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Philosophy 243: “Introduction to Logic”

Spring, 2010
Professor Robert O’Connor
Teaching Assistant: Esther Hesse
Blanchard 501; Ex. 5891
Hours: MTWR, 2 - 4
Robert.Oconnor@wheaton.edu
DESCRIPTION: An introduction to both formal and informal logic, with attention
to critical analysis and writing. Application will be made to philosophical
and other areas of reasoning.
OBJECTIVES:
i) To enable the student to identify and understand the structure and force
of arguments as presented primarily in an informal mode.
ii) To enable the student to identify and evaluate the reasons and
arguments given in support of the claims presented or positions
adopted.
iii) To enable the student to identify and address errors in informal modes
of reasoning.
iv) To enable the student to recognize various argument forms and to
assess the validity of each.
v) To enable the student to articulate an argument supporting her own
beliefs with regard to any broadly philosophical issue.
REQUIREMENTS:
i) Readings: The student is expected to complete the readings prior to the
class for which they are assigned.
ii) Problem sets: For each reading, the instructor has assigned a set of
exercises to be completed by the following class period.
iii) Writing Exercises: Every other week, the student will write a short essay
to be assigned by the instructor, roughly according to the
parameters provided in the text.
iv) Quizzes: There will be a quiz on alternate weeks covering any material
from book and class discussion from the previous quiz date to the
immediately preceding class.
v) Essay: The student will be required to write a short position paper
concerning an issue of her own interest. The essay is to be based on
an in-depth analysis of an argument in support of some specific
position. The particular issue may be drawn from any source.
After evaluating the strength of that particular argument, the
student will present the case for her own position.

and then provide a write-up identifying (i) the issue discussed. I may ask students to present their findings to the class. . (ii) the argument given for the position taken. (iii) any irrelevant reasons or errors in logic. the student will collect and analyze five items from any media source.vi) Media Project: Throughout the course of the quad. and (iv) an appraisal of the strength of the argument.

Critical Thinking. 1 Pages 1-21 Topic Issues & Arguments W 3 3 68-75 75-82 Vagueness Ambiguity F 2 41-54 Argument Structure W 5 147-160 Rhetoric 160-168 Writing Exercise #1 Comparisons F 5 M W 1-5 8 254-262 Quiz #1 Categorical Claims F 8 263-268 Categorical Inference M 8 273-281 Categorical Syllogisms Assignment 1-3 1-4 3-3 3-6 3-7 2-4 2-5 2-7 5-10 5-12 Lewis. 9th ed. Chapter 3 5-18 5-20 8-1 8-2 8-3 8-4 8-8 8-11 .DISTRIBUTION: Writing Exercises Quizzes Essay Media Project Total SCALE: 93-100 90-92 88-89 83-87 TEXT: A AB+ B 3 4 15% 60% 15% 10% 100% 80-82 70-79 60-69 0-59 BC D F Moore & Parker. (Mayfield) READINGS: Week Day 1 M 2 3 @ 5% 4 @ 15% 1 @ 15% 5 @ 2% Chap.

Chapter 8 7-5 7-6 7-7 10-3 10-16 10-17 11-5 .) F 7 M 10 346-364 Inductive Arguments Analogical Arguments W F 11 6-11 385-410 Causal Arguments Quiz #4 8-12 8-19 9-1 9-2 9-4 9-5 Lewis.W F M 8 8 9 297-312 W 9 314-321 F 9 322-326 6 W 9 328-332 7 F M 9 6 183-199 Syllogisms (cont. Some Gr. Short Truth Tables Writing Exercise #2 Truth-Functional Args. Chapter 8 9-6 9-7 9-9 9-10 6-2 6-5 7-2 7-4 Lewis.) Quiz #2 Symbolizing TruthFunctional Claims Truth-Functional Args. II Rules Quiz #3 Psychological Fallacies W 7 211-228 More Fallacies 5 8 Writing Exercise #2 Fallacies (cont. Group I Rules Truth-Functional Args.