You are on page 1of 60

FETING BOOK COUNCILS LARRY KRULE page 6

REMEMBERING SHIRAHS BERNIE WEINFLASH page 8


WRITING PATERSONS PAST page 20
EXPLORING TEVYES SHTETL page 45
NOVEMBER 14, 2014
VOL. LXXXIV NO. 8 $1.00

NORTH JERSEY

83

2014

JSTANDARD.COM

On top
of Touro

Teanecks
Alan Kadish
oversees Americas
largest Jewish
university
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2 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Page 3

Grape expectations
ferment Israeli tariff tussle
l Its not exactly a case of sour grapes.

In fact, its too many cases of sweet


grapes.
New York Senator Charles Schumer
is pressing Israel to lower its tariff on
grape juice so that New York State
farmers, who are stuck with a bumper
crop of grapes this year, can compete
more effectively in the Jewish states
juice market.
According to many press reports,
New York State is a major producer
of Concord grapes. The New Jerseybased kosher grape juice maker Kedem,
a major exporter to Israel, is Americas
second-largest consumer of this grape
variety, behind only Welch Foods.
Presumably such a move would make
grape juice cheaper in Israel. But even
without lower prices, Israelis apparently
are known in the industry for their grape
juice consumption an article in one
upstate New York publication described
grape juice as a major diet staple in
Israel.
Grape juice is a staple at Israeli dinner
tables, and opening up the Israeli market,
and any other foreign market, to more
American grape juice exports would be a
tremendous boon to Chautauqua County
concord grape farmers, Schumer said,
according to the Times of Israel, which

noted that most Kedem juice in Israel


is drunk by religious Jews, especially
immigrants from the U.S. who know the
product, at their Friday night Shabbat
tables.
Whether or not Israel agrees to cut
the tariff (apparently the United States
eliminated its own in 2013), you have
to admit there is something ironic
about the Jewish state importing the
fruit of the vine all the way from the
New World. After all, grapes are one
of the seven species, those agricultural
products listed in the Bible as special
products of the Land of Israel.
Wine has become one of Israels
major exports, and grapes and
grapevines are mentioned frequently
in the Bible Song of Songs alone
has 24 references to grapes, wine or
vineyard, some of them downright
erotic.
Schumer is a longtime advocate for
Israel, and its unlikely the grape tariff
ever will rival West Bank settlements
as a source of U.S.-Israel tensions. But
perhaps its time for some entrepreneur
either in Israel or New York State
to develop a popular new use for
the fruit. Let us know if you hear of
anything through the grapevine.
JULIE WIENER / JTA WIRE SERVICE

For convenient home delivery,


call 201-837-8818 or bit.ly/jsubscribe
Candlelighting: Friday, November 14, 4:20 p.m.
Shabbat ends: Saturday, November 15, 5:21 p.m.
LETTERS, P. 27

We now understand that keeping this type


of illness in the darkness of secrecy serves to
provide fertile ground to nurture its growth.

RUTH AND PHIL ROTH, TEANECK

From left: Hadassah founder Henrietta Szold, Zionist hero Joseph Trumpeldor, banker-philanthropist Baron Edmond de Rothschild, U.S. President John
F. Kennedy, cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin, and Laika, the cosmo-canine who was
the first animal to orbit the earth.

Chewing on the Mastik mystique


l Every so often, while trawling for
things nostalgic on the Internet, you
might happen upon a website that
defies explanation. The Virtual Museum of Israel Chewing Gum Wrappers
is such a site.
Posted by world-class gum wrapper
collector Roberto Back, the collection
includes wrappers from the pre-State
era when chewing gum was brought
to the region under the British and
is divided into categories according
to manufacturer, historical era, and
subject.
Backs collection proves that
chewing gum or at least its
wrappers doesnt lose its cultural
flavor overnight, or even after decades.
To borrow one of the Hebrew terms
for gum, you might call the site a
mastik-al experience.
Back has dedicated the site to
the Israeli gum wrappers, both as a
nostalgic issue and also of interest for
chewing gum wrappers collectors.
Many of the gum wrappers displayed
here are from my personal collection,
others are collaboration from
different people that kindly sent me
the pictures and many others are
taken from different websites.
Early on, gum wrappers were

considered an educational tool, with


series themes like Animals, Cities
of the World, Jewish Festivities,
People of the World, and the like.
Gum wrappers also were used to
present images of historical figures,
political leaders, philanthropists,
scientists, and intellectuals. Later on,
popular culture subjects like sports
heroes and cartoons and comics were
introduced. Even these tended to
have an educational component; for
example, gum lovers could learn about
traffic signs with Bart, Lisa, and Maggie
Simpson.
Perhaps the biggest cultural
revolution in terms of Israeli attitudes
toward gum is its repositioning over
the past two decades as a dental
health aid for adults, as well as kids, in
the fight against plaque.
Theres much more of this novel
collection to explore and enjoy.
Back also has posted links to
interviews with Dr. Haim Grossman, a
researcher of Israeli culture, who has
published a book on the subject called
Mastik Shel Paam (chewing gum of
yesteryear).
You can experience this sticky
website for yourself at bit.ly/js-gum
RACHEL NEIMAN / ISRAEL21C.ORG

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CONTENTS
NOSHES....................................................4
OPINION................................................ 24
COVER STORY 28
TORAH COMMENTARY 43
CROSSWORD PUZZLE44
ARTS & CULTURE 45
CALENDAR46
GALLERY49
OBITUARIES 51
CLASSIFIEDS 52
HOME DESIGN 55
REAL ESTATE 56

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 3

Noshes

Just saw a preview for Exodus. For my


part, Im waiting for Leviticus.
Twitter post from Adam Kotsko, a professor at Shimer College, commenting on
the new movie from director Ridley Scott.

STEWARTS DEBUT:

Rosewater reflects
a spoof gone sour
Rosewater is the
first film directed
and written by JON
STEWART, 51. It is based
on a memoir by IranianCanadian Newsweek
reporter Maziar Bahari
about his 107-day imprisonment in solitary
confinement by the Iranian regime. A few days
before Irans 2009 presidential election, Daily
Show correspondent
Jason Jones, pretending
to be a spy, interviewed
Bahari at a Teheran coffee shop. The regime
arrested Bahari four days
after the interview aired
on The Daily Show
and charged him with
spying. After his release,
he and Stewart became
friends. Heres an excerpt
from a recent New York
Magazine interview with
Stewart: (Q) Speaking
of Iran: You learned a
great deal about its politics and culture writing
and directing Rosewater.
Did you make the movie
because you felt guilty
about contributing to
Baharis jailing? Stewart replied: Listen, Jews
do a lot of things out of
guilt. Generally it has to
do with visiting people,
not making movies. If I
could draw a linear, rational line to what we had
done and the charges
against Maziar, I would
be really devastated. You
couldnt do something
more inane and vapid
than Jason Jones in sun-

glasses and a kaffiyeh


in a caf going, I am
an American spy! But
you cant control what
idiots will weaponize.
(Opens Friday, November 14)
Jewish Standard readers will be especially
interested in this question from the same interview: (Q) The Iranian
interrogators obsession
with New Jersey as a
den of massage wickedness which comes
straight from the true
story had to be right
up your alley. Stewart,
a New Jersey native, replied: Yeah, off-camera
Id invent things about
the various massage
oils that would be used:
Some of it pumped right
from Saudi Arabia. Just
ridiculous stuff, just to
entertain us as we progressed. Because it wore
on people emotionally,
the amount of work,
where we were doing it,
the conditions we were
doing it under, and the
type of story we were
telling.
DANIEL RADCLIFFE, 25, recently
told Conan OBrien that
he ingested half a cup of
antifreeze and was sick
for three days. Backstory:
he was making the film
Horns in Canada. It was
very cold, so the crew
put antifreeze in the
trailers water lines overnight. Radcliffe didnt
know and drank from the

Jon Stewart

Daniel Radcliffe

Fred Mayer

Glorious viewing
Mila Kunis

Isla Fisher

trailers inside water tap


which had the poisonous stuff inside it. Meanwhile, JERRY SEINFELD,
60, told Brian Williams
that he might be on the
autistic spectrum. He
said that hes very literal
in conversation and basic
social engagement is a
strugglebut I dont see
it as dysfunctional, I just
think of it as an alternate
mindset.
Ashton Kutcher, in a recent appearance on
The Conan OBrien
Show, explained how
he and his fiance, MILA
KUNIS, 31, came up with
their newborn daughters
name, WYATT ISABELLE.
First, Kutcher said he
came down with name
Tourettes, and started
spitting out every name

that came to mind in an


effort to find one that
Mila would like. Finally,
he said Wyatt, and Kunis said, thats It. Then
he added, We gave her
the middle name Isabelle
after Milas grandfather,
who was Itzhak, and so
it has a little heritage.
He didnt explain that its
a Jewish naming custom to give a newborn a
name whose first letter
or sound is similar to the
name of the honored
relative.
Robert Downey Jr.,
who wed producer
SUSAN LEVIN DOWNEY
40, in a Jewish ceremony
in 2005, welcomed a
daughter on November
4. Shes named AVRI
ROEL DOWNEY. In 2012,
they had a son, whom

Want to read more noshes? Visit facebook.com/jewishstandard

The History Channel of Canada made an original dramatic film in 2012, The Real Inglorious Basterds, that
was shown earlier this week on the American Heroes
Channel (AHC formerly the Military Channel). It will
be rerun on November 15 at 9 a.m., on November 17 at 7
p.m., and on November 18 at 2 a.m. It tells the true story
of two young American Jewish refugees from Europe
who joined a secret branch of the army, parachuted into
Austria in the last months of World War II, and met up
with a German army deserter. Together, they gathered
invaluable intelligence and did sabotage work. Sergeant
FRED MAYER, now 92, one of the two Americans, was
captured and tortured. But he convinced the Nazi head
of that region that he was an army bigwig and eventually, alone, he accepted the surrender of Innsbruck and
turned the city over to advancing American troops!
N.B.

they named EXTON


ELIAS DOWNEY. (I
suspect that Avri, too,
is named after a Jewish
relative. It is a common
Hebrew nickname for
Abraham). Meanwhile,

ISLA FISHER, 38, and


hubbie SACHA BARON
COHEN, 43, reportedly
are expecting their third
child. The couple has two
daughters: OLIVE, 7, and
N.B.
ELULA, 4.

California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at


Middleoftheroad1@aol.com

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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 5

Local
Meetings of very sharp minds
Larry Krule, retiring Jewish Book Council president, talks about literature and Davar
JOANNE PALMER

o learn more about the Jewish


community in the late 1960s,
you could just read The Chosen and Portnoys Complaint. Chaim Potoks 1967 novel was
sharply drawn, sociologically on point,
and deeply moving. Phillip Roths 1969
novel was brash, irreverent, shocking, and
controversial.
Both were central to mid-20th-century urban Jewish self-understanding
(its tempting to say they were seminal,
The hospital, once called St. Francis but
but given the specifics of Portnoys complaint, that might not be the best choice
now renamed as Metro South Medical
of words).
Center, is now successful. The theme in
Those two books, among others, had
my work is analyzing, investing in, and
such a strong influence on Lawrence
managing troubled companies, and fixing them, he said. We are not investing
Krule, who read them when they were
in them to dissolve and liquidate them,
new and he was young, that eventually
but to fix them. The hospital is the best
they led him to a ten-year presidency of
example of that we sold it to the largest
the Jewish Book Council. His term is now
public hospital chain in the country, and
ending; he and the councils president,
its successful.
Carolyn Hessel, are retiring, and both will
Larry Krule laughs with writer Michael Kramer.
We offered employment
be honored at a gala dinner on
to everyone in the hospiNovember 18.
tal. We didnt make money
Mr. Krule lives in Teaneck now,
through cutting staff. We
but he grew up in suburban Chicago; he said that those of us who
wanted to do it as positively
grew up in the Northeast who have
as possible.
seen the Coen brothers 2009
But, he added, that does
movie, A Serious Man, can get
not mean that he never lays
some idea of the general look and
off employees at companies
sound of his childhood.
he has acquired as he works
There was a strong intellecto turn them around. Life
tual component to his informal
is never so simple. Still, as
education.
much as possible, we do
My uncle was a very chariswell by doing good, he said.
matic, extroverted personality,
Mr. Krule specializes in
Mr. Krule said. He brought me,
turning around hospitals
early on, to a lecture series in
in trouble; now it is a specialty for which there is a
Highland Park thats the one in
special need, he said, but
Illinois, not here. It was at the shul
he didnt know that at the
headed by Rabbi Samuel Dresner,
outset.
who was one of the classic Conservative rabbis, and the series
The skill that seems to
Left, Larry Krule at Davar with Rabbi David Hartman and at a Jewish Book Council meeting with
included lectures by Abraham
help him most in his work,
Carolyn Hessel.
Joshua Heschel and Elie Wiesel.
Mr. Krule said, is managing
Another feature of midwestern
relationships. It is that skill
I loved Ida Crown, Mr. Krule said.
midcentury Jewish life was a porousness
that led him to the Jewish Book Council. I
Torah and modernity, Mr. Krule said. Its
I made good friends people Im still
in the boundaries between the religious
manage the board, and work with Carolyn
blend of traditional religion and modernity, and its use of baseball as a conduit
friends with now. We were very intelstreams. The rabbi of Mr. Krules Conto allow her to do the great things that she
servative shul was Jay Karzen, who was
lectually precocious. We read Saul Belfor it, was just right for someone growing
does, he said.
low, Philip Roth, I.B. Singer, Bernard
ordained by Yeshiva University. I became
up in suburban Chicago.
As for him, it is a great opportunity to
Malamud. Many of those writers since
sort of a protg of his, Mr. Krule said.
Mr. Krule earned his bachelors degree
participate in the encouragement of Jewish literature in America, he said.
have gone out of style, but they were
Rabbi Karzens influence combined with
in business at Roosevelt University in Chicago and his M.B.A. at the University of
And what exactly is Jewish literature?
instrumental in shaping the ethos of a
Chaim Potokss to move Mr. Krule first
Chicago. Thus armed, he moved east.
Defining it is always a challenge, he said.
generation.
to Chicagos premiere modern Orthodox
Mr. Krule works at restructuring trouWe try to have the biggest tent possible.
Out of all of those literary influences,
yeshiva high school, the Ida Crown Academy, and from there to a year of study in
bled companies. Most recently, I led a
The council gives out awards every year.
The Chosen might have been the most
Israel and to the modern Orthodox life he
group that bought a hospital on the south
The books it chooses either have a Jewpotent.
ish theme, even without a Jewish author,
still lives today.
side of Chicago that was very depressed.
It is a great sort of contextualizing of
6 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

We were very
intellectually
precocious. We
read Saul Bellow,
Philip Roth, I.B.
Singer, Bernard
Malamud.

o
r
a
i
o
c
o
T
F
M

B
t
f
b
m
t

t
t
n
d
d
v
o

Local
or have a Jewish author and have some
relevant Jewish meaning or context. The
awards are meant to encourage new Jewish authors. There is a group of young
or young-ish writers whose flourishing
careers are due in no small part to Carolyn Hessels keen eye, Mr. Krule said.
Those authors include Jonathan Safran
Foer, Nicole Kraus, Nathan Englander,
Mattie Friedman, and Dara Horn.
Just as Mr. Krules work at the Jewish
Book Council grew out of his passion for
the words of smart people using words to
form and share ideas, so too did his other
brainchild, Davar, the minyan that has
met at his house every few weeks, give or
take, since 2000.
Davar which means both word and
thing and therefore is a perfect name for
the amorphous, wordy, beloved but hardto-describe prayer and discussion group is
not a synagogue. It does not meet regularly,
does not offer membership or charge dues,
does not sell tickets for its high holiday services, does not have clergy, a board, or any
other formal structure.
What it does have is very smart visiting

scholars discussing ideas after davening


together on Shabbat mornings.
Its for people who want to be intellectually challenged; people who are intellectually sophisticated and share a common
textual foundation, although they are not
necessarily at the same stage at their religious observance, Mr. Krule said.
The prayer service is Orthodox, but
the scholars backgrounds range more
widely. I dont discriminate when I invite
scholars on the basis of their religious
expressions, but on the sincerity of their
convictions, the standards of their scholarship, and their general Jewish scholarly
gravitas, Mr. Krule said. When a speaker
accepts his invitation, it is with the understanding that the group he or she has
engaged to address includes many people
with postgraduate education, doctors
and lawyers and businesspeople who have
a high degree of Jewish learning. They are
told not to dumb anything down. This is
not a group that wants to be spoon-fed.
Mr. Krule invites both men and women
as visiting scholars. I do not want to
appear as if Im pursuing affirmative

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action, but I do want to provide an opportunity for female scholars, who do not
have the opportunity to speak at regular
synagogues but have to wait until the tallis
is off, he said.
Each speaker gives three talks. The
first is on Friday night. The second is on
Shabbat morning. I have restructured
the sequence so that after the Torah
reading we break for a full kiddush, Mr.
Krule said. Then we reassemble, and the
scholar is invited to speak for an hour.
Its much longer than a drasha, its never
about the parsha, its almost always textbased, with handouts, and there is always a
question-and-answer period afterward.
After the talk, we have Musaf, and we
try to finish by noon. (In order to do that,
the davening starts at 8:15. The time has to
come from somewhere.)
The last talk is in the afternoon, after
Mincha and seuda slishit.
The idea is to deliver the scholars a
crowd that is there solely to hear them,
that is fed and so not on edge, but not so
sated that they fall asleep, Mr. Krule said.
Davars scholars in residence have

included such well known writers, rabbis,


and thinkers as Judy Klitsner, David Hartman, Moshe Halbertal, Tamar Ross, Adin
Steinzaltz, Yehuda Mirsky, Tova Hartman,
Judith Hauptman, and David Ellenson;
their affiliations range across much of the
Jewish world but their scholarship is on a
very high level.
Davar is very much Mr. Krules baby.
Because he does not charge membership
fees, he hopes that people who come frequently, thus making clear that they like
what they experience, will contribute to it.
I rely not on the kindness of strangers but
on the kindness of friends, he said. This
week, Dr. James Kugel will be scholar-inresidence. Dr. Kugel, who is now retired,
taught Bible, midrash, and Second Temple literature first at Harvard and then at
Bar Ilan universities. He is the author of
many books, including and this is how
we go full circle here How to Read the
Bible, which won the National Jewish
Book Award as the best book of 2007.
To learn more about Davar, including
where to go to hear Dr. Kugel, go to www.
davar.com.

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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 7

Local

Remembering Bernie Weinflash


Community mourns visionary leader and founding patron of Shirah chorus
LOIS GOLDRICH

ome people are irreplaceable, said Matthew


(Mati) Lazar, founding director and conductor
of Shirah, the Community Chorus at the Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades in Tenafly.
Bernie Weinflash was one of them.
Mr. Weinflash, founding patron of the choral group
now celebrating its 21st year, died on November 9 at 94.
Mr. Weinflash was born on the Lower East Side and was
a veteran of World War II. Trained as an accountant and
lawyer, he was a stockbroker for Oppenheimer and Co.
Shirah was one of Mr Weinflashs proudest achievements. In a video of his talk at the choral concert that
marked his 90th birthday Bernie always spoke at our
concerts, Mr. Lazar said the founder mused that by
creating Shirah, I will have helped perpetuate Jewish
survival.
That accurately represented how important the choir
was to him.
In a 2012 interview, Mr. Weinflash, who had moved
to Fort Lee after living in Cresskill for many years, told
the Jewish Standard that on his fathers 20th yahrzeit, he
wanted to find an appropriate way to memorialize him. He
and his late wife, Ruth to whom Shirahs 18th anniversary concert was dedicated decided that since his father
had loved both Jewish music and Hebrew liturgy, the most
appropriate way to honor him would be through song.
Actually, I was just looking for an excuse to do it,
joked Mr. Weinflash, who told the Standard at the time
that he approached the leadership of the Kaplen JCC in
1994 with his idea for a Jewish choir. A culture without
music will not last, he said.
The interview goes on:
Peppering his remarks with snatches of Yiddish melodies and lyrics, the soon-to-be-92-year-old music lover
said he grew up in a household filled with song. His late
brother, who later became a cantor, played the piano.
We sang all the songs, he said, joyfully tossing off lyrics
from a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. I wanted to be instrumental in maintaining Jewish tradition through song.
Youve got to walk along and sing, Mr. Weinflash
continued in the story, paraphrasing words he heard
from his own mother. I thought that even the short stories of Sholem Aleichem might not survive, but Jewish
melody, he believed, had a better chance of perpetuating Jewish tradition. Im following Sholem Aleichems
direction, he said, pointing out that the author had
written an ethical will. I want to leave the continuity
of Jewish music.
I loved him, said the JCCs executive director, Avi
Lewinson, who enjoyed a close relationship with Ruth

Bernie and Ruth Weinflash. His quest for a choral group to carry on the traditions of Jewish music became
a reality known as Shirah, the Community Chorus at the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades.
and Bernie Weinflash for more than 25 years. He was
a dear friend. I sat next to him on the High Holidays at
Temple Emanu-El in Closter.
A member of the JCC board of directors, Bernie
really resonated for me, Mr. Lewinson continued. He
was deeply committed and passionate about the Jewish community, about yiddishkeit, about Am Yisrael,
about Israel. He was a kind, gentle, loving, caring human
being. He was always supportive of the JCC and of me
personally. And not only did Bernie and Ruth Weinflash
support the JCC financially, but they literally volunteered, putting in their time, especially for Jewish culture and education.
Mr. Lewinson described Shirah as a shidduch that
really worked. And indeed, the choral group came
about through a kind of matchmaking.
Mr. Lazar said that Mr. Lewinson recognized the confluence of interest and ability. According to him, Bernie
and Ruth Weinflash had the idea, he had the ability, and
Mr. Lewinson had the location. Born of a shared desire to

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8 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

offer Jewish choral music at the Kaplen JCC, Shirah found


a ready home at the facilitys Thurnauer Music School.
But Mr. Weinflash did more than create Shirah, Mr.
Lewinson said. He endowed a writing course, supported so many things in the school of performing arts,
the music school he was never short of ideas.
Bernie was a visionary one of the most brilliant
people Ive ever met, said Mr. Lewinson, clearly
amazed at the number of books Mr. Weinflash had read
and could quote from. He had an amazing, phenomenal mind.
That sentiment was echoed by Rabbi David-Seth Kirshner, religious leader of Closters Temple Emanu-El,
where Mr. Weinflashs funeral took place on Tuesday.
Bernie was brilliant speaking multiple languages
and reading philosophy in his spare time, Rabbi Kirshner said. Mr. Weinflash had belonged to the shul for
about 50 years and had served on the synagogues board
of directors, he added. He attended weekly, even until
a few weeks ago. He loved chazzanut and appreciated

Jewish Family Service of Bergen and North Hudson is a licensed


mental health agency providing individual, family, couple, group and
play therapy.

For help please call 201-837-9090 or email IRA@jfsbergen.org

Local
music in the service. Additionally, he
was an ardent Zionist and was elated by
speakers who talked about Israel and
made it a focal point, Rabbi Kirshner
said.
Moreover, He led the High Holiday
Shacharit services at the temple for many
years, always had a word of good cheer,
and was consistently churning out ideas
for programming and the cultivation of
members at the temple, even as recently
as last month.
I am proud to have called him my
friend, Rabbi Kirshner summed up. He
will be missed sorely.
Mr. Lewinson said that every time Mr.
Weinflash would call and they spoke
regularly he had amazing enthusiasm
and ideas for programs. He was an amazing leader; and his dedication to the continuity of Jewish culture and learning was
inspiring. This is a personal loss he was
a valued mentor.
Remembering Ruth Weinflash, Bernies
wife of 55 years, Mr. Lewinson said that
together they were unstoppable. They
adored each other, and they passed their
love of Jewish learning to their children,
who are very involved with Jewish organizations in their own communities.

Mr. Lazar said that Mr. Weinflash loved


music.
He loved to sing, especially Yiddish
songs, he said. And as a strong Zionist,
he loved Hebrew songs as well. He really
understood how a choir can be the paradigm of community. It resolves the tension between the individual and the group
and allows certain peoples strong suits to
make up for other peoples weak suits.
Also, since its usually accompanied by
text, its how we learn about the culture,
history, and life of the Jewish people.
He and his wife were lucky enough to
have quality time with Bernie and Ruth, a
magnificent woman, a magnificent couple,
Mr. Lazar said. And Carol Kopelman, the
Weinflashs youngest daughter, sang with
Shirah in its beginning years, he added.
Bernie and Ruth never missed a
concert, he said. They were our biggest fans, our champions. Bernie was
a multidimensional human being who
was extremely knowledgeable and yet
extremely reasonable. He knew how to
listen, and how to talk.
Mr. Weinflash, he said, never lost his
inner drive or intellectual capacity.
He was someone to emulate. A highly
unusual individual, passionate and

Bernie Weinflash loved music and song, especially Yiddish and Hebrew melodies expressing his religion and culture.
reasonable.
Mr. Weinflash also sat on the board of
the Jewish Book Council and he was a past
president of the American Jewish Committee of Northern New Jersey. He was

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the father of three children Jody Konstadt, Jeff Weinflash, and Carol Kopelman
and the grandfather of seven grandchildren. He also is survived by two brothers,
Nathan and Irving.

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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 9

Local

Here comes the sun


Yeshivat Noam installs solar panels
LARRY YUDELSON

rom the parking lot, all you can


see is the yellow warning tape.
But the roof Yeshivat Noam
in Paramus holds 1,500 solar

panels.
On Friday, the panels were connected to
the schools electric wiring. When they are
switched on that is expected to happen
any day now they will provide about half
the schools electric needs.
And they will make Noam the first area
Jewish day school to have gone solar.
There is also an educational angle to the
panels.
When I saw the panels going up on the
school roof, I thought it would be so cool
to tie it in to our learning, said Barbara
Sehgal, one of Noams middle school science teachers.
Energy already was at the center of the
eighth grade science curriculum, and the
annual middle schools Earth Fair. In the

past, students have built wind turbines


and hydroelectric generators. Now, they
will be able to watch real-time data showing how much energy the school is generating. And they will be able to use that data
to practice making graphs.
The point is to make the students
aware, Ms. Sehgal said.
With its low buildings none is higher
than two stories and flat roofs, Noam
is an ideal candidate for solar power. But
finding the right firm, and the right business proposition, took time, said Jonathan Kepets, the schools vice president of
finance.
The ultimate goal of the school was to
reduce its operating cost without any cash
outlay, Mr. Kepets said. Its not in the
best interest of the school to sink capital
into a project like this.
In New Jersey, solar energy doesnt only
make money from replacing electricity
that otherwise would have to be bought.
It also earns credits that can be sold to

alexischasman

Style Your Life...

Alexis Chasman will be presenting her


Fall/Holiday Accessories Collection
at the JCC on the Palisades.

Yeshivat Noam now has solar panels on its roof.


electric companies, which are required
to generate a specific percentage of their
electricity from renewable sources.
In the end, Noam partnered with
Amberjack Solar Energy. The economics
were right for us, Mr. Kepets said.
Amberjack owns the solar panels and

paid all costs for installation. Noam will


pay a lower-than-market rate for the electricity the panels generate. Amberjack will
be able to resell the solar credits.
It helps us bring in a semblance of stability with the power were consuming,
Mr. Kepets said.

ISIS and Hamas


Two Sides of the Same Coin?
The Challenge for America and Israel
in the 21st Century

Join an important and timely discussion

Thursday, November 20, 2014 | 8:00 pm


Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel
10-10 Norma Ave, Fair Lawn, NJ

Featuring Dr. Eric R. Mandel

Designer Jewelry, Scarves, Bags,


and Unique Gift Items will be featured.
Kaplen JCC on the Palisade
411 East Clinton Avenue
Sunday November 16th 10 am-5 pm
Monday November 17th 9am-4pm

Founder of the Middle East Political Information Network;


Co-Chair of StandWithUs, an international organization
dedicated to combating extremism and anti-Semitism;
Columnist for the Jerusalem Post
Sponsored by
Israel Committee of the
Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel
StandWithUS
Bergen County High School of Jewish Studies (BCHSJS)
Zionist Organization of America (ZOA)
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jerseys
Jewish Community Relations Council

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

Fashion Stylist, at www.alexischasman.com


10 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

For more information call: 201-796-5040


Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation Bnai Israel

Aaah-sisted Living

Lester Style

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daily living a dream. Our assisted living apartments offer
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Affordable luxury with amenities that include:


Elegant glatt kosher dining
Luxury housing in a supportive intimate setting
Cultural, social and educational activities/programs
Community chapel
On-site medical/health care/rehabilitative services
Social support for residents and families
Memory care resources

Scan with your smart phone


for more information

Ask About Our Respite Stays


Flexible arrangements are available for seniors who
require a short-term stay with supportive services.
Call Barbara Knopf 973.929.2725

The Lester Senior Housing Community


Weston Assisted Living Residence
903-905 Route 10 East,
Whippany, NJ
www.jchcorp.org
Owned and Managed by the Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan New Jersey
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 11

Top $ Paid
for Judaica
Collectibles

House
Calls

Local

Thinking about health


Jewish women gain special event
through Holy Name Medical Center
HEIDI MAE BRATT

346 Palisade Avenue, Bogota, NJ

other. Wife. Daughter.


Employee. Chauffeur. Chef.
Entertainment coordinator.
COO or co-COO.
Thats just a few of the hats a Jewish
woman typically wears.
The demands of juggling myriad roles
of caretaking and day-to-day family and
career management that she faces easily
can edge out the precious time required to
take care of her own health needs.
Sometimes that neglect amounts to
something relatively benign, like not getting an annual teeth cleaning.
But sometimes that neglect is a missed
annual mammogram or Pap smear, and
it can lead to much more serious health
problems.
To help Jewish women redirect attention
to their own health and well being, Holy
Name Medical Center in Teaneck is offering a special event on Sunday, November
16. Its the Jewish Womens Health Symposium and Brunch, and it will be hosted at
the Jewish Center of Teaneck.
The brunch will feature two renowned
physicians who will discuss gynecologic
health, breast imaging, issues related to
wellness and prevention, and genetics.
They are Dr. Sharyn N. Lewin, a leading gynecologic oncologist and womens
health specialist, who moved to Holy Name
recently to much fanfare, and Dr. Joshua
D. Gross, a radiologist and breast-imaging
expert, who is the director of breast imaging at Holy Name.
The purpose of the brunch is to educate women regarding important health
care issues especially related to hereditary
genetics, breast imaging, and the best gynecologic and breast health, Dr. Lewin said.
The talks emphasize prevention and wellness, she added.
We want Jewish women, and men and
women in general, to understand their risk
for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer
Syndrome (HBOC) and/or Lynch Syndrome
based on their personal and family histories, she said.
Jewish women in particular are at risk of
developing these gynecologic cancers.
One in 40 Ashkenazi Jewish women
have a deleterious mutation in one of the
BRCA genes, so understanding risk and
What: Jewish Womens Health
Symposium and Brunch
When: Sunday, November 16,
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where: The Jewish Center of
Teaneck, 70 Sterling Place
Cost: Free, but call to reserve a
seat. (201) 833-3336.

12 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Dr. Sharyn Lewin




HOLY NAME MEDICAL CENTER

preventative strategies is a focus of the symposium, Dr. Lewin said. We will discuss
screening mechanisms and prophylactic
surgery, for example, for high-risk women
to reduce the risk of breast and ovarian
cancers.
Dr. Lewin, who joined Holy Name after
a stint at Columbia Universitys New York
Presbyterian Hospital and fellowship training at Memorial Sloan Kettering in Manhattan, was recruited specifically to spearhead
a comprehensive center in Bergen County
that will focus on womens health and on
their lives.
For now, Dr. Lewin, who has won many
awards and published widely during her
career, is working out of Holy Names cancer center, but eventually she and the center will move. It will remain part of Holy
Name.
This brunch and symposium, its organizers said, will give the community a chance
to become acquainted with Dr. Lewin.
A kosher brunch catered by Maadan of
Teaneck will be offered to participants. The
symposium and brunch, which take place
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., is free of charge, but
anyone interested in attending is asked to
call to reserve a spot.
In addition, the mornings community
partners include Sharsheret, which will
also field staffers who can answer questions
and provide information during the first
hour of the brunch, which will be devoted
to networking.
The Jewish womens brunch is just one
example of Holy Names focus on providing culturally sensitive programs, which
include the Korean Medical Program and
the Hispanic Outreach Program as well
as accommodations for members of the
Jewish community, such as the Sabbath
room and Sabbath lounge, Sabbath elevator, interfaith chapel, daily bikkur cholim
visits, hospice programs accredited by
the National Institute of Jewish Hospice,
and the African-American wellness series,
said Jacqueline Kates, the medical centers
spokeswoman.

upcoming aT

Kaplen

JCC on the Palisades

WELL Symposium
healThy eaTing To

survive The holidays

Learn the essential tools for


battling gastronomic indulgences
during the holidays, stocking the
panty, eating healthy and more.
Our guests include Stephanie
Middleberg, MS, RD, CDN, Middleberg
Nutrition, NYC and Amie Valpone, Editor in
Chief of thehealthyapple.com and Personal Chef.
For more info, contact Sharon Potolsky at 201.408.1405.
Register online at www.jccotp.org.
Fri, Nov 21, VIP Reception: 10-10:30 am, Lite Breakfast,
Program & Q&A: 10:30 am-12 pm
VIP $180, Couvert $50, RSVP by Nov 14

Puss in High-Tops
A cool take on Puss in Boots
flying ship producTions

A whimsical fast-paced musical based on the classic French


tale about a cool cat who outwits the king. Group rates
available. No refunds or exchanges. Space is limited. Visit
jccotp.org/theaterseries or call 201.408.1493 for tickets.
Sun, Nov 16, 2 pm, $12 advance sale per person,
$17 day-of, space permitting

Fall Boutique

Boutique

for
all

film

Top Films You May Have


Missed (or want to see again)

Join us for the Film/Discussion Series with


Harold Chapler. Mr. Chapler will introduce each
film with pointers. Coffee and light snacks
included. Optional discussion afterward.
Mondays, 7:30 pm, $5/$7 per film
Nov 17: 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days
Friendship and CourageCannes Festival winner
Dec 8: BarBara
Cold War thrillerBerlin Festival winner
Jan 12: Brothers
A Golden boy and a renegade
Sundance winner

Kaplen

Annual Cantorial Concert

Featuring beautiful melodies from our


Shabbat liturgy and the inspiring voices of
great local cantors, this concert honors our
deep cantorial tradition and the cantors
who keep it alive. Through narration
and song, we will share in a Shabbat
celebration that includes traditional
chazzanut, contemporary tunes, classic
melodies and folk-inspired songs.
Underwritten by the Weinflash Family.
Sun, Nov 23, 3 pm, $8/$10 in advance,
$10/$12 at the door

Dont miss this annual shopping


extravaganza featuring jewelry,
womens fashions, menswear,
sunglasses, childrens clothing
and accessories, decorative home
furnishings and much more! Its the
perfect place and time to pick up
holiday gifts for family, friends and
you! All proceeds to benefit the
Early Childhood Special Programs.
Co-chairs: Andrea Messinger, Jeanine
Casty, Candice Flax and Elysa Todd.
Sun, Nov 16, 10 am-5 pm
& Mon, Nov 17, 9 am-4 pm

for
all

ReelAbilities NJ Disabilities
Film Festival

Join us as we host the largest festival in the country


dedicated to promoting awareness and appreciation of
the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people with
different disabilities. Visit jccotp.org or contact Shelley
Levy at 201.408.1489 for films and times.
Sun-Thurs, Nov 16-20, free
(a $5 donation is appreciated)

To regisTer or for more info, visiT

jccotp.org or call 201.569.7900.

JCC on the Palisades Taub campus | 411 e clinTon ave, Tenafly, nJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 13

Local

Local

Holocaust-Era Assets in Former East Germany:


Deadline December 31, 2014
The Claims Conference has established a Late Applicants Fund (LAF) of 50 million in order to accept applications
from certain heirs of a former Jewish owner (persecutee) of property/assets in the former East Germany for which the
Claims Conference received proceeds as Successor Organization under the German Property Law of 1990.
The heirs of a persecutee who can make application to the LAF are:
(a) The immediate testamentary heir of the persecutee;
(b) Children, grandchildren, or great grandchildren of the persecutee;
(c) Siblings of the persecutee;
(d) Children of siblings listed under (c);
(e) Spouses of persons listed under (b), (c) and (d).
The Claims Conference has published on its website, www.claimscon.org, a list of the properties/assets received by
the Claims Conference as of the date of publication, and such assets for which claims by the Claims Conference are
still pending under the German Property Restitution Law, including the name of the former owners and/or businesses,
as well as the addresses of the properties/assets.
Applications can be filed directly with the Claims Conference for no fee. There is no need for applicants to pay a fee to
any party. The LAF will accept applications through December 31, 2014.
The detailed rules of the LAF, applications, and other information are also on the Claims Conference website,
www.claimscon.org.
All applications and communications regarding the Late Applicants Fund must be submitted to:
Claims Conference Successor Organization, Sophienstrasse 26, D-60487 Frankfurt am Main, Germany.
Fax: 011-49-69-97-07-08-11. Email: claims-conference-laf@claimscon.org
After the application deadline, the Claims Conference shall determine the payment that each eligible heir will receive. This
determination will be based on a number of factors detailed on the Claims Conference website.
To aid applicants who do not have complete information, the Claims Conference has a Department for Property
Identification. If you believe that you or your relatives may have owned Jewish property in the former East Germany,
please include as much information as possible in your application and the Department will endeavor to identify such
property. Please write to the above address. There is no charge for this service as well.
The Claims Conference has an Ombudsman. To contact the Office of the Ombudsman,
please email Ombudsman@claimscon.org or write to The Ombudsman, PO Box 585, Old Chelsea Station, New York, NY 10113.

Chaim Kagedan with Nathan and Alyza Lewin as the Zivotofsky family
speaks with the press at t htehe U.S. Supreme Court. PHOTOS BY DR. STEVEN KAGEDAN

Jerusalem status
back at high court
Local lawyer part of team arguing
for Israel location on passport

Young Israel of Fort Lee


& The Destiny Foundation

ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN

Present

Rabbi Berel Wein


Scholar-in-Residence

Shabbat Parshat Toldot


November 21 22, 2014
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Friday, November 21
4:20PM : Mincha
Dinner (reservation only) and lecture following services;
Extraordinary Times, Extraordinary People
Saturday, November 22
8:45AM : Shacharit - Sermon by Rabbi Wein
Gala Kiddush following services
4:00PM : Mincha
4:20PM : Lecture - It Was the Best of Times, It Was the
Worst of Times; Judaism and the Modern State of Israel

ALL LECTURES
ARE FREE & OPEN
TO THE PUBLIC
For more information
contact Young Israel
of Fort Lee at
201-592-1518 or email
yiftlee@gmail.com

Rabbi Berel Wein, the founder and director of the Destiny Foundation

since 1996, has, for over 25 years, been identified with the popularization of
Jewish history through his more than 1,000 lectures heard world-wide on CD
and now as downloadable MP3s, his 15 books, history courses, educational
tours and, most recently, dramatic and documentary films.

The Destiny Foundation is an Educational Media Foundation dedicated

to bringing Jewish history to life in an exciting and interactive way. Our films
and multi-media programming are designed to educate, inspire, inform and
instill a sense of pride and purpose in being Jewish - and to demonstrate how
each and every Jew fits into the big picture of Jewish history.
Young Israel of Fort Lee
1610 Parker Ave Fort Lee, NJ 07024

14 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Zev Goldberg, Rabbi


Neil Winkler, Rabbi Emeritus

hen the Supreme Court


heard the Zivotofsky v.
Kerry case last week,
the legal team arguing
for 12-year-old Menachem Zivotofskys
right to have Israel designated on his
passport as his place of birth included
Chaim Kagedan, 32, of Teaneck.
The Harvard-educated attorney got
his first taste of presenting cases before
actual judges as a teenager on the mock
trial team of the Torah Academy of Bergen County. He helped the team advance
to the state semifinals, a significant milestone in a fiercely competitive program.
I learned that the skills I have are
well suited for things a lawyer needs to
do, especially presenting to a jury and
judge, he said. The experience encouraged me to feel that law was a profession
that I wanted to seriously consider, and
it continued to feel like the right path as
the years went on.
Mr. Kagedan was a research assistant
to Professor Alan Dershowitz in his first
year at Harvard. The following year, Professor Dershowitz recommended him to
Nathan Lewin, the prominent Washington lawyer handling the Zivotofsky case
along with his daughter, Alyza Lewin.
The father-daughter attorney team
was representing Menachem Zivotofsky
and his parents in their suit against the
State Department, which had refused
to allow Jerusalem-born Menachems

passport to read Israel as his place of


birth, despite a Congressional statute
affording this right. Instead, it reads simply Jerusalem.
Then-President George W. Bush questioned the constitutionality of the statute when he signed it in 2002 the year
Menachem Zivotofsky was born, claiming that it would interfere with the presidents authority to determine the terms
on which to recognize foreign states. The
Obama administration raised the same
objection.
As such cases tend to do, the Zivotofsky lawsuit has been bouncing around
different levels of the legal system for
years. Mr. Kagedans initial research for
the Lewins related to the justiciability of
the suit (also known as the threshold
issue), which eventually was affirmed
by the Supreme Court the first time it
heard the case, in November 2011.
After the Supreme Court ruled in our
favor, it went back down to the court of
appeals for analysis on the merits of the
issue, and they ruled against us in favor
of the executive branch, Mr. Kagedan
said. Then the Supreme Court said
theyd hear the merits of the case.
In the meantime, he had finished
law school and started his career. After
spending several years with the firm
Davis Polk and completing clerkships
with a federal district court judge and a
federal appellate judge, in October 2013
he joined the New York branch of the
Washington-based law firm Venable. But

Local
he had stayed in touch with the Lewins and was following the progress of the Zivotofsky case.
When I saw in April that the Supreme Court issued
a notice that it would hear the case again on its merits,
I contacted Nat, and he said hed love my help.
He received permission from Venable to work on
Zivotofsky v. Kerry, so long as he did not neglect his
billable work for the firm. That was a bit challenging,
said the father of two. I worked late nights in the past
few months so as not to give short shrift to any of my
obligations.
He co-authored and edited the briefs submitted to
the Supreme Court, and spent hours in phone and
email conversations with Nat and Alyza Lewin to
determine strategy. As the court date came closer, he
traveled to D.C. to participate in the practice run for
the oral arguments what to say, what not to say,
what to anticipate from the judges.
The Secretary of State was maintaining that the president has sole authority to recognize sovereign states
and therefore can overrule Congress on this matter. In
response, the three lawyers argued that printing the
word Israel under the place-of-birth designation on
a passport at someones request does not constitute an
act of recognition of a foreign sovereign.
If that argument were to be rejected, they had an
alternative argument ready: Even if you do say it constitutes a formal act of recognition, the president does
not enjoy sole recognition authority, but rather shares
that power with Congress, Mr. Kagedan said. So Congress had an absolute right to pass this law.
The proceedings left observers with the impression that the court was split along conservative/liberal
lines on the case. Mr. Kagedan pointed out that over
the course of several months a decision must be rendered by June there is tremendous back-and-forth
between the justices, and opinions can be changed or
modified. Still, he expressed cautious optimism, saying we think we have a pretty good chance of getting
the five votes we need.
Regardless of how the decision comes down, there
is hometown pride in Mr. Kagedans role in the historic
case.
Chaim was an unusually smart student who very
early was driven to join the mock trial team and of
course excelled, said Yigal Marcus of Teaneck, who
coaches the Torah Academy team and has done so
for 21 years. I am not surprised he has risen to this
level, and were very proud of any contribution we
made to his development as a successful attorney.
Its really nice seeing the fruit of the labor we put
into training these kids and instilling them with passion and determination in pursuit of something great.

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ts a win-win venture.
Wonderful pies for Thanksgiving
and a built-in donation to a worthy
cause. And, say sisters Sharon Wieder and Adeena Sussman, an appropriate way to honor their late mother and
grandmother.
We do all the baking in my kitchen in
Teaneck, said Ms. Wieder, co-founder
with her sister of Pies for Prevention.
Now coordinating 18 bake sales in communities around the country and in Jerusalem, Ms. Wieder said the six-year-old
project began with two sales, her own,
and one run by a woman in Long Island
who wanted to help Sharsheret. All the
proceeds benefit that organizations
ovarian cancer support and education
program.
Sharsheret is a Teaneck-based group
founded in 2001 that assists and provides
resources for young Jewish women who
face breast cancer, and their families as
well. With help from Ms. Wieder and Ms.
Sussman, they also have been expanding
their resources for ovarian cancer.
The pie program began in 2009,
said Ms. Wieder, who is a breast cancer
survivor.
I used Sharsheret, she said. They
have amazing links and programs.
She said that her mother had been
diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer in
2003. She died in February 2006 after a
valiant struggle. She was very young and
quite special. Her grandmother died of
the same disease in August 2009.
My sister and I, following the example of my mother an incredible optimist decided to harness that energy

and do something. My mother was a


balabusta, always cooking. My sister is
a chef, Im a dietitian, and we grew up
helping my mother cook and [observing]
her graciousness as a host.
I wanted to do something to give
back to Sharsheret. They had been doing
work on breast cancer, and I wanted
them to focus more on ovarian cancer.
Now it is, she said. Among other
efforts, this summer Sharsheret will hire
a summer intern to work specifically on
that area.
Our fundraising has been in direct
support of that, she said. Im excited
that Sharsheret will use the money
toward that.
Ms. Wieder, who has a 17-year-old
daughter and twin 15-year-old sons, has
lived in Teaneck for more than 16 years.
Our family always celebrated Thanksgiving, she said, pointing out that she
picked that holiday for the fundraising
effort so we wouldnt compete with
other charities, which have programs
for Sukkot or Shavuot. I hadnt seen anything for Thanksgiving.
She said that she and her sister, who
lives in New York but is an honorary
Teaneck resident and a full partner in
the program, do all the baking for the
Teaneck and New York City sales. While
they coordinate all the sales done under
their banner, helping with recipes and
timelines, each city has its own baker,
or bakers, who decide what to bake and
what to charge.
All the bakers supply all the ingredients, she said, noting that customers
have the option to order, give a gift, or
sponsor a baker. The bakers pay for
SEE PIES PAGE 50

Rabbis Nazi analogy draws fire


JOANNE PALMER
The president of the Rabbinical Council
of American, Rabbi Leonard Matanky, has
weighed in on the ongoing dispute between
Rabbi Steven Pruzansky of Congregation
Bnai Yeshurun in Teaneck and Gary Rosenblatt of Teaneck, editor and publisher of
New Yorks Jewish Week.
I am pained that I have to distance
myself from a colleague, but the kind of language that Rabbi Pruzansky used is unacceptable and crosses the line of decency
and discourse, Rabbi Matanky is quoted in
the Jewish Week as having written. (Rabbi
Matanky lives in Chicagos West Rogers
Park neighborhood which is more or less
the Teaneck of the Midwest where he is
rabbi of Congregations K.I.N.S. and dean of
the Ida Crown Jewish Academy.)
The backstory leading to these words is
complicated. It traces back to Rabbi Barry
Freundels arrest last month for voyeurism. The spiritual leader of Kesher Israel
Congregation in Washington, D.C., Rabbi
Freundel is accused of having spied on
women, videoing them using a camera
hidden in a clock radio as they prepared to
immerse themselves in the mikvah in order
to convert to Judaism.
In response to that deeply troubling situation, the RCA appointed a commission
to look into ways to make the conversion
process smoother and to reduce the possibility that such a crime would ever recur.
The chair of that commission is the RCAs
immediate past president, Rabbi Shmuel
Goldin of Congregation Ahavath Torah in
Englewood.
In a long post on his blog, www.rabbipruzansky.com, Rabbi Pruzansky, who had
been the head of Bergen Countys Bet Din
LGiyur its conversion court announced
that he was leaving that position.
Some controversy erupted from that
October 30 post. The RCAs commission
includes six men and five women. As we
reported last week (Local rabbi resigns
from Bergen County beit din), Rabbi Pruzansky does not think it necessary or perhaps even wise to include women. But,
he said, he did not say, or even imply, that
his resignation from the beit din had anything to do with the fact that women are
on it.
In that post, Rabbi Pruzansky wrote that
the Jewish Week had misunderstood his
decision, through what he called sheer
incompetence. The Jewish Week, he
wrote, is typical of the sordid state of journalism today.
The paper had erred when it wrote about
his resignation, he said; it got the name of
the organization he was leaving wrong.
In an addendum to his original post,
Rabbi Pruzansky said that although the
Jewish Week later corrected that mistake

it added another, insinuating an unwholesome connection between the two men by


writing that Rabbi Pruzansky shared the
company of Rabbi Freundel. It was an odd
and unpleasant turn of phrase.
In that October 30 post, Rabbi Pruzansky
added what has become the most incendiary part. He demanded that the Jewish
Weeks publisher apologize for what he
called despicable outrageous slander.
They should apologize, he wrote. But,
I guess, to follow their way of reporting,
both the Jewish Weeks publisher and Julius
Streicher published newspapers that dealt
a lot with Jews. Same business, I suppose.
Thats bad company to be in.
(That line has been removed from the
post, but as of Wednesday it still appears
in the comments, where it had been
repeated.)

I am pained that I
have to distance
myself from a
colleague, but the
kind of language
that Rabbi
Pruzansky used
is unacceptable
and crosses the
line of decency
and discourse.
RABBI LEONARD MATANKY

On November 5, Rabbi Pruzansky added


another post to his blog. It is called Gary
Rosenblatt Lies. Now He Should Apologize.
In that post, after clarifying his stance,
he wrote:
Now, why would a journalist blatantly
print lies and falsehoods? I hesitate to
speculate. Obviously, recent events have
reminded us that we never fully know what
kind of demons lurk within human beings,
demons that they carry with them (perhaps
from childhood) and lead them into all
sorts of mischief. One astute observer commented, about the publisher: The man
never met a feminist, especially a so-called
orthodox one he hasnt tripped over his
shoes running to worship. Likewise, hes
never met an orthodox rabbi, especially
ones that ignore him, that he hasnt tried
to vilify.
(For the record, Mr. Rosenblatt is an
Orthodox Jew; both his father and his
grandfather were Orthodox rabbis.)
SEE ANALOGY PAGE 58

TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek
TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek
TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek

Pruzansky vs. Matanky

TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek


TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek
TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek TheJewishWeek

Local

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EVENTS

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 17

Local

Masa classes
Local man directs North American branch of Israel-boosting experience
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
David B. Miller of Teaneck would not be surprised if you never have heard of Masa Israel
Journey.
I feel Masa is the best-kept secret in the
Jewish world for helping you find the right
program in Israel and giving you a scholarship for it, said Mr. Miller, who took over
as Masas North American director in June.
The program was founded in 2004. It is
a joint project of the government of Israel

and the Jewish Agency for Israel, and its


creation reportedly was the outcome of a
casual remark by then-Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon about how nice it would be if more
adults from the diaspora could spend a year
in Israel. Some Masa participants do spend
a year in Israel, but the various programs
under the Masa umbrella also include fivemonth options.
This year, about 11,000 18- to 30-yearolds roughly half of them North American, and about 750 from New Jersey are

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participating in a vast array


experience, but there
of Masa alternatives that
is no required agenda.
include everything from
Mr. Miller, who is
interning at Google Israel
from Montreal, studied
to training as a scuba-diving
business administration, political science,
instructor in Eilat.
and theater at McGill
About 40 percent of them
and Concordia uniare gap-year students studying at yeshivas and seminarversities there, after a
ies or experiencing Zionism
1986 gap year in Israel
through travel and serviceat Ye shivat Kerem
learning programs such
BYavne. He led March
as the Young Judaea Year
of the Living trips for
David Miller
Course.
16 years, and worked at
For them, our involveYeshiva University for
ment is important but not essential in
six years before taking the Masa directorship. During his three years as chief
going to Israel, Mr. Miller said. Most
operations officer in the admissions
of them already know what type of program they want to go on, and we give
office, YU undergraduate admissions
them a $1,000 scholarship. For those
increased by 16 percent.
who qualify, we provide financial aid of
He hopes to increase Masas numbers,
up to $4,000.
too.
For the majority, however, Masa plays
Whats very exciting for me about
a pivotal role in putting Israel on the
Masa, coming from YU, is that its such
agenda.
a broad group we can reach out to,
Someone might be thinking about
he said. Our programs can be tailored
teaching English in China or Japan, and
academically or non-academically. Religious, not religious, left, right we can
instead we convince them to join our
find something for almost everyone.
Israel Teacher Fellowship program. This
And thats really nice, because Israel
year we have around 155 college graduates teaching English in locations across
becomes their Israel and they return as
Israel, earning a monthly stipend, in
changed people, involved in the Jewish
cooperation with Ministry of Education,
and broader community, with a stronger
Mr. Miller said. Its a very impactful prorelationship with Israel.
gram. They come back so engaged.
He acknowledges that any overseas
The main difference between Masa
experience can be a personal and professional boon, but he argues that Milan or
and touring programs such as Birthright aside from the length of time
Melbourne arent the same as Israel for a
participants spend in Israel is Masas
Jewish young adult. Its their homeland,
emphasis on living like a local. You get
and they sort of feel that, he said. We
an apartment, buy your own food, make
dont have to push it.
Israeli friends, Mr. Miller said. We have
The push comes in the recruitment
a lot of optional add-ons such as a leadphase. Masa personnel use social media
ership summit, a trip to Poland, and
and college visits to determine what
Shabbaton weekends to enhance the
types of programs students are seeking,

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Masa participants learn to shop at local stores in Israel.

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and then try to match them with an existing program


in Israel, or start a new one.
Mr. Millers main responsibilities are overseeing the
all-important recruitment effort as well as boosting
Masa Israel Journeys brand recognition and alumni
engagement.
Alumni are really important for us, because our
goal is to make sure they bring back the experience
and engage in their communities, while still remaining
part of the new community created in Israel, he said.
Our programs start in Israel and end in America with
the same cohort of people.
He heads a staff of 12 in his New York office, as well
as regional recruitment and marketing representatives across North America. Since taking office, he has
revamped the marketing team and appointed a new
alumni director, Osnat Spiegel.
Adina Poupko, Masa North Americas new director
for national partnerships, is strengthening ties with
such organizations as Nefesh BNefesh, the Orthodox
Union, Young Judaea, and the Hillel Foundation for
Jewish Campus Life.
Adina visited a dozen campuses last week in Boston, Washington, and New York, and students told her
that Denmark is a popular place now for study abroad,
so were going to see why, and what we can learn from
that to give us that competitive edge, Mr. Miller said.
Its not good enough that we have programs in Israel.
We have to have the best programs in Israel, so that
when participants return they can tell a positive story.
The feedback loop is key in helping us build programs
people really want.
He said that fewer than one percent of all Masa participants decided to leave Israel during the summers
conflict with Hamas in Gaza. They had a new perspective on what Israel means, and felt closer to their
Israeli brothers and sisters.
Mr. Miller works closely with Masa Israel Journeys
recently appointed CEO, Liran Avisar Ben-Horin, who
had been chief of staff of the director general of the
prime ministers office. He likes the challenge of his
new position. Its not a cushy job, but its so exciting,
he said. You can make a real difference.
He and his wife, Elissa, a preschool teacher at Yeshivat Noam, moved to Teaneck from Passaic two years
ago with their children, who are 16, 13, and 8. Their
middle child, Joshua, celebrates his bar mitzvah on
Saturday, November 15, at Congregation Rinat Yisrael. The family is involved in municipal youth sports
leagues, including Teaneck Baseball Organization,
Teaneck Soccer, and Mitch Gross Basketball League,
as well as the youth hockey program at Torah Academy of Bergen County.
I hope to open the doors of Israel to a very diverse
diaspora, Mr. Miller said. I am always surprised how
many engaged Jews have not been to Israel and dont
have Israel on their agenda. Our goal is that participants will feel more a part of the Jewish people. When
you come back to your community, maybe youll work
out at the JCC instead of the local gym, maybe youll
read some books on Zionism or Judaism, maybe youll
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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 19

Local

Life beyond silk


Novelist spins Paterson fact
into historical fiction
She came with the
idea of Oh my goodeslie Rupley,
ness, Ill be wealthy but
who was born in
she married a socialist.
Paterson in 1945
My grandfather died
but has lived
before I was born. All
in California for many
I knew about him was
years (her town, Walthat he belonged to the
nut Creek, is not unlike
Workmans Circle, Ms.
Short Hills, she said), has
Rupley said. I thought
had many careers before
that it would be fun to
she became a first-time
research it.
novelist.
As her idea matured,
Leslie Rupley
The career that led her
she decided to make her
most directly to this one
book a novel, although
was her stint as a personal historian.
she incorporated many elements of her
What is that? I was a ghostwriter of
familys real life. Her heroines name,
memoirs, she said.
Emma, was also her grandmothers name.
For the past decade or so there has been
During the early twentieth century, Paterson was shaken by the conflict between
a surge of interest in the form, aided in no
laborers and mill owners, leading to a
small way by the rise in self-publishing, but
famous workers action the Silk Strike of
the fact that most people, even those who
1913 and by the deadly the influenza panhave had interesting lives, cannot write
demic of 1918. All this figures in her book.
remains a timeless truth.
Ms. Rupleys heroine, Emma, is a difIt was fun, Ms. Rupley said. I wrote
ficult character, as in real life many of
the life story of a woman who came to
us are. Like her namesake, Ms. Rupleys
California from a shtetl. She told me
grandmother, she was not willing to live
about shtetl life, which was very helpful in my novel. And I wrote the story of
what she saw as the life of a good socialist, giving up all but simple pleasures for
a German woman who lived in Katowice,
the shared cause. Although her husband
near Auschwitz, and was 16 when the war
and children were staunch socialists, she is
ended. The womans father, fearing that
an entrepreneur at heart. Beyond the Silk
she would be raped and the town pillaged
Mills chronicles her struggles both as a
when the Russians took it over, put her on
woman in a world not particularly open to
a train, saying You have to be able to be
female entrepreneurs and as a member of
captured by the Americans.
a family not particularly open to her view
These and similarly evocative stories,
of the world. It is both a family story and
which could have happened only in specifics times and places, led her to think about
the portrait of a particular time and place.
writing her own familys story.
Ms. Rupleys book is based on research.
My grandmother lived with us in PatMuch of it was done in New Jersey.
erson, Ms. Rupley said. She was from
I have many relatives in Fair Lawn and
Lodz, from a weaving family. Her brothTeaneck, so I came to north Jersey often,
ers had preceded her to this country, and
Ms. Rupley said. I would go to Paterson to
they established themselves as mill owners
do more research. I visited the silk mills.
in Paterson. They owned the Pope Mill,
I remember than when I was a child,
she said. Paterson, a textile town, was a
my father took me to the Great Mills, and
magnet for Europeans both Jews and
that was another inspiration for my book,
non-Jews who had worked in the textile
she continued. He loved Paterson, so I
industry before they escaped to the New
thought that I would create the Paterson
World. Many were highly skilled, and the
that is in my novel.
town flourished.

JOANNE PALMER

Beyond the Silk Mills


Leslie Rupley will speak locally
On November 15, from 2 to 4 p.m., she will read, answer questions, and sign books
at the American Labor Museum/Botto House National Landmark in Haledon.
On November 16, at 2 p.m., she will read, answer questions, and sign books at
the Fair Lawn Public Library.
On November 17, she will discuss her book at the Wayne Y and later sign books
at the Teaneck General Store.
On November 19, at 8 p.m., she will read, answer questions, and sign books for
the Knights of Pythias as the Fair Lawn Senior Center.
20 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Silk mill workers, top, toiled in rooms like the one in the middle photo. Above,
a building in Paterson today, reflecting its industrial past.

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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 21

Local
Dedication ceremony honors donors
Members of the Jewish Center of Teaneck
who contributed to the centers Atid fund
will be honored at a special kiddush at a
dedication ceremony during Shabbat on
November 22.
The Atid campaign, a challenge fundraising grant for the center, was started in
2009 with the aim of dedicating individual

seats in the sanctuary with plaques naming the donors. Payments, which may be
made through 2017, will be matched by the
challenge grant.
For information about buying a plaque,
call Eva Lynn Gans, the Atid committee
chair, at (201) 699-0344.

Rabbi Berel Wein


coming to Fort Lee
Young Israel of Fort Lee and the Destiny Foundation offers
a scholar-in-residence weekend, November 21-22, at YIFL.
Rabbi Berel Wein, founder and director of the Destiny Foundation, an educational media organization dedicated to
bringing Jewish history to life, is the special guest.
Shabbat dinner on Nov. 21 begins with Minchah and Kabbalat Shabbat at 4:20 p.m., with a dinner and lecture to follow. On Shabbat morning following Schacharit at 8:45 a.m.,
Rabbi Wein will speak again. The shul is at 1610 Parker Ave.
For information, call (201) 592-1518, or rabbigoldberg@
yiftlee.org, or visit yiftlee.org.

Rabbi Berel Wein

Wayne shul recalls Rabbi Shacknai


with annual memorial lecture
Michael Wildes

Valerie Vainieri
Huttle

Rabbi Greg
Litcofsky

Vidalia Acevedo

Panel to discuss immigration reform


The Bergen County section of the National
Council of Jewish Women will present a
panel discussion, Immigration Reform:
An American Dilemma, at its November
18 general meeting at 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Emeth in Teaneck.
Panelists are immigration attorney
Michael Wildes, who is a former federal
prosecutor and a former Englewood

mayor; Rabbi Greg Litcofsky of Temple


Emanu-El of West Essex in Livingston,
and Vidalia Acevedo, the director of
outreach and multicultural services at
the Center for Hope and Safety. Assemblywoman Valerie Vainieri Huttle is the
moderator.
For information, visit www.ncjwbcs.org.

Recovery group lauds volunteer


Ricki Ellen Gorman of Cresskill received
the Peer Excellence award from JACS ( Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent Persons, and Significant Others) at its 70th
retreat gala, Celebrate our JACS Volunteers, on November 1.
For 35 years, JACS has been a support
network for Jews in recovery and the people who love them. JACS volunteers work
closely with its staff to provide opportunities including outreach, a speakers bureau,
crisis consultation, retreats, spiritual days,
sober Jewish holiday celebrations, and
sober Birthright tours.
Ms. Gorman was honored for her volunteerism. She attended her first JACS retreat
in May 1995, where she became involved
as a volunteer. She created the JACS auction at retreats, co-chaired retreats, and
became a member, secretary, and vice
president of the JACS Council. She is part
of the speakers bureau, attended teen
retreats, and was on the editorial committee of Jewish Sisters in Sobriety, a
book of Jewish womens stories of alcoholism, drug addiction, co-dependence, and
recovery.
For information, call the JACS office
at (212) 632-4600. Messages will be forwarded to Ms. Gorman with confidentially
and anonymity.
A local Jewish Twelve Step/JACS group
meets the first Wednesday of each month

Rabbi Geoffrey A. MitelBeth Tikvah in 1960 as its


man, founding director of
first full-time rabbi; it was
Sinai & Synapses, discusses
his first and only pulpit.
How Do We Talk About
He served there for nine
Science and Religion?
years; he died when he was
for Temple Beth Tikvahs
38. The annual lecture in
annual Rabbi Shai Shacknai
his memory began in 1971
Memorial lecture. Shabbat
at the suggestion of Rabbi
services on Friday, NovemShacknais successor, Rabbi
ber 21, begin at 8 p.m.; dinIsrael Dresner, in collaboraner is at 6:30.
Rabbi Geoffrey A.
tion with Rabbi Shacknais
Mitelman
Rabbi Mitelman also is
widow, Shirley Shacknai
an associate of CLAL, the
Freedman.
National Jewish Center for Learning and
The synagogue is at 950 Preakness
Leadership.
Ave., Wayne.
Rabbi Shai Shacknai came to Temple
For information, call (973) 595-6565.

Ricki Ellen Gorman

at 7:30 p.m. at Jewish Family Service of


Bergen and North Hudson, 1485 Teaneck
Road, in Teaneck. The meeting is open to
all Jews who want to get help with their
own or a loved ones addiction. Meetings
focus on issues of alcoholism, chemical
dependency, and co-dependency as they
relate to Judaism and spirituality. The
group is nondenominational, and anonymity is respected. For information call
Ira at (201) 837-9090 or ira@jfsbergen.org.
Donations (with retreat gala in the subject line) can be sent to JBFCS/JACS, 135 W
50th St., Sixth Floor, New York, NY, 10020.

22 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Dr. Ben Chouake, left, with Senator Cory Booker, host Raphael Benaroya, and
Rabbi Shmuley Boteach. 
COURTESY NORPAC

NORPAC hosts Cory Booker


at home event in Englewood
Linda and Raphael Benaroya recently
hosted a NORPAC pre-election evening
with Senator Cory Booker (D-N.J.) at
their Englewood home. Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, and Drs. Ben Chouake and
Mort Katz were chairs.

Senator Booker, the subject of a recent


Jewish Standard cover story, won reelection last week. He first won the seat,
which had been left vacant by the death
of Senator Frank Lautenberg, in a special election last year.

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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 23

Editorial
Only in America

t is likely that the most important


part of the General Assembly of
the Jewish Federations of North
America, which convened just
outside Washington, D.C., earlier this
week, was Vice President Joe Bidens
speech.
By now, Mr. Biden is so given to
shtick that at times he seems like a
caricatured version of himself. He
knows hes cute and thats odd
for the vice president of the United
States. But and more importantly
he also made news sorely needed
good news by pledging the United
States undying commitment to
Israel. Not only does Israel need the
United States, but the United States
also needs Israel, he said. In fact, the
mutual need is so great that if Israel
had not existed, we Americans would
have had to have created it, he added.
His own personal commitment to
fighting anti-Semitism and to Zionism came from his father and was
nurtured by his family throughout his
childhood, he said, and he has done
the same for his children and now his
grandchildren.
And President Obama never will let
Iran create nuclear weapons he said.
In fact, he roared that message. Occasionally he moved from a near monotone to a bellow as he spoke. That he
bellowed, and the crowd roared back.
Mr. Biden also charmed. He told a
story of having met with Golda Meir
when he was a very young senator
and she a grizzled prime minister.
After their meeting, he said, as they
stood together for a photo shoot, she
stared straight ahead, as per convention in such situations, and told him,
out of the corner of her mouth, why,
despite its problems, Israel would survive. The secret, she said, is that we
dont have anywhere else to go.
Of course, we have to hope that the
promises the vice president makes to
a huge room full of Jews are promises
that the president will keep in other
venues, but at least the start was good.
Mr. Biden was sporadically charming. But in an earlier session, Supreme

Jewish
Standard
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666
(201) 837-8818
Fax 201-833-4959
Publisher
James L. Janoff
Associate Publisher Emerita
Marcia Garfinkle

TRUTH REGARDLESS OF CONSEQUENCES

Court Justices Stephen Breyer and


Elena Kagan were interviewed by
NPRs legal correspondent, Nina
Totenberg, and all three were endlessly charming. (Were we playing a
word-association game, Supreme
Court justices would not likely lead
immediately to charming.)
All are Jewish, although only Ms.
Kagan addressed that issue in any
depth. She talked about becoming bat
mitzvah at Lincoln Square Synagogue,
then as now modern Orthodox. She
firmly believed, she said, that her older
brother was the model in all things.
Whatever he did, she did. He became
bar mitzvah, so
Lincoln Square did not allow young
girl to become bat mitzvah at services,
but her rabbi, the then-young Steven Riskin (now the eminent Rabbi
Shlomo Riskin of Efrat), was creative
in his solution to the problem, she said.
Elana Kagan read haftarah at shul on
Friday night. It is easy to imagine that
even then, Ms. Kagan was a formidable presence.
Mr. Breyer was more reserved, with
the affect of a flinty New Englander.
(He said that when he is recognized,
he often is confused with the retired
Justice David Souter, a genuine flinty
New Englander.) He told a story of
being asked what he felt about being
one of three Jews on the court. Its
fine, he said.
Yes, it is fine.
And Nina Totenberg was a delight
as well. It is odd to see someone projected on a big screen, sitting on a
stage in front of you, wearing killer red
high heels, looking entirely unfamiliar
and absolutely unlike her voice, as her
entirely familiar voice fills the room.
There were many issues of substance broached during the plenums,
and many appeals to the heart. Participants heard from news analysts Chuck
Todd and Andrea Mitchell, actress
Marlee Matlin, and Great Britains
former chief rabbi, Jonathan Sacks.
They heard from the brother of Hadar
Goldin, the Israeli soldier presumed
kidnapped and later discovered dead

Editor
Joanne Palmer
Associate Editor
Larry Yudelson
Guide/Gallery Editor
Beth Janoff Chananie
Contributing Editor
Phil Jacobs
About Our Children Editor
Heidi Mae Bratt

jstandard.com
24 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

this summer, who himself is a soldier,


and from a young woman, an IDF
medic who had just finished her service and was in South America when
the war ended and she cut short her
vacation to volunteer. She described
how it feels to tend to wounded soldiers in the dark; you have to substitute touch for sight, she said. But
that was her unit, and those were her
friends, and her place was with them,
no matter what.
We heard from Jews who had made
aliyah from France as well as from
Russia, and a Jew who still proudly
lives in India. We heard from a woman
who survived the Holocaust and one
whose family returned to their kibbutz despite the sirens and the Iron
Dome hits and the tunnels discovered beneath their feet in the wars
aftermath.
There were older people in the vast
room that housed the plenums, but
there were many young ones as well.
Hillel sent many students the largest
group was from Michigan and the
federations delegations seemed to
be multigenerational. The Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey had a
healthy-sized delegation. We have a
very active federation an accurate
reflection of our Jewish community
and both its lay leaders and its staff are
passionate about its work and its connection to the larger Jewish people.
Despite the bad news that has
headed our way with missile-like malice since last spring, we left the giant
meeting filled with hope. It is extraordinarily energizing to be in a space as
big as the giant room in the gargantuan hotel and conference center in
National Harbor, Md., just outside
Washington a fairyland, with twinkling lights and a huge Ferris wheel visible outside the massive windows and
fake snow that falls every evening a
space filled with excited, exciting, loud,
JP
proud Jews.
For more coverage of the General
Assembly of the Jewish Federations of
North America, see pages 39 and 40.

Correspondents
Warren Boroson
Lois Goldrich
Abigail K. Leichman
Miriam Rinn
Dr. Miryam Z. Wahrman
Advertising Director
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Janice Rosen

Advertising Coordinator
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P.O. Box 7195 Jerusalem 91077
Tel: 02-6252933, 02-6247919
Fax: 02-6249240
Israeli Representative

Bringing the
battle to our
campus enemies

month ago the president of the Palestinian


Authority, Mahmoud Abbas, came to Cooper
Unions Great Hall, where he spoke to approximately 1,000 students, mostly from NYU.
Praised as a moderate, at least in comparison to Hamas,
Abbas accused Israel of genocide in Gaza. He repeated
that charge at the U.N. General Assembly four days later.
Did anyone object to this monumental blood libel
against the Jewish people?
Yes. It was an NYU undergraduate who happened to
have just finished his Chabad smichah, Mendy Boteach, along with five of his
siblings. My son had sought
to enlist the mainstream Jewish groups on campus to protest Abbass demonization
of Israel. They encouraged
their students to participate
in the lecture instead. Some
had given Abbas a standing
ovation. Mendy was not disRabbi
heartened. The media interShmuley
viewed him extensively as
Boteach
the lone protestor, and his
message was broadcast far
and wide.
I decided there would have to be an appropriate
response to the Palestinian Authority president falsely
accusing the Jews of wholesale slaughter. I approached
my friend and mentor, Nobel Peace Laureate Elie Wiesel,
and asked him to participate in a panel discussion, so he
not only could refute the monstrous allegation but also
talk about why the Jews are perennial targets of genocide,
both as victims and now as purported perpetrators. Are
we living in an age of new anti-Semitism?
I then invited my friend Samantha Power, the American ambassador to the U.N., who wrote the most important book on genocide, A Problem from Hell, to introduce Mr. Wiesel. Samantha, who is pretty busy rescuing
a fallen word, graciously agreed.
Finally, I turned to my former student, Professor Noah
Feldman of Harvard, one of Americas greatest legal
scholars, to join the discussion.
Rabbi Shmuley Boteach of Englewood has written
30 books; his latest is Kosher Lust: Love is Not the
Answer. Tickets for Genocide and the Jews: A NeverEnding Problem on November 17 are available at www.
shmuley.com and www.thisworld.us.

Production Manager
Jerry Szubin
Graphic Artists
Deborah Herman
Bob O'Brien
Bookkeeper
Alice Trost
Credit Manager
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Ruth Hirsch

Founder
Morris J. Janoff (19111987)
Editor Emeritus
Meyer Pesin (19011989)
City Editor
Mort Cornin (19151984)
Editorial Consultant
Max Milians (1908-2005)
Secretary
Ceil Wolf (1914-2008)
Editor Emerita
Rebecca Kaplan Boroson

r
-

t
-

Rab
Che

Opinion
It was all set. The announcement of students only play defense on campus.
the event immediately garnered all the We must force Israels haters to defend
usual attacks from pro-Arab and anti- the record of Hamas, with its honor killIsrael sites all over the Internet. We knew ings of women and extrajudicial killings
it would be big. Now we only had to get of gays. Weve long witnessed Abbas
the moderate naming public squares
the students.
And here we met even more ferocious after Palestinian terrorists whose hands
opposition from Jewish groups on cam- are dripping with Jewish blood. He postpus than from Palestinian ones. Jewish humously bestowed the Star of Honor
groups would not send the simple ad on Abu Jihad, the mastermind of the
to their mailing lists. They gave excuses. 1978 Coastal Road attack, where 38 IsraeThey said it was late. They were traveling. lis, including 13 children, were killed,
calling him the model of a true fighter
But one told me exactly how he felt.
Israel is political. My job as a rabbi is and devoted leader. He named a public
to create a Jewish environment for the square after Dalal Mughrabi, the Palesstudents and bring them closer to tradi- tinian woman who led the attack, in 2011.
tion. Why would I risk being divisive by Last August, Abbas gave a heros welstanding up for Israel? We stay away from come to Palestinian murderers who were
released by Israel as a goodwill gesture.
politics.
Weve watched as Abbas has slowly
Another student leader told me, We
have excellent relationships with Arab become yet another Arab dictator who
and Palestinian students here. Associat- no longer holds elections once he has
ing ourselves with your event will elicit been elected. Weve watched as Abbas
the ire of the Palestinian students and put has turned the Palestinian Authority into
us in their crosshairs. Why do we need a kleptocracy, enriching his sons, Tarik
that?
and Yasser, as theyve taken control of
I responded, Standing up for Israel on the cigarette, construction, and other
campus is not political and it is not Zion- lucrative trades.
ist. It is the supreme expression of Jewish
Now comes the news that Abbas
pride. Israel is the sum of Jewish hopes response to last weeks shooting of an
and dreams. When we stand up for Israel Israeli-American activist in Jerusalem by
we celebrate our national aspirations for a Palestinian terrorist was to write to the
peoplehood.
murderers father, praising his son as a
And can there really be Jewish obser- Palestinian hero.
vance without Jewish pride? Can there be
All this from the Abbas who wants
a soul without a body?
peace. The man with whom Israel is
It was becoming a battle. My son supposed to be doing business. The
Mendy, who had been given responsibil- man who is not Hamas. The man who
ity as the events chief student organizer, received a standing ovation from NYU
was growing disillusioned. He knew students.
before he arrived at NYU that he wanted
This Monday, November 17, we will go
a principal form of his student experi- beyond protest and organize a proper
ence to be Israel promotion and defense. response. Who can respond better to
Now he was in the thick of things. NYU Abbass lie about Israeli genocide against
has more Jewish students than any other the Palestinians than Elie Wiesel. Profesprivate university in America, but he had sor Wiesel has been my friend and I have
to fight with the leading Jewish organiza- been his disciple for 25 years. This sumtions there to get them to promote Elie mer, he and I published a full-page ad
Wiesel to their students.
in the worlds leading newspapers that
Mendy wisely decided to circumvent assailed Hamas for engaging in human
the Jewish organizations and go directly sacrifice by intentionally firing rockets
to the non-Jewish mainstream and politi- from schools and homes and encouragcal organizations, which were only too ing Arab children to devote their shoulhonored to host Elie Wiesel. At last count ders and bodies to the Palestinian cause.
Ignoramuses like Javier Bardem and
the tickets were nearly sold out.
But if youre wondering why Israel is Penelope Cruz, along with self-hating
being hammered on campus, look no fur- Jews like Naomi Wolf and terrorist-lovers
ther than this story, which repeats itself like Mahmoud Abbas, have been parroton campuses everywhere. While the ing the ultimate blood libel, that Jews are
Palestinian students stand up proudly engaged in genocide. What better way to
for their side, accusing Israel of all kinds destroy the State of Israel than to make it
of abuses, Jewish organizational lead- impossible to defend itself?
ers are afraid of being divisive, of being
When genocide is trivialized, it does
marginalized as defenders of an unpop- not touch just the six million dead
ular regime, and of being accused of in the Holocaust. It trivializes the 1.5
defending human rights abuses. In their million Armenians slaughtered by
fear, they cede the campus to anti-Israel the Turks. It trivializes the 2.5 million
activists.
Cambodians murdered by the Khmer
This cannot stand.
Rouge. It trivializes the 800,000 Tutsis
As were doing in our event at Coo- slaughtered by the Hutu. And it trivialper Union/NYU, we must bring the fight izes all the innocent victims in Croatia,
to our enemies. No longer can Jewish Serbia, and Kosovo.

Scandals in the rabbinate


How to understand
and prevent them

the rabbi back from doing so?


I would suggest a flaw in rabbinic training
is at fault on several fronts. On one hand, rabbis are not taught to know themselves well
n the wake of the recent, highly publienough as part of their training. On the other,
cized mikvah scandal, I wonder what
they are often referred to as future klei kodesh,
possesses men and women who have
holy vessels, by the seminarys literature, their
dedicated themselves to the perpetuateachers, and their advisers. This is an explotion of Judaism and its values to abandon those
sive combination. Not to really know yourself
values.
means to be unclear about the boundaries of
Often enough this occurs in the domain of
your abilities. Then to see yourself as a holy
sexual wrongdoing, but there also are recorded
vessel, into which the authority of the tradition
instances of such ethical offenses as the misuse
or even of God has been poured suggests
of discretionary funds for personal or family
that you can handle anything and everything.
needs, and criminal activities including the
No one is insusceptible to temptation, and
embezzlement of synagogue or Jewish orgatemptation easily can be justified, especially by
nizational assets. The parties involved often
someone who is convinced that he or she is a
have sterling records of service to the Jewish
holy vessel. Only self-knowledge has a chance
community and are well-respected as clergy
of leading to self-restraint, and though even
in their denominations and then
then things can go awry, selfsuddenly all hell breaks loose
awareness improves the odds.
regarding a discovered transThe other force that can act
gression that is not a mere pecnegatively on rabbis, especially
cadillo. Why does this happen?
talented ones, is the respect
My explanation for these falls
and even adulation they receive
from grace makes no reference
from their constituencies. Sometimes this is based on the place
to psychological pathology,
of power the rabbi has cultivated
which indeed may play some
within the larger community, or
role, but about which I have
Rabbi Dr.
his or her intellectual achieveno expertise. Rather, I speak as
Michael
ments, charisma, or perceived
someone who spent the better
Chernick
piety. None of these may be
part of a lifetime training men
counterfeit at the outset, and the
and women for religious service
rabbi may apply all these talents
to the Jewish people. For the
to the good and welfare of the Jewish and genmost part, the men and women I taught have
eral communities. Unfortunately, his or her
shown themselves to be exemplars of Jewish
career have to the rabbis detriment in cases
values. They are people of faith, they take Jewish learning and observance seriously, and they
of immense moral failure on his or her part
hold themselves to high moral standards and
provided the rabbi with a cover for inappropriate behavior. I would be completely remiss if I
encourage others to do the same.
blamed the community for that bad behavior.
Unfortunately, this is not where the story
It is, after all, rabbis responsibility to get help
ends. Some of the students I taught who went
when their moral compass is in danger of failon to careers in the rabbinate were involved in
ing to point out the right direction. Neverthewhat to me, their congregants, and their communities were shocking breaches of trust and
less, it is a difficult thing for a rabbi to live a life
morals, and often were outright crimes. These
filled with adoring adherents without becoming
were outcomes I would never have expected
sure that no one would ever suspect or imagine him or her of being capaple of self-comprofrom the apparently committed and upright
mise. It is no wonder, then, that it is frequently
people who sat in my classes. As I see it, the
the most beloved and most respected men
answer to some extent lies in the nature of the
and women in the rabbinate who get caught
rabbinate and of rabbinic training.
in these traps. But hubris is not an excuse for
One of the significant roles a rabbi plays is
criminal or immoral behavior, and here again
counselor. Even if the counsel is about a matter
it is only an ability to do thorough heshbon haof Jewish law or observance and not directly
nefesh, soul-searching and self-evaluation, that
about a congregants personal problems, often
stands a chance of preventing rabbinic scandal
enough the rabbi becomes aware of confidential aspects of a congregants life. This often proand deserved retribution for it.
vides him or her with access to that persons
It is my hope that rabbinic seminaries will
weaknesses. For example, what if it a mourner
take greater note of these events, which often
shares how he or she is still seriously grieving
enough tarnish their reputations along with
beyond the period of mourning for a spouse,
that of the fallen rabbis. If they do, perhaps
and asks the rabbi what help the Jewish tradithey will exert more of an effort to train their
tion offers for dealing with this. Where should
students to recognize the moral pitfalls that
the line between appropriate empathy and a
can become disasters for them and undermine
more dangerous form of consolation be drawn?
their service to God and their communities.
How well will a rabbi handle that situation? Will
Further, in the wake of this most recent scandal and previous ones, seminaries should conhe or she appropriately outsource this counseling situation to a grief counselor? And then
sider post-semichah spiritual and psychological
SEE SCANDALS PAGE 26
there is the bigger question: What would hold

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 25

Opinion

Support for depression is right around the corner


Refaenu to begin peer-led discussion groups in Paramus

y friend and I stand in the


doorway and survey the
room.
A dozen or so chairs are
laid out in a wide circle and I cant tell if
the setup is inviting or scary or both. My
nerves are like jumping beans in my stomach. My friend nudges my left arm.
You okay?
I scan the room skeptically.
Unclear.
I watch the arriving participants as they
straggle in, some in pairs, more often
alone. They all look like regular, decent
people. Some seem shifty and uncertain
I suppose just as I must appear to them
but no one screams crazy to me. There
is no neon sign above anyones head that
reads:
ABOUT TO CRACK!
or
WILL COME UNDONE!
or
GOING OFF THE DEEP END!
No, everyone looks fairly ordinary.
My friend nudges me toward the chairs
and we sit. Apparently, the support group
rents out a few rooms in this small office
building on Wednesday nights to hold meetings. There are multiple groups, actually,
broken into categories: Unipolar Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Friends and Family, Under 30. Here in these hidden offices,
a few doors down from Carnegie Hall, I
plunge right into a group of my peers.
I cant tell what ages everyone is
they certainly all cant be under 30 but
amongst these strangers I start to see
familiar faces. Across to my left sits a tall,
well-groomed man, probably bordering on 30, who looks as though he came
straight out of a Dapper Dan ad. I watch
as he loosens his tie and the collar of his
white button-down shirt and straightens
his back against the chair. As I study his
excellent posture, I wonder whats his
story. I try to read the blank expression
on his face. He doesnt seem particularly
sad or troubled just blank.
My attention shifts to a young woman

sitting a few spots down.


Shes alert, jumpy as a squirrel sensing danger. Then she
sifts through the red leather
bag on her lap. Her hair is
dyed almost red, with natural
brown showing at the roots.
She looks up, and catching
me staring, abruptly averts
Dena
her eyes; she then looks back
Croog
and offers a brief, shy smile. I
return the gesture.
I feel somewhat in a blur.
Nevertheless, I try to focus my attention on
the surrounding environment. The facilitator, an unassuming man somewhere in his
late 50s, wears a kind smile and starts to
speak gently, with empathic softness. His
tone is comforting, a natural trait. I yearn
to be like this.
Id like to welcome you all to the Mood
Disorders Support Group of New York. My
name is Peter.
He pauses, studies the participants, and
then continues. As he speaks to us, I feel
as though hes directing his words toward
me alone. I wonder if others feel the same
way, as though Peter is addressing them
specifically.
He says:
Im here as a volunteer and a person
with a mood disorder another facilitator
might be a person who has a close friend
or family member with one and Ive
trained to facilitate our groups. My role
is to allow you to have your group while
I keep our discussion on track and make
sure that this remains a constructive, safe,
and encouraging environment. I may occasionally ask a question or make a comment
to move the discussion along. Ill also be
keeping track of the time and making sure
there is no major misinformation passed
here.
Before we go around the room and
briefly introduce ourselves, what brings us
here tonight, and how were each doing,
Id like to go over a few ground rules.
Yes, this did happen. Something very
close to this, anyway. And now, here, as

a trained facilitator myself,


waiting as Refaenu stands
on the brink of its big kickoff
to implement these support
groups in our own community, I think about the guidelines at MDSG to which we
still will hold:
1. Complete confidentiality.
Whats said in the group stays
in the group.
2. Feedback is given by
sharing experiences, not by
telling each other what they should or
should not do.
3. Dont be judgmental of others.
4. Treat one another with kindness,
compassion, and respect.
5. Its okay not to share.
6. Its everybodys responsibility to
make the group a safe place to share.
Ive painted this picture of what happens at support groups because I dont
want there to be any surprises. What I, as
a new participant, gained from that June
evening in 2004 still holds true today,
when I am a facilitator. Were not alone.
We dont have to feel isolated. The simple
act of being in that room with people who
just get it, no matter whether theyre
your best friend or a complete stranger, is
so comforting and empowering and all
this even possibly happen before the support group actually begins.
In support groups, hearing others
points of view and experiences about their
own struggles and triumphs is extremely
valuable. For example, learning about new
coping mechanisms or different types of
therapies. A discussion focusing on what
people aim to get out of therapy, or about
how to tell someone else about his or her
disorder. The objective is to create an environment of hope and comfort, wherein the
shame and stigma that accompany depression and related disorders are reduced in
the lives of those who encounter them, in
the lives of their loved ones, and by extension, hopefully, eventually, into the realm
of our extended Jewish community.

Change takes time, for sure. But how


amazing would it be to live in a world
where mental illness and well-being are
treated the same way as physical health? A
place where people who feel isolated are
reminded that there is no such thing as
being alone? Where people dont have to
live with the shame brought on by stigma,
and where they dont have to, on top of
that, bear the burden of living two lives
one, the face to the outside world, the
other, the hidden torment inside? Where
people need not live these double lives,
because the stigma and taboo surrounding
mood disorders and mental health in general would vanish? How amazing would
that be?
Refaenu aims to provide such hope and
support through peer-led support groups.
And in the meantime, maybe just the mere
idea of having such groups will help in the
process of reducing the stigma.
Its a long road ahead, but starting next
week, we can take that first step together.
Support groups begin Tuesday, November 18, at 7:30 p.m. at the Ben Porat Yosef
building on E. 243 Frisch Court in Paramus. If you have any questions about
Refaenus support groups or our organization in general, please feel free to mail
me at dena@refaenu.org.

Scandals

for them to issue clear statements defining


sexual harassment, what constitutes questionable practices related to community
funds that must be avoided, and how a
counseling session best can be prevented
from becoming a source for nasty accusations. Further, seminaries should see themselves as responsible for helping their students learn the art of engaged distance
that is, how to show empathy while being
conscious of the negative possibility of getting overly involved in situations beyond
their expertise, the situations that ultimately
can get out of control.

Obviously there is no panacea for moral


failure in the rabbinate, just as there is none
for other professions and callings. But if our
training institutions for rabbinic service can
help reduce by any percentage rabbinic victimization of those whom rabbis are supposed to serve, that would be progress, and
a great prevention of desecration of Gods
name and defamation of Judaism. Further,
if we can save some of the best of our rabbis
from destroying themselves, that too would
be an immense blessing for them, and for
those of us who turn to them for their wisdom and support.

Professor Michael Chernick holds


the Deutsch Family Chair in Jewish
Jurisprudence and Social Justice at the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in New York; his area of expertise
is the Talmud. Professor Chernick
received his doctorate from the Bernard
Revel Graduate School and rabbinic
ordination from R. Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary, both affiliates
of Yeshiva University. He has written
extensively about Jewish law and lore and
has lectured on these topics in the United
States, Europe, and Israel.

FROM PAGE 25

education and guidance, which might act


as a helpful preventative for their current
ordainees.
There is no reason for seminaries to be
nave, and to believe that simply teaching
halachah or Jewish ethics and theology will
help their ordainees face the real-life, morally dangerous situations that may arise in
their careers. Therefore, if a seminary cannot provide significant programs that promote personal insight, there is every reason
26 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

In support
groups, hearing
others points
of view and
experiences
about their own
struggles and
triumphs is
extremely
valuable.

Letters
Overcoming the stigma

Our son did not die of a drug overdose as was stated


in your recent article about Refaenu (Hearing, helping
each other, October 31). He died of the complications of
a mental illness, much in the same way as a person who
has malignant cancer dies of the complications of his
or her illness. He died even though he had a loving and
supportive relationship with his family, despite having
many good friends and doing well in school, and despite
having a great sense of humor and a ready smile. He was
under the care of a medical professional who prescribed
medication to help him with his illness. Unfortunately,
as with many of these illnesses, it took only a moment of
overwhelming despair to plunge him into hopelessness,
and he used the very medications prescribed for him to
take his own life.
Even more unfortunate is that our son did not only
have to cope with a devastating disease; he had to
live with the shame imposed by the stigma associated
with it. He had to endure tremendous shame over and
above being ill. Had he been able to avail himself of

Stuttering Foundation (www.stutteringhelp.org) is


famous for the free resources that it offers, which have
been accessed by stutterers all over the world. Their
streaming videos and downloadable books and brochures are very helpful. Furthermore, the websites of
the Israeli Stuttering Association (www.ambi.org.il) and
the Jewish Stuttering Association (www.jstutter.org) also
are extremely helpful to people who stutter and to the
parents of children who stutter.
Marvin Goldfarb
The Bronx

Sending Birthday
Greetings to our
Friends

Kitty & Roz

Wishing them Good Health & Happiness


as they enter their 91st year!
Love,
Your Canasta Buddies Deanne, Janice, Roberta

We now understand
that keeping this type
of illness in the
darkness of secrecy
serves to provide
fertile ground to
nurture its growth.
peer group support, perhaps he wouldnt have had to
bear the unbearable. Maybe knowing that there were
others like him struggling to overcome the same challenges, he would have drawn strength and been able to
realize that his illness was no different from any other.
We have no doubt that as his parents, we too would
have benefitted from the information and support
offered by people in similar circumstances. We have
learned an important lesson, albeit too late to help our
son. We now understand that keeping this type of illness in the darkness of secrecy serves to provide fertile
ground to nurture its growth. Shining a light on it helps
to limit the shame and maybe create the opportunity
for a better outcome.
Refaenu, by offering peer support groups for people
suffering from anxiety, depression, or bipolar disorder,
etc. and for their friends and family, can help in so many
ways. Those attending can draw strength in understanding that they are not alone. They can begin to realize that
their illness is no more shameful than any other physical
condition, and they can find camaraderie and information from others who get it.
Isnt it about time we learned to help each other this
way?
Ruth and Phil Roth
Teaneck

Help for stuttering

Your October 31 article, Whats in the box, kid?,


was inspiring and informative. I went onto Amazon
to buy Greenhorn and hope to read this childrens
book soon.
Your article mentioned the Stuttering Foundation, a nonprofit organization that helps people
who stutter. Please note that the website of the
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 27

Cover Story

At the
heart of
Touro
Alan Kadish leads
Americas largest
Jewish university
Larry Yudelson

ew children, if any, dream


of growing up to become
university presidents.
Dr. Alan Kadish of
Teaneck certainly didnt.
Instead, the childhood dream
that led him to the presidency of
Touro University began with the
death of a beloved uncle.
My mothers brother, a strapping man in his 50s, had a sudden
cardiac death when I was 15, Dr.
Kadish, 58, remembered.
That was a problem I wanted to
study.
Alan Kadish, the son of a father
from the Lower East Side and
a mother from Vienna, went to
Yeshiva Universitys MTA high
school. He then attended Columbia
University, where he majored in
biochemistry, and he followed that
with a medical degree from Yeshiva
Universitys Albert Einstein College.
His specialty, of course, was cardiology: helping to prevent and treat
heart attacks. After a residency at
Brigham and Womens Hospital
in Boston, he took a fellowship at
the Hospital of the University of
28 Jewish Standard NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Pennsylvania.
That proved fateful; he met Connie Eleff, a graduate student in
sinology in Harvard Hillels sukkah.
They married 11 months later. (The
couple has four children: one in
Israel, one in New York working on
a startup in Brooklyn; one who just
graduated from the University of
Chicago, and the youngest, who just
starting college. New York University, not Touro. Much to my chagrin, but thats where she wanted
to go, Dr. Kadish said.)
After Penn, Dr. Kadish settled into
the life of a medical school professor and researcher, first at the University of Michigan and then, for 19
years, at Northwestern University
in Chicago. It was a great career
choice, he said.
He enjoyed research and wrote
nearly 300 papers. He favored
applied research projects, studies that directly improved medical care. And he enjoyed seeing
patients as well. Being able to mix
research, teaching, and patient care
was gratifying, he said.
By 2009 he was heading a
research institute at Northwestern.
Thats when the headhunter

found him.
Touro was looking for a chief operating
officer and designated successor for Rabbi
Dr. Bernard Lander, who founded Touro
as an Orthodox Jewish college in 1970 and
had grown it to become Americas largest
university under Jewish auspices.
Rabbi Lander seemed healthy. He was
quite vigorous. He was planning a bunch
of new things, said Dr. Kadish.
But he also was 94. The plan was for
Dr. Kadish to take over operations and for
Rabbi Lander to semi-retire as chancellor.
Two months after Dr. Kadish came to work
in Touros Manhattan headquarters, Rabbi
Lander died. A month later, Dr. Kadish was
named president.
I had the chance to work with him
only two months, Dr. Kadish said. That

wasnt enough. He was an incredible man.


I would have loved to learn more.
He muses: There was a recent study
that seemed to show a correlation between
longevity and intelligence. The genes may
co-locate to some extent. There may be
something to that.
Dr. Kadish had known of Rabbi Lander
when growing up. Both lived in Queens,
and Rabbi Lander was a co-founder of
Yeshiva Dov Revel, the day school Dr.
Kadish attended. I met him a few times.
He was this towering figure, Dr. Kadish
said.
Not physically; certainly not at the end
of his long life. Photos show him a head
shorter than the six-foot tall President
George W. Bush, when the two met in the
Oval Office. But Rabbi Lander was not just

the founder of Touro he was one of the


first graduates of Yeshiva College, he had
had been named by Mayor LaGuardia to
what was later to become the New York City
Civil Rights Commission, he was an expert
on the great postwar scourge of juvenile
delinquency, and after serving as a pulpit
rabbi in Baltimore he went on to earn a
Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia and a job
teaching sociology at Hunter College.
Then came his second act: Yeshiva Universitys president, Rabbi Samuel Belkin,
invited him to professionalize and develop
its new School of Education and Community Administration. Before long, YU had
three new accredited graduate schools
one in psychology, one in social work, and
one in education.
For his third act, Rabbi Lander started

Touro College. He wanted to do Yeshiva


College right or at least his way. His
authorized biography relates that he
assured Rabbi Belkin that the schools
wouldnt compete for donors Touro
would rely on tuition.
In hindsight, that seems to have been a
wise move.
Yeshiva University has a much larger
budget than Touro even though it serves
fewer students around $850 million in
2012, according to its tax forms, compared
to Touros, which is around $475 million.
But where YUs revenue is split between
tuition, donations, and government
grants, more than 90 percent of Touros
income comes from tuition.
Yeshiva University, however, has fallen
on tough financial times.

Jewish Standard NOVEMBER 14, 2014 29

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At left, with Lieutenant Governor Robert J. Duffy at the launch of the development of the new Touro
College of Osteopathic Medicine in Middletown, N.Y. Right, with Dr. Bernard Lander, founder and first
president of the Touro College and University System.

Shortly before Rosh Hashanah, Yeshiva University President Richard Joel wrote a public letter to the
schools community that spoke of the need to restructure and develop a long-term sustainable business
plan in the face of continuing deficits.
Touros tuition-focused approach has both strengths
and weaknesses, Dr. Kadish said. The downside, of
course, is we dont have as many diverse sources of
revenue as other institutions do. The positive is were
less dependent on market returns and less dependent
on government funding. The sequester has hurt us but
hasnt been catastrophic.
That said, were certainly looking to increase development and increase research grants, he continued.
But I dont ever see a situation where tuition revenue
is the minority of our income. As long as students find
values in our education, well be able to make a go of it
financially.
Today, some 18,000 students find value in a Touro
education. Theyre spread out in more than 30 schools
in seven states and countries. This includes medical
schools in New York, Nevada, and California.
Throughout the university, its schools operate on the
Jewish holiday calendar and its cafeterias serve only
kosher food. But some schools have no Jewish students;
theyre not the target.

Talking heart to heart


Dr. Alan Kadish has seen tremendous changes
and advances in the field of cardiology in the 25
years he practiced as a clinician and a researcher.
Two in particular.
One was radiofrequency ablation, which
cauterizes small damaged areas of the heart,
and gave us the ability to cure cardiac dysrhythmia abnormal heartbeats for the first time.
Before that, people who studied heart rhythm
disturbances were primarily diagnosticians. Just
around that time I started training in 1980, scientists were developing techniques to cure cardiac

And other Touro schools specialize in sub-segments


of the Orthodox Jewish community. If Lander College
for Men as the original Touro college was renamed
is modeled on Yeshiva College, with dormitories, traditional yeshiva learning, and extracurricular activities,
the Lander College of Arts and Sciences in Brooklyn provides a college education with fewer frills. Women take
classes during the day, and men, who presumably are
studying in their yeshivot by day, take classes at night.
Still another school provides certificates and associate
degrees in technical subjects for chasidic sudents still
wary of secular education but coming to an increasing
realization that at the right time, many not all students have to enter the workforce and get an education,
Dr. Kadish said.
Early next year, Touro plans to make its first entry
into New Jersey, with a non-degree-granting program in
computer science in Lakewood, home of Beth Medrash
Govoha, one of the largest charedi yeshivot in the world.
Other programs serve primarily non-Jewish niches.
Touro originally founded the New York School of
Career and Applied Studies in 2002 to help Russian Jewish immigrants; now it serves other immigrant groups
and minorities.
On 125th street in Harlem, Touro offers a masters
program in science. Its designed to take people who

arrhythms with catheters. Some of the early work


was done by my mentor at the University of Michigan, Fred Morady.
The second major advance was the ability to
ease the technique of having a defibrillator implanted that senses rapid heartbeats and stops
them. Defibrilaltors also became far more sophisticated.
Cardiovascular disease is still the most common cause of death, but the field has been a big
success. People are living longer and have a better quality of life. Both prevention and treatment
have made a difference. It has helped a lot of
people. Theres still a lot more to do, he said.

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werent quite ready for medical school


when they finished college and prepares
them for medical school and life sciences, Dr. Kadish said.
And then there are the schools that
dont target a particular demographic
but are in places where you would not
expect to find a Jewish university outpost. Touro University of Nevada boasts
the states only masters of occupational
therapy degree and its only physician
assistant studies program.
What, you might ask, is a Jewish university doing in a place like suburban
Las Vegas?
The answer, for Dr. Kadish, is that education in general, and medical training in
particular, reflect Jewish values.
The idea of building a better world
and helping people in need, helping
other people be productive, these are
things that go back to the Chumash in
very obvious ways, he said.
There are places where Judaism is
overt, he said, pointing to institutes on
the Holocaust and on Jewish law at the
Touros law school, and a program on
Jewish medical ethics at New York Medical College, a school Touro acquired in
2011.
And there are places where its part of

the mission, Dr. Kadish said. Its a universal value that comes out of the Jewish tradition, for people to be productive
and contributing members of society. A
second value is the Jewish intellectual
tradition. Its very powerful. The universality of it isnt always recognized. The
fact is that significant general literacy
and critical thinking skills have been
part of the Jewish intellectual tradition
for many years.
That Touros education is wrapped in
a Jewish package hasnt generated significant negative feedback, he said. Ill
go to the places where the majority of
the student body is not Jewish and talk
about Jewish values or aspects of Judaism. I find that its always well received.
People appreciate what Touro does and
they respond positively to it, he said.
Last month, Dr. Kadish went to
Nevada to open a facility. I spoke a little
bit about rebuilding, which Las Vegas
has done after the economic downturn
and the country has done after 9/11, he
said. I compared it to how remembering losses like the destruction of the Beit
Hamikdash gives energy and focus.
It was received positively, even by
non-Jews, he said.
What about Dr. Kadishs own stamp on

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Rabbi Berel Lazar, the chief rabbi of Russia, presents Dr. Alan Kadish with a
gift last month.

facebook.com/jewishstandard
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 14, 2014 31

Cover Story
Touro? What has changed under his tenure?
Perhaps not surprisingly, he has been enhancing the
universitys research component.
(His own research has been cut down to taking part
in conference calls about continuing projects on which
his former colleagues are still work. One concerns the
genetics of sudden cardiac deaths; another looks into
better ways to evaluate who should get a defibrillator.)
Although we will never be a research-intensive university, we felt it important to incorporate research
components in what we do, he said.
He has pressed the schools expansion and growth.
Weve continued the idea that we would focus on
fields where there was a need and could get people into
the job market. We found the health science students
pretty much had a one hundred percent employment
rate, he said.
Lander College for Men, named after Rabbi Dr. Bernard
Thus, Touro bought New York Medical College. And
Lander, founder of Touro
now it is building a medical school campus in Middletown, in Orange County, N.Y.
Its our fifth medical school campus, Dr. Kadish said.
Another technological change: Were moving toward
Once it is fully completed, it will have about 3,000 students.
eliminating cadavers in our anatomy classes, he said.
Medical education has changed since he was in school, he
Instead, the school will begin using interactive three-dimensional display technology. You can visualize the body, can
said. Small group discussions and clinical experiences have
see the X-rays on the body, can analyze tissues the same
permeated more in the first two years.
way you can on an actual cadaver. It really allows you to do
More changes are afoot. Were in the process of eliminating lectures. Lectures will be on iTunes university. Classes
a dissection and put it back together. It gives you an intuitive
will all be discussion-based.
feeling for anatomy.
Obviously, were measuring outcomes of the students
On the Jewish front, Touro is developing a summer campus in the Catskills for yeshiva students. It is in the process
who go through that program, he adds, ever the researcher.

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of acquiring the Hebrew Theological College in


Skokie, Ill., which has a college and a yeshiva that
has trained rabbis for nearly a century. It also has
a yeshiva high school for boys, which will be the
third such high school in the Touro system, joining
schools in Queens and Monsey, N.Y.
Dr. Kadish, however, no longer lives in Queens,
or in Chicago. Now he lives in Teaneck which is
one of the epicenters of Yeshiva University loyalty.
Connected to YUs Washington Heights campus
by Route 4 and the George Washington Bridge,
Teanecks Orthodox synagogues are mostly
helmed by YU ordained rabbis and attended by
YU graduates and faculty members.
That doesnt make life awkward, Dr. Kadish said.
Ive had a lot of good interactions here. Ive
never seen anything negative. Weve eaten at
Kenny Branders house that is, Rabbi Kenneth
Brander, YUs vice president for university and
community life.
In one sense it allows me to enjoy Shabbos a little
more. While we have a number of students and parents here, as well children of rabbinic leaders, its not
overwhelming. I get stopped by a parent only every
hour, not every five minutes, he said.

Pre-college advice
from Dr. Kadish
So what advice would a college president
give to prospective college students or
rather, to their parents?
Dr. Kadish offered a two-pronged answer
to that question. One focused on religious
questions, the other on academic and career
advice.
From the Jewish point of view, college has
become a more complicated thing than it was
in the past, he said. Theres been more of a
divergence between general societal values
and Jewish values in the past 30 years. Thirty
or 40 years ago, marriage was a positive
universal value. Everyone wanted to get married and raise a family. At college, one was
exposed to those kind of values, even if how
to get there wasnt the same in the Orthodox
Jewish community and other communities.
Now, fewer than 50 percent of adults in
the U.S. are married. Thats one example of
where its become more complicated.
From a Jewish standpoint, I would advise
students to understand and engage society,
to try to become productive members of society. But remember that theres a divergence
between societys values and our values.
You have to really focus on the tradition and
power of Judaism and its values to not get
overwhelmed by other ideas. You have to be
more careful than in the past, he said.
For his general perspective on college
education, he cites the American Council of
Education.
The American Council on Education has
been talking about a T model of education.
A broad liberal arts education is the top of
the T. The base of the T is a focus on career
education.
I would advise my own children, and children in general, to keep both of those in mind.
The intellectual value and critical thinking
skills of a liberal arts education are important, but its increasingly important to focus
on acquiring those skills which will get you
successfully into your career and move you
forward, he said.

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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 33

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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 35

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La Lanterna Cafe & Grill

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Opinion

Can the political left tackle anti-Semitism?

hile Ive never been a big


the U.K., America, Europe, South Africa, or elsefan of celebrity intervenwhere is whether it can address the issue of antitions in politics, I will conSemitism adequately without also examining how
cede that on occasion, a
the obsession with the Palestinian cause among
big-screen actor or a rock star will achieve
progressives has contributed to its growth.
the kind of impact about which mere morCertainly, Britains Labour Party is a pertinent
tals can only dream.
example of how much the Palestine issue domiCase in point: Maureen Lipman, a muchnates discussion of wider foreign policy considerloved British Jewish actress whom Ameriations. In his excellent book, Blair, Labour and
Ben Cohen
can audiences will recognize from her
Palestine, the British academic Toby Greene
role in Roman Polanskis 2002 film about
notes former Labour leader Tony Blairs refusal
the Holocaust, The Pianist, in which she
to criticize Israeli government policy in the runplayed the mother of the films main protagonist, Wladyup to the Iraq war. However, Greene observes, it is not clear
slaw Szpilman.
that if Blair had been more critical of Israel, there would have
Labour Party leader Ed Miliband, shown here, has so
Last week, Lipman wrote an article for Standpoint, a
been less of an opportunity for the far left to promote anti-Zionangered actress Maureen Lipman that she wrote that
British political magazine, called Labour Has Lost Me.
ism which it duly did by aligning the slogan Freedom for Palshe will not vote for Labour for the first time in five
(Shes referring to the current opposition party in a counestine alongside exhortations to oppose the war that toppled
generations.
try where they spell labor with a u.)
Saddam Hussein.
In that piece, she did two things.
While the far left miserably failed to turn the antiwar protests
presence here, that it is time for progressives to give their soliFirst, she relayed one of the best Jewish jokes Ive
into an electorally successful political movement, it did succeed
darity to the Yazidis of Iraq and the Rohingya of Burma, and not
encountered in a long time, about a rabbi so overcome
in exporting its anti-Zionist principles into much of the mainjust the Palestinians.
with the desire to try a steamed pigs head that he venstream liberal left which helps explain why one of the first acts
It would take guts to say that critics of Israeli policy have to
tures in secret to a distant restaurant famed for this dish,
of Swedens new left-wing government was to recognize Palesdissociate themselves from anti-Zionist, eliminationist rhetoric
only to have a congregant walk in on him as hes poised
tine as an independent state.
if they want to be taken at face value. And it would take guts
for his first bite. The rabbi exclaims, Can you believe this
If the left-wing Italian philosopher Gianni Vattimo is correct
to defend Muslim minorities from bigotry and racism, while at
farshtinkener place? You ask for an apple and this is how
when he gushes that anti-Zionism is synonymous with leftist
the exact same time urging their leaders to confront the antithey serve it!
world politics, then responsible voices on the left have to conSemitism plaguing these same communities.
Second, so disillusioned is Lipman with the stance on
sider where that will take them.
Yet if there does turn out to be a leader on the left who is willIsrael of current Labour leader Ed Miliband, who is also
The fact is that in the west, Palestine is now the primary
ing to say these things, then he or she is fully deserving of
Jewish, that she will not, she wrote, vote for the Labour
cause of anti-Jewish violence and anti-Semitic sentiment. That
JNS.ORG
the title mensch.
Party for the first time in five generations.
is less shocking when you realize that incitement against Jews,
Just when the virulence against a country defending
demonization of Zionism, and terrorist violence against Israelis
Ben Cohen is a news analyst for JNS.org and a contributor
itself, against 4,000 rockets and 32 tunnels inside its boris what defines the present strategies of the main rival Palestinto the Wall Street Journal, Commentary, Haaretz, and
ders, as it has every right to do under the Geneva Convenian groups, Fatah and Hamas.
other publications. His book, Some Of My Best Friends:
tion, had been swept aside by the real pestilence of the
But it would take a left-wing leader with guts to declare that
A Journey Through Twenty-First Century Antisemitism,
Islamic State, in steps Mr. Miliband to demand that the
there is no place for these politics in our societies, that neiis available on Amazon.
government recognize the state of Palestine alongside the
ther civic, nor social, nor racial equality are advanced by their
state of Israel, Lipman thundered. She then told Miliband
#16643 FV Winter lunch & learn Bergen Ad_6.5x5 10/8/14 3:47 PM Page 1
that his timing sucked, as he had turned on Israel when
there were so many more pressing problems in the world,
from the genocidal Islamist rampage to the machinations
of Russian President Vladimir Putin. In her final flourish,
Lipman declared that shed only vote Labour once the
party was again led by mensches.
(Oh yes, the pig jokethat followed an anecdote about
Miliband eating a bacon sandwich shortly after meeting
Lipman at a party in London, where he asked whether he
might join her for a Shabbat dinner.)
You and Your
Aging Parents
Clearly stung by the mauling he received from Lipman,
Common Concerns
Miliband now has demanded a zero tolerance approach
Wednesdays at 11:30 a.m.
Common Sense Solutions
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All in all, it seems to have been much more personal
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issued an equally strong statement against anti-Semitism
nt
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y
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JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 37

Jewish World

Securitys best practices


European officials convene in Newark
to discuss protection of Jewish areas

from both continents. Sessions addressed


the current threat in Europe and how to
share best practices from U.S. law enforcement with European police.
The problem of extremist violence
directed at communities of faith transcends
traditional boundaries; too often, however,
the solutions to the problem have remained
parochial, John Farmer, a law professor who
co-founded Rutgers Universitys Institute for
Emergency Preparedness and Homeland
Security, told conference participants.
The Faith-Based Communities Security Program has a $1 million funding commitment
from Paul Miller, a New Jersey philanthropist and a former executive vice president of
Pfizer, the pharmaceutical giant. In the coming months, the program plans to bring top
U.S. government and Jewish communal officials to Europe to consult with their counterparts there. The initial meetings will be
exploratory; the goal of the conference was
to outline what advice U.S. officials could offer
and how it should be presented.

RON KAMPEAS
NEWARK European Jewish institutions
increasingly find themselves potential terror targets.
But attempts to ramp up security at synagogues, day schools, museums, and community centers from Paris to Copenhagen have
been stymied both by a lingering distrust of
the police among some communities and by
law enforcements reluctance to single out
any ethnic minority for special treatment .
Those challenges, among others, brought
top European security officials to Rutgers
Universitys Newark Campus on October 31,
where they met with their American counterparts and learned about a new initiative
backed jointly by Rutgers and the Jewish Federations of North America to help
European Jewish communities work with
police to prevent attacks.
About 40 people attended representatives of Jewish umbrella groups in the United
States and Europe as well as police officials

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38 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

The initiative comes after an intensification of violence targeting Jews in


Europe, including attacks on synagogues
in France during Israels war in the Gaza
Strip; street attacks on Jews in Germany,
the Netherlands and Britain; and fatal
attacks at Jewish institutions in Brussels
this year and Toulouse, France, the year
before.
Paul Goldenberg, who heads Secure
Communities Network, an arm of the
JFNA and the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish Organizations,
said European nations neglect their Jewish communities at their own peril. I
keep calling it a canary in a mine, he
said. We are not different, we are the
same as you. If we disappear, democracy
dies.
Yet European countries face some
unique challenges in protecting Jewish
institutions.
At the gathering, an official of the
Jewish Community Protective Service
in France said that French law enforcement resists engaging with groups representing minorities in part because of
traditions dating to post-French Revolutionary turmoil, when civilian militias
were seen as a threat, and also because
of a post-Nazi occupation distaste for cultivating civilian informants.
Meanwhile, in former Eastern bloc
countries, programs that have proved
successful in the United States for
example, the Department of Homeland
Securitys See something, say something campaign, which encourages
reporting of suspicious packages and
behavior would not be easy to replicate, participants said.
Policing in the communist era was
an intelligence function of the state,
said an official familiar with European
policing practices, who asked not to
be named because of the sensitivity of
his interactions with European police
forces. That doesnt change overnight
in some countries, some of the officials
of the old regimes are still in policing. It
will take a generation to change.
The perception that Jews are capable
of protecting themselves also is inhibiting law enforcement in several countries. Police in Denmark tend to view
that countrys Jewish community first
and foremost as Jewish people who live
in Denmark, said Jonathan Fischer,
the communitys vice chairman. That
makes it easy for them to push away the
reality and say that this has something to
do with the Jews, although the perspective should be that this has something to
do with a Danish minority.
Rabbi Andrew Baker, the international
affairs director for the American Jewish
Committee, said that it can be difficult to
get authorities to share information with

police departments in neighboring countries. He noted that Danish authorities


had records on about a hundred people who had joined extremist Islamists
in their wars and then returned, but
the Danes have been reluctant to share
that information with other nations
agencies.
That does not make sense given the
EUs open borders, according to Rabbi
Baker. Weve seen how you can get in a
car and drive from Brussels to Paris, he
said, referring to the suspected assailant
in a deadly attack on the Jewish museum
in Brussels this year who was later
caught in France. You can also drive
from Copenhagen to Paris.
Another challenge: addressing threats
that come from within the Muslim community while avoiding discriminating
against Muslims.
In the process of enhancing security,
its important not to impose American
solutions, said Gabi Jiraskova, the security manager for the European Jewish
Congress. Our role is to make the community understand it is necessary to be
prepared, while respecting the different
hierarchies in each community, she
said.
That applies to police forces, said
John Cohen, a Rutgers professor who
is helping to head the faith communities initiative and who until earlier this
year headed intelligence analysis at the
Department of Homeland Security.
The police in Paris and Copenhagen do not need American professionals coming in and telling them how they
police, he said. What is invaluable
is when you bring police officials from
around the world together and talk
about different problems and present
different strategies.
Among the strategies Cohen and others outlined was establishing trusting
relations with Muslim communities in
order to identify potential attackers,
having police forge relationships with
community members, educating young
people to reject violent ideologies, and
establishing liaisons between targeted
communities and law enforcement.
One strategy is to prepare communities for crises they might have to face
together, said Michael Masters, the director for emergency management in Cook
County, Ill., who will join the Rutgers
initiative on its European tour. He called
it the tornado and blizzard approach.
We make sure houses of worship and
kids are safe ahead of natural threats,
he said. That builds up trust and preparedness for possible attacks targeting
a minority, Masters said. If youre better prepared for all hazards, youre better prepared for a specific event.


JTA WIRE SERVICE

Jewish World

Jewish federations meet, schmooze


Their future, they say, is in increased collaboration
URIEL HEILMAN
OXON HILL, MD. There was the vice president of the United States, two Supreme Court
justices, and an Academy Award-winning
actress with a compelling Jewish story.
There were Jewish professionals, lay leaders, clergy, and recent college graduates. The
West Point cadets Jewish choir performed.
The Israeli prime minister appeared via
satellite from Jerusalem.
Part pep rally, part training session, and
part family reunion, this weeks annual General Assembly of the Jewish Federations of
North America drew some 3,000 people to
a conference center outside Washington to
cheer federations philanthropic work, listen
to presentations on subjects ranging from
European anti-Semitism to crowdfunding,
and to schmooze.
As usual, much of the talk at the General
Assembly was how to bolster North Americas 153 Jewish federations.
We can go beyond exchanging ideas
to actually exchanging services, the Jewish Federations CEO, Jerry Silverman, said

in a speech at the closing plenary. JFNA


expanded the resources of our consulting
and community development department,
but what if we also leverage and share the
resident expertise in this room and across
our federations?
The federations face an uphill battle at a
time when studies show younger American
Jews are less affiliated than previous generations with Jewish institutional life and less
likely to give to Jewish causes let alone with
clearinghouses like Jewish federations.
Though federation annual campaigns are
up by about 7 percent compared with this
time last year, the number of federation
donors has declined by about one-third since
2000, according to the sociologist Steven M.
Cohen of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. Meanwhile, last years Pew
Research Center survey of U.S. Jews found
that 43 percent of non-Orthodox Jews from
30 to 49 donate to Jewish causes in contrast
to their counterparts from 50 to 69, some 60
percent of whom give Jewishly.
At the conference, the answer to these
trends was twofold. One, organizers

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses the Jewish Federations


of North Americas General Assembly via satellite on November 11.
RON SACHS

showcased dozens of federation programs


that are piloting new models for programming and outreach. Billed by organizers as
fedovations a mashup of the words federation and innovation they included

case studies in reaching younger donors,


providing services to the elderly, planning
profitable events, and finding ways to engage
and excite unaffiliated community members.
SEE FEDERATIONS PAGE 40

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 39

Jewish World
Federations
FROM PAGE 39

Jewish Federations plans to share these success stories in a federation-wide online database to be deployed in the coming weeks.
The second answer was for federation
leaders and some of the plenary speakers
from outside federation, including the actress
Marlee Matlin to drive home the message
of the importance of collective action in the
Jewish world.
We do have the intellectual and financial
potential to effectuate substantive change,
but only if we work together, Jewish Federations board chairman Michael Siegal said in
a plenary address on Monday. Federations
must lead this charge and convene the necessary organizations and thought leaders
because, simply, we have the reach that others do not.
Barry Shrage, the president of Bostons
federation, called Combined Jewish Philanthropies, said that while many federations
are doing terrific things, the challenge for the
federation network as a whole is to identify
priorities and then chart a course to address
them collectively.
At the end of the day, do we have an
agenda or do we not have an agenda? Shrage
asked. Where are we going?
He also dismissed concern about shrinking
donor bases, saying the number of high-end

donors is growing they contribute the bulk


of federation dollars and that federations
should not measure their successes by the
checkbook.
The most important thing is not to count
how much money were raising, Shrage said.
Its to count how many good things were
doing.
Vice President Joe Biden affirmed the
Obama administrations ironclad commitment to Israels security and talked about
his experience taking each of his kids to the
site of the Dachau concentration camp when
they were 15 to teach them about the incredible resilience and indomitable nature of the
human spirit.
Biden also called Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu a really great friend
in contrast to the recent characterization
of Netanyahu as a chickenst by an anonymous Obama administration official in an
interview with journalist Jeffrey Goldberg of
the Atlantic, who also spoke at the G.A.
Seeking out Ron Dermer, Israels ambassador to the United States, in the audience,
Biden said, Ron, youd better damn well
report to Bibi that were still buddies. You got
it, right?
Netanyahu, speaking to the assembly on
Tuesday by video link, focused on Iran.
Iran is not part of the solution, its a huge
part of the problem, Netanyahu said, referring to reports that the United States may be

coordinating with Iran in their shared battle


to crush the ISIS jihadist group in Iraq and
Syria. The Islamic state of Iran is not a partner of America, it is an enemy of America,
and it should be treated as an enemy.
Netanyahu said such treatment should
extend to nuclear talks now under way
between the major powers and Iran by
keeping tough sanctions on the regime, by
making clear that the international community is determined to do whatever it takes to
prevent Iran from breaking out or sneaking
out to get the bomb.
He said a deal that would allow Iran a limited uranium enrichment capacity would be
a disaster of historic proportions.
In another plenary, NPR correspondent
Nina Totenberg got U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer to discuss the Jewish
values that drive his work (tzedakah) and
Justice Elena Kagan, who grew up Jewish
on the Upper West Side, to reveal that she
has become a duck hunter since joining the
nations highest court.
Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, Britains former
chief rabbi, gave a rousing plenary address
about the importance of Jews commitment
to each other despite their differences.
I dont need you to agree with each other;
I need you to care about one another, he
said.
A late-night session featuring Goldberg and
the editors of two Israeli papers, Aluf Benn

of Haaretz and Steve Linde of the Jerusalem


Post, was packed. Goldberg said that his conversations with Netanyahu and officials in
his government left him with the impression
that the Israelis plan to wait until the next U.S.
president takes office before trying to rebuild
ties with the White House.
The conferences theme was the world
is our backyard, and it included a sprawling indoor space designed like a backyard
replete with patio furniture, artificial turf
panels, and giant dandelions. The corners
featured small stages where presenters the
list included author Peter Beinart; Philip Gordon, the White House coordinator for the
Middle East, North Africa and the Gulf region;
and Matt Nosanchuk and Noam Neusner, the
current White House Jewish liaison and a
predecessor in the post held court during
mealtimes. But many of the sessions were not
listed in the conference booklet and had poor
turnout.
Deborah Covington, vice president for
planning and allocations at the Chicago Jewish federation, Jewish United Fund, said she
came to the G.A. to network with peers and
hear about federation work outside of what
she regularly encounters. On that count, she
said, the G.A. was a success.
The breakout sessions felt relevant to
me, she said. I thought it was a particularly
good conference this year.

JTA WIRE SERVICE

NEWS ANALYSIS

U.S., Israel present a united front at D.C. assembly


RON KAMPEAS
WASHINGTON Joe and Bibi? Still buddies.
U.S. and Israel? Still allies. Agreement on Iran
and the Palestinians?
Well.
The governments of President Obama and
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
were back on joshing terms this week, but
the deep differences that led to recent namecalling exchanges still percolated.
Netanyahu and Vice President Joe Biden,
as well as top aides in both governments,
used back-to-back conferences this weekend
to get the message across loud and clear: We
love one another.
Ron, youd better damn well report to
Bibi that were still buddies. You got it, right?
Biden said Monday, picking out Israeli Ambassador Ron Dermer, known for his closeness
to Netanyahu, from the crowd at the annual
Jewish Federations of North America General Assembly, taking place this year outside
Washington in Oxon Hill, Md.
The next afternoon, at the conferences
close, Netanyahu was right back atcha in a
video-linked address.
And by the way, Ron, you can tell Vice
President Biden that I know were still buddies. Well always be buddies, Netanyahu
said from his library.
Dermer spoke to the Israeli American

Council on Saturday night. That would be a


crowd likely to be more skeptical than most
of claims that the Obama administration had
Israels back.
But the ambassador went out of his way to
show that not only was the alliance close, it
was unprecedentedly close, and the recent
hiccups were not unusual.
Dermer praised the the moral, political,
and strategic support that Israel has enjoyed
for over six decades from Republican and
Democratic administrations, including from
the Obama administration.
Today the depth of that support comes
in the form of unprecedented security cooperation and intelligence sharing, record military assistance and missile defense funding
and backing at the United Nations and other
ways, he said.
In his Jewish Federations speech, the
loquacious Biden could not resist the
repeated use of the L word.
I once signed a photo to Bibi: I dont
agree with a damn thing you say, but I love
you, he said. We love one another and we
drive one another crazy Im serious. Thats
what friends do. We are straight with one
another.
Crazy may be overstating it, but the relationship sure has been fraught: From anonymous Israeli government accusations over
the summer that Secretary of State John

40 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Kerry was engaging in a terrorist attack on


Israel by backing a cease-fire agreement with
Hamas that had been shaped by its Qatari
backers; to Netanyahus lecturing U.S. TV
audiences on how un-American it was for
the Obama administration to oppose Israeli
building in eastern Jerusalem; to an anonymous Obama administration official telling
journalist Jeffrey Goldberg that Netanyahus
behavior on the peace process and on Iran
was chickenst.
Despite the recent love fests, the issues that
underpinned the tensions remained.
Its not yet clear whether Iran and the
major powers will reach a deal by the Nov.
24 deadline, but Philip Gordon, the National
Security Councils Middle East counselor,
said that were such a deal achieved, in all likelihood it would allow Iran to continue enriching uranium at limited levels.
Weve said yes, we can imagine a small
enrichment program, so long as we had confidence that if they try to break out, well have
plenty of time, and thats the only deal well
accept, Gordon said during a Q&A at the
General Assembly. (This reporter moderated
the session.)
In his remarks to the Jewish Federations
gathering, Netanyahu said that allowing
Iran to keep any enrichment capacity would
leave it as a nuclear threshold state.
The worst thing that could happen now

is for the international community to agree


to a deal that would leave Iran as a threshold nuclear power and removes its sanctions, he said.
Also percolating was blame-laying as the
Israeli-Palestinian peace process remained
in tatters and violence intensified in Israel
and the West Bank. This week, two Israelis have been stabbed to death in terrorist
attacks and one Palestinian was killed in the
West Bank in clashes with Israeli troops.
For Netanyahu, blame had a single
address: the Palestinians.
The Palestinian Authority, which should
also be working to calm tensions, has joined
Hamas, he said, in fanning the flames.
The Israeli leader referred to Palestinian
praise for the gunman who two weeks ago
attempted to kill a Jewish activist, Yehuda
Glick, who seeks greater Jewish access to
the Temple Mount, and to PA claims that
Jews have no historical affinity to the site.
The Obama administration, however,
sees blame on both sides. Netanyahu this
week urged Arab-Israelis protesting the
shooting death of an Arab-Israeli protester
to move to the Gaza Strip and the West
Bank.
Anyone who is not urging calm and nonviolence and a return to the status quo runs
the risk that it can be a very explosive situation, Gordon said.
JTA WIRE SERVICE

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 41

Jewish World

Washington exhibit brings to life


350 years of American Jews in military
HILLEL KUTTLER
WASHINGTON Mementos of Jacob Goldstein slide
across the horizontal screen like cards being dealt at a
casino: his photograph, his name, an Operation Urgent
Fury headline denoting the 1983 military campaign in Grenada, Goldsteins explanatory text summarizing his role
during the invasion.
Even more striking than the photograph showing the
uniformed rabbi wrapping tefillin on the Grenada beach,
with his rifle resting atop a mound of sandbags, is his recollection of going from a Lubavitcher chasid in Brooklyn
to a U.S. Army officer and chaplain, reaching the rank of
colonel.
Goldstein is among the dozens of soldiers whose stories are told in an exhibition that opened on Tuesday
at the National Museum of American Jewish Military
History.
The exhibit, Jews in the American Military, engagingly conveys the role of American Jews in defending their
country, from Asser Levy being granted the right to bear
arms in 1657 to help protect Manhattan, to the 55 Jewish
men and women killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The interactive digital table from which Goldsteins
image emerges is called Service Around the World. Pull
up a chair, select a decade since the Cold
War began in 1945, tap any dot on the
map, and learn about the American militarys involvement in conflicts, events,
and humanitarian missions. Many items
include personal stories. Others, like the
peacekeeping force that President Ronald
Reagan dispatched to Lebanon, do not,
but curators hope that Jewish veterans
will write in with information that can be
added.
Elsewhere, the exhibit presents compelling text, photographs, and artifacts in
chronologically ordered sections. Display
cases present such Jewish gems as medals
from the Civil War and the Spanish-American War; an 1899 prayer book; a captured
Artifact case displays objects from World War II.
German rifle from World War II; a Torah

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN JEWISH MILITARY HISTORY
ark that a Chinese officer fashioned from
teak as a gift to Morris Gordon, whom the
officer had befriended after saving Gordon from drownWelfare Board, which tends to the needs of Jewish soling during World War II. (Gordon would use the ark while
diers, JWV and museum officials estimated, for example,
conducting services on the legendary Burma Road.)
that some 10,000 Jews fought in the Civil War, 225,000 in
Nearby, from Guam, is the coconut that Seymour SilverWorld War I and 550,000 in World War II.
man mailed to his daughter Maurita writing her name,
Contemporary membership numbers for JWV are modest, however; older veterans are dying and the number of
their Portsmouth, Va., address, and a sketch of a palm
Jewish enlistees dropped once the compulsory draft was
tree on the fruit itself. Maurita Silverman would follow her
lifted after the Vietnam War. The organization now has
father into the military, serving as a nurse in the Vietnam
20,000 members, mostly World War II veterans, accordWar, according to museum archivist Pamela Elbe.
ing to its treasurer, Norman Rosenshein.
Jews in the American Military is a permanent exhibition that took eight years to develop at a cost of $750,000.
To remain viable long term, JWV is recruiting returnees
The funding was raised by Jewish War Veterans of America
from Iraq and Afghanistan while offering free membership
groups and from the national office of JWV, an affiliate of
to the 20,000 Jewish soldiers now on active duty.
the museum, with which it shares its brick DuPont Circle
Poor outreach seems to stand in the way, however.
building.
JWVs national chief of staff, Marsha Schjolberg, provided
While the museum has mounted exhibitions on such
a telling example.
themes as Korean War service and women serving in
When Schjolbergs daughter, who works at the nearby
World War II, it never has presented a comprehensive
Jewish Community Center of Greater Washington, sought
look at the Jewish presence in the U.S. military from the
to publicize a talk, set for this Veterans Day, by a Jewish
start to present day, museum coordinator Mike Rugel said.
author of a new book on military heroism in Iraq and
Drawing on figures supplied by the National Jewish
Afghanistan, a local JWV post refused to help promote the
42 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

A U.S. Marine in Vietnam drew a Jewish star on his


helmet, circa 1968.

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN JEWISH MILITARY HISTORY

talk. Indeed, said Schjolberg, a San Diego-area resident


who served in the Naval Reserves for 28 years, she didnt
learn of JWVs existence until after she had retired.
Her late father, Harold Fuchs, a World War II veteran,
lived just 10 blocks from a JWV post near Los Angeles and
would eagerly have participated in the organization had
he known about it, she said.
Schjolberg said she hopes the exhibit helps inform nonJews of the notable contributions made by Jews.
The exhibition abounds in examples. Col. Teddy Roosevelt, according to the text at the exhibit, held his Jewish soldiers in high regard and became a member of the
Hebrew Veterans of the War with Spain, a precursor to
JWV. A photograph shows Murray Blum, killed on Dec. 3,
1943, after he rescued a Merchant Marine shipmate when
a German U-boat torpedoed their vessel.
Then theres Col. Gerald Fink, a Korean War fighter pilot
shown in his plane, with Big G chalked on its door. The
plane was shot down in 1951, and Fink was tortured as a
prisoner of war. He passed his time woodworking; using
shattered glass and an improvised knife, he sculpted a
3-foot crucifix memorializing Father Emil Kapaun, a Catholic chaplain and fellow American POW.
Surely, the crucifix made by a Jew for a deceased priest
in a Communist prison camp is unique, the exhibitions
text reads. It was a point of pride for Col. Fink until his
JTA WIRE SERVICE
death in 1987. 
The National Museum of American Jewish Military History,
at 1811 R Street, N.W. in Washington D.C., is open 9 a.m. to 5
p.m. Mondays to Fridays, and by appointment on Sundays.
It is closed on Jewish and federal holidays.

Dvar Torah

Gratitude in its holiest expression

his weeks Torah portion relates how


Eliezer, the trusted aid of Avraham, was
sent to Haran on a mission to find a wife for
Avraham and Sarahs son Isaac. Eliezer asks
God to show him a sign to indicate the intended match
for Isaac. The sign is fulfilled and Rebecca is identified as the candidate after offering water to Eliezer and
his camels. In a display of gratitude to God for having
endowed his mission with
success, Eliezer prostrates
himself and offers praise
and thanksgiving to the
Almighty.
Expressing gratitude for
everything we have is fundamental to the Jewish way of
life. Indeed the very name
yehudi Jew stems from
Rabbi
the Hebrew name Yehuda
Chanoch
which is derived from
Kaplan
hodaah, meaning to thank
Chabad Jewish
and express gratitude. And
Center of Northwest
the very first sentence a
Bergen County,
Jew utters upon awakening
Franklin Lakes
is the Modeh Ani prayer in
which we offer thanks to the
Almighty for having restored our soul.
It is interesting to note that during the chazans
repetition of the Amidah, only the Modim blessing in
which thanks is offered to God is recited individually
by each member of the congregation. Offering thanks
must be done verbally and in person since this brings
us to recognize the gifts we have and reinforces the
trait of gratitude within us.

orchestrated our meeting in order to recognize their


extraordinary expression of gratitude. After all, what were
the chances that a local rabbi would be at the Kotel, spot
them at the very moment they seemed lost and get the
idea to walk across the plaza to ask if they needed help?!
(If the subjects of this story happen to read this please get
in touch with me. I would love to meet you again!)
A story is told of a pedestrian who rushes into a burning

home and saves a man from the raging inferno. The likely
victim asks the anonymous pedestrian how he can possibly
reward him? The stranger replies that he should live a life
worth saving. While verbalizing our gratitude is central to
Judaism, ultimately the most profound expression of gratitude to our Creator is when we live a life worthy of the holy
soul invested in us.

Offering thanks must


be done verbally and
in person since
this brings us to
recognize the gifts
we have and
reinforces the trait of
gratitude within us.
I was privileged to take part in a most beautiful gesture of gratitude about five years ago in Israel at the
Kotel, the Western Wall.
I was standing at the Chabad Tefilin booth in the
Kotel plaza when I noticed a couple some distance
away who appeared to need some help. I made my
way over to them and they said that they were looking for a rabbi to guide them in saying a prayer. Im
your man; youre talking to a rabbi, I told them
and asked what the purpose of their visit was. They
explained that their adult daughter was in remission
from cancer and they had come to say thank you
to God! They had traveled from the USA, halfway
around the world, just to say thank you.
Upon further inquiry I learned that they were
from Woodcliff Lake, a mere stones throw from my
own community of Franklin Lakes. I was stunned.
I shared with them my conviction that God had
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 43

comedian

ROBERT KLEIN

Crossword BY DAVID BENKOF


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11/11/14 8:50 AM

AN ORDINARY MAN
WHO DID EXTRAORDINARY THINGS
Written by & Starring

Tom Dugan

Directed by

Jenny Sullivan

BEGINS
OCTOBER 24
Telecharge.com
or 212-239-6200
410 West 42nd Street
WIESENTHALTHEPLAY.COM

Across

Down

1. One of Grouchos bushy ones


5. Military service led by Norton A.
Schwartz from 2008-2012
9. Black ___ (2010 Natalie Portman
film)
13. Its sweet
16. Marcel Marceau, e.g.
17. Place to celebrate Shushan Purim
18. Galilee and others
19. Study Talmudically
20. ___ and Judys Kid (Adam Sandler
album)
22. Margot Frank was Annes (abbr.)
23. Wandering Jew alternative
25. What Jill Abramson did at The New
York Times
27. Matzah maker
30. It usually overlaps with 21-Down
(abbr.)
32. ___ Francisco (Levi Strauss headquarters site)
33. Devour Deuteronomy
34. It might make you say Aw, shoot!
35. They might compete with Judaism
38. Make something chosen
39. Canadian Jew who directed
Ghostbusters
41. Seder song: V___ Sheamda
42. Roman attacks on Jerusalem
44. Givat ___ (Moshav named after
Bialiks given name)
45. Chant the Torah
46. Its alums include Sally Priesand and
Zalman Schachter-Shalomi
47. Salingers Catcher in the ___
48. The 20-shekel ones are green
49. Back to the ___ (film produced by
Steven Spielberg)
51. Israeli weight measure
53. The voice of Olaf the Snowman in
Frozen
54. Luxemburg was a red one
56. Sheldon Adelsons first casino
59. My trip to Israel was two weeks
___....
61. Two percent of Israelis
64. Marty Feldman role
65. Orange picker, sometimes
66. ___ is Too Many: Canada and the
Jews of Europe 1933-1948
67. Part of a Chagall window
68. Garrett Wittels was nominated in
the Best Male College Athlete category for this award

1. Car some Jews boycott


2. Ben Yehuda, e.g.
3. Leer at, like Groucho Marx
4. The cows Joseph said represented
years of plenty
5. Organ origin of milchigs
6. Place to put your tefillin
7. Eldan alternative in the car-rental
world
8. What Richard Simmons tries to make
people
9. Message a kosher phone cannot send
(abbr.)
10. L.A. Holocaust Center honoree
11. Sondheim song Everybody Ought to
Have ___
12. Suffix for Jewish
14. 2014 novel: Jewish Mothers ___ Die
15. Chavruta
21. See 30-Across
24. Seinfeld character the Soup ___
26. Krav Maga alternative ___ chi
27. Warner ___ Entertainment Inc.
28. House on many campuses
29. Award-winning actress, Almost
Famous
31. Proverb quality
34. Jewish Museum of New York qtr.
35. Sondheim lover
36. Salutation with an arm raised at an
angle
37. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and Al
Franken (D-Minn.)
39. Happen annually, like the High
Holidays
40. Like Moses at the burning bush
43. ___ Shabbos! (Yiddish greeting)
45. Idolize
47. Send a kiddish cup from Israel again
48. Double-sided page of gemara
49. The Coen brothers won an Oscar for
its screenplay
50. ___ of Ages (Maoz Tzur in
English)
52. Promulgate, as in an edict of expulsion
53. Rick Rechts song ___ to Israel
55. Avot (patriarchs) number
57. Inside for Rashi
58. Act as a mohel
60. The gold kind is described in the
Book of Job
62. Middle name for Hasdai Shaprut
63. It ends many Jewish last names

The solution to last weeks puzzle is on page 53.


44 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Arts & Culture


A fuller view
of Tevyes shtetl
Scholar illuminates an intense golden age
JONATHAN E. LAZARUS

he mythical Anatevka of Fiddler on the Roof has conjured


up enduring shtetl sights and
sounds for three generations
of Jews (and non-Jews) worldwide who
remain in the thrall of the blockbuster
musical and its central character, Tevye,
the put-upon dairyman who seems the
absolute embodiment of all its woes.
Theatergoers, movie viewers, and
devotees of Fiddler recordings connect deeply to the bittersweet amalgam
of Sholem Aleichem stories about a village under stress and a Tevye broken and
bewildered by the decrees of the czar, the
growing feistiness of his wife and daughters, the unchecked violence of the Cossacks, and the seeming fickleness of the
Almighty to his variety of plights.
Great theater, yes, but not quite the historical real deal.
Fortunately, a vastly more focused picture of shtetldom is supplied by Yohanan
Petrovsky-Shtern, a professor of Jewish
studies at Northwestern University. His
expansive and formidably researched
New History of Jewish Life in Eastern
Europe provides the perfect counterweight to the intense emotionality of
Fiddler.
Dr. Petrovsky-Shtern shares both the
micro and macro of the hundreds of shtetls
comprising the Pale of Settlement during
the century before Fiddler, which was
set in the 1880s. These communities were
essentially geographic hybrids, containing
elements of both villages and towns and
serving as bridges between them. They
were defined demographically for revenue
purposes, first by Polish nobles and then
by Russian bureaucrats.
Shtetls constituted a thriving arc of
entrepots duty-free trading posts
between western Europe and interior Russia and pulsed as centers of commerce and
contraband. Their inhabitants were resilient and resourceful, mainly but not exclusively Jewish. Anatevka once belonged
in this robust category, but when Tevye
decamped to America (at the same time,
incidentally, when my mother left Ukraine
Jonathan E. Lazarus is a former news
editor of the Star-Ledger.

as an infant), they had been ground down


by a ruthless and cunning campaign of the
czars and their satraps.
Instead of using these geographic entities as progressive models for a Russian
society still mired in serfdom, rulers from Catherine to Nicholas II chose
a much darker course. Dr.
Petrovsky-Shtern notes
the cruel irony that just as
shtetls reached the narrow window of a golden
age, which he defines as
between 1790 and 1840,
the seeds of their destruction were being sown in
St. Petersburg.
The campaign was
fueled by a xenophobic
Yohanan
and resurgent Russian
Petrovskynationalism targeting
Shtern
Catholic nobles and the
Jews who served them in newly appropriated territories. These populations had
been absorbed during three partitions
of the Polish kingdom between 1772 and
1795, and later, chunks of Ukraine had
been added. (Does that sound ominously
current?)
Suddenly, the czars were confronted
with sizable cohorts of non-Eastern Orthodox subjects, along with up to 1.2 million
Jews. The rub was how to Russify these
outliers and break the grip of an almostfeudal symbiosis between the Polish
nobles, known as magistrates, and the
Jewish traders, merchants, and craftsmen
in their service. The arrangement, though
hardly equitable, endured for centuries
and seemed to benefit both parties.
Magistrates owned the shtetls land and
buildings, issuing edicts, levying taxes,
and dispensing justice unilaterally. Jews
produced, distributed or traded everything from vodka to vellum and conducted
the festive but highly competitive fairs and
marketplaces at which all manner of goods
were sold or bartered. (Gentiles remained
dumbfounded that Jews distilled the vodka
but didnt drink it.)
Jews also functioned as the premier innkeepers for the crowds thronging marketplaces. Their dwellings often contained
rooms, stables, and vending stalls under
one roof. Most Jewish inhabitants were

industrious, pious (some exuberantly chasidic, others formatively Zionistic), and


generally conformed to the decisions of
the kahal, or community umbrella organization. Shtetlkeit, however, hardly was
free of gossip, jealousies, infidelities, or
brawling.
With so many political, social, economic, and religious currents in play, Dr.
Petrovsky-Shtern concentrates on the
fates of the inhabitants in Volhynia, Podolia, and Kiev provinces, compromising the
new leading edge of imperial Russia and
fleshing out the Pale of Settlements geographic contours. His narrative roams as
freely as the vast geography he covers.
Catherine the Great became the first
ruler to deal with the new realities of borders and population. She surveyed her
expanded realm and immediately targeted
the Polish landowners as internal threats.
Yet she felt more maternalistic toward their
Jewish charges, and to her way of thinking,
acted with restraint toward them.
Catherines mercantile policies and her
paranoia about European enlightenment
ideals contaminating the motherland soon
resulted in huge tariffs, closed borders,

open smuggling, and the first disruption to


the ebbs and flows of shtetl life. The quotidian, predictable rhythms of this unique
and exuberant existence were squeezed
by ambitions for an uber Russia on a footing with the other great powers.
Polish magistrates were stripped of
their estates or forced to sell them for a
song after falling prey to newly competing
pseudo-shtetls and workshops set up in
the interior of the country. Jews now had
to report each commercial transaction to
the czars representatives or deal with a
corrupt police chief or the fickle Russian
courts. A whole new set of intermediaries had been superimposed as the Polish
legacy was being dismantled.
At least in the early decades of Russian
rule, the Jewish population tried to prove
its fidelity to their new masters. During the
Napoleonic invasion they subscribed heavily to the Russian cause since they could
not serve in the army. This was especially
true of urban Jews and first-guild merchants with the financial wherewithal to
do so.
By the late 1820s, Nicholas I began
SEE SHTETL PAGE 50

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 45

Calendar
Friday
NOVEMBER 14

Temple Sinai Rock Band


performs during services,
7:30 p.m. 1 Engle St.
(201) 568-3035.

Saturday
NOVEMBER 15

Shabbat in Fair Lawn:


Biblical scholar Dr.
Sharon Keller is scholarin-residence at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai
Israel. She will discuss
marital and non-marital
relationships in biblical
text. She teaches at
Hofstra University
and has held faculty
positions at Hebrew
Union College, JTS, and
NYU. Services, 6:30 p.m.;
dinner, 7:30, program,
8:30. She will speak
during Shabbat services
starting at 9 a.m., and
again during kiddush
lunch. 10-10 Norma Ave.
(201) 796-5040

Shabbat in Emerson:
Congregation Bnai
Israel welcomes Shabbat
with songs, prayers, and
an intergenerational
drumming circle,
7 p.m. 53 Palisade Ave.
(201) 265-2272

Shabbat in Teaneck:
Rabbi Shalom Rosner
of Yeshivat Reishit
Yerushalayim in Beit
Shemesh, Israel, and
Daf Yomi magid shiur
(translator), is the
scholar-in-residence
at Congregation Rinat
Yisrael. He will give a
dvar Torah before Maariv,
The Orthodox Jew in
the Modern World,
7:45 p.m. On Shabbat
morning at 7:30 a.m., he
will give a Daf Yomi shiur;
followed by drashot
at the 8:30 and 9 a.m.
minyanim; a discussion,
The Mitzvah of Talmud
Torah Is There Room
For Anything Else? after
Minchah at 4:05 p.m.,
and concluding with a
Daf Yomi shiur on Sunday
morning at 7 a.m. 389
West Englewood Ave.
(201) 837-2795.

Shabbat in Tenafly: The

Casino event in
Paramus: The JCC of
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah hosts
a casino night with
game tables and silent
and live auctions,
7 p.m. Refreshments
and dairy dessert.
304 East Midland
Ave. (201) 262-7691 or
jccparamus.org.

Gidi Grinstein
Shabbat in Closter:
Gidi Grinstein, founder/
president of the Reut
Institute, and author of
Flexigidty: The Secret
of Jewish Adaptability,
speaks at Temple EmanuEl during services,
9 a.m. Mr. Grinstein
was the secretary and
coordinator of the
Israeli delegation to the
peace negotiations with
the PLO under Prime
Minister Ehud Barak
and helped design the
Birthright Israel program.
The Reut Institute
works to advance
Israels socioeconomic
development to ensure
security and prosperity
within the framework
of 21st century Zionism.
180 Piermont Road.
(201) 750-9997

Shabbat in Englewood:

Rabbi Shalom Rosner

(201) 833-1322, or
(201) 394-5019,
rebyossel@verizon.net, or
www.emeth.org.

Congregation Kol
HaNeshamah holds Gan
Shabbat, services for
2- to 6-year-olds, 11 a.m.,
led by early childhood
teacher Leona Kleinstein.
On the premises of
St. Pauls, 113 Engle St.
(201) 816-1611, or info@
KHNJ.org.

Reb Shlomo Carlebach


Celebrating Carlebach
in Teaneck: Temple
Emeth hosts Give Me
Harmony, the Bergen
County tribute to Reb
Shlomo Carlebach
on his 20th yahrzeit,
6:30-11 p.m. Musical
Havdalah led by
Avram Mlotek, learning
sessions with guest
teachers including Neila
Carlebach; concert with
C. Lanzbom of Soul Farm
and Nochi Krohn, and
a jam session with local
musicians. Refreshments.
1666 Windsor Road.

46 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Sunday
NOVEMBER 16
Jewish womens health
symposium/brunch
in Teaneck: Holy Name
Medical Center hosts a
Jewish womens health
symposium and brunch
at the Jewish Center of
Teaneck, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Dr. Sharyn N. Lewin,
gynecological oncologist
and womens health
specialist, and Dr. Joshua
Gross, board-certified
radiologist specializing
in breast imaging, are
guest speakers. Kosher
brunch. 70 Sterling
Place. (201) 833-3336 or
HolyName.org.

Early childhood fair


in Teaneck: Jewish
Eaglemania
Concert in Wayne:
Eaglemania, an Eagles
tribute band, performs in
the Rock Tribute series at
the Wayne YMCA, 7 p.m.
The Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey. 1 Pike Drive.
(973) 595-0100.

Comedy in Fort Lee:


The JCC of Fort Lee/
Congregation Gesher
Shalom holds Showtime
Tonight: An Evening of
Laughter and Song,
starring the comedian
Modi, award-winning
recording artist/
composer Cantor Paul
Zim, and singer/pianist
Lisa Yves, 7:30 p.m.
1449 Anderson Ave.
(201) 947-1735 or
geshershalom.org/
concert.

Mentalist in Teaneck:
The Bergen County
Friends of PTACH hold
an evening of mystery
and comedy starring
mentalist Marc Salem
at Congregation Rinat
Yisrael, 8 p.m. Dessert
reception follows.
Proceeds benefit the
PTACH scholarship
fund. 389 W. Englewood
Ave. Steve Fox,
(201) 362-6776 or www.
ptach.org.

Federation of Northern
New Jerseys Early
Childhood Education Fair
is at Windsor HallWorld
of Wings, 10 a.m.-noon.
Families receive 50
percent off admission
at the World of Wings
butterfly exhibit. 1775
Windsor Road. Ellen,
(201) 820-3917 or ellenf@
jfnnj.org.

Fall boutique in Tenafly:


The Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades offers a vendor
boutique with jewelry,
womens fashions,
stationery, sunglasses,
childrens clothing,
tabletop accessories, and
more, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and
on Monday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Proceeds benefit the Early
Childhood Department.
411 E. Clinton Ave.
(201) 408-1435 or
fpopper@jccotp.org.

Brunch and learn in


Cliffside Park: To mark
Kristallnacht, Temples
Israel Community Center
and Beth El of North
Bergen host a Brunch
and Learn program
with Dr. Tamara Reps
Freeman, a Holocaust
ethnomusicologist/
violinist/music educator,
at Temple Israel, 10 a.m.
207 Edgewater Road.
(201) 945-7310.

Preschool program in
Woodcliff Lake: Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley holds Club Katan
for children who will
begin kindergarten
in September 2015,
10:15 a.m. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801,
ext. 12.

Author in Ridgewood:
Yascha Mounk, instructor
of political science
and writing at Harvard
University, a Jeff and
Cal Leonard Fellow

The Bergen County


YJCC hosts Fall Into
Laughter: An Evening
of Cocktails and
Comedy, Saturday, Nov. 22 at 8 p.m.
Comedians include headliner James
Mattern, pictured, and Grant Gordon.
Cash bar. 605 Pascack Road. (201)
666-6610 or www.yjcc.org.

NOV.

22

at the New America


Foundation, and author
of Stranger in My Own
Country: A Jewish Family
in Modern Germany,
speaks at Temple Israel,
10:30 a.m. Co-sponsored
with Ramapo Colleges
Gross Center for
Holocaust and Genocide
Studies. 475 Grove St.
(201) 444-9320.

Jewish values: Temple


Beth Sholom in Fair
Lawn concludes an adult
education series, A
Time for Peace, A Time
for War, led by Rabbi
Alberto Zeilicovich,
addressing Jewish values
in relation to peace and
war, with The Problem
of Power in Times of War
and Peace. 10:30 a.m.
40-25 Fair Lawn Ave.
(201) 797-9321, ext. 415,
or AdultEd@tbsfl.org.

Breakfast in Teaneck:
Byachad, Temple
Emeth of Teanecks
mens and womens
group, meets for a
discussion with Steven
Goldstein, The Jewish
Community as a Force
for Equality, 10:30 a.m.
$6. 1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322 or www.
emeth.org.

Author in Hackensack:
Rabbi Simon Glustrom,
rabbi emeritus of the
Fair Lawn Jewish
Center, discusses his
new book, Unfinished
Journey A Rabbis
Bout With Doubt,
at Temple Beth El,
10:30 a.m. 280 Summit
Ave. (201) 342-2045 or
emplebethelhackensack@
gmail.com.

NYC walking tour:


Congregation Kol
HaNeshamah of
Englewood offers an
architectural walking tour
of the Upper West Side
with NYU professor John
Tauranac, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
(201) 816-1611, info@KHNJ.
org, or www.KHNJ.org.

Holiday boutique
in Fair Lawn: The
sisterhood of the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel
hosts a boutique with
holiday items, including
Judaica, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Vendor space available.
10-10 Norma Ave.
(201) 796-5040.

Calendar
Football watching in
Ridgewood: BYachad,
(Hebrew for together),
Temple Israel & JCCs
informal social group for
20- to 40-somethings,
meets at the temple
to watch the New York
Giants game 1 p.m. 475
Grove St. (201) 444-9320
or erinlindenberg@
hotmail.com.

Film in Paramus:
The JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah continues its
annual Jewish Film
Festival with a screening
of Joshua Then and
Now, 1:30 p.m. East
304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691.

Synagogue open
house festival in Fort
Lee: The sisterhood of
the New Synagogue
of Fort Lee holds a fall
open house celebration
with family-friendly
activities including folk
art demos, Judaic crafts,
klezmer and cantorial
music, scribal arts, mah
jongg, food, and tours
of the shuls Holocaust
memorial exhibit,
2-6 p.m. 1585 Center Ave.
(201) 947-1555.

Film in Franklin Lakes:


Temple Emanuel of North
Jersey hosts a screening
of Beulah and other
television episodes from
the 1950s, 2 p.m. Ice
cream and popcorn. 558
High Mountain Road.
(201) 560-0200

in Paterson, discusses
her new book, Beyond
the Silk Mills, at the
Wayne YMCA, noon.
The Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey. 1 Pike Drive.
(973) 595-0100.

Feature film: The Kaplen


JCC on the Palisades
in Tenafly screens 4
Months, 3 Weeks, 2
Days, 7:30 p.m., as
part of a series, Top
Films You May Have
Missed (Or Want To See
Again). Harold Chapler
introduces the film and
leads the discussion
afterward. 411 E. Clinton
Ave. (201) 408-1493.

Tuesday
NOVEMBER 18
Coping with
Alzheimers: In
recognition of National
Alzheimers Awareness
Month, the Kaplen JCC
on the Palisades in
Tenafly, in partnership
with the Alzheimers
Association, presents
Communication: The
Key to Understanding
Behaviors at the
JCC, 11:30 a.m.
Light refreshments.
411 E. Clinton Ave.
(201) 408-1450

food for its Fran Leib


Memorial Food Drive, in
the parking lot, 7-9 a.m.
Food donated to the
Center for Food Action
in Mahwah. ShopRite gift
certificates welcome.
East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691.

After-school program
in Wayne: The Chabad
Center of Passaic
County offers an afterschool program for
2- to 8-year-olds and
siblings, with a story
hour and crafts, at the
Wayne Public Library, 461
Valley Road, 4:30 p.m.
(973) 694-6274 or
Chanig@optonline.net.

Discussing childrens
behavior in
Orangeburg: The
Orangetown Jewish
Center continues a
series with programs on
fostering educational,
spiritual, social, and
cultural aspects of all
children, including those
with exceptionalities. The
session is Systematic
Training for Effective
Parenting, a parent
workshop on learning
to handle mistakes and
misbehaviors in a calm
and constructive way,
7 p.m. Refreshments.
8 Independence Ave.,
Orangeburg, N.Y.
(845) 359-5920 or
office@theojc.org.

Thursday
NOVEMBER 20
Hadassah breakfast
in Paramus: River Dell

Rabbi Randall Mark


Childrens theater in
Tenafly: Flying Ship
Productions presents
Puss in High Tops for
the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades Professional
Childrens Theater
series, 2 p.m. Group
rates; birthday parties
arranged. 411 East Clinton
Ave. (201) 408-1493 or
www.jccotp.org.

Monday
NOVEMBER 17

Housing construction in
the West Bank: Rabbi
Randall Mark discusses
The Future of Housing
in the West Bank and
East Jerusalem after
minyan at 7:45 p.m., at
Congregation Shomrei
Torah in Wayne.
30 Hinchman Ave.
(973) 696-2500
The JCC of Paramus/
Congregation Beth
Tikvah continues
its annual Jewish
Film Festival with a
screening of A Serious
Man, 8:30 p.m. East
304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691.

NOVEMBER 19
Fall turkey/food drive:

Rupley, who grew up

The Jewish Community


Center of Paramus
collects frozen kosher
and nonkosher turkeys
and nonperishable

Friday
NOVEMBER 21
Shabbat for seniors: The
Bergen County YJCC in
Washington Township
continues Kabbalat
Shabbat, a monthly
program with lunch and
a speaker, noon-2 p.m.
Next program December
19. Partially subsidized by
a grant from the Jewish
Federation of Northern
New Jersey. 605 Pascack
Road. (201) 666-6610.

Early Thanksgiving
celebration in West
Nyack: The Rockland
Jewish Academy offers
the ThanksGIVING
Project, an early
childhood celebration
for 3- to 6-year-olds
and their parents, with
learning about tzedakah
through art, storytelling,
math, and science,
10 a.m. At 1:30 p.m., there
will be a Sifriyat Pijama
BAmerica Hebrew story
time with activities and
a snack at 1:30. Bring
canned goods to donate
to a local food pantry
and gently-worn shoes
for Soles4Souls. Sifriyat
Pijama continues on
Jan. 23, March 6, and
April 12. 450 West
Nyack Road. Judy
Klein, (845) 627-0010,
ext. 104, www.
rocklandjewishacademy.
org,

Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
services led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer and
Cantor Rica Timman with
the Shabbat Unplugged
Band, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.

Shabbat in Teaneck:

Film in Paramus:

Wednesday

Author in Wayne: Leslie

Hadassah meets for


Fun with Fashion, a
fundraising breakfast
at Lord & Taylor at
the Fashion Center,
9:30 a.m. Fashion and
makeup demonstrations.
Proceeds benefit
Hadassah and the
Hadassah Medical
Organization. $20.
East Ridgewood
Ave. Reservations,
(201) 967-8919.

of Jazz Guitar, a onehour master class, will


be offered for all levels.
The Metro YMCAs of the
Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North
Jersey. 1 Pike Drive.
(973) 595-0100 or go to
www.wayneymca.org.

Guitar Mafia
Guitar music in Wayne:
Guitar Mafia performs in
the Rosen Performing
Arts Center at the Wayne
YMCA, 8 p.m. The guitar
extravaganza features Al
Caiola, Bucky Pizzarelli,
Lou Pallo, and Frank
Vignola with special
guests including Vinny
Raniolo, Bob Leive,
and Eddie Brigati from
The Rascals. Before
the show, Tips & Tricks

Temple Emeth offers a


musical service led by
Rabbi Steven Sirbu and
cantor Ellen Tilem with
the Temple Emeth band,
8 p.m. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-1322 or
www.emeth.org.

Shabbat in Woodcliff
Lake: Temple Emanuel
of the Pascack
Valleys cantor, Mark
Biddelman, on guitar,
hosts Shabbat Yachad,
Hebrew prayers set to
easy-to-sing melodies.
He is accompanied by
keyboardist Jonathan
Hanser, bassist Brian
Glassman, and drummer
Gal Gershovsky, 8 p.m.

Free copy of CD with


service melodies available
at the shul. 87 Overlook
Drive. (201) 391-0801 or
www.tepv.org.

Saturday
NOVEMBER 22

Tricky tray in Fair


Lawn: The sisterhood
of Temple Beth Sholom
holds its annual tricky
tray event. Doors open
at 1 p.m.; calling starts
at 2. Refreshments.
40-25 Fair Lawn Ave.
(201) 797-9321.

Shabbat in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth, in
conjunction with
the One Book, One
Community project of
the Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jerseys
Synagogue Leadership
Initiative, offers a day
of learning focusing on
themes of this years
book selection, The
Golem and the Jinni.
Day begins with Torah
study, 9 a.m., with bagels
and coffee, services at
10:30, kiddush lunch
at 12:15 p.m., and a
presentation/workshop/
discussion, Project
Identity: Share Your
Familys Journey,
with Jill Kravitz, at 1.
1666 Windsor Road.
(201) 833-1322 or www.
emeth.org.

Sunday
NOVEMBER 23
Preschool program in
Leonia: Congregation
Adas Emuno holds Tot
Mitzvah, a monthly
program for preschoolers
with arts and crafts, food,
stories, and music, led
by teacher Doris White,
9 a.m. 254 Broad Ave.
(201) 592-1712 or www.
adasemuno.org.

Coffee and breakfast


in River Edge: Temple
Avodat Sholom hosts
Java Nagila, a gathering
for parents of Sunday
school children and
parents of nonschoolaged children to have
coffee, breakfast goodies,
and schmooze together,
9-11:30 a.m. 385 Howland
Ave. (201) 489-2463

Holiday boutique in
Tenafly: The Temple
Sinai early childhood
education committee
holds a boutique
with jewelry, clothing,
childrens accessories,
and home dcor,
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Proceeds
benefit the Early
Childhood Center. 1 Engle
St. (201) 568-6867.

Uncle Moishy in Passaic:


Jewish Family Service &
Childrens Center hosts
an all-new concert with
Uncle Moishy at Ahavas
Israel, 2:30 p.m. Sponsor
opportunities available.
181 VanHouten Ave.
(973) 777-7638, ext. 623.
or jfsclifton .org

Monday
NOVEMBER 24
Senior program in
Wayne: The Chabad
Center of Passaic County
continues its Smile
on Seniors program
with a mini yoga chair
class at the center,
11:30 a.m. Light brunch.
$5. 194 Ratzer Road.
(973) 694-6274 or
Chanig@optonline.net.

Music in Teaneck:
Chabad of Teaneck
offers a musical
evening celebrating the
power of prayer, with
Australian born singer/
songwriter Rivka Leah,
8 p.m. Refreshments.
513 Kenwood Place.
(201) 907-0686 or
rivkygoldin@gmail.com.

Singles
Sunday
NOVEMBER 16
Brunch and film: North
Jersey Jewish Singles
group (late 40s to
late 60s) at the Clifton
Jewish Center meets for
bagels and conversation
and to see a film, noon.
$15. 18 Delaware St.
(973) 772-3131.

Journalist/filmmaker in
Leonia: Bob Schapiro,
a journalist and
Emmy Award-winning
filmmaker, will discuss
From Beirut to Beijing:
A Jewish Journalists
Story about his work in
the Middle East, Central
America, and Ethiopia,
11 a.m. 254 Broad Ave.
(201) 592-1712 or www.
adasemuno.org.
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 47

Calendar
Salon Tiferet hosts pair

Fine art/ceramics show and sale

Salon Tiferet is hosting a dialogue with Professor Suzanne Last


Stone, professor of Jewish law and contemporary civilization at
Cardozo Law School, and Rabbi Nathaniel Helfgot of Netivat Shalom in Teaneck, and SAR High School.
The discussion on political theories in the Book of Samuel
will be at 8 p.m., Sunday, November 16, at 370 Hillcrest Road in
Englewood. Salon Tiferet brings leading scholars and intellectually curious adults with diverse Jewish educational backgrounds
together for an intensive, interdisciplinary experience of Jewish
text. For information, visit www.minyantiferet.com/salon-tiferet.

Professor Suzanne
Last Stone

Heart-to-heart with cardiologists


Dr. Robert Altman, cardidisease, and understanding and
ologist and cardiac elecpreventing sudden cardiac deaths
trophysiologist at Mount
and the role of cardiac defibrillators. The lecture also will explore
Sinai St. Lukes and Mount
what arrhythmia means, new
Sinai Roosevelt hospitals,
treatment strategies, and how to
speaks at the Kaplen JCC
make sense of the multitude of
on the Palisades in Tenafly
new medications that are adveron Wednesday, November
tised to consumers.
19, at 1 p.m.
Dr. Danik is the director of the
The presentation,
Dr. Robert Altman
electrophysiology laboratory at
Heart to Heart, includes
Mount Sinai St. Lukes and Mount
information on cuttingSinai Roosevelt, and Dr. Cohen is a prevenedge research on the physiology of the
tive cardiologist at Mt. Sinai St. Lukes and
heart, focusing on its function as an electrical organ.
Mt. Sinai Roosevelt hospitals in Manhattan.
Two other physicians will join Dr. AltCall Judy Lattif at (201) 408-1457 or email
man Dr. Randy Cohen and Dr. Stephan
her at jlattif@jccotp.org, or call Michele
Danik. Topics include the hearts electrical
Schaffer (201) 408-1496.
system, the prevention of cardiovascular

Torah study in Glen Rock


Rabbi Neil Tow offers a Torah study
course at the Glen Rock Jewish Center on
Thursdays at 8 p.m. The interactive study
includes reading the Torah a few sentences

at a time in English. The shul is at 682 Harristown Road in Glen Rock. Call (201) 6526624 or email at rabbi@grjc.org.

Photo by Akira Kinoshita

PROGRAM OF

Vivaldi,
Beethoven
and more

ITZHAK
In Recital with Pianist Rohan De Silva
PERLMAN
Presented by IMG Artists
48 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

4:30 p.m., with artists remarks at 2:30.


The afternoon also will feature a demonstration in the YJCC ceramics studio
and light refreshments. The show and
sale will continue on Monday through
Wednesday, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The YJCC is at 605 Pascack Road. For
information, call (201) 666-6610.

Israeli scholar will discuss


courts and female conversion
Dr. Michal Tikochinsky, the director of the Womens Beit
Midrash at Beit Morasha in Jerusalem, will discuss Rabbinical Courts and Female Conversion Candidates on Sunday,
November 16, at 8 p.m., at Congregation Rinat Yisrael in
Teaneck. The lecture will be in conversational Hebrew.
Dr. Tikochinsky, a leading Talmud scholar, holds a law
degree and a Ph.D. in Talmud from Bar Ilan University. For
information, call (201) 837-2795.

Dr. Michal
Tikochinsky

Addressing the confidence gap


America, World News,
Journalist and best-selling
and Nightline, covering
writer Claire Shipman will
politics and other national
discuss the Gender Confidence Gap on Monday,
and international stories.
November 17, at 7:30 p.m.,
Before she joined ABC News
as part of the Dr. Marcia
in 2001, she was a White
Robbins-Wilf scholar-in-resiHouse correspondent for
dence program at YUs Stern
NBC News, where she regularly reported on presidenCollege for Women.
tial policy and politics for
Ms. Shipman will talk
Claire Shipman
NBC Nightly News and
about her latest book, The
COURTESY YU
Today.
Confidence Code: The Art
The talk will be in the
and Science of Self-AssuranceWhat Women Should Know,
Moot Court Room of YUs Benjamin N.
which she co-wrote with Katty Kay of
Cardozo School of Law, 55 Fifth Ave. at
the BBC. The book investigates the roots
12th Street in Manhattan.
of the confidence gap between men and
Admission is free and the talk is open
women.
to the public; bring valid photo ID and
Ms. Shipman is a senior contributicket. Reserve tickets at Smarttix.com or
tor for ABC News Good Morning
by calling (212) 868-4444.

Lecture to look at ISIS and Iran

Schumann,

Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center


December 3, 2014 | 7:30 PM

The Bergen County YJCC in Washington


Township holds a fine art and ceramics
show and sale on Sunday, November 16,
through Wednesday, November 19. It will
highlight the work of adult students and
faculty from the YJCCs ceramics, watercolor, and acrylic painting classes.
The show begins with an opening
reception on November 16, from 1:30 to

TICKETS:
LincolnCenter.org
CENTERCHARGE:
212.721.6500

Professor Zaki Shalom,


Woodcliff Lake. It is sponsored by American Associa senior staff member of
ates of Ben-Gurion UniverBen-Gurion Universitys
sity of the Negev Greater New
Research Institute for the
York region in partnership
Study of Israel and Zionism and a member of the
with the synagogue.
research staff at the InstiIn 2007, Dr. Zaki was
tute for National Secuawarded the prime ministers
rity Studies, will discuss
prestigious David Ben-Gurion
Between ISIS and Iran:
memorial prize for his book,
Professor Zaki
Threats and OpportuFire in His Bones.
Shalom
nities Facing Israel in a
For reservations, call Dana
Newly Emerging World
Ben-Benyamin at (646) 452Order, on November 19 at 8 p.m. The
3702 or dbenyamin@aabgu.org. Temple
lecture will follow minyan at TemEmanuel is at 87 Overlook Drive. Go to
ple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley in
www.tepv.org.

Gallery
2

n 1 While learning about the parashat,


Teaneck Chabads preschool nursery class re-enacted the flood during
the times of Noah. COURTESY CHABAD

n 2 Guess Whos Coming to Shabbas,


a new program at the Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation Bnai Israel, puts
congregants together for Shabbat dinners in their own homes, with invited
guests acting as hosts later in the year.
n 3 Nearly 400 participated in the Friendship Circle of Passaic Countys recent
Friends Walk 4 Friends fundraiser. From
left, Assemblyman Scott Rumana of
the 40th District, Rabbis Michel Gurkov
and Mayer Gurkov of Chabad of Passaic
County, and Mayor Christopher Vergano
of Wayne. The walk took place at Wayne
Valley High School. COURTESY CHABAD
n 4 Wearing the color purple, participants at the Gallen Adult Day Health Care Center
raised Alzheimers awareness by participating in a petition-signing campaign to find a cure
for the syndrome. The petition will circulate all month and be sent to elected officials. Helen
Hartoch of Teaneck and Al Markim of Rockleigh add their signatures. COURTESY GALLEN

n 6 First and second graders at the Academies at the Gerrard Berman Day School
in Oakland studied chemical reactions. Lab partners Jessica Krakovsky and Matthew Simon correctly hypothesized that mixing baking soda with vinegar would
release bubbles and inflate the balloon at the top of the cylinder. COURTESY GBDS

n 5 In celebration of Parshat Noach, Yeshivat Noam in Paramus invited a petting zoo to the school. COURTESY YESHIVAT NOAM

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 49

Arts & Culture/Local


Shtetl
FROM PAGE 45

conscripting Jews in an attempt to further


stamp them with a Russian identity. In the
1830s, censorship was imposed on Jewish
printers and only two houses were allowed
to continue the trade. Jews were nimble
and inquisitive, though, so books were
passed on or bootleg copies smuggled in
great quantities. Indeed, smuggling in all
sectors of shtetl life seemed to increase in
direct proportion to Russian restrictions
and interdiction.
By the 1840s, the kahals, or community
Jewish councils, had ceased to function.
Jews whose shtetls had failed (by design)
were limited in resettlement rights to other
shtetls only, thus increasing a spiral of distress and despair. Education reforms
were promulgated to further erode and
blur ethnic and religious uniqueness. In 1861
serfs throughout the empire were freed by
Alexander II, sending a surge of Ukrainians
into the shtetls as competitors to the already
hard-pressed residents.
The uneasy triangulation of Russian,

Jewish, and Polish interests unleashed and


exposed the tensions of a giant entity falling woefully short of its parts. Dr. Petrovsky-Shtern quotes Moshe Rosman, a new
scholar of Polish Jewry, as saying the
Lords Jews, or the Polish magnates Jews,
were now being turned into Russian imperial Jews, and the results were dismaying
Today many of these shtetls are either
gone or given Russia, Polish, or Ukrainian
identities. Wars, both hot and cold, revolutions, and redrawing of boundaries have
further muddied the historical timelines.
However, the names of Belogodka, Brailov,
Kamenets-Podolsk, Slavuta, Talezhyntsi
and countless others remain intriguing
to ethnographers, historians, and family
researchers.
Add Anatevka to the roster if you like.
Petrovsy-Shtern wouldnt object. He is,
after all, in the business of increasing our
connection and concern about shtetldom
in a way that compliments rather than
contradicts Fiddler. The echoes of To
Life will always reverberate from these
fascinating locales.

C me join us for a community event at


Care One at Teaneck!
Halachic Organ Donation: Is It Permissible?

A Discussion on Organ
Donation in Jewish Law
Come learn and discuss the medical
and halachic issues surrounding
brain-stem death and hear about the
latest controversial Israeli legislation
on organ donation.

RSVP: Laurie Kleid


973-908-3420, lkleid@care-one.com

Tuesday December 2, 2014


7:00pm Registration
7:30pm Lecture

Care One at Teaneck


544 Teaneck Rd.
Teaneck, NJ 07666

SPEAKER

Robert Berman, founder and director of the Halachic


Organ Donor Society, received an MPA from Harvards
Kennedy School of Government, an MBA from Baruch
College and his BA from Yeshiva University.

www.hods.org

www.jstandard.com
50 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Pies
FROM PAGE 16

the ingredients and boxes, she said.


Sharsheret provides stickers and thankyou notes. The customers pick up their
own pies before the holiday.
Many of the bakers are friends,
although this year, after Sharsheret sent
out promotional materials for the project,
the sisters received phone calls from other
prospective volunteer bakers.
Ms. Wieder said that while none of
the bakers has official kosher certification, as far as she knows, only one
baker (new this year) does not have a
kosher kitchen.
Most people trust the kashrut of an
individuals home, she said, adding
that a few bat mitzvah girls in Bergenfield and Florida took on the baking
project to raise money for Sharsheret.
So far, the project has raised some
$140,000, between donations and
baked goods.
Were learning different things
every year, she said, crediting her sister as recipe creator.
The pies are yummy and delicious,
she said, reeling off flavors ranging from
pumpkin to pecan to chocolate chip

Its all fresh


no freezing.
One close friend
purchased a
stand-alone
oven, so now
weve got three
ovens, three
mixers, and
three bakers.
cookie dough. They also make breads,
such as pumpkin cranberry loaves.
Last year, the sisters made more than
400 pies and some 280 breads. They bake
to order, making a few extras for themselves and their families.
We start Sunday and finish Tuesday afternoon, Ms. Wieder said. Its all
fresh no freezing. One close friend purchased a stand-alone oven, so now weve
got three ovens, three mixers, and three
bakers.
Her sister, Adeena Sussman, said that
because she is the only woman in the family not afflicted with cancer, I felt extra
committed to helping find cures, or at
least supporting women in the community living with cancer.
It was a very personal drive, she
said. My sister is very dear to me. That
she could emerge cancer-free I was
very grateful.

She said that while her mother was


very low key, she led by example, both in
her profession and at home. We learned
to cook, entertain, host, and be gracious.
We tried to figure out something to do to
reflect her values and the way she lived
her life.
On a lark, she said, the two decided to
bake some pies and see what happens.
Sharon was volunteering for Sharsheret,
which helped with the back end of the
project, doing administrative stuff and
setting up web pages.
The first year, the project earned more
than $16,000.
Were letting [the project] grow at its
natural pace, Ms. Sussman said, noting
that while originally most of the bakers
were friends, this year, four or five sales
are spearheaded by people who didnt
know my mom or sister but who decided
to do it on their own, whether through a
personal connection to ovarian cancer or
to Sharsheret.
Its a purely voluntary endeavor.
None [of them] are working on it for
compensation.
Ms. Sussman, whose professional life
lies at the intersection of publishing and
cooking, food and writing, said she came
up with her pie recipes through trial and
error.
My mom would have liked the pecan
pie, she said, calling her mother a wonderful baker.
Still, she said, working together with
her sister is the most rewarding part of
the project.
Its a great way to do something meaningful, fun, and spend time together. It
feels very natural. We were fortunate to
be raised in a home where community
service and good works were modeled.
Elana Silber, Sharsherets director
of operations, said the organization is
extremely grateful to the sisters for their
efforts.
Pies for Prevention is an incredibly
successful campaign that helps to raise
awareness about ovarian cancer in the
Jewish community and Sharsherets ovarian cancer program, she said.
With Sharsherets technology, we are
able to offer easy online pie-ordering in 18
locations nationally and internationally,
and engage thousands through Sharsherets social media platforms, including Facebook and Twitter. Inevitably,
each year we receive calls from women
reaching out to Sharsheret for support,
who explain that they learned about
Sharsheret because they participated in
Pies for Prevention.
Pies for Prevention is not just another
bake sale. Its so much more.
For more information, email srwieder@
optonline.net or adeenasussman@gmail.
com. Recipes, helpful tips, and other
resources are available. Proceeds from
the bake sale support the Stephanie Sussman and Ann Nadrich Memorial Fund
and Sharsherets ovarian cancer program.

Obituaries
Leon Brecher

Shura Milman

Leon L. Brecher, 76, of Andover,


formerly of Fair Lawn and the
Bronx, died on November 7.
A sister, Bernice Herskovits of
Pompton Plains, formerly of Fair
Lawn, nieces and nephews,
and great-nieces and nephews
survive him.
Arrangements were by Robert
Schoems Menorah Chapel,
Paramus.

Shura Milman of Lawrence


Township died on November 9.
Born in Ukraine, he was an
antiques dealer.
He is survived by his siblings, Dr.
Simon Milman and Sofia Milman.
Arrangements were by Gutterman
and Musicant Jewish Funeral
Directors, Hackensack.

Britta Spigler

Sylvia Dauber

Sylvia Dauber, 93, of Jersey City


died on October 21. Predeceased by
her husband Harold in 2006, she is
survived by her children, Sheila and
Allan, a sister, Lillian, and a niece,
Elyse.
Arrangements were by Jewish
Memorial Chapel, Clifton.

Rosa Gutgold

Rosa Gutgold of Paramus died on


November 6.
She was a Holocaust survivor.
Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.

Rose Lenson

Rose Lenson of Cliffside Park,


Boynton Beach, Fla., Teaneck,
and West New York, died on
November 10.
Predeceased by a sister, Ray
Weinstock, she is survived by her
husband of over 72 years, Harry,
daughters, Barbara Haber and Sandy
Stein; three grandchildren, and two
great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Gutterman
and Musicant Jewish Funeral
Directors, Hackensack.

Britta Spigler of Fair Lawn died on


November 1.
She is survived by her husband,
Sam, children, Anita ( Javad), and
Ben (Robyn), and a grandson.
Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.

Gloria Steinberg

Gloria Steinberg, ne Larack, 92, of


Teaneck died on November 8.
She was a member of
Congregation Beth Sholom and its
memorial association in Teaneck.
Predeceased by her husband
David 30 years ago, she is survived
by daughters Martha Steinberg
of West Creek and Rachel
Kashi of Englewood, and four
grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden
Memorial Chapels, Fort Lee.

Arrangements were by Gutterman


and Musicant Jewish Funeral
Directors, Hackensack.

Dr. Lawrence Zigelman

Dr. Lawrence David Zigelman of Fort


Lee died on November 7.
A pediatrician in Closter, he
received his medical degree from
Weill Cornell Medical College of
Cornell University and had been in
practice for 41 years.
He is survived by his wife, Sherry,
ne Hauser, his parents, Rabbi
Abraham and Beatrice Zigelman, his
children, Mark and Michelle, and
sisters, Reena Zigelman Leitner and
Aviva Zigelman.
Shiva will be observed this
afternoon until 2 p.m., and on
Saturday, after Shabbat.
Contributions can be sent to the
Young Israel of Fort Lee, 1610 Parker
Ave., Fort Lee or Emunah Women
of America, 7 Penn Plaza, Suite 205,
New York, attention Clifford Wasser.
Arrangements were by Gutterman
and Musicant Jewish Funeral
Directors, Hackensack.

Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Inc


Jewish Funeral Directors

Family Owned & managed


Generations of Lasting Service to the Jewish Community
Serving NJ, NY, FL &
Throughout USA
Prepaid & Preneed Planning
Graveside Services

Our Facilities Will Accommodate


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Handicap Accessibility From Large
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Graveside services at all NJ & NY cemeteries
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Always within a familys financial means

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Richard Louis - Manager
George Louis - Founder
NJ Lic. No. 3088
1924-1996

We continue to be
Jewish family managed,
knowing that caring people
provide caring service.

Suzanne Tillman

Suzanne Tillman, ne Krinsky, of


Englewood Cliffs died on November 7.
Born in Kentucky, she was
a homemaker and a long-time
member of Congregation Ahavath
Torah of Englewood.
Predeceased by her husband
Robert in 1991, she is survived by
a son, Steven of Edgewater, and a
sister, Lois Marcus.

Obituaries are prepared with


information provided by
funeral homes. Correcting
errors is the responsibility of
the funeral home.

ALAN L. MUSICANT

MARTIN D. KASDAN

GUTTERMAN AND MUSICANT


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Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
at Our Funeral Home or in Your Own Home
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Barry Wien - NJ Lic. No. 2885


Frank Patti, Jr. - NJ Lic. No. 4169
Arthur Musicant - NJ Lic. No. 2544
Frank Patti, Sr. Director - NJ Lic. No. 2693
327 Main St, Fort Lee, NJ

201-947-3336 888-700-EDEN

www.jstandard.com

www.edenmemorial.com

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 51

Classified
Announcement

Cemetery Plots For Sale

RESERVE THE DATE


Monday,
December 8 , 2014
7 P.M. - 10 P.M.
for

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND


ANNUAL RECEPTION
to be held at
Congregation Beth Sholom
Teaneck, New Jersey
for more infomation:
jinglis@jnf.org

Houses For Sale

Four Plots Beth Israel Cemetery,


Ridgewood, N.J. Perpetual care!
$4,500. Negotiable! Call 954-7424650
Riverside Cemetery, Saddle
Brook, NJ. Excellent location. Plot
21, Graves 7,8,9. $1,000.00 per
grave. Negotiable! Will sell separately. Call 845-667-0248 or email
djresquire@aol.com

Help Wanted
housekeeper for working woman in Bergen County with no pets
or children. Sleep-in 6 nights. English speaking. 201-491-4131

learning SPECIALIST

TEANECK - Open House


Sunday, Nov 16th, 12 - 2 PM
630 Wyndam Road
Beautiful renovated Colonial.
Prime location, 3 plus BDRM,
2.5 Bth. Media room, balcony
Keller Williams Town Life
Crystal Burns 201-925-1228
teaneck- Starter home. Near
Houses of Worship & Cedar Lane.
Hardwood floors, fireplace. Needs
work,
but
move-in-condition.
$300s. Call 201-692-0887

The Frisch School, a modern


Orthodox high school in Paramus, NJ is seeking a Learning
Disabilites or Reading Specialist
for the Learning Center.
An optional position is also
available to teach 9th and 11th
grade English to students with
learning differences.
Masters Degree required.
Three years minimum experience preferred.
Excellent working environment,
benefits and salary.
Resume to:

elaine.keigher@frisch.org

Situations Wanted
.

Well Organized, Reliable Person Seeking Employment:

Knowledge of Journal Entries. Cue Books, Excel, Accounts Payable


and Receivables.
Strong background as a Mortgage Broker overseeig cases from
pre-approval to closing.
Ensuring that all loan documentation is complete, schedule property
appraisals.
Finalizing title searches and insurance with borrowers & sellers.
Worked with banks, prime and subprime.
Helped clients with obtaining credit approval.
References upon request.
Email: Alexandrakuv77@yahoo.com

(201) 837-8818

Help Wanted
TEACHERS MATH & HISTORY
needed for Jr. High Boys
School in Northern, NJ,
Monday - Thursday afternoons.
Experienced Only!
Education degree preferred
Email resume:

bhykop@gmail.com
or fax 973-778-5697

Tutoring
WANT TO LEARN SPANISH?

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Private tutoring available also

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Situations Wanted
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52 Jewish Standard NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Antiques Wanted

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Jewish standard nOVeMBer 14, 2014 53

WE MAKE IT OUR BUSINESS


TO HELP YOUR BUSINESS.

Here are some of the advertisers who use our publications to target their best customers:
The Jewish Standard is a valued resource of news and health information for our patients
and our community, and we are proud to showcase Englewood Hospital and Medical Centers
quality healthcare services in this award-winning publication.
WARREN GELLER, PRESIDENT AND CEO, ENGLEWOOD HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTER

"We always include The Jewish Standard as part of our Marketing


Plan and are happy to be one of their long-time partners."
BENZEL-BUSCH MOTOR CAR CORP.

We get the best response from our ads in the Jewish Standard.
SUE YUDIN, YUDINS APPLIANCES

For a number of years now, Northern Valley ENT has been proud to advertise in the
Jewish Standard. It is a something for everyone paper. That is only one of the reasons why
we have always gotten favorable responses from our ads.
DR. SCHERL, DR. LEE AND THE STAFF

C
P A

WE REACH MORE READERS AND HOUSEHOLDS THAN


ANY OTHER JEWISH PUBLICATION IN NORTH JERSEY.
CALL OUR ADVERTISING DIRECTOR NATALIE JAY AT 201-837-8818
54 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

Home Design
11 ways to create a welcoming
front entrance for under $100
CARA GREENBERG

ouldnt it be nice to
approach your homes
entrance with a grin
instead of a grimace?
Take these tips for beating a clear, safe,
and stylish path to your front door.
First impressions count not just for
your friends, relatives, and the UPS guy,
but for yourself. Whether its on an urban
stoop or a Victorian front porch, your front
door and the area leading up to it should
extend a warm welcome to all comers
and neednt cost a bundle.
Heres what you can do to make welcoming happen on the cheap.
1. Clear the way for curb appeal. The
path to your front door should be at least
3 feet wide so people can walk shoulderto-shoulder, with an unobstructed view
and no stumbling hazards. So get out
those shears and cut back any overhanging branches or encroaching shrubs.
2. Light the route. Landscape lighting
makes it easy to get around at night. Solarpowered LED lights you can just stick in
the ground, requiring no wiring, are surprisingly inexpensive. We found packs of
eight for under $60 online.
3. Go glossy. Borrow inspiration from
Londons lovely row houses, whose owners
assert their individuality by painting their
doors in high-gloss colors. The reflective
sheen of a royal blue, deep green, crimson,
or whatever color you like will ensure your
house stands out from the pack.
4. Pretty up the view. A door with lots of
glass is a plus for letting light into the front

hall but if you also want privacy and a


bit of decor, check out decorative window
film. Its removable and re-positionable, and
comes in innumerable styles and motifs.
Pricing depends on size and design; many
available for under $30.
A way to get the look of stained glass without doing custom work or buying a whole
new door: Mount a decorative panel on the
inside of the door behind an existing glass
insert, $92 for an arts and crafts-style panel
20 inches high by 11 inches wide.
5. Replace door hardware. While youre
at it, polish up the handle on the big front
door. Or better yet, replace it with a shiny
new brass lockset with a secure deadbolt.
Available for about $60.
6. Please knock. Doorbells may be the
norm, but a hefty knocker is a classic
that will never run out of battery life, and
another opportunity to express yourself
(whatever your favorite animal or insect is,
theres a door-knocker in its image).
7. Ever-greenery. Boxwoods are always
tidy-looking, the definition of easy upkeep.
A pair on either side of the door is traditional, but a singleton is good, too. About
$25 at garden centers. In cold climates,
make sure pots are frost-proof (polyethylene urns and boxes mimic terracotta and
wood to perfection).
8. Numbers game. Is your house number
clearly visible? Thats of prime importance
if you want your guests to arrive and your
pizza to be hot. Stick-on vinyl numbers in
a variety of fonts make it easy, starting at
about $4 per digit.
9. Foot traffic. A hardworking mat for
wiping muddy feet is a must. A thick coir

mat can be had at the hardware store for


less than $20. Even fancier varieties can be
found well under $50.
10. Go for the glow. Fumbling for keys
in the dark isnt fun. Consider doubling up
on porch lights with a pair of lanterns, one
on each side of the door, for symmetry and
twice the illumination. Many mounted lights
are available well under $100.
11. Snail mail. Mailboxes run the gamut
from kitschy roadside novelties masquerading as dogs, fish, or what-have-you to

sober black lockboxes mounted alongside the front door. Whichever way you
go, make sure yours is standing or hanging straight, with a secure closure, and
no dings or dents. The mail carrier will
thank you.
Ruby Kaplan, licensed Realtor in New Jersey
& New York, has submitted this article for the
purpose of providing maximum opportunity
for sellers/buyers to achieve their goals. www.
rubykaplan.com.

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Real Estate & Business


Try Tuesdays at Wayne YMCA
for free November activities
Ever wonder whether a membership at
the YMCA is right for you? Then Tuesday
is your lucky day. Every Tuesday during
November, the Wayne YMCA invites you
to try the facility for free.
Take any of the regularly scheduled
classes, such as Group Power, Zumba,
Pilates, and Yoga, among many more.
Work out in the state-of-the-art fitness
center or enjoy a family swim.
Have fun and get fit. A Y membership is
a great value, offering free group exercise
classes, free fitness assessment, access to

most YMCAs in New Jersey, no monthly


contracts, state-of-art fitness equipment,
and free babysitting while parents work
out.
The Y is located at 1 Pike Drive, Wayne.
Call (973) 595-0100. Identification is
required and a parent must accompany
a child under 18. Space in classes may
be limited. Visit www.wayneymca.org to
see exercise class schedules. The Metro
YMCAs of the Oranges is a partner of the
YM-YWHA of North Jersey.

NVE Bank bolsters drive


for Englewood Hospital
More than $4,000 raised in Walk for Awareness
NVE Bank raised more than $4,000 to
assist Englewood Hospital and Medical
Centers fight against breast cancer. The
Englewood based community mutual
bank served as a sponsor for the hospitals 16th Annual Walk for Awareness
on October 26.
NVE organized a team of over 65
employees, friends, and family to walk
the 5K route and raised funds through
sponsorships, pink ribbon sales at its
branches and an employee Jeans Day
initiative. NVE also sponsored two
stations for the walkers, handing out
water and granola bars.
NVE is proud to once again partner
with Englewood Hospital to raise funds

56 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

for the Leslie Simon Breast Care and


Cytodiagnosis Center at Englewood
Hospital and Medical Center, said
Robert Rey, president and CEO. I am
so proud of our staff and customers for
their generosity on behalf of this worthy
cause.
NVE Bank, established in 1887, offers
an extensive range of personal and
business products and services. As a
community mutual bank, NVE Bank is
FDIC insured, doesnt have stockholders,
and operates to benefit its customers
and communities. The bank maintains
12 offices throughout Bergen County. For
more information, call (866) 683-2265 or
visit at www.nvebank.com.

Real Estate & Business

TEANECK OPEN HOUSE


Sunday, November 16th, 1-4PM

Close to NYC Transport & Houses of Worship

Davis, Saperstein & Salomon to host bar association breakfast


The Teaneck Bar Association will hold its semi-annual
networking breakfast on Thursday, November 20, at
7:30 a.m. in the Community Room at Davis, Saperstein
& Salomon, P.C., 375 Cedar Lane, Teaneck. Attorneys are
encouraged to bring their marketing materials.
The Teaneck Bar Association is open to all lawyers
admitted in any jurisdiction that either live or work in
Teaneck. Membership is free, and all active, retired or
nonpracticing Teaneck attorneys are welcome. Datel
Solutions will sponsor the Teaneck Bar Association
meeting. Breakfast will be catered by Poppeys. A short

demonstration will be given on increasing personal productivity using Dragon Dictate Software.
The Teaneck Bar Association is an informal group of lawyers that either live or work in Teaneck. Those interested in
attending the next TBA meeting are asked to call Jennifer Shaw
at Davis, Saperstein & Salomon at (201) 907-5000 or email
jennifer.shaw@dsslaw.com

335 Griggs Avenue Asking $529,900


Just Listed! 4BR, 3.5 BTH Colonial
on Oversized Property; Many Updates;
Over 2200 sq ft; Large Fenced Yard!

BARBARA OSTROTH
Your Teaneck Realtor
NJAR Distinguished Sales Associate
(201)965-3105 cell
(201)262-6600 X144
www.barbaraostroth.com
Mortgage pre-approval
1-888-538-5732

ANNIE GETS IT SOLD


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Ann Murad, ABR, GRI, SRES

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 16TH


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Silver Level, 1997-2000, 2002, 2009, 2011, 2012
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E-mail:

1288 W Laurelton, Pkwy, Tnk


56 Harriet Ave, Bglfd
51 Wilbur Rd, Bgfld
83 Cameron Rd, Bgfld

anniegetsitsold@msn.com

313 Broadway, Westwood, NJ


Each Office Independenty Owned and Operated

537 Kinderkamack Rd
Oradell, NJ 07649

A DIVISION OF V AND N GROUP LLC

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2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is aregistered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real
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SUNDAY OPEN HOUSES

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ALPINE

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Gorgeous Mediterranean colonial offers open floor plan, 9 ceilings, dining room
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trees, gourmet kitchen w/wine cooler, master suite w/fireplace
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1BR 1.5 Baths. Renovated kitchen and
baths. Full river view. $209,900
2BR 2.5 Baths. Low floor. Largest 2 BR.
2 terraces. River and sunset view. $225,000
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2BR 2 Baths. Gut renovation. Redesigned
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Sponsor Units Available for Rent


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201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Office
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75 Westside Ave.

$369,900

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1466 Jefferson St.

Larry DeNike
President

MLO #58058
ladclassic@aol.com

Daniel M. Shlufman
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dshlufman@classicllc.com

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Serving NY, NJ & CT

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201-368-3140

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Contemp W Eglwd Col. 6 BRs (incl 1st Fl Master Suite), 4.5


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FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY

(201) 837-8800

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 57

SELLING YOUR HOME?

Real Estate & Business


bergenPAC collecting toys
for fire department drive

Call Susan Laskin Today


To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com

Cell: 201-615-5353

bergenPAC is collecting toys for the Englewood Fire Deparments annual toy drive
until December 15.
When we started the drive 10 years ago,
we served only a few families. Now its a
city-wide effort that helps over 250 families, said Lieutenant Ray Rodriguez of the
Englewood Fire Department. Its a really
special feeling to put a smile on a childs
face.
As a leader in community support,
bergenPAC is proud to participate in this
annual event. bergenPAC provides arts programming to 30,000 schoolchildren annually to underserved students that have lost
their school arts funding.
Giving joy to our local children is an
important part of what we do at bergenPAC, said Dominic Roncace, bergenPAC

CEO. Whether its through the toy drive,


our Performing Arts School scholarship
program, or for providing school arts programming, it is our priority to continue outreach to the local community.
Toys will be distributed on December 18
at a local public school.
Toys may be placed in the specially
marked Firefighters Toy Drive boxes
in the bergenPAC lobby during box office
hours, Monday through Friday from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. and Saturday noon to 4 p.m. The
box office is open two hours prior to performances and during all shows. Visit www.
bergenpac.org/events for event listings.
For more information, please contact
(201) 816-8160 x38.
BergenPAC is located at 30 N. Van Brunt
Street in Englewood.

Analogy

mistake on his part, or something that


lent itself to different meanings, and something that offended me and would not have
offended another person.
It is not surprising that he resented having his sordid tactics used against him, and
his only response rather than concede
the use of the dastardly ploy was to cry
Holocaust.
So allow me to state unequivocally that
Gary Rosenblatt is not a Nazi, and the Jewish Week is not Der Sturmer. The Jewish
Week is adept at a modern form of yellow
journalism, in which the use of commonality as comparison is rampant, in which
lies are wantonly published and in which
targets especially Orthodox Rabbis,
Orthodox Jews and the Holy Torah are
routinely assailed. Sadly, such drivel has its
audience.
According to Rabbi Matanky, as quoted
in the Jewish Week, if a non-Jew had made
such statements, we would be up in arms.
It simply cannot be condoned, especially
coming from a rabbi.
The president of the RCA has made his
position clear, and it stands, Rabbi Goldin
added.
The head of the Anti-Defamation League,
Abraham Foxman, expressed his point of
view succinctly in a letter to the Jewish
Week.
Whatever disagreements Rabbi Steven
Pruzansky may have with The Jewish Week
or its editor, Gary Rosenblatt, his comparison of this newspaper with the vile, antiSemitic Nazi rag Der Sturmer was simply
unacceptable, he wrote.

2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.

FROM PAGE 17

On November 11, Rabbi Pruzansky wrote


another post. This one he called The Last
Word: Gary Rosenblatt Still Lies.
There, he addresses the issue of whether
he called the publisher of the Jewish Week
Mr. Rosenblatt a Nazi by comparing
him to Julius Streicher.
He did not, Rabbi Pruzansky wrote in
his blog. All I did was respond in kind to a
sleazy journalistic trick that they attempted
to use on me. The trick? Conflating comparison with commonality. It goes like
this: the statement, Gary Rosenblatt has
two eyes and two feet, just like Genghis
Khan is a true statement. It is not a comparison of those two individuals, but an
assertion of what they have in common. It
is no indication at all that the two men are
essentially alike values, personality, temperament, world-view, etc. but the linkage of the two is designed to arouse in the
mind of the reader an unfavorable image.
Mr. Rosenblatt did that to him when
he linked him to Rabbi Freundel, Rabbi
Pruzansky charged, so he merely turned
returned the favor.
It is true that whenever the Holocaust is
referred to at all, any subtlety is completely
lost in the process, he wrote. It is indeed
unpleasant to find ones name gratuitously
linked in the same sentence with a Nazi, as
it is unpleasant to find ones name gratuitously linked in the same sentence with an
accused voyeur. That was my point! Yet, the
publisher acts as if it was some innocent

Like us on Facebook
58 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014

facebook.com/jewishstandard

Remarkable Service. Exceptional Results.


NJ:
NY:

Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
CLOSTER

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T:

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201.906.6024
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Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ

M:

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Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.

JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 14, 2014 59

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


Tel: 201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
Store HourS

MEAt DEpARtMENt

Whole
turkey

Lb

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Super
Family
Pack

gROcERY

12 oz.

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DAIRY

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99

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orange Juice

$ 99

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organic

Homemade Soups

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$ 99

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$ 99

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Lb

Lb

Apple & Eve


Appple
Juice
8 pack

Salt & Pepper Kugel


Cauliflower Kugel

$ 99

100 % Apple Juice only

Whole or Jellied

FROZEN

Les Petites
Shredded Cheese

2/$

2/$

Assorted

Lb

14 oz.

10

8 oz.

Kugels & Souffles

99

ready to Cook

$ 99

Kedem
tea
Biscuits

real Foods
Rice & Corn
thins

ready to Cook

Jerusalem Style Dark Meat

original only

Save on!

26 oz

2/$

2/$

Breakstones
Cottage Cheese
Doubles

Inside
Skirt Steak

Lb

16 oz.

Savory Dips

American Black Angus Beef

Qt.

Gourmet Salad

red Peppers

Breaded Chicken
Chicken Cutlets
Cutlets

Chicken
Bones

99

12 oz..

Gefen
Marinara
Sauce

Assorted

Fresh

2/$

Classic only

16.9 oz.

Lb

Lb

2/$
6 oz

Hunts
Snack
Pack

Keedler
Graham
Pie Crust

$ 99

Assorted

2/$

9 Inch ready

Filippo
Berio
olive oil

12 oz

5 LB.

extra Virgin only

$ 99

2/$

$ 99

Sun Maid
raisins

$ 99

$ 99

Heinz
red Wine
Vinegar

Pillsbury
Flour

Assorted

Box only

organic

Silver
tip roast

Save on!

All Purpose only

Shibolim
Whole Wheat
Knockers

Lb

2/$

Pickled

$ 99

Cookie
Crisp
Cereal
11.25 oz

Lb

$ 29

Golden
Blossom
Honey

Beef Deckle
Corned Beef

General Mills

$ 59

DELI SAVINGS

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com

oranges

American Black Angus Beef

$ 49

Ground
Chuck

Lb

Save on!

1 lb. bags

Combo Pack

$ 99

$ 99

MARKET

4/$

Chicken
Chicken
Cutlets Drums &Thighs

$ 99

8-16 oz.

Peeled Baby
Carrots

3 lb. bags

thin Cut

Family
Pack

Frozen 16-20 LB.

2/$

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com

MARKET

TERMS & CONDITIONS: This card is the property of Cedar Market, Inc. and is intended for exclusive
use of the recipient and their household members. Card is not transferable. We reserve the right to
change or rescind the terms and conditions of the Cedar Market loyalty program at any time, and
without notice. By using this card, the cardholder signifies his/her agreement to the terms &
conditions for use. Not to be combined with any other Discount/Store Coupon/Offer. *Loyalty Card
must be presented at time of purchase along
with ID for verification. Purchase cannot be
reversed once sale is completed.

cedar Markets Meat Dept. prides Itself On Quality, Freshness And Affordability. We carry the Finest cuts Of Meat And
the Freshest poultry... Our Dedicated Butchers Will custom cut Anything For You... Just Ask!

thANksgIvINg spEcIAl

for

2/$

5/$

Loyalty
Program

10/$

Fuji
Apples

5 lb. bags

english
Cucumbers

5/$

Fresh
Lemons

4/$

Hot House

Snow White
Mushrooms

ronzoni
Lasagna

Loyalty
Program

Idaho
Potatoes

5/$

Cello

Curly #80 & Oven


ready #81

BeFore SuNDoWN

ORGANIC ORGANIC ORGANIC

Juicy
Pomegranates

2/$

CEDAR MARKET

ORGANIC ORGANIC ORGANIC

Golden
Sweet
Pineapples

Boneless
Flanken

Fine Foods
Great Savings

CEDAR MARKET

pRODUcE

American Black Angus Beef

Sign up For Your


Loyalty
Card
In Store

SuN - tue: 7AM - 9PM


WeD: 7AM - 10PM
tHurS: 7AM - 11PM
FrI: 7AM - 2 HourS

Sale effective
11/16/14 -11/21/14

42 pk/ 24 oz

7 Inch

Mazors Pizza
Dough

2/$
12 oz

Save on!

Barneys Party
Assortment

2/$
8 oz

Check out our New Line of Cooked Fish

$ 49

egg
Salad

BAkERY

ea

6
$ 49
6
$ 99
5
$ 99

Black & White


Seven Layer
Cake

20 oz

Marble
Chinese
Cookies

15 oz.

Blueberry
Pie

16 oz

pROvIsIONs

oven or Smoked only

empire
turkey Slices

$ 79

8 oz

Hod Lavan
turkey Bacon

$ 99

We reserve the right to limit sales to 1 per family. Prices effective this store only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Some pictures are for design purposes only and do not necessarily represent items on sale. While Supply Lasts. No rain checks.

8 oz

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