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DRAG ME UNDER ROCKS FORT RYLAND

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RELATIONSHIPS IN COLLEGE

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TIME TO PLAY THE GAME

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NEVADA SAGEBRUSH
SERVING THE UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO SINCE 1893

THE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

FIRST COPY FREE, ADDITIONAL COPIES 50 CENTS EACH

VOLUME 121, NUMBER 12

POLICE

Shooting still under investigation


Staff Report

Photo provided by Tim Robb

Officers from the Reno Police Department stand next to Robert William Hampton IIIs car
after the shooting on Wednesday, Nov. 5. As mandated by law, this case is being investigated
by an agency outside of the task force.

The Reno Police Department


has launched an investigation into
the fatal shooting of 33-year-old
Robert William Hampton by an
unidentified officer on the corner
of College Street and Terrace Drive
near the Wolf Den on Wednesday,
Nov. 5.
The shooting was the result of
a traffic stop being conducted
by the All Threats All Crime task
force, which is composed of officers from the Washoe County
Sheriffs Office, Sparks Police
Department, the Department of
Public Safety - Parole & Probation
and the United States Marshals
Services. Reno Police is conducting further investigation as to why
the task force was conducting
traffic stops in the area.
Hampton fled in his vehicle
after the officer called for backup
and tried to detain him for three
felony warrants. He struck the
officers hand and leg with the
vehicle. The officer shot and killed
the fleeing suspect, causing the
vehicle to strike another before
stopping. The officers involved
in the shooting have been placed
on administrative leave for the
investigations duration.
The news desk can be reached at
cboline@sagebrush.unr.edu and
on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

Photo provided by Tim Robb

Nevada Living Learning Community residents observe the police investigation taking place
on the corner of College Street and Terrace Drive on Wednesday, Nov. 5. Virginia Street
between 11th and 15th Streets was closed for an hour and a half after the shooting.

Air Force veteran returns to Reno a new man


By Maddison Cervantes

The day before Harrison Hayes


freshman orientation at the
University of Nevada, Reno in
2008, he turned to his girlfriend
and made a decision that would
change every fiber of his 18-yearold being.
Hayes was in need of an alteration, perhaps one that held more
importance in his life than a
degree in business.
Born and raised in Kaiserslautern, Germany, Hayes was
a military brat with his father
in the Air Force. Still very much
Americanized, Hayes attended a
Department of Defense School
with his fellow United States
military children and both his
mother and father are from
California. When Hayes was 16
years old, his family left Germany
and moved to Reno, where he attended Galena High School.
Instead of going to college at
the local university, as Hayes had
originally planned, he opted to
follow in his fathers footsteps
and enlist in the Air Force.
Its kind of a cliche, I suppose,
but I decided that I wanted to
serve my country, Hayes said. I
felt like I had been given so many
opportunities and I wanted to be
able to do my part as well.
Because of his military family,
Hayes had an idea of what he was
getting himself into when joining
the Air Force. However, once he
left for boot camp, Hayes was
surprised by the camps disciplined and structured environment. Still, he held no regrets in
his decision, and enjoyed every
moment of it.
He explained that there is a
common theme, or bond, in the
military that Hayes believes is
impossible to comprehend if one
has not taken part in it.
After approximately one year
of training in the United States,
Hayes was assigned to the 961st
Airborne Air Control Squadron in

Okinawa, Japan, where he spent


three years as a communication
technician. Hayes experience
was centered on the flying aspect
of the military.
While it was fun while it
lasted, I cant really see myself going back in that capacity, Hayes
said.
His time in the Air Force felt
less like a job to him, and more
like a lifestyle. His fellow service
members became his family.
What he went through with them
created this specific bond, in
which he could not simply relate
to other people once he came
home.
Its not the easiest thing to
transition from the military
back to a life that you once
lived, Hayes said. The military
becomes so deeply ingrained in
what you do and who you are, it
actually serves like an identity.
Hayes said that once he parted
with the military, he experienced
a loss of identity, and this was not
something he found easy to share
with his friends and family.
I think that I didnt want to
show [my struggles], and I didnt
show it, but it was actually really
hard, Hayes said. Getting my
feet back on the ground took
some work.
In December 2012, Hayes
returned to Reno after his fouryear term. He explained that one
of his biggest struggles when
getting out of the military was
the absence of a tight bond and
constant support system.
Aside from this, and the lack
of having a constantly immense
amount of responsibility, Hayes
stated that he managed to fit into
the flow of his daily life.
He is now 24 years old, and
is currently progressing in his
fourth semester at UNR, moving
toward his bachelors degree in
social work.
Sophomore Michael Daley, a
friend of Hayes, described him
as intuitive and down-to-earth;

Photo courtesy of Harrison Hayes

In a photo taken by photographer Tara Williams, Harrison Hayes (pictured left) practices aiding a wounded victim during an exercise at Kadena Air Force
base in Okinawa, Japan. Hayes spent four years in Okinawa, and has over 500 hours flying aircrafts.
someone very pleasant to be
around.
I first met [Hayes] in English
class, Daley said. He was very
kind and laid-back, but also
private.
Daley explained that when he
learned of Hayes history in the
Air Force, it became apparent to
him that Hayes privacy was a result of his experiences overseas,
but he was never informed of
anything specific.
When Hayes returned home,
he explained that he tried many
options to find his footing, such

as volunteering in the Reno community.


Hayes volunteers at Infinity
Hospice, visiting patients diagnosed with terminal diseases and
other illnesses.
Ill sit by their side and make a
friend, and Ill be with them until
whenever their time comes,
Hayes said.
Besides volunteering, Hayes
dove into his academics, surfing
on the west coast and spending
quality time with friends and
family.
Hayes believes that he joined

the Air Force as one person,


and returned home someone
completely different. Without the
military, Hayes said that his life
would not be in the positive place
that it is now.
I was not ready to navigate
myself to overcome the obstacles
that were going to come my way
and will still come my way in the
future, Hayes said.
Through the discipline and
experiences Hayes had while
serving, he gained the ability
to assess and push through the
tough times in his life.

Now that he is able to overcome these challenges, Hayes is


continuing down the steady road
of earning his degree. He hopes to
become a licensed social worker,
eventually moving forward as a
therapist.
Today, I dont face struggles,
Hayes said. Its been a learning
experience, but Ive got it down
now.
Maddison Cervantes can be
reached at mcervantes@sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter
@madcervantes.

The military becomes so deeply ingrained in what you do and who you
are, it actually serves like an identity.
- Harrison Hayes

A2 NEWS

Student voice of the University of


Nevada, Reno since 1893.

cboline@sagebrush.unr.edu

@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

BEST BUDDIES

SENATE RECAP
NOV. 5
BY ROCIO HERNANDEZ

PUBLIC COMMENT

thersko@sagebrush.unr.edu
rhernandez@sagebrush.unr.edu

John Sagebiel, assistant director


of the University of Nevada, Renos
Environmental Program, and Mike
Averett, Assistant Director of Building
Services, came to the senate meeting
on Wednesday, Nov. 5 to discuss initiatives to make the university a more
environmentally-friendly place.
They informed the Associated
Students of the University of Nevada
senators that there are two new Waste
Management solar compactors on
campus: one in between the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center and Joe
Crowley Student Union, the other
across the street from the Fitzgerald
Student Services Building. Averett said
that each compactor compresses the
trash within it, which allows it to hold
three to four times more trash than the
average trash can.
The compactor also comes with a
recycling compartment. Averett stated
that this makes the compactors some
of the few outdoor recycling bins on
campus. According to Averett, if his
department sees that the compactors
are being used frequently, it would
look into installing more in the future.

mcervantes@sagebrush.unr.edu
jmarbley@sagebrush.unr.edu
euribe@sagebrush.unr.edu
sharper@sagebrush.unr.edu
dcoffey@unr.edu
alexasolis@sagebrush.unr.edu
nkowalewski@sagebrush.unr.edu
bdenney@sagebrush.unr.edu
dylansmith@asun.unr.edu
jrussell@sagebrush.unr.edu
lbeas@sagebrush.unr.edu
marcuscasey@unr.edu
lnovio@asun.unr.edu
tbynum@sagebrush.unr.edu
adnevadasales@gmail.com

SENATOR FOR COLLEGE OF


EDUCATION RESIGNS

CONTRIBUTING STAFFERS:
Lauren Gray, Tara Park, Nicole
Skow, Alexa Simpson, Anastasia
Warren, Maggie Saunders, Blake
Miller

Photo courtesy of Trevor Bexon

Volunteers gathered at the Best Buddies Friendship Walk fundraiser on Saturday, Nov. 8. Best Buddies is a nonprofit organization
that matches volunteers and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to promote social inclusion.

UNR volunteers walk for friendship


CONTACT US:
Office: 775-784-4033
Fax: 775-327-5334
3rd Floor Joe Crowley Student
Union
Room 329, Mail Stop 058
Reno, NV 89557
The contents of this newspaper do
not necessarily reflect those
opinions of the university or its
students. It is published by the
students of the University of
Nevada, Reno and printed by the
Sierra Nevada Media Group.

ADVERTISING:
For information about display
advertising and rates, please call the
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:


Letters can be submitted via email to
cboline@sagebrush.unr.edu.

CORRECTIONS:
The Nevada Sagebrush
fixes mistakes.
If you find an error, email

By Jennifer Marbley
University of Nevada, Reno students and community volunteers
gathered at the first Northern
Nevada Best Buddies Friendship
Walk to take a step toward increasing social inclusion on Saturday,
Nov. 8. Jason Smith, state director
for Best Buddies Nevada chapter,
addressed a crowd of participants at
the Sparks Marina to celebrate the
walk as a symbol of unity for people
with intellectual and developmental
disabilities. He said that volunteers
were investing in the community
by donating to events such as the
Friendship Walk.
Best Buddies seeks to promote
opportunities for social interaction
for people with disabilities by promoting friendship, leadership and
employment. During the Friendship

Im happy I joined Best Buddies


because it made me realize that
one should be accepted.
- Leo Yang

cboline@sagebrush.unr.edu.

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to Smith, school can be particularly


difficult for those with developmental disabilities. He said that school
can be a segregating and isolating
experience and that many disabled
people arent equipped with the
social skills necessary to succeed
in getting jobs. Smith said that bullying is also prevalent for students
with disabilities and can crush selfconfidence.
Bullying is a big deal, but what
people dont know is that the bulk
of people who get bullied are people
with disabilities, Smith said.
The UNR Best Buddies Chapter
helped organize the event to raise
funds for the nonprofit organization.
Senior Melissa Osorio, president of
UNRs Best Buddies Chapter, worked
with Smith to start the club last year.
According to Osorio, research shows
that most individuals interact with

Walk, registered teams participated


in a 2-mile walk along the Sparks
marina to raise both funding and
awareness in the Reno community.
The organization raised $7,000 of
its $15,000 fundraising goal to help
develop new Best Buddies programs
in Reno.
All proceeds from T-shirt sales
went to fundraising for Best Buddies.
The event was additionally sponsored by The Ferraro Group, Atlantis
Casino Resort and Spa and the Reno
Aces Ballpark.
Best Buddies membership is available for individuals from middle
school through college. According

about 50 people a day, while individuals in the Best Buddies program


interact with about three. Her goal
is to create one-to-one friendships
with student volunteers and people
with developmental disabilities in
order to make more connections in
the community.
I think its important for [disabled
people] to be out in our community,
because there is that stigma against
them, Osorio said. Thats what
were trying to stop here. A lot of the
buddies only have contact with their
parents or doctors. Nobody wants to
be alone.
Osorio partnered with sophomore

Natasha Price, who has a developmental disability, last year. Because


of the program, Price gets to help out
in the community, meet new people
and participate in events such as the
Friendship Walk.
The Best Buddies UNR Chapter has
over 30 members, with 11 buddies
paired with student volunteers. They
have bimonthly meetings and host
social events such as attending Aces
baseball games, having potlucks and
hosting a pajama parties at the Best
Buddies office. Volunteers meet with
a buddy at least twice a month to do
a social activity and communicate a
minimum of once per week. Osorio
said that her experience with Best
Buddies has made her more compassionate towards others.
I think [Best Buddies] definitely
made me a better friend, Osorio
said. It makes me more considerate
of what other people are saying. You
look at the world in a different perspective. You value friendships more
and the little things.
Osorio encouraged other UNR
students to get involved in the Best
Buddies Friendship Walk, including
Senior Leo Yang, a member of the
Kappa Sigma fraternity on campus.
According to Yang, he encouraged his
entire fraternity to support the nonprofit after he had a rewarding experience volunteering with a buddy.
Yang became involved with Best
Buddies in spring 2014 after Osorio
recommended that he volunteer. He
was paired with a buddy who had
Down syndrome and they shared
an interest in movies. Yang said the
experience was fun because he did
something positive for him and his
buddy.
Im happy I joined Best Buddies
because it made me realize that
everyones different, but everyone
should be accepted, Yang said.
Jennifer Marbley can be reached at
jmarbley@sagebrush.unr.edu and on
Twitter @MissMarbley.

Speaker of the Senate Caden Fabbi


read former College of Education
Sen. Jade Macks letter of resignation.
In the letter, Mack expressed her
apologies to the senate and students
she represented. Mack wrote that she
felt the need to resign in order to give
full attention to her classes, as she is
entering her final semester of college
next spring.
Students interested in filling this
position can find the job posting on
unrsearch.com.

SENATORS SUPPORT
INCREASING COUNSELING
CENTER FEE
Sens. Anthony Ramirez of the College of Engineering and Catie McCrillis of the College of Science presented
a senate resolution in support of
the proposed counseling center fee
increase.
Counseling Services aims to increase
the counseling fee, which is paid by all
UNR students, from $35 to $50. The
International Association of Counseling Services recommends that the staff
to student ratio be 1:1,000-1,500. If approved, the money raised will be used
to lower the staff to student ratio from
1:2,143 to 1:1,500 by hiring additional
psychologists.
Sen. Ryan Hood of the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural
Resources, voted for the proposition.
While he is generally opposed to fee
increases, he said that he thinks that
the increase could benefit the student
population because the counseling
centers services can improve their
mental health and safety.
Sen. Thomas Green of the College
of Education said that he didnt agree
that all students should pay the centers fee if they dont use the services
and therefore, was against the raise.
The resolution passed in a 18-2 vote.
The Board of Regents will make the
final decision on the fee proposition
during its two-day meeting on Dec. 4-5.

Rocio Hernandez can be reached at


rhernandez@sagebrush.unr.edu and
on Twitter @rociohdz19.

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

By Jennifer Marbley
The Start Smart workshop held
in the William J. Raggio Building
on campus helped attendees
develop a personalized budget
and learn salary negotiation
techniques in a three-hour biannual workshop on Friday, Nov. 7.
Students discovered that women
are expected to make $1 million
less than an equally qualified
male over a lifetime, according
to research conducted by the
American Association of University Women. The workshop
was sponsored by the Women
are Getting Even Project and the
AAUW.
The Start Smart workshop gave
attendees financial worksheets
and online resources designed
to help them calculate budgets
based on expenses. During the
event, students learned how
to find the average salary for a
desired job and how to negotiate
a wage based on their qualifications.
The UNR workshop also
included a role-play practice session on salary negotiation techniques where one student played
an employer and another acted
as a potential hire. According to
the AAUW, Start Smart primarily
focuses on women, because they
tend to negotiate less, which
contributes to the wage gap.
The event had presentations
from representatives in the
AAUW and the WAGE Project.
Sarah Blithe is a UNR communication studies professor who believes negotiating is an essential
skill for young professionals. She
was an organizer and facilitator
for group discussions during the
Start Smart workshop on campus.
The workshop is mandatory for
the class she teaches, COM422:
Differences in Communication,
where her students discuss gender and its relation to the wage
gap. Blithe negotiated her salary
for her current job and wants to
teach young women the same
skill.
Women are not socialized to
be negotiators, Blithe said. We
get the label of bossy girls and
boys are labeled as leaders.
AAUW research considers contributing factors to wage gaps,
such as education, experience,
location and other variables that
influence pay rates. However,

NEWS A3

@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

SALARY
NEGOTIATION:
THE THREE TS
A Start Smart workbook
gave attendees tips for
salary negotiations.
TONE: Be positive. Salary
negotiation is a discussion
about your qualifications
and the employers needs.
TACTICS: Do your
research. Anticipate the
employers needs and base
your negotiation on your
competitive market value.
TIPS: Advocate
for yourself. Its your
responsibility as a potential
employee to demonstrate
how your work experiences
will add value to the company.
there is still an unexplained 23
percent wage gap for white women, which increases for women
of color. According to AAUW
research, white women make 77
cents for every dollar a man earns,
black women make 68 cents and
Latina women make 57 cents
compared to their equally qualified male counterparts. Because
of union negotiations, Nevadas
pay rates are slightly more equal,
with women earning 85 cents to
every dollar a man earns.
Two of Blithes students, junior
Michaela Wynn and senior
Ashley Garcia, were among the
events attendees. Wynn said that
she would consider negotiating a
salary if she thought that she was
overqualified for a position. According to Wynn, she learned new
tips for being successful in her
future career. Wynn and Garcia
participated in the role-playing
salary negotiation practices and
mapped out personal finances
in the Start Smart workbooks
handed out at the event.
I didnt know you could
negotiate a [salary], Garcia said.
Its not just a salary, I learned
that you can negotiate benefits,
vacation time you can take, or the
transportation they can offer you,
overtime and promotions.
Students additionally learned
that they could negotiate for
more than a pay raise. Com-

Breanna Denney/Nevada Sagebrush

Sarah Blithe, a communication studies professor at the University of Nevada, Reno, mentors students on salary negotiations at the Start Smart
workshop in the William J. Raggio Building on Friday, Nov. 7. The workshop also taught attendees budgeting skills and how to plan career goals.
pany benefits are also ways to
negotiate. According to Blithe,
dental insurance, pension plans,
tuition reimbursement and stock
options are all aspects of a job
that students should consider
when accepting a job offer. She
encouraged students to do their
research about a company and
their benefits package to bargain
salaries.
Garcia said that the workshop
was helpful and that shes more
willing to negotiate a salary for a
job she is qualified for due to the
Start Smart workshop.
We need to take the time to
invest in ourselves, Garcia said.
Its a life skill that I dont think
a lot of students on campus are
getting.
Jennifer Marbley can be reached
at jmarbley@sagebrush.unr.edu
and on Twitter @MissMarbley.

EVENTS

Conference shares
By Maddison Cervantes
People flew into Reno from all over
the country to tap into their dreams
and plan for the lives they want to
live.
The fourth annual 1 Life Fully
Lived conference was held at the
University of Nevada, Reno in the Joe
Crowley Student Union last Saturday
and Sunday. The Joe was filled with
world-class motivational speakers
and attendees from all walks of life.
This conference is dedicated to
encouraging people to dream,
plan and live their lives in a more
optimistic and satisfying way. The
universitys professional business
fraternity, Delta Sigma Pi, stated
that they align with this concept
of living and partnered with the
organization to assist in planning
and hosting the event.
Sophomore and DSP member
Marcus Casey discovered the
organization through a fraternity
brother when the conference was
hosted at Truckee Meadows Community College. Casey valued the
meaning behind the organization, and believed that students
would benefit from the experience. He then became driven to
host the next 1 Life Fully Lived
conference at UNR.
During both days of the conference, multiple speakers with
different skill sets separated
into breakout sessions throughout the
building. Information provided during these
sessions included the most efficient ways of
handling money, effective planning practices,
focusing techniques and how to stay physically
and mentally healthy.
Attendees often find the conference to be
highly rewarding due to the different features
offered by speakers, such as learning the steps
to having a more positive outlook, and acquiring the motivated mindset.
The guy in one of the sessions was handing
out money to anyone who participated, because we put ourselves out there, said senior
Adrienne Bragas. He was trying to get the audience to do exactly that.
Keynote speaker David Osborn gave an
hour-long tutorial on how to create a life plan
and then fulfill it, which is something that Tim
Rhode, founder of 1 Life Fully Lived, believes
would be beneficial for college students. Osborn distributed $20 bills to each individual
who provided a response to him during his session, explaining that when one takes a chance
in life, he or she gets rewarded.
As an entrepreneur, Osborn has experienced
both struggle and achievement. He explained
the importance of constructing a bucket list
full of adventure and surrounding yourself with
passionate, goal-oriented individuals.
Osborn spends time going on trips with a
group of men who influence him in a positive
way. Through their adventures, they discuss
their plans for the future, and they each offer
their support.
I have a vision for my life, Osborn said. I
learned that if I drive myself in the direction that
Ive chosen, nothing else matters and theres no
way that Im not going to achieve that future.
Osborn encouraged his audience to choose
their path of life, and if done so permanently,
success will be in their future.
This mindset is something that junior Kerem
Ozmen believes he would have benefitted from
earlier in his college career.
Everyone has a lot of great insight, but I wish I

Photo courtesy of Hal Elrod

could have come to something like this as a


freshman, Ozmen said. Im still learning a lot
but I would have taken it to heart back then too.
The organization is interested in reaching out
to students like Ozmen, but during that earlier
and less-developed stage in college.
In my mind, college prepares you for a career, but it doesnt prepare you for having a plan
in the real world and to think ahead, Rhode
said. And thats what we are about.
Rhode began the organization because he
was finding that people were not acquiring
the necessary tools to be successful in the real
world. He was in contact with specific individuals who had overcome similar struggles, and
knew how to help.
Speaker Hal Elrod wrote a book titled Miracle
Morning, a guide to a positive start to each day.
He spoke during the second session on Saturday, and explained that as a life coach, he also
endures struggle.
At 25 years old, Elrod was thousands of
dollars in debt, lost his home and continued
to sink into depression. His book is about his
developed morning routine that he discovered,
after months of despair, was the key to success.
Elrod explained that his Life S.A.V.E.R.S.,
the steps to his Miracle Morning, are simple
procedures such as brushing your teeth, reading a book and exercising, but they result in a
confident day, every day.
With the assistance of his world-class speaking friends, Rhode was able to establish 1 Life
Fully Lived and begin turning lives around
through energetic inspiration and guidance.
Our title is, Creating flow in your mind,
body and soul, Rhode said. Flow is when you
are doing something you love and you lose all
track of time, and we want everyone to live their
whole lives like that.
Maddison Cervantes can be reached at mcervantes@sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter
@madcervantes.

A4 NEWS

@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

ltur
UN
UNR h
honors Native American culture
UPCOMING EVENTS

By Rocio Hernandez
University of Nevada, Reno
senior Christine Braunworth
remembers growing up on four
Native American reservations. Her
childhood consisted of basketball
tournaments held within the
reservations, pow wows where
families and friends gathered
together, root digging, collecting
berries, and hunting and fishing
trips with her family.
I grew up pretty traditional,
Braunworth said. I still take my
children out there and do those
things, so my culture to me is still
really alive and a part of my life.
Twenty-four years ago, former
President George H.W. Bush
declared November as National
Native American Heritage month
and, on Sept. 23, Gov. Brian
Sandoval signed a proclamation
to continue that tradition. According to the Inter-Tribal Council
of Nevada, there are 26 Native
American tribes that call the Silver
State their home.
November honors the contributions that all Native Americans
have made to the country. According to the National Congress of
American Indians website, Native
American Heritage Month plays a
key role in raising awareness of the
challenges Native Americans have
faced in the past and present and
how tribal citizens have overcome
these problems.
Junior Marissa Weaselboy is an
enrolled member of the Shoshone
tribe in Nevada. She said that she
wants the month to bring more
consciousness
about
Native
Americans and their past.
I think that the most important
thing to remember that we are the
originally inhabitants of this land
and that we have survived everything that has been done against
us, Weaselboy said. We are still
here. We are thriving.
In honor of Native American
Heritage Month, UNRs Center for
Student Cultural Diversity hosts
a series of events through the
month of November that highlight
different aspects of Native Ameri-

Rock Your Mocs Display


and Recognition Day
- 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
- Nov. 14, 2014
- Center for Student
Cultural Diversity
In honor of Nov. 15, National
Rock Your Mocs Day, the
Center for Student Cultural Diversity will provide
a display of various forms
of American and Alaska
Native footwear. Students
are invited to come to the
Center and take a photo
with their moccasins or Native American jewelry and
be entered in a raffle to win
a prize.

Breanna Denney /Nevada Sagebrush

Saundra Mitrovich, outreach and retention coordinator for the Center for Student Cultural Diversity, makes earrings using beads during an activity for
National Native American Heritage Month at the Center on Nov. 4. The Center will continue to host other events throughout the month.
can culture, such as traditional
Native American games and jewelry making. Saundra Mitrovich,
outreach and retention coordinator for the Center, said that she
believes it is important to expose
students to different cultures on
campus.
This is an amazing place to
have an exchange of knowledge
and ideas and theres probably no
better place to celebrate traditions
and culture and have conversations about different populations
and the issue they face than on a
college campus, Mitrovich said.
As an enrolled member of the
Tyme Maidu tribe of California,
Mitrovich has observed that her
culture is still being belittled by
the usage of Native American people as mascots
and
the
Native
American-themed
Halloween costumes
that depict her culture
in a negative light.
Mitrovich said that it
frustrates her when people

National College
of
Education Week

dont respect and understand her


heritage.
Stereotypes and misconceptions about Native Americans and
their culture are some of the issues
that Native American students at
UNR, such as Weaselboy, would
like to see changed.
I know people have a problem
with seeing us as modern
humans, [but] we
have assimilated,
Weaselboy said.
We are not this
idea of these
crazy Indians
running
around
in

buckskins, living in teepees and


hunting buffalo. Its important to
show [people] that there is a different image of us.
In addition to providing an
open dialogue about Native
American challenges, Mitrovich
also said that Native American
Heritage Month is an opportunity
to remind people that Native Americans are not
ancient
artifacts
because
they
continue to be a
relevant part of
todays world.
There
are
many rights,

such as access to water, that Native


American people continue to fight
for and initiatives they have put in
place to make their communities
a better place.
[Native Americans] are not in
the past; they are very relevant
today, whether it be in political
movements, education, anything, Mitrovich said. Native
people are present and here, so
[the event] kind of reminds people
to not just look at them as that
forgotten past or as that archaic
stereotypical way but more so [as]
a vibrant, bright culture.
Although certain times of the
year are designated as heritage
months, Mitrovich believes
that people shouldnt limit
themselves to honoring
different cultures during
those time periods.
Mitrovich said that
students
should
take the time to
understand
the
various aspects of their
community, because it can

Native/API Youth
Summit
- 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
- Nov. 24, 2014
- Joe Crowley Student
Union, Ballroom A
Washoe County School District and other surrounding
county students are invited
to attend the annual college preparation and empowerment youth summit
for American Indian and
Alaska Native youth, as well
as Asian American and Pacific Islander youth. College
students are encouraged to
contact Saundra Mitrovich
at smitrovich@unr.edu to
volunteer for the event.
enrich the campus and make the
community more successful.
People want to be respected
and appreciated holistically for
all that they bring to the table,
Mitrovich said. We should be
celebrating each others cultures
and traditions every day.
Rocio Hernandez can be reached
at rhernandez@sagebrush.unr.edu
and on Twitter @rociohdz19.

November 17-20, 2014

Monday

November 17th
9:00 to 11:00 Student Appreciation Day
WRB 1st & 2nd floor Come and enjoy coffee, juice
and delectable treats

Tuesday
November 18th

Faculty Appreciation Day

Wednesday
This is Nevada

November 19th
11:00 to 1:00
WRB 2nd floor

/nevadaASUN

@nevadaASUN

@nevadaASUN

Mobile App

ASUN reminds you to request a ride from ASUN Campus Escort


Services at www.unr.edu/campus-escort or call 742-6808 if you
need a ride after an event. ASUN supports providing equal access
to all programs for people with disabilities. Persons with
disabilities requiring accommodations are encouraged to email
nevadaeducationassociation@gmail.com

Bake Sale
Proceeds to benefit Early Learning Center classroom
Raffle Tickets given for each Bake Sale
purchase for Thursdays Raffle prizes giveaway

f
nevadaASUN.com

Meet and Greet with Dean Kenneth Coll, Ph.D.


Opportunity to meet with our Colleges Dean Coll

Thursday
November 20th
6:30 to 8:00
WRB room 2003

Special Guest Speaker Diane Barone, Ed.D.


Literature in a Changing Society
Raffle drawing prizes giveaway
(must be present to win)

Sponsored by College of Education Student Organizations


U of NEA (University of Nevada Educators Association)
HDFS (Human Development and Family Studies)
ASUN (Student Senators for the College of Education)

JAVA WITH A JOURNALIST

JON RALSTON

Top Political Journalist in the State of Nevada, columnist, author, and more.
Students are welcome to hear Ralston speak in a more casual
setting in Starbucks about the politics in Nevada.

7:30 8:30 PM
Tuesday, November 18
The Joe Starbucks
To learn more about Jon Ralston, go to ralstonreports.com

Mobile App

ASUN reminds you to request a ride from ASUN Campus Escort Services at www.unr.edu/campus-escort or call 742-6808 if you need a ride after an event.
ASUN supports providing equal access to all programs for people with disabilities. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations are encouraged to email
directorlegaffairs@asun.unr.edu.

f
/nevadaASUN

ASUN reminds you to request a ride from ASUN Campus Escort Services at www.unr.edu/campus-escort or call 742-6808 if you need a ride after an event. ASUN supports providing
equal access to all programs for people with disabilities. Persons with disabilities requiring accommodations are encouraged to email edgar.gansito@gmail.com.

This is Nevada

@nevadaASUN

NevadaASUN.com

@nevadaASUN

Mobile App

Music & Entertainment


@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

on the

prowl
THINGS TO WATCH
OUT FOR THIS WEEK
By Alexa Solis

NEVADA WRITERS
HALL OF FAME
Thursday
6 p.m.
Joe Crowley Student
Union, Milt Glick
Ballroom

Breanna Denney /Nevada Sagebrush

(Pictured from left to right) Wes Forster, Adam Landis, Johnny Bailey and
Jesse Gaddis of indie rock group Rigorous Proof pose for a photo in their
rehearsal space on Sunday, Nov. 9. While there is no set release date for their
upcoming album , Perspectives, a physical release should be out within 30
days, according to vocalist and guitarist Johnny Bailey.

RIGOROUS PROOF
Local Band prepares to release
full-length debut album
By Alexa Solis
Six months ago, the members of Rigorous Proof sat
around their living room bantering and laughing as they
discussed their upcoming debut album. A white board of
working song titles sat upon their rehearsal spaces wall.
Today, the Reno indie rockers are in the final stages of
releasing the record, titled Perspectives.

FORT
RYLAND
GIVES
METAL
MUSIC A
HOME

Maggie Saunders /Nevada Sagebrush

(Top) Maurice Harold, vocalist for local metalcore band Drag Me Under, sings to the crowd on Saturday, Nov.
8 at Fort Ryland. Fort Ryland is a basement venue that specializes in booking local metal bands. (Bottom) The
members of Drag Me Under headbang at their Fort Ryland concert. There are no security guards at the venue,
and respectful moshing is encouraged. The basement is located on Ryland Street.

Johnny Bailey, Rigorous


Proofs guitarist and vocalist,
said that as they finalize the
copy writing, artwork and
publishing, the album is approaching its push towards
release.
While the business end of
music is unavoidable, the
band members havent lost
any of the passion that they
had when they first began.
Since they recorded their
first EP in 2011 at Dogwater
Studios, the band has seen a
remarkable growth in both
maturity and skill, according
to Dogwater Studios owner
Rick Spagnola.
They [Rigorous Proof ] got
so drunk they could hardly
play at a show I had at my
house, Spagnola said. I had
a spectacular recording of
them playing terrible. When
youre young, I guess you do
crazy things. Now, you look
at how professional they are
and how reliable they are.
Theyve really got their shit
together now.
The band has been living
and working together for
most of their time as Rigorous Proof. All four members
consider this to be an essential part of their growing success and skill as musicians.
Weve all lived together
for so long, and everyone
told me that it was going
to destroy the band, but it
didnt do anything except
make us stronger, Bailey
said. It put us on a telepathic level which, in turn,
is where I feel like this record
has developed into the Rigorous Proof sound.
The men pride themselves
on their close personal connection to each other, and
others have taken notice of
those bonds. Spagnola noted
that they are one of the few
bands in his experience that
makes the conscious effort
to let every member shine.
The really great thing
that they do, that not a lot
can, is that they take turns,
Spagnola said. If you watch
most bands, they dont do
that, and really gives them
a different dynamic. I really
dig their stuff, and it really
takes a lot of maturity that
most young men their age
dont have.
Perspectives was recorded at Dogwater Studios in
the span of eight, five-hour
days. They recorded the
album without a metronome
and
almost
completely
live according to Rigorous Proof drummer Wes
Forster. The recording was
done quickly, and the songs
themselves needed minimal
production. According to
Spagnola it maintains its live
feeling while still sounding
polished.
With Rigorous Proofs first
EP having been released in
2011, the band members feel
that their debut full-length
record has been a long time
coming. Bailey mentioned
that the album has roots
from when they were just

starting their careers at 19


years-old.
This album, in its own origin, is the first long-playing
record that weve gotten to
do, and theres a lot of living
inside of the songs because
some of them go back to
when our mentor and producer Brandon [Brooksher]
was still in the band, Bailey
said. Its our coming of age
album.
Though Brooksher left the
band to move to L.A. and
later passed away in what
Bailey described as a freak
occurence, the band has
taken much of his advice to
heart. All Time is Now, the
albums intro track, is somewhat of a tribute to their late
mentor, according to Bailey.
Something he [Brooksher] used to say to us was, you
got to flip your patch man,
Bailey said. Meaning flip
your patch from left to right,
which is something pirates
used to do so they could go
down into the bowels of the
ship and be able to see when
it was dark.
The foursome took those
words and have lived by
them ever since. Remembering that sometimes, a
change is needed in order
to face challenges. Working
full time jobs in addition to
getting their band off the
ground has been exhausting,
according to Forster.
Though the road has been
difficult, their friends and
family that come out consistently to their shows are the
main drive behind finishing
the record, according to Bailey. Live performances are
most of what the band uses
to build their fan base.
As they sat around their
living room, surrounded
by instruments, the band
members
contemplated
their future. It became clear
that completing each others
thoughts is second nature to
the quartet.
Well [we hope to], one:
that we wake up tomorrow,
Bailey said.
And two: to just moving
towards
something
that were doing full time,
Forster said as he continued
Baileys train of thought.
With a new record on the
horizon and touring plans in
the works, Forster is hopeful about what lies ahead.
Whatever may come, Landis
explained that there is nothing more satisfying then
the physical release of their
album.
Its just great to hold a
CD or a vinyl in your hand,
Landis said. Digital music is
intangible, you can click play
and listen to it, but theres still
a little caveman mentality
that exists in everyone where
theres that haptic need for
something there. I dont think
thats ever going to go away.
Alexa Solis can be reached
at alexasolis@sagebrush.
unr.edu and on Twitter
@alexacsolis.

the states aspiring writers

NEVADA CHAMBER
OPERA: FALL OPERA
PRESENTATION
Friday - Sunday
7:30 p.m.
Church Fine Arts,
Nightingale Concert
Hall
-

JIM JEFFRIES COMEDY


SHOW
Friday
8 p.m.
Silver Legacy
Resort Casino
-

YELLOWCARD
CONCERT
Friday
8 p.m.
Knitting Factory
-

Alexa Solis can be reached at


alexasolis@sagebrush.unr.edu
and on Twitter @alexacsolis.

Opinion
A6

@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

STAFF EDITORIAL

Use university alerts in times of crisis

he University of Nevada, Reno community


was dangerously close
to a fatal shooting that
occurred on Virginia Street near
the Church Fine Arts building
last Wednesday.
Just after 4 p.m. on Nov. 5,
a man was killed by a Washoe
County Sheriffs deputy outside
The Wolf Den. While no students were harmed during the
altercation, it raised concerns
about how safety information is
transmitted to students across
campus. A significant responsibility falls on the campus
safety systems to transmit this
information, but for this to be
truly effective, students need
to educate themselves on the
resources at their disposal.

The community reaction


to the shooting could have
changed dramatically if more
students had opted in to the
universitys text message alert
system, which sent a warning
out to students the day of the
shooting. Traffic could have
been diverted from Virginia
Street, students walking to the
dorms could have avoided
the intersection and community members could have
felt calmer about the situation
after understanding the details
and absence of direct danger to
campus.
The alert distributed important information to students by
telling them that the altercation
had been resolved and that
regularly-scheduled classes

would continue as planned.


However, because students
must choose to receive the
alerts, only a handful of people
actually saw the informative
text message. As a result,
rumors were spread and many
students panicked, wondering if the victim had been a
member of the Wolf Pack.
There are a variety of alert
systems for students, but to actually use them effectively, they
need to be aware the systems
exist. Those blue light poles
around campus? If you are being
pursued by someone you can hit
one of the lights and the campus
police will track your position.
Another little-known fact: if you
are standing at one blue light
then you should always be able

to see another one.


In addition to the texting alerts
and blue light systems, there
are red banners that appear on
campus computers when there
is an emergency, accompanied
by audio alerts that sound in
classrooms. When these alerts go
off, it is important for students to
be aware of the potential danger
to campus.
However, there is a drawback
of the computer-based audio
system. The system has drawn
mixed reviews, causing
confusion in classrooms by
bewildering professors and
scaring some students into
thinking that the situation is
out of control. While the audio
buzzing does accomplish the
goal of telling students there is

SMITTEN STUDENTS

an emergency, it can sometimes


be overkill and may cause more
harm than good.
Nonetheless, the current
systems are able to transmit
information quickly, as long
as all students are on the same
page. Sending out a mass
email through the MyNevada
listserve would reach nearly all
the universitys students and
would stop the transmission of
misinformation from student to
student through social media.
Of course, looking at social
media can sometimes be effective (with Twitter being the most
reliable example), but having
the majority of your information
funneled from that location is
not advisable.
Although no students were

Dont be afraid to find a


partner amid university hook-

am really sick of hearing


my peers constantly telling me how to do college,
specifically in terms of
relationships. In this discover
yourself environment, we
should be
experiencing
anything
and
everything
we want.
If you
want to
be single
Lauren
throughout your
Gray
college
career,
good for you, really. But for
those students who want to
settle down with someone for
a while, or maybe even find
the person they want to marry,
I say, get off their backs.
Growing up, I imagined
that college was about two
things: grades and partying.
Being single, hooking up
and late nights of studying
were all of the things I looked
forward to before arriving
here. What I failed to realize
(like many of my friends) is
that this idea of what college
just had to be wasnt made
up of all experiences; it was
just an image. The image of
being single and going crazy

because were finally free to


do what we want is popular,
but this perspective of college
is only true for a group of
people among the thousands
that attend this university.
For the people that choose
to do college differently than
spending their free time
at the Wolf Den hitting on
the hot blonde, or cramped
in a living room listening
to some drunk guy ramble
about his car, the idea of
a relationship in college is
obviously different. There
are, in fact, college students
who do not find it worth their
time to be hooking up. Just
like I say its absolutely OK to
be single and have sex with
whomever, its just as OK to
be in a relationship.
I think something we forget
with this college image
mindset is that relationships
can be extremely beneficial.
Healthy relationships provide
stability and companionship.
College is challenging at
times, and having someone
you care about supporting
you and your growth can
help. Relationships may
also provide you with the
confidence you need to get
through the challenges of
college and transitioning to
life on your own.
In addition to things we

forget, just because we enter


a relationship in college
doesnt mean we need to stay
in it our whole lives. My dad
always told me growing up
that when youre young, you
are practicing relationships.
At this time in our lives, we
are trying things out, and that
is perfectly acceptable.
Becoming someones
significant other does not
mean an automatic R.I.P. to
singledom forever. Maybe you
find someone who complements you for the time being.
A relationship might give
you what you need now,
but may not always forever.
Dont be scared to enter a
relationship because youre
afraid the person youre
interested in may not be your
future spouse or because you
wouldnt be doing what the
college image dictates.
Just because you are in a
relationship in college does
not mean that you cant party
or go out, either. You can
define the boundaries of your
relationship and if it is worth
being in, your partner will
understand. People throw
things out there like if you
party, youll cheat or college
isnt for relationships.
Once again, these are just
stereotypes and the aspects
of a relationship are set by

the people in it.


So if you want to take part
in drinking, watching movies,
dancing, playing League
of Legends, smoking,
Dungeons and Dragons or
whatever else you want to do
with your significant other, it
is up to the two of you. Dont
let other people define that
for you.
If youre single and loving
it, great! But dont try to push
your friends to feel that way
too.
Let them figure their
situations out for themselves.
Realize that just because
youre single in college and
living it to the fullest does not
mean others arent doing the
same in a relationship.
College is a time to
experiment and find out
what you like and who you
are. So if you want to be in
a relationship, that is totally
fine. You define these things
for yourself and youre only
missing out if you feel that
way. There are no rules to
relationships in college, so
follow your heart, ignore
the stereotypes and do what
makes you happy.
Lauren Gray studies journalism. She can be reached at
dcoffey@unr.edu and on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

The Nevada Sagebrush editorial


staff can be reached at cboline@
sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

COFFEY BREAK

Condemn the war, not


our American heroes

Illustration by Leona Novio/Nevada Sagebrush

harmed in the incident, last


Wednesday, should still serve
as a lesson to campus; the way
the information was dispersed
could have been improved. Yes,
the administration has a huge
hand in this; however, the tools
are there for students to be in
tune with how information is
given to them.
You might have reservations
about registering your email
or phone number with the
campus alert system, but a
single text message could go a
long way in maintaining your
safety on campus.

ts been nearly 44 years since


Edwin Starr hit the no. 1 spot
on the Billboard Hot 100 with
his re-recording of War. The
song captured the hearts and
minds of millions of Americans
that were
embittered
by the
Vietnam
War by
begging
the simple
question,
War. What
is it good
for? Im
Daniel
sure this is
Coffey
the point at
which you
energetically responded with,
absolutely nothing! in your
head.
While I cant help but agree
with the pacifist sentiment
expressed in the popular tune,
I am left considering the effect
of these words on so many
veterans across the country.
As Americans joined arms in unified opposition to the war, did
any one person ever stop and ask
how those in the service might
respond to this disapproval?
Instead of supporting some of
the most patriotic individuals
in our country, the public
discredited the efforts of soldiers,
labeling them as counterproductive and malicious.
This phenomenon of shaming
veterans is not only disappointing, its a national disgrace.
Despite the valuable role that
anti-war protest has played
in Americas history, there is
a fine line between criticizing
the justifications for war as
opposed to criticizing those
involved in the war itself. More
specifically, there is a difference
between condemning seemingly unnecessary violence and
condemning fellow Americans
who have chosen to fight for
freedom. In our country, the
majority of voters elect most of
the politicians that dictate our
foreign policy, so, in many ways,
the responsibility falls on our
own shoulders.
Soldiers are agents of the war,
but that does not mean they are
responsible for its existence.
Unfortunately, our society has
historically demonized the
people who took the countrys
call to action. In 2007, columnist
Seth Gitell wrote a revealing
opinion piece for the New York
Sun detailing firsthand accounts
of public disrespect for veterans.
He discussed Rudy Loupias
who fought in the 2nd Battalion,
4th Marines at Dai Do in 1968.
After returning home, Loupias
often hid his bravery out of fear
of being labeled a baby killer,
a common insult expressed
toward veterans after the
Vietnam War. Instead of finding
pride in his patriotism, he was
led to feel shame for simply
following orders.
Loupias was one of millions
of people throughout history to
leave behind his family, home
and comfort of everyday life,
and yet, he was treated like a
dissenter in his own country a
country that he risked his life to
protect. The disgusting behavior
displayed by his community
deeply affected his ability to feel

confident and appreciated, a


feeling no veteran should have
to experience.
At this point, you may be
shrugging off this example as
indicative of a different time in
American history, and while that
is true in some ways, the social
stigma associated with being
a veteran persists. The academic journal Social Problems
published a 2013 study called
Attitudes toward U.S. Veterans
Returning from Iraq, and the
results proved that Americans
still display a level of disrespect
toward veterans. While the
study did not indicate hateful
attitudes toward veterans, it
demonstrated the belief that
mental disorders and veterans
are often closely linked.
While it is true that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder appears
most frequently in veterans,
survey respondents also
associated substance abuse and
domestic violence with being a
soldier. This social stigma often
haunts veterans throughout
their lives, leading others to view
them as potentially unstable or
disturbed. Regardless of how
accurate these beliefs may or
may not be, it is critical that
Americans work to promote a
cultural shift from these negative
associations to positive ones in
regards to soldiers.
Instead of asking a veteran
about the horrors they experienced in war, ask them about
the pride they felt when coming
home. Work to constantly show
gratitude to these patriots,
because the price they pay for
your freedom is often significant. This can be done with a
simple thank you when seeing
a person in uniform or even
refuting your friends when they
begin to discuss the associations
that many people still unfairly
project onto veterans.
While I cannot speak from
personal experience, it seems
that being a veteran can be
extremely difficult. Many
people, myself included, cannot
fathom the inhumanity of war,
so we should make our best
effort to mitigate the pain that
veterans feel. This can be done
in any variety of ways from
supporting events conducted
by your local chapter of the
American Legion or lobbying
for better mental healthcare for
veterans after their service.
Opposing the concept of
war is not a bad idea, but you
should express your concerns
to your state and national
representatives. They have
more power to create change
and, more importantly, should
take responsibility when your
concerns are underrepresented.
Veterans have done their part
in serving our country, so its
time we do ours and change the
way we think about and treat
our brave soldiers. On behalf
of myself and those that share
my opinion, thank you to all
those who have served. You
never stopped fighting for me,
so I promise I will never stop
fighting for you.
Daniel Coffey studies journalism.
He can be reached at dcoffey@
unr.edu or on Twitter @TheSagebrush.com.

Opinion
A6

@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

STAFF EDITORIAL

Use university alerts in times of crisis

he University of Nevada, Reno community


was dangerously close
to a fatal shooting that
occurred on Virginia Street near
the Church Fine Arts building
last Wednesday.
Just after 4 p.m. on Nov. 5,
a man was killed by a Washoe
County Sheriffs deputy outside
The Wolf Den. While no students were harmed during the
altercation, it raised concerns
about how safety information is
transmitted to students across
campus. A significant responsibility falls on the campus
safety systems to transmit this
information, but for this to be
truly effective, students need
to educate themselves on the
resources at their disposal.

The community reaction


to the shooting could have
changed dramatically if more
students had opted in to the
universitys text message alert
system, which sent a warning
out to students the day of the
shooting. Traffic could have
been diverted from Virginia
Street, students walking to the
dorms could have avoided
the intersection and community members could have
felt calmer about the situation
after understanding the details
and absence of direct danger to
campus.
The alert distributed important information to students by
telling them that the altercation
had been resolved and that
regularly-scheduled classes

would continue as planned.


However, because students
must choose to receive the
alerts, only a handful of people
actually saw the informative
text message. As a result,
rumors were spread and many
students panicked, wondering if the victim had been a
member of the Wolf Pack.
There are a variety of alert
systems for students, but to actually use them effectively, they
need to be aware the systems
exist. Those blue light poles
around campus? If you are being
pursued by someone you can hit
one of the lights and the campus
police will track your position.
Another little-known fact: if you
are standing at one blue light
then you should always be able

to see another one.


In addition to the texting alerts
and blue light systems, there
are red banners that appear on
campus computers when there
is an emergency, accompanied
by audio alerts that sound in
classrooms. When these alerts go
off, it is important for students to
be aware of the potential danger
to campus.
However, there is a drawback
of the computer-based audio
system. The system has drawn
mixed reviews, causing
confusion in classrooms by
bewildering professors and
scaring some students into
thinking that the situation is
out of control. While the audio
buzzing does accomplish the
goal of telling students there is

SMITTEN STUDENTS

an emergency, it can sometimes


be overkill and may cause more
harm than good.
Nonetheless, the current
systems are able to transmit
information quickly, as long
as all students are on the same
page. Sending out a mass
email through the MyNevada
listserve would reach nearly all
the universitys students and
would stop the transmission of
misinformation from student to
student through social media.
Of course, looking at social
media can sometimes be effective (with Twitter being the most
reliable example), but having
the majority of your information
funneled from that location is
not advisable.
Although no students were

Dont be afraid to find a partner


amid university hook-up culture

am really sick of hearing


my peers constantly telling me how to do college,
specifically in terms of
relationships. In this discover
yourself environment, we
should be
experiencing
anything
and
everything
we want.
If you
want to
be single
Lauren
throughout your
Gray
college
career,
good for you, really. But for
those students who want to
settle down with someone for
a while, or maybe even find
the person they want to marry,
I say, get off their backs.
Growing up, I imagined
that college was about two
things: grades and partying.
Being single, hooking up
and late nights of studying
were all of the things I looked
forward to before arriving
here. What I failed to realize
(like many of my friends) is
that this idea of what college
just had to be wasnt made
up of all experiences; it was
just an image. The image of
being single and going crazy

because were finally free to


do what we want is popular,
but this perspective of college
is only true for a group of
people among the thousands
that attend this university.
For the people that choose
to do college differently than
spending their free time
at the Wolf Den hitting on
the hot blonde, or cramped
in a living room listening
to some drunk guy ramble
about his car, the idea of
a relationship in college is
obviously different. There
are, in fact, college students
who do not find it worth their
time to be hooking up. Just
like I say its absolutely OK to
be single and have sex with
whomever, its just as OK to
be in a relationship.
I think something we forget
with this college image
mindset is that relationships
can be extremely beneficial.
Healthy relationships provide
stability and companionship.
College is challenging at
times, and having someone
you care about supporting
you and your growth can
help. Relationships may
also provide you with the
confidence you need to get
through the challenges of
college and transitioning to
life on your own.
In addition to things we

forget, just because we enter


a relationship in college
doesnt mean we need to stay
in it our whole lives. My dad
always told me growing up
that when youre young, you
are practicing relationships.
At this time in our lives, we
are trying things out, and that
is perfectly acceptable.
Becoming someones
significant other does not
mean an automatic R.I.P. to
singledom forever. Maybe you
find someone who complements you for the time being.
A relationship might give
you what you need now,
but may not always forever.
Dont be scared to enter a
relationship because youre
afraid the person youre
interested in may not be your
future spouse or because you
wouldnt be doing what the
college image dictates.
Just because you are in a
relationship in college does
not mean that you cant party
or go out, either. You can
define the boundaries of your
relationship and if it is worth
being in, your partner will
understand. People throw
things out there like if you
party, youll cheat or college
isnt for relationships.
Once again, these are just
stereotypes and the aspects
of a relationship are set by

the people in it.


So if you want to take part
in drinking, watching movies,
dancing, playing League
of Legends, smoking,
Dungeons and Dragons or
whatever else you want to do
with your significant other, it
is up to the two of you. Dont
let other people define that
for you.
If youre single and loving
it, great! But dont try to push
your friends to feel that way
too.
Let them figure their
situations out for themselves.
Realize that just because
youre single in college and
living it to the fullest does not
mean others arent doing the
same in a relationship.
College is a time to
experiment and find out
what you like and who you
are. So if you want to be in
a relationship, that is totally
fine. You define these things
for yourself and youre only
missing out if you feel that
way. There are no rules to
relationships in college, so
follow your heart, ignore
the stereotypes and do what
makes you happy.
Lauren Gray studies journalism. She can be reached at
dcoffey@unr.edu and on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

The Nevada Sagebrush editorial


staff can be reached at cboline@
sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

COFFEY BREAK

Condemn the war, not


our American heroes

Illustration by Leona Novio/Nevada Sagebrush

harmed in the incident, last


Wednesday, should still serve
as a lesson to campus; the way
the information was dispersed
could have been improved. Yes,
the administration has a huge
hand in this; however, the tools
are there for students to be in
tune with how information is
given to them.
You might have reservations
about registering your email
or phone number with the
campus alert system, but a
single text message could go a
long way in maintaining your
safety on campus.

ts been nearly 44 years since


Edwin Starr hit the no. 1 spot
on the Billboard Hot 100 with
his re-recording of War. The
song captured the hearts and
minds of millions of Americans
that were
embittered
by the
Vietnam
War by
begging
the simple
question,
War. What
is it good
for? Im
Daniel
sure this is
Coffey
the point at
which you
energetically responded with,
absolutely nothing! in your
head.
While I cant help but agree
with the pacifist sentiment
expressed in the popular tune,
I am left considering the effect
of these words on so many
veterans across the country.
As Americans joined arms in unified opposition to the war, did
any one person ever stop and ask
how those in the service might
respond to this disapproval?
Instead of supporting some of
the most patriotic individuals
in our country, the public
discredited the efforts of soldiers,
labeling them as counterproductive and malicious.
This phenomenon of shaming
veterans is not only disappointing, its a national disgrace.
Despite the valuable role that
anti-war protest has played
in Americas history, there is
a fine line between criticizing
the justifications for war as
opposed to criticizing those
involved in the war itself. More
specifically, there is a difference
between condemning seemingly unnecessary violence and
condemning fellow Americans
who have chosen to fight for
freedom. In our country, the
majority of voters elect most of
the politicians that dictate our
foreign policy, so, in many ways,
the responsibility falls on our
own shoulders.
Soldiers are agents of the war,
but that does not mean they are
responsible for its existence.
Unfortunately, our society has
historically demonized the
people who took the countrys
call to action. In 2007, columnist
Seth Gitell wrote a revealing
opinion piece for the New York
Sun detailing firsthand accounts
of public disrespect for veterans.
He discussed Rudy Loupias
who fought in the 2nd Battalion,
4th Marines at Dai Do in 1968.
After returning home, Loupias
often hid his bravery out of fear
of being labeled a baby killer,
a common insult expressed
toward veterans after the
Vietnam War. Instead of finding
pride in his patriotism, he was
led to feel shame for simply
following orders.
Loupias was one of millions
of people throughout history to
leave behind his family, home
and comfort of everyday life,
and yet, he was treated like a
dissenter in his own country a
country that he risked his life to
protect. The disgusting behavior
displayed by his community
deeply affected his ability to feel

confident and appreciated, a


feeling no veteran should have
to experience.
At this point, you may be
shrugging off this example as
indicative of a different time in
American history, and while that
is true in some ways, the social
stigma associated with being
a veteran persists. The academic journal Social Problems
published a 2013 study called
Attitudes toward U.S. Veterans
Returning from Iraq, and the
results proved that Americans
still display a level of disrespect
toward veterans. While the
study did not indicate hateful
attitudes toward veterans, it
demonstrated the belief that
mental disorders and veterans
are often closely linked.
While it is true that Posttraumatic Stress Disorder appears
most frequently in veterans,
survey respondents also
associated substance abuse and
domestic violence with being a
soldier. This social stigma often
haunts veterans throughout
their lives, leading others to view
them as potentially unstable or
disturbed. Regardless of how
accurate these beliefs may or
may not be, it is critical that
Americans work to promote a
cultural shift from these negative
associations to positive ones in
regards to soldiers.
Instead of asking a veteran
about the horrors they experienced in war, ask them about
the pride they felt when coming
home. Work to constantly show
gratitude to these patriots,
because the price they pay for
your freedom is often significant. This can be done with a
simple thank you when seeing
a person in uniform or even
refuting your friends when they
begin to discuss the associations
that many people still unfairly
project onto veterans.
While I cannot speak from
personal experience, it seems
that being a veteran can be
extremely difficult. Many
people, myself included, cannot
fathom the inhumanity of war,
so we should make our best
effort to mitigate the pain that
veterans feel. This can be done
in any variety of ways from
supporting events conducted
by your local chapter of the
American Legion or lobbying
for better mental healthcare for
veterans after their service.
Opposing the concept of
war is not a bad idea, but you
should express your concerns
to your state and national
representatives. They have
more power to create change
and, more importantly, should
take responsibility when your
concerns are underrepresented.
Veterans have done their part
in serving our country, so its
time we do ours and change the
way we think about and treat
our brave soldiers. On behalf
of myself and those that share
my opinion, thank you to all
those who have served. You
never stopped fighting for me,
so I promise I will never stop
fighting for you.
Daniel Coffey studies journalism.
He can be reached at dcoffey@
unr.edu or on Twitter @TheSagebrush.com.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

OPINION A7

@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

DONT STARVE IN COLLEGE

Get creative when feeding the beast

ts Monday night, you just


got home from class and
you have a discussion to
respond to on WebCampus, two exams to study for
and you still havent cleaned
your house
after the
party you
had on
Saturday
night.
Food may
not be the
first thing
on your
Terrance mind.
To
Bynum
compromise, you
either make a TV dinner or
grab some fast food and take
care of the other things that
seem a little more important.
You shouldnt do that to
yourself anymore.
You are only hurting yourself
if you dont put some thought
into your meals. As a college
student, you need to get all of
the nutrients you can to keep
your body healthy. TV dinners
and food with preservatives
just wont cut it. Youre also
doing your wallet a favor by
not eating fast food, because
even if youre not buying a lot
of fast food, it still adds up.
With winter on the horizon,
its time to make sure all of
your meals are nourishing
and, more importantly,
delicious. Theres no reason
to wait until the New Year to
practice better eating habits
when your wallet, taste buds
and stomach could be reaping
the benefits of a better diet,
starting today.
As students, we tend to
forget that we do have options
when it comes to our food.
Why not get creative now?
If you start now, then in
the future, making meals
to accommodate for a busy

schedule, or even a laid-back


one, will become second
nature.
Make your own meals at
home, or even better, at a
friends home. The key to producing more satisfying meals
is to actually enjoy creating
them. If you dont want to
cook it, then youre not going
to cook it. Added company
while cooking is always fun,
especially if theyre contributing too.
If finances are
keeping you from
making your own
meals, dont fret, I have
a little method Id like to
propose to you: mixmatching. Write down a
few base ingredients you
know you like to eat, like
proteins, starches, whole
grains and a vegetable or
fruit.
Ive started doing
this in my own life and
it has helped quite a
bit. I listed my favorite
foods and ingredients
I wanted to try like
peas, mixed vegetables,
chicken, salmon, milk,
eggs, corn, whole grain
bread, cold-cut turkey,
sweet potatoes, brown
rice, heavy wheat
cereals and oatmeal.
These were foods I
found a little cheaper,
both in small and
ample amounts.
I found almost 60
recipes online that were fast
and easy to make, and they all
had similar ingredients. I only
ended up spending around
$50 for almost 2 1/2 weeks of
pretty well rounded meals that
I enjoyed.
You can also create your own
recipes, or find recipes online
like I did, that only require 5 to
10 ingredients. That said, the
next step is to find more recipes

Photo illustration by Breanna Denney /Nevada Sagebrush

MAYBE I SHOULD CHANGE MY DIET A BIT...


that you like with similar
ingredients.
Since the recipes dont
contain a lot of ingredients, it
can be inferred that they wont
take long to prep or cook.
Put a couple of hours away on
your least busy day of the week,
and go shop. When you go
out, dont just go to one store:
go to several. Compare prices
and consolidate accordingly. If

youre the type of person who


loves to plan, a really cool tool
to look into before shopping is
the Wal-Mart app.
On the app, there is an option
where you can scan your
Wal-Mart receipt, and if you
find a product sold at another
establishment that is cheaper
than the product sold at WalMart, they will refund you the
price difference between the

two. Within a 42-hour period,


Wal-Mart will give you a gift
card for their store in the total
amount of the difference.
Tying in nutritious ingredients that you enjoy and saving
money while shopping can
make cooking an anxiety-free
process with plenty of good
meals in store for you.
Getting creative with food is
tough when you have a lot of

stuff going on, but as long as


you look at it as an outlet for
fun and not a chore, youll love
it. Make sure you put yourself
first this winter by getting
creative with your food instead
of being lazy. It will pay off.
Terrance Bynum studies journalism. He can be reached at
dcoffey@unr.edu and on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

Tips from a transfer student: finding your community

hat exactly is a
learning curve?
Can you define it
outside of taking
a test? In laymans terms, it is
the rate of a persons progress
in gaining
new
experience
or skills.
Its the
idea that
you can
only really
gain new
knowledge
by
Alexa
Simpson changing
up your
everyday
routine. For some people,
this may be getting a new job,
going for a long run, taking
a spontaneous trip to the
farmers market or, like what
I did, transferring to a new
school.
It was hard to visualize the
changes that needed to be
made on my trek to a new
school across the country. I
agonized over every detail

Will I make new friends? Will


the classes be harder? If the
classes are harder, will it be
worth getting lower grades for
a more specialized education?
Will I like living in Reno, the
supposed Biggest Little City?
The list goes on and on.
Transferring colleges as
a junior was challenging. I
remember walking down the
long slab of concrete that
leads from West Stadium all
the way through campus. I
shuffled past the groups of
giggling girls, weaved my way
through the backpack jungle
of people on a mission to get
to class and nearly collided with skateboarders who
rushed through the cliques of
students.
I was experiencing the same
discomfort that so many
students have when exploring
a new campus. That first
moment of putting yourself
into a new and uncomfortable
situation is going to be hard
for anyone. After all, the most
difficult decisions in life are
the ones that force you to

choose between lingering in


the familiar or taking a risk.
Whether it is finding a new job
or moving to a new home, the
decision to make a major life
change takes courage, and I
was facing that firsthand.
On those first few days at
University of Nevada Reno,
I tried not to look too long
at the crumpled up piece of
paper that said where my
classes were. My mind would
wander on those long hauls to
class, I cant believe there are
busses that actually shuttle
swarms of people from one
side of campus to the other.
I remember thinking, OK,
Alexa, focus. Get to class on
time without looking too
much like a lost puppy.
Coming from a small liberal
arts college in Nashville, where
it only took about five minutes
to walk to either side of
campus, 10 minutes with the
amount of friends I would run
into, UNR was foreign to me. At
Belmont University, I had a job,
an internship and a sorority. I
left in hopes of having the best

of both worlds the experience of a tight-knit music


college, and the knowledge of a
bigger, louder, D-1 school with
community spirit like UNR.
In the first years of college,
it is hard for students to find
their niche. It usually takes
a couple semesters for them
to even think about getting
involved. Once I left my niche
at Belmont, it was hard to seek
out a new place for myself at
UNR, especially coming in as
a junior. I was dormant: I sat
in my 150-person lectures not
listening, I would hear about
different clubs on campus
and ignore them. I drove to
campus, went to class and left.
Everything changed when I
started to embrace my major.
I was genuinely interested in
what the professors had to
say and could tell that they
cared about the work I was
producing. By welcoming the
opportunities the Reynolds
School of Journalism has given
me, like joining the Ad Club,
applying for the Integrated
Marketing Competition and

forming a bond with other


journalism students, I have
once again been awakened to
great windows of opportunity.
If you open yourself up to
new possibilities, you will be
surprised by the results you
find. There are communities
all over campus that can help
you establish your identity as
a member of Wolf Pack. While
I may have found my home in
the J-school, you might find
yours in Greek life, the student
government or even a club on
campus.
I have found that the
key to success in not only
transferring, but graduating
with the notion that you really
accomplished something in
college, comes down to three
important things: find your
passion and achieve it, take
risks and immerse yourself in
a supportive community.
It is so easy for humans to
get into that habitual routine
the one that is familiar
and easy. You may find that
you have stopped trying new
things. I was so busy with my

routine that it never occurred


to me to try and branch out
of my friend group or explore
new opportunities or places. I
had, in fact, stopped my learning curve as many students do
without realizing it.
Venturing off with nothing
to lose except maybe a little
bit of pride can be a great help
in getting to know yourself.
Students can follow this
example in their own lives by
taking that loan to go study
abroad, by taking that job, by
joining that club where they
dont know anyone, by taking
that risk. That initial leap is
all you need to discover what
makes you tick.
Walking down that windy
concrete slab, I am now the
one on a mission, waving to
my friends and smiling when
I see that ever so familiar look
of the girl staring down at the
campus map.
Alexa Simpson studies public
relations. She can be reached at
dcoffey@unr.edu and on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

SOCIAL SKILLS

A defense of social media from a connected millennial

ook up from your phone.


Dont let the world pass
you by. Disconnect.
Videos, photos and
articles flood our social media
outlets, telling us that social
media itself
is corrupt
and that it
is ruining
our generation that
it stops us
from living
our lives to
Anastasia the fullest
and suWarren
perficially
knocks us
down and, at times, boosts our
self-esteems.
Ironic, that these messages are crafted for and shared
through the exact thing that
they are speaking against.
The idea of not living your
life through your phone is an
important one one often

shared with us on our social


media. However, the idea
that social media, when used
correctly, can actually be
beneficial is one that I have yet
to see at all.
We see selfies as vain. We
see posting too often as being
too open. We see others eyes
glued to their screens as they
walk through the streets of a
beautiful place.
Yet, we use social media. And
thats not a bad thing.
Im a social media user and
often I use it too much. I will
admit that I need to work on
putting down my phone in
certain situations and not
doing it for the Insta, just as
much as the next person. Why,
however, does social media
often have such a negative
connotation?
As with many other things in
life, we fail to realize the value
social media provides.
Why not share what youre

doing with your friends and


family? Why not use your
platforms to inspire others?
Why not use these outlets to
keep up with loved ones that
are afar? Why not share the
good and bring awareness to
your passions and different
causes?
Why not use these platforms
of communication to do great
things?
As annoying as some people
found it, the ALS Ice Bucket
Challenge that took over our
feeds this year helped the ALS
Association raise millions more
than the year prior for their efforts. Organizations can get the
word out to their friends about
different community service
events within seconds. The
other day, a New York Times
bestselling author tweeted back
at me when I posted about
their book.
The fact that we have access
to this form of communication

that has the power to connect


us to people all over the
world, that has the power to
inform us in the blink of an
eye and allows us to post an
inspirational video for all of our
friends to see, is not something
to be looked down upon or as
a norm, because its pretty
damn amazing.
Sharing often and sharing
your life are two different
things. I, for one, post on my
personal accounts like its
my job, but I also maintain
a decently private personal
life because that is the way
I choose to live. If you find
yourself constantly updating
your feeds at a family dinner
or on your hike through Tahoe,
you might want to consider
putting down your phone. Im
not telling you to share your
world or check your social
media all day everyday Im
telling you to realize the
amazing tool before you.

As with anything in life that


is used for the greater good,
without hurting others, while
making yourself happy and
used in moderation, social
media is actually incredible.
Use Facebook and Twitter
to inform yourself on issues
and world events. Use it to
get the word out about your
philanthropy event. Use it to
post a pretty picture that you
like (youre right, with the right
filter that holiday coffee cup is
really awesome). Use it to keep
up with old friends. And, if you
want, dont use it at all.
I encourage you to realize the
implications of social media
and the fact that people around
the world can connect so easily
on a daily basis. If you choose
to use it, I encourage you to
be smart and think before you
tweet. I encourage you to take
a step back from this everyday
thing you use and appreciate
the science behind it, as well

as the convenience in which it


allows you to live.
Social media is a privilege,
and as with any privilege, it
should be appreciated. Its
power should be respected. It
shouldnt be taken advantage
of or taken for granted and it
should be used wisely.
So, next time you get an
update from a national
publication on your Twitter
feed, next time you watch
an inspiring video posted to
Facebook telling you to live
in the moment, next time you
read an inspiring quote on
Instagram that causes you to
do something a little bit better
that day than the one before,
realize that it is a positive, a
convenience, a privilege and
anything but normal.
Anastasia Warren studies public
relations. She can be reached at
dcoffey@unr.edu and on Twitter
@TheSagebrush.

Gameday

A8 SPORTS

vs. Southern
Utah
W, 28-19
8/30

THIS WEEKS GAME

@SagebrushSports | nevadasagebrush.com

vs. Washington
State
W, 24-13

at Arizona

9/05

9/13

AP TOP 25

1. Mississippi State (48)


2. Florida State (12)
3. Oregon
4. Alabama
5. TCU
6. Baylor
7. Arizona State
8. Ohio State
9. Auburn
10. Ole Miss
11. Nebraska
12. Michigan State
13. Kansas State
14. UCLA
15. Notre Dame
16. Georgia
17. Arizona
18. Clemson
19. Duke
20. LSU
21. Marshall
22. Wisconsin
23. Colorado State
24. Georgia Tech
25. Utah

9-0
9-0
9-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
7-2
8-2
8-1
7-2
7-2
8-2
7-2
7-2
7-2
7-2
8-1
7-3
9-0
7-2
9-1
8-2
6-3

OTHERS RECEIVING VOTES


Oklahoma 85, Texas A&M 83, Missouri 68, USC 47,
Minnesota 26, Louisville 12, West Virginia 6, Stanford 4, Boise State 1, Georgia Southern 1, Miami 1

USA TODAY

1. Mississippi State (41)


2. Florida State (20)
3. Alabama
4. Oregon (1)
5. TCU
6. Baylor
7. Ohio State
8. Arizona State
9. Auburn
10. Ole Miss
11. Nebraska
12. Michigan State
13. Kansas State
14. Georgia
15. UCLA
16. Notre Dame
17. Clemson
18. Arizona
19. Duke
20. LSU
21. Marshall
22. Wisconsin
23. Georgia Tech
24. Oklahoma
25. Colorado State

9-0
9-0
8-1
9-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
8-1
7-2
8-2
8-1
7-2
7-2
7-2
8-2
7-2
7-2
7-2
8-1
7-3
9-0
7-2
8-2
6-3
9-1

OTHERS RECEIVING VOTES


Missouri 90, Minnesota 83, Utah 70, USC
29, Texas A&M 22, Louisville 13, Boise
State 7, Stanford 6, East Carolina 3,
Miami (FL) 3, Cincinnati 2, Florida 1

THIS WEEKS GAME

Nevada vs. Air Force

When: Saturday, 11 a.m.


Where: Falcon Stadium,

Colorado Springs, Colorado


(46,692, field turf)

TV: ROOT Sports


Season records: Nevada (6-3

overall, 3-2 MW),


Air Force (7-2 overall, 3-2 MW)

The coaches: After the bye


week, Nevada will look to improve
its record to 7-3 when it travels
to Colorado to take on Air Force.
Nevada is led by head coach
Brian Polian who is 10-11 in his two
seasons as a head coach. Air Force
head coach Troy Calhoun has been
the model of consistency with the
Falcons, winning at least six games
in all but one season as the head
coach. After a down season last
year where the Falcons only won
two games he has gotten things
back on track with a 7-2 record this
season. Calhoun has a combined
record of 56-43 during his eight
seasons at Air Force.

L, 35-28

at San Jose
State
W, 21-10

vs. Boise State

9/27

10/04

L, 51-46

Saturday, Nov. 15
11 a.m.

Air Force

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

vs. Colorado
State
L, 31-24

at BYU

at Hawaii

vs. San Diego


State

at Air Force

vs. Fresno State

W, 42-35

W, 26-18

10/11

10/18

10/25

W, 30-14

11 a.m.

7:30 p.m.

11/01

Ground & Pound


Pack seeks to keep pace in MWC title hunt

11/15

at UNLV
TBA

11/22

11/29

TALE OF THE TAPE

2014 statistics

Nevada

Air Force

OFFENSE
Rushing

282.4

213.7

Passing

151.4

122.2

Pass Efficiency

163.8

405.7

Total Offense

433.9

192.0

Scoring

29.9

31.7

Defense
By Stone Harper

151.8

Rushing

131.0

After a week off from play, the Wolf Pack will travel to
Colorado Springs, Colorado to take on Air Force, a team
that has been in a thorn in Nevadas side the last two seasons. Last September, Nevada defeated Air Force 45-42 in
a thrilling game for one of the Wolf Packs four wins last
season. Two years ago it was a different story. Nevada
came into the game 6-2 and left with a 48-31 loss.
This year, Air Force comes into the game with a 7-2
record, including last weeks win over UNLV 48-21.
The Falcons also have perhaps the best win in all of the
Mountain West Conference when they beat Boise
State 28-14 back in September. Not only will this
be an important game in the fact that Air Force
has always played Nevada difficult but also
because Nevada controls its own destiny and
if the Pack wins its remaining three games, it
will represent the West in the MWC Championship game.

136.4

Pass Efficiency

125.4

444.8

Total Offense

364.9

25.1

Scoring
SPECIAL TEAMS/MISC.

22.0

37.1

Net Punting

36.7

9.7

Punt Returns

5.4

28.0

Kickoff Returns

19.8

+2

Turnover Margin

-1

2014 STATISTICAL LEADERS

Air Force
Category Avg./Game

Player

OWENS CONTINUES TREND OF


GOOD MWC RUNNING BACKS

Kale Pearson

Passing yds

134.8

Jacobi Owens

Rushing yds

109.8

Jalen Robinette Receiving yds

The MWC may not have the most talent or be


a power-five conference, but one thing that it
does have going for it is that it has some of
the best running backs in the country, from
Boise States Jay Ajayi, to Colorado States
Dee Hart and San Diego States
Donnel Pumphrey. This week
is no different, as they take on
Air Forces Jacobi Owens.
This season Owens has
rushed for 988 yards and five
touchdowns. Owens is fourth
in the conference in rushing
yards and has seemed to get out
of the funk he was in during the
middle of season. In the first three
weeks of October, Owens rushed for 78
yards, 54 yards and 64 yards respectively but in
his last two games he has rushed for a combined
253 yards and a touchdown including last week
against UNLV where he rushed for 135 yards
and a touchdown.
In the Packs last game against San Diego
State they held the MWC-leading rusher Donnel
Pumphrey to 75 yards rushing and forced him to
fumble the ball twice. The Wolf Pack will have
to have a similar showing against Owens if it
expects to be victorious.

Jordan Pierce

Tackles

Jordan Pierce

Tackles for loss

67.3
(81)
(14.0)

Interceptions

W. Steelhammer

(3)

Jacob Onyechi Punt return yds avg.

Scoring

(76)

Nevada
Category

Avg./Game

Will Conant

Player

15.0

Cody Fajardo

Passing yds

213.7

Don Jackson

Rushing yds

72.1

Jerico Richardson

Receiving yds

57.6

Jonathan McNeal

Tackles

(70)

Tackles for loss

(7.0)

Ian Seau

(3)

Interceptions

Duran Workman

Richy Turner Punt return yds avg.

(65)

Scoring

Brent Zuzo

9.7

*totals in parentheses
2014 MOUNTAIN STANDINGS

Standings

PIERCE PACES AIR FORCE


DEFENSE

Conference Overall

Colorado State
Boise State
Utah State
Air Force
Wyoming
New Mexico

Nevada has yet to face a defensive playmaker like the Falcons linebacker Jordan
Pierce. This season, Pierce is leading the
team in tackles with 81, tackles for loss
with 14, sacks with five and is second on
the team in interceptions with two. Pierce
is a play maker who does it all for the
Falcons (he even blocked a kick this year).
Pierce has also been playing really good
football in the past few weeks. He has
reached double-digit tackles in the last
three games and has recorded three sacks
in the same timeframe. Last week against
UNLV, he had 11 total tackles and a sack.
In the last few weeks, Nevada has not
played high quality opponents, and has been
able to stall on offense and still be able to come
away with a victory. This week it takes on a tough
challenge and it will be important for the Pack to
come out of the gates firing and in order for that to
happen, Nevada will have to stay away from Pierce.

5-1
4-1
4-1
3-2
2-4
1-4

9-1
7-2
7-3
7-2
4-6
3-6

2014 WEST STANDINGS

Standings

Conference Overall

Nevada
San Diego State
Fresno State
San Jose State
Hawaii

3-2
3-2
3-3
2-3
1-4

6-3
5-4
4-6
3-6
2-8

UNLV

1-5

2-8

AIR FORCE SCHEDULE

Stone Harper can be reached at sharper@sagebrush.


unr.edu. and on Twitter @StoneHarperNVSB.

Breanna Denney / Nevada Sagebrush

Senior Richy Turner (2) runs after making a catch during the San Diego State game on Saturday, Nov. 1. Turner caught three
passes for 49 yards and a touchdown in the win.

Date

Opponent

Time

Aug. 30

Nicholls State

Sept. 6

at Wyoming

Sept. 13

at Georgia State

W, 48-38

Sept. 27

Boise State

W, 28-14

Oct. 4

Navy

W, 30-21

Oct. 11

at Utah State

L, 34-16

Oct. 18

New Mexico

W, 35-31

Nov. 1

at Army

W, 23-6

Nov. 8

at UNLV

W, 48-21

Nov. 15

Nevada

11:00 a.m.

Nov. 21

at San Diego State

6:30 p.m.

Nov. 28

Colorado State

12:30 p.m.

W, 44-16
L,17-13

MAKING THE CALL

OPTIMIST SAYS

PESSIMIST SAYS

DIFFERENCE MAKER

Nevada has been playing extremely well recently, winning its


last three games including a pivotal division matchup against
San Diego State two weeks ago. Nevada has also done
very well on the road this year with a 3-1 record away from
Mackay Stadium. The running game is starting to flourish
after two running backs rushed for over 100 yards against
San Diego State. Nevadas defense will continue to stop the
run game like it did against the Aztecs and the Wolf Pack will
continue its winning streak.

If Nevada has struggled at one thing this year, its putting


together a consistent game where special teams, offense
and defense all play well during the same game. That will
happen again and, unlike other games, a good Air Force team
will capitalize on the Wolf Packs mistakes to get the victory.
Nevada will struggle stopping the Falcons exceptional run
offense and will not be able to do enough on defense to counter
Air Forces talented group.

Nevada will face another quality Mountain West Conference


running back in Air Forces Jacobi Owens. Last week, Nevada
did a fantastic job against the MWC-leading rusher Donnel
Pumphrey, forcing him to commit two turnovers, but he still
managed to rush for 6.5 yards per carry. Owens comes into the
season having rushed for 988 yards which is good enough for
fourth in the conference. Last week against UNLV, he rushed
for 135 yards and a touchdown. The Wolf Pack will need to keep
Owens from making big plays and force the Falcons to pass the
ball, which is something Air Force has struggled to do.

OUTCOME: Nevada wins 24-17

OUTCOME: Air Force wins 34-17

JACOBI OWENS

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

SPORTS A9

@SagebrushSports | nevadasagebrush.com

Pack in the Pros


Week #10

Photo courtesy of Denver Broncos Media Services

Cleveland guard Joel Bitonio (75) sets a block against the Cincinnati Bengals on Thursday, Nov. 6. Behind
Bitonios blocking, the Browns routed the Bengals 24-3.

By Chris Boline
Each week The Nevada Sagebrush will take a look at former Wolf Pack players in the National
Football League. The week 10 editions top three players were all victorious this last weekend, and
one of those players is continuing his ascent into offensive Rookie of the Year consideration.

1. Joel Bitonio

3. JAMES-MICHAEL JOHNSON

The Browns offense didnt need to do much work


in this game (Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton had
an awful evening throwing three picks and under
100 passing yards), but Bitonio and the offensive
line still put in work. Three separate Cleveland running backs had touchdown runs, the offensive line
allowed no sacks and the Browns now sit atop the
AFC North standings. While Bitonio cannot take all
the credit the second round pick still deserves a hefty
amount of praise. The rookie has been instrumental
in keeping Cleveland rolling after center Alex Mack
went down earlier this season with a broken leg. The
Browns have already eclipsed their entire win total
from last season and Bitonio has played a big hand
in that turnaround.

In a battle of teams featuring Wolf Pack alumni,


Johnson and fellow former Nevada star Josh
Mauga were victorious against Duke Williams
Bills. While Mauga has been pacing the Chiefs in
tackles this season, Johnson outperformed his
comrade in the linebacking corps by racking up
six tackles, even though he did not even start the
game. Thus far, the former fourth round pick has
35 total tackles on the season which is good for
fifth on the team.

Offensive tackle, Cleveland Browns

2. Colin Kaepernick

Quarterback, San Francisco 49ers

Playing on the road this season has brought the


best out of Kaepernick. The quarterback is 3-2 on
the year and has scored some impressive wins while
away from California. In week one of the season, the
49ers knocked off the Cowboys. Then, in week six,
they bashed the Rams and, this last weekend, they
won a nail-biter in New Orleans against the Saints.
While Kap didnt have his best game (234 total yards
and one touchdown), he still played well enough for
San Francisco to stay afloat in the NFC West race.

Linebacker, Kansas City Chiefs

HONORABLE MENTION

Tara Park /Nevada Sagebrush

Nevada hitter Madison Foley spikes a ball against Boise State on Saturday, Nov. 8.
The Wolf Pack were defeated by the Broncos 3-0.

Volleyball better
than losses show

Rishard Matthews

Wide Receiver, Miami Dolphins


Matthews had a fairly quiet afternoon by
hauling in one catch for 14 yards. Nonetheless,
the Dolphins would be wise to throw to the third
year pro in the red zone. In both games this
season where Matthews had a touchdown reception, Miami was victorious. The wide receivers
current stat totals sit at seven receptions for 82
yards and two touchdowns.

Chris Boline can be reached at cboline@sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter @CDBoline.

Pack freshmen have big


expectations for team

By Tara Park
Despite losing this week to Utah State (3-1) and
Boise State (3-0), the Wolf Pack remained ninth in
the 11-team Mountain West Conference standing.
We are better than what our rank is, said hitter Sam Willoughby. Its a matter of playing to be
consistent.
Nevada remains ahead of San Diego State and
San Jose State in the MWC race, which the Wolf
Pack topped 3-1 and 3-0 earlier this season,
respectively.
The program has struggled immensely during
the last three seasons, totaling a mere 13 wins in
that span. However, Nevada (7-16, 4-9 MW) has
undergone major changes this year from strategy
on the court, work ethic in the weight room and
even higher academic standards.
Were trying to change the entire culture of
Nevada volleyball and this is the first season with
the big change, Willoughby said. You see the
change when we are playing well. When we dont
play well, thats when were slipping back into bad
habits.
Consistency has been the Wolf Packs Achilles
heel thus far. Earlier in the season, Nevada went
into the half up 2-0, only for Air Force to come
back and win 3-2. Yet, Nevada did the same thing
to Fresno State, giving the Pack its first conference
win of the season.
Many matches throughout the season have
ended in Nevada losing the set 23-25 or 22-25.
Players and coaches alike have stressed the teams
down-to-the-wire losses are due to digging themselves into holes early in its games.
However, the Wolf Pack has excelled in service
aces, averaging a conference-best of 1.63 per
game, with Wyoming trailing at 1.38.
Its an asset for us, said Nevada head coach
Ruth Lawanson. We were at the bottom last year
in serving, so its a nice step forward. Serving is
the first line of defense for us.
Leading the way for the Wolf Pack in the aces
category is Willoughby with 0.39. The junior
changed her serve last spring. Before, Willoughby
served from the floor, but now does a jump float.

Its a higher contact with the ball, Willoughby


said. I feel like its coming down [at the opponent]
faster. Im glad to see a result.
Other Nevada players have performed well so
far this season, adding their names to the group
of conference leaders.
Senior middle blocker Tessa Leaea ranks twelfth
in kills with 238. In the Packs first win this season
to Fresno, Leaea reached 1,000 kills for her career.
Lawanson believes that Leaea will be able to
reach 1,200 before the end of her final season at
Nevada. Leaea needs 1,172 career kills to tie Kelly
Martin (1991-94) at No. 10 on Nevadas all-time
record book.
Leaea appears on many of the years other
conference-leading lists. She is ranked eighth in
points, 10th in blocks and 19th in hitting percentage.
Setter Lyndsey Anderson is ranked ninth for
assists with 677. One player who is not on the
conference list, but has raised big numbers on
Nevadas player stats, is freshman Madison Foley.
[This season] has been very demanding and
busy, but it has also been a ton of fun, Foley
said. Theres some games where Im happy with
how I played and others where its the complete
opposite, but overall Im happy with the way Ive
performed this season.
Foley trails Leaea at 200 kills and has 210 digs
(second on the team behind libero Kara Kasser).
Lawanson compared Foley to a previous player,
Grace Anxo, in her freshman year.
[Anxo] came onto a more experienced team
with more seniors, Lawanson said. With only
two seniors, Foley is having to take a lot more of a
role than [Anxo] had to. In terms of what she had
to do this season shes done a really good job.
Five games remain on the Wolf Packs schedule,
including a pivotal Governor Series matchup
with UNLV tomorrow.
The next couple of matches will only move us
up [in conference rankings], Lawanson said. But
we have to play the whole game.
Tara Park can be reached at euribe@sagebrush.
unr.edu and on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

Williams is not only the most recognized


freshman, she is also the groups most versatile
player. Williams will play this season at point
guard and the three guard. She is also a very
skilled rebounder, averaging seven a game during her two varsity seasons in high school.

AJ CEPHAS

Tara Park /Nevada Sagebrush

Freshman AJ Cephas (32) holding a basketball after practice on Monday, Nov. 10. Cephas will contribute to the
team by low post scoring and shot blocking.

By Stone Harper

TEIGE ZELLER

Zeller has had an interesting road to Reno. She


was born in Dubai, but was raised in Los Lunas,
New Mexico where she became a basketball
standout while playing for her father Marty at
Los Lunas High School. There she was a first team
all-state performer during her sophomore, junior
and senior year. Even though she had offers from
Texas Tech, Arizona State and Oregon she decided
to come to Nevada.
At 6-foot-2, Zeller will be another big body
down in the post to get rebounds. She also has
a solid array of post moves and will be used as a
scorer in the paint.
Zeller will contribute to the Wolf Pack and has
massive expectations for her and the team.
I definitely expect us to win the conference

championship, Zeller said. For me, Im just


going to make sure I can contribute whenever I
can as a freshman and doing whatever I can to
help the team.
Despite her young age, Zeller is a physically
apt teenager, which is something womens basketball head coach Jane Albright noticed when
she recruited Zeller, describing her as being as
strong as a junior in college.

MARIAH WILLIAMS

Of all of the freshmen in the group, Williams has


the most hype. The website College Sports Madness
named Williams their Mountain West Conference
preseason freshman of the year. The thing that is
more impressive about the honor is that she didnt
play her senior year.
It was kind of unexpected because I didnt play my
senior year, so it was really a surprise. Williams said.

The last of the three freshman recruits is 6-foot


forward AJ Cephas. She will help bring a winning
background to Nevada due to her success at Deer
Valley High School in Antioch, California, where
she won three league titles. In 2014, during her
senior season, her team also won the California
Interscholastic Federation North Coast Section
D-1 championship. Cephas hopes to continue
her winning ways in college. She looks to bring
a MWC championship back to Reno.
Cephas will be counted on to come off the
bench and score with her good midrange game.
She will also be looked at for rim protection. As a
senior in high school, she averaged an incredible
4.5 blocks a game.
Though Cephas has a lot of defensive talent
and is good at scoring from midrange, she still
has a bit to improve on to make the next step
from high school standout to college superstar.
In high school, she had more success scoring
when facing the basket than on the blocks,
Albright said. She is still learning about the
physical nature of the game.
Stone Harper can be reached at sharper@sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter @StoneHarperNVSB.

Tara Park /Nevada Sagebrush

Freshman Mariah Williams (22) poses for a picture


during womens basketball media day on Monday,
Nov. 10. Williams was named preseason MWC
freshman of the year.

A10 SPORTS

@SagebrushSports | nevadasagebrush.com

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

Men
CONTINUED FROM PAGE A12

Coleman finished with a


game-high 28 points, while
going 3-6 from the three-point
area and 11-13 from the free
throw line. The main story of
Colemans game was how differently he played during the first
and second halves. During the
first half, Coleman was 1-5 from
the field and had only scored
three points while the Wolf Pack
trailed the Cougars 36-29.
However, in the second half,
everything changed. The Wolf
Pack players started to make
smarter choices with the ball,
the defense was stingier and
Coleman started making his
shots.
I thought he found his
groove, said Nevada head
coach David Carter. I think in
the first half [Coleman] wasnt
playing as aggressively as he
should and in the second half he
had more of a purpose.
He played like former great
Deonte Burton, the man Coleman backed up for his first two
years at Nevada. He had the
same mannerisms that Burton
had in this game and everyone
seemed to notice it.
He kind of reminded me of
[Burton] out there, said junior
AJ West. We got fueled off of his
energy and everyone enjoyed
watching [Coleman] embrace
his inner [Burton].
However Coleman was not
the only Pack player who played
well, West had a double-double
recording 12 points and 15
rebounds and paced the Wolf
Pack defense, Access Denied
as he refers to himself on Twitter
blocked five shots to validate his
nickname. His energy got the
rest of the players more involved
on defense, limiting the Cougars

WWE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE A12

This event will most likely


occur in the following two situations: 1) after nearly decapitating
UNLV quarterback Blake Decker
in the final game of the regular
season or 2) by being named the
defensive MVP in the MWC title
game.
Either way, not only will the
Wolf Pack likely win if he does
this, but America will as well.

2) RUNNING BACK DON


JACKSON BOOKER T

Blake Miller /Nevada Sagebrush

Nevada point guard Marqueze Coleman (1) dribbles up court against Cal State San Marcos on Saturday, Nov. 8. Coleman finished with a game-high 28 points.
to 27 percent shooting from the
field in the second half.
We just wanted to do whatever it took to not disappoint
the fans, West said. That was
definitely our biggest priority out
there.
West did not disappoint the
fans. However, there was a Nevada player who did not perform
well in front of the Wolf Pack fans;

senior Michael Perez. The teams


leader in points per game among
returners struggled, scoring only
five points and going 0-4 from
the three point line. Even though
this was just an exhibition game
Perez will have to step up on the
scoring load if the team wants to
be successful this season.
Nonetheless, even with Perezs
off night, Nevada still had a

excellent showing from several


players in the rotation, including sophomore DJ Fenner, who
scored 13 points, four rebounds
and two assists on the game,.
Fenner, who is projected to start
at guard, was happy with the
squads showing.
It was a great way to get our
feet wet, Fenner said. Especially with the big guys, I feel

like it was a great way to get the


season started.
Though the night started out
slow, it ended with a win and
coach Carter realized this in the
grand scheme of things.
It was a tough game to play
because we didnt scout the way
we usually do, Carter said. It
was hard because we played a lot
of kids, I just wanted everyone

to get their feet wet and I wasnt


really worried about the score.
With the exhibition game
wrapped up Nevada will open
up its regular season with a game
against Cal Poly at the Lawlor
Events Center on Saturday.

SPINAROONIE

victory over the Aztecs that his


favorite wrestler is Jeff Hardy,
being compared to the five-time
WCW Champion is hardly a bad
compromise.

Master Sexay in some circles.


Combining the powers of the
most consistent member of the
Nevada defense (Dobrich was
named team captain for the
second year in a row) and the
MWCs sack leader (Seau has
seven on the year), this would
create pandemonium at Mackay.
Of course, Fajardo would be the
centerpiece of this ensemble
by pulling off the worm at the
50-yard line following a huge
touchdown strike.

4) HEAD COACH BRIAN


POLIAN TRIPLE H
ENTRANCE

awesomeness of the moment.


With the head coach having his
best season to date for Nevada,
he could very well pull this stunt
off to jack up his players to win
out this season.
Now if you dont agree with
the selections above, that is
your own choice, but for right
now, thats the bottom line.

While the Sacramento,


California native does not share
the same trademark dreadlocks
with Booker T, it is possible to
surmise that the aspiring rapper
has practiced his break-dancing
moves once or twice. Jackson has
broken out this year by leading
the team in rushing (he has 649
thus far) and if there were no
penalties for excessive celebration, it is possible the running
back could show this off after a
long touchdown run.
Even though Jackson
admitted in the post-game
press conference following the

3) DEFENSIVE END IAN


SEAU, QUARTERBACK
CODY FAJARDO AND
LINEBACKER JORDAN
DOBRICH TOO COOL
DANCE

This comparison makes sense


on multiple levels. Both Seau
and Rikishi are from American
Samoa heritage, Fajardos
hair looks great in a visor and
Dobrich is already called Grand

What better way to kick off


any homecoming game than
by having Polian spit a mist
of water in the air in front of
and on the Wolf Pack student
section? If this were to actually
occur before a big game, I am
fairly certain that a member
of the band (most likely a
tuba player) would spontaneously combust from the sheer

Stone Harper can be reached at


sharper@sagebrush.unr.edu or
on Twitter @StoneHarperNVSB.

Chris Boline can be reached at


cboline@sagebrush.unr.edu and
on Twitter @CDBoline.

Open Senate Seat for the College of Education

Apply online at
www.unrsearch.com
Breanna Denney /Nevada Sagebrush

Wolf Pack point guard Terilyn Moe (13) heaves a shot against an Academy of Art player on Friday, Nov. 7. Led by
Moe, Nevada routed the Knights 74-51.

Women
CONTINUED FROM PAGE A12

on the court, and I kind of like


to set the tone by example,
Moe said. What I learned most
there was speaking to your teammates, encouraging them, saying
names, so being a vocal leader.
Burns has also noticed a
change in Moe since the year has
started.
I think that now shes moved
back to it, shes more comfort-

able at (point guard), Burns


said. She still looks for her shot,
but shes really good at commanding the floor, letting us
know what she wants from us,
where shes going to pass it and
all that, so I think its just helped
her be aware of where everyone
is on the court and how to get
the team to run what we need to
run.
Nevada will be back in action
Friday against UC Santa Barbara. The Wolf Pack will look to
carry over dominance from the

exhibition, while still playing


the basic basketball head coach
Jane Albright and the staff has
instilled in the players.
Weve got a really deep
team, Albright said. We just
keep letting them try to improve.
Certainly there were a lot of
things we needed to work on,
but I thought for the first game it
was really exceptional.
Nicole Skow can be reached at
euribe@sagebrush.unr.edu and
on Twitter @TheSagebrush.

Inside Scoop
A11 SPORTS

@TheSagebrush | nevadasagebrush.com

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

ON TAP

WEEKLY TOP 5

WOMENS
BASKETBALL

Wolf Packs
biggest opponents

vs. UC Santa Barbara, Friday,


Nov. 14 at 6:30 p.m.

THE SKINNY: The Wolf Pack


opens up the season with a game
against UC Santa Barbara in
the Lawlor Events Center. Last
week, Nevada was able to win
its exhibition game against the
Academy of Art 74-51. A few
standouts from the game were
junior Terilyn Moe, who led the
team in scoring with 17 points,
Nyasha LeSure who had 16 points
and eight rebounds and senior
center Mimi Mungedi who had
11 points, four rebounds and a
block.

CROSS COUNTRY

Mountain Regional
Championship, Friday, Nov. 14,
Albuquerque, New Mexico

THE SKINNY: The Wolf


Pack travels to Albuquerque,
New Mexico to compete
in the Mountain Regional
Championship. In Nevadas
last race, it finished sixth in the
Mountain West Championship.
The Pack has been paced this
season by senior Demerey
Kirsch and junior EmKay Myers,
who have both broken the
Nevada record for fastest time
in a 6k race.

UNLV

SAN DIEGO STATE

SETON HALL

BOISE STATE

CALIFORNIA

MENS
BASKETBALL

vs. Cal Poly, Saturday, Nov. 15.


at 3 p.m.

THE SKINNY: Nevada will


open up the regular season
with a home game against Cal
Poly on Saturday. The Wolf
Pack was able to defeat Cal
State San Marcos 72-62 last
week in its exhibition. It was
led by Marqueze Coleman who
scored a game-high 28 points,
including the Wolf Packs last
17 points. Junior AJ West had
a double-double with 12 points
and 15 rebounds.

Tara Park/Nevada Sagebrush

Terilyn Moe poses for a photo during womens basketball media day on Monday, Nov. 10. The point guard came up just shy of a
triple-double in the season opener, scoring 17 points with nine rebounds and eight assists.

anything to win

WHOS HOT
MARQUEZE COLEMAN
BASKETBALL

After the first half of


Nevadas exhibition game
against Cal State San
Marcos, Coleman might
have been put in the Whos
Not section after going 1-5
shooting and only scoring
three points. Then the
second half happened, and
Coleman took the game
over. He was able to score
25 points in the second half
alone and also hit multiple
three pointers, rallying
Nevada to a 72-62 victory
after trailing by as much as
seven in the game.

Moe emerges as teams selfless leader

WHOS NOT
MICHAEL PEREZ
BASKETBALL

Few players were bestowed


with higher expectations
than Perez at the start of
the season. He was the
teams leading scorer among
returners, averaging 11 points
a game, and was one of the
teams returning starters.
However, Perezs season
got off to a rocky start. He
finished the game with five
points shooting 1-8 from the
field and 0-4 from three.
Perez will have to step it up if
the Wolf Pack is going to be
successful this season.

peak to Nevada point guard


Terilyn Moe for a few minutes
and some things will jump out.
T-Moe, as she goes by, is shy
and resists the limelight.
Ask her if she feels pressure to the
Wolf Packs main
offensive threat,
Moe will say:
I dont really
look for my shots
if its there, its
there. If someone
else is open,
theyre open.
Ask her what
Eric
her personal
Uribe
goals are, shell
reply:
I dont really have a personal goal.
I just want to win a Mountain West
championship.
Moe is the quintessential point guard
and an unselfish leader that has one
thing on her mind: winning.
While shoot-first point guards are
quickly taking over the game, in the
pros and even recently at Nevada, Moe
doesnt fall into the trend.
Moe, who played point guard during
high school, started at the wing during
her first two seasons with the Wolf Pack

while the departed Arielle Wideman


held down the point. While playing out
of position was an uphill climb, point
guard comes naturally to Moe.
Shes really unselfish and I think her
team recognizes that, said head coach
Jane Albright. They know she doesnt
care about her stats. Shes just trying to
make a play and help us win games.
The junior averaged 10.6 points and
2.7 assists a year ago both marks
ranked second best among the Wolf
Pack after a debilitating ACL injury
derailed her freshman campaign.
A full offseason, one not consumed
by rehabbing her knee, paid dividends
for Moe, where she worked tirelessly on
improving her jump shot.
Last year, she was take it all-in
or shoot a three, but this year shes
really developed a mid-range game,
Albright said. Ive seen more improvement in that area than anything else.
During Nevadas 74-51 exhibition
win against Academy of Art on Nov.
7, Moes state line read 17 points,
nine rebounds, eight assists and two
steals. While falling just shy of a triple
double, each figure was a team-high.
A heavy burden will rest on Moes
shoulders to score, especially after
the Wolf Pack lost Danika Shark

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and Wideman who combined


for nearly 33 percent of the teams
offense in 2013-14.
Moes strong suit is heading to the
charity stripe, which she reached 11
times against Academy of Art. Last
season, she attempted a jaw-jarring
180 free throws 63 more times
than her next teammate. Moes 139
made free throws placed her seventh
on Nevadas single-season record
book.
Despite standing at a pedestrian
5-foot-8, Moe has no fear of driving to the basket. While shes the
second-shortest girl on the roster, her
toughness is second to none.
Take for instance on Monday, Nov.
10 when Moe was hampered by a
swollen knee. Whereas most players
would sit out practice due to the
injury, according to Albright, Moe
was unsurprisingly out in full force.
Shes a blue collar and has a bit
of a chip on her shoulder, Albright
said. Shes not the one you have to
kick in the rear end and say, Come
on, lets go. She loves working hard.
Eric Uribe can be reached at euribe@
sagebrush.unr.edu and on Twitter
@Uribe_Eric.

File Photo

Former Nevada point guard Deonte Burton dunks


against UNLV on March 8, 2014. Notching two
victories against the Rebels will be difficult this
season without Burtons high-scoring capabilities.

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Sports
A12

@SagebrushSports | nevadasagebrush.com

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2014

womens

mens

moving
mountains
Photo illustration by Nicole Kowalewski with photos by Blake Miller (left), Breanna Denney (background) and Tara Park (right) /Nevada Sagebrush

Coleman
steps up in
Nevada win
By Stone Harper
The main idea of an exhibition game is for a team to
beat up on a lesser, opponent
in front of the schools home
crowd, in order to get them
excited for the season. For most
of Nevadas exhibition last Saturday that goal wasnt going as
planned. The Wolf Pack trailed
California State University San
Marcos with as little as four
minutes left in the game,

until point guard Marqueze


Coleman decided that enough
was enough and took matters
into his own hands. Coleman
scored the teams last 17 points,
leading Nevada to a 72-62 victory.
I was just taking over shots,
Coleman said. Whatever shots
fit with the offense in rhythm, I
was taking them and they kept
falling.

See MEN Page A10

Pack hits the season running


By Nicole Skow
Nevada basketball season
is back in full swing and the
womens team opened the
season with an exhibition
against Academy of Art Friday,
Nov. 7. The Wolf Pack gave fans
a glimpse of what is store for
the rest of the season,after
cruising to a 74-51 victory.
I think its a great win for
us, said forward Emily Burns.
Everyone wants to win their
home opener, so its definitely
lifted our spirits. We know we
can dominate like this on the
court and it just lets us know
that this is how we want to
play and this is how were
going to play. We just need to
keep it up like this.
The Mountain West preseason poll put Nevada in the
middle of the bunch, predict-

ing that the Wolf Pack would


finish fifth, despite finishing
third last season. The Wolf
Pack lost almost 40 percent
of its scoring with the exit
of Danika Sharp and Arielle
Wideman, who were the Packs
first and third leading scorers,
respectively.
We arent so much looking
at replacing that as we are at
looking at a different strategy,
said Wolf Pack associate head
coach Camille Williams. We
want to be more of an inside
game team, which will open
up our outside play. We got
Emily Burns moving out from
a post position to a guard
position, so that allows us to
play more inside-out so our
outside game will come from
the perimeter but, for now, we
want to emphasize getting the
ball inside.

The inside game might be


where the Wolf Pack talent is
deepest. When reigning MWC
Defensive Player of the Year
Mimi Mungedi starts, she
tends to get into foul trouble,
allowing players such as Aja
Johnson, Nyasha LeSure, Julia
Shelbourn and Teige Zeller to
get quality minutes. Fridays
game allowed the coaching
staff to work on the bench
players to show the coaching
staff why they deserve to play.
Moreover, the freshman
made quite a splash in the
home opener. Wing player
Mariah Williams had four
rebounds, while Zeller put
up eight points and seven
rebounds, four of which were
offensive. Despite being categorized as a freshmen, the
team doesnt view them in that
light.

We dont look at them as


freshmen, said point guard
Terilyn Moe. Theyre a part of
the team. We dont hold them
any lower than us. Theyre a
part of the team and we expect
them to produce.
With the arrival of only five
new players, the teams roster
is largely unchanged from last
year. A few tweaks have been
made, such as Burns playing
guard instead of post, but the
biggest change has been Moes
shift back to point guard. She
has spent her college career
playing shooting guard after
playing point guard in high
school. This past summer, she
attended a point guard camp
to help get back in the rhythm
of things.
It really helps me to be

See WOMEN Page A10

Do you smell what the Wolf Pack is cookin?

s the Pack prepared to


finish off San Diego
State two Saturdays
ago, a new face appeared on the Mackay Stadium
video board.
To quote
the immortal Jim Ross,
also known
as Good Ol
JR, Good
lord! Thats
Daniel
Bryan!
Indeed,
Chris
it was the
Boline
four-time
WWE world
champion on the video board,
(I mean TitanTron,) starting his
trademark Yes chant. Even
though the Mackay faithful
were not as up to speed during

the first unveiling of the chant


(many seemed confused and
bewildered), this was not the
case late in the fourth quarter.
Following a 47-yard run by
running back Don Jackson to
put the game away, Bryan came
on the board a second time and
the house was brought down.
Propelled by this momentum,
Nevada now sits at 6-3 on the
year and has a shot at making
its first conference title game
in its short history in the
Mountain West.
That being said, the Pack
could use all of the help it can
get during the home stretch of
the season and what better way
to get some extra confidence
than some inspiration from
professional wrestling? Thus,
this list was compiled to sort
the next best wrestling trend

to be implemented at football
games.
This countdown will consist
of the most to least probable WWE/F-inspired events
occurring at the next Wolf Pack
football game.

1) DEFENSIVE END BROCK


HEKKING HULK HOGAN
RIPPING HIS SHIRT
Fueled by the recent 30 for 30
documentary on his idol Brian
Bosworth, Hekking will be at his
testosterone-fueled peak the
next time Nevada takes the field.
With his adrenaline pumping at
an all-time high, the defensive
end will rip off his jersey
following a big play to emulate
one of the greatest heavyweight
champions of all time.

See WWE Page A10

Photo: (CC) Ed Webster/Flickr.com

WWE superstar Triple H makes his entrance during Wrestlemania 28 on April 1, 2012. Columnist Chris Boline
suggests Nevada head coach Brian Polian duplicate a similar entrance during football games.