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IMPACT modules consist of focused, in-depth training content that can be consumed in about 1-2 hours

Welcome to NAS Foundations

Course Description

Start Training Run/Download the PowerPoint presentation

Student Resource Guide Training slides with notes

Assessment Must be completed online


(Note: Completed Assessments will be reflected online within 24-48 hrs.)

Complete Course Directions on how to


update your online transcript to reflect a
complete status for this course.

For questions or support please contact Global Education

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EMC Global Education IMPACT

Course Completion

Link to Knowledgelink to update your transcript and indicate that you have completed the course.

NAS Foundations
Course Completion Steps:

1.

Logon to Knowledgelink (EMC Learning management system).

2.

Click on 'My Development'.

3.

Locate the entry for this learning event you wish to complete.

4.

Click on the complete icon [

].

Note: The Mark Complete button does not apply to items with the Type: Class, Downloadable (AICC Compliant)
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EMC Global Education

NAS Foundations IMPACT


Course Description

e-Learning

This foundation level course provides participants


with an understanding of Networked Attached
Storage (NAS) and the EMCs Celerra NAS offering.

Course
Number:
Method:

MR-5WP-NASFD
IMPACT

Duration:

3 hours

Audience
This course is intended for any person who presently or plans to:
Educate partners and/or customers on the value of Networked Attached Storage (NAS) and
the EMCs Celerra NAS offering

Provide technical consulting skills and support for EMC products

Analyze a Customers business technology requirements

Qualify the value of EMCs products

Collaborate with customers as a storage solutions advisor

Prerequisites
Prior to taking this course, participants should have completed the following courses:
None
Course Objectives
Upon successful completion of this course, participants should be able to:
Describe Network Attached Storage and its benefit

List NAS configuration considerations

Describe Celerra NAS Products

List Celerra Management Software

Identify Celerra opportunities based on platform, benefits, and support services

Modules Covered
These modules are designed to support the course objectives. The following modules are
included in this course:
This course includes a single module on Networked Attached Storage.
Labs
Labs reinforce the information you have been taught. The labs for this course include:
None
Assessments
Assessments validate that you have learned the knowledge or skills presented during a
learning experience. This course includes a self-assessments test, to be conducted on-line
via KnowledgeLink, EMCs Learning Management System.

If you have any questions, please contact us by email at GlobalEd@emc.com

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1 of 1

NAS Foundations, 1

NAS Foundations

EMC Global Education


2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Welcome to NAS Foundations.


Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.
These materials may not be copied without EMC's written consent.
EMC believes the information in this publication is accurate as of its publication date. The information is subject to change
without notice.
THE INFORMATION IN THIS PUBLICATION IS PROVIDED AS IS. EMC CORPORATION MAKES NO
REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WITH RESPECT TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS
PUBLICATION, AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
Use, copying, and distribution of any EMC software described in this publication requires an applicable software license.
EMC, Celerra, CLARiiON, and Symmetrix are registered trademarks of EMC Corporation.
All other trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 2

EMC Technology Foundations


z EMC Technology Foundations consists of AutoIS, SAN

products, NAS products and Storage Platforms, as well


as advanced storage management software.

z EMC Technology supports the portfolio of end-to-end

services designed to help accelerate the


implementation of Information Lifecycle Management
(ILM).

z ILM uses EMC Technology to enable organizations to

better and more cost-effectively manage, properly


protect, achieve compliance and improve the availability
of their business information in a way that ties varying
information usefulness to business goals and service
levels.

EMC Global Education


2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

This course describes Network Attached Storage and the features that contribute to EMC Technology.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 3

NAS Foundations
z After completing this course, you will be able to:
Describe Network Attached Storage and explain its value
List NAS Configuration Issues
Describe Celerra NAS Platforms
List Celerra Software Features
List Celerra Management Software
List Windows Specific Options
List NAS Business Continuity Options

EMC Global Education


2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

These are the learning objectives for this training. Please take a moment to read them.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 4

Network Attached Storage


NAS Overview

EMC Global Education


2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Lets start by looking at an overview of NAS.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 5

What Is Network-Attached Storage?


Client Application

Application

Application

z Built on the concept of

shared storage on a Local


Unix Client
Area Network

z Leverages the benefits of

Windows Client

Unix Client

Network

a network file server and


network storage

z Utilizes industry-standard

network and file sharing


protocols

File Server + Network-attached storage = NAS


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The benefit of NAS is that it now brings the advantages of networked storage to the desktop through file-level sharing of
data.
NAS is network-centric. Typically used for client storage consolidation on a LAN, NAS is a preferred storage capacity
solution for enabling clients to access files quickly and directly. This eliminates the bottlenecks users often encounter when
accessing files from a general-purpose server.
NAS provides security and performs all file and storage services through standard network protocols, using TCP/IP for data
transfer, Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet for media access, and CIFS, http, and NFS for remote file service. In addition, NAS
can serve both UNIX and Microsoft Windows users seamlessly, sharing the same data between the different architectures.
For client users, NAS is the technology of choice for providing storage with un-encumbered access to files.
Although NAS trades some performance for manageability and simplicity, it is by no means a lazy technology. Gigabit
Ethernet allows NAS to scale to high performance and low latency, making it possible to support a myriad of clients through
a single interface. Many NAS devices support multiple interfaces and can support multiple networks at the same time.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 6

Why NAS?
z Highest availability

Firewall

z Scales for growth

Internal
Network

z Avoids file replication


S1

Internet
S2
..
..

NAS

z Increases flexibility
z Reduces complexity
z Improves security
z Costs

Sn
Web
Servers

Data Center

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Shared applications can now achieve the availability, scalability benefits of networked storage. Centralizing file storage
reduces system complexity and system administration costs. Backup, restore, and disaster recovery are simplified.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 7

NAS Operations
NAS

z All IO operations use File level IO

protocols

No awareness of disk volumes or disk


sectors

Application

z File system is mounted remotely using a

network file access protocol, such as:

IP Network

Network File System (NFS)


Common Internet File System(CIFS)
z IO is redirected to remote system

NAS Device

z Utilizes mature data transport (e.g.,

TCP/IP) and media access protocols

z NAS device assumes responsibility for

organizing data (R/W) on disk and


managing cache

Direct
Attach

OR

SAN

Disk

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One of the key differences of a NAS disk device, compared to DAS or other network storage solutions such as SAN, is that
all I/O operations use file level I/O protocols. File I/O is a high level type of request that, in essence, specifies only the file to
be accessed, but does not directly address the storage device. This is done later by other operating system functions in the
remote NAS appliance.
A file I/O specifies the file. It also indicates an offset into the file. For instance, the I/O may specify Go to byte 1000 in
the file (as if the file were a set of contiguous bytes), and read the next 256 bytes beginning at that position.
Unlike block I/O, there is no awareness of a disk volume or disk sector in a file I/O request. Inside the NAS appliance, the
operating system keeps tracks of where files are located on disk. The OS issues a block I/O request to the disks to fulfill the
file I/O read and write requests it receives.
The disk resources can be either directly attached to the NAS device, or they can be attached using a SAN.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 8

NAS Architecture
To Storage

NFS and CIFS handle file


requests to remote file
system

Application
Remote I/O
request
Operating System
I/O Redirector

I/O is encapsulated by
TCP/IP Stack to move
over the network
NAS device converts
requests to block IO and
reads or writes data to
NAS disk storage

NFS/CIFS

TCP/IP Stack

Storage Network
Protocol
(Fibre Channel)
Drive Protocol (SCSI)
NAS
Operating
System
Network File
Protocol Handler
TCP/IP Stack

Network Interface

Network Interface
File I/O to NAS

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The Network File system (NFS) protocol and Common Internet File system (CIFS) protocol handle file I/O requests to the
remote file system, which is located in the NAS device. I/O requests are packaged by the initiator into the TCP/IP protocols
to move across the IP network. The remote NAS file system converts the request to block I/O and reads or writes the data to
the NAS disk storage. To return data to the requesting client application, the NAS appliance software re-packages the data
to move it back across the network.
Here we see an example of an IO being directed to the remote NAS device and the different protocols that play a part in
moving the request back and forth to the remote file system located on the NAS server.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 9

NAS Device
z Single-purpose machine or

Client Application

component, serves as a dedicated,


high-performance, high-speed
communication of file data

IP Network

z Is sometimes called a filer or a

network appliance,

z Uses one or more Network Interface

Cards (NICs) to connect to the


customer network

z Uses proprietary optimized operating

system; DART, Data Access in Real


Time, is EMCs NAS operating
system

NAS Device
Network Drivers and Protocols
NFS

CIFS

NAS Device OS (DART)


Storage Drivers and Protocols

z Use storage protocols to connect to

networked storage resources

Disk
Storage

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A NAS server is not a general-purpose computer significantly reduced/tuned OS in comparison to general purpose
computer. It is sometimes called a filer because it focuses all of its processing power solely on file service and file storage.
The NAS device is sometimes called a network appliance, referring to the plug and play design of many NAS devices.
Common network interface cards (NICs) include gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mb/s) or Fast Ethernet (10Mb/s), ATM, and FIDDI.
Some NAS also supports NDMP, Novell Netware, and HTTP protocols.
The NAS operating system for Network Appliance products is called Data ONTAP. The NAS operating system for EMC
Celerra is DART - Data Access in Real Time. These operating systems are tuned to perform file operations including
open, close, read, write, etc.
The NAS device will generally use a standard drive protocol to manage data to and from the disk resources.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 10

NAS Applications
z CAD/CAM environments, where

widely dispersed engineers have to


share and modify design drawings

z Serving Web pages to thousands of

workstations at the same time

z Easily sharing company-wide

information among employees

z Database application

Low transaction rate


Low data volatility
Smaller in size
Not performance constrained

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10

Database applications have traditionally been implemented in a SAN architecture. The primary reason is the deterministic
performance of a SAN. This characteristic is especially applicable for very large, on-line transactional applications with
high transaction rates and high data volatility.
However, NAS might be appropriate where the database transaction rate is low and performance is not constrained.
Extensive application profiling should be done in order to understand the specific database application requirement and, if in
fact, a NAS solution would be appropriate.
When considering a NAS solution, the databases should:
be sequentially accessed, non-indexed or have a flat file structure
have a low transaction rate
have a low data volatility
be relatively small
do not have performance / timing constraints

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 11

NAS Configuration
An Introduction

EMC Global Education


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This section will introduce NAS configurations.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

11

NAS Foundations, 12

What is a Network?
z LAN

Site 1

z Physical Media
z WAN

Site 2
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12

LAN
A network is any collection of independent computers that communicate with one another over a shared network medium.
LANs are networks usually confined to a geographic area, such as a single building or a college campus. LANs can be small,
linking as few as three computers, but often linking hundreds of computers used by thousands of people.
Physical Media
An important part of designing and installing a network is selecting the appropriate medium. There are several types in use
today: Ethernet, Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and Token Ring.
Ethernet is popular because it strikes a good balance between speed, cost, and ease of installation. These benefits, combined
with wide acceptance in the computer marketplace and the ability to support virtually all popular network protocols, make
Ethernet an ideal networking technology for most computer users today.
WAN
Wide area networking combines multiple LANs that are geographically separate. This is accomplished by connecting the
different LANs using services such as dedicated leased phone lines, dial-up phone lines (both synchronous and
asynchronous), satellite links, and data packet carrier services. Wide area networking can be as simple as a modem and
remote access server for employees to dial into, or it can be as complex as hundreds of branch offices globally linked using
special routing protocols and filters to minimize the expense of sending data sent over vast distances.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 13

Physical Components
z Network

NIC

Interface Card
(NIC)

z Switches

Switch
155.10.10.XX

z Routers
NIC

Router

NIC
155.10.20.XX
Switch
NIC
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13

Network Interface Card


A network topology is the geometric arrangement of nodes and cable links in a LAN, and is used in two general
configurations: bus and star.
Network interface cards, commonly referred to as NICs, are used to connect a Host, Server, Workstation, PC, etc. to a
network. The NIC provides a physical connection between the networking cable and the computer's internal bus. The rate at
which data passes back and forth can be different.
Switches
LAN switches can link multiple network connections together. Todays switches will accept and analyze the entire packet of
data to catch certain packet errors and keep them from propagating through the network before forwarding it to its
destination. Each of the segments attached to an Ethernet switch has the full bandwidth of the switch
10Mb/100Mb/1Gigabit.
Routers
Routers pass traffic between networks. Routers also divide networks logically instead of physically. An IP router can divide
a network into various subnets so that only traffic destined for particular IP addresses can pass between segments.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 14

Network Protocols
z Transport

NIC

Protocols

z File system

Switch

Protocols

155.10.10.XX

NIC
Router

NIC
Switch

155.10.20.XX

NIC
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14

Network protocols are standards that allow computers to communicate. A protocol defines how computers identify one
another on a network, the form that the data should take in transit, and how this information is processed once it reaches its
final destination. Protocols also define procedures for handling lost or damaged transmissions, or "packets."
Network transport protocols are used to manage the movement of data packets to devices communicating across the
network. UDP and TCP are examples of transport protocol. UDP is used in non-connection oriented networks, while TCP is
used to manage the movement of data packets in connection oriented networks.
TCP/IP (for UNIX, Windows NT, Windows 95 and other platforms), IPX (for Novell NetWare), DECnet (for networking
Digital Equipment Corp. computers), AppleTalk (for Macintosh computers), and NetBIOS/NetBEUI (for LAN Manager and
Windows NT networks) are examples of network transport protocols in use today.
Network files system protocols are use to manage how data requests will be processed once it reaches its final destination.
The NFS, Network File System protocol, is used to manage file access in a networked UNIX environment and it supports
both UDP and TCP transport protocols.
The CIFS, Common Internet File system protocol, is used to manage file access in a networked Windows environment and it
supports both UDP and TCP transport protocols.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 15

Network Addressing
155.10.10. 14
Host name Mary

155.10.10.13
Host Name Peter

z IP Addressing
DHCP
Server

z DHCP

DNS Server

z DNS

155.10.10.11

155.10.10.XX
155.10.10.12
Router
155.10.20.XX

Switch

Host Name = Account1


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155.10.20.11

15

Several things must happen in order for computers, attached to a network, to be able to communicate data across the
network. First, the computer must have a unique network address, referred to as the IP Address. It is a four octet number, for
example 155.10.20.11, that uniquely identifies this computer to all other computers connected to the network.
An address can be assigned in one of two ways; dynamically or statically. A static address requires entering the IP address
that the computer will use in a local file. This can be quite a problem from an administrative view, as well as a source of
conflict. If two computers on the same subnet are assigned the same IP address, they would not be able to communicate.
Another approach is to set up a computer on the network to dynamically assign an IP address to a host when it joins the
network. This is called the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP Server). In our example, the host Mary is assigned
an IP address 155.10.10.14, and the host Peter is assigned an IP address 155.10.10.13 by the DHCP server. The NAS
device, Account1, is a File server. Servers normally will have a statically assigned IP address. In this example, it has the IP
address 155.10.20.11.
A second requirement for communications is to know the address of the recipient of the communication. The more common
approach is to communicate by name, for example, the name you place on a letter. However, the network uses numerical
addresses. IP addresses can be managed in three ways. The first approach is to enter the IP address into the application (IP
address in place of www.x.com in your browser). The second is to maintain a local file with host names and associated IP
addresses. The third is a hierarchical database called Domain Name Service (DNS), which resolves host names to IP
addresses. In our example, if someone on host Mary wants to talk to host Peter, it is the DNS server that resolves Peter to
155.10.20.13.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 16

Volume and Files


155.10.10. 14
Host name Mary

155.10.10.13
Host Name Peter

z Create Volumes

Volume

z Create Network

DHCP
Server

DNS Server

Filesystem

155.10.10.11

155.10.10.12
Router
NAS
Account1

155.10.20.11
File System

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Array

/Acct_ Rep

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16

Create Array Volume


The first step in a network attached storage environment is to create logical volumes on the array and assign it a LUN
Identifier. The LUN will then be presented to the NAS device.
Create NAS Volume
The NAS device will perform a discovery operation when it first starts or when directed. In the discovery operation, the
NAS device will see the array LUN as a physical drive. The next task is to create logical volume at the NAS device level.
The Celerra will create meta volumes using the volume resources presented by the array.
Create Network File
When the logical volumes are created on the Celerra, it can use them to create a file system.
In this example, we have created a file system /Acct_Rep on the NAS server Account1.
Mount File system
Once the file system has been created, it must be mounted. With the file system mounted, we can then move to the next step,
which is publishing the file system on the network.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 17

Publish 155.10.10. 14

Group Name = SALES

Host name Mary


User Mary
MS Windows
Share

z Export
DNS Server

z Share

155.10.10.11

155.10.10. 13
Host name Peter
User Peter
Unix
Export

DHCP
Server

155.10.10.12
Router

Group Name = Accounting


NAS

155.10.20.11

Array

ACCOUNT1 /Acct_ Rep


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17

Now that a network file system has been created, there are two ways it can be accessed using the network. The first method
is through the UNIX environment. This is accomplished by performing an Export. The Export also publishes those
UNIX clients who can mount (access) the remote file system. The export is published using NFS. Access permissions are
assigned when the export is published.
The second method is through the Windows environment. This is accomplished by publishing a share. The share publishes
those Windows clients who map a drive to access the remote file system. The share is published using CIFS. Access
permission are assigned when the share is published.
In our example, we may only allow Mary and Peter, who are in the Sales organization, share or export access. At this
level, NFS and CIFS are performing the same function but are used in different environments. In our example, all members
of the Group SALES, which include the users Mary and Peter, are granted access to /Acct_Rep.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 18

Client Access

Group Name = SALES


155.10.10. 13
Host name Peter
User Peter

155.10.10. 14
Host name Mary
User Mary
MS Windows

Unix

MAP

z Mount

DNS Server

z MAP

155.10.10.11

nfsmount

DHCP
Server

155.10.10.12
Router

Group Name = Accounting


NAS

155.10.20.11

Array

ACCOUNT1 /Acct_ Rep


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18

To access the network file system, the client must either mount a directory or map a drive pointing to the remote file system.
Mount is a UNIX command performed by a UNIX client to set a local directory pointer to the remote file system. The
mount command uses NFS protocol to mount the export locally.
For a UNIX client to perform this task, it will execute the nfsmount command. The format for the command is:
nfsmount /name of the NAS server:name of the remote file system / name of the local directory
For example:
nfsmount /Account1:Acct_Rep /localAcct_Rep.

For a Windows client to perform this task, it will execute a map network drive. The sequence is my computer> tools>map
network drive. Select the drive letter and provide the server name and share name in the Folder field.
For example:
G:
\\Account1\Acct_Rep
If you make a comparison, the same information is provided: the local drive (Windows) or the local directory and the name
of the NAS server and the name of the export or the share.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 19

File Permissions

Group Name = SALES


155.10.10. 13
Host name Peter
User Peter

155.10.10. 14
Host name Mary
User Mary
MS Windows

z Creates File

Unix
DNS Server

z File Request

155.10.10.11

DHCP
Server

155.10.10.12
Router

Group Name = Accounting


NAS

Account1

155.10.20.11

Array

/Acct_ Rep
Files

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MRPT1

PRPT2

2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

19

Creates file
Once access is gained by the client, files can be created on the remote file system. When a file is created by a client, normal
permission is assigned. The Client can also modify the original permissions file assigned to a file. File permission is changed
in UNIX using the chmod command. File permission in Windows is changed through Right clicking on the selected file,
then selecting Properties> Security add or remove group add or remove permissions. It should be noted that in order to
modify the file permissions, one must have the permission to make the change.
File request
Once access is gained by the client, files can be created on the remote file system. When a file is created, normal permission
is assigned or can be modified. File permission is changed in UNIX using the chmod command and file permission in
Windows is changed through Right clicking on the selected file >Properties> Security add or remove group add or remove
permissions. It should be noted that in order to modify the file permissions, one must have the permission to make the
change.
If a request for a file is received by the NAS server, the NAS server will first authenticate the user either locally or over the
network. If the user identity is confirmed, then the user will be allowed to perform operations contained in the file
permissions for the user of the Group to which the user is a member.
In our example, user Mary on host Mary creates a file MRPT1 on the NAS server Accout1. She assigns herself the normal
permission for this file, which allows her to read and write to this file. She also limits file permissions to other members of
the Group Sales to read only. User Peter on host Peter is a member of the Group SALES. Peter has access to the export /
Acct_Rep. If user Peter attempts to write to file MRPT1, he would be denied the permission to write to the file.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 20

EMC NAS Platforms


Products

EMC Global Education


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Let examine the current NAS products offered by EMC.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

20

NAS Foundations, 21

EMC NAS Platforms

Spanning the Enterprise


Microsoft OS
Based
Data Integrity
1 Intel Based

Celerra Family DART OS Based


High Availability

High Availability

1 or 2 Data Movers 1 or 2 Data Movers

Advanced Clustering

Advanced Clustering

214 Data Movers

214 Data Movers

Windows NAS

Integrated NAS

SAN and NAS

SAN and NAS

SAN, NAS and MPFS

Replication

Replication

Replication

Replication

Replication and advanced


business continuity

Netwin

Celerra
NS X00S
NSX00

EMC Global Education

Celerra
NS X00GS
NS X00G

Celerra /
CLARiiON
Golden Eagle /
Eagle frame

2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

Celerra /
Symmetrix
Golden Eagle /
Eagle frame
21

EMC offers four DART Operating System alternatives, the Celerra NS range, Celerra / CLARiiON range, and Celerra /
Symmetrix range.
The processing power, supported storage capacity, number of Ethernet connections, and functionality provided are listed on
the slide to differentiate the offerings. The most full-function, high capacity offering is the Celerra / Symmetrix, offering
capacity up to 52 TB and 224 Ethernet connections. It also provides the most sophisticated business continuance and
disaster recovery solutions through TimeFinder/FS and SRDF.
The Celerra / Symmetrix SE offers both the Symmetrix and Celerra technology in one cabinet. It provides an excellent
solution for customers who have floor space constraints, as a proof of concept solution, or a lower end need that requires
Symmetrix functionality.
Another option the customer has is to front-end a CLARiiON CX600 with the Celerra. This fits well in an environment with
existing CLARiiONs and associated experience. Full function disaster recovery requirements are better suited for a Celerra /
Symmetrix solution.
As we progress through this module, you will see that the functionality provided through DART, running on the Celerra
Data Mover, is the same, regardless of the back-end storage used. The differences will be noted.
Note: These numbers are maximums and may require non-standard configurations.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 22

Celerra NAS - SAN Scalability


z Consolidated storage

infrastructure for all applications

z NAS front end scales

independently of SAN back end


Connect to multiple Symmetrix,
CLARiiON
Improved utilization

z Allocate storage to Celerra and

Celerra
NSX00G
NSX00GS

CLARiiON
CX Family

Celerra
Golden
Eagle/
Eagle
Connectrix
SAN

servers as needed

Easy to move filesystems among


Data Movers
Online filesystem growth
z Centralized management for SAN

and NAS

Symmetrix
DMX Family

Windows
UNIX
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22

One of the reasons that Celerra Golden Eagle scales impressively is due to the architecture that separates the NAS front end
(Data Movers) from the SAN back end (Symmetrix or CLARiiON).
This allows the front end and back end to grow independently. Customers can merely add Data Movers to the Celerra
Golden Eagle to scale the front-end performance to handle more clients. As the amount of data increases, you can add more
disks, or the Celerra Golden Eagle can access multiple Symmetrix or CLARiiON. This flexibility leads to improved disk
utilization.
Celerra Golden Eagle supports simultaneous SAN and NAS access to the CLARiiON and Symmetrix. Celerra Golden Eagle
can be added to an existing SAN, and general purpose servers can now access unused back-end capacity. This extends the
improved utilization, centralized management, and TCO benefits of SAN plus NAS consolidation to Celerra Golden Eagle,
Symmetrix, and CLARiiON.
The configuration can also be reconfigured via software. Since all Data Movers can see the entire file space, it is easy to
reassign filesystems to balance the load. In addition, filesystems can be extended online as they fill.
Even though the architecture splits the front end among multiple Data Movers and a separate SAN back end, the entire NAS
solution can be managed as a single entity.
The Celerra NSx00G (configured with two Data Movers) and the Celerra NSx00GS (configured with a single Data Mover)
connects to a CLARiiON CX array through a fibre channel switch. Celerra NSx00G / NSx00GS supports simultaneous SAN
and NAS access to the CLARiiON CX family.

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NAS Foundations, 23

Celerra Family Hardware

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Lets take a closer look at the hardware components of the Celerra family.

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23

NAS Foundations, 24

Celerra Family Control Station Hardware


z Two form factors
Golden Eagle and Eagle
Frame

Golden Eagle
and Eagle
Frame

Control Station
Control Station

NS XXX Frame

Control
Station

NS XXX Frame
Control Station
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Control Station provides the controlling subsystem of the Celerra, as well as the management interface to all file server
components. The Control Station provides a secure user interface as a single point of administration and management for the
whole Celerra solution. Control Station administrative functions are accessible via the local console, Telnet, or a Web
Browser.
The Control station is single Intel processor based, with high memory capacity. Dependant upon the model, the Control
Stations may have internal storage. Currently, the NS and Golden Eagle frame series only have this feature.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 25

Celerra Family Data Mover Hardware


z Single or Dual Intel Processors
z PCI or PCI-X based
z High memory capacity
z Multi-port Network cards
z Fibre Channel connectivity to

storage arrays

z No internal storage devices

Data Mover
Golden Eagle and Eagle Frame

z Redundancy mechanism
NS XXX
Frame
Data Mover

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Each Data Mover is an independent, autonomous file server that transfers requested files to clients and will remain unaffected, should a
problem arise with another Data Mover. The multiple Data Movers (up to 14) are managed as a single entity. Data Movers are hot
pluggable and can be configured with standbys to implement N to1 availability. A Data Mover (DM) connects to a LAN through FE,
GigE, FDDI, and ATM. The default name for a Data Mover is server n, where n is its slot location. For example, in the Golden Eagle/
Eagle frame, a Data Mover can be in slot location 2 through 15 (i.e. server_2 - server_15 in Celerra Golden Eagle/ Eagle frame). There is
no remote login capability on the DM, nor do they run any binaries (very secure).
Data Mover redundancy is the mechanism by which the Celerra family reduces the network data outage in the event of a Data Mover
failure. The ability to failover the Data Movers is achieved by the creation of a Data Mover configuration database on the Control Station
system volumes and is managed via the Control Station. No Data Mover failover will occur if the Control Station is not available for some
reason.
Standby Data Mover configuration options: 1. Each standby Data Mover, as a standby for a single primary Data Mover
2. Each standby
Data Mover, as a standby for a group of primary Data Movers 3. Multiple standby Data Movers for a primary Data Mover. These Standby
Data Movers are powered and ready to assume the personality of their associated Primary Data Movers, in the event of a failure. If a
Primary Data Mover fails, the Control Station will detect the failure and initiate the failover process. The failover procedure, in an
Automatic configuration, is as follows.
The Control Station will:
1. Remove power from the failed Data Mover
2. Set the location for the Standby Data Mover to assume its new personality in the configuration database.
3. Control the personality take over and allow the Standby Data Mover to assume the primary role, thereby
enabling clients to re-access their data.
Once the failed Data Mover is repaired, the failback mechanism is always manually administrator initiated. This process is
the reverse of the failover process and restores the primary functionality to the repaired Primary Data Mover and returns the Standby Data
Mover into its standby state in preparation for any future outage. There are three operational modes of operation for Failover: Automatic,
Retry, and Manual. Automatic Mode: the Control Station detects the failure of a Data Mover. The failover process occurs without trying
any recovery process first. Retry Mode: the Control Station detects the failure, an attempt to reboot the failed Data Mover is tried first
before the failover procedure is initiated. Manual Mode: the Control Station will detect the failure and remove power from the failed Data
Mover. However, no further Data Mover recovery action will be taken until administrative intervention. Recovery after a Data Mover
failover is always a manual process.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 26

NAS Reference Documentation


z NAS Interoperability Matrix
Data Movers
Control Stations
Software supported features
www.emc.com/horizontal/interoperability

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The NAS interoperability Guide provides support information on the Data Movers and Control Station models, NAS
software version, supported features, storage models, and microcode. This interoperability reference can be found at:
http://www.emc.com/horizontal/interoperability

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 27

Celerra Family Software


Software Operating System

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Now lets look at operating system software used by the Celerra Family.

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27

NAS Foundations, 28

Celerra Software Operating Systems


z Linux 7.2
This is an industry hardened and EMC modified Operating system loaded on the
Control Station to provide
Secure NAS management environment
Growing in popularity and corporate acceptance

z DART Data Access in Real Time


This is a highly specialized Operating system designed to optimize network traffic
Input/Output throughput and is loaded on the Data Movers
Is multi-threaded to optimize load balancing capabilities of the multi-processor Data
Movers
Advanced volume management - UxFS

Large file size and filesystem support


Online filesystem extensibility
Metadata logging for fast recovery
Striped volume support

Feature rich to support the varied specialized capabilities of the Celerra range

Data Mover Failover


Networking functionality Port Aggregation, FailSafe Network device, multi-protocol support
Point in time Filesystem copies
Windows environmental specialties

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Linux OS is installed on the Control Station. Control Station OS software is used to install, manage, and configure the Data
Movers, monitor the environmental conditions and performance of all components, and implement the Call Home and dial-in
support feature. Typical Administration functions include the volume and filesystem management, configuration of network
interfaces, creation of filesystems, exporting filesystems to clients, performing filesystem consistency checks, and extending
filesystems.
The OS that the Data Movers run is EMCs Data Access in Real Time (DART) embedded system software, which is
optimized for file I/O, to move data from the EMC storage array to the network. DART supports standard network and file
access protocols: NFS, CIFS, and FTP.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 29

Celerra Family Software


High Availability Features

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Lets examine some of the high availability features found in the Celerra family.

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29

NAS Foundations, 30

Network FailSafe Device


z Network outages, due to environmental failure, are

more common than Data Mover failures

z Network FailSafe Device


DART OS mechanism to minimize data access disruption due
to these failures
Logical device is created using either physical ports or other
logical ports combined together to create redundant groups of
ports
Logically grouped Data Mover network ports monitor network
traffic on the ports
Active FailSafe Device port senses traffic disruption
Standby (non-active) port assumes the IP Address and Media
Access Control address in a very short space of time, thus
reducing data access disruption
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Having discussed the maintenance of data access via redundant Data Movers, we will now discuss the same concept utilizing
network port mechanisms, first the Network Failsafe device.
Unlike Data Mover failure, network outages due to environmental failures are more common.
To minimize data access disruption due to these failures, the DART OS has a mechanism that is environment agnostic, the
Network FailSafe Device.
This is a mechanism by which the Network ports of a Data Mover may be logically grouped together into a partnership that
will monitor network traffic on the ports. If the currently active port senses a disruption of traffic, the standby (non-active)
port will assume the active role in a very short space of time, thus reducing data access disruption.
The way that this works is a logical device is created, using either physical ports or other logical ports, combined together to
create redundant groups of ports.
In normal operation, the active port will carry all network traffic. The standby (non active port) will remain passive until a
failure is detected. Once a failure has been detected by the FailSafe Device, this port will assume the network identity of the
active port, including IP Address and Media Access Control address.
Having assumed the failed port identity, the standby port will now continue the network traffic. Network disruption due to
this change over is very minimal and may only be noticed in a high transaction oriented NAS implementation or in CIFS
environments due to the connection-oriented nature of the protocol.
There are several benefits achieved by configuring the network FailSafe device: 1. Configuration is handled transparently to
client access; 2. the ports that make up the FailSafe device need not be of the same type; 3. Rapid recovery from a detected
failure; 4. can be combined with logical Aggregated Port devices to provide even higher levels of redundancy.
Although the ports that make up the FailSafe device need not be of the same type, care must be taken to ensure that once
failover has occurred, that client expected response times remain relatively the same and data access paths are maintained.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 31

Link Aggregation - High Availability


z Link aggregation is the combining of two or more data

channels into a single data channel for high availability

Two Methods - IEEE 802.3ad LACP & CISCO FastEtherChannel


z IEEE 802.3ad LACP
Combining links for improved
availability
If one port fails, other ports
take over
Industry standard IEEE
802.3ad
Combines 212 Ethernet
ports into a single virtual link
Deterministic behavior
Does not increase single
client throughput

LINK

Celerra

Industry
Standard
Switch

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Having discussed the network FailSafe device, the next methodologies we will look at are the two Link Aggregation
methodologies. Link aggregation is the combining of two or more data channels into a single data channel. There are two
methodologies that are supported by EMC NAS devices. They are IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Control Protocol and
CISCO FastEtherChannel using Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP).
The purpose for combining data channels in the EMC implementation is to achieve redundancy and fault tolerance of
network connectivity. It is commonly assumed that link aggregation will provide a single client with a data channel
bandwidth equal to the sum of the bandwidth of individual member channels. This is not, in fact, the case due to the
methodology of channel utilization and, it may only be achieved with very special considerations to the client environment.
The overall channel bandwidth is increased, but the client will only ever receive, under normal working conditions, the
bandwidth equal to only one of the component channels.
To implement Link Aggregation, the network switches must support the IEEE 802.3ad standard. It is a technique for
combining several links together to enhance availability of network access and applies to a single Data Mover and not across
Data Movers. The current implementation focuses on availability, therefore check the NAS support matrix. Only full duplex
operation is currently supported. Always check the NAS Interoperability Matrix for supported features at the following:
http://www.emc.com/horizontal/interoperability

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 32

Link Aggregation - High Availability (cont)


z CISCO FastEtherChannel
Port grouping for improved
availability
Combines 2,4, or 8 Ethernet
ports into a single virtual
device
Inter-operates with trunkingcapable switches
High availabilityif one port
fails, other ports take over
Celerra
Does not increase single client
throughput

Channel
CISCO Switch

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Ethernet Trunking (Ether Channel) increases availability. It provides statistical load sharing by connecting different clients
to different ports. It does not increase single-client throughput. Different clients get allocated to different ports. With only
one client, the client will access Celerra via the same port for every access. This DART OS feature interoperates
FastEtherChannel capable Cisco switches. FastEtherChannel is Cisco proprietary.
IEEE 802.3ad / FastEtherChannel - Comparison

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 33

Network Redundancy - High Availability

z An example of FSN and Port aggregation co-operation

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This example shows a fail-safe network device that consists of a FastEtherChannel comprising the four ports of an Ethernet
NIC and one Gigabit Ethernet port. The FastEtherChannel could be the primary device, but as per recommended practices,
the ports of the FSN would not be marked primary or secondary. FSN provides the ability to configure a standby network
port for a primary port, and the two or more ports can be connected to different switches. The secondary port remains
passive until the primary port link status is broken, then the secondary port takes over operation.
A FSN device is a virtual device that combines 2 virtual ports. A virtual port can consist of a single physical link or an
aggregation of links (EtherChannel, LACP). The port types or number need not be the same when creating a failsafe device
group. For example, a quad Ethernet card can be first trunked and then coupled with a single Gigabit Ethernet port. In this
case, all four ports in the trunk would need to fail before FSN would implement failover to the Gigabit port. Thus, Celerra
could tolerate four network failures before losing the connection. Note: an active primary port/active standby port
configuration on the Data Mover is not supported. Unlike Data Mover failure, network outages, due to environmental
failures, are more common. To minimize data access disruption due to these failures, the DART OS has a mechanism that is
environment agnostic; the Network FailSafe Device. This is a mechanism by which the Network ports of a Data Mover may
be logically grouped together into a partnership that will monitor network traffic on the ports. If the currently active port
senses a disruption of traffic, the standby (non-active) port will assume the active role in a very short space of time, thus
reducing data access disruption.
The way that this works is a logical device is created using either physical ports or other logical ports, combined together to
create redundant groups of ports.
In normal operation, the active port will carry all network traffic. The standby (non active port) will remain passive until a
failure is detected. Once a failure has been detected by the FailSafe Device, this port will assume the network identity of the
active port, including IP Address and Media Access Control address.
Having assumed the failed port identity, the standby port will now continue the network traffic. Network disruption due to
this change over is very minimal and may only be noticed in a high transaction oriented NAS implementation or in CIFS
environments due to the connection-oriented nature of the protocol.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 34

Celerra Family Management


Software

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34

In this section, we will examine Celerra management software. This family includes VLAN support, and user interfaces,
(Celerra Native Manager, Celerra WebUI, Celerra Monitor, EMC ControlCenter). It also includes Filesystem controls, as
well as MS Windows environment management software.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 35

Celerra Family Software


Management
Virtual Local Area Networks

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We will begin by looking at Virtual Local Area Networks, or VLANS.

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35

NAS Foundations, 36

VLAN Support
z Create logical LAN

segment

Broadcast Domain
LAN

Divide a single LAN


into logical
segments
Join multiple
separate segments
in one logical LAN

Hub

Hub

VLAN A

Collision Domain
Bridge

LAN Segment

or

Collision Domain
LAN Segment

Switch

Hub

Hub

VLAN B

z VLAN Tagging

802.1q

Collision Domain
LAN Segment

z Simplified

Management
No network
reconfiguration
required for
member
relocation

Bridge

Hub

Hub

VLAN A

or
Switch

Router

Workstation VLAN B

Broadcast Domain LAN

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Network domains are categorized into Collision, a LAN segment within which data collisions are contained or Broadcast
and the portions of the network through which broadcast and multicast traffic is propagated. Collision domains are
determined by hardware components and how they are connected together. The components are connected together and are
usually Client computers, Hubs, and repeaters. Separation of a Collision domain from a Broadcast domain is accomplished
by a network switch or a router that generally do not forward broadcast traffic. VLANs allow multiple, distinct, possibly
geographically separate network segments to be connected in to one logical segment. This can be done either by subnetting
or by using VLAN tags (802.1q.), which is an address added to network packets to identify the VLANs to which the packet
belongs. This could allow servers that were connected to physically separate networks to communicate more efficiently and
it could prevent servers that were attached to the same physical network from impeding one another.
By using VLANs to logically segment the Broadcast Domains, the equipment contained within this logical environment need
not be physically located together. This now means that if a mobile client moves location, an administrator need not do any
physical network or software configuration for the relocation as bridging technology would now be used, and a router would
only be needed to communicate between VLANS.
There are two commonly practiced ways of implementing this technology - 1. IP Address subnetting or
2. VLAN
Ethernet packet tagging. When using the IP address subnetting methodology, the administrator will configure the broadcast
domains to encompass the whole network area for specific groups of computers by using BridgeRouter technology. When
using the VLAN tagging methodology, the members of a specific group will have an identification tag embedded into all of
their Ethernet packet traffic.
VLAN Tagging allows a single Gigabit Data Mover port to service multiple logical LANs (Virtual LANs). This allows data
network nodes to be configured (added and moved as well as other changes) quickly and conveniently from management
console, rather than in the wiring closet. VLAN also allows a customer to limit traffic to specific elements of a corporate
network and protect against broadcasts (such as denial of service) affecting whole networks. Standard router based security
mechanisms can be used with VLANs to restrict access and improve security.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 37

VLAN - Benefits
z Performance
z Reduced Overhead
z Reduced Costs
z Security

VLAN-A

VLAN S

VLAN E

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The benefits of VLAN support include:


Performance: In all networks, there is a large amount of broadcast and multicast traffic and VLANS can reduce the
amount of traffic being received by all clients.
Virtual Collaborative Work Divisions: by placing widely dispersed collaborative users into a VLAN, broadcast and
multicast traffic between these users will be kept from affecting other network clients and reduce the amount of
routing overhead placed on their traffic.
Simplified Administration: with the large amount of mobile computing today, physical user relocation generates a
lot of administrative user reconfiguration (adding, moving and changing). If the user has not changed company
functionality, but has only re-located, VLANs can perpetuate undisrupted job functionality.
Reduced Cost by using VLANS: expensive routers and billable traffic routing costs can be reduced.
Security, by placing users into a tagged VLAN environment, external access to sensitive broadcast data traffic can
be reduced.
VLAN support enables a single Data Mover with Gigabit Ethernet port(s) to be the standby for multiple primary Data
Movers with Gigabit Ethernet port(s). Each primary Data Mover's Gigabit Ethernet port(s) can be connected to different
switches. Each of these switches can be in a different subnet and different VLAN. The standby Data Mover's Gigabit
Ethernet port is connected to a switch which is connected to all the other switches.

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NAS Foundations, 38

Celerra Family Software


Management
User Interfaces

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In this section, we will examine the different user interfaces. These interfaces include the Command line, Celerra Native
Manager, Celerra WebUI, Celerra Monitor, and EMC ControlCenter.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 39

Celerra Management Command Line


z The command line can be accessed on the Control

Station via

An ssh interface tool i.e. PuTTy


Telnet
z Its primary function is for the scripting of common

repetitive tasks that may run on a predetermined


schedule to ease administrative burden

z It has approximately 60 UNIX command-like commands

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Telnet access is disabled, by default, on the Control Station due to the possibility of unauthorized access if the Control
Station is placed on a publicly accessible network. If this is the case, it is strongly recommended that this service is not
enabled.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 40

Celerra Web User Interface prior to NAS 5.2


z Supports the most common

tasks

Network configuration
Hardware configuration
Management:

Data Movers
Filesystems
Shares
Checkpoints

Status
Utilization
z Integrated help for specific

tasks and fields

z Graphical indicators report

system health

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With the exception of the Celerra Native Manager, the other GUI tools are installed and run from the Control Station. The
Native Manager is loaded as an add-on product onto a management workstation/server.
The Celerra Web Manager is launched from a Netscape or Internet Explorer browser. The GUI supports the most common
administrative tasks. Celerra Web Manager uses a dual-frame approach. The left-hand frame contains an expandable tree
view of administration. The right-hand frame contains the system health, links to on-line help, and the data output and form
inputs for the selected administration including:
NetworkConfiguration of network settings including DNS, NIS, WINS, link aggregations, and network identity
(IP addresses, subnet masks, VLAN ID).
HardwareTools required to manage and inventory the physical hardware in the system. This includes operations
to configure shelves of disks when the back-end storage array is CLARiiON, managing global spares, and upgrades
(disk, bios, firmware, software).
StatusMonitor the status of the Celerra, including uptime, software versions, release notice link, network
statistics, event logs, and hardware status (any hardware components that are in a degraded state).
UtilizationMonitor the CPU and memory utilization for the Data Movers.
Data MoverManagement of CIFS shares, NFS exports and User Mapping. Other functions include reboot,
shutdown, number of reboots, date/time and NTP configuration, Data Mover name, Data Mover type, and character
encoding. FilesystemsThe tools required to list, create, modify, expand, check, and delete file systems.
CheckpointsIncludes screens to list, create, modify, refresh, and delete SnapSure checkpoints. It also provides a
way to restore file system to one of its checkpoints. Admin accessUsed to manage administrative access to the
Control Station. This includes host name, IP address, user name, password, etc.
Notification (phone home)Used to configure the phone home capability of the Control Station. This includes
configuration of destinations for SMTP e-mail, SNMP traps and modem call outs.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 41

Celerra Native Manager - prior to NAS 5.2


z Filesystem management
z Quotas configuration and

reconfiguration

z Wizard capabilities for

initial configuration

Offline editing
Batch program generation
Template import / export
z Online operation (live changes and

updates)

z Reconfiguration (modifications and

deletes)

z Automation and expert system

support

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Celerra Native Manager is a native Windows 2000 application that exhibits a familiar Windows look and feel. The
application runs from a network client communicating with the Control Station. Native Manager simplifies the tasks of
configuration, reconfiguration, ongoing operation, and observation with features like Targeted Views, simple navigation,
rules-based automation, and configuration check-pointing and comparisons.
Specific features of this management interface include the following:
File system management, Quotas configuration and reconfiguration, Wizard capabilities for initial configuration, Offline
editing; Batch program generation; Online operation (live changes and updates), reconfiguration (mods and deletes)
Automation and expert system support.
It also provides smart features such as rule-based automation and diagnosis, configuration checkpoint, and comparison. In
addition, Native Manager provides status and configuration monitoring, basic statistics, events, and logs.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 42

Celerra Monitor - prior to NAS 5.2


z Performance
Data Movers
CLARiiON
Symmetrix
z View
System ID
Status
Alerts

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Celerra Monitor is a Java client/server application which runs from the Control Station. It allows you to closely monitor
specific performance data about the Data Movers in the Celerra cabinet and the attached Symmetrix or CLARiiON from a
network client.
Celerra Monitor consists of a Java server (poller) that runs on the Control Station and a Java applet (or in the case of
Windows, an application) that runs in your browser.
Use Celerra Monitor to perform the following tasks for the CLARiiON or Symmetrix and the Data Movers:
View System ID and version information
View overall system status
View hardware components with error conditions
View system alertsevents that may require administrator intervention
Acknowledge (delete) system alerts
Receive online alerts of events posted to the system log
View performance
View configuration
View statistics
View logs
View summaries of past configurations
Control access and polling of monitored data

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 43

Celerra Manager v5.2 Management

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With the release of DART v5.2, the GUI management has become consolidated into one product with two options 1. Celerra
Native Manager Basic Edition and 2. Celerra Management Advanced Edition
The Basic Edition will be installed, along with the DART OS, and will provide a comprehensive set of common management
functionality for a single Celerra at a time. The Advanced Edition will add multiple Celerra support, along with some
advanced feature GUI management, and will be licensed separately from the DART code.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 44

Celerra Manager v5.2 - Wizards

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Celerra Manager V5.2 will offer a number of configuration Wizards for various tasks to assist with new administrator ease
of implementation.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 45

Celerra Manager v5.2 - Tools

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Celerra Manager V5.2 will offer a set of tools to integrate Celerra monitoring functionality and launch Navisphere Manager.
With the addition of the Navisphere Manager Launch capability, the SAN/NAS administrator will have a more consolidated
management environment.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 46

EMC ControlCenter V5.x.x NAS Support


z Discovery and monitoring

Data Movers
Devices and volumes
Network adapters and IP
interfaces
Mount points
Exports
Filesystems (including
snapshots and checkpoints)

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The EMC flagship management product, EMC ControlCenter, has the capability of an assisted discovery of both EMC NAS
and third party NAS products, namely NetApps filers
Currently, management of the EMC NAS family is deferred to the specific product management products due to the highly
specialized nature of the NAS environment. Therefore, this product functionality (shown on this slide) is focused mainly
around discovery, monitoring, and product management software launch capability
ControlCenter V5.x.x has enhanced device management support for the Celerra family. The ControlCenter Celerra Agent
runs on Windows and has enhanced discovery and monitoring capabilities. You can now view properties information on
Celerra Data Movers, devices, network adapters and interfaces, mount points, exports, filesystems (including snapshots and
checkpoints), and volumes from the ControlCenter Console. You can also view alerting information for the Celerra family as
well.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 47

Celerra Family Filesystem


Management
Quotas

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Lets examine filesystem controls supported by the Celerra Management software.

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47

NAS Foundations, 48

Filesystem Controls - User Quota Restrictions


z One of the most common concerns in a distributed data

environment is users tend to save many copies of the


same information

z When working in a collaborative distributed

environment, the amount of data space required by


each use expands rapidly and, in some cases,
uncontrollably

z To minimize data space outages, the user space can

be controlled by imposing Quotas on users, or groups


of users, to limit either the number of blocks of disk
space they can use or the number of files they can
create

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There are three main types of quota used in data space control:
Soft Quota: This is defined as the amount of data space or number of files used under normal working conditions. It
is a logical limit placed upon a user that can be exceeded without the need for any administrative intervention. Once
the soft quota limit has been exceeded, the user has a grace period to use the extra space defined by the hard quota
limit. However, the user/group cannot exceed the hard limit
Hard Quota: This is defined as the total space or number of files a user/group can use or create on a filesystem
Tree Quota: This is defined as the total space or number of files that a user/group can use or create on a data
directory tree. Tree Quotas are used as a logical mechanism to segment large filesystems into smaller administrative
portions that do not affect each others operation
The grace period is is a time limit during which the user, or group, can continue to increase the amount of disk space used or
number of files created. If the grace period expires, the user/group must reduce the amount of space used or the number of
files to below the soft limit before any new space or files can be created.
The Celerra family will support all of these Quota methodologies, thereby assisting administrators used to these management
tools, with a seamless transition into an EMC NAS environment.

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NAS Foundations, 49

Celerra Family Management


Software
Windows Specific Options

EMC Global Education


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Now we will examine Windows specific options that are supported by the Celerra family.

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49

NAS Foundations, 50

Usermapper
z Maps Windows Security ID to UNIX Permissions
z Two Methodologies
Single Mode - one Primary Server only
Distributed Mode - One Primary -> Many Secondaries

Primary Server
Maintains Master DB
Provides New UID/GID to
specific Secondary issuing the
request.

Secondary Server
Maintains Cache of entries
used on particular secondary
from the Master DB
Resolves Queries for any
request that is in cache
Requests update if an entry is
requested that is not in Cache

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As the EMC DART OS is a UNIX based solution, the integration into the Windows environment requires a special set of
tools to ease this process.
One of the most crucial tools is the ability to map Windows Security Identifiers to the UNIX User/Group/Other file/folder
permission structures of the DART OS filesystem.
There is no industry standard methodology to achieve this, and the EMC NAS solution uses two methodologies of
usermapper to achieve this goal. The first is the Single Mode, which only uses a primary server for handling a request to
access a data resource; or the Distributed Mode, which uses both a single primary and multiple secondary server to handle a
request to access a data resource. The best practices are that the Primary server is configured on the Control Station for
highest availability and ease of management.
Data Consistency and High Availability requires that each Usermapper Server must be designated as either a Primary or a
Secondary (Only one Primary Server can be specified).
In the event that the Primary Server becomes temporarily unavailable, no new user entries will be mapped. Entries already
contained within the Secondary Server cache will be used to resolve queries. When the Primary Server becomes available
again, new mappings will occur automatically. In the event that the Primary Server needs to be replaced, a Secondary
Usermapper Server can be made the Primary by manually reconfiguring the server. This procedure is not recommended as a
common practice and should be done with the help of EMC support. Some of the procedures required for this process
include verifying the Secondary Server was entirely synchronized with the Primary in order to avoid duplicate and/or lost
mapping. This will also involve restarting all servers in the correct sequence. Refer to the most up to date corresponding
documentation for the exact procedures. Unlike previous versions, Secondary Usermapper Servers must be up and running
before the Primary starts.

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NAS Foundations, 51

Usermapper - pre & post DART v5.2


Primary Server

(4) Adds a new entry from specified

Example:
New User Requests Resource
(New mapping required)
Data Mover

Usermapper DB

UID/GID range

(5) Notifies all other Secondary Servers that


they should initiate a cache update request

Usermapper DB

DART
v5.2

Usermapper
Resolver

(3)

Pre - DART
v5.2

New Mapping
Request

(6)
New Entry

(1) Resolver queries

Secondary Server

First server configured

(2) Mapping is not in DB

(8) Replies to the Data


Mover's request with the
UID/GID mapping

(7) Updates cache with new mapping

Usermapper DB

Configuration/Installation
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This slide steps through the granting of access process.


Step 1 A client request is received at a Data Mover, with the resolver stub running, without a valid UID / GID. The
resolver will then contact the first usermapper server configured in the configuration file with a request for a UI / GID
Step 2 and 3 As the secondary servers are configured before the primary server, a secondary server will be contacted. If
this secondary server does not have a listing for the particular user making the request in its cache, a request will be raised
to the primary server for a UID / GID new mapping.
Step 4 and 5 When the primary server receives a request for a new mapping, an entry from the specified UID / GID range
is added to the database and a notification is issued to all secondary servers that their cache entries will need to be updated.
Step 6 and 7 The secondary server making the request for the new mapping will update its cache with new information
from the primary server upon the receipt of the notification to update cache from the primary.
Step 8 The secondary server that received the initial request will now respond back to the requesting Data Mover with the
new mapping information and the user will be granted access (or denied access) to the requested resource.
NOTE: DART v 5.2 introduces a fundamental upgrade to the usermapper process. This upgrade is that each Data Mover
now maintains its own usermapper data base of user mappings. This now assists with Data Mover failover connectivity
continuance and access is unaffected by possible Control Station failure.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 52

Virtual Data Movers DART v5.2


z Virtual Data Movers on Single Physical Data Movers

DART v5.2

Another improvement to the Windows integration is the ability


to create multiple virtual CIFS servers on each Data Mover
This is achieved by creating Virtual Data Mover environments
This is a huge benefit to the consolidation of multiple server file
serving functionality onto single Data Movers as each virtual
Data Mover can maintain isolated CIFS servers with their own
root filesystem environment
This will allow whole Virtual Data Mover environments to be
loaded, unloaded, or even replicated between physical Data
Movers for ease in Windows environmental management

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Currently, in pre DART v5.2, a Data Mover supports one NFS server and multiple CIFS servers, where each server has the
same view of all the resources. The CIFS servers are not logically isolated and although they are very useful in consolidating
multiple servers into one data mover, they do not provide the isolation between servers as needed in some environments such
as data from disjoint departments hosted on the same data mover.
In v5.2, VDMs support separate isolated CIFS servers, allowing you to place one or multiple CIFS servers into a VDM,
along with their file systems. The servers residing in a VDM store their dynamic configuration information (such as local
groups, shares, security credentials, and audit logs, etc.) in a configuration file system. A VDM can then be loaded and
unloaded, moved from Data Mover to Data Mover, or even replicated to a remote Data Mover as an autonomous unit. The
servers, their file systems, and all of the configuration data that allows clients to access the file systems are available in one
virtual container.
VDMs provide virtual partitioning of the physical resources and independently contain all the information necessary to
support the contained CIFS servers. Having the file systems and the configuration information contained in a VDM does the
following: 1. enables administrators to separate CIFS servers and give them access to specified shares; 2. allows replication
of the CIFS environment from primary to secondary without impacting server access, and 3. enables administrators to easily
move CIFS servers from one physical Data Mover to another.
A VDM can contain one or more CIFS servers. The only requirement is that you have at least one interface available for
each CIFS server you create. The CIFS servers in each VDM have access only to the file systems mounted to that VDM, and
therefore can only create shares on those file systems mounted to the VDM. This allows a user to administratively partition
or group their file systems and CIFS servers.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 53

Additional Tools - MMC Snap-ins


z UNIX User Management

Active Directory migration tool


MMC plug-in extension for Active
Directory uses and computers
Celerra Management tool snap-in
(MMC Console)
z Virus Checker Management

Celerra Management tool:


(MMC Console)
z Home Directory snap-in

Allows multiple points of entry to


a single share
z Data Mover security snap-in

Manage user rights and auditing


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Celerra offers a number of Windows 2000 management tools with the Windows 2000 look and feel. For example, Celerra
shares and quotas can be managed by the standard Microsoft Management Console (MMC).
The tools include:
The Celerra Management Tool (MMC Console)Snap-in extension for Dart Virus Checker Management which
manages parameters for the DART Virus Checker.
The Active Directory (AD) Migration tool Migrates the Windows/UNIX user and group mappings to Active
Directory. The matching users/groups are displayed in a property page with a separate sheet for users and groups.
The administrator selects the users/groups that should be migrated and de-selects those that should not be migrated
or should be removed from Active Directory.
The Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Snap-in extension for AD users and computers. This adds a
property page to the users property sheet to specify UID (user ID) /GID (group ID)/Comment and adds a property
page to the group property sheet to specify GID/Comment. You can only manage users and a group of the local
tree.
The Celerra Management Tool (MMC Console) Snap-in extension for Dart UNIX User Management displays
Windows users/groups which are mapped to UNIX attributes. It also displays all domains that are known to local
domain (Local Tree, Trusted domains).
The Home Directories capability in the Celerra allows a customer to set up multiple points of entry to a single
Share/Export so as to avoid sharing out many hundreds of points of entry to a filesystem for each individual user for
storing their Home Directories. The MMC Snap-in provides a simple and familiar management interface for
Windows administrators for this capability.
The Data Mover Security Settings Snap-in provides a standard Windows interface for managing user rights
assignments, as well as the settings for which statistics Celerra should audit, based on the NT V4 style auditing
policies.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 54

Celerra Family Business


Continuity
Disk Based Replication and Recovery Solutions

EMC Global Education


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Now we can examine some of the replication and recovery solutions available in the Celerra family.

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54

NAS Foundations, 55

Disk-Based Replication and Recovery Solutions


Celerra / Symmetrix

Synchronous
Disaster
Recovery
SRDF
FUNCTIONALITY

FileFile-based
Replication
Celerra /CLARiiON

TimeFinder/FS
Celerra Replicator
EMC OnCourse

File
Restoration
Celerra SnapSure
Celerra / FC4700
Celerra
NS600

RECOVERY TIME

Hours

EMC Global Education

Minutes

Seconds

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55

High-end environments require non-stop access to the information pool. From a practical perspective, not all data carries the
same value. The following illustrates that EMC Celerra provides a range of disk-based replication tools for each recovery
time requirement.
File restoration: This is the information archived to disk and typically saved to tape. Here we measure recovery in hours.
Celerra SnapSure enables local point-in-time replication for file undeletes and backups.
File-based replication: This information is recoverable in time frames measured in minutes. Information is mirrored to disk
by TimeFinder, and the copy is made accessible with TimeFinder/FS. The Celerra Replicator creates replicas of production
filesystems either locally or at a remote site. Recovery time from the secondary site depends on the bandwidth of the IP
connection between the two sites. EMC OnCourse provides secure, policy-based file transfers.
The Replicator feature supports data recovery for both CIFS and NFS by allowing the secondary filesystem (SFS) to be
manually switched to read/write mode after the Replicator session has been stopped, either manually or due to a destructive
event. Note: There is no re-synch or failback capability.
Synchronous disaster recovery: This is the information requiring disaster recovery with no loss of transactions. This strategy
allows customers to have data recovery in seconds. SRDF, in synchronous mode, facilitates real-time remote mirroring in
campus environments (up to 60 km).
File restoration and file-based replication (Celerra Replicator, EMC OnCourse) are available with Celerra /CLARiiON. The
entire suite of file restoration, file-based replication, and synchronous disaster recovery are available with Celerra
/Symmetrix.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 56

Disaster Recovery
Celerra Symmetrix Remote Data Facility

EMC Global Education


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In this section, we will look at the Celerra disaster recovery solution.

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56

NAS Foundations, 57

Celerra SRDF Disaster Recovery

Increases data availability by combining the high availability of the


Celerra family with the Symmetrix Remote Data Facility
Network
Campus (60 km) distance

Celerra

Uni or bi-directional

Celerra

z Celerra synchronous disaster recovery solution


Allows an administrator to configure remote standby Data Movers waiting to
assume primary roles in the event of a disaster occurring at the primary data
site
SRDF allows administrator to achieve a remote synchronous copy of
production filesystems at a remote location
Real-time, logically synchronized and consistent copies of selected volumes
Uni-directional and bi-directional support
Resilient against drive, link, and server failures
No lost I/Os in the event of a disaster
Independent of CPU, operating system, application, or database
Simplifies disaster recovery switchover and back
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In the NAS environment, data availability is one of the key aspects for implementation determination. By combining the
high availability of the Celerra family with the Symmetrix Remote Data Facility, data available increases exponentially.
What the SRDF feature allows an administrator to achieve is a remote synchronous copy of production filesystems at a
remote location. However, as this entails the creation of Symmetrix specific R1 and R2 data volumes, this functionality is
currently restricted to Celerra / Symmetrix implementations only.
This feature allows an administrator to configure remote standby Data Movers waiting to assume primary roles in the event
of a disaster occurring at the primary data site. Due to data latency issues, this solution is restricted to a campus distance of
separation between the two data sites (60 network km).
The SRDF solution for Celerra can leverage an existing SRDF transport infrastructure to support the full range of supported
SAN (storage area network) and DAS (direct-attached storage) connected general purpose server platforms. The Celerra
disaster recovery solution maintains continuously available filesystems, even with an unavailable or non-functioning Celerra.
Symmetrix technology connects a local and remote Celerra over a distance of up to 40 miles (66 km) via an ESCON or Fiber
Channel SRDF connection. After establishing the connection and properly configuring the Celerra, users gain continued
access to filesystems in the event that the local Celerra and/or the Symmetrix becomes unavailable. The Celerra systems
communicate over the network to ensure the primary and secondary Data Movers are synchronized with respect to meta
data, while the physical data is transported over the SRDF link. In order to ensure an up to date and consistent copy of the
filesystems on the remote Celerra, the synchronous mode of SRDF operation is currently the only supported SRDF
operational mode. Implementation of Celerra disaster recovery software requires modification of the standard Celerra
configuration. SRDF has two modes of operation: active-passive and active-active. Active-passive (Uni-directional) SRDF
support means that one Celerra provides active Data Mover access while a second (remote) Celerra provides all Data
Movers as failover. Active-active (Bi-directional) SRDF support means that one Celerra can serve local needs while
reserving some of its Data Movers for recovery of a remote Celerra, which will reserve some of its Data Movers for
recovery of the first Celerra . In addition, local failover Data Movers can be associated with Data Movers in the primary
Symmetrix to ensure that local failover capability is initiated in the unlikely event there is a hardware related issue with a
specific Data Mover.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 58

Data Replication
SnapSure, TimeFinder/FS & Celerra Replicator

EMC Global Education


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Next we will examine several of the Celerra data replication solutions.

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58

NAS Foundations, 59

Celerra SnapSure - Data Replication


z Enables speedy recovery
Low volume activity, read-only
applications
Simple file undelete
Incremental backup

Celerra

CLARiiON or
Symmetrix

z Logical point-in-time view of

Celerra data

Works for all Celerra Implementations


Saves disk space
Maintains pointers to track changes to
the primary filesystem
Not a mirror; creation of specialized
volumes (R1/R2, BCVs) not required
Multiple Checkpoints for recovery of Production
different point-in-time images
filesystem
GUI Checkpoint schedule
manipulation
Checkpoint out of order delete
Automatic mounting - NAS v5.2

Checkpoint

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Due to the business demands for high data availability and speedy recovery, there are many methodologies utilized to
facilitate this requirement.
The first methodology discussed is the SnapSure feature of the Celerra family. This methodology uses a logical point-in-time
view of a Production Filesystem to facilitate Incremental backup views of a Production File System, PFS, individual file
recovery, and roll back of an entire filesystem to a previous point-in-time image. SnapSure maintains pointers to changes to
the primary filesystem and reads data from either the primary filesystem or a copy area. The copy area is defined as a metavolume (SavVol).
One of the obvious benefits of this solution is that it is storage array agnostic, i.e. works for all NAS DART implementations.
This also means that there are no specialized volumes that need to be configured for this feature to function. Some other
replication methodologies, such as SRDF and TimeFinder/FS, are dependant upon the creation of Symmetrix Remote Data
Facility and Business Continuity Volumes in the Symmetrix. SnapSure does not require any specialized volume creation and
will therefore work with any back-end storage array, CLARiiON, or Symmetrix.
Multiple Checkpoints can be done on the Production Filesystem and thereby facilitate the ability to recover different pointin-time images of files or filesystems. Without using any other similar replication methodologies, i.e. Celerra Replicator,
then the currently supported maximum of Checkpoints per filesystem is 32.
For ease of management, Checkpoints can be manipulated with the GUI management interfaces, along with the ability to
schedule the frequency of the Checkpoints.
Most Checkpoint technology is chronologically linked; however, the DARTv 5.2 solution will support out of order deletion
of checkpoints, while maintaining SnapSure integrity. SnapSure Enhancements allow customers to delete a Checkpoint out
of order. This feature allows customers to delete any Checkpoint instead of being constrained to having to delete
Checkpoints from the oldest to maintain integrity.
A customer may also delete an individual scheduled checkpoint instead of the entire schedule, and may refresh any
checkpoint instead of the only the oldest.
Checkpoints created in DART v5.2 are automatically mounted upon creation and maintenance of a hidden checkpoint
directory in any subdirectory. This new hidden directory will now also allow changing the default name
(yyy_dd_hh_mm_ss_GMT) into something more administratively friendly.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 60

Celerra TimeFinder/FS - Data Replication


z

Point in time copy of file system

Provides an independent mirror copy of


Celerra data for out-of-band business
processes and support functions

Provides read and write functionality


independent of the original

Requires Symmetrix storage

Celerra controlled features

Point-in-time copies
Dynamic mirroring
Multiple BCVs
Spans volumes
Entire filesystem

Symmetrix

Celerra

Point-in-time
copy
FSA
PFS

PFS
Copy

Applications

Backup and restore


Data warehouses
Live test data
Batch jobs

BCV = Business Continuance Volume

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A second Celerra data replication method that provides high availability and rapid recovery is the TimeFinder /FS feature.
TimeFinder is a well established and mature product. In the Symmetrix Storage array, it is utilized to produce a standalone
copy of a production volume. It uses a specially defined volume, called a Business Continuance Volume (BCV), to facilitate
this functionality. As the Symmetrix Array is the only array currently able to define a BCV, TimeFinder/FS on the Celerra
Family is currently restricted to implementations with Symmetrix only.
The TimeFinder/FS implementation is different from a standard TimeFinder implementation. It allows users to copy
filesystems into Business Continuance Volumes (BCVs) for a wide variety of purposes.
How it happens is outlined below.
TimeFinder/FS creates a point-in-time copy, or a dynamic mirror, of a filesystem. Integrated into the Celerra Control Station.
The TimeFinder/FS option allows users to create filesystem copies (with only a brief suspension of access to the original
filesystem). These copies permit independent read/write copies of data, useful for non-disruptive file backups, live copy
test beds for new applications, and mirror copies of files for redundancy and business continuity. It will facilitate backup
and restore of older versions of a specific file, directory, (by mounting the snapshot filesystem and manually recovering the
file or directory) or complete file system. It can also function in mirroring and continuous updates mode for an active
filesystem. Filesystem copies require that the configuration of the Symmetrix system attached to the Celerra include BCVs.
A BCV, which attaches to a standard volume on which a filesystem resides, provides the foundation for the filesystem copy.
Filesystems can share BCVs, although the BCV remains dedicated to a volume.
After issuing the single TimeFinder split command, the Celerra initiates the synchronization of the primary and BCV
filesystem volumes. When the synchronization is almost complete (typically within two seconds), access to the primary
filesystem is halted and Data Mover memory is flushed to ensure a consistent copy of the data is split off. When consistently
synchronized, the split command is issued and the BCV is available for use. The BCV is mounted to a second Data Mover
for backup or for use in secondary business processes.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 61

TimeFinder/FS Near Copy


z Synchronous disk-based

disaster recovery and data


replication solution
Requires Symmetrix storage
R1 / R2 data is synchronized
for disaster recovery
Read-only R2 data accessible
via BCV for backup and
testing purposes
Synchronous SRDF as base
technology
60 km distance

ESCON / Fibre Channel

UNIX

Windows

Data
Network

SRDF
R1

R2
BCV

Celerra Symmetrix

Symmetrix Celerra

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Combination of the TimeFinder/FS product with another mature Symmetrix product, Symmetrix Remote Data Facility
(SRDF), has enabled the TimeFinder/FS concept to be utilized for Disaster Recovery, as the stand alone copy of the data can
now be synchronously updated at a remote site. It allows this solution to be utilized as both a Data Replication and Disaster
Recovery solution.
This is known as TimeFinder/FS Near Copy, as the supported SRDF network distance between the two sites is 60 km
(campus), due to the synchronous nature of the R2 volume updates.
The Remote TimeFinder/FS Near Copy solution applies to environments that have a requirement for real-time, synchronous,
disk-based recovery. Synchronous SRDF is used to maintain the R1/R2 pair. TimeFinder BCVs can be generated from the
R2 and made available (read-only) to independent Data Movers in the remote Celerra. The Celerra at the remote site can
make the content available for secondary business processes such as testing or backup. This solution works for environments
with SRDF active-active mode, where R1s and R2s exist in both sites, as well as active-passive, where all the R1s are
located in one site, with SRDF to a passive R2 only Symmetrix. Synchronous SRDF operates over ESCON/Fibre Channel
and is limited to 60 km distances. The BCV at the R2 site is read-only, and restore must be done manually.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 62

TimeFinder/FS with SRDF Far Copy


Windows UNIX z

Windows UNIX

R1 Site
Network

STD
R1/ BCV

R2 Site
Network

STD

SRDF

Adaptive
Copy

Celerra Symmetrix

Asynchronous data replication


solution
Replicated point-in time copy
of primary site filesystem
Data replication time will not
impact production file system
performance
Requires Symmetrix storage
Uses SRDF Adaptive Copy as
base technology
Sites can be geographically
distant

R2/ BCV
Symmetrix Celerra

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All remote copies of data are not designated for Disaster Recovery, but could be used for data replication, such as Web Site
data replication, Inventory Replication, Off-site Backup facility, or Employee directories. To facilitate these kinds of
solutions, where time taken to replicate the data will not impact the performance of the Production Filesystem,
TimeFinder/FS Far Copy can be utilized.
The Remote TimeFinder/FS Far Copy solution applies to environments that have a requirement for remote point-in-time
copies of the filesystems beyond the typical distances associated with synchronous SRDFthat is, greater than 60 km.
Adaptive SRDF is used to replicate the information over geographical distances. The read-only copy at the remote site can
be made available for secondary business processes such as testing or backup.
Implementation of this solution allows data to be replicated asynchronously over a very wide area to where it is needed. It
will not affect the Production file system, PFS, as would the Celerra SRDF solution if the distances were over 60 network
kilometers, because a BCV copy of the PFS is first made and then the BCV is copied to the remote location, while the
Production Filesystem continues serving data to the clients uninterruptedly.
As this solution is dependant upon the TimeFinder/FS, it will only be supported with the Celerra / Symmetrix configuration.
The process for performing this action is:
1. Create a R1/BCV of STD
2. Sync R1/BCV with R2/BCV over SRDF link
3. Restore R2/BCV to Local STD (read-only if the relationship between the R2BCV needs to be maintained)
4. Import File System on R2 Celerra

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 63

Celerra Replicator - Data Replication


z Point-in-time read-only

filesystem copy over IP


z Production filesystem available

during replication

UNIX
Windows

z Only sends changed data over

wire (after initial synchronization)

UNIX
Windows

R1 Site
Network

R2 Site
Network

z One-way link for single target

content distribution
z Asynchronous Data Recovery
z Data recovery for CIFS data

Production
Filesystem
Primary
SavVol

Secondary
Filesystem

IP
Network

Secondary
SavVol

Log

Celerra / Symmetrix

Celerra NSX00

Replication Process

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Celerra Replicator is an IP-based replication solution. Replication between a primary and a secondary filesystem can be on
the same or a remote Celerra system. The data flow is described in the following steps. Celerra Replicator Events: Step 1:
Manually synchronize production file system and secondary file system - Initial Copy: Before starting Celerra Replicator, a
full copy of the Production File System, PFS, has to be made on the Secondary File System, SFS.
Step 2: Any changes to the production filesystems are recorded in the log - Log Changes: On the primary, where PFS is
mounted read/write, all CIFS block addresses of changed blocks are logged in a main memory log. Periodically, copy
changes to SavVol: Transfer is triggered by special events. The trigger can be controlled by a user-defined policy or via an
explicit request on the Control Station.
Step 3: Remote replication copies log changes to primary SavVol, and begins movement to secondary SavVol - The transfer
step comprises creating a local copy of all of the changes made to the log file and copying them to a local delta set called
SavVol. The copy process is designed to copy a Checkpoint of the blocks, allowing the PFS to be modified during the copy.
IP Transfer: A transfer is set up with the remote replica for the newly updated set of SavVol blocks. While the transfer is in
process, read/write activity on the PFS is not halted. Instead, a new log area is set up to track subsequent changes.
Concurrently with the copy process, the newly created delta set is transferred to the secondary over IP. In local replication
(when the secondary Data Mover is in the same cabinet as the primary), no transfer is required. The delta set is accessible as
a shared volume.
Step 4: Remote SavVol changes are incorporated into secondary filesystems.
Playback on Secondary: The delta set is made available to the secondary in its SavVol. When the delta set arrives at the
SavVol of the secondary and has been flagged as valid, the secondary will start to replay the blocks from its local SavVol
(a local copy of the replicated delta set) and apply the delta set to the SFS. This operation occurs transparently and with
almost no interruption to SFS access.
The Replicator feature is able to support data recovery for both CIFS and NFS by allowing the secondary filesystem (SFS)
to be manually switched to read/write mode after the Replicator session has been stopped, either manually or due to a
destructive event. Note: There is not re-synch or failback capability. Through version Dart 5.1, there is no automated resynch or failback capability. This capability was added in Dart 5.2.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 64

Celerra Family
Tape-Based Backup and Restore Options

EMC Global Education


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Lets take a look at backup and restore options available with the Celerra Family.

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NAS Foundations, 65

Tape-Based Backup and Restore Options

Network
Backup

EMC Data Manager


Most backup utilities
z NFS / CIFS mounts over the client network
or separate sub-network
z

NDMP
Backup

(LAN(LAN-less
local backup)

Network

z
z
z
z
z

EDM
VERITAS NetBackup
Legato Networker
CommVault Galaxy
HP OmniBack
Atempo Time Navigator

DATA
Celerra

EDM Tape

Celerra

Data

Network
EDM

Symmetrix
or CLARiiON

Tape

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2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

65

NAS is a fast growing market. Many NAS implementations have mission-critical data availability requirements and this is
what Celerra does best. Fast and efficient backup and restore is an absolute requirement.
There are a number of options as far as backup and restore is concerned.
Network backups entail simply mounting the filesystems across the network and backing up to the backup server. EMC Data
Manager, and most backup utilities, support this option. EDM also will preserve the bi-lingual (CIFS and NFS information)
with network backups.
NDMP backups only use the LAN for control information (LAN-less) and the data is transferred to the local backup device.
EDM, VERITAS NetBackup, Legato Networker, CommVault Galaxy, HP OmniBack, and Atempo Time Navigator support
Celerra NDMP backups. NDMP backups preserve the bi-lingual file information.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 66

Celerra Network Backup


z EMC Data Manager
Network

Celerra

CLARiiON
or
Symmetrix

EDM

Connectrix

Tape
Library

Multi-protocol support
Supports both shared UNIX
(NFS) and Windows (CIFS) in
a mixed environment
Network-based backup
Preserves NFS and CIFS
attributes

z Third-party backup products

CIFS access through shares


NFS access through mounts

Data Flow
Control Information Flow

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Network backups utilize a backup server that mounts the remote filesystems and transfers them to tape. The data path
includes the Celerra Data Mover, the network, and the backup server.
EMC Data Manager supports network backups and provides multi-protocol support based on Celerra API. This preserves the
NFS and CIFS multi-protocol attributes and file permissions.
Most third-party backup products support CIFS network backups through remote file shares and NFS network backups using
remote file mounts.
Third-party backups should not be used for multi-protocol files. For example, if they are backed up over a CIFS share, they
will lose any NFS attributes and permissions upon restoration.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 67

Celerra RecoveryNDMP Backup


z

Production
Network
Client with NDMP z
backup software
Data Mover
NDMP Agent

Tape
Library Unit

Celerra

CLARiiON
or
Symmetrix

Data Flow
Control Information Flow

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2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

EMC Data Manager


Full, incremental, and differential
backups
EDM Autoschedule workload balancing
Three-way backup (between Data
Movers)
Third-party NDMP
VERITAS NetBackup
Legato NetWorker
CommVault Galaxy
HP OmniBack
Atempo Time Navigator

Celerra backs up data to directly attached


tape library unit (TLU)

Backup is performed by client running


NDMP-compliant ISV software

No LAN performance impact: only control


data goes via the LAN

Multi-protocol support: both CIFS and NFS


filesystem attributes

67

EMC Data Manager supports the Network Data Management Protocol (NDMP) to backup and restore Celerra platforms.
NDMP is an industry standard LAN-less backup for NAS devices. NDMP backups only use the LAN for control information
and the data is transferred to the local backup device. EDM NDMP supports full, incremental, and differential backups to
either a tape library connected directly to the Celerra , or a three-way backup to share the tape library among Data Movers.
EDM NDMP supports multi-protocol (NFS and CIFS) environments. EDM Autoschedule workload balancing optimizes
backup of NAS platforms by automatically spreading out the scheduling of full backups on a filesystem basis, rather than
doing one huge full backup on a volume basis.
VERITAS NetBackup, Legato Networker, Commvault Galaxy, HP OmniBack, and Atempo Time Navigator also support
Celerra NDMP backups.
Backup activity can be localized to a single backup Data Mover, thus requiring only one Data Mover be physically
attached to the TLU (tape library unit). This option is implemented through TimeFinder/FS. Filesystems are split off and
mounted to the backup Data Mover and backed up with no impact to the primary filesystem.
Tape library units are connected to a Data Mover via a SCSI interface. Backup traffic is offloaded from the network and
allows for dual accessed filesystems to be backed up, preserving both permission structures on the filesystem.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

NAS Foundations, 68

Module Summary
Key points covered in this module were:

Network Attached Storage and its value


NAS Configuration Issues
Celerra NAS Platforms
Celerra Family Software
Celerra Management Software
Windows Specific Options
NAS Business Continuity Options

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2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

These are the key points presented in this training session. Please take a moment to read them.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

68

NAS Foundations, 69

EMC Global Education


2004 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

This ends our NAS Foundations training. Thank you for your participation.

Copyright 2004 EMC Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

69