
6
4
1
3
3
0
1
0
0
1
4
0
0
0
2
2
2
12
3
1
0
14
5
0
6
0
1
1
1
4
3
1
2
5
227

Other
1
0
4
0
1
5
0
4
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
21

Total
243
195
235
14
175
141
44
29
13
76
88
31
24
41
15
61
19
15
25
58
15
35
39
15
11
5
15
15
33
15
15
10
5
5
5
21
15
15
20
34
64
10
42
5
15
5
10
49
52
82
15
12
2246

Chapter 5 Employment Cost: Occupational Wages, Hours Of Work And Employment Cost
The average for the current sample is G$650,114. This figure depends on various expenditures
relative to employment costs and the level of employment of the organizations involved. Up to
2007 average cost of employment was increasing, with positive increments /additions, however,
between 2007- 2008 AEC declined by 8 % due to negative increments. This trend continued
between 2008- 2009 with continued decline in AEC resulting in 10% decline.
GRAPH 5.1 DISTRIBUTIONS OF COMPARATIVE AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT COSTS 2003-2009

Table 5.1 Average Employment Cost 2003-2009

Year

Average Employment Cost G$

Increase G$

Increase %

2003

466,898

2006

724,586

165,191

724,715

(62,184)

2004
2007
2008
2009

559,395
786,899
650,114

Source: OWS 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009.

Page 21 of 45

92,497

20

62,313

30
9

(76,001)

-10

-8

Changes over the period could depend in part on the types and sizes of the organizations included in
the samples over the years, the level of efficiency, level of employees used among others.

From the table below it is observed that increases were noted in the following: Rice milling, bakery,
saw milling, furniture manufacturing, construction, sale of petroleum, travel service among others
while decline was observed in security service.
Table 5.2 COMPARATIVE ANNUAL AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT EXPENSES 2007- 2009

No.

ISIC Code

2009
Economical Activity

1319

Gold Mining

1419

Bauxite

1512

Fish Processing

1531

Rice Milling

1551

Man. of Bakery Product

1564

Beverage manufacturing

2022

Manufacturing of Blinds

2422

Manufacturing of Paints

2424

Paint Manufacturing

3320

Optical Service

3691

Sale of Jewellery

4100

Sale of Purified Water

5010

Auto Parts Sale

5030

Sale of Automotive Parts

5121

Wholesale of life animals

5150

Sale of Mining Equipment

5211

Retail of food items

5232

Retail of Textiles & HH Goods

2
4
5
6
7
8
9

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

1411

Quarry

1511

Food Processing

1513

Canning of Food

1533

Man. Livestock Feeds

1561

Manufacturing of Liquor

2010

Sawmilling

2102

Packaging

2423

Manufacture of Drugs

2899

Welding Fabrication

3610

Production of Furniture

4010

Transmission of Power

4520

Construction

5020

Machine Shop

5050

Sale of Petroleum prod.

5123

Sale of Industr. Chemicals

5200

Retail Trade

5231

Retail of Pharmaceuticals & Cosmetics

Page 22 of 45

2008

Annual Total Expenditure

Annual Average

on Labour Cost

Employment Cost

$ 47,433,698.00
$ 37,510,734.80

$302,644,600.00

0
0

$ 51,135,475.00
$ 60,243,339.00
$ 38,363,371.00

2007

Annual Average

Annual Average

Employment Cost

Employment Cost

$ 765,059.65

$1,124,526

$670,671

$273,762

$927,826

$ 581,084.94

$535,695

$461,156

$ 599,427.67

$340,363

$144,086.

$62,277

$285,948

$ 914,895.97
$ 669,567.70

$ 860,619.13

0
0

$82,560
0

$ 21,991,200.00

$ 1,099,560.00

$284,505,119.00

$ 476,557.99

$421,452

$831,429

$ 551,283.37

$ 5,079,340.00

$ 1,015,868.00

$ 75,449,701.00

$ 838,330.01

$ 20,397,484.80

$647,652.

$ 457,750.00

0
0
0
0

$316,824
0
0
0
0

$427,648,766.00

$ 497,266.01

$120,143,248.00

$ 1,133,426.87

$468,394

$211,179

$ 27,038,229.00

$ 844,944.66

$1,658,535

$ 656,735.38

$239,835

$401,914

$ 5,748,376.00

$ 479,031.33

$319,112,849.80

$ 795,792.64

$437,142

$311,986

$ 9,627,576.00

$ 687,684.00

$518,254

$606,101

$ 992,650.38

$ 3,662,000.00

$ 33,101,924.00

$731,175,049.00
$ 42,687,800.00

$ 58,201,589.91
$ 18,892,519.00
$ 14,463,720.00

$ 472,884.63

$ 1,334,261.04
0

$ 538,903.61
$

64,260.27

$ 602,655.00

$100,724,898.80

$ 434,159.05

$140,408,086.00

$ 426,772.30

$ 80,404,681.00

0
0

$586,389
0
0
0
0
0

0
0

$418,008
0

$412,047
0
0
0
0
0

36

5233

Electronics Shop

38

5239

Retail of Stationary

5513

Hospitality/Accommodation

6021

Transportation (Taxi Service)

6301

Shipping

6411

Mail

6519

Banking

6599

Money Transfer

6601

Sale of Insurance

7290

Other Computer related activities, sales

7430

Advertising

7511

Para Public Sector

7514

Collection of Rates & Taxes

8010

Primary Education

8022

Technical Education

8511

Medical Services

8519

Human Health Activities

9111

Business

9303

Funeral Services

37
39
40
41
42

43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72

5234

Retail of Hardware

5510

Hotels

5520

Restaurants, Bars and Canteens

6030

Transportation (Trucking Service)

6304

Travel Services

6420

Telecommunications

6592

Credit Granting

6600

Insurance

7250

Repair & Maintenance of Computer

7412

Accounting Services

7511

General Public Service Activities

7512

Municipality

7523

Security Services

8021

Secondary Education

8030

University

8511

Private Hospitals

9000

Garbage Disposal

9233

Conservation

Grand Total

Page 23 of 45

$ 66,054,918.00

$ 475,215.24

$ 57,440,641.00

$ 692,055.92

$161,549,843.80
0

$ 841,405.44

$ 47,574,400.00

$425,068

$348,972

$ 492,100.00

$ 274,968.00

$ 17,776,800.00

$444,745

$ 435,692.31

$ 5,499,360.00
$ 2,952,600.00

0
$468,727

$ 666,571.18

$ 84,059,254.00

$227,300,771.00
$117,636,924.00

$ 2,334,979.28
$ 888,840.00
$

98,702.07

0
0

$384,986
0
0

$406,308

$194,712,000.00

$ 255,863.34

$2,328,593.

$1,303,696

$ 8,383,703.00

$ 349,320.96

$1,147,203

$868,628

$ 619,445.72

$ 3,596,568.00
$ 4,204,200.00

$ 17,344,480.23

$ 719,313.60
$ 700,700.00

0
0
0

$2,466,019
0
0

$480,117

$1,170,041

$ 30,995,713.00

$ 815,676.66

$577,654,476.58

$ 2,396,906.54

$724,310

$407,638

$916,364.

$ 471,499.07

$557,567

$ 559,884.67

$3,402,698

$1,642,539

1,073,692

$ 511,978.05

$518,464

$ 1,053,467.06

$ 77,011,612.00

$ 846,281.45

$134,827,180.30

$ 740,808.68

$ 9,062,016.00

$ 362,480.64

$ 50,450,400.00
$ 33,593,080.00

$125,024,619.88
0

$ 806,610.45

$243,162,312.00

$ 711,000.91

$ 27,467,040.00

$ 1,831,136.00

$ 24,733,322.68

$ 1,075,361.86

$ 1,578,612.00

$ 315,722.40

$ 69,629,015.00
$143,271,520.00

$5,642,342,757.58

$41,135,419.10

0
0
0

$723,208
$444,109
0
0
0
0

$858,630

$473,317.

$542,015

$19,567,292.

0
0
0
0

$18,356,373.00

Data below indicates that female dominate in traditional jobs such as food processing, retail,
hospitality/ accommodation, restaurant/bars, mailing, banking, medical services and males in gold
mining, quarrying, rice milling, sawmilling, welding/fabrication, garbage disposal among others.though women hold substantial numbers in welding & fabrication.

7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31

1511

Food Processing

151

301

59

11

16

16

1411
1531
1533
1551
1561
2010
2022
2422
2423
2899
3320
3610
3691
4010
4100
4520
5020
5030
5050
5121
5123
5150
5211
5231
5232
5233
5234
5239
5513

Quarry

Rice Milling

Man. Livestock Feeds

Man. of Bakery Product

Manufacturing of Liquor

2
3
4
1

38
81
53

62

62

437

452

302,644,600

669,567

70

60,243,339

860,619

15

13

78

13

765,059

13

11

47,433,698

Total

Not Stated

Male
62

Gold Mining

Annual
Average
Employment
Cost
$

1319

Annual Total
Expenditure on
Labour Cost
$

Indo

Afro

Female

Economical Activity

No. of Businesses

No.

ISIC Code

Table 5.3 GROSS EMPLOYEES BY ETHNICITY, ANNUAL LABOUR EXPENSES, and AVERAGE EMPLOYMENT
EXPENSES 2009

11
50
42
15

0
5
0

0
3
4
4
1

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

41
88
64
20

37,510,734

51,135,475
38,363,371

914,895
581,084
599,427

21,991,200

1,099,560

5,079,340

1,015,868

20,397,484

551,283

Sawmilling

22

513

84

37

131

101

13

47

268

597

284,505,119

Manufacturing of Paints

61

29

40

43

90

75,449,701

625

235

850

860

427,648,766

93

13

23

59

17

106

120,143,248

1,133,426

22

10

32

32

27,038,229

844,944

Manufacturing of Blinds
Manufacture of Drugs
Welding Fabrication
Optical Service

Production of Furniture
Sale of Jewellery

Transmission of Power
Sale of Purified Water
Construction

Machine Shop

Sale of Automotive Parts

1
1
1
1

15
4

35

22
4

35

396

152

11

1
7

39
72

10
5
0
3

24
3
0
1

26

36

12

36

13

60

0
1
2
0
1
0
0
1
8
0

206

149

35

Sale of Industrial. Chemicals

10

Sale of Mining Equipment

20

Retail of food items

20

100

132

Retail of Textiles & HH Goods

21

132

Retail of Hardware

16

Retail of Pharmaceuticals & Cosmetics


Electronics Shop

Retail of Stationary

Hospitality/Accommodation

Page 24 of 45

10
2

18

121
14

92
7

5
0
0
0
5
2

61

156
126

20

245
168

33

10
1

Sale of Petroleum prod.

Wholesale of life animals

11
0
1

73

110

16

14

197

109

140

23

54

84

108

25

139

20

126

215

173

82

16

59

48
77
38

33
62
45

45
22

13
81
53

0
4
3

0
8
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0

70

37
8

70

3,662,000

33,101,924

476,557
838,330
497,266
457,750
472,884

543

548

731,175,049

1,334,261

12

5,748,376

479,031

4
0
0
0
0
0

65

108

294

0
0
0

42,687,800
58,201,589

656,735
538,903

401

319,112,849

14

9,627,576

687,684
434,159

24

18,892,519
14,463,720

795,792
64,260

602,655

10

232

100,724,898

329

140,408,086

426,772

192

161,549,843

841,405

0
1
0
5
4

63
0
0
7

81

139
83

341

80,404,681

66,054,918

57,440,641

227,300,771

992,650
475,215

692,055

666,571

32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57

5520

Restaurants, Bars and Canteens

24

54

216

97

72

19

25

10

47

270

6030

Transportation (Trucking Service)

6021
6301
6304
6411
6420
6519
6592
6599
6601
7250
7412
7430
7511
7514
7523
8010
8021
8022
8511
8519
9000
9111
9233
9303

Transportation (Taxi Service)


Shipping

Travel Services
Mail

Telecommunications
Banking

Credit Granting

Money Transfer

Sale of Insurance

Repair & Maintenance of Computer


Accounting Services
Advertising

General Public Service Activities


Collection of Rates & Taxes
Security Services

Primary Education

17

11

25

183

299

206

378

1
3
2
1
1
2
1

229
14
1
2

20

10

21

4
8

105

69

128
4

17

0
1
0
3
0

17

20

136

117

79

38

52
54
21

32
90

30

2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

0
1
0
2
2
0

11
1
2

39

24

22

84

53

5
1

268

230

136

30

91

15

Funeral Services

28

49

60

13

13

Grand Total

108

Percent

Human Health Activities


Garbage Disposal
Business

Conservation

Page 25 of 45

6
2
3

82
4

73
11

17

18

63
0

74

Medical Services

24

Technical Education

20

40

Secondary Education

16

5
6

532

20

39

26

13

12

13

18

92
3
5

12

13

5
1
0

13
3
0
1

0
0

20

117,636,924

435,692

2,952,600

492,100

5,499,360

274,968

36

84,059,254

2,334,979

482

482

47,574,400

98,702

584

584

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

740
0
0
0
0
0

21

20

194,712,000

255,863

24

8,383,703

349,320

4,204,200

700,700

5
6

28
38
91

241

107

107

0
0
0
0
0

3,596,568

17,344,480
30,995,713
77,011,612

719,313
619,445
815,676

846,281

2,396,906

50,450,400

471,499

134,827,180

25

9,062,016

60

577,654,476

182

740,808
362,480

33,593,080

559,884

243,162,312

711,000

155

125,024,619

15

27,467,040

1,831,136

24,733,322

1,075,361

1,578,612

315,722

342

136

136

13

10

251

4952

4311

1919

2088

361

463

92

4340

9263

100

53

47

21

23

47

100

888,840

761

17,776,800

23
5

69,629,015
143,271,520

5,642,342,757

806,610

511,978

1,053,467

41,135,419

From the sample below one notes that wages and salaries depend on the nature of the industry
involved, and the technical nature of the job among others.
TABLE 5.4 AVERAGE SALARIES AND HOURS OF WORK - 2009

Occupation

Average Wages, Salaries and Hours of Work


Code
July Earnings ($)

Hours/Worked Paid

Saw Milling & Lumber Yard Establishments 2010

Janitor
Clerk
Cleaner
Sales Clerk
Foreman
Cashier
Clerk
Operator
Checker
Saw Doctor
Accounts Clerk
Mechanic
Labourer
Security Guard
Porter
Cross Cut Operator
Foreman
Timber Grader
Gang saw operator
Tractor Driver
Junior. Foreman
Manager
Band saw Operator
Fork Lift Operator
Managing Director
Scaler
Accountant
Senior Supervisor
Welder
Captain
Administrator
General Manager
Restaurants 5520
Sales Persons
Labourer
Cook
Clerk
Counter Staff
Pastry Maker
Kitchen Staff
Cake Decorator
Baker
Clerk

Page 26 of 45

9132
4111
9132
5220
8141
4211
4115
8141
4131
8141
4121
7231
9332
5169
9151
8141
8141
8141
8141
8331
8141
1210
8141
8141
1317
8141
2411
3439
7212
2470
3431
1229
5220
9131
5122
4111
5123
7412
5122
7412
7412
4211

16,000
28,620
29,600
31,200
31,500
32,000
36,750
37,011
40,600
41,000
41,599
42,666
43,335
43,628
46,666
50,000
50,025
52,000
55,000
55,000
59,800
63,683
65,000
65,000
66,000
67,600
68,000
75,000
80,000
80,000
84,000
85,750
38,333
29,159
29,305
29,453
32,000
33,612
34,000
36,000
37,094
40,000

124
166
184
160
180
170
160
174
160
174
172
170
168
164
216
200
183
208
208
208
208
170
208
208
176
208
160
208
160
160
160
160
192
184
184
184
160
192
184
192
192
192

Supervisor
Washer
Manager
Chief cook
Hotels 5513
Pastry Maker
Bartender
Charwoman
Gardener
Janitor
Maintenance Staff
Cleaner
Handyman
Laundry Attendant
Assistant Cook
Housekeeper
Bar Attendant
Cashier
Cook
Laundry Staff
Check in Clerk
Beverage Retailing 5211
Driver
Clerk
Salesman
Sales girl
Clerk
Housekeeper
Labourer
Clerk
Sales Clerk
Bond Clerk
Inventory Clerk
Salesman
Supervisor
Technician
Human Resource Manager
Chief Security
Credit Controller
Manager
Director
Machine Shop- 5020
Bond Clerk
Salesman
Maid
Manager
Clerk
Accounts Clerk
Mechanic
Quarry 1411
Labourer

Page 27 of 45

7410
9133
1315
5122

48,974
42,000
66,000
66,139

192
192
192
173

8322
4113
5220
5220
4112
9131
9151
4211
5220
4113
4131
5220
3439
3114
1221
5169
1221
1210
1210

23,968
27,804
29,745
30,000
36,000
36,000
37,278
38,282
39,167
42,500
47,910
49,134
49,798
60,000
69,000
73,800
84,000
91,133
147,500

189
200
179
176
160
168
179
176
176
190
192
163
176
163
166
172
166
172
166

9213

21,600

7412
5123
9132
6113
9132
6113
9132
9313
9132
5122
9131
5520
5123
5122
3439
4222

4113
5220
9132
1314
4211
4121
7231

22,000
29,477
29,658
32,669
33,000
35,000
36,000
37,491
38,133
38,320
41,250
43,813
44,000
44,868
48,934
50,130

29,250
35,930
50,380
62,500
69,423
78,219
75,753

96
160
184
160
172
163
184
184
184
193
170
189
160
167
176
192

184
179
154
175
194
217
192
160

Accounts Clerk
Carpenter
Security
Guard
Driver
Welder
Captain
Serviceman
Machine Operator
Food Processing 1511/14
Processor
Porter
Advertiser
Driver
Accounts Clerk
Store Clerk
Branch Manager
Payroll Supervisor
Supervisor
Wharf Supervisor
Director
Managing Accountant
Office Manager
Rice Milling 1531
Packer
Labourer
Operator
Electrician
Dryer Worker
Quality Control
Senior Operator
Driver
Dryer Operator
Security
Administrative Officer
Stock Feed Manufacture 1533
Cook
Accounts Clerk
Payroll Clerk
Office assistant
Stores Attendant
Cashier
Hatchery Operator
Billing Clerk
Security Guard
Supervisor
Administrative Officer
Operator
Electrician
Electricity Distribution 4010
Meter Reader

Page 28 of 45

4121
7123
5169
5169
8322
7212
8141
7111
8141

49,525
54,375
56,998
59,614
68,000
71,100
92,600
99,370
138,852

160
160
166
160
160
166
160
172
192

9151
9322
8141
7241
9322
3152
8141
8322
8141
5169
3439

26,000
28,112
44,350
45,525
48,000
52,300
56,475
60,000
60,000
61,000
65,000

139
139
167
139
184
206
208
184
184
236
200

7411
9151
3415
8322
4121
4131
1210
3439
3152
3142
1210
2411
2470

5122
4121
4121
9131
4131
4211
8290
4131
5169
3439
3439
8141
7121
9153

33,400
33,750
36,875
40,000
48,333
50,000
65,000
80,000
90,000
90,000
100,000
100,000
102,032

35,000
35,000
35,000
35,646
40,000
40,000
40,000
45,000
48,204
50,000
55,000
76,172
85,000
40,733

200
184
184
184
184
200
176
200
200
200
200
200
173

115
160
160
160
160
160
240
184
240
240
184
184
184
173

Clerk
Accounts Clerk
Data Entry Clerk
Driver
Accounts Supervisor
Finance Manager
Engineer
General Manager
Telecommunications 6420
Salesman
Senior Accounts Clerk
Payroll Analyst
Technician
Security Guard
Recruiter
Network Technician
Executive Director
CEO
Water Processing & Distribution 4100
Pharmacist
Inventory Clerk
Cashier
Security
Handyman
Sales Clerk
Sales Rep
Customer Service
Plumber
Welder
Mechanic
Craftsman
Plant Operator
Porter
Manager
Advertisement/News Media 7430
Receptionist
Clerk
Accounts Clerk
Junior Graphic Artist
Reporter
Graphic Artist
Administrative Head
Accounts Executive
Art Director
Fabrication of Metal 2899
Welder
Data Entry Clerk
CEO
Primary Education (Private) 8010
Clerk
Teacher

Page 29 of 45

4211
4121
4114
8322
2411
1221
8160
1210

43,333
48,394
48,394
56,155
92,400
123,067
130,000
175,813

173
173
173
173
203
173
173
173

3221
4131
4211
5169
5220
5220
5220
7134
7134
7212
7231
7239
9401
9401
3152

71,878
32,625
40,111
49,500
41,622
34,450
50,000
42,286
55,211
24,386
47,364
42,884
45,335
18,400
200,000

171
183
183
176
160
183
176
146
160
84
176
160
160
184
146

5220
4121
4122
7442
5169
2412
7242
1233
1210

4222
4211
4121
2452
3462
2452
1221
2419
1234
7212
4114
1210
4111
3310

32,000
35,000
40,000
45,000
60,000
60,000
89,000
170,000
175,000

43,645
45,192
50,000
55,000
56,000
60,000
76,840
80,000
170,000
35,142
40,000
50,000
25,000
29,333

160
160
168
160
168
168
160
160
160

160
192
168
168
168
160
192
160
160
176
176
176
160
160

Head Teacher
Secondary Education (Private) 8021
Teacher
Head Teacher
Technical Education 8022
Typist
Janitor
Checker
Receptionist
Typist Clerk 1
Typist Clerk 2
Store Keeper
Clerk
Technician
Customer Relation
Technician 2
Lecturer (Part time)
Instructor
Finance Officer
Lecture 1
Lecture 2
Deputy Principal
Administrator
Government Ministries/Agencies 7511
Cleaner
Librarian
Stores Clerk
Typist Clerk
A/c Clerk
Driver
Lands Surveyor
Laboratory Technician
Clerk
Technician
Documentation Officer
Electrician
Adm. Officer
Metrication Officer
P.P.O
Junior Manager
Snr. PO
Manager
Manager Scholarship
Head of Department
Senior Manager
Town Councils 7514
Charwoman
Janitor
Market Clerk
Clerk
Caretaker

Page 30 of 45

1228

60,000

160

4112
9141
5219
4224
4111
4111
4131
4111
2330
5220
2330
2330
2330
2411
2330
2330
2413
2330

30,450
36,990
37,730
37,730
37,830
40,245
43,297
43,894
47,959
50,000
50,032
52,500
52,984
60,000
81,661
111,619
155,000
156,489

150
160
146
146
146
146
160
160
160
176
146
42
140
136
146
146
160
146

9132
9141
4211
4211
9141

24,330
27,700
28,741
29,520
33,390

3310
3310

9132
4141
4131
4112
4121
8322
3431
3152
4113
8161
3431
7241
2413
2413
1224
2413
1222
1212
2412
1120
1212

41,765
85,000

30,549
36,344
37,730
37,830
42,915
44,170
63,344
56,007
58,915
60,000
63,324
67,467
79,500
79,500
89,880
105,828
108,639
110,000
153,926
176,954
221,516

160
160

168
168
168
164
160
163
168
160
160
160
168
160
160
160
160
160
168
160
168
160
160

148
148
168
176
148

Handyman
Office Assistant
Finance Clerk
Toll Clerk
Treasurer
Driver
Admin Officer
Town Clerk
Manager
Gas Stations 5050
Attendant
Data Entry
Driver
Driver RTW
Wash bay Supervisor
Pump Mechanic
Manager
Depot Supervisor
Operation Manager
Director
Computer Repairs 7250
Secretary
Technician
Accounting & Auditing 7412
Security
Support Staff
Administrative Assistant
Accounts Clerk
Driver
Payroll Clerk
Audit Clerk
Accountant/Auditor
Tax Senior
Director
Waste Disposal Service 9000
Mechanic
Clerk
Supervisor
Security
Manager
Hospitals 8512
Cleaner
Office Assistant
Cook
Statistical Clerk
Mechanic
Technician
Technician
Administrative Officer
Hospital Administrator
Medical Doctor
RHO
Drug Manufacturer 2422

Page 31 of 45

9401
9151
4122
4211
3443
8322
3439
3434
1221

35,661
38,296
41,305
47,523
54,509
57,564
64,000
64,410
110,769

173
160
174
173
176
173
168
176
173

4115
7343

30,000
45,000

160
160

9153
4111
8322
8322
8159
7231
1314
3431
3434
1314

33,434
40,200
41,400
71,518
76,596
77,845
80,000
89,662
112,079
160,000

5169
9131
3439
4121
8322
4222
4121
2411
2411
1210

44,640
51,692
65,000
75,141
85,500
87,414
87,595
232,500
750,000
800,000

9132
9151
5122
4122
7231
3133
2221
3439
1221
2221
1228

34,055
37,730
37,732
38,315
41,691
43,297
43,297
65,000
162,680
172,033
206,493

7231
4122
2412
5169
1210

36,000
44,000
48,000
48,000
56,000

192
192
192
192
190
190
180
192
192
192

196
173
178
194
208
178
193
202
202
171
120
120
128
192
124
160
160
160
180
146
160
160
200
160
208
160

Factory Worker
Factory Worker
Sales Clerk
Salesman
Computer Clerk
Labourer
Payroll Clerk
Driver
Driver Salesman
Asst. Supervisor
Administrator
Credit Supervisor
Production Manager
Managing Director
Sales Manager
Taxi Service 6021
Chauffeur
Travel Service 6304
Cleaner
Clerk
Travel Manager
Auto Sales 5030
Store Clerk
Cleaner
Receptionist
Office Assistant
Cashier
Accounts Clerk
Labourer
Sales Clerk
Security
Computer Operator
Clerk
Secretary
Technician
Supervisor
Spare Parts Sup
Accountant
Manager
Service Centre Mng
Sales Manager
Sales Of Machinery 5150
Office Assistant
Administrator
Commercial Banking 6519
Clerk
Cambio Teller
Receptionist
Teller
Customer Service Officer
Officer-in-Charge

Page 32 of 45

9151
9322
5220
5220
4114
9152
4121
8322
5220
3439
3439
3411
1222
1210
1233

28,000
29,066
42,790
42,790
46,000
52,500
57,500
60,000
60,000
60,285
72,500
75,000
200,000
250,000
265,000

160
160
189
189
160
152
173
160
160
203
184
176
173
173
173

9132
4222
1233

24,000
36,000
150,000

72
170
170

9151
3439

41,000
78,000

8332

4131
9131
4220
9151
4211
4121
9331
5220
5169
4113
4152
4115
3115
3439
3439
2411
1210
1210
1210

4222
4212
4222
4212
5220
1221

54,000

30,000
30,800
35,000
36,000
38,764
40,000
40,000
40,000
43,419
44,744
46,000
47,478
47,623
66,189
84,000
142,147
190,000
247,642
301,350

40,000
40,800
43,956
49,679
58,693
161,157

216

144
102
144
180
155
170
160
180
165
164
160
170
170
169
170
170
180
170
170
160
160
180
180
180
180
180
180

Junior Analyst
Marketing Officer
Managing Assistant
Communications Officer
Security Service 7523
Security Guard
Pawn Broker 6892
Janitor
Attendant
Safe Room Staff
Administrative Officer
Secretary/Mng
Coordinator
Money Transfer Agency 6599
Security
Customer Service Officer

Supervisor

Insurance Service 6601


Clerk
Accountant
Supervisor
Claim Investigator
Branch Manager
Postal Service 6411
Office Assistant
Postal Apprentice
Postman
Clerk
Postal Clerk
Accountant
Senior Postmaster
Managing Accountant

Page 33 of 45

3433
1223
1222
1224

166,010
197,801
211,450
222,059

180
180
180
180

9132
5220
4139
3439
4111
1210

24,000
28,000
32,000
34,000
42,588
54,000

192
192
192
192
176
192

5169

5169
5220

30,000

50,000
53,000

206

192
192

6599

58,000

192

4121
4121
3439
3439
1210

40,000
60,000
65,000
65,000
95,000

176
176
176
176
176

9151
4141
4142
4122
4141
2412
3431
2411

31,503
35,000
35,312
35,436
47,937
56,811
70,236
123,259

104
104
104
104
104
104
104
104

TABLE 5.5 Some of the top jobs by Industries: JULY 09


Occupation
Accounting & Auditing 7412
Security
Support Staff
Administrative Assistant
Accounts Clerk
Driver
Payroll Clerk
Audit Clerk
Accountant/Auditor
Tax Senior
Director
Drug Manufacturer 2422
Factory Worker
Sales Clerk
Salesman
Computer Clerk
Labourer
Payroll Clerk
Driver
Driver Salesman
Asst. Supervisor
Administrator
Credit Supervisor
Production Manager
Managing Director
Sales Manager
Commercial Banking 6519
Clerk
Cambio Teller
Receptionist
Teller
Customer Service Officer
Officer-in-Charge
Junior Analyst
Marketing Officer
Managing Assistant
Communications Officer
Technical Education 8022
Typist
Lecture 1
Janitor
Checker
Receptionist
Typist Clerk 1
Typist Clerk 2
Store Keeper
Clerk
Technician
Customer Relation
Technician 2
Lecturer (Part time)
Instructor
Finance Officer
Lecture 2
Deputy Principal

Page 34 of 45

Code

July Earnings ($)

Hours/Worked Paid

5169
9131
3439
4121
8322
4222
4121
2411
2411
1210

44,640
51,692
65,000
75,141
85,500
87,414
87,595
232,500
750,000
800,000

196
173
178
194
208
178
193
202
202
171

4222
4212
4222
4212
5220
1221
3433
1223
1222
1224

40,000
40,800
43,956
49,679
58,693
161,157
166,010
197,801
211,450
222,059

180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180
180

9322
5220
5220
4114
9152
4121
8322
5220
3439
3439
3411
1222
1210
1233

4112
2330
9141
5219
4224
4111
4111
4131
4111
2330
5220
2330
2330
2330
2411
2330
2413

29,066
42,790
42,790
46,000
52,500
57,500
60,000
60,000
60,285
72,500
75,000
200,000
250,000
265,000

30,450
81,661
36,990
37,730
37,730
37,830
40,245
43,297
43,894
47,959
50,000
50,032
52,500
52,984
60,000
111,619
155,000

160
189
189
160
152
173
160
160
203
184
176
173
173
173

150
146
160
146
146
146
146
160
160
160
176
146
42
140
136
146
160

Administrator

Chapter 6 Conclusion

2330

156,489

146

The 6th Occupational Wages and Hours of Work Survey continues to garner valuable information
on trends regarding wages, salaries and hours of work across occupations and industries in
Guyana.

There were significant improvements in producing a survey that has more extensive coverage
and an improvement in the quality of the data. Responses were received from eight regions
compared to five regions during the previous years.

Based on the data, approximately 58% of the workforce are on the job between 1 and 4 years
which gives an indication of serious problems with retaining workers. Efforts are needed to retain
workers, while providing reasonable compensation packages or conditions of services.
We must take cognizance that more than 90 % of labour force does not have an education above
secondary level. This issue needs to be addressed in order to maintain a more competitive
economy.
Of the 251 establishments, 90 % were Guyanese owned, while 6 % and 4% were ownership with
foreign equity or completely foreign owned which indicates the need to move towards increasing
foreign investment in the country.
Job categories such as Accountancy, Drug Manufacturing and Commercial Banking, attracted the
largest number of employees and higher paying salaries, while a significant number of persons
preferred to work in the heavy-duty machinery working environment on the basis of receiving high
paid salaries resulting in increased demand for training in the latter jobs from our BIT department.

Page 35 of 45

APPENDIX - A
MINISTRY OF LABOUR, HUMAN SERVICES & SOCIAL SECURITY
Lot 1 Water & Cornhill Streets, Stabroek, Georgetown.
Tel: 225- 0566, Fax: 227- 1308

2009-08-15

Ministry of Labour, Human Services and Social Security,


1 Water and Cornhill Streets.
Phone Statistical Unit
2237408
Dear Sir/Madam,

The Ministry of Labour Human Services and Social Security in conjunction with the
International Labour Organization is conducting an Occupational Wages and Hours of
Work Survey amongst establishments in Guyana from 15th August to 31St October 2009.

The Occupational Wages and Hours of Work Survey is intended to generate statistics for
wages and salary administration in Guyana. This survey covers establishments in the
regions as well as the private and public sectors.
Your establishment was selected to respond to our questionnaire.
Our request is in keeping with provisions of the ILO Convention 160 and Recommendation
170, which deal with labour statistics.

Please note that information collected will be held in the strictest confidence and data will
not be reported or presented in any personal manner. From observation of the
questionnaire it will be noticed that on pages 3 and 4 detailed data will required
according to random selection of fifteen positions held. There is provision on page five for
total earnings for all the employees over a one year period.

This would be our sixth Occupational Wages and Hours of Work Survey, having
commenced in 2003. The International Labour Organisation has expressed satisfaction in
our efforts to provide this vital information and many thanks for your cooperation if you
may have been previously contacted and responded positively.
Queries may be forwarded to our Statistical Unit, telephone number 223-7408

We will be very thankful for your kind assistance and wish your establishment success in
its future endeavors
Thanking you,
Trevor Thomas
Permanent Secretary.
PHONE # 22-68996, 22- 37408

National HIV & AIDS Workplace Policy


Embracing the fight against HIV & AIDS

Page 36 of 45

Visit our website:www.mlhsss.gov.gy

APPENDIX-B

Questionnaire

Ministry of Labour Human Services & Social Security Guyana Occupational Wages Survey, 2009
Date Issued and Identifier
ISIC Code
Kindly read explanatory notes before responding to questions.

Name of Establishment: _________________________________________________


Main Economic activity _________________________________________________

Main Product or Services ________________________________________________


Address:

_________________________________________________

Region:

_________________________________________________

_________________________________________________

Head of Organization:
(Name)
__________________________________________________
Contact Person:

__________________________________________________

Position of Contact person: ________________________________________________


Telephone No.:

E-mail Address

Page 37 of 45

_________________________________________________

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Purpose of Survey
Your establishment has been selected to participate in the Occupational Wages Survey (OWS). The main purpose of this survey is to generate
statistics for wages and salaries administrators and wages and salaries determination in collective bargaining negotiations as well as
productivity computations.
Coverage

Your report should include data only for the establishment in the box to avoid multiple reporting as your other branches may have also been
selected to participate in our survey. The provision of data specific to your establishment will allow us to come up with reliable estimate of
wage rates by industry, region and employment size.
Reference

The reference date of this survey is July 31,2009.

Collection Authority

The information asked for is collected under authority of ILO Convention 160 and recommendation 170. ILO convention 160
deals with the importance of collection and dissemination of Labour statistics. Our country is a member of the ILO and has
strongly supported the progressive policies of the ILO over the years.
Authorized Field Personnel

The MLHS&SS will supervise this survey with guidance and assistance from the ILO Caribbean Office. Staff identified is
employed with the MLH&SS and ID should be presented.
Confidentiality

All information from your establishment will be integrated with others and will be disseminated only in summary or
statistical table.
Available Assistance

If you have problems completing this form or feel you may have difficulties meeting the due date please feel free to contact
the Statistical Unit of the Ministry of Labour Human Services & Social Security at 1 Water & Cornhill Streets, Georgetown.
Telephone number 223-7408.
Part A- Total Employment by Category

(i) Total ------------------- Male----------- Female------------------

ii) Ethnicity: Afro/Guyanese----------- Indo/Guyanese--------- Amerindians -------------

Mixed ------------- Others ---------------------

iii) Age Range 15- 24 ------------ 25- 29 ----------- 30- 49----------- 5059------------ Over 60 years------(ii) Working Proprietor/Partner-

(iii) Contributing Family Member

Total---------- Male------ --Female ----------

Total------ Male--------Female---------------

(iv) Employees./Wage Earners/Salaried Employees Total------ Male---------Female---------------2. Please provide the following information for your establishment.
A) Ownership with foreign equity

/ / Wholly Guyanese owned / /

B) Engaged in export market only / /


C) Multinational
D) With Union

E) With CBA

F) Private Sector/ /

Page 38 of 45

YES/ No

Domestic market only

//

Wholly Foreign owned / /


Both

YES/ No

YES/ No

Public sector / /

Para-Public Sector / /

//

Thank you for completing Part A. Please complete Part B.

Part B Occupational Wages


No.

Enter information as required for the remaining items in questionnaire. The information should refer to persons
employed as of July 31, 2009 and the data on earnings refer to the full month of July 2009.
SEX

AGE
15
and
Over

M/F

1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

10
11
12
13
14
15

Page 39 of 45

ETHNICITY
AG---Afro
IG Indo
I- -Amerindian
M- Mixed
O-Other

Occupation
Brief description
Manager eg Admin.
of main task
Mng.
\and duties
Technician eg.
Electrician,
Engineer eg Civil,
Mechanical, Electrical

Educational
Attainment
(Use Code)
1=-Primary
2=-Secondary
3=. Technical
4=-Tertiary
0=-None

Experience
(use Code)

1=1yr.
2=-2-4 yrs.
3=-5-9 yrs
4=.10-14 yrs
5= . >15 Yrs.

OCCUPATIONAL WAGES AND HOURS OF WORK


9
NO.

10
Enter the
MODE OF
PAYMENT
as follows:
1 MTH
2 DAY
3 HR
4 PR
5 COMM
6 OTHweekly etc
(See Note
6)

11
Wage paid
for either a
full hours, a
full days or
a full
months
work

12
Wage paid for
either a full
hours, a full
days or a full
months work

13
Enter the
total
earnings
received
by the
employee
for the
month of
July 2009

14
Type of
Employee

15
Type of
Employee

(See Note 2)

(See Note 2)

Enter the
commencing
basic wage
paid to the
respective
new
employee
(See Note 7)
$

Enter the
basic wage
paid to the
respective
Employee(See
Note 8)

Total
Monthly
Earnings
(See Note
9)
$

Enter the
type of
employee if
appropriate
as follows:
1Apprentice/
Trainee
2 Temporary
3 Part time
4 Piece- rated

16
No. of
normal
hours
worked
in July 2009
(See Note
10)

17
No. of hours
paid for
in July 2009
(See Note
11)

5 Contract
6 Full Time
7 Others

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Thank you for completing Section B. Please complete Section C for the period 1st August 2008-31st July 2009.

Page 40 of 45

SECTION C

Total Expenditure of Employer on the following item for the period 1st August 2008 to 31st July,2009
(12 months or one year).
A

Labour Cost
Total Earnings (Wages and Salaries paid) in Cash

Total Earnings in Kind

Cost of Housing by Employer

All Employees G$

(See Note 12a)

(See Note 12b)

(See Note 12c)

Employers Social Security Expenditure


(See Note 12d)

Vocational Training
(See Note 12e)

Cost of Welfare Services


(See Note 12f)

Other Labour Cost


(See Note 12g)

Total Expenditure on Labour Cost

FOR OFFICAL USE


REMARKS:

Page 41 of 45

CODED BY:

CHECKED BY:

IMPORTANT
EXPLANATORY NOTES
1. Please note that columns 1-16 will refer to one case or occupation.
2. Assemble a list of the employees of the organization. The list should only consist of employees of the
organization. The list should consist of employees who receive pay for any part of the reference
period.
Include:

Full time and part time workers

Permanent, temporary and casual employees

Managerial and executive employees

Employees who commence work during reference period

Employees who finished work during reference period

Employees absent on paid or prepaid leave (e.g. Annual leave, sick leave.)

Employees on workers compensation who continued to be paid

Working proprietors of incorporated businesses.

Exclude all employees who did not receive pay for the reference period, e.g.

Irregular casual who did not receive pay for the reference period
Employees on leave without pay.
Employees on strike or stood down without pay.

Exclude also the following persons who, for purposes of this statistical return, are not regarded as
employees:

Directors who are not paid by salary.


Proprietors/ partners of unincorporated businesses.
Self employed persons such as subcontractors, owners/drivers and consultant.
Persons paid solely by commission without retainer.

3. From the assembled list enter in the questionnaire the number of persons by category if the total
number of employees are more than two employees but less than ten employees enter all.
4. If more than nine employees, but less than fifteen employees, enter all.

5. If more than fourteen, then a random sample of fifteen employees will be taken. (Interviewer will
guide accordingly).
6. MODE OF PAYMENT

(a) Refers to the manner in which employees are paid as shown by the following categories:

Description
(i) MONTHLY
(ii) DAILY
(iii) HOURLY

Abbreviation
MTH
DAY
HR

Code
1
2
3

Description
(iv) PIECE-RATED
(v) ON COMMISSION
(vi) OTHERS -weekly etc

Abbreviation
PR
COMM
OTH

Code
4
5
6

(b) PIECE-RATED employees include those who are paid a fixed basic wage plus piece rated
remuneration.
Page 42 of 45

(c)ON COMMISSION employees include those who are paid a fixed basic wage plus commissions even
though they may not have earned any commission in July 31 ,2009.
8. BASIC WAGE

Refers to the amount paid to an employee for either a full hours, or a full days or a full months work.

EXCLUDES, overtime payments, shift/food/housing/transport allowances, payroll tax, skill


development levy, other cash payments and payments in kind.
7. COMMENCING BASIC WAGE
Refers to the basic wage (as defined in Note 2) paid to a new employee without any prior relevant
working experience and who was recruited by your company between August1 2008,and July 31,
2009. NOT REQUIRED for apprentices and trainees.
9. TOTAL MONTHLY EARNINGS
a. Refers all remuneration received by an employee for July 2009 before deductions of the employees

contribution to the NIS lateness for work, equipment spoilage, personal income tax deductions and
other deductions payable by the employee.

b. INCLUDES overtime payments commissions, allowances (e.g. shift, food, housing and transport),
service points and other regular cash payments.

c. EXCLUDES payroll tax, skill development, levy, employers contribution to bonuses, productivity or
incentive bonuses, other lump sum payments and payments in kind.

10. Normal hours of work Number of hours per day, or week, in excess of which any time worked is
remunerated at overtime rates or forms an exception to the rules or customs of the establishment.

11. Hours paid for: include all hours actually worked, as well as hours paid for annual leave, public
holidays, sick leave, and similar paid absences or time away from work.

Page 43 of 45

12.SECTION C
Labour Cost:
Labour cost is the actual cost incurred by the employer in the employment of labour. A description of
each type of expenditure on labour cost is given below.
a) Total Earning
Gross pay for normal and overtime work, bonus & gratuities.

b) Payments in kind
This represents the value of goods and services given to the worker by the establishment as
remuneration. If the goods or services are produced by the establishment they should be valued at
production cost; if purchased by the establishment they should be valued at acquisition cost.
Included are payments in kind for fuel (e.g. electricity, gas), food, drinks and other items such as
clothing and footwear. Housing and social security benefits are not included here.

c) Cost of workers housing:


Where the dwelling is owned by the establishment, this cost takes the form of the cost of repairs,
maintenance, interest and depreciation. Where the dwelling is not housing: owned by the
establishment, the cost takes the form of housing allowances and grants paid directly to employees.
d) Employers contribution to National Insurance Scheme
This comprises the employers contributions on behalf of the workers to the National Social Insurance
Scheme, as well as to private pension and medical insurance schemes. also security included are
severance and termination pay.

e) Vocational Training Institutions


Teaching materials, and reimbursement of school fees to workers. Cost of instructors and training
Included are fees and other payments for training done by instructors
f) Cost of welfare services
This includes the cost of cultural and recreational facilities and services for staff.
g) Other labour cost

Included here are the cost of transporting workers to and from work by the employer and the
reimbursement of fares and labour costs not elsewhere included.

END OF QUESTIONNAIRE

Page 44 of 45

APPENDIX C. List of Personnel Involved in the Survey


Survey Coordinator:
Blenman, Carole

Steering Committee:
Name

Designation

Henry, Ivelaw

Chief Statistical Officer

Blenman, Carole

Statistical Officer

Benjamin-Samuels, Abike

Statistical Officer

Onwuzirike, Onyekachukwu

Statistical Officer

Enumerators:
Basdeo, Prandatt

Nichols, Neville

Benjamin-Samuels, Abike

Onwuzirike, Onyekachukwu

Bess, Maxean

Primus, Carol

Bissoondial, Ronald

Rawana, Marioye

Blenman, Carole

Semple, Dexter

Branco, Merlene

Solomon, Charles

Forde, Karen

Steaman, Corleen

Gardiner, Dawn

Sultan, Saudia

Glasgow, Shondell

Williams, Brenda

Henry, Ivelaw

Willis, Stanislaus

Moore, Valerie
Data Entry:
Henry, Ivelaw
Onwuzirike, Onyekachukwu

Page 45 of 45