by Guerin Lee Green

Nor t h
De nv e r
NEWS
April 4, 2008
mailed to
14,117
Homes
Potter Highlands • West Highland • Sunnyside • Sloan’s Lake • Berkeley
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Local organizations and neighbors work together in Villa Park to launch an “Extreme
Community Makeover,” to cleanup and restore 10 city blocks of West Denver neighbor-
hoods. Photo by Marla Lindstrom Benroth.
Giant Health care fight
ahead at State Capitol
Beating back a set of health insurance
reforms will draw lobbyists like moths to
the flame at the State Capitol.
Rep. Morgan Carroll (D-Aurora)
introduced legislation that will require
insurance companies to justify their rate
increases before they can take effect.
Speaker Andrew Romanoff (D-Denver)
also announced a companion measure to
require insurance companies to pay what
they owe, when they owe it.
North Denver representatives,
including Senator Paula Sandoval and
Representative Jerry Frangas will likely
be front and center in the fight. Sandoval
is noted as a friend of the insurance
industry, but Sandoval is the prime
Senate sponsor of the bill, which would
turn health insurance upside down in
Colorado. Frangas is a bill co-sponsor.
The insurance industry has spent more
than $1 billion nationally on lobbying
activity from 1998 - 2007. In just the first
two months of the 2008 session, the insur-
ance industry had already spent $188,000
in lobbying just in Colorado. That figure
is expected to increase dramatically by
session end. There are dozens of insur-
ance lobbyists in Colorado.
Morgan says consumers should have
a right to know where their premium dol-
lars are being spent.
One insurance lobbyist, Carole
Walker with Rocky Mountain Insurance
Information, told Steven Paulson, an
Associated Press reporter, that “rate hikes
sometimes take as long as two years to
make a decision.”
The bill requires review of the pro-
posed rate hikes within 60 days, so
Morgan reason that this an example of
inaccurate “sky is falling” type argu-
ments that have begun and will likely
continue.
Morgan says insurance premiums
have increased in Colorado six times
faster than inflation, and that consumers
are getting less coverage.
“We have an obligation to serve as a
watch dog on rates to protect Colorado
families and businesses from being over-
charged, and to bring transpar-
ency to our insurance rates so
we know where our money is
going,” said Carroll.
“I don’t think citizens can
really understand why mean-
ingful health care reform hits a
dead-end unless they know how
much time and money is spent
on lobbyists to defeat reform
efforts. The people will decide
the fate of these efforts.”
After first reading, a pair a rezoning
bills now move to a public hearing in
City Council on April 28th.
The rezoning, which woud change
zoning in two areas of West Highlands
and Sloan’s Lake from R-2 to R-1, is
hoped by proponents to stop scrape-
offs of single family homes which are
being replaced by duplexes and tri-
plexes. Opponents say the re-zoning
harms private property rights.
Significantly, Councilman Rick
Garcia successfully asked the Council’s
Blueprint Denver committee to add
language to the rezoning bills, extend-
ing the effective date until January 1,
2009. According to Garcia, the eight
months would allow projects in motion
to be concluded. It would also allow a
property owner who have said they has
plans for a scrape-off to begin. Garcia
indicated that those changes were nec-
essary to meet objections raised by
those on City Council.
Garcia said he expects a “legal pro-
test” of the re-zoning to be filed. A legal
protest, if certified, would require ten
council votes to pass the bills.
The re- zoi ng i s
“symbolic as to how we are going
to deal with the implementaton of
Blueprint Denver (the city comprehen-
sive plan),” said Garcia.
More online at northdenvernews.com
by the North Denver News
Walk out to your car in the morning,
and the odor strikes you first. You smell
gas. And then you see the puddle of it
underneath your car.
That was the scene eighteen times
over this winter, as theives brazenly
drilled holes into the gas tanks of trucks
and SUVs from below to steal gas.
“It’s amazing they didn’t blow them
selves to kingdom come,” said Ven
Wagner, a mechanic who welds gas
tanks for repair. “If they got a tank that
was mostly empty, a small spark could
have ignited the gas vapor, and they
would have had a nice fireball.”
Denver Police Detectives arrested
two men, Shad Reimer and Randell
Tomei, after a search revealed evidence
of the thefts, followed by a swift confes-
sion.
It took police almost two months
to track down the thieves, who struck
in the middle of the night, and left few
clues or evidence.
Repairs to the trucks and SUVs ran
into the thousands of dollars, as many
needed a full replacement of their gas
tanks in order to be safely roadworthy
again.
Arrest in North Denver gas
thefts
This month
North
DeNver News
Windows Dressed up
p.34
Queen’s Day p.23
Zio Romolo’s p.15
Old Gardens p.18
18 gas thefts from parked trucks and
SUVs have left a mess across North
Denver
Reimer and Tomei
Cumulative Changes in Health Insurance Premiums, Overall
Inflation, and Wages and Salaries 2001-2005
40.1%
7.7%
25.1%
50.5%
60%
2.8%
1.2%
2.4%
13% 7.2%
10%
8.0%
7.9%
6.7%
4.7%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Health Insurance Premiums Wages and Salaries Overall Inflation
Sources: Colorado Health Institute (premiums) ,Bureau of Economic Analysis (wages), and Bureau of Labor Statistics (inflation).
North Denver re-zoning moves
to final Council hearing
April 4, 2008
Page 2
North DeNver News
The Origins of Economic Distress:
Apex and Foundation
We now have seen three financial
bubbles arise and two burst in an aston-
ishingly short period of time. The first
was the internet/tech stock bubble, which
blew up, vaporizing some $7 trillion. Next
was the housing bubble, in which home
valuations rocketed up 50% while GDP
increased 14%. Eric Janzen, writing in
Harper’s, put the inflated value of hous-
ing due to the bubble at $13 trillion, using
the Federal Reserve’s Flow of Funds. One
good way to recognize a bubble? When
the cost of an item (like a home) is increas-
ing far more quickly than people’s ability
to buy the item. And now we are in the
midst of a commodity bubble, with gold
and oil leading the way, but also including
grain, uranium and copper. The com-
modity bubble is currently being inflated
by two factors-- the plunging value of the
dollar, which automatically creates price
increases in commodities valued in dollars,
and the massive asset rotation out of stocks
and into commodities. Simply put, when
stocks and bonds look risky and none-
too-profitable, investors switch to another
asset class or type of investment. The stock
market has been flat for a decade, mea-
sured by the S&P 500, so investors have
put their money into, or speculated with,
oil, gold and the like. More buyers mean
higher prices, yes?
Some observers, like William
Fleckenstein, put the bubble blame square-
ly upon the Federal Reserve, and a sus-
Everything You Want to Know About the Democratic National
Convention and its Impact on Denver Neighborhoods
DNC Panelists Will Include:
Sky Gallegos, DNC, Deputy CEO Intergovernmental Affairs
Katherine Archuleta, Mayor’s Office, Policy Advisor on Policy &
Initiatives
Mike Dino, CEO Denver Convention Host Committee
David Quiñones, Division Chief, Special Operations Division,and
Michael Battista, Deputy Chief of Operations, DPD
Sharon Linhart, Downtown Denver Partnership, DNC Task Force

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Out goes Republican hatchetman
(see the law-skirting Trailhead 527)
and nice guy oilman Bruce Benson
as head of the Denver Public Schools
Foundation. And in comes self-de-
scribed homemaker Kristin Richardson,
another major Republican donor, to
head a foundation that ostensibly
supports an overwhelmingly poor,
Hispanic, and urban school district in
very Democratic Denver.
Richardson has donated $25,000 to
the Republican National Committee,
along with checks to Pete Coors, Bush-
Cheney, the American Renewal PAC,
and Rick O’Donnell. The American
Renewal PAC , with a track record
of supporting the most conservative
Republican candidates for federal
office, was the leadership PAC of JC
Watts, an outspoken Oklahoma con-
servative.
All in all, Richardson has donat-
ed more than $50,000 dollars to
Republicans, including a maximum
donation to Mitt Romney.
Give the high level of involvement
of DPS Foundation-associated folks in
pumping big Republican money into
Denver School Board races, this new
leadership development shouldn’t be
a surprise.
But what are the educational policy
positions of a Bush, Coors and Romney
supporter. Vouchers? Support for char-
ters?***
--North Denver News
It’s a another big Republican
donor to head the Denver Public
Schools Foundation
Imagine our economy in three parts.
The first is the foundation, upon which
everything else rests. In the modern age,
that foundation is energy- the vast enter-
prise by which resources are taken from
the earth (and increasingly the sun and
sky), refined, transported and used. The
third, the apex, is the financial sector—
the creation of capital and credit, and its
exploitation. Everything feeds the apex,
every credit card and check transaction,
every major purchase (home, car, educa-
tion) puts a percentage into the financial
sector, however small. Finance is large-
ly parasitic, feeding off value and trade
created elsewhere. The middle ground
between the apex and foundation is our
productive economy, where labor and
capital combine to create value and ben-
efit.
This metaphor is purely subjective—
there is no value judgement in putting
banks at the top and oil drillers at the
bottom and everyone else in the middle.
But it is helpful to understand how these
segments interact.
Most Americans don’t recognize this
structure and the cracks that threaten
the stability of the productive economy.
Our leaders, when aware, won’t discuss
it. Interests, from corporate, to labor, to
environmental, to bureaucratic, fear a real
debate about our common needs. The
media, generally too depthless, won’t
dare to tell the story. Academia is too frac-
tured and secularized to grasp the long
view round it.
Regardless, the problems are real.
Some measures of it are visited upon
the vast majority of American families.
Real wages (adjusted for inflation) in the
United States are stagnant over the last
seven years, only 0.8% higher in January
2008 then March 2001.
Inflation is said to be contained. But
the reality? Energy prices leap ever higher
daily. Health care costs inflate at double
digit rates. Even food prices threaten the
effective standard of living. The dollar is
so weak that it may not be the world’s
reserve currency much longer, a possibili-
ty that could literally bankrupt the nation,
leaving no buyers for the prodigious debt
we create month in and month out.
At its peak, the apex, the American
financial sector is in miserable shape,
despite extraordinary efforts by the Federal
Reserve to maintain stability. Highly lev-
eraged in every market by speculation,
from credit card debt to municipal bonds,
we are seeing a gigantic house of cards
crumble. American prosperity is an illu-
sion of debt. We borrow, and create money
through leverage, far in excess of the
cumulative value of economic production
(GDP). At every turn, from mortgages, to
bonds, we put a fraction down and prom-
ise to pay later. A hedge fund, Carlyle
Capital, related to the private equity fund
the Carlyle Group, failed last month-- it
was leveraged 32 times to one. In plain
language, it took $1,000 in collateral and
purchased $32,000 worth of mortgages--
good old government insured mortgages,
to the tune of $27.1 billion. No bank or
credit union could ever have done this
32-to-1 trick, but a variety of pseudo-
banks have done the same, essentially
creating phony money through leverage.
And many of them, including the giant
investment bank Bear Stearns have now
failed. That phony money is now gone,
taking some $18 billion in shareholder
value with it.
see FINANCIALs on page 9
April 4, 2008
North DeNver News
Page 3
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Over 40 percent of Colorado’s high
school students never make it to grad-
uation, and our state ranks 48th for
high school dropouts between ages
16 and 19, according to The Colorado
Children’s Campaign. Colorado ranks
26th overall out of the 50 states in the
number of high school dropouts.
But even worse, the Colorado
Department of Education reports a
shocking 72.3 percent of Hispanics in
Denver are dropping out of school –
the worst rate in America. Villa Park,
south of West Colfax, where Latino
residency reaches 80 percent compared
to 32 percent in Denver overall, is a
neighborhood hit hardest. With a high
poverty level, 63 percent of households
have income less than 100 percent of
Denver’s median income.
Several organizations, in an effort to
encourage Villa Park homeowners who
struggle financially by offering practi-
cal help, have partnered and launched
what they
call “Extreme
C o m m u n i t y
Makeover,” a
massive out-
reach to restore
10 city blocks
of West Denver
neighborhoods,
according to
C o n f l u e n c e
Mi n i s t r i e s ,
which is spear-
heading the
cleanup. The ten
blocks are Colfax
to 6th, Federal to
Sheridan.
It is “extreme”
not in the sense
of TV’s “Extreme
Makeover Home
Edition,” where
beaten-up hous-
es are razed to
the ground and
rise again as huge breathtaking state-
of-the-art residences. The work in this
community may be just an exterior
spruce-up, but it’s extreme in the sense
of the sacrifice of strangers willing to
build bridges of hope to those in need.
It’s extreme in the heart connections
that are made in the process.
The initiative serves the community
through two primary projects:
Extreme Community Makeover
unleashed in Villa Park
see NEIGHBORHOOD on page 10
by Marla Lindstrom Benroth
April 4, 2008
Page 4
North DeNver News
Melanie Beaton
North Denver Notions
CharmingOldDenver.com
The Official Blog of
Charming Old Denver
Jennifer Allan, Re/Max City Horizons, 303-947-1335
Denver School of Gymnastics (DSG)
is celebrating thirty years of teaching
children the wonderful sport of gym-
nastics. Owners Debbie and “Coach”
Joe Walker established DSG in 1967
and it is one of the oldest private clubs
in America. Located
at 58th and Lamar in
Arvada, DSG has had
a strong presence in
Northwest Denver
with alumni and now
their children attend-
ing programs.
“If a child is having
fun, they learn faster,”
says Coach Joe, and this is the approach
that DSG uses in all levels of teaching
from “mom and tot” all the way up
to their competitive levels. This phi-
losophy is different than most gyms,
“we offer competitive team programs
without the long training hours of
other programs,” says Debbie. “Our
philosophy is to train efficiently and
effectively during our practice hours.
We encourage kids to try other activi-
ties and believe strongly in family time,
and that competitive sports at a young
age should not take up all of their extra
curricular time.” This is the team pro-
gram philosophy that Debbie and Joe
have used for 30 successful years.
Denver School of Gymnastics offers
programs starting at 18 months with
Parent and Tot classes that are available
for boys and girls, as well as preschool
level classes that are forty-five min-
utes. After preschool level, the pro-
gram becomes available to only girls,
and depending on their skill level those
classes are one hour to one-and-a-half
hours once a week. The girls can then
move up into DSG’s
competitive team pro-
gram that competes
with the USAG and
locally with the Rocky
Mountain League
organizations.
Denver School of
Gymnastics also offers
a Mom’s Morning Out
Program that runs Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Fridays through out the summer. It
is a half day program that offers gym-
nastics, crafts and fun in the jumping
castles.
In honor of thirty years, Denver
School of Gymnastics is having a
reunion on August 16, 2008. This will
be a great celebration for past alumni
as well as current families attending
DSG, which have made 30 years pos-
sible. If you are an alumni, there is an
alumni registration form available on
their website dsgym.com. “Our biggest
successes are the amount of former
DSG gymnasts that still love gymnas-
tics and DSG and that they bring their
own children back to train with us.”
For more information the Denver School
of Gymnastics can be reached at 303-424-
2910 or on the net at www.dsgym.com.***
Denver School
of Gymnastics
celebrates
30 years of
teaching
children
Denver School of Gymnastics offers classes for kids of all ages, including these three
three-year olds.
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April 4, 2008
Page 5
North DeNver News
How many neighborhood activists
does it take to screw in an energy-
efficient light bulb, thereby reducing
Denver’s carbon footprint? Just two,
and in pursuing this easy means to
reduce energy consumption in their
own front yards, Kevin Suchlicki and
Sue Okerson started the Porch Bulb
Project.
The Porch Bulb Project endeav-
ors to take a chunk out of residential
greenhouse gas emissions by replac-
ing incandescent porch bulbs with
energy-efficient compact fluorescent
lamps (CFLs). For Earth Day 2008, the
Porch Bulb Project, joining with its new
partner Groundwork Denver, aims to
distribute 100 porch light CFLs in the
Sunnyside neighborhood.
The Porch Bulb Project evolved
because Okerson and Suchlicki wanted
to take action in reducing Denver’s
carbon footprint. They noticed lots
of porch lights on all night -- ideal
situations for CFLs. So Suchlicki and
Okerson’s bright idea was to replace
incandescent bulbs in porch lights with
CFLs . . . for free.
Okerson and Suchlicki started out by
donating the CFLs themselves. To this
generosity, another 300 CFLs have been
added from the City’s environmen-
tal sustainability initiative GreenPrint
Denver and the City Council offices of
Rick Garcia and Judy Montero.
Since its inception, over 70 incan-
descent bulbs have been replaced,
reducing Denver’s carbon footprint
by almost four metric tons per year.
Although we still have a ways to go
-- a Denverite’s per capita emissions
are about 25 metric tons per year -- the
Porch Bulb Project is low-hanging fruit
that moves us all in the right direction.
CFLs use 25 percent of the energy an
incandescent bulb uses and can last 10
times as long, consequently reducing
waste, energy use, and the emissions
and pollution that result from that con-
sumption. Additionally, each CFL can
save as much as $40 over the life of the
bulb.
Groundwork Denver, a non-prof-
it based in Northwest Denver, will
work to further the Porch Bulb Project’s
accomplishments, expanding the use
of CFLs as well as providing infor-
mation and resources in reducing
residential greenhouse gas emissions.
Groundwork Denver’s mission is to
improve the physical environment and
promote health and well-being through
community-based partnerships and
action.
The Porch Bulb Project is a compo-
nent of Groundwork Denver’s Climate
Change Program. To volunteer for
the Porch Bulb Project, to donate
bulbs or for more information about
Groundwork Denver’s Climate Change
Program, contact Program Director
Julie Connor at 303-455-5600 or Julie.
Connor@groundworkdenver.org, or
visit www.groundworkdenver.org.

For more information about Denver’s
carbon footprint, visit www.greenprintden-
ver.org. For more information about the
Porch Bulb Project, visit www.porchbulb-
project.org. ***
Low-hanging fruit on the
porch
by Julie Connor
Apr 26 - 7:30pm, Apr 27 - 3:00pm
Cleo Parker Robinson Theatre
119 Park Avenue West, Denver
Tickets: $15.00 Adults, $12.00 Students/Seniors
Buy online: www.balletariel.org
Information: 303.282.9828
4141 W. 30th Ave.
$749,000
Extraordinary home with
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stunning kitchen and beautiful
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baths. Spectacular 9,250 sq. ft.
lot. Truly one-of-a-kind in
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Karen Nichols
303.336.4739
11880 W. 30th Pl.
$429,900
Remodeled 2-story on quiet
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includes Corian countertops,
custom island, ash cabinets in
kitchen that opens to family
room with wood floors, gas
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4 spacious bedrooms and 2
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Corrie Lee
303.817.9266
303.399.7777
www.perryandco.com
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Eliza Gibbons
North Denver Notions
If your schedule allows,
traveling on the shoulder
is the way to go.
In travel lingo
the year is divided into three
basic periods: high season,
low season and the shoulder.
The shoulder – basically April
May, early June, September and October
– is close enough to high season for you
to enjoy decent weather, but far enough
away from peak tourist time so that you
won’t have peak crowds.
If you plan on going to Brazil during
Carnaval, Mexico during spring break,
or the Big Island of Hawaii for the
Ironman, plan on paying a hefty pre-
mium.
By traveling on the shoulder, I’ve had
the animal-rich Pantanal in Brazil virtu-
ally to myself, nearly deserted beaches
in Mazatlan, Mexico, and uncrowded
dive boats and dive sites in Hawaii.
Flexibility is key to airline travel dur-
ing the shoulder. Depending on what
day of the week you travel you might
save $100-200 on your airfare. I often
find that changing a travel date from
a Monday to a Tuesday will save me a
bundle. And long-haul flights during
off-peak and shoulder season are rarely
full, so you might get a couple of seats
or even a whole row to yourself.
Bargaining is the key to getting hotel
rooms at great rates during the shoul-
der. Hotel reservation agents are sup-
posed to first offer you full-rate rooms.
But since hotels are unlikely to be full
during this time, you have a strong
bargaining chip on your side as hotels
would rather have you there – even at a
cheaper rate – than have another empty
room for another night. Don’t be shy.
Ask if there are any lower or special
rates, and you’re virtually guaranteed
to get it. Be cheeky and ask for a room
upgrade, and you might
get that too!
Once you’re there, be
sure to check the hours
and availability of tourist
attractions, restaurants,
buses, trains, etc. Some places might
have shorter hours, such as museums in
Europe, that tend to close earlier in the
winter, and some smaller tourist towns
might close down altogether during the
winter. While a full stop to business is
becoming more rare, it’s still a good idea
to check.
Choosing your hours carefully can
go a long way toward having a calm,
uncrowded visit to a very popular
attraction. I’ve visited the famous ruins
at Chichén Itzá several times over the
past many years. Each time I go there
are more wonders uncovered, and each
time there are more people who want
to see them. The last time I went I had
rented a car and driven all over the
Yucatán to several different ruin sites
and small towns, so I had flexibility. I
got to Chichén Itzá at 8 in the morn-
ing, before the crowds and before it got
blazing hot. I had this ancient majes-
tic Mayan city virtually to myself. By
the time the tour buses rolled in from
Cancún with their thousands of visitors,
I was done ruin-tromping and headed
to an underground cenote to cool off.
For those of you with kids, the shoul-
der season is hard to hit unless you want
to pull the kiddokens out of school. But
for those of you who aren’t slaves to the
school-year schedule, you can travel to
the best places on earth, for less, and
without feeling like the rest of the earth
is there with you!***
Shoulder
travel
Frolik
on 32nd
Flirty Skirts, Fantastic Tees, and
Fabulous Dresses! Check us out at
Frolikon32nd.com!
A boutique
of clothing &
other fine wonders
National author returns to
Highlands’ home, urges better
vision in new development
by Elizabeth J. Wheeler
Page 6
North DeNver News
April 4, 2008
Sarah Hilbert, 39, author of
“Working-Class Beauties: The
Colorful Brick Bungalows of Denver’s
Highlands” in the Winter 2007 issue
of American Bungalow, this March
visited her parents in the family’s
Highlands home, which they have
owned for 34 years.
Over coffee she told me, “I live
in an amazing historic district in
Pasadena, California called Bungalow
Heaven. It is recognized nationwide
as one of the first historic residential
districts of the country and for its
charming one- and two-story crafts-
man bungalows, all of which were
built from 1905 to 1920 for working-
and middle-class families. Many of
the homes in Highlands are similar
to those in my neighborhood. Even in
the current unstable housing market
in California, realtors say our homes
are selling because people “want to
live in a ‘character community’ that
is stable.”
Hilbert stated that Bungalow
Heaven would never have come to
be were it not for a few people who
were shocked into action in the 1980s
when several beautiful bungalows
were torn down to make way for an
ugly, three-story apartment building.
The parallels between Highlands now
and Bungalow Heaven 20 years ago
are striking.
She referred me to this excerpt from
the Bungalow Heaven Neighborhood
Association website (http://www.
bungalowheaven.org/background.
html).
“Some of the more concerned
neighbors began phoning others, and
set up a meeting to see what could
be done. Soon the precariousness
of our neighborhood became clear.
To keep our bungalows from being
demolished and replaced with a wall
of apartment buildings, we would
have to aggressively push through a
“downzoning” to zone the land back
to single family use.”
So we circulated petitions, drew
more and more people to meetings,
insisted that other City Council mem-
bers listen to us -- and we showed
them the new apartment building.
After months and months of dis-
cussion, hearings, arguing with land-
owners expecting to bulldoze and
cash in, we won.”
Two things concern Hilbert about
the process occurring in Highlands:
1. There is no enforced, vigilant
“due process” that allows neighbors to
learn beforehand that a home on their
block will be torn down. Neighbors
seemingly have no recourse over
scrapes that occur in their near prox-
imity.
She told me, “My mother knows
a woman who had a new two-story
development constructed next door
after a scrape. She can no longer
garden the same way she did in her
backyard because her natural light is
blocked. Shouldn’t she have been able
to voice that concern before the build-
ing was created? Do the needs and
wants of the immediate community
not matter at all when a development
is about to take place? “
2. There are no design guidelines
and development standards in place.
”From my understanding,
Blueprint Denver would help delin-
eate guidelines, but it sounds as
though there has been great difficulty
in getting Blueprint Denver codified.
While I would never advocate for
uniformity in style and appearance,
I would argue that placing two-sto-
ry stucco, modern-style, glass-and-
steel structures right in the middle
of a block of small brick cottages is,
at best, terribly unimaginative and,
at worst, the path to destabilizing
the neighborhood by destroying the
humanscale and charm of the neigh-
borhood,” stated Hilbert.
“Highlands shaped who I am - it
forged my passion for old homes,
and it made me seek out urban neigh-
borhoods and urban communities
as an adult. I want to make sure
that as Highlands changes, it’s done
with vision and responsibility and
that the community is wholly includ-
ed in the process.” ***
No r t h
De n v e r
NEWS
North Denver’s Bigger, Better Paper
To Advertise: 303.458.7541
A stucco, modern-style, glass-and-steel structure pierces a block with many small
brick cottages on Meade Street. Design guidelines and development standards would
have prevented this obtrusive style and height. Photo by Elizabeth J. Wheeler
2 column x 5.5 inches 1 column x 8.5 inches
BHA-1765-A FEB 2007
To download graphic files go to www.edwardjones.com/graphics/us/sales/ads
A growing business requires a growing team.
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Please stop by or call
for an appointment with
a financial advisor so we
can be of service to you.
Please stop by or call for an appointment with a financial
advisor so we can be of service to you.
Eric W Jasper
Financial Advisor
.
3475 West 32nd Avenue
Denver, CO 80211
303-458-6655
Edward Jones believes that relationships are key to
success. We feel that the best way to develop strong
relationships is by doing business face-to-face. In order
to meet the needs of our growing business, I'm pleased to
announce that John Stadtmueller will be joining me to
provide you with one-to-one, personalized service and
advice.
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Eric W Jasper
Love Your Earth
TM
is celebrating
Earth Day on April 22nd
- with 10% off everything
in the Boutique!
Love Your Earth
TM
Boutique
4110 Tennyson Street
Where ALL Goods are Local,
Organic, or Recycled
ph. 303-455-3366
LoveYourEarth.org
Songs • Chants • Dance • Instruments
www.milehighmusictogether.com • 720.366.8655
Music Together
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is a well respected,
nationwide program with
highly trained teachers
beautiful, sophisticated
music, and an emphasis on
family participation.
Mixed age classes designed
for infants through age 5.
Visit our website for Center
information, video clips, class
schedules, and free demo classes.
New Home at 41st & Tennyson
Follow a withdrawal strategy
that won’t leave you empty
Fran Schroeder and Corinne Hunt
Denver Icons
April 4, 2008
Page 7
North DeNver News
Its first Mass was said in a rent-
ed feed store on the corner of 25th
Avenue and Decatur
Street on October 6, 1889,
in what was the town
of Highlands. In time it
would become part of
Denver. The celebrant
was Dominican Fr. Joseph T. Murphy
whose audience numbered 28 people,
a listing of whom still exists in church
records. The pews and altar had
begun life as dry goods boxes, but
attendance grew rapidly, and it was
decided to move servic-
es to the old Highlands
Town Hall at 29th and
Federal.
The first summer in
the new location, with
Edward D. Donnelly, the first pas-
tor, assisted by Father Murphy, the
parish raised $500 to buy three lots
at West 25th and Grove, where a
If you own mostly fixed-rate invest-
ments, such as bonds and certificates
of deposit (CDs), you will probably
have to take smaller withdrawals each
year than you would if your portfo-
lio contained a greater percentage of
stocks. That’s because stocks, over
time, have more growth potential than
other types of investments - and you
will unquestionably need this growth
to combat the two threats to your
retirement income described above:
longevity and inflation. (Of course,
stocks also carry the risk of losing
some, or all, of your principal, but if
you invest in an array of quality stocks
and hold them for the long term, it
doesn’t guarantee a profit or protect
against loss but you may be able to
help reduce the effects of price volatil-
ity.)
Another factor behind your annu-
al withdrawal rate is the amount of
income you can expect from other
sources. If you open a small busi-
ness or do some consulting, you may
be able to withdraw less from your
investment portfolio than if you had
no earned income during your retire-
ment years. You also may be able to
make lower annual withdrawals if
you’ve built up a sizable pension or
401(k), supplemented by your month-
ly Social Security checks.
Your financial advisor can help you
develop a withdrawal strategy that is
suitable for your individual needs and
that can counter the effects of infla-
tion, longevity and market volatility.
By making the right moves at the right
time, you can go a long way working
toward the retirement lifestyle you’ve
envisioned.
You can reach Eric Jasper, AAMS at
303.458.6655 for more sound financial
advice. ***
St Dominic’s
Church
two-story brick,
R o ma n e s q u e
church school
opened.
Five Dominican Sisters arrived
from Wisconsin in August 1890, to
open a school.
A convent was built for them at
3035 West 25th.
Despite a fire in February 1891,
the facilities were rebuilt, served
by several interim pastors, until
the arrival of Father Roscoe F.
Larpenteur in 1918. It was he
who oversaw the building of the
church we admire on Federal
Boulevard. Designed by the
same architect as that of the
Denver Municipal Auditorium,
Robert Willison, the English
Gothic church was built of stone
from quarries in Monte Vista,
Colorado, and Boise, Idaho.
It was dedicated on February
14, 1926, by Bishop Tihen with
dozens of Dominican priests,
brothers and sisters in their
white robes in attendance at
this, the home base for Rocky
Mountain Dominicans. It was
this church that opened the first
credit union in the diocese in
1933 to help parishioners during
the Great Depression.
Viking Park, across Federal
Boulevard from the church, pro-
vides a magnificent foreground for
this grand Gothic church.***
Take a Vacation away
from your routine...
And let us show you
how to make your
own books, journals
and cards!
Leather journal with your
custom-made,
fused glass button
April 12 and 19, 10-noon
All materials provided
$65
Hard cover journal with a
pamphlet stitch
May 10 or 11, 9-noon
$35
Accordion book
June 21 or 22, 10-noon
Preregistration and payment
required prior to
the class date
Denver Bookbinding
Company
2715 17th St
(32nd and Tejon)
303-455-5521
see us online at:
denverbook.com
see us on-line at
denverbook.com
303-455-5521
2715 17th St
Make your
loved one feel
special by
creating your
own bound
volume.
A special gift,
and for less
than $50!
G R A N D O P E N I N G !
Saturday, April 12th from 1-4pm
food, drink, and raffle drawings for services at the studio
- along with prizes from local merchants and businesses!!
Dr. Scott Evans, DC
Christopher Latham, CMT
4650 W 38th Ave. Suite 210
303-433-5433
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When you’re working, you proba-
bly focus on how much you’re putting
in to your investment portfolio. But
when you retire, how much you take
out will be a matter of considerable
interest. And that’s why you have to
prepare the proper withdrawal strate-
gies.
Specifically, once you retire, you’ll
need to decide what percentage of
your investment portfolio you can
withdraw each year without running
out of money. How much can you take
out annually?
There’s no one right answer for
everyone. However, when you’re con-
sidering a suitable withdrawal rate,
you’ll need to consider a few differ-
ent factors - one of which is your age
at retirement. Given today’s longer
life expectancies, you could easily be
around - and incurring a wide vari-
ety of expenses - when you are 90 or
older. Consequently, the younger you
are when you retire, the lower your
annual withdrawal rate should be.
But, when determining your ideal
withdrawal rate, it isn’t just the sheer
number of years that you need to con-
sider - it’s also what’s happening to
your purchasing power during those
years. Even with a relatively mild
annual inflation rate of 3 percent, it
would take just 25 years for the cost
of living to essentially double. So,
if you need, say, $75,000 per year to
cover your expenses when you retire,
you will need $150,000 per year in
25 years. If we go through a period
in which inflation rises significantly,
you might have to scale back your
annual withdrawals or adjust your
investment portfolio to provide more
opportunities for growth.
And, speaking of your investment
mix, it’s also a key factor in deter-
mining your annual withdrawal rate.

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Have you ever been a pain
in the neck to your Mom?
Make it up to her this Mother’s Day with a
gift certificate to alleviate her other
aches & pains.
April and May special: 3 visits for $199
(first time patients only)
Denver's Oldest
Independent Fish
and Aquarium
Store
5055 W. 44th
(One Block East of Sheridan)
303-458-0376
FISH
DEN

S
i
n
ce 19
6
9
April 4, 2008
Page 8
North DeNver News
Cyndeth Allison
North Denver Musings
the details of their lives.
In fact, author and naturalist
Kathleen Cain’s lifelong love affair
with cottonwood trees led to her new
book, The Cottonwood Tree:
An American Champion.
The book looks at cotton-
wood trees from nearly every
possible angle. It discusses
serious scientific information
like their natural history, identifica-
tion of the various subspecies, and
how they are contributing to our
understanding of genetics.
It addresses ecological issues, both
the very important part cottonwoods
play in establishing and maintaining
the habitats in which they live, and
the dangers they face
today.
It gives us a tour
of famous individual
trees across the coun-
try. It explains uses
of cottonwoods. The
bark is sweet food
for horses, the wood
makes bowls, drums
and Santos and roof
beams for pueblos.
Kathleen’s book
does all of this and
more, in an engaging
style. The technical
information is dense
enough to please the
most rigorous scien-
tist. The tree stories
make you see and feel the enchant-
ment of the species. In fact, it does
such a good job that it’s been nomi-
nated for a Colorado Book Award.
Enchanting? Cottonwoods?
Anyone who has grown up in this
part of the country must think of
these as common trees, nothing spe-
cial, just a hardy native. So I thought
until I picked up Kathleen’s book
and began to discover all their special
characteristics, like the cottonwood
star, or how they are the first to colo-
nize a streambed, making shade for
grasses, flowers, and animals, homes
for birds, using their roots to hold the
bank in place.
Reading The Cottonwood Tree:
An American Champion was to look
through Kathleen’s eyes, to begin to
see the magic she sees in these trees.
And so I found myself, early in the
It was an unseasonably warm
day in early March when my friend
Kathleen and I spent an amazing
hour-and-a-half walking through
open space looking at cot-
tonwood trees.
She showed me many
trees, pointing out how to
read their histories and how
to read what they are tell-
ing us about the environment they
live in. For example, you can tell
drought-dropped twigs by the bel-
ly-button shape of the end; twigs
dropped for other reasons have flat
ends. She crushed some of those
twigs to release their musty scent,
which put me right back on the
bank of the irrigation
ditch that ran through
our yard when I was
a kid.
Kathleen showed
me the sawed-off
stump of a gigantic old
specimen and another
stump rotted away
only on the south,
looking like a nature
shrine in the Irish
countryside. We saw
flicker condos in the
dead trees, still empty,
and rodent homes in
the roots, and beaver
damage that will even-
tually kill the tree. We
saw a lone tree on the
hilltop, as sincere as any Willa Cather
knew, and a beautifully shaped shade
tree with a bench underneath.
She showed me how to recognize
fungus and how the tree protects
itself. We saw drops of golden sap on
the buds, just waiting for the warmth
of the next few weeks to become
liquid.
We saw Plains Cottonwoods and
Narrow Leaf Cottonwoods, which
don’t look to me like cottonwoods at
all, and hybrids.
She broke a twig at the knuckle
to reveal a magical center - a nearly
perfectly-shaped five-pointed star.
Kathleen glowed as she showed
me each new wonder, and as she told
me the natural history associated
with this type of tree. She loves each
cottonwood she meets. To her they
are individuals and she remembers
Tree
stories
Services provided include conventional braces, esthetic braces, and invisalign.
Patients of all ages welcome
“Accepting most insurance and a Medicaid provider”
spring, on a path
along Farmer’s
Highline Canal,
rapt, as Kathleen alternated between
heavy science and delightful folklore,
touching bark, tramping through last
year’s leaves, meeting any number of
these strong, noble beings. I had no
idea there was so much to learn, or
that I, certainly no naturalist, as any
regular reader of this column knows,
could have so much fun learning it.
Kathleen will be at the West Side
Books Stories for All Seasons on May
10 reading from her book and sharing
more about the magic of cottonwood
trees. I’ll certainly be there. Why don’t
you join us?
Stories for All Seasons Second
Saturday Readings, West Side Books,
3434 W. 32nd Avenue, 303/480-0220,
May 10, 7:30 PM. ***
N
e
w

P
r
i
c
e
!
N
e
w

P
r
i
c
e
!
S
O
L
D
www.ßradfordFealEstate.cou · 303.133.0211 · 2550 15th Street, üenver
Brokerage for buyers
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Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
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uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
$274,900
Wonderful 1950's ranch on ureat block with excellent
location between hiuhlands su. and sloan lake, oak furs,
coved ceilinus, uodated kitchen, larue uaster bedroou,
larue backvard with oatio and uarden area, 2-car
uaraue with work bench, new furnace and h20.
Call Brad Lewis 720.971.1200
2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St. 2938 Osceola St.
3315 Wolff Street 4205 Irving Street 1735 Boulder Street 3087 West Denver Place 3337 Decatur Street
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NewSprocket townhomes with modern style, architectural details,
tons of light, attached 1 car garage! 2 Bdrm, 3 baths, views!!
Steps fromshopping, restaurants and parks- hot location! These
are great units, only 1 left- hurry, moving fast!!
Presented by Kristen Moore 303-726-7597
$349,900
Don’t miss this unique turn of the century two story home with
beautiful landscaping. This well maintained home has newer roof,
electrical, plumbing, furnace, and windows. Main level bedrmmakes
great office/den or guest bedrm, great neighborhood!
Presented by Brad Lewis 720-971-1200
$599,900
Wow! Remarkable Denver Square in Harkness Heights, period
renovation with modern updates. Great kitchen with 6 burner
range, floor to ceiling cabinets, built-in speakers, master suite
with dressing room, large bedrooms, beautiful original staircases
&Builtins!
Presented byFilip Boelen 303-910-2072
$319,900
Adorable cottage ½block frompark features hardwood floors,
tons of closet space &versatile layout. You’ll love the huge
family roomw/fireplace &spacious master bedroom. Open house
Saturday 12 to 3. Virtual tour: www.3315Wolff.com
$379,900
Rare chance to own a piece of NW Denver history. The darling
sunburst house mixes historic and updated: exposed brick, pocket
doors, hardwood on both levels, concrete countertops, huge deck,
enormous garage & more! All a few minutes from lodo.
Presented by Rachel Grace Hultin 303-667-0609
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www.BradfordRealEstate.com • 303.433.0211 • 2550 15th Street, Denver
Presented by Brad Lewis 720-971-1200
Presented by Jordana Lebowitz 303-921-0332
Presented by Rachel Grace Hultin 303-667-0609
April 4, 2008
North DeNver News Page 9
Holistic Approach to Pediatrics Care
Ten minute drive from Highland and Sloan Lake neighborhoods
Green Mountain Pediatrics
Infants, Children & Adoloscents
Dan Schloegel, MD, FAAP
Francince Paston, MD, FAAP
M,TH 8am - 5:30pm
T, W, F 9am - 4:30pm
Sat 9am - 12pm
255 Union Blvd #120 • Lakewood CO 80228
Phone 303.936.7415 • Fax 303.936.2177
G
r
e
e
n

M
o
u
ntain
P
e
d
i
a
t
r
i
c
s
tained monetary policy that drove the
cost of money to nearly zero for a fifteen
year period. Cheap money also channels
money from the productive sectors of the
economy into financial speculation, widen-
ing the cracks in the apex. Fleckenstein’s
book, Greenspan’s Bubbles, is a lengthy
tour of the effects of the Fed’s actions.
Speculation is fueled by cheap money and
leverage, and while regulators have turned
a blind-eye to widespread and creative use
of leverage, cheap money is purely the
result of monetary policy.
It seems, however, that bubbles and
leverage are only a portion of the problems
besetting the apex of the economy.
The Chinese are purchasing the debt of
the United States at the rate of $1 billion
daily, totaling some $1.5 trillion so far. As
James Fallows has reported, that means
the poor of China have purchased $4,000
in U.S. debt for every man, woman and
child in America. Put on hold for a second
what that means in geo-political terms.
This represents a huge risk for both China
and America. For the Chinese, this is an
investment risk. As the dollar suffers, the
commodities that they use for manufac-
ture and the energy they import, get more
expensive relative to their huge asset base.
As some point, the Chinese will have to
diversify (just like your 401k), and unwind
this giant dollar position, or risk getting
clobbered as everything they import goes
sky high in pricing. For the U.S., this is a
debtor’s risk. If the Chinese call our loan,
or begin to sell off their devalued dollar
investments, we will be badly hurt. They
will be selling into a falling market, risking
a run on Treasuries. Simply put, the interest
cost to taxpayers will skyrocket, crippling
our ability to deal with Social Security,
Medicare, Medicaid, not to mention every-
thing else the federal government spends
money upon. This is an arrangement that
simply can not be sustained.
China also invests in America through
Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWF), and they
buy much more than just treasury bonds.
They are giant investors in private equity
funds, which increasingly, own American
corporations, including many companies
you are a daily consumer of.
As the American financial sector cra-
tered this January, Sovereign Wealth Funds
from Singapore, China, Abu Dhabi and
Oman raced to the rescue. Or was it a
firesale? Merrill Lynch, Citigroup, Morgan
Stanley, Bear Stearns and UBS, the cream of
the American banking industry, took in a
total of $30.5 billion from SWFs, according
to CFO Magazine. It’s unclear exactly who
all these investors are, and what their real
stakes may total.
How active these SWFs will be as inves-
tors, we don’t know. But just as small busi-
nesses know, when hometown banks get
gobbled up and decision-makers move to
far away cities, loans get harder to come
by. If Americans believe that folks in Abu
Dhabi and Singapore have their best inter-
ests at heart, they may be in for a nasty
surprise down the road. But what we do
know is that the American economy no
longer has the strength or the flexibility to
support its own banks and brokers.
Increasingly, the dollar is creating a
new set of hazards for our financial apex.
The weak dollar hampers our competitive
position in the financial sector. No one
wants to buy assets valued in dollars when
those dollars will be worth less tomorrow
than today, an almost guaranteed outcome
given the Federal Reserve’s rapid cuts in
interest rates. At some point, the world
will no longer need the dollar, at least as
a reserve currency (the currency assets are
held in). And since America has outsourced
its manufacturing base, increasingly out-
source it high-value service industry, and
is eroding its status as financial titan, what
will be left? Hollywood? Video games?
Not a very pretty prospect. With our low
savings rate and high consumer debt lev-
els, we will be hard pressed to find the
funds to invest in technology, the area we
still hold a global edge in.
Next month, the cracks in the founda-
tion and what you can do.
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Presented by Rachel Grace Hultin 303-667-0609
Spicy Pickle announced today that
two of its Denver-area franchise loca-
tions are extending their “Smoking Hot
Benefit” for the Friends of the Denver
Fire Department and the American Red
Cross/Mile High Chapter through April
30, 2008. The promotion raises money for
these two Denver organizations every
time a customer says “I’m a Friend of the
Denver Fire Department.” Both walk-in
and catering sales are included in the
offer.
“Either directly or indirectly, Denver’s
Red Cross chapter and the Friends of the
Denver Fire Department are essential
to the quality of life in our commu-
nity,” said John Volmert, Spicy Pickle
franchisee and owner of the two Spicy
Pickle locations at 988 Lincoln St. and
745 Colorado Blvd. “Fire victims would
be in dire straits without the short-term
housing and living essentials provided
by the Red Cross. And the Friends of the
Denver Fire Department works to ensure
that basic firefighter needs, not covered
by tax dollars - like firehouse furnishings
and exercise equipment - are made avail-
able to our officers.”
Until April 30, Volmert’s two Spicy
Pickle restaurants will donate 10% of
the proceeds from each sale to these two
community organizations when dine-in,
carryout or catering patrons make the
request. Total funds will be split equally
between the two groups. The new April
30 date further extends the success of the
promotion, which began March 1 to coin-
cide with National Red Cross Month.***
Spicy Pickle locations extend Red Cross/
Denver Fire Dept deal thru Apr 30
Financial sector distress echoes through
the economy
continued from page TWO
Group takes on neighborhood revitalization in Villa Park
April 4, 2008
Page 10
North DeNver News
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38tb Ave
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Serving your window fashion needs since 1958
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Expires May 31st, 2008
1. In cooperation with Habitat for
Humanity, they are building duplex
housing at 7th and Lowell.
2. Through the “One Block, One
Church, One Day” initiative, compa-
nies, churches and organizations are
adopting a block a day to help hom-
eowners with painting, home repairs,
lawn work and other projects.
On Saturday, March 29 on a beau-
tiful sunny day more than 20 volun-
teers descended upon the King and
8th block in the Villa Park area wear-
ing thick workman gloves and armed
with rakes, shovels, other tools and
sturdy black trash bags. Another 10
joined Habitat for Humanity in build-
ing duplex housing at 7th and Lowell.
They all came with a purpose: as
part of the early battalion of the initia-
tive to serve residents – without charge.
The Westside Christian Church, a block
over, provided support and cooked up
hot dogs and hamburgers and served
fruit and soft drinks donated by area
stores, such as Costco, King Soopers
and Sunflower Market.

They Couldn’t Believe it
Juan Ricalday stands in the alley
behind his house peering upward into
a tree where Alvin Maes sits. With his
chainsaw cranked, Maes fells “widow
maker” branches by the armloads.
“I was so concerned about this tree,”
Ricalday says. “But I couldn’t climb up
and cut the branches. I really appreci-
ate this help…” With the money he
makes from day labor jobs, he couldn’t
afford to contract it out.
Audrey shyly sits on the porch of
her modest bungalow. Two of her five
children, Tristian, 4, and Angel, 2, with
curly black hair and dark brown eyes,
wearing matching outfits, play happily
in the front yard. A couple of hours
ago Patricia Maes delivered a basket of
goodies for Audrey’s 11-day-old girl,
suffering from jaundice and just home
from the hospital. Inside sits a stroller
– a replacement from Confluence for
the doll stroller the family was using a
couple of weeks ago.
A worker passes by and chats. As
she leaves, Tristian runs across the
yard to the invisible border line calling
continued from page 3 out, “Can I give you a hug?”
Fastened onto a fence in the mid-
dle of the block across from Audrey’s
home a big sheet of construction paper
serves as the backdrop for 13 sheets of
paper listing the names and addresses
on the block of those who wanted help,
and Extreme Community Makeover
crews’ task lists. They include: “Trash
cleanup. Trim Trees. Rake Yard. Scrape
peeling paint, replace bad plywood.”
One note says simply “Wants to help
us out.”
That is the organizational brain-
storm of Alvin Maes, from the church
that has partnered with Confluence
today, Faith Bible Chapel (Pastor Roger
Funk’s Sunday School class). Mr. Maes
headed up this particular One Block/
One Church/One Day outreach. Maes
and his wife canvassed businesses for
donations (Lowell’s provided cement),
surveyed the neighborhood for needs
and picked up rakes, shovels and other
tools offered for loan from the Denver
councilman’s office.
The marching orders are posted
on the fence of Bob Oliver, one of the
residents who rolled up his sleeves
and worked with the crew in his yard.
They helped him move a 400-pound
parking block – he is no longer able to
move by himself like he did four years
ago – along with cleanup of both front
and back yard.
Oliver is a rotund Walmart greet-
er whose license plate says “World’s
Greatest Grandpa.” In the midst of the
swooshing of leaves and laughter of
the workers, Oliver smiles brightly and
says, “This reminds me someone still
cares.” His wife pokes her head out the
back door to thank everyone.
At the corner of King and 8th, three
men shovel the last of twelve pickup
loads of leaves and garbage from a
driveway; they have been working
since early in the morning. The hom-
eowners are afraid they will come to
the door with a bill afterward, but the
men reassure them, “No, we are doing
this to bless you – free gratis.”
The blessing goes both ways. “It’s
wonderful to meet people’s needs and
help them out,” said one worker whose
13-year-old son gave up a Saturday
hanging out with friends to join the
team.
Many residents are nowhere to be
seen while workers make their way
down the block. Perhaps they are skep-
tical? Perhaps they don’t know how to
respond to the unexpected kindness?
But among those who join the action
throughout the day are three young
Latino boys who roam from yard to
yard, pitching in to bundle sticks and
stuff leaves into bags.
Revitalizing Urban Neighborhoods
According to a Confluence Ministries
board member, one of the impetuses for
the community makeover initiative is
to stabilize the community and to pro-
tect it from gentrification, or the buying
and renovation of houses and stores
in deteriorated urban neighborhoods
by upper- or middle-income families
or individuals. Gentrification improves
property values but often displaces
low-income families and small busi-
nesses.
Facilitating the makeovers, Jude
and Cindy Del Hierro, founders and
directors of Confluence Ministries,
have been serving Denver for over 25
years - many of those years while living
and raising three children in the inner
city. In 2003, a former synagogue and
yeshiva became available as a home
base at 1400 Quitman Street, about a
mile away from this day’s makeover.
With the help of hundreds of vol-
unteers, and donations of top quality
materials from area businessmen, the
abandoned brick building has been
gutted and transformed into a beau-
tiful outreach center teaming with
activities. Community volunteers pro-
vide English as a Second Language
(ESL) classes, Whiz Kid tutoring, gui-
tar classes, and teach computer skills
in their computer lab. A Mothers of
Preschoolers group (M.O.P.S.) meets
monthly. During the Confluence block
parties, free basic health screening
along with other services is also avail-
able.
If you are interested in participating in
the 2008 Extreme Community Makeovers,
or you belong to an organization, church or
business that would like to adopt a block for
a day, contact Confluence at 303-377-3050
or e-mail trhoades@confluenceministries.
org. For more information, go to www.con-
fluenceministries.org and www.extreme-
communitymakeover.org. ***
Page 11
March 4,2008
North DeNver News
I watched the movie Hair
the other night; you know, the
1979 film based on a Broadway
musical that took place during
Vietnam with Treat Williams
as the rebellious hippy with wild
hair! It reminded me how much
hairstyles have influenced our
perception of people and fash-
ion. What’s “in” as far as hair-
styles is anyone’s guess. The
80s crazy big curls are back but
so is the 20’s bob and the 70’s
very straight look with bangs.
So wear your hair like you’d
wear your favorite pair of jeans,
comfortably and an ideal fit for
your lifestyle.
My preferred places to get
my hair quaffed in northwest
Denver are Bliss, The Parlour,
Honey Comb and Scarlet.
If you have fantastic curly
or wavy hair, Victoria at Bliss
will know exactly what to do
to make sure when you wake
up you don’t look like Treat
Williams in 1979. For color
I only trust Gabriel at The
Parlour with my highlighted
locks. He is also fantastic with
NW De nv e r Hair st yl e - b y Shop Gir l
men and children’s cuts. For
an all around healthy Colorado
look, ask for Lisa or Angela at
Honey Comb. And for the per-
fect shake and run short hair-
style, ask Jill Kelley at Scarlet.
For some great style ideas
while you’re out and about
in northwest Denver check
out Randee, the manager at
Fashion or Faux Pas?
Do you have pressing fashion issues?
Questions? Or just want to talk about
a hot new shop? Drop the North
Denver Shop Girl a line at
shopgirl@northdenvernews.com
V]nUffYVcih]eiY"bYh
Selling and
Accepting
Spring Items!
Kismet for the flawless straight
bob; Crystal, NIA instructor
at Studio Soma for the best
long curly do; Debra, owner of
“Shine, design and marketing”
or the best funky spiky short
cut.
So whether you identify
yourself as hip, sassy, funky,
athletic, old school, stylish or
an overworked executive type,
find a stylist who understands
your lifestyle and your hair and
you’ll always look your best.
-- Shop Girl
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Charlotte Nicholls
North Denver Notions
In a rarely traveled hallway at North
High School, a group of faculty members
and students from The Metropolitan
State College of Denver (MSCD) have
claimed an unused classroom to create
The Viking Writing Center. The goal of
this unique amenity is to strengthen all
forms of student writing.
The center gives North
High School students the
opportunity to polish their
writing skills while simul-
taneously giving aspiring
English educators study-
ing at MSCD the oppor-
tunity to develop skills working with
students. Students utilizing the center
can bring any type of writing during
any stage of the writing process.
“The writing center has given Metro
State students a great opportunity to
learn how to help students with indi-
vidual needs. It’s important to work
with actual students in addition to theo-
retical and practical studies,” Jordan
Heitman, MSCD student and writing
center volunteer, said.
The Viking Writing Center opened in
the Fall of 2007, led by Dr. Jill Adams, an
English Education Professor at MSCD.
Students of all grades and writing abili-
ties are welcome, and the coaches are
prepared to assist in any stage of the
writing process, from brainstorming to
putting the final touches in a finished
piece, or even just a friendly face to
talk to. “It worked really well to have
my students go down to the writing
center for prewriting. It put them in
a new environment, which allowed
them to be more open, expressive, and
experimental,” student teacher Amber
Shearer said. The center
is open Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday and Friday from
7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
In the writing center’s
early days, MSCD student
writing coaches provided
individual tutoring most
frequently. Over time, the coaches devel-
oped new services, and the center now
offers full class tutoring, presentations,
helpful lesson materials, and extracur-
ricular activities.
The center also hosts the Brown Bag
Book Club once a month. Participating
students receive a free book and free
lunch while they discuss the book with
peers and MSCD students. The writing
center hosted a writing contest last fall
and provides information on other con-
tests for interested students.
Upcoming activities include Manga
artist visits on April 15 and May 6.
Poetry workshop sessions on Fridays
during learning family time will also be
held April 11-May 16.
For more information on the center, con-
tact Jill Adams at jadams82@mscd.edu.***
North High
School’s
Writing
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North DeNver News
Page 12
April 4, 2008
Dixie Darr
North Denver Notions
In 1938, seventeen-year-old Fern
Coon, her sister June and a couple of
friends attended a carnival at Maple
Grove grade school in Des
Moines. The girls entered a
cake walk and Fern won the
cake.
She turned around and
saw a boy with blond hair
and blue eyes. He wore brown
slacks with very shiny shoes and a
white shirt with the cuffs rolled up
two or three times.
“Aren’t you going to share?” he
asked.
Feeling flus-
tered, Fern said,
“I don’t have
anything to cut it
with.”
“Oh, I have a
knife,” he grinned
and pulled out a
pocket knife.
So they all
shared the cake,
and then the boy,
named Verle,
walked Fern
home. He asked
for a date that
night, and a few
days later, he came
to pick her up in a
1929 Chevy bor-
rowed from his
father.
“When us girls
went out,” Fern
explained, “Dad always gave us two
dollars to put in our shoe, in case we
needed to get another ride
home. He told me that if
Verle lit up a cigarette, I should get out
of the car right away and
come home. He said some
boys would blow smoke in
your face and make you all
crazy.”
And before they were
down the driveway, Verle
lit a cigarette. “I know my dad saw it.”
Fern said, “but we just kept agoin’.”
“When we got into town, he turned
the car down a dark road and Fern
said, ‘You’d bet-
ter stop right here
and let me out.’ She
wasn’t going down
that dark road with
him. It turned out
that he lived at the
end of that road.
They were going to
pick up his folks to
go to church.
They got
engaged later that
year, but eventually
broke up and both
went on to marry
other people.
Fern raised
her family in Des
Moines. Verle
and his wife (also
named Fern) moved
to Colorado and
they didn’t see
each other for fifty
years.”
Coincidentally, both retired and
spent the winters in Arizona. One
morning Fern drove her Crown Vic to
a restaurant in Mesa where a group of
seniors went for coffee. A car pulled in
next to her and she recognized the Polk
County Iowa license plates. Two men
got out of the car.
“Are you from Des Moines?” Fern
asked. “I know everybody in Polk
County. What’s your name?”
“Verle Darr,” one said.
Fern couldn’t believe her ears.
“Verle Darr? Albert and Goldie Darr’s
son? Don’t you recognize me? I’m Fern
Coon.”
His wife passed away shortly after
that, and the reunited couple married
in 1991, 53 years after they were first
engaged.
On March 25, 2008, at the age of
90 and after 17 years of marriage to
his first love, my father, Verle Darr,
passed away. I love you, Daddy. Rest
in peace.***
Love
Story
Verle Darr. Photo by Dixie Darr.
This is Martha, a 3 year old Rottweiler.
She was transferred from a local shelter,
and is very mellow and sweet, she loves
to lean on you, she is looking for her
forever home. If you are interested,
Please call: 720-937-0633.
For Adoption At
Planet Pethood
4338 Tennyson Street
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720-855-9800
Open 5-9 Tuesday through Sunday
C h e c k o u t o u r We e k e n d B r u n c h
Saturday and Sunday 9-2
D a i l y H a p p y H o u r 4:30-6:30 i n B a r
Half Price Drafts!
Liquor and Food Specials
“It just might be the nicest restaurant space in all of
North Denver”
- Guerin Green, North Denver News
“Gemelli’s is truly a find. Terrific food, easy-on the
wallet, and a style of Italian cooking that you don’t find
much of in Denver.”
- Warren Byrne
KEZW The Restaurant Show
www.GemellisItalian.com