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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

Q1 The Oregon Department of Fish &


Wildlife Director must possess a number of
characteristics, experiences, and qualities
to be successful. Please rank the criteria
you feel are most important in a Director for
the Department of Fish and Wildlife. (Please
note that a designation of 1 is the highest
priority. Entries automatically re-order.)
Answered: 2,396

Skipped: 0

Have been
guided with ...

Demonstrate
strategic an...

Experience in
communicatin...

Experience
directing th...

Experience
managing hum...

Ability to
make progres...

Experience as
a skilled...

Understand how
to foster a...

Have been guided with a strong


conservation mindset and a
commitment to using scientific basis for
resources management

36.64%
878

13.27%
318

9.72%
233

8.68%
208

7.76%
186

7.01%
168

7.60%
182

Demonstrate strategic and visionary


leadership in the areas of fish and
wildlife and natural resources
management

15.57%
373

22.41%
537

14.73%
353

11.85%
284

11.10%
266

10.02%
240

8.89%
213

14.69%
352

15.61%
374

15.15%
363

14.32%
343

12.31%
295

1/2

Experience in communicating high


profile, complex and potentially
controversial subject matter in a manner
that contributes to transparency and
encourages public trust in the agency

10

Total

Average
Ranking

9.31%
223

2,396

5.64

7.26%
174

7.05%
169

2,396

5.25

11.31%
271

7.72%
185

2,396

4.68

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


Experience directing the development
of policy for fish, wildlife and/or natural
resources management

10.73%
257

12.69%
304

14.82%
355

11.60%
278

13.06%
313

13.44%
322

11.81%
283

11.85%
284

2,396

4.50

Experience managing human, financial,


budget, and information resources in a
manner which instills employee and
public trust and accomplishes the
organizations mission.

11.64%
279

10.77%
258

11.39%
273

13.61%
326

12.69%
304

13.81%
331

13.86%
332

12.23%
293

2,396

4.37

Ability to make progress in resolving


long standing and emerging problems

8.43%
202

9.81%
235

11.64%
279

14.82%
355

14.02%
336

14.86%
356

13.81%
331

12.60%
302

2,396

4.21

Experience as a skilled consensus


builder working with multiple
stakeholders, often with competing
interests.

5.01%
120

9.52%
228

11.64%
279

12.60%
302

12.73%
305

13.90%
333

16.19%
388

18.41%
441

2,396

3.83

Understand how to foster a climate in


which employees strive to meet the
highest standards of performance

3.09%
74

6.84%
164

10.43%
250

11.69%
280

14.32%
343

14.65%
351

18.16%
435

20.83%
499

2,396

3.52

2/2

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

Q2 Are there any additional characteristics,


experience, or qualities (not mentioned in
question #1) the next Department of Fish &
Wildlife Director might need in order to be
successful?
Answered: 1,363

Skipped: 1,033

Responses

I think that an innovative person would suit the Director position well. We do not need an "old school, by-thebooks" type of person in leadership....it just makes the organization look clunky. This person needs to know how
to think on their feet, think outside the box, and listen to the latest science that is emerging from our top
researchers.

The Department greatly needs an individual that can make drastic cuts to reduce waste. I would recommend
someone with more private experience then Government.

Conservation and protection from corporate exploitation.

Would be nice to see a director with a background geared towards the main consumer, the hunters and
fishermen.

Understanding that ultimately the fish and wildlife resources belong to the citizens of Oregon as a whole, not
merely to the various user groups or other vocal interests and a willingness to stand up for the long term public
interest in maintaining and enhancing those resources.

IT IS DIFFICULT TO RANK SO MANY QUALITIES WHEN ALL ARE SO CRITICALLY IMPORTANT.ONE THAT
IS PERHAPS ASSUMED IN THE INITIAL QUESTIONS IS THE NEED TO BALANCE R4EAOURCE
CONSUMPTION AND RESOURCE CONSERVATION.

be tough on businesses that want you to bend the rules in their favor. It isn't going to be easy, but it has to be
done.

A demonstrated commitment to wildlife conservation as a top priority of management choices. A demonstrated


commitment to protecting predators. Demonstrated knowledge and policymaking that reflects successful
collaborations with other agencies and conservation organizations that protect ecosystems in order to conserve
wildlife.

None that come to mind.

10

"The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl."

11

Yes there is: a huge dose of common sense. I cringe when I see that the ability to know and understand the
scientific domain rates mention and yet I no where do I see that the ability to use that information in the real world
as valued. How can a director begin to understand the problems/issues/needs of my world and the world of those
he/she will supervise without some real world experience and a healthy does of common sense. In most cases in
my experience directors are book smart and street stupid. I'd like to see that change.

12

I would like to see a person who isn't swayed by political pressure or money do his or her job with integrity.
That's not asking so much, is it?

13

To be fully aware of what is necessary for a healthy wilderness. Using true science, not hearsay, or biased
research.

14

They should harbor the belief that Oregon's Fish and Wildlife are a public treasure, for the good of all Oregonians,
and not something to be sold to the highest corporate bidder.

15

ability to develop and maintain successful collaborative partnerships

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


16

It is important that the director be able to also bring the non hunting and fishing community into the fold. Once
included it is important that the director help those that do and don't hunt and fish both understand the important
role of responsible consumptive and non consumptive uses of natural resources for both commerce and
recreation.

17

Leadership skills and good communication skills, verbal especially. Be a role model for employees. Be involved in
employees' activities, be more personable.

18

Experience with habitat and or nongame species issues. Our leader needs to have the foresight to bring in new
stakeholder groups in order to fulfill our mission. Focusing only on the hunter and fishers is no longer working for
us.

19

No links to commercial organizations that operate for profit to the detriment of the environment.

20

Strong presence and character suited to working in the legislative sessions.

21

Gain support from legislative policy-makers, without watering down the fish and wildlife outcomes. Recognize the
importance of and increase the engagement of the other piece of the stakeholder pie (in addition to anglers and
hunters) - the supporters of fish and wildlife (for viewing, just because, for ecosystem health, etc.). The nonutilization group of stakeholders (some may be conservationists, others may not be) is where growth for the
agency lies. This group must be engaged and involved in planning, budgeting, and financial support of the
agency.

22

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

23

Honesty! ####### and those at the top often censored their biologists from speaking the truth to the public.
(smallmouth bass not an invasive? nothing wrong with the management of lamprey? Melrose de-emphasis zone
for elk= free elk for the rich landowners, less elk for everyone else)

24

It is important that the next Director makes decisions based on sound science, not to serve special-interest
groups.

25

Someone who is committed to focusing on relationships and results. Someone who understands the difference
between leading and managing, who is willing to lead (not manage) the agency. Someone who is committed to
principles (e.g. integrity, empathy).

26

Know how to listen and relate to the public. Simply saying that the public is heard and that ODFW is working for
the public does not mean it is so. It would be best if the new director is a REAL person... someone who actually
fishes and hunts and knows what the Oregon sportsmen want.

27

N/A

28

I am concerned with the introduction of hunting on wildlife refuges and the lack of announcement and short public
comment opportunity which took place in September. [disq.us/8kbt2u ] A strong commitment to conserve and
protect wildlife is crucial and to find alternatives to killing.any wildlife. Less killing, less hunting.

29

The director needs to have the ability and skills to create more opportunities for hunters in the state. As residents
we are losing opportunities and getting license rate hikes at the same time. It may be more expensive to hunt out
of state but the opportunities are greater and the experience is better. He/she needs to fix this problem.

30

must have an understanding of the coastal and river commercial fishery

31

They should not be in the pockets of lobbyist and corporate interests like Nestl, Monsanto, and large logging
operations.

32

Simplify the hunting & fishing rules. Make Hunting & Fishing a Priority NOT a fund raiser.

33

an ability and willingness to embrace the value of warm water fisheries as a valuable resource that is worthy of
budget spend and preservation. Also, the ability to recognize that nature and our native species manage
themselves better than we have or can ever do.

34

The ability to be innovative, collaborative and strategic. Strong ability to lead staff in this direction.

35

The ability to work with staff and the public to set state or regional priorities will be critical. Allocating resources to
fit with those priorities will be challenging; no one wants to see their priority go unfunded.

36

recognize local impact of ODFW actions in the agriculture sectors

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


37

The director should be a strong wilderness and natural area advocate and voice for fish and wildlife themselves,
not just human uses for these animals and resources.

38

ability to convince the hunting/fishing public that their concerns/needs are trumped by efforts to protect and
enhance biodiversity.

39

Emphasis on working with partner agencies and the ability to create new partnerships to further the ODFW
mission.

40

To remain humane and ethical when dealing with wildlife issues and not bow to political pressure from big
business interests

41

An understanding of landscape scale management. The new director cannot hope to succeed in one area, i.e.
maintaining wild salmon populations, without considering those populations as a context of the whole system,
including habitat quality and quantity, predator/prey relationships, water quality and forest health, and human
consumption. This applies to all aspects of managing fish and wildlife populations and health.

42

dedication to protecting our resources

43

Should be, or have been an active sportsman.

44

Ability to engage personally with staff members at all levels. Have a regular 'presence' with staff. Maintain an
open dialogue with staff whenever possible

45

We have had two very risk adverse directors (not counting #####) recently- ####### and ####. It is time for a
less risk adverse leader. ODFW staff moral is the lowest I've ever seen it and if we get more of the same lack
luster - bunker mentality leadership. The wheels will come completely off and no one will want to work here any
longer.
Luck, it seems these days...

46
47

Focused on habitat conservation and the ability to stay firm on the agency mission of protecting Oregon's fish,
wildlife and their habitats. The new Director needs to understand the importance of land use planning and ODFW
staff being involved in local land use actions. The Director needs to be proactive and encourage coordination
beyond just collecting data. We can have all the data in the world, but if it isn't used in policy decisions, it's
worthless.

48

Problem-solving and listening to public input on concerns and issues is vital. Previous Directors have not had this
skill and instead of hearing different perspectives, became defensive and non-engaged when issues were
broached.

49

Should be from Oregon and an active participant in hunting and/or fishing.

50

Willingness to provide support for staff when partisan entities approach the Director to denigrate staff.
Understanding of regional F&W issues and solutions.

51

Must stand on principles and not be swayed by economic dreams or short term solutions.

52

Protecting our environmental resources from large corporate greed by preserving our heritage of water, land and
native habitat for the next generation.

53

The courage and foresight to say no to special interests like Nestle who seek to use Oregon's resources for their
own gain. The complete understanding that once a resource is gone its gone for good. A big heart, mind and
conscience.

54

An open mind which can accommodate the clear understanding of rapidly shifting weather patterns of the planet
earth and a willingness to search out causes and solutions.

55

Empathy, intelligence, fairness

56

The Director should be able to step in the "shoes" of the most important assest for the agency; this the
employees. Furthermore the Director should look towards additional training for managers that are good at
science, however lack the critical skills to manage people.

57

Experience outside ODF&W, not entrenched in current culture and mindset of Department.

58

Placing the urgency of the environment and ecosystems importance and health as the first priority, above politics
and all else. Also, allowing nature to manage itself, less micro managing. Anti pollution, educating the public on
the use of pesticides, fertilizers have in nature may help prevent someone from fertilizing their lawn and then
expecting to keep finding plenty to hunt or fish.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


59

Putting the ecological systems first (in which human and social systems rely) so that all can flourish. Starts with a
healthy, balanced, wild, & bio diverse environment!

60

The ability to stand firm in resolve and belief without wavering under pressure from bullies.

61

compassion, kindness, honesty, integrity

62

1. Incorporate indigenous knowledge,experience, and rights in all Department issues. 2. Remove privatized
interests from the public domain issues of the Department 3. Eliminate private/corporate financial issues from all
Department public domain considerations, programs and issues.

63

Boycott nestle

64

n/a

65

Be an advocate for fish, wildlife, and their habitats, rather than an advocate for fishermen and hunters. Be
compassionate toward the land and toward native species. ODF&W appears from the outside to be a network of
"Good Old Boys" which excludes many types of Oregonians. The new director should be bold, progressive, and
willing to take the department in a new direction.

66

More concern over plane fertilizers. Companies should not be putting stuff on other peoples properties.

67

Create a work environment in which employees are encouraged to work together, instead of competing with each
other.

68

Listening to mother earth. Hear her screams.

69

Uncertain

70

Moral fortitude and taking the righteous road even when it's harder to maintain.

71

The new director should have a background in wildlife biology and a love of the outdoors.

72

The mindset at Oregon Fish & Wildlife is all wrong. For example Oregon Fish & Wildlife feels that habitat
restoration is all that is necessary whereas Washington Fish & Wildlife realizes that one habitat restoration may
never be achieved, for example the invasive bullfrogs. Likewise the return of condors to the Columbia River Gorge
isn't likely with just habitat restoration. Do you really believe a condor in Arizona or southern California is just
going to fly up to Oregon? Dream on, the condors need to be reintroduced which is something Oregon Fish &
Wildlife doesn't want to do. I understand the idea behind this, we shouldn't be playing god but in this case the
condors won't probably be returning to the Columbia River Gorge in our lifetimes, if ever.

73

Ability to embrace emerging objectives and new directions in wildlife while maintaining connections to the
traditional

74

Must act first and foremost in a way that benefits the fish and the wildlife. There are plenty of people on the other
side of the issue and it's a wonder there are any animals left at this rate of depletion.

75

Customer service oriented. I believe ODFW has a terrible reputation for customer service. nine out of ten times, a
phone call to the main office results in an answering machine.

76

Experience with protecting our public water systems. The ability to work with the community members of
Cascade Locks to address unemployment with alternative proposals that offer sustainable jobs instead of
Nestle's water bottling plant proposal.

77

This person needs to see through the eyes of an outdoorsman! The people of Oregon deserve to expand the
traditions of familys going back many generations. ODFW has put to many restrictions on hunting and fishing
oportunities, Controlled hunts, catch limits, native fish restrictions (fish is a fish) uncontrolled predator populations
(what's next, do you want the Grizzly bear too?) If ODFW look at fishing and hunting like a business, you would
do more to protect your assets instead of letting it be wasted by loving it to death. People used to come from all
over to fish and hunt Oregon, I used to Deer and Elk hunt, the seasons are to mess up to be worth the effort, but
maybe that what ODFW wants? This new director needs to lead ODFW in a new direction, make us proud to fish
and hunt Oregon, so many comunities count on these resources for their familys, commercial fishing could be
great again, sport fish off the coast was a regular event for us. Invest in the right person and be great or pick the
wrong person and see the numbers of licsences keep dropping and businesses going away. Kevin M.
kevincavedude@bendcable.com

78

Interest in preserving non-game wildlife.

79

The ability to make tough choices in reducing staff and creating more efficiency.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


80

I would just emphasize the importance of conservation, which I listed as my number one concern. The basis for
this is the simple phrase, "Once it's gone, there's no getting it back." Mother Nature is the only one who can
create the natural environment; it's a gift that needs to be treasured and cared for. Tampering with, and often
destroying, wild habitats is one of the worst actions humans can take in this world of climate change and over
development. I believe that many, many Oregonians are deeply upset and angry about the use of cruel traps,
poisons, unscientific elimination of predators, shooting of seals and owls and the kill mindset in general. It's the
approach of the ignorant bully rather than the informed caretaker. I moved here from Boston 14 years ago
because of the beauty of this state, the incredible hiking trails, the waterfalls, the wonderful wildlife that inhabit the
forests--we're so very fortunate. But there's something really creepy about knowing that the mentality overlooking
this bounty is coming from such a low-and violent-position.

81

to understand the importance of hatcheries to anglers as a "put and take" resource. So there continues to be a
good sport fishery for all.

82

Not bowing to corporate interests. Do what is best for the people, the true stakeholders of the commons.

83

Willingness to confront state land and transportation agencies regarding unsustainable practices that harm
habitat and wildlife -- I'm thinking of ODF and ODOT in particular.

84

Take care of our waters and land for the public rather than for private profits...see natural resources not as
products and crops but as amazing resources that need protection and careful usage for the good of all life now
and in the future

85

The director should be firmly committed to defending *public* resources and keeping them both protected and
under public, not private, control. The director should not have any background in the private sector, and must be
committed to resisting pressure from corporations to influence the rule-making and enforcement processes. One
example is the current controversy over the proposed water swap at Oxbow Springs that would benefit the Nestle
corporation directly. This is an unacceptable proposal, and it illustrates the kinds of pressures, both political and
economic, that the new director will need to resist.

86

This person should be a trained wildlife biologist and love outdoor recreation.

87

Should be a hunter and fisherman. Should have experience under Oregon rules and regulations.

88

Background in biology.

89

commitment to preservation of wild lands - NOT succumbing to timber interests.

90

Protection of our natural resources and wildlife should be top priority, not livestock industry interests who bully
politicians while impacting water, air, and terrestrial environments with their introduced species and antiquated
logic.

91

Willingness to include public testimony in ther decision making.

92

They MUST be committed to conservation of Oregon's natural resources, clean water, and wildlife,
REGARDLESS of pressure from companies, corporations, etc. who could compromise these for the sake of
profit. Unsustainable logging and pollution and reappropriation of public water cannot be allowed to continue,
regardless of the cost.

93

the ability to work with other organizations in lessening the effects of climate change on our environment.
Developing a more sustainable future for our children and the planet. Taking part in global efforts to solve these
issues.

94

Conservation is the absolute most important agenda item. Our wild places are what makes Oregon special.

95

The person chosen should be someone who enjoys the outdoors in some way such as fishing, hiking, sailing,
etc.

96

Yes - fully commit to enforcement of agricultural laws and industrial pollution laws relative to the recovery of
waters... make indigenous diets the standard for allowable pollution levels... which are active genocidal violence
against first nations eating indigenous fish based diets

97

serve the public interest

98

Ethics that keep them from selling our public lands to the highest bidder.

99

Keep the "commons" free from private ownership and exploitation. For example, do not sell public water to the
Nestle Corporation.

100

Someone NOT interested in building a "kingdom" like your last one. Work for the people not the power.

5 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


101

The Director should have previous experience with Fish and Wildlife management in multiple regions of the US
other than just the Northwest.

102

We need a conservation-minded person here to protect our beautiful state of Oregon waters and natural
resources

103

You need a commissioner from each major region that is a biologist, has a conservative outlook about the
recourses, and is an active participator in hunting and fishing so he will appreciate conserving the recourse for
further generations

104

Economic priorities can be considered but conservation must be paramount. Protection and expansion of
habitats that support diverse and important wildlife should not be anything other than a #1 priority of the new
director.

105

Remember: 1.) their purpose, 2.) the consequences of their decisions, and 3.) they have a real job to do, and it's
not political in nature. Don't give in to special interest groups. We need someone who can stand up an lead the
department, despite naysayers.

106

Have a science background and a conservation ethic Have the ability and desire to consider all constituents'
desires, including those that promote a more scientific and diverse approach to wildlife management.

107

Very important they do not sell of our water recoces for our fish hatcheries. We already struggle with declining
fish and water levels this is not a time to make it worse. Conservation is very important to those of us who live
here.

108

Greater commitment to the task at hand than to political prospects - this person should NOT be a politician (ie,
someone using this as one of many jobs on a political career ladder)

109

A passion for protecting the environment and a firm grasp of the science behind the task.

110

Have a science background and a conservation ethic Consider all constituents' desires, including those that
promote a more scientific and diverse approach to wildlife management. Consider conservation as a real goal by
including refuges from hunting Ensure native predators receive protections more in line with other species
Implement and maintain predator plans that will require nonlethal strategies as a first response Eliminate trapping
and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting Consider no hunting of wolves
when they are delisted Effect an outright ban on killing contests

111

I would prefer an Oregon native with a strong commitment to the health, integrity, and pristine nature of our
environment and scenic areas. Also someone who is able to balance the competing needs of farmers, ranchers,
food production and wildlife.

112

Understand that people are inseparable from the natural world.

113

We need a person with high ethics who puts the earth and her creatures above profit .

114

To put the needs of Oregon Fish and Wildlife about personal interest groups.

115

Use common sense

116

Experience in restoration of damaged ecosystems, streams, riparian zones, etc. Preferable to have experience in
permaculture design. Values health of microbial ecosystems at the same level as macrobiotic ecosystems, such
as soil health and structure.

117

ability to stand up to anti hunters, in court if needed and protect our big game.

118

Please choose someone who will protect and conserve wildlife. Please choose someone who values viewing wild
animals over hunting animals. As we are on the edge of the largest mass extinction in 65 million years, it is crucial
that wildlife is allowed to live.

119

Keeping our natural resources safe and intact for future generations.

120

The ability to manage our resources to improve and promote better hunting opportunities...increased herd sizes.

121

Assigning priority to expanding wilderness area protections to expand the amount of wild habitat.

122

Science background

123

Do what is right for the animals, not the public

124

Honest, highest level of integrity.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


125

protecting wildlife and standing up to corporate businesses to protect the environment. Making sure wildlife
crimes do not go unpunished and protecting wildlife, fish and resources.

126

Facilitating accessible information for public education.

127

Have the sportsmans trust and qualities in conservation harvest numbers.

128

The ability to withstand political pressures and economical pressures from narrow interestsplacing highest priority
on the wellbeing of the earth, the water and the denizens therin. To wit: protecting water resources from
privatization, such as the Nestle efforts to control the water that must be in the stewardship of the people.

129

A love of Oregon and to make decisions based solely on what is best for the health and preservation of the
wildlife and lands of our great state.

130

Above all else, respect for Oregon's natural resources and the ability to protect it.

131

Commitment to the people and the environment of Oregon not to big business

132

Being able to take the long, long view. If we have impacted our fish and wildlife to the level they are currently,
what will their status be in another 50 or 100 years given, population growth, changes in climate and land use.
Stand up to strong perspectives that are not based on science, but on fear and myth, i.e. wolves, habitat
destruction, etc.

133

The Director of the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife must be able to put longterm public interests ahead of short term
commercial or business interests by protecting our natural resources, water, fish, and wildlife from companies
that would privately profit from harvesting our states public resources.

134

-Experience or plan for turning down potentially lucrative offers at the expense of protecting fish and wildlife. Ability to apply a "common sense" approach to science and data analysis meaning 1)if there is lack of scientific
research of direct cause and effect it does not necessarily indicate a lack of harm to fish and wildlife and 2)data
can be analyzed in multiple ways

135

To have clear objectives to protect our water resources. For example, to protect our water resources against
corporate interests such as Nestles wanting to mine water for financial gain that would harm the watershed.

136

A commitment to lowering our carbon footprint so as to lessen the effects of climate change.

137

Committed

138

The Director cannot successfully carry out the agency's core mission without a fundamental understanding and
unshakable conviction that when the laws of nature and of economics drive conflicting imperatives, the laws of
nature are more immutable than those of economics and must take absolute precedence. Prime example:
systematic denial by affected business interests and their political accolytes of human carbon emission as the
primary driver of global climate change because addressing that issue effectively would require the short-term
elimination of coal as an energy source and a long-term conversion to non-fossil and non-combustible (excepting
hydrogen) fuels. This is by now a well-established self-evident fact. The economic well-being of coal- and oilproducing regions will necessarily be adversely affected by any energy policy that adapts to this natural reality.
The solution is to reorient energy and economic policy in ways that allow those regions to convert to other staple
industries (hemp production in Appalachia would be an ideal replacement for coal mining, as an example).
Likewise, locally there will be a great demand associated with climate change to access the Northwest's
abundance of clean water, and commercial interests will be at the forefront of trying to create a lucrative market in
what should be a free resource owned by all -- one that is imperative in adequate quantity and quality to sustain
fish and wildlife. Clean water and suitable habitat in general is a survival imperative and therefore a natural
RIGHT of human, animal and plant life alike, and the agency and society as a whole MUST get on board with this.
Today we need an effort comparable to the WWII war effort to conquer this threat to the survival of life as we
know it, and ODFW is in a position to be the tip of the spear. Nowhere on Earth is there a more magnificent and
habitable natural environment than in Oregon. We have much more to work with in this connection than most of
the world, and must show the rest of humanity the way forward for the sake of all.

139

Outreach skills to counterparts at all levels of government, from local to federal.

140

Must be honest, trustworthy and committed to the greater good, not the good of particular interest groups. Must
understand that the greater good is not necessarily related to money.

141

Politically independent and having the interest of all Oregonians in mind, not interests of corporations and quick
money.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


142

I thought I was suppose to pick the most or least important in question 1. and all it did was list them in numerical
order????? Please clarify otherwise I will submit that your survey is rigged!! With regard to question #2. The
candidate would have no affiliations with businesses that would stand to benefit from said candidates position
within ODFW.

143

conflict resolution

144

have a science background and a conservation ethic

145

Interest and investment in true wildlife conservation plans that are backed by science. An ability to focus on an
ecosystem as a whole rather than trying to address problems as though species don't exist in inter-species
communities.

146

Experience working in interstate and multicultural solutions development.

147

A strong conservation ethic.

148

Strong background in field research and predator issues from an ecosystem management viewpoint

149

Ability to bridge the social gap between consumptive and non-consumptive interests in, and attitudes toward,
wildlife.

150

Honesty and Integrity

151

Must be willing to protect our land, water, wildlife resources.

152

Whomever gets the position should also be able to recognize that raising the hunting tag fees and licenses WILL
NOT make it all better and create a bigger budget. The fees have already risen to a level that more and more
people are contemplating giving up the sport due to the affordability.

153

Conservation of water and nature should be the primary goal of this job.

154

Respects the needs of wildlife over that of corporations.

155

An understanding that hatchery practices generally don't result in healthy salmon populations. An understanding
that water (i.e. as a resource) is not for corporate control but belongs to all Oregonians. Stop Nestle profiteering
at the expense of Oregon's natural resources, communities, and people.

156

Being a sportsmen themselves

157

Conservation-minded to ensure that tourists and future generations enjoy Oregon's outdoors.

158

Question 1 did not work!!!!!

159

Wildlife management based on fact not miguided environmentalists

160

I think the previous answers cover it.

161

Understanding the critical need to conserve the lives of living beings, and their habitat above all else.

162

nope.

163

A sense of humor & nerves of steel. An excellent listener & communicator.

164

public support for conservation policies

165

To protect the lives of wildlife. Hopefully will be against hunting.

166

The new director should be a strong environmentalist with a proven record of protecting wildlife andhabitat based
on real science.

167

Someone who works well with others and doesn't seek consensus but builds consensus. Someone who has a
love and understanding of the outdoors but doesn't sacrifice larger community interests for natural interests when
they are lesser.

168

Protect our resources from the profit oriented exploitation by Corporate groups in other states and countries.

169

strongly motivated to protect the water of Bull Run and the Pacific northwest from corporate interest

170

willingness to go out on a limb to PROTECT our wilderness and wildlife areas for future generations. Does not
cave in to petty corporate politics that benefit the few at the expense of the many. Has personal integrity!

171

Long term vision

8 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


172

I would prefer someone who is not beholden to the idea that government needs to manage itself like a business
and puts long-term resource health ahead of short-term fiscal targets. Someone who recognizes the vital
importance of water to our long-term occupation of this ecosphere and protects that in the face of economic and
political pressure.

173

Should have strong science background and an obvious dedication to water protection for the people of Oregon
to preserve our water rights. You can live without oil but one cannot live without water.

174

patience

175

Willingness to stand up to large corporations and the fallacy that jobs should dictate over the environment.

176

They cannot have close ties to industry or hold a pro-business agenda.

177

The next director should make a priority out of protecting our natural resources from private developers and those
who are seeking to make a profit of of public lands.

178

The qualities listed in the survey seemed to me to be almost all equally important and I don't feel like the survey
accurately reflects my beliefs.

179

A focus on preserving our resources is the top priority.

180

- have a science background and a conservation ethic - consider all constituents' desires, including those that
promote a more scientific and diverse approach to wildlife management. - consider conservation as a real goal by
including refuges from hunting - ensure native predators receive protections more in line with other species implement and maintain predator plans that will require nonlethal strategies as a first response - eliminate trapping
and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting - consider no hunting
of wolves when they are delisted - effect an outright ban on killing contests

181

Commitment to long term preservation of resources for the public rather than short term gain for private profit.

182

Understanding of how public goods benefit the public and how privatization harms the public. Understanding of
the theories by Nobel laureate Elinor Ostrom of how to manage shared resources without privatizing them. A
good foundation in the theory of economics and a pro-social attitude that prevents them from allowing
corporations to privatize and profit from water and other natural resources that belong to all of us.

183

Must be a hunter/fisherman

184

Preferably be an outdoor person who hunts and fishes as they will see short comings in policy.

185

Belief in the fact that public lands belong to everyone, not to any particular county, corporation or other special
interest group.

186

biology and climate change and how it effects animals and their environment

187

background in wildlife biology, an appreciation for outdoor recreation, and an deep respect for the stewardship
responsibilities the director would hold for future generations

188

I think dedication to conserving our limited natural resources and protecting them for Oregonians is the top
priority.

189

The next director needs to realize his/her responsibility is to manage fish and wildlife for the benefit of the
species, the planet, and all the people of Oregon -- not just hunters and anglers.

190

Ability to deeply listen to and understand opposing points of view, to engage with ideas that may be unusual or
untested. And also, respect for all participants involved. We have to address the needs behind our policies
effectively, or we'll continue to fight with each other about appropriate use of natural resources, wasting energy,
time, and goodwill.

191

The new director should have a strong commitment to conservation of wildlife. A vast majority of Oregonians
favor conservation of wildlife, and are unaware that ODFW's funding is reliant on hunting and fishing. Getting a
permanent funding source that is divorced from hunting and fishing should be the top priority for the new director.
I believe Oregonians do not know that ODFW is chronically underfunded and would be very sorry to hear it. So
the first step is to communicate to Oregonians the ways in which fish, wildlife and birds are harmed because
ODFW does not get enough money from the legislature to properly implement for example the Conservation
Strategy. The great news is that Oregonians love wildlife, so the money will be found, the challenge is how to
communicate to the public how important it is to transform ODFW into a conservation organization as people
already think it is. Having Nestle give up and go away in Oregon especially Columbia Gorge would be an effective
strategy to engage the public. No more business as usual, but daring to do the right and legal thing by
protecting fish and wildlife and denying Nestle.

9 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


192

Honesty and integrity.

193

No... the characteristics listed in question 1 do a good job of covering all relevant qualifications for this position.

194

The courage and integrity necessary to take the best actions for wildlife even when they are not popular with tbe
general public.

195

Translating information for broad general public understanding

196

A commitment to protecting and preserving the natural ecosystems in as much balance as possible ahead of
human over-use. The person is charged with the keeping of public land balanced with human activity.

197

Ability to share those very important values for fish and wildlife with other states and government agencies and
hold your ground for what is right when big time lobbyists try to buy the opposite values.

198

I would like to see this agency first and foremost support the wildlife and wilderness areas with the highest
degree of respect and understanding of ecological systems - not of man and how we make money and how we
'manage' these resources for human gain other than the undeniable benefit of staying out of nature's business. I
would like to see Oregon's wilderness areas be just that and know that administration and staff support this.

199

The previous questions are irrelevant to me, so please ignore my answers but do take note of what I consider to
be important: IS THE DIRECTOR CONSERVATION-MINDED IE. DOES HE - OR SHE - HAVE THE BEST
INTERESTS OF WILDLIFE AT HEART? DOES HE HAVE EMPATHY? IE. WILL THIS PERSON RESTRICT THE
TORTURE AND KILLING OF ANIMALS BY THE CONSUMPTIVE MINORITY USING POISON, TRAPS,
DROWNING ETC.? DOES THE DIRECTOR PRIORITIZE PROTECTION OF THE ENVIRONMENT FOR THE
ENVIRONMENT'S SAKE (INCLUDING WILDLIFE) AND NOT ONLY FOR THE PERCEIVED BENEFIT OF
PEOPLE?

200

That the individual be well-read with current literature and news pertaining to the protection of public resources,
not only in the region, but in other parts of the country and world.

201

Care passionately about the environment

202

Ability to question why water bottle companies can't purchase their own springs rather than poach public
resources.

203

Understand the history of Oregon and be sensitive to Oregonian's long-standing values and perspectives. The
state's resources are precious and need to be managed for the long-term benefit of all Oregonians.

204

Ability to resist political pressure and stick to the science.

205

A clear understanding of and appreciation for the state's unique natural resources and a willingness to put
preservation and expansion of our natural ecosystems as a primary priority.

206

The reality of Global warming should be factored into every decision made about Oregon's wildlife.

207

Commitment t to keep public lands public. Protect the carbon balance of our great forests. Keep all commercial
enterprise ecologically sound locally employed and habitat oriented. Commitment to stewardship rather than
"harvest any old growth or second groth areas. Commitment to ban clear cut s entirely.

208

Perhaps focusing on the watershed health issues so healthy sustaining runs of native species may be selfpropagating. Hatchery dollars put toward steelhead returns have been producing diminishing returns for the
amount of dollars invested. This means a clear mission is defined between anadromous fish run natural
reproduction rates and watershed health. This issue crosses many jurisdictions and should be a large focus,
especially in light of how many additional sportsman dollars are spent pursuing these species. There are few
natural resources in the state of Oregon where the economy is more stimulated than where plentiful of
harvestable fish are present.

209

Not really. All of those skills are important.

210

A commitment to a long term (7 generation) stewardship of our resources for the benefit of ALL the people.
Public rights over corporate rights.

211

To specifically focus on the fact that as director, he or she is entrusted with a finite resource that belongs to the
public.

212

Should have long term view and protect public resources vs. selling them to out of state interests or exploiting
them for short term gain. E.g. NO Nestle water giveaway. Water is the next oil. Currently it belongs to the people
of Oregon. Giving it for pennies on the dollar to a foreign company in exchange for a few relatively short term
jobs is inexcusable waste.

10 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


213

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

214

Commitment and experience in eliminating sexism and raciswm within the organization. Show examples of when
she or he has done this in past jobs

215

Income sources are always important for any agency - but it should not be the driving force of policy. ALL
Oregonians need to have a say in natures preservation. A director who understands that and does not focus on
one or two sport oriented groups is needed.

216

Strong commitment to preserving our natural resources for the PUBLIC good, not for private corporations.

217

Someone who loves fish, wildlife, water and humans!

218

The options listed are sufficient

219

* To have a science background and a conservation ethic * To understand that the public viewpoint is shifting to
see fish and wildlife as parts of a functioning and necessary ecosystem, not just as targets for sportsmen, and
therefore to support that reality rather than drag against it

220

An understanding of the history of use and enjoyment and competing interests in managing and preserving
Oregon lands and waters.

221

No, I think that's a pretty good list.

222

Quick study.

223

He or she should understand that the exploitation of natural resources for private gain is often at variance with
conservation, and that conservation is our highest value here in Oregon.

224

Able to see the big picture and communicate that vision to employees and the public

225

High level of integrity

226

Must stand in strong opposition to man made pollution and wilderness corruption

227

needs to prioritize the future of Oregon wildlife over compromise with business interests.

228

Ability to withstand corporate financial and political pressure for corporate gain, when making decisions for
Oregon fish and wildlife and their futures.

229

The challenge in such a position is the combination of the public policy face of it, business interests, and the
detailed nature of conservation policy. Conservation -- if well done -- is our ace card for Oregon's future. Don't
repeat mistakes such as logging a large part of Bull Run for short term profit. We need a visionary able to carry
the message to the public and articulate enough to be able to stand up to the inevitable (false) 'jobs vs.
environment" game.

230

None.

231

I really believe what I listed as #1 and #2 are truly the most important qualities. We need someone whose focus is
to protect our precious natural resources (isn't that why most of us live in Oregon, because of the beauty and
livability of this state) and someone who can work with people at cross interests because of some of the
contentious issues we face today.

232

Refrain from establishing policy based on the wants and influences of private, for-profit corporations. The resolve
to re-write polices that do just that, despite powerful monied influences applying pressure. Consistently reaching
out to the public for input and then actually listening to it.

233

Thoroughly understand and appreciate climate change and what it will likely affect in Oregon's environment.

234

Quick and transparent decision-making where possible.

235

Ability to choose and secure the best options for Oregon's fish and wildlife habitats regardless of competing
pressure (financial or otherwise) from political or commercial interests

236

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. Thank you.

237

Skills and experience in public participation, and the ability to facilitate effective two way communication with
stakeholders and the public.

238

should be an inspiring person. Someone who is admirable and charismatic.

11 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


239

Conservation before profit, always. To make Oregon a world leader in conservation and precious resource
preservation. Duty now for the future!

240

Respect for preserving our diminishing wild areas!

241

The next director should have a strong background in science and be able to consider the needs of all Oregon
residents, including non-consumptive users of wildlife. The director should also have a strong conservation ethic.

242

Would love to see someone in this position who is not necessarily a hunter or angler. Definitely these activities
should not be prerequisites for this role.

243

Well it would be nice to have an individual with a sportsman's background to there is continued context and
appreciation of the the Agency's historic mission. And someone for whom political correctness, especially in
regard to predator control is something to acknowledge but not necessarily be governed by.... Oh and I voted to
ban dogs-bait for bear cougar. However, I also realize now that my vote was a mistake. Never used to carry a
firearm bowhunting. After a cougar came out of nearby tree - on the Eastern side of the Coast Range I now feel
compelled too. Sorry for the rant, its just that the agency needs to recognize mistakes and correct them for
conservation and not political purposes.

244

Common sense would be very helpful..which we as the public haven't seen in the prior management. .

245

The individual should not have conflicting ties to commercial fisheries. For example should not own or operate a
commercial fishing boat or commercial fishing supply store, or be related to commercial fisheries interests.

246

get the cougar population understood that's is growing and not allow the wolves here

247

The ability to equally balance preserving wildlife and habitats for sportsmen/women and other outdoor
enthusiasts.

248

To listen to the public.....all sides of the public, not just the sportsman's side.

249

Respect for predators and wilderness /Endangered species Understanding of Old Growth dependant - / forestry
issues Water quality/quantity / erosion, sediment /understanding pollution>pesticides < Wild Fish ! Problem
animal mediation- bears.cougar.wolf...hunters groups? Disease like foot rot-elk and hair loss S.- deer Love
Nature!

250

- have a science background and a conservation ethic - consider all constituents' desires, including those that
promote a more scientific and diverse approach to wildlife management. - consider conservation as a real goal by
including refuges from hunting - ensure native predators receive protections more in line with other species implement and maintain predator plans that will require nonlethal strategies as a first response - eliminate trapping
and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting - consider no hunting
of wolves when they are delisted - effect an outright ban on killing contests

251

Put wildlife first realising that there is a greater concern to humans than how much money can be made.

252

Understanding that the Department of Fish and Wildlife is responsible first to the wildlife it aims to protect and
their habitat. Understanding that stakeholders are not only hunters and ranchers but wildlife advocates, wildlife
rehabilitators and 'environmentalists' as well and no stakeholder group should be listened to more or less than the
others.

253

They should be committed to conservation for the sake of the animals and the balance of wildlife - not for the
convenience of killers

254

In the matter of keystone predators, ie: wolves, cougars, etc, do not allow favor to be given to the hunting and
ranching factions who seem to be major influencing factors in wildlife management. I am very much against the
favoritism shown to the ranching and hunting community.

255

A strong sense of the importance of all species and their value to our environment. An ability to be strong when
facing ignorance and greed.

256

Although it is a difficult task, the person should balance all interests without a bias for or against any one group of
people; sportsman, scientists, government agencies, companies, ect. Everyone has their own agendas, but the
person should be able to focus on the mission of ODFW.

257

Ability to work effectively with politicians

258

Have university education in ecology and conservation and understand ecosystems, not just forestry and
"resource management." Consider ALL constituent's opinions, including those promoting a more scientific and
ecological approach to wildlife management.

12 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


259

FWS Director should always identify nonlethal means to resolve conflicts between ranchers,farmers and wildlife.
Should investigate humans who complain of wildlife because many are animal haters. Should end welfare
ranching on public lands. Should end aerial shooting of wildlife as population control and instead use birth control.

260

Would like to see leadership from ODFW that is not beholden to hunting, trapping, fishing interests. ODFW works
for the entire state, not just the small minority of those who wish to crudely extract wildlife for their own use.
Oregon wildlife is something to behold and enjoy wild in state and federal lands. The new director of Oregon Fish
& Wildlife should: - have a science background and a conservation ethic - consider conservation as a real goal by
including refuges from hunting - ensure native predators receive protections more in line with other species implement and maintain predator plans that will require nonlethal strategies as a first response - eliminate trapping
and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting - consider no hunting
of wolves when they are delisted - effect an outright ban on killing contests

261

Teddy Roosevelt like. Conservationist who looks toward future populations and sets aside refuges.

262

Preference show for a candidate OUTSIDE of the ranching and hunting industries. Wildlife biologist.

263

Respect and preserve wildlife over the needs of humans.

264

The Director must use sound science to base decisions on, be honest, and use an ecosystem approach to
wildlife management rather than predator control. Hunting licenses must not be issued to balance the books.
More funds for the department can be got through poacher patrols near rural residential areas with steep
fines.Thedirector

265

Not owned by any one special interest group: do not hire a former timber executive or gun rights nut.

266

How will they handle conflicts between livestock interests, hunters, and non-game animal proponents.

267

Compassion for wildlife and acknowledging that animals are sentient beings who feel fear, stress and pain as we
do.

268

I think the person should not have a family who involved in livestock farming. We need to choose someone who
has no bias towards apex predators or livestock ranching. Maybe, a non hunter should be considered for the
position.

269

An understanding of and vision for conservation of wild populations based on emerging science.

270

Understanding that wildlife and human interests are not mutually exclusive and that human priorities don't always
come first.

271

Not cower to Legislator's threats or unreasonable demands. On tarry to sound science. Need to back up ODFW
staff when attacked by political interests in my opinion Director' s office has lacked courage up stand up to legal
store and were willing to sell out staff, sound science, and sportspersons to get budget passes. You don't need
100% yes votes to pass a budget!

272

They should be a crossbow hunter, and have a Master in Business Administration and a minimum of 10 years of
experience.

273

Advocate of agency mission and personnel to public, other interest groups and politicians. Charismatic leader.
Ability to see and implement pathways to solutions. Recognized scientific expert/leader.

274

I believe the wild spaces are sources in their own right. What I mean by that, is contrasted to being re-sources.
You see, many people take advantage of those wild spaces and many people draw some type of inspiration or
reinvigoration from enjoying them. In that regard, the management of those spaces and resources should
encourage preservation of them as SOURCE of encouragement and power for generations to come.

275

From the perspective of the vast majority of Oregonians who support the conservation rather than the hunting of
Oregon's wildlife, I believe the new director should have a desire to shift emphasis from consumptive to nonconsumptive priorities within the ODFW. This would be in line with national and state trends of the last several
decades. This does not mean that the ODFW would no longer support hunting/fishing, but that the balance of its
efforts and expenditures would be strongly tilted toward species conservation, habitat protection and expansion
and less toward the traditional emphasis on maintaining, for example, over-abundant ungulate populations.

276

Lots of experience conserving and protecting non-game wildlife.

277

Make decisions that benefit all people, not just anglers, hunters, and ranchers. Promote and protect public land
for public use, not private use (like ranchers grazing their livestock on public land).

13 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


278

Knowledge in the fact that wild steelhead need to be protected. Develop a plan for NO KILL for wild steelhead in
the entire state of Oregon. Protect natural steelhead spanning by not introducing "hatch fish" in the North
Umpqua River System.

279

Someone that will not raise the license fees, come on $340+millions budget? Why so much, majority of the
ODFW are poacher anyway.

280

The ability to stand up to and not be risk adverse to inaccurate public and media perceptions and misinformation.
Ensure that key Policy HQ staff are making sound and fair decisions that are supported by the OARs and biology.
Ensure a firm hand in ensuring Division(s) fiscal responsibilty and maximization of outside funding sources (e.g.
Do no cut Agency funding that attracts Federal contributions).

281

Being completely honest and unbiased towards conservation efforts. Ability to manage wildlife using methods
that do not inflict pain and suffering or play games with overpopulated animals. Ability to use the brain and not a
quick fix when it comes to manage wildlife. Be professional not cruel and sloppy.

282

An open mind. Director must be able to think about the whole picture, not just the interests of one group of
people. Also relates to animal populations.

283

He/she should be a hunter/fisherman/outdoorsman. Who truly understands the issues and is willing to address
the problems we are facing.

284

An understanding that the purpose of this office is not to handhold the concerns of a favored few, but to safeguard
the lives of present and future denizens occupying our wildlands for all to experience.

285

Demonstrate the ability to work along side multiple interest groups with one common goal. That is to teach live in
harmony with fish and wildlife and their ecosystems, not against fish and wildlife; to conserve and protect natural
resources. Hands on and visibility is necessary to build emplyee leadership, as well as public trust. Work witth
state, regional and national efforts, including E.S.A. monitoring and changes, including listing and delisting
species as related to hunting (example, pending regulations which might delist the Wolf); allow the species to
properly establish iin OR before opening hunting. Regarding hunting, do not allow any type of trapping, baiting,
hounding, poisoning, etc., especially that which could inflict unusual suffering, or affect multiple species, i.e.,
poisoning.

286

Fish management shouldn't be the main priority, realize hunters and hunting organizations have alot to offer

287

The next director should: - consider conservation as a real goal by including refuges from hunting - ensure native
predators receive protections more in line with other species - implement and maintain predator plans that will
require nonlethal strategies as a first response - eliminate trapping and snaring as outdated, inhumane and
ecologically destructive forms of hunting - consider no hunting of wolves when they are delisted - effect an
outright ban on killing contests

288

Since we are discussing the person overseeing Oregon's finite resources which, if mismanaged could leave
Oregon like so many regions which have removed wildlife habitat after depleting natural resources that belong
not just to Oregonians but to those who cannot defend them, we should be looking for someone who is
passionate about conservation.

289

Familiar with Oregon-specific wildlife and fish issues.

290

Basic understanding of the history of fish and wildlife management in Oregon, the recent changes (ie particularly
fish/wildlife population declines) that have occurred resulting in declines in hunting and fishing opportunities, and
the culture of the employees that work at ODFW.

291

1) Fully understand and appreciate that the Department manages all native wildlife and fish and just not game
species. 2) Has the vision and commitment to seek diverse sources of funding to manage the above 3)
Understands the need to develop programs and funding streams related to non-consumptive fish and wildlife
users

14 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


292

Yes, the Director should possess a degree in wildlife biology and environmental science and have a love for the
natural world. He/she should be someone who truly enjoys outdoor recreation and feels that preservation of
wildlife and our natural resources are paramount to any well-funded special interest groups, such as ranchers
and farmers. Above all else, the Director should protect the Oregon Public Trust Doctrine and be the voice and
protector of wildlife and the natural resources for future generations. The Director should be mindful of climate
change before making any decisions regarding hunting, logging, hazing, fishing, or elimination of any particular
species. The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Department should take seriously it's job of being the protector of wildlife
and our natural resources and the Director should possess the educational requirements and experience
necessary to use scientific research before making decisions to kill any animal. The public values our public
lands and resources, including our beautiful wildlife, and the Director of Oregon Fish and Wildlife should be the
leader in innovative methods to conserve resources, not destroy. He/she should be out "in the field" as much as
possible.

293

The ability to make decisions on a rational basis and resist undue influence from corporate or commercial
interests

294

The Director needs to have superior communication skills in order to move staff in a singular direction while
communicating effectively with multiple stakeholders.

295

Stop catering to hunters and estBlish no hunting areas for conservTion and wildlife watching.

296

I'd like to see someone interested in partnering with other state and federal agencies and working toward solving
problems to the mutual benefit of everyone.

297

Conflict resolution experience in order to bring the rural-urban differences in priorities to a productive
conversation that doesn't gloss over deep seeded disputes.

298

1) A recognition that non-game fish and wildlife are more abundant than and probably more important to
ecosystem function than game fish and wildlife. 2) The Director should be an individual who is logical and
reasonable. 3) The Director should be devoid of any "us vs the rest of the world" mentality. 4) The Director should
walk the walk not just talk the talk of collaboration and partnerships for the betterment of fish and wildlife.

299

Someone with a background in wildlife biology and a love of outdoor recreation.

300

Stop killing wildlife!! Wild animals have less and less habitat to survive and just live their daily lives. Please work
towards preserving the amazing species of all types including predators such as wolves and coyotes. We must
protect the entire ecosystem in order for all of us to survive.

301

The ability to think "outside the box" when considering wildlife management strategies, especially those pertaining
to predators.

302

Start listening to majority of hunters and fishers in stead of elite minority!

303

As the ultimate interface between science/conservation and politics, the director needs to be skilled in both
arenas. He needs to be able to project 'cool' under fire. He needs to be able to speak effectively in both
interpersonal and public forums. He needs to be persuasive, while at the same time not offending those who may
disagree. And, he needs to be able to bring the department along with him even when dealing with political forces
that many employees disagree with.

304

Yes he should consider an outright ban on killing contests.

305

A person with children and/or a genuine investment in the long-term health of the environment.

306

In my dealings with ODFW, it's very much an Old Boy's network, focused on hunting and fishing, to the detriment
of nongame species. A woman in this position, who is both a hunter / fisher, and a biologist, would be perfect.

307

- have a science background and a conservation ethic - consider all constituents' desires, including those that
promote a more scientific and diverse approach to wildlife management. - consider conservation as a real goal by
including refuges from hunting - ensure native predators receive protections more in line with other species implement and maintain predator plans that will require nonlethal strategies as a first response - eliminate trapping
and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting - consider no hunting
of wolves when they are delisted - effect an outright ban on killing contests

308

The individual should have a science background and support passive use of resources, rather than supporting
the active destruction of resources. Consider conservation the primary goal of the department. Eliminate trapping
and snaring, as these are inhumane, outdated, torturous forms of hunting. Ensure that native predators receive
protections in line with other animals.

15 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


309

We need someone who can stand up for conserving, protecting and rehabilitating the environment. This has to be
a priority over recreational purposes. Our native species of fish need to be protected and that may mean removing
dams and getting rid of hatchery fish. Unpopular, but necessary. Science backs this up.

310

Love of the outdoors!

311

A true love of nature without bias against any particular species. An true understanding of the essential balance
between predators and prey animals, and especially "apex" predators. A true hatred for the wanton slaughter of
wolves, bears, cougars, coyotes, or any other animal.

312

Field experience

313

Emphasis on sustaining or increasing water and land wildlife even at the expense of commercial and sport
interests. Making sure that Oregon's wildlife is available to future generations to enjoy.

314

This person must have broad perspective in representing wildlife issues for ALL state residents, not just hunters
and anglers. Watchable wildlife should be placed high on the agenda.

315

Honesty, Courage to fight the prevailing politics base on public perception not common sense supported by real
science.

316

Someone who appreciates the delicate nature of our unique environment. Someone who will not let short term
financial gains drive descisions.

317

Collaborative

318

The Director should acknowledge that on all proposed issues and policies, he/she will ask the following question:
Based on the best science, does this action or policy protect and enhance the conservation and protection of
Oregon's fish & wildlife and the habitat they require. If the answer is to this question is NO, then the proposed
action or policy must not go forward.

319

ability to inspire confidence in the employees and stakeholders dedication to non-game wildlife conservation

320

Some scientific training or preparation for dealing with current climatological trends. Good social media skills or
the ability to hire people with those.

321

Lower the cost of tags and application fees this is dicouraging hunters to purchase tags which in turn lowers the
money coming in then the the department raises the fee's, many hunters cant afford the cost of a tag anymore my
children love to hunt and I want to have them be encouraged rather than discouraged just because of money.

322

We need to realize that, like it or not, we have put ourselves into a position that requires us to be stewards of the
environment. We are in a rebuilding, or repairing, time of natural resources. And so, special interest groups
should not be allowed to just stop that process with a legal action without being required to assist in achieving it's
solution. Furthermore, we need more oversight. These efforts need better protection from start to finish, not just
Oregon boundaries.

323

Willing to focus on "Protecting" wildlife, even at the cost of domestic animals or economic impacts. Too many
animals are killed in the name of "wildlife management". Some agency has to have protection as its main focus.

324

Should be someone with a scientific background not focused on special interest big industry.

325

Someone with a frame of reference to the natural world that can see the difference between true restoration of
problems caused by logging and other disturbances and the collaborative lies being fostered as restoration in the
watershed councils and stewardship groups destroying what is left of our biosphere. Someone who is not driven
by economics and will not shill for the timber industry.

326

The Director of FWS should actually care about the well being of wildlife and do everything to protect it. The
overwhelming amount of scientific data available must be a top priority in making decisions. Furthermore, the
view of the majority of the citizens of the United States should be at the forefront of any and all decisions
regarding wildlife, nature and conservation measures. Wildlife belongs to all citizens and should not be viewed
only from a limited, one state perspective.

327

I believe they should have a kind and generous spirit toward the welfare of the animals involved. Their protection
should be high on the list of priorities.

328

Help to ensure that forest lands are available to hunt in.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


329

Common sense and an ability to look beyond the BS that now seems to be pervading wildlife management. Ability
to stand firm on sound policy in light of continuing pressures from strident environmental groups like Defenders of
Wildlife, WildEarth Guardians and Predator Defense. An ability to represent the entire state, not just the uberliberal I-5 Corridor, and an understanding of the risks faced by the farming and ranching communities in the other
2/3 of the state.

330

Integrity and accountability, and requiring that of all his/her employees.

331

A TRUE lover of nature and animals (making thoses things his/her top priority - not hunters & trappers)

332

To be independent of ANY OTHER organizations, not to have conflicting interests, ie. NOT to be a rancher or a
member of a ranching family!

333

No hunter!! Someone who set the animals first!!!

334

Best-science conservation: Kill the hatcheries. Prioritize non-game fish/wildlife. Stop hunting seasons for top
carnivores.

335

Background in wildlife biology, a focus on preservation and restoration of biosystems, a love of the outdoors and
expanding opportunities for generations to come to have access to wild places.

336

Must not put ODFW on a pedestal - need to work with many other agencies, institutions, etc.

337

The COURAGE to make decisions based on actual science in order to benefit ALL species instead of just game
species. The COURAGE to make good decisions based on what is best for the wildlife, as opposed what is best
for consumptive users. And the COURAGE to stand by these decisions, even if they anger some special interests
groups. Finally the ETHICS to do what is right and not being swayed by the need to be liked, or by what
would be easiest or in their own best interests.

338

Some familiarity with the particular issues in Oregon, and differing priorities that will be encountered.

339

Love of outdoor recreation

340

I just want to reiterate that someone with a background and focus in wildlife and fisheries biology as well as a love
of and appreciation for outdoor recreation is a critical skillset that a Director should possess.

341

Knowledge of what will decimate fish populations and dedication to prevention. Bird and fish are vulnerable to the
chemical and physical changes made by humans. Outdoor sports and our survival as a species may depend on
our understanding of this. I grew up in Oregon. The outdoors is why people come here. It is why we stay. Thank
you for your time Elyse Thompson

342

To not be personally compromised with conflict of interest but dedicated to the specie or wildlife projects success
of the highest good of the wildlife's continued survival.

343

Develop a better understanding of how to run a fiscally sound business/agency by appealing to rate payer(license
holders),

344

Better management of endangered species habitat.

345

Not a puppet for the Forestry industry.

346

I'd love to see the person of interest be especially gifted in communication skills to be able to talk with ranchers
and the public to save our wildlife. To solve problems with the wolves and other predatory animals. Keeping in
mind our native species as the primary species needing protection. Being mindful that our wildlife are part of the
whole of the earth and how important ecology and habitat is to wildlife and there -by being important to us. Our
own survival depends on a healthy ecosystem. Being capable of turning away from big interests groups that are
only driven my money and self interest. Keeping in mind always the health of bees and our flora and fauna. Be
willing and able to use alternative options in place of pesticides, herbicides and insecticides. Being especially
concerned in Non GMO products to our land, air and water. In other words, someone that is aware of the
important issues concerning the universal health of all. And capable of making independent decisions in favor of
our overall best. Id like to know that this person is interested in species extinction and which life forms are
especially vulnerable.

347

The ability to stand up to political pressure when making wildlife management decisions.

348

Outside the Box thinking is critical. Times are changing and the public at large is no longer approving of hunting
or predator killing contests. It's essential the new dir

349

I believe that the new director should have a back ground of ACTUAL experience in wildlife harvest. I believe that
this will best serve the mission of the ODFW, and ensure the future use and enjoyment of our future generations.

17 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


350

Loves animals and nature and the natural order of wild life, especially those that were here before us and driven
to or near extinction. A person that shows respect for his position and can not be "bought" or persuaded .

351

Must be for wildlife and wild places. Must be compassionate, empathize and humane. Must have a love of
animals and nature. Must be willing to stand up for wildlife and wildlife habitats. Must support the endanger Spies
Act. Must be strong enough to stand up for what is right and just and not compromise his values.

352

Having a sense of fairness when dealing with all groups that want their interests protected and using science to
guide these decisions. ie. not caving into special interest groups i.e. hunters, ranchers needs that only represent
6% of the population.

353

Look at the effect clear cut logging has had on fish and wildlife in the state of Oregon. Look at the big picture of
how our environment affects ther health and welfare of fish and wildlife here.

354

Make changes to how this agency is funded. If not general funding then then a special tax (call it what you want)
that provides money for the agency from all residents.

355

Having worked for ODF&W for many years - NOT FROM OUTSIDE!!!

356

Be objective and fair in protecting our wildlife and resources. Not to be ruled by money, but by your heart.

357

Need to know that habitat protection is the most important issue.

358

Risk taking for addressing the big, complex challenges Oregon is facing.

359

Thick skin.

360

The director needs to absolutely put wildlife and wild land protection first and not allow the hunting, trapping and
cattle lobby to put pressure on the DFW. Killing wildlife has to be seen as an unacceptable option. This director
needs to be bold and forward thinking enough to acknowledge the damage that animal farming is doing to the
planet and ecosystem.

361

a willingness to encourage input from private Oregon citizens.

362

I hope she or he is able to prioritize the health of the ecosystem over all things. Hunting, fishing and outdoor
recreation require a vibrant environment. Ensuring habitat for rare and endangered species and honoring the
essential role of predators are key.

363

The most important to me would be someone who understands Permaculture Design. This is a science based,
whole-systems approach to the complete web of life and the interactions and relationships therein. It is derived
form the words Permanent and Culture and seeks to work with nature, to partner with nature as opposed to
fighting it. Why not put Mother Nature's power on your side instead of fighting against something you can never
hope to defeat? Watershed management, soils management, fire management erosion control and harnessing
the natural inputs of sun light, precipitation, wind, and organic matter deposition are all woven together in a
holistic system rather than treated as separate or competing elements. Nature and the universe are structured
like a web, just as our brains' neural net, mycelial webs or the internet are. They must be an integrated system to
function correctly.

364

A true commitment to the fish and wildlife, a desire to protect them and their habitats.

365

CONSERVATION! I am very concerned that the new Director promotes CONSERVATION and Maintaining the
SAFETY of ENDANGERED ANIMALS! The director should NOT bend to extremist hunting/nra/angler interests.
The director should also follow SCIENCE based research on how to best PROTECT the Environment AND
Wildlife in it!!!

366

The Director needs to be more conservation minded in the regards to wildlife, wilderness, and public lands. The
Director is acting steward if these that belong to us all. And not give into any hunting or livestock special interests
at the sake of wildlife and land

367

Someone who represents the constituents that fund ODFW. Simply put, someone who has the best interest of
hunters at heart

368

someone who is visionary in understanding that today's decisions affect generations to come, for both human
and the environment

369

Respect for and honoring employees AND families.

370

Someone who is actually a true wildlife biologist with a masters or PhD degree and has worked out in the field
with integrity.

18 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


371

All those questions are very good and a number could easily be #1. I feel that whoever gets this job has to be
prepared to be very transparent (unlike Wisconsin where they are dodging the question of why they allowed so
many wolves to be killed in 2 zones. I personally was hung up on when I asked if they had taken an extra 100
wolves would something have been done.) So this person must be prepared to be very transparent and not hang
up on citizens who have a logical question.

372

The next Director needs to understand the sciences of biology and ecology. Specifically that our natural
environment needs both predators and prey to be in balance.

373

The ability to take a stand against the development or destruction of natural resources/habitat for corporate
purposes & protect our wildlands for hundreds of future generations

374

Determination to enforce law concerning ALL violations, equally prosecuting individuals and organizations no
matter how politically powerful. The conservation of Oregon wild resources is the goal, and citizens of all states
should value ODFW management.

375

Be open to a new approach to wild life management that is not so dependent on game species, but takes a
holistic approach that will bring in the interests of a broader group of stakeholders representing the recreation
community.

376

SAVE & PROTECT ALL ANIMALS & ENVIRONMENTS. CURTAIL LOGGING. STOP POLLUTION.

377

The ability to listen to all sides of an issue. The ability to be non-biased. Dedication to protect our natural
resources and to stand up to those that merely want to exploit them for human entertainment.

378

Knowledge of the science of fisheries, and the importance of wild stock not farmed fish. Emphasis on the
importance of Salmon restoration, dam removal, fish ladder if dams are employed, and stopping dumping of
waste in rivers and the Ocean.

379

Should be someone who is active in hunting and fishing.

380

The Director should represent the interests of sport, recreational, and commercial enterprises. That being said,
allowing for large scale commercial fishing operations in the upper river is an issue that needs to be addressed
with greater intensity. Commercial fishers can still harvest in the ocean. Imposing unreasonable bag limits that
allow for high fish mortality while allowing commercial fishers to keep any fish swimming up the river via gill net
harvest is a double standard that needs to end.

381

Since the population of Oregon is approx 3.93 million ( 2013 census) & there are ONLY 259,000 registered
hunters, I would like to see a person who represents the PEOPLE of Oregon, NOT juts the few ( less than 1%)
hunters. Also they should take care of Oregon's wildlife to serve the MAJORITY of her population NOT the few
ranchers that make money off our land. Wildlife viewing brings in 17% more revenues than hunting. So alive
wildlife is worth more than dead. http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/feb/21/trophy-hunters-grizzlybear-hunting-canada

382

An understanding that top predators are extremely important in a natural system and that they should be more
the "managers" than human beings should be.

383

The new director should not be beholden to special interests like the ranching and trophy hunting communities.

384

Knowledgeable about the critical issue of climate change and prepared to take steps to manage Oregon's natural
resources. Must make sustainability of functioning ecosystems and habitat protection the highest priority even if
that means reducing or restraining some human activities.

385

Must be able to work with all people effectively and be able to compromise when required.

386

Free of vested economic/financial interest.

387

Implement policy regarding climate change. If the Director can prioritize climate change as an issue which affects
the health of fish and wildlife, then ODFW can pressure the state to create more strict policy about the carbon
footprint of municipalities, businesses, and citizens in Oregon. Wolves: Please, absolutely, continue to protect
the life of OR-7 by not publishing any information about his wheareabouts, except perhaps 2 months later than
his position on a map. It is so exciting to have wolves back in western Oregon and into CA!

388

The ODFW director should prioritize outreach to land owners in order to better enable habitat restoration. If we
currently spend hundreds of millions of dollars on fish hatcheries while native fish stocks continue to decline, it
would seem time to shift focus on engaging landowners, politicians and the agricultural industry in habitat
conservation and restoration, and more efficient water and land use practices.

19 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


389

The Director should not be biased toward industry interests over those of the public. Neither should the Director
give unnecessary weight to the often highly vocal hunting community. Wildlife belong to the whole population of
Oregon, not just the small minority of Oregonians who consume or otherwise extract animals. Consumption, in
the form of hunting, fishing, or trapping, is not the only form of "use." The photographer, wildlife viewer, or mere
outdoor enthusiast who values the knowledge that there is a diverse array of native wildlife in the area, have
interests that compete with those of consumptive users, but that are valuable nonetheless. The Director should
be able to always remember that wildlife is the property of all the people, vocal or not, current or future
generations, and consumptive or conservationist.

390

Be focused on the agency's mission of protecting and restoring fish & wildlife and not swayed or influenced by
economic or political interests. There are enough advocates for business interests - the Director should advocate
for the fish & wildlife.

391

You must be diligent as to the fish and wildlife come first, never the politics.

392

Respect for life in all of its forms should be an essential qualification for this position, along with the ability to have
that respect trump the demands made by hunters and fishermen for more species to be taken.

393

A background, understanding or willingness to think outside the box and be able to collaborate with those who
don't share the view that our wildlife is here for human use, entertainment, recreation, pleasure, and to be used
as a resource.

394

Must keep an open mind about issues that may be controversial. And part of having this open mind is to base
decisions on science, not on wildlife haters seeking to sway his/her opinions.

395

Someone who has a history of hunting and fishing and will lead the agency in a way that protects Oregon hunters
and anglers opportunities.

396

The Director must not be stuck in the mindset that his or her job is to provide things to hunt and fish. The agency
must give a much higher priority to managing ecosystems for their long-term health. The agency must be
managing for resiliency in the face of changing climate.

397

An absolute love and respect for nature.if those qualities are missing , you might as well put a politician in
charge.

398

A strong legal background, or knowledge of legal issues relating to fish and wildlife A knowledge of basic science
and how to use science to enhance fish and wildlife in Oregon A willingness to strongly state positions intended to
enhance fish and wildlife A commitment to enhance fish and wildlife rather than a commitment to making all sides
happy A willingness to listen to all sides and take action designed only, or primarily, to enhance f & w

399

a scientist foremost, a bureaucrat lastlyCli

400

Yes. The person needs to care about preservation of wildlife and the environment. The Federal fish and wildlife
people are a killing machine. Protect the wolves in OR, particularly OR7.

401

A strong understanding that anglers and hunters actually fund the agency and the willingness to work for these
user groups.

402

Strong moral character, willing to listen to the science and NOT the special interests of a small sector of the
population.

403

Should have a love of and respect for the natural world.

404

Dedication to preserving and protecting our natural environment rather than an orientation toward exploitation of
"natural resources".

405

Degree in wildlife biology

406

someone with a background in wildlife biology and a love of outdoor recreation. No connection to corporate
resource extractors. Background in NGO and/or non profit sustainability or wildlife conservation organization. An
academic It would be nice if this new director has experience in endangered species law. Someone who actually
loves the outdoors, has fished and foraged and knows the connections between species within ecosystems and
their services to each other, not just to humans.

407

They need to follow solid science and not fall to politics

408

The person should be a wildlife biologist and have a strong and demonstrable love of the outdoors.

20 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


409

All wildlife management should always first and foremost require nonlethal tools and these tools need to be
enforced before the taking of any wildlife. Also that the agency does not just align with the hunting community and
the agricultural industry. Conservation groups and pro-wildlife groups need to be involved in the task of wildlife
management at all times.

410

Ability to readily understand and integrate a wide variety of factors, fields, and facts to creatively and accurately
assess the landscape-level situation faced by individual species, figure in changing ecosystem factors, and keep
an open, but keen mind for new facts and developments.

411

I'd love to see a female in the position. Conservation and a love for the outdoors and outdoor recreation.
Interested in sustainability.

412

I could be your next Director - although not having any of those qualification listed I am a lover of the outdoors
and wildlife and with college level classes in biology and science - I GET IT the balance of nature and the
environment. Without that I don't care what "qualifications you have - you're inadequate!!! Adherence to science,
and not tainted biased agenda's parading as science: and make sure that there is strict adherence to quotas and
opening and closing of seasons- make examples of poachers and those that hunt earlier or latter than allowed.
Enlist volunteers if necessary - they cost nothing!!!

413

I think it's hugely important that the director have a strong love of the outdoors, and interests in wilderness. Only
someone who is happy and comfortable outdoors should even be considered for this position. It's important to
have interpersonal skills, be able to communicate, and manage a bureaucracy, but without a deep love of and
commitment to wilderness a director would almost certainly flounder (no pun intended).

414

Biology background and understanding. Preserving and supporting biological diversity.

415

Educating the public about the importance of preserving wildlife so as to prevent the unnecessary killing of
wildlife due to lack of understanding.

416

I believe the following would be essential qualities in the candidate for this position: A background in Wildlife
Biology. Attention to, and understanding of, Wildlife Rehabilitation and how pubic education programs to co-exist
with wildlife can benefit wildlife. Not just focusing on fishing and hunting, but also being aware of, and promoting
non-game and watchable wildlife programs and opportunities. Public education and establishment of restoration
projects to increase wildlife corridors. Someone who loves to be in, and appreciates, the outdoors...i.e. not just a
bureaucrat or someone who likes to hunt.

417

It is extremely important that the new director have a background in wildlife policy and have a strong commitment
to the conservation as well as preservation of the wildlife resources in Oregon.

418

Yes. The Director should not only be conservation-minded, but animal-welfare focused. She should lead OFWS
toward a more evolved approach to protecting wildlife against commercial, recreational, and other adverse
interests. A Director that applies a "scientific approach" to resource management, even while purportedly
dedicated to conservation is often code for questionable policies such as wildlife culling.

419

It's very important that the new director have a strong understanding of wildlife biology and not be mired in
antiquated concepts of wildlife management or myopically focused only on promoting game species

420

Stand by our wildlife no matter what...not ranchers hunters

421

Keeping it as WILD as possible!

422

Should have a background in wildlife biology. Should have a love of and experience in outdoor recreation.

423

Based upon my personal experience with ODFW, it is highly bureaucratic and focused on the minutea rather
than the larger issues at hand. Definitely the old guard of hunting and fishing, and employees (at midmanagement level, which is who I was working with) are unable to adjust this model to the world at hand.
Therefore, the new Director must be a leader; someone who is willing to lead the current employees into a new
way of thinking, despite the fact that it will be unpopular with many employees. This person must be willing to be
unpopular with staff.

424

A commitment to protect clean water and maximum wildlife diversity.

425

Make conservation a priority. Uphold the Oregon State Endangered Species Act in state forests. Do not engage
in lethal control of wolves. Do not listen to special interests, especially the hunting and ranching lobbies.

426

Has to like wildlife and understand the delicate ecosystem that we are 'managing'

427

Not a sell-out to hunting and fishing interests. Anyone who "enjoys" killing is a psycho.

428

The ability to bring consensus on wildlife management decisions.

21 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


429

Science based decision maker with NO (past present or future) links, financial or otherwise, to big business with
profits in mind--i.e. timber industry.

430

prefer someone with a background in wildlife biology and a love of outdoor recreation.

431

Biology back ground, avid out door enjoyer.

432

A backgroung in wildlife biology and ecosystem management

433

Someone with a background in wildlife biology and a love of outdoor recreation

434

Wildlife biology degree. Put people before corporate greed.

435

Be aware of the amount of poaching going on and have new ways of combating this issue.

436

Must have personal fishing experience in Oregon for at least 10 years in 80%, of all fisheries.

437

Strong back ground in ecology and ecosystem understanding. Especially the importance of all species and their
contributions to a healthy ecosystem. The concept of trophic cascades is important and must be recognized and
used in making management decisions that benefit the ecosystem and all segments of Oregon's diverse
population.

438

The director needs to be accountable to all Oregonians, not just the hunting/fishing/trapping lobbies. Resources
need to be managed for recovery of vulnerable populations (predators such as wolves, mountain lions etc) and
sustainability of the ecosystems which make Oregon unique.

439

A new director with an open mind and the ability to reinvent the organization would be great. Having someone
with a diverse background and a wide range of experience and expertise in much more than consumable wildlife
is needed. Selecting a new director with non game field experience and a strong zoological background should
be a high priority. The vast majority of Oregon's wildlife species are non-game however nearly all of ODFW's
resources are directed to game species. The ability to have a non-bias and fresh approach to assessing the
organizations structure, funding, staffing, and approach to how business is done would be a great way to rebuild
public confidence. The department should be led by someone with a strong conservation ethic and
understanding.

440

focus more on enhancing the fish and wildlife than protecting it.

441

he should be a hunter, fisherman and an outdoorsman.

442

No

443

Someone who sincerely believes his/her constituency is all of Oregon. Not just hunters, anglers and trappers.

444

Not everyone believes in fishing and hunting and the views of all Oregonians should be taken into account.The
director must understand how cruel hunting and trapping can be as well as wasteful.

445

Maybe you think the survey questions already address the issue, but I think it is really important that all
conservation perspectives be considered, not just the perspectives of people who hunt and fish. Wildlife belongs
to us all!

446

na

447

dont sell our money and stop raising the price on tags and licenses

448

A deep conviction for and devotion to preservation, or restoration as the case may be, of a balanced ecosystem.

449

To have a u understanding about fish and wild and strive to stay focused meeting guidelines and conservation for
future wild life

450

The director needs to realize that ODFW manages a public resource (eg wildlife & wildlife habitat) but that it also
serves a paying customer base of Oregonian and out-of-state outdoorsmen and woman. Simple economic
principals along with best available science can help guide common sense decisions that provide more
opportunities for the recreational fisherman and hunters which represent the primary customer base.

451

Defend all that is wild and refuse to allow "hunting" permits.

452

Ability to withstand an erratic and sometimes punitive legislature. Ability to pull the various geographies and
philosophies of the state together. Ability to withstand loud, angry voices wanting wildlife to be managed by
bullets and traps.

22 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


453

Be able to stand up to the out of state corporations who ignore wildlife and destroy natural habitat for profit.
Understand that corporations and other landowners do not own wildlife under Oregon's statutory law and be
active in protecting wildlife in that context. Quit relying on stupid ideas such as letting 9 year old kids hunt and
shoot high power firearms to "save" our hunting.

454

Having a leader that bridges the gap between fisheries management and public needs/wants.

455

Common sense

456

Commitment to maintaining the health of our natural resources.

457

He or she must have the ability to counter the tendency to cater entirely to recreational user groups. The majority
of Oregon's citizens are neither recreational fishermen or hunters, but common citizens. They are, in fact,
consumers, who currently are an under-represented and under served group of the citizenry. ODFW does a poor
job representing their interests. As a consumer and voter, I resent that.

458

Commitment to providing opportunities for anglers to harvest their catch, and providing a harvest while also
conserving wild fish populations.

459

Fish and wildlife exist to manage animal and support hunters.

460

Backbone to fight and protect habitat and land use issues. Some one who will not roll over on protecting habitat,
and fish and wildlife species. Some one who uses new ideas, and backs up management decisions with sound
science, not sticking with old relics of the past like current wildlife division does. Have accountability for wildlife
management in the agency and to make tough decisions to change wildlife management.

461

An ability to reflect the desires of all Oregonians, not just those who hunt, fish and trap.

462

A genuine respect for public ownership of wildlife, fish and other resources. The ability to listen respectfully and
carefully and to consider honestly all points of view. The ability to resist pressure from minorities and lobbyists
when they do not represent the best interest of the public in general and scientific knowledge. The goal should be
maximum protection and enjoyment/use for the public with maximum protection for species and the environment.
Hard to achieve a balance when everyone is pulling one in different directions.

463

Experience building funding for fish and wildlife services that isn't tied to hunting and angling licenses.

464

A director that understands the economic value of ecotourism and conservation along with hunting and fishing
revenues and the willingness to develop those ecotourism opportunities to not only bolster ODFW but the
communities that are adjacent to these tourism areas would be helpful for a struggling state.

465

Develop "can do" department/employee attitudes. Develop collaborative relationships in state basins and basin
interests.

466

Someone who is willing to listen to all of Oregon's citizens, not just the ones who hunt and/or fish. Someone not
owned by out-of-state concerns.

467

Being willing and motivated to move the agency from a pro-hunting entity to one that promotes non-consumptive
wildlife appreciation and viewing. Being motivated to infuse the precautionary principle into management of the
state's wildlife and end all predator hunting and trapping and replace lethal control with preventative, non-lethal
methods.

468

see below.

469

Recognize that the human dimensions and social science of natural resources management is at least as
important as the natural resources, and use departmental resources to study and address human dimensions
issues, opportunities, and challenges.

23 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


470

I believe that we are truly at a crossroads in the management of our resources. It is imperative that we begin to
manage our resources with a bigger picture of how all areas of our wildlife impact each other. I am not a hunter,
nor a fisherman, yet I love wildlife - just for existing as wildlife. The very fact that our state is so filled with
spectacular scenery and wildlife requires truly careful management to ensure that it is preserved. Preservation
should be our primary goal. Our wildlife is so stressed by urban sprawl and unmanaged development that I think
it is crucial to make wildlife LIVING our number one goal. As I said, I am not a hunter, but I do have a strong
scientific background in biology and veterinary medicine, and I think that harvesting our prime animals instead of
culling the weak is NOT in our best interest. I also am not a fisherman, but I am a strong advocate of Marine
Reserves in order to preserve Ocean health so that everyone can continue to enjoy our planet. So, in summary,
we need a true free thinker who is not afraid to move outside the traditional box of hunting and fishing, someone
who can incorporate true novel ideas and bring opposing sides to the table to foster a truly healthy mega
environment. Also we need to embrace modern technology instead of relying on outdated, indiscriminate trapping
techniques for monitoring populations.

471

Need to work with licensed wildlife rehabilitators. Should respect and appreciate their dedication and commitment
for treating and caring for the State's Wildlife , many independent rehabbers pay out of pocket.

472

Ability to recognize the importance of fishing and hunting opportunities to the public and ability to expand
opportunities to utilize natural resources.

473

A director who understands that managing wildlife is not all about hunting and killing. Wildlife is not disposable. If
an animal needs protection step up to the plate and do exactly that.

474

The ability to stand strong against one faction of the public, keeping always conservation and the health of habitat
and resources in mind.

475

End managing the ODF&W as a Profit Corporation(Federal),with a preferential view towards fees and usage by
agricultural and sport interests. ODF&W needs to return to the original Theodore Roosevelt vision of preserving
wild species for all time. Not one of preserving private grazing and sport areas for maximun profit,and not leasing
out kill permits in order to provide emperics for continued funding. It is not 1980 anymore. Hasn't been for a while.
It is 2014,and Oregon's wild species are already having to try to adapt to a rapildly changing environment,which
is causing migrations and declines in health,vigor,and population. ODF&W needs to figure out how to support
Oregon's once thriving wild species,to prevent them from becoming Canada's thriving wild species. ODF&W has
been very short term ideology the last few decades,and it is showing in our landscapes. And in the decline of our
household pets(come on,really? 6 feet from the trail is a trap? WTH?)

476

THE NEED TO WORK WITHIN A BUDGET, IF YOU KEEP RAISING LICENSE AND TAG FEES YOU WILL
LOSE MORE FUTURE HUNTER FISHERMAN. KEEP IN MIND POACHING WILL INCREASE IF YOU
CONTINUE TO WANT MORE MONEY AND GIVE US LESS TIME AND AREAS TO HUNT AND FISH.

477

Someone with integrity and respect for all the wildlife, without the preconceived notion that killing IS conservation.

478

The new director needs to do something revolutionary; take into account the opinions and real world knowledge
of his or her customers, the hunting and fishing public. Do not just have a hearing and do what you want anyway.
The new director should realize that the solution to budget woes is not to drive more hunters away by increasing
licensing fees. Look to Idaho and other states with successful game management to see what may work and
what may not. I work at a licensing agent and everyday I see people choose not to pay the exorbitant fees saying
it's just ridiculous to pay that much and you think increasing fees is the answer.

479

Some one who is not a tool of the hunting and trapping contingent but carries scientific expertise in conservation
of fish and wildlife.

480

They should be highly screened for signs of nepotism! It is very difficult for resident Oregonians to be successful
in drawing big game tags; it is devastating to see the ODFW director get busted giving the "good hunts" away to
their family and friends. Also, I believe the preference point system should be overhauled IF there is room for
improvement after a thorough and honest scrutiny.

481

ODFW needs a well rounded director, one who understands and appreciates the concerns of both the
conservation community and the hunting community. The director also needs to begin a dialogue with the public
at large and begin to make them feel invested in the decisions of this agency.

482

First, thank you for engaging the public in this decision. I believe that the next director not be a hunter, thus not
influenced by this small percentage of folks that seek to destroy wildlife instead of allowing nature to monitor
itself.

483

Excellent spokesperson and public face for the department and the state. Strong advocate for doing what is right
(scientifically correct), even when many voices have other priorities.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


484

Someone perhaps with high-level experience in an agency other than fish & wildlife. This allows new
perspectives.

485

Wean ODFW away from consumption based business model to one that recognizes that non consumptive users
do want to enhance wildlife in the state.

486

An unbiased prospective between sport and commercial harvest.

487

We need a director who will listen to the voices of all Oregonians, not just hunters, trappers and the like. The
wildlife and wild lands of Oregon belong to all of us.

488

So long as the new person is collaborative, creative, transparent, and sincere they should be able to do a good
job for all the wildlife and ALL the citizens of Oregon. Wildlife is for everybody, plus they have their own important
place in the natural order of our world. Please don't make it only about hunting and only about killing what gets in
the way of people, no matter how far people encroach into wildlife's habitat.

489

although I am sure you have already been inundated with this topic, IF Oregon truly wishes to maintain a
functional and viable ODFW for the future protecting a quickly diminishing wildlife resource base MUST be a "top
3 priority" - WILDLIFE MUST be kept in the forefront of issues managed with the WILDLIFE'S best interests in
mind - PREDATORS MUST be taken out of the "political" realm and back into SCIENTIFIC CONTEXT or you can
simply rename "ODFW" to "ODF" IT IS REALLY THAT SIMPLE

490

consider the views of ALL Oregonians, and not just a narrow hunting/trapping/angling constituency.

491

The ability to represent all interests not just those of sportsman hunters and fisherman.

492

To act in favor of all wildlife .. To protect them and make decisions that benefit their well being ..

493

Understanding the practice of sustainability, stewardship, and making logic- based decisions to place the
environment first and the people after in most cases.

494

I would like to see a director that considers the interests of ALL Oregonians, not just the hunters, ranchers,
anglers. There is a lot of new research concerning ethical land and wildlife management and I would like to see
alternative options legitimately considered.

495

It is time for the next director to be able to consider new directions for the department - directions that reflect the
changing interests of Oregon's general population.

496

The new Director should be open to the views of ALL Oregonians, including those who value wildlife as an
aesthetic, not just a recreational hunting, resource. Oregonians increasingly want wildlife protected for its own
sake, rather than for hunters to be able to pursue and hunt.

497

Must be a hunter and fisherman himself. Don't want any politician in the job.

498

Someone who is not an asshole! Able to instill quality leadership of top quality employees, by leading by
example.

499

must be an avid sportsman and angler to appreciate what the job needs.

500

look at other states ,compare their success to ours, do what is right to preserve and grow ouri wildlife. do what is
right to enhance our fish populations. stop catch and release, of salmon and coho because mortality rate is to
high. Set a limit on caught fish, then shut it down.

501

The ability to equally distribute funds and attention to all species of fish, warm water as well as others and other
types of wildlife besides game animals and birds.

502

I would like to see a director who respects all walks of wildlife running ODFW. Someone who understands that
our ecosystem is an interconnected web and needs all species to be balanced and healthy. I would like to see
someone who is open to integrating wildlife and fisheries science into public education so that what ODFW
researches and does is more accessible and understandable to the public.

503

Someone that has a passion for hunting, fishing and the outdoors.

504

Understanding the value of education programs which increase Oregonians appreciation and respect for our rich
natural heritage.

505

Understand that Oregon is and has been mismanaged regarding wildlife for some time. Oregon HAS the
resources to become a destination state similar to Co. or NM. We need to protect our resources while still
allowing conservation efforts (including Hunting) This would mean aggressive predator control and wildlife
enhancement programs.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


506

Be a woman or person of color. Have experience working in communities of color. Bilingual in English and
Spanish.

507

Ability to stand the heat generated by doing what conserving and enhancing calls for even when short-term
interests clamor for something else.

508

Should probably be an outdoors person,hunter,fisherman etc... boater.

509

Do not run the Department from a Liberal, Left Wing political agenda.

510

Understanding of basic biology and how science is used to answer questions about resource issues. Have an
understanding of the roles that hunters and fishermen play in our agency and in resource decisions.

511

The largest segment of the public are non-hunters who see wild animals as an integral part of the wild ecosystem, to be admired and observed from afar, rather than "products" to be managed for profit. We need a
director who is not from the narrow segment of trappers and hunters, but someone with a multifaceted view, a
broad, science-based perspective that gives more than lip-service to the huge majority of the public that wants
wildlife respected, not simply used. As for improving the financial coffers of Oregon through wise wildland
management, there is so much greater potential for income from tourism in a unique state like Oregon if it can
build on a reverence for life, a reverence for the natural beauty and magnificence of it's natural lands,
encouraging education about the environment and knowledge of the complexities, the fabulous complexities, of
how plants, animals and geology all depend upon each other to make life possible for all of us. Today's society is
so much better educated about the natural world, we need a Director of ODFW that is in tune with this modern
public; a Director that is aware of his potential for either destroying the public's trust in the state and it's ability to
manage wildlife, or building a strong cooperative spirit between ODFW and the public. We need a Director that
will diversify the ODFW Board, that will encourage appointment of non-hunters, environmentalists, a specialist
from the HSUS, other scientists- people who represent the best of that wide swath of the public that both love and
understand the natural world far better than the generations that came before us.

512

Positive attitude! Confident enough to trust the expertise of your staff. Ask for input on issues. Don't be afraid to
delegate high level tasks to competent managers and biologists. Strong background in natural resource science
or policy. Must understand scientific principles in order to judge what is best for longevity of the resource. Politics
is a separate matter; that folds in later; must first understand the importance of science and consequences of
decisions. Thinks outside the box; has demonstrated vision and strategic planning abilities. Not just business as
usual approach (e.g., beyond hunting and fishing as our sole source of support). Engage other sectors of the
public - such as conservation groups, national sanctuary program, to leverage additional support and funds for
managing/conserving resources. Ability to stand firm when needed; sometimes can't get consensus and have to
make decisions that are best for the resource we manage for long term success. Sense of humor and personable
helps tremendously. Respects and empowers the employees!

513

I think having someone with a true love, and background in hunting/fishing would be a must.

514

Courage to communicate the threats posed by introduced, non-native fish, wildlife and vegetation, consistent with
conservation values to a traditional hunting and fishing customer population. Courage to move ODFW to a
balanced, ecologically educated agency managing all fish and wildlife - not just those fished and hunted - for the
benefit of habitat, the hunting/fishing, and non-hunting and fishing residents of Oregon. Courage to manage fish
and wildlife on federal lands consistent with the purposes set out by Congress for those lands (wilderness,
multiple use, all native fish and wildlife and habitat), and to the benefit of all Americans.

515

Someone who values science, the natural environment, wild, and wildlife habitats more than then they value
pleasing hunters and fisherman, a very small segment of the state's population. Someone who can envision and
implement ways to raise revenue without relying on hunting and fishing fees. Someone who can encourage
nonhunters and nonfishermen to contribute to wildlife habitat and restoration and who can guarantee that
nonhunting revenue will not be used to promote or encourage hunting.

516

The ability to listen to the majority of people that hunt and fish in the State of Oregon that make up the primary
budget with the purchase of tags and licenses. to be able to appropriate funds wisely with long range goals that
meet what the general population is interested in.

517

NA

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


518

-They must be willing to always at least appear to be on the side of the license holders who pay their salary. Someone who can identify the problems the license holders can actually see and then act in a manner that may
fix those problems. I.E. All fisherman are sick of paying for seal and bird food. I am sure there is a study to
support the concept of just how many seal's/sea lion's and birds would exist in our fishery if we did not produce
their meals at our expense. -Transparency! Simply put, ODFW has a history of un-explained reg changes and unanticipated fee hikes. It has become such an expense to participate in the sport that most everyone I know now
has to budget just to buy licenses and tags. We are not willing to give it up but it would be nice if we knew why
we had to pay another fee for fishing the Columbia drainage, buy a tag for salmon/steelhead, halibut and
sturgeon when we only target one species or why we have to pay for a hunting license to put in for draw tags
when we don't hunt if we don't draw.

519

A firm knowledge of the fish and game resources at all levels. And the what interests are import sportsmen and
women. And the foresight to be long-term oriented.

520

commucation with the public in the local area about the habitat and game/fish population management for the
area, not on a state wide basis. Oregon resident.

521

Someone who understands the unique character that is Oregon and Oregonians.

522

Resist the political ploy to ban lead ammo. It's a sham brought on by special interest groups!

523

Lead with integrity.

524

525

yes. must be fair minded when it comes to allocating fish and game among various groups. just because one
group chooses to hunt or fish with a certain piece of equipment (ie a Bow or a fly rod) the director should not
encourage that they get more resources or chances to hunt or fish than any other er group

526

The next director should be a hunter and fisherman that will not only look out for wildlife, but other hunters and
fishermen as well.

527

A mind set to manage wildlife based on wildlife and not on a financial budget. An avid hunter and fisher, a true
outdoorsman. Someone who will allow more local decisions to be made rather than the voice of the city to rule
the state.

528

I only suggest that the new Director truly adhere to the mission of the ODFW to "protect and enhance Oregon's
fish and wildlife and their habitats..." While "use and enjoyment" has often been seen as the most important part of
that mission, we have for far too long read that as meaning ODFW needs to provide angler opportunity to catch
more and more hatchery fish. I wish, instead, that protection and enhancement for the fish, wildlife and their
habitats would take center stage in the new Director's vision and management strategy moving forward. The
science is compelling and definitive: hatcheries damage wild populations. While the extent of that damage can be
debated (barely), ODFW and other state fish and wildlife agencies need to modernize practices, eliminate the
interactions between hatchery and wild fish (to the extent that is possible), and shift the management focus to
preserve native fish whenever possible.

529

Courage

530

They have to be a hunter, fisherman and outdoorsman to apply. Should be able to prove these activities for a
minimum of 10 years prior to applying.

531

The ability to lead conflict resolution. To appear unbiased in leading the discussion.

532

Needs to have his head on his sholders and needs to be from eastern oregon

533

Knowledge of wildlife rehabilitation, which is not noted previously, is an extremely important area of information
that a director would need to know. It is important to conserve, but it is also important to correct the (largely manmade) mistakes that lead to wildlife needing to be rehabilitated. Information about captive-breeding programs,
restricted hunting areas, and conservation areas is also critical.

534

The new director should have a preponderance of demonstrated wildlife management experience in the Western
USA, as opposed to fisheries management. For too long wildlife management has been.

535

Experience setting priorities in a climate of decreasing budgets Experience using citizen volunteers to staff for
added value

536

Honesty, integrity, keep politics out of the ODFW, maintain a high public profile and get out and meet the people.
(and not just in Salem, Eugene, Corvallis, Medford or Portland)

27 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


537

Experience with, knowledge of, and/or finding value in the non-game & watchable wildlife (birds, whales, etc.) is
important for managing those populations. With experience around that, more well-rounded decisions can be
made when it comes to conservation discussions and projects.

538

Not that I know of.

539

interest in and knowledge about the preservation of wildlife beyond game species

540

Experience protecting all wildlife, not just those hunted. Experience providing information in a non-threatening
manner about all wild creatures without using fear-based tactics. Willingness to work with the decisions made by
the citizens without depicting those decisions in a derogatory and disrespectful way and the ability to insist all
agency personnel do the same. Maybe you could hire someone who has experience protecting truly dangerous
wildlife, like alligators or bison, who wouldn't act like protecting wolves and mountain lions is a pain.

541

should be a conservationist

542

Lobbying skills to increase ODFW budget via federal and/or state money.

543

I see that you have not considered working with wildlife rehabilitators as part of your questionnaire. Nor
advancing green spaces or wildlife corridors through suburban areas.

544

Out of box thinker, pragmatic,

545

Needs to be willing to stand by employees while also listening and incorporating public sentiment.

546

Somebody who values non-game wildlife as well Public education about preventing (man made) problems for
wildlife. (Non lead bullets, pick up your fishing line and lures, etc)

547

make the fish and wildlife the priority over any political pressure.

548

Experience creating, developing, encouraging and acknowledging a strong wildlife rehabilitation community
Strong focus on non-game wildlife, watchable wildlife, (i.e., non-consumptive) Experience with finding creative
way to fund non-game wildlife Substantial field research experience

549

He should have the ability to sort out the truth on major issues like the Wolf Reintroduction program. Mush of
what has been published to promote it has been less than truthful. Lying is not considered to be a qualification for
this position.

550

1) Fiscal responsibility. Wildlife dollars spent on wildlife. Fish dollars spent on fish. 2) Decisions based on the
good of the resource rather than top down management as it currently occurs. 3) Prevent the use of hunter
dollars for single species management as is currently being done with wolves.

551

address declining blacktail deer population ,,,controlled hunts for blacktail ro rotate every two years to hunters .

552

The next director needs to be understanding of the employees challenges working within limited means and
support from other staff (budget reductions, retirements, not filling vacant needed positions, layoffs). The new
Director must possess loyalty to staff, have honor and commitment to our agency. Stand up for what is wrong and
or right and not be afraid of what other government will say or do. Have a strong conviction is his or her beliefs,
and the sense to work with others for compromises without compromising our agencies mission, his or her self, or
employees of ODFW.

553

Being able to think outside the box. Being able to consider program reductions if needed to reduce budget
burden if the alternative is continued fee increases

554

Ability to swim the political waters of Salem

555

ODFW needs to be restructured away from the petty fiefdoms that currently exist. Our area is underserved by the
agency because it consists of mostly small private lands, yet this is an area of immense promise for habitat
recovery if more landowners were recruited and efforts made. While there is much great work being done and
many excellent staff, the agency could be much more effective with available resources by having standardizing
approaches and protocols across the state, while still recognizing the uniqueness of the different ecoregions and
resources.

556

Should be politically independent.

557

MAKE ALL DECISIONS BASED ON ACCURATE BIOLOGICAL DATA-----------NOT PUBLIC PRESSURE

28 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


558

The culture within the agency is deeply entrenched. Many view points in ODFW leadership are antiquated and
approaches are old and used up. The new director needs to bring a fresh outside perspective on natural resource
management and be ready to face the hard facts about the national decline of hunting/fishing revenue. It is time
to diversify.

559

Support restoration of the PERMANENT pioneer license with no annual (non permanent) component

560

Be a Hunter!!

561

Yes, they need to care about animals! It is an embarrassment to our state to have sea lions branded and killed.
There are too many instances where killing animals seems to be the solution to problems rather than figuring out
real solutions! Too much hunting is allowed!

562

Experience hunting and fishing in Oregon.

563

We need a director that is not going to inhibit law abiding hunters from pursuing game and allows the predators
and herd animals to thrive through ethical means. In the last decade or longer harder and more stringent
restrictions are placed on hunters and their abilities to take game. Predators like bears and cougars are not
allowed to be hunted by means of scents/ baits or animatronics and their numbers are so out of control that they
are a threat to the public. In addition they are decimating deer and elk. Now with the introduction of wolves into
the ecosystem this will be compounded. This has gotten so out of control that recently I was told by a ranger that
if I wanted to use a scent to hunt bear I would have to use myself as bait by putting a scent to myself to attract
them. This is foolish and dangerous. For a director to force people to put their life at risk in order to ethically take
an animal is disgraceful.

564

Ability to stand the heat generated by doing what conserving and enhancing calls for even when short term
interests clamor for something else.

565

Integrity Team player Willing to look for answers/recommendations from the professionals working for him/her.

566

Consensus building, ability to respect, inspire and lead workers.

567

568

ability to value all people, input, non game issues equally with fishing and hunting. Resource conservation value,
not only consumption. Birders should be valued as contributing to scientific observations, caring for the resource
and as partners with projects.

569

A commitment to providing natural resource careers to as many qualified Oregonians as possible.

570

Willingness to work towards a fishing strategy that allows coexistence of commercial & sports needs without
jeopardizing the long term fish population .

571

Manages game for hunting purposes NOT wolf and cougar population!

572

needs to understand the relationship between prey and predator and protect the wildness/natural state of it all.

573

Needs to be a hunter and fisherman. The only way to understand the the real problems with Oregons wildlife is
for a director to have this experience.

574

Proven success with increasing Deer and Elk populations and consequent increased number of hunters.

575

Experience with budgeting, and allotting monies to the division they are intended for. Do not rob one division to
enhance another

576

None

577

Stay true to the mission of conservation for wild fish.

578

Ability to convince the legislature that ODFW needs more money to manage non-game wildlife issues
(endangered species, endangered habitats).

579

The new director's top priorities should be promoting hunting and fishing, increasing recruitment of new hunters
and anglers and sustaining hunting and fishing opportunities in perpetuity. It would be extremely unfortunate if
ODFW ended up doing nothing more than charge parking fees for heron and squirrel viewing opportunities. The
director of ODFW needs to understand exactly what conservation IS. Far to often I am hearing and/or reading the
word (conservation) used as a synonym for preservation; it is not. Certain stakeholder groups are using this to
their advantage to give the appearance that the agency is not doing its job. The director should possess,
encourage, and implement a conservation philosophy.

29 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


580

The ability to not allow the commercial and sport fishing industry determine the extinction of the fish runs. Limit the
number of commercial guides and their trips per day.

581

Can articulate well in oral communication. Willing to meet with special interest groups to reach agreement on
issues such as salmon and wildlife management throughout the state. Work toward solutions and making final
determinations are important.

582

The next person needs to be a hunter and fisher person. and will spend time in the different units, of the state .
Hunting the areas that is open to all hunters .

583

To care for the well-being of the local Oregon fish and wildlife as well as the same care coming from fellow
employees. I think that many people in our field these days, care too much about money and their careers rather
than the actual issues at hand in the biological field. More time needs to be spent genuinely caring about the
ultimate outcome of the habitat and populations of these animals, than most currently do.

584

Ability to stand up to constituents and do what is right for Oregon's wildlife.

585

COMMON SENCE,TIME UNDER HIS BELT,NOT AFRAID TO GET HIS HANDS DIRTY,HARD WORKING AND
HONEST. WOOD LIKE TO SEE HIM OR HER A NATIVE OF OREGON.

586

General knowledge of current policy combined with personal experience in the field concerning habitat, hunting
and fishing in Oregon. May be beneficial to have experience hunting/fishing in other states as well who may have
successful management policies in place.

587

(1) The Director requires a strong commitment to educate children, teens, and adults, so expertise in educating
the public is necessary. (2) Public outreach and free events are necessary for the new Director. For example,
continued Free Fishing Weekends, Fish Stocking and Free Family Fishing, and Educational programs like the
Bonneville hatchery - a great place to learn about fish, feed large rainbow trout and view adult white sturgeon
measuring more than 10 feet long. (3) The Director needs to improve and implement more fish stocking strategies
and events.

588

Foster recruitment practices to reflect diversity (gender, racial, etc.) of constituency as a critical component of the
overall strategy to build consensus. Strengthen conservation practices by clarifying jurisdictional issues with
reiterative feedback from stakeholders.

589

-Work with the hunting and fishing community. -Hunter or fisherman

590

Long standing experience in the field

591

Having real experience as a hunter/angler is very important. A degree in "Resource management" is not

592

Needs to provide opportunities for sportsmen

593

Background in conservation of non-game species and critical habitat.

594

Not associated with the gill net fleet.

595

Appreciation and understanding of science and facts - and the strength to support science and facts, using them
in a proactive and progressive manner to help plan for a positive future of our fish and wildlife. Be guided by, and
lead by, scientific facts not politics.

596

Experience with and understanding of Oregon's unique environment and wildlife conditions is extremely
important.

597

visit and be familiar with all corners of the state. visit with groups such as OHA to be exposed to local needs and
concerns.

598

Responsibly deal with the disproportionate level of predatory animals that create a poor hunting environment.

599

Have an understanding of the cultural and scientific importance of hunting and fishing as positive things for
wildlife management and not always as a negative.

600

An avid hunter and fisherman who understands the challenges sportsman face in our state.

601

enough "common sense" to not create regulations that lead to waste of game, example ocean regulations that
lead to dead fish that must be tossed, fin clipped fish only in lakes with no natural spawn, invasive species
permits for ALL not just 10' plus.

30 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


602

Bravery to do the right thing: withdraw ODFW's application to give Oxbow Springs water to the City of Cascade
Locks (and then Nestle) based on two major concepts: from the conservation perspective, the fish should have
the spring water, not a possibly unstable source of well water, and from a public policy perspective, the springs
are a public good and should not be sold off to a (very anti-conservation) corporation like Nestle.

603

Needs to manage on science based fact not heart felt wants and also must take in recreational needs for all not
just single use entities ( i.e. Salmon and Trout over warm-water agency introduced species like Bass and Crappie
in certain areas and bodies of water.)

604

The ability to inform the public of the importance and the scientific basis for protecting fish and wildlife resources
in the face of public opposition.

605

Should have a love of wildlife so that they don't pay people to go out and kill "nuisance" wildlife. Should have a
political attitude that does not cater to big land owners, ranch owners and timber companies. Should take the
attitude that they are conserving the wild, not managing it as a resource for others to get rich on.

606

A fresh look at resource management issues in the 21st century. Get rid of the old mindset and bring in new
ecosystem based ideas. The ability to step out of the politics of keeping everyone happy and instead do the right
thing. The strength to get rid of employees who do not follow your lead and who are determined to stay in the old
mindset.

607

The next odfw director should be an avid outdoorsmen. They should have experience with the issues directly
related to hunters and fisherman/woman. The director should be the one person in the administration that is a
advocate for sportsman. We have many resource protectors in the state offices and the director should protect
resources from the sportsmens perspective.

608

A political Firearms owner Hunter fisherman

609

Not a career politician.

610

The agency is clearly on an unsustainable trajectory and with an average of 1 new ESA listing a year, is unable to
manage its resources according to its conservation mission. The next director must be a change agent with a
proven track record of creative revenue ideas and the ability to modernize a dying industry. The timber industry
and the ag industries have a few (very few) examples of these kinds of leaders, such as the founders and barons
of the FSC.

611

Develop youth programs in rural areas to keep the future hunters and anglers interested in fishing and hunting.

612

Ability to work with a Wildlife commision that is political!

613

Our next Director needs to have the drive to push other public land mangers like the USFS and BLM to create
more habitat for our big animals. Our Deer and elk numbers are way down for many reasons like Poaching,
Cougar and wolf predation and without strong numbers folks are going to say screw it, I'm not going hunting
cause there are no animals. It's not sour grapes, it's a fact! Without timber harvest our Blacktail numbers are
down, and the mule deer are being slaughtered by predation, poaching and vehicle on our highways. You
yourself have said 50% of the deer killed are done illegally and only a small % are killed by lawful hunters. Elk
numbers are way down around the state and in the cascades, too hunt elk with a bow??? Well, good luck!
Steelhead fishing on the Sandy sucks too, I live on the river, theres no fish and no fisherman either. Stop being
politicly correct and manage the states resources by science, get rid of the bio's who don't want to kill anything.
Hire bio's who understand why they are hired for. They work for us not you!

614

No

615

Our land and animals are needed for future generations. That being said someone taking this placement needs
to have a clear mind for the preservation of our forests and wildlife. Willing to stand when maybe no one will.

616

No

617

Serve the public as an employee.

618

Must, make it a priority to get control of radical groups that have impacted our hatchery programs and big game
heards. Must put the sportman and women ahead of all others when making policy.

619

Must support hunting and fishing as a major management tool. Must be aware of the impact hunter and fisher
dollars have on all forms of wildlife. Must be supportive of aging and young hunters and fishers and establish
programs to encourage each to continue hunting and fishing. Must resist all efforts to ban various hunting and
fishing activities. Be very active in restricting ATV use in the field.

620

Supporting hunting and fishing "as a heritage and cultural fact.

31 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


621

Be a strong person with a true concern for the folks living in different areas of the state and what exactly that
means. Not being swayed by the enviro groups so much but care more for the folks with a real stake in wildlife
management in their area.

622

Stand up against political and corporate infringements against sportsman's rights & land usage.

623

Understanding and focus on resource management to keep an ecosystem healthy, not just a focus on closing
access off to everything.

624

need to keep in mind of the typical outdoor sportsman..more oportunity

625

Been a guild.

626

Honesty, follow through, and doing what they say they will do.

627

The goal of enhancing game and fish population should be the foremost priority for the ODFW. Without healthy
numbers of game and fish, sportsmen will continue to drop out of the sport, causing reduced revenue for the
department.

628

Understanding the needs of the recreational fisherman, keeping in mind that they contribute more to the ODFW
than the commercial fees.

629

Long time hunter and fisher

630

Good communicator with legislators, fish and wildlife constituents and employees.

631

Start managing the game and not the revenue. It's horrible to see 3,000 hunters, hunt a heard of deer that
numbers no more than 1,000 in its entirety. My kids won't have anything left to hunt if this keeps up.

632

Appreciation of the need to educate the public on critical habitat issues.

633

The ability to listen to both side of interested parties and use real science, not emotions or money influences, to
come to a common sense decision.

634

A good candidate would have experience hunting, fishing and enjoying the outdoors.

635

Understand sustainable solutions.

636

Be a hunter and fisherman. Strong belief in the US wildlife conservation model where the sportsmen are the true
conservationists. Ability to rise above politics and political pressure. Courage and skill to deal with extreme
environmental groups. Objectivity in dealings with stakeholders. Clear understanding who funds the agency and
honesty in how the budget is generated and published.

637

Have common sense. Fair and consistent. Down to earth. Non political

638

Public access to our resources. Heart of a servant.

639

no

640

Be more into wildlife management than making money for ODFW.

641

Be able to listen to your customers, the people WHO hunt and fish!

642

They must hunt and fish.

643

Applicator should have several years of both hunting and fishing experience in Oregon or the Pacific NW.
Hunters and fish men actually understand the issues better than most and are the one actually paying for a lot of
the conservation efforts.

644

Not a hippie

645

Understand biology, specifically the science of ecology and evolution. Understand natural resource laws, policies,
and conservation. Have transparency with the public. Be a mover and a shaker. Bring skills necessary for
collaboration and get folks to work hard and to increase efficiency of services. I wish I had a government job; it's
regular, pays well, with great benefits. What I see, however, are folks who get good pay and benefits, but aren't
efficient or effective. Performance is important, make measurable goals, and timelines to complete them.

646

Not interested in a director with commercial fishing background. We need a director with a mindset that benefits
the sport fishermen.

647

Hunter and fisherman participant.

32 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


648

Na

649

Should be a hunter and fisherman.

650

The ability to run the policy on best logical practice, not the 'feelings' of the loudmouth left.

651

An understanding that humans are a part of the ecosystem. We are not an alien species.

652

Experience in managing fisheries and wildlife specific to sportsmen. Recognizing the financial impact the
resources have on local economy.

653

I would like to see someone who has lived in Oregon and experienced the declined in quality and population of
Fish and Game in our state, In addition the lack of improvement efforts provided by the ODFW.

654

Restructure ODFW as too much money is wasted on internal resources instead of investing in actual resource
that would help bring back the elk and deer population!! Do not bow down to political correctness and ensure the
hunters and fisherman ante benefitting as we are the ones spending out hard earned money. I am hoping this
survey is taken serious and not just another poor attempt to justify the ODFW failures!

655

Yes. Seriously care about what it takes to produce more game and less cougars and less worry about annual
pay raises and stop the ridiculous cost of licenses and fees. You have to hunt only out of recreation because it's
not economical to hunt anymore. The O.D.F.W has become way to greedy

656

The ability to separate facts from emotional and long standing prejudices between user groups. This is essential
when no actual "conservation benefits" are used as reasons to allocate resources. The experience and wisdom to
avoid being influenced (making decisions) based on political noise rather than scientific and common sense
knowledge.

657

Not to be anti hunting or fishing. That's where their paycheck comes from.

658

Needs to be willing and able to form a strong cooperative relationship with labor recognizing that employees who
are involved with the union are employees who care deeply about the agency and its mission.

659

BE A HUNTER WORK TO DELIST WOLVES AND SAVE THE GAME FOR HUNTERS

660

Sensitivity to the desires of non-consumptive users of wildlife.

661

The ability to set and manage policy objectives that is informed by a deep understanding of global climate change
and how the actions of ODFW can work to offset or slow the negative impacts of that change.

662

ability to adhere to mission statement- increase fishing hunting opportunities Be resolute- do not cave in to
special interest groups like NFS and their no hatchery policies do not give away our wetlands to groups like
Wetlands conservancy that do not allow trespassing on their property

663

Listen more to the people putting the money into the system. Hu nters anglers trappers.

664

Someone who knows Oregon politics -- Executive branch, Legislative branch, Judicial Branch -- state and
federal, Media, & Stakeholders (Landowners, natural resource managers, commercial fisheries, guides, hunters,
conservationists, general public)

665

BE fiscally responsible and have the fortitude the get an out of control beauacracy back in line.

666

Work well with and respect the contributions of volunteers.

667

The next Fish and Wildlife Director needs to be a person that likes to hunt and fish. The person also needs to
speak up about the issues the state faces when it comes to the horrible job ODFW has done with predator
management.

668

Someone who is educated in the use of and the destination of fish, due to gill nets, sein nets, and tangle tooth
nets. And not have the commercial industry in his back pocket

669

I think they need some type of experience in the field.

670

Making sure that there is a balance that is founded on not killing fish for profit but for need. Really need to cut out
the profiteers to bring back the runs of fish you promise.

671

Just don't be hesitatant or timid to address the problems Oregon has, primarily in Predator management.

33 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


672

#1 not following political persuasion or environmental crazies when making policies. You are losing hunter
because of restrictions and over pricing hunts. The government is out of control when it comes to spending ( I
worked for the Federal Government so I have seen it first hand.) The short fall that is being forecasted is just
stupid and sad management. You must make cuts and changes need to happen. Raise the cost to offset your
short fall and you will have hunts become poachers and you will lose more income because the poachers take
valuable animals and are not paying anything. Please listen to hunters they want health population and healthy
populations mean money for ODFW

673

"The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's approval to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle."

674

The Director must be open to all stakeholders - including the commercial fishing industry. Bringing together
recreational fisherman, guides, and gillnetters is key to an environmentally and economically sustainable fishing
industry. By choosing moderate, rational leaders from each stakeholder group to assist in crafting sensible,
balanced harvest strategies Oregon could become a leader in providing both world class recreational fishing and
exporting a top quality, healthy food source to the nation and world.

675

A strong belief that the health and integrity of the natural environment and its denizens is the highest priority for
ODF&W. And that the enjoyment of them is the second highest.

676

suport the people who fund ODFW aka sportsman

677

A very important characteristic is honesty. Another very important characteristic is a commitment to the earth and
the good of the people -- all of the people -- rather than any corporate interests that may wish to place
privatization and revenue generation above other objectives that would better serve both man and nature.

678

Stand up to the Radical Enviros. Gotta have thick skin.

679

Our fish and wildlife need to be managed for abundance and public access to them by hunters, fisherman, birders
etc. Hunting and fishing is conservation. Forest management is conservation. Scientific management by humans
is the answer, taking humans out of the equation is the problem. A quality Director will agree with me.

680

I would think that the director of ODFW would have to be someone with a proven love of the outdoors, specifically
hunting and fishing..........

681

Strong conservationist education.

682

ability to counter right-wing extreme wolf haters in Eastern Oregon

683

The Director need to be supportive on reversing the downward trent of big game populations in Oregon. The
director need to make decisions on ways that are science based in preventing any farther decline of wildlife. This
includes the management of all wildlife that includes predators. Needs to put the priority on wildlife numbers and
the money will follow.

684

I believe it is important to keep the ODFW focused on the needs and benefits of the citizens and ecosystems of
Oregon. In doing so, the new director will be able to reject corporate projects that will decrease the quality of life
for both, such as the proposed Nestle bottling plant.

685

ability to balance the requests of the special interest groups from the metro areas with the needs of the rural
communities and sportsmen/sportswomen.

686

The new Director needs the ability to foster a climate conducive to fair treatment of everybody, and not just
sportsmen. For instance, most of us are not commercial or recreational fishermen, yet those of us who value our
access to locally caught Columbia River salmon are relegated to a diminishing share of the resource. That's
simply not right. We need commercial fishermen to supply the fish we enjoy (and pay for) to the marketplace.
With the commercial gillnet fishery in the Columbia River main stem set to be eliminated, this threatens our source
of the best fish in the world. Governor Kitzhaber is completely mistaken in his antipathy towards the gillnet fishery.
It is time for the Oregon Fish & Wildlife Commission to correct this injustice.

687

The preservation and conservation of keystone species - bears, wolves, mtn. lions, raptors and salmon.

688

They should be long-time Oregon residents, live in Oregon, and be hunters themselves.

689

Nothing to add

690

The new director needs to be able to facilitate a transition to an agency that addresses a broader spectrum of
constituent values the needs of a broader range of species, and a stronger emphasis on habitat - especially those
at risk. This will require a new funding model, which cannot be accomplished without the trust and support of the
public and the legislature.

34 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


691

The new Director should not be a current employee of ODFW but someone outside the agency. The new Director
must also be a creative person looking to make decisions to take agency in new ways to meet conservation
criteria of agency.

692

Willing to stridently espouse common sense conservation principles that improve habitat quality and wildlife
abundance and resilience. Work for the betterment of natural resources, not for lobbyists or commonly illinformed legislators. Willingness to take risk and speak honestly and openly about what needs to happen to
improve wildlife abundance, resilience, and conservation.

693

The Director needs to develop a number of new policies on "hot button" issues, thus needs to ... A. Understand
the "pro" and "con" of fish hatcheries, have an objectively and rationally determined policy on future hatchery use
in Oregon, and be able to articulate and defend that policy. [My personal vision is that Oregon will reduce
hatchery output by a set amount every year until there are no more hatchery fish released in any river or stream-only in lakes with no inlet or outlet.] B. As in "A" for endangered and re-introduced wildlife (wolves, spotted owls,
various salmon and steelhead runs, etc.) C. As in "A" for non-native fish and animal species (black bass, etc.) D.
Education and programs for non-hunters and non-anglers to encourage hunting and fishing. E. Use "Best
Practices" from other states and other countries! F. Other issues, such as habitat improvement.

694

I want someone who has the best interest of the Fish first off, the commercial fisherman and the recreational
fisherman. The best interest would also fit into the hunting and wildlife area. Use common sense and do what is
best environmentally for our fishing to be as strong as ever in this state.

695

2.1 A scientific background, preferably a degree or multiple degrees in fish, wildlife and/or other resource or
public administration management; 2.2 Experience dealing with local, state and federal elected officials; 2.3
Experience dealing with local, state and federal agencies; 2.4 Demonstrated leadership abilities building internal
and external management teams to address specific scientific, administrative, economic and political problems.

696

Ability to make tough decisions.

697

be a lifelong sportsman who has hunted PUBLIC land

698

Needs to listen to the public. There are a lot of funds that come from hunters and anglers. These are the people
who are in the field everyday and see what is working and not working.

699

Yes - the new Director needs to realized, foremost, without the continued interest of current and future
generations of hunters and fishermen, there will be no need, whatsoever, for a DOFW

700

excellent leadership skills experienced leader of similar sized organization

701

Habitat protection should be a priority

702

a true fisherman and hunter .

703

Ability to precipitate change while keeping staff and constituents positively involved

704

We need someone that realizes that we are overwhelmed with predators now in our
stat(cougars,coyotes,bears,etc. I realize that these are a very important issue for people on the East side of the
Cascades and should not be dictated by people in large areas.

705

Some one that is unbiased in his or her decisions.

706

Quit listening to liberals using junk science to try and influence policy. Find a way to actually bring down the cost
of licences and tags. We sure don't get any bang for our buck with you people.

707

Must be committed and have shown the desire to guide Oregon's Fish and Wildlife to future sustainability.

708

work with hunters and anglers to bring back ,the good old days. where our voices and concerns carried some
weight

709

Consider the non fishing public and how they get to access the resource

710

I feel it is of the utmost importance that the next director and his staff be aware of individual rivers and estuaries
along our coast where there have been ongoing problems with inconsistent regs and long overdue change
needed in policies regarding the use of motorized boats/jet sleds in fish migration and spawning areas. The
Nehalem River is a prime example! No motorized boats of ANY KIND above the Miami-Foley River bridge at
Foss Road. This is something that would go a LONG WAY, and similar actions too, in the public gaining
confidence in its DFW leadership. I am hoping that we will have a director who can take immediate action on
some of these problems to help protect our upriver fish.

35 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


711

Common sense, as the regs now are so confusing and hard to follow very few folks can wade their way thru
understanding all the limitations and the new director should be able to able to write and approve directives that
can easily be understood by the populace.

712

Manage with the people of Oregon in mind.

713

Willingness to advocate for OREGON wildlife, with a focus on long-term habitat improvement and robust species
health.

714

Willingness to learn for others.

715

I deep love for Oregon

716

ODF director should be familiar with Oregon timber industry and the interplay between timber practices and
water quality (and fish).

717

Someone who will honestly listen to, and consider, the public's opinion.

718

A candidate who won't bow to political pressure from people who know nothing about hunting, fishing, or wildlife.

719

Should be a hunter and angler, to properly represent the constituents served.

720

No

721

S/he needs to be an ACTIVE fisherman/woman and hunter.

722

Manage te resources hopefully with out adding additional fees for hunt/fishing in specific areas with out
addressing what those fees are going to pay for. IE Columbia Basin fishing licesne surcharge.

723

how about a person from Oregon. One that really fishes and hunts,and communicates to the sportsman out here
why the dept. is changing the rules, charging more money, making the the rules so complicated.

724

To be able to look at the way other states manage there game animals and possibly look at other directions this
state can take to increase the numbers of wild game,

725

Needs to be an active hunter or fisherman/fisherlady

726

Should be a hunter, fisherman or have first hand knowledge of these hobbies.

727

Strong political awareness and the ability to find balance amongst resource activities in the state while minimizing
the power and voice of the extremes on either side of an issue. Must have the ability to make a decision
considering all facts and considering all of the 7 co-equal goals of the department under 496.012

728

The appointee needs to understand just how FED UP Oregon's sportsmen are with the complete lack of common
sense on the part of ODFW management. EXAMPLE: why in God's name would you keep having cow elk tags
issued in a unit simply to lower the cow population to meet the bull/cow ration??? Oregon's sportsmen PAY
TAXES and we are fed up with the game seasons being managed to do nothing but produce REVENUE to keep a
group of people employed who do absolutely nothing to conserve big game resources which are at an all time
low. Sound like a rant? It is.

729

I think a commitment to stewardship of wildlife, and protecting endangered and threatened species is important. It
is also clear that the management of hatcheries should likely change, decreasing the reliance on that system of
making up for the impact of dams.

730

Honesty and an ability to combat the status quo.

731

They MUST find a way to enhance Hatchery fish for anglers to harvest. There also is a need to blend Wild fish
protections to enable these populations to grow. If these issues are made the TOP priority, angling license sales
will continue to decline. Anglers will NOT continue to purchase licenses unless there are Hatchery fish to harvest. I
want my children and grandchildren to be able enjoy the wonderful fisheries that I have loved my entire 62 years
of my life as a Native Oregonian!

732

This directory should be an accomplished and passionate angler and/or hunter

733

no

734

Know how important sport fishing is to the state of oregon

735

A background in natural resources is a must ! The director needs to have a fundamental knowledge of the
biological world, being a good administrator is not enough.

736

Must hunt and fish

36 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


737

Don't sleep our water to corporations to sell back to us .

738

Put people and conservation first. Withdraw the application to allow Nestle to bottle our water.

739

Be independent, and stop following Colo. in every game decision that comes to light.

740

They must posess and have demonstrated the PERSONAL COURAGE to promote sound science based
management techniques and to support their staff in these efforts in the face of increased pressures to manage
wildlife based on non-scientific assumptions and emotion based desires of an increasingly urbanized citezenry
that doesn't understand fundamental basic biology.

741

Strength to do what is right for the resource and not the demands of the politicians. Manage based on science not
politics or money.

742

Find ways to make hunts more successful. Why are deer dying of epizootic diseases? Our hunting seasons are
not correct to manage overcrowding of deer populations.

743

A director that views natural spaces/areas within a framework that preserves these spaces rather then viewing
them as economic commodities.

744

Creative in ways to better finance the organization that are not inherently a conflict of interest.

745

Understanding the relationship of our ecosystem and supporting habitat for the health is our forests

746

Is not swayed by pseudo science touted by misguided environmental groups. Needs to use science to improve
our resources not things that make "sense".

747

Thinking outside the political box

748

Understand, support and appreciate the role of hunting and fishing and the North American Model of Wildlife
Conservation.

749

The ability to make us understand how the points system works and keep employees from manipulating it for
their own gain

750

I would like to see that person be an avid hunter and fisherman.

751

The need to be willing to implement strong predator management to help keep our big game populations strong.

752

Something other than a politician. Someone committed to the ODFW and the public.

753

Needs to be able to balance commercial and sport interests. Currently there appears to be a slant towards
commercial harvest even though it yields a lower economic impact than sport harvest.

754

no comment

755

An eye towards the future with unknown potential for climate change and water scarcity and how that might affect
fish and wildlife. Working knowledge of restoration strategies to protect and restore intact ecosystems.

756

be funny!

757

An ability to put issues into a realistic perspective without allowing political viewpoints, pressures from both the
Fed and State, and outside interest groups to override the best approach to the problem. Keep the public
informed without seeming to favor one special interest group. I have lived my life, 67 years, in Oregon. I two
occasions I remember rules being made that I felt were influence far more by interest groups than good Biology.
Of course, both of the above are extremely hard to do well; but I like to see them considered.

758

Must protect natural resources against corporate profiteering.

759

They must be an active hunter and angler to appreciate the lack of natural resource to the sportsman/women.

760

do not raise the price of tags and license.

761

Understand that the people buying hunting and fishing licenses are the citizens who's voice and concerns should
be listened to.

762

Ethics and a belief that Fish & Wildlife is about taking care of fish and wildlife first and foremost, business and
commerce are very important, but protecting species as natural resources is critical.

763

Needs to actually be a hunter & fisher

764

Get back to managing our big game and forests with science based management that had populations growing.

37 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


765

Should be a hunter / angler themselves

766

Keep private polluting companies out of natural public resources to safegaurd our legacy for future generations.

767

intimate knowledge of Native American Treaty Rights and respect of them.

768

Be born and raised in oregon

769

Independent of corporate interests, highest priority to preserve and protect our public lands, not use them as
revenue generators.

770

Have a complete understanding of the North American Conservation Model and the role Hunting and Fishing
plays in it.

771

The ability to take the long view of resource protection and management and not cave in to immediate and often
political pressure.

772

An eye to the "long term" and experience with how to rebuild wildlife populations that have been in decline

773

Must hunt and fish and just not be a manager.

774

People (citizens &communities) first, corporations last

775

The ability to seek assistance from subordinates that my know more about a subject than he/she does.

776

Focused on conservation of our watersheds and environments, which means putting nature above commerce!
Money will come and go, but we only have so much water. So many trees.

777

New Director needs the be approachable like his last two predecessors.

778

The new director needs charisma when it comes to expressing topics to the public but, he/she needs to keep
outdoors-men in mind in these issues.

779

Cares about conserving the entire range of Oregon's historic biodiversity including top predators throughout their
historic range.

780

It would seem to be a benefit if the new director was, in fact, a Hunter and Fisherman ( or woman ) so that the
problems that we have in Oregon; loss of huntable game numbers, reduced hunter interest because of lack of
game, access and raising cost of license and tag fees to even get ready to go hunting are readily obvious to
them.

781

A person who values the input of hunters and will listen to their suggestions and stories.

782

Ability and willingness to stand up to economic and political pressure, and make science based decisions
regarding natural resource management.

783

He needs to realize the importance of families being able to hunt to gather even if they live in another state. The
future of hunting in this state is keeping families hunting and that means the younger generation.

784

The new Director and his/her staff must do a much better job than the current administration in reaching out and
maintaining a rapport and working relationship with cooperating agencies like USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services.
The new Director must have the courage to run the department based on science not politically correct decisions.
Easier said than done because of the agenda of several special interest groups who always play the lawsuit trump
card when collaborator process and negotiations don't go their way. This may mean the Director's tenure
may be short, but it would restore the sportsmen's faith in the Department.

785

As a hunter in the forests, I would like to see better communication between us hunters and why it seems the the
fees keep rising and the deer and elk population seems to be declining. Many of what I hear is that the Cougars
are taking most of our wildlife and the fact that we don't have the ability to hunt Cougars with dogs is the reason.
Not knowing the facts, I would like to see better communication to understand what is the real reasons, instead of
listening to hearsay...

786

know how to manage the reores and witpe ot preditors

787

The new director Should have had both a hunting or fishing license for the past 10 years. Any hunter or fisherman
will truly do what is best for the fish or wildlife.

788

The next director must understand the needs of all sportsman throughout the state. There are many issues that
we are facing including issues with wolves to fee increases for licences and tags. The director must be able to
work with sportsman on all issues.

38 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


789

predator management must be a top priority! keep hunting and fishing affordable to the public.

790

Being willing to LISTEN to the people that DO hunt and fish in this state.

791

Ensure return of all native animals and plants and the removal of all non-native plants and animals. Flagrant
example: Smallmouth Bass in the Umpqua System. At present there is a catch limit of 15/day. It should be
unlimited, They are killing smolts and lamprey ammocetes.

792

True science based wildlife management. Not the protection of one species at the loss to all the others.

793

We need a director we can better set sport fishing seasons. This mess every spring of short seasons then
meetings every week with multiple reopeners of the river is absurd. We have to check the regs daily to know if
we can fish. We also need a director that doesn't let he entire river get fished out by these gill netters we in the St.
Helens area barely get a chance with the amount of days given to the netters it takes days for it too recover after
they net.

794

A focus on the future, including an understanding of how conservation of our wild and forested lands can help to
mitigate climate change.

795

The list was satisfactory.

796

The ability to run the agency more like a business and start saving now for the more than likely lean times ahead.
Making decisions to gain and retain license holders by providing the ability to pursue more fishing and hunting
opportunities.

797

More important than any of the questions asked on the previous page of this survey is that the new director must
be willing to participate in active predator management, keep hunting affordable, and take several other steps
needed to turn around hunting in Oregon. The new director must realize that he/she is running a business and
the customers are the hunters and fisherman who pay the bills by buying ODFW's product, which is a license to
hunt a sustainable high quality resource that's expertly managed to produce consistently good results for the
customer. Until you do that, you will fail, because hunters will stop buying hunting licenses due to your poor track
record of managing the resource.

798

Get back to using science and wildlife management techniques instead of politics to make decisions. Needs to be
able to focus on wildlife as well as fish (Salmon aren't the only thing in trouble in Oregon)

799

No history of being a member of any anti hunting anti trapping groups etc.

800

Use proven scientific data. No I feel or I think approach to problem solving. Solve issues and problems in reverse
order. Start with where you would like to be and develop the resolution by work backwards to the point of where
you are.

801

The ability and resolve to stand up and admit a mistake, but do so with a potential solution in mind.

802

Have experience as a hunter and fisherman in the field. Needs to be a very good listener. One that understands
what people are saying.

803

Commonsense when it comes to actual management of our big game and fishery, not necessarily college
educated idiot and/or book smart, but actual first hand experience. Not creating seasons and tags that wipe out a
population in a particular area, aka doe and cow hunts.

804

Strong conservation and environmental advocacy background

805

Ability to work successfully with legislators on budget and legislative issues. Ability to tell constituents "no" (in a
polite way) when needed. Give our Commission the tools to focus on the needs of our F&W resources and the
majority of our constituents, not the vocal minorities.

806

Be in tune with the hunters.

807

Ability to reach unrepresented non traditional, non consumptive resource users such that they feel the agency
works in their interest as well as traditional hunter and fishers.

808

due the job of managing the fish and wildlife of the state.

809

Equal focus on needs of non-game fish & wildlife.

810

New director should be an experienced angler angler and hunter.

811

Understand real science over following science that is not proven.

39 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


812

Ensuring staff has agency backing to make best decisions for fish/wildlife, regardless of political pressure from
legislators, Governor's office, other agencies (i.e. WRD).

813

Overall field experience, not just another book learned bureaucrat...someone who understands wildlife,
management & natural resources and how to best conserve these resources while still making them useful to the
people of Oregon. Someone who's highest interest is in that of the wildlife & citizens of Oregon, not in making
things look good on paper to the greedy government. ODFW listens too much to the tree huggin' city folks than to
the common sense land owner. Perhaps educating those in urban areas what other Oregonians are having to
deal with would be a more common sense policy.

814

Be understanding and compassionate to the interests of hunters and fishermen.

815

Must be actively involved in outdoor pursuits, a hunter, a fisherman, an avid outdoorsman. Must have a wildlife
science background.

816

Ability to work effectively with commission and State of Oregon to find stable funding for the agency to fulfill it's
mission, now and in the future.

817

The ability to negotiate with different agencies to obtain the necessary additional capital to meet the conservation
goals of the organization.

818

The new director should have fun, know how to engage and excite the public and their employees.

819

Will need a high EQ.

820

The ability to understand we (Oregonians) have no desire to continue down the path of his predecessors in that
the rules and regulations can be clear and concise and one does not need to be a Jurist Doctorate. The ability to
understand that Oregonians do not need to be repeatedly told what weapons they can possess while hunting and
get rid of the convoluted droning on dogma in the synopsis.

821

Ability to recognize long term consequences and benefits of policy on societyl and environment.

822

The director should be a fellow hunter/fisherman themselves. I don't trust a non-hunter to direct the management
of hunting.

823

The person needs to not over look that fact that predators have a huge impact on deer and elk and Antelope
populations. They need to understand that with out hunters there will not be a ODFW. they need to rethink tag
prices so that more people will be involved in hunting and fishing. The state has made it to where its not
economically feasible to have the family all go hunting. and they need to learn from farmers that you can not kill
off all of your brood stock and raise a new crop of animals. I think they need to look at changing the bag limit to a
three point or better on mule deer and black tail deer as well. I really think they need to go back to step one and
start over.

824

Oregon is so beautiful and we are so fortunate that the people if this state have invested in parks, public spaces,
protecting our wildlife and keeping our water accessible by all. Please share that vision for the future. No private
water or wild spaces.

825

Experienced hunter and fisherman, not just a desk jockey. Someone who has actually been in the outdoors
environment.

826

Many people are limited to areas near urban centers for experiencing and appreciating fish and wildlife. I would
like to see a director that values, supports, and commits resource to department resource biologists that provide
guidance to urban parks departments, park districts, and cities and counties. This allows for invaluable
knowledge to enhance and promote healthy fish and wildlife habitat where most people live and work. It also
provides expertise in planning construction projects that have less impact to wildlife.

827

A demonstrated commitment to citizen inclusion in decisions, even when it's difficult.

828

Ability to set long term goals for healthy ecosystems.

829

Commitment to preserving the wilds of the Pac NW and honestly working with local environmental groups

830

I want a leader who is willing to stand up against powerful corporate interests like Nestle. We know the Governor
is no longer pushing for a Nestle water bottling plant in the Gorge and the new ODFW director should not be
afraid to pull out of a water exchange process that is clearly a bad choice for Oregon's fish and wildlife and
communities. Tens of thousands of Oregonians have spoken out against the Nestle water bottling proposal that
ODFW is involved and we want to see ODFW make the right choice by stopping the water exchange that would
give away public water for Nestle's profit.

40 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


831

Experience and vision as to how the various pieces of the agency are connected and can work together. We need
more cohesiveness as an organization - very silo'd today. Many shadow IT departments doing their own thing
and this has been allowed and perhaps encouraged. Need to bring ALL parts of the agency together to sing off
the same sheet of music.

832

The most important to me is to recognize the status quo is unsustainable in the way we manage our industrial
forests and the damage to the ecosystems that results. Clear-cutting headwaters of salmon-bearing streams is
not only damaging to fish populations but also impacting human populations due to degradation of water quality
and supply. This type of activity also is counterintuitive if ecotourism is a goal. Peopl do not pay top dollar to
come look at bare hillslides.

833

A strong understanding of the role public land plays in the management of wildlife, and a committed interest in
protecting those lands for public rather than commercial use.

834

Strength of character in maintaining a commitment to sound science-based management

835

The Director should do what's best for the majority of Oregonians, not just the loudest person in the room.

836

Must be an avid hunter or fisherman!

837

1) understanding of the historical basis of fisheries in the NW 2) willingness to think out side the box and
implement changes that do not follow the status quo

838

Understanding and having the ability to work together with tribal interests and governments

839

It is essential that the new director honor the interests of the public and ensure that our resources do not fall into
the hands of private interests.

840

Strong concern and focus on non-game wildlife, especially for species of concern.

841

Open minded, willing to represent the needs of all Oregonians over the needs of corporations. Maintaining
oregons

842

Must reconcile the strategic differences between the fisheries and wildlife divisions. A holistic approach to
management is requierd.

843

Thick skin.

844

A people person, not a politician. One that has come up from the ranks not a appointment from the Governor or
the politicians.

845

Yes. This individual needs to be a stanch advocate for the resources they are tasked with preserving . . . wildlife,
fish, and habitat. This individual DOES NOT need to be an advocate for the status quo or political favor-making.

846

A background and strong interest in recreational, non-consumptive wildlife experiences.

847

Proven ability to resist entrenched interests and implement change

848

Needs to be a HUNTER. Undertsanding our concerns in declining deer and elk and increased predators

849

The Director needs to make sure the HR department values the experience of EBA's and employees doing the
bulk of the field work. EBA's are given very little credit for what they do. Its very hard to move up within the
agency. It seems like ODFW doesn't value your experience until you leave the agency and get experience
elsewhere.

850

Be active in fishing and hunting

851

Be more visible/proactive and involved rather than a figure head. Be inclusive rather than invisible or dictatorial.

852

More focus on the future of hunting and less focus on the now. Too much opportunity now does not always make
for a better future.

853

Experience working in conservation organizations.

854

Not afraid to use litigation as a tool to acheive conservation goals.

855

Integrity Honesty Ability to work with an appointed, sometimes weak or ineffective citizens governing board
Energy Not cynical to current state of affairs

856

Actively promote professional development of newer, younger biologists Signed, Older, jaded biologist

857

A vision of where management is going

41 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


858

Would like experience with Oregon's unique issues.

859

Fish and wild life is a huge arena and it is impossible to find someone knowledgeable in all. Must be open minded
to work with staff in all areas, deal with political pressure and still protect the resource.

860

avid hunter and fisher. someone who doesn't have a business that benefits from policy, like the current one does.

861

Be a hunter/fisherman of a non commercial application.

862

A person with Integrity. Someone who will stand behind what they say & do. Someone who will take
accountability and ownership of their decisions even if their choice is wrong or makes them look bad. Someone
who has lived in Oregon for at least ten years, who has experience "in" Oregon. not just someone who has
formal education and a bunch of text book knowledge. Someone who does not have major stake holdings or
financial interests in Oregon industries such as timber/forestry or farming/agriculture.

863

being very open to new ideas that could potentially help the wildlife management in a 5 to 10 year span.

864

Focus on improving game numbers and quality, not focused on allowing everybody to hunt. Follow scientific data
not unsubstantiated opinions or gut feelings.

865

Not a puppet of special interests Must believe in climate change as a serious, human-made threat to human and
natural communities Must insist on integrating programs and priorities across state agencies (i.e. Healthy
Environments Vision)

866

Knowledgeable of the entire states wildlife and fish problems

867

Someone who will make big game management a high priority. Someone who believes one of the main missions
of the ODFW is to provide quality hunting experiences for Oregon tag holders and not to sell as many tags as
possible.

868

869

They must must understand what needs to be done for predator management and habitat improvements. If things
keep heading in the direction they are Odfw is in trouble.

870

Protection of resources should come first, not license sales..... some one who can see that predators need to be
controlled from sea lions to cougars.

871

Getting a larger share of the pie in terms of the monies allocated to ODFW.

872

The director must have a strong scientific background in wildlife conservation and management. They must not
come into the position with bias for or against existing policy, but with flexibility to use science as it evolves to
help develop best management practices for recovering listed species and preventing the listing of others.

873

Should be an outdoorsman with no personal bias toward non- hunting/fishing policies.

874

Understand the current and future political climates that can and will affect the agency and the constituents that is
serves. This new director needs to have the ability to orchestrate the different factions, special interest, and
political hot buttons that are tearing our fish and wildlife department to shreds and alienating the sportsmen of the
state. The new director also needs to have the foresight to encourage growth within the ranks of sportsman and
balance the management objectives with out looking out for every special interest.

875

Experience in handling a very strong anti hunting rights groups. And preditor management.

876

Resourceful in identifying and acquiring individuals, organizations and departments to contribute time, funding or
other support of ODFW's mission.

877

878

Integrity, Friendliness, Competence

879

An ability to look at future trends and innovate the agency's current model to focus on where they're going (less
hunting, more conservation/wildlife as a viewing resource). Someone who understands the need for better
implementation of science based research and better data collection/standards.

880

Priority placed on protecting the resources rather than on protecting the agency.

881

Neutrality on fishing issues involving Sport Vs. Commercial

42 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


882

The new director can not come from within ODFW. We have spent too many years with the good old boy club
"running" ODFW. We need new ideas on funding, people management and the direction of the agency. If
someone is hired from within, they have already been brainwashed to keep following the same path we are on.
The new director needs to be more in tune with his employees and what is going on out in the field rather than
just making appearances for appearances sake. He/ She needs to not only focus on high priority, news worthy
subjects, but every day issues going on with the agency. The new director needs to be willing to take an active
role in healing the damage done between management and non-management. They will need to take a close look
at the abuse that employees are subjected to by HR and management. ODFW is loosing good employees and
those unable to quit/ retire are loosing their drive to keep doing more for less and less.

883

Passion for the protection of wildlife and habitat.

884

Find a Biologist who knows what they are talking about! Who wont be swayed by the money from nonsportsmans! Someone who knows the difference between whats good for Oregon and not money! Someone who
wont bend over whenever the "stake holders" shake their wallets and why are there stake holders for natural
resources in the first place?!

885

Needs to be able to convene partners and supporters to address ongoing budget issues. Must be able to address
policy formation/refinement around issues like wolves, climate change, etc.

886

Common sense and good judgment.

887

A valid scientific background. If the Director consumes wildlife (sport, trophy, thrill, food, etc.), then he/she must
have the utmost integrity and ability to separate his/her wildlife consumptive activities and/or desires in making
decisions regarding conservation. There can be no perception of a "Conflict of Interest," or a subtle "leaning" in
decision making to favor consumptive activities.

888

understand and appreciate that not all constituents and potential supporters are extractive users. Be an advocate
for wildlife first, budget second. Ability to be creative in visioning new sources of revenue Coach long time
employees to move out of a put and take mentality and embrace conservation, cultivate an organization wide
appreciation for all wildlife, not just those with current revenue associated with their take. Recognize the impact
sportsfisherman have on the economy, not just the data presented by commercial interests

889

An understanding of the impacts of climate change on Oregon's natural resources, including wildlife populations.

890

ODFW has become too narrowly focused on facilitating hunting and fishing activities, and too averse to taking
tough stands even when they are unpopular with logging, livestock, hydro-power, etc... interests. I say this as a
devout salmon angler who spends thousands of hours each year on the water. The agency has moved too far
away from its actual statutory mission of protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife, and their habitats. As a result, the
agency has lost ground in terms of public trust and support, and has become too invested in a funding model
(hunting and fishing license sales) that is literally dying out. ODFW's next leader needs to have the skills and
backbone to shepherd the agency through a re-organization and re-visioning, to take it back to its statutory
mission, and to build trust with diverse stakeholders in order to get the support the agency needs to secure new
sources of revenue. That isn't to say walk away from their role as the agency charged with managing and
protecting Oregon's fish and game resources, but that should not be the agency's main focus any longer.

891

Courage to admit that current mule deer management is not working to achieve management objectives in many
units. Willingness to explore/adopt restructuring deer/elk seasons and non-resident quotas to improve recruitment
within herds and cash flow.

892

Someone who is experienced in the public and private sector and who may bring a fresh perspective to the
agency.

893

A fresh attitude that will allow us to work cooperatively with, and use the scientific advances of, other states, the
tribes, and federal agencies- especially the U.S. Fish and Wildlife. Current attitudes reject any science that
doesn't fit the "philosophy" of some of our top fishery personnel.

894

Ability to represent the needs of the constituency not represented by special interests or ESA mandates. (All to
often the voices of Special Interest groups drowns out the voices of the majority of the fishing community.)

895

Calmness; a fast decision is different from a good decision. Also a deep respect for the professionals he/she
manages, and the natural resources of Oregon. The new director should be savvy enough to rely somewhat on
the experience and knowledge of his staff, and not be afraid to seek their opinions out. A sense of humor will be
absolutely necessary to survive in this position.

43 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


896

Someone who can build/increase ODFW employee morale during a time when there is much distrust in
government and its employees. ODFW faces a "perfect storm" scenario with deer and elk populations and hunter
numbers in decline, wolves, bears and cougar numbers on the rise, and fee increases on the horizon. It's not a
good time to be a gov't employee. There is a sense of public disillusionment with ODFW's ability to manage and
maintain robust numbers of game populations we all enjoy hunting. Combine that with employee benefits
declining (PERS revisions, health insurance, etc.) and it results in employees feeling like they're getting beat up.
Building morale is important. Something that would do this without adding cost is allowing field staff to take a dog
in the field with them. Simple yet, it can increase employee morale.

897

An open mind as to solutions to current and future problems.

898

In the entirety of the ODFW's history there has never, to my knowledge, been a woman director (acting, interim,
or permanent). It's time that changed.

899

We need predator control. Promote hunting with dogs for Cougars ans bears. The deer and rlk populations are
declining in huge part to too many predators. Delisting and managing the gray wolf which should be treated as the
invasive species that it is by eliminating it.

900

Commited to providing the best hunting opportunities for Oregon hunters and state control of resources.

901

Make sure the information in the regulations is clear and precise....too much is confusing.

902

To be non bias to any user group and to understand that Fish & Wildlife of Oregon are owned by the people and
not by companies or persons who make profit from it.

903

Mindful of financial impacts on the department from license dollars and expanding the revenue base with that in
mind.

904

Select director should not currently be in a top leadership position in ODFW. The current ODFW leadership has
been managing our fish and wildlife populations and harvest opportunities with political science priorities and not
natural science priorities.

905

More fish and game, less wolves! More enforcement for the Upper Rogue

906

Honesty is number one!

907

More hatchary fish and hatchary's

908

Must be a hunter and fisherman willing to see the need to fill the fish and game ranks with the same. So there isn't
a conflict of interest with the needs of predator control.

909

The knowledge to bring Oregon's big game populations up to state management objectives and to make Oregon
hunting comparable to other states in the west with similar species and ecosystems.

910

start doing some predator management people don't want to buy a hunting and fishing licence anymore because
the deer and elk herd numbers are so low

911

Track record of full independence in prior work history from any agricultural, hunting or timber interests.

912

They should have an understanding and appreciation of the financial resources and economic benefits that the
commercial fishing and seafood processing industries bring to the state of Oregon and its rural coastal
communities.

913

the person that takes over as the director of fish and wildlife in Oregon should be an avid hunter and fisher.

914

Conservation is the wise use of resources. Within the context of the agency, this use should include use for the
greatest benefit for the people of this state, balancing social and economic values. The successful candidate
should express these values and have them demonstrated in past performance.

915

Having a sense of humor. Also, being from outside of Oregon.

916

Hunter fishermen/woman...

917

To show respect and appreciation for ODFW employees.

918

Work with timber companys to gain public access to more areas.

919

The drive to increase our wildlife populations (mostly game populations) from their present low levels. This would
require more boldness and strong leadership from the director in regards to habitat restoration, predation, and
alternative concepts to maintaining healthy game populations.

44 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


920

Building on the idea of visionary leadership, the director should have experience or, at minimum, a vision for
transitioning ODFW away from the traditional "hook and bullet" North America model of fish and wildlife
management and into a broader vision of conservation. License and tag sales support some of ODFW
operations, but fall well short of supporting the increasing needs of a conservation program serving a wider array
of species, stakeholders, and user groups in Oregon. Wine tastings and general fund increase will only go so far
in addressing this need.

921

Follow the science. Be willing to except the removal of some programs that are not finically viable to benefit fish
and wildlife and budget concerns. Such as a comprehensive review of closing hatcheries where cost out weighs
the benefits both finically and for fish and wildlife.

922

Director needs to have background and experience in Management, Harvest and Conservation of resources.
Most if not all management practices were brought about and paid by harvestors of the resource. A Director
without background in harvest will not and can not appreciate that aspect of the agency. The new director MUST
find a method for non-harvestors to fund the conservation measures that this sector insists that the agency
undertake.

923

The director of Fish and Wildlife should be an Oregon resident of long standing, who personally hunts, fishes, and
recreates in the outdoors in Oregon. A strong background in science and biology would also be good.

924

Emphasis on conservation of Oregon's native fish and wildlife and the habitat they depend on. It is past time to
move away from the agency's over- emphasis on mgmt for hunting/fishing. Ability/willingness to empower the
agency and its employees to protect Oregon's native fish and wildlife and their habitats in permitting and planning
processes (for example, in processes before other state and federal agencies). Ability/willingness to meaningfully
incorporate climate change adaptation into mgmt of Oregon's native fish and wildlife and their habitats.

925

Practical on-the-ground experience and not only experience in office administration.

926

Whomever is chosen must be a sportsman first and put Hunters and fishermen first

927

Knowledge and experience in both Terrestrial and Fisheries management issues. Be without bias in experience
and knowledge toward terrestrial versus fisheries issues. Have an appreciation of conservation and nongame
wildlife issues and the concepts of ecosystem connectivity and health I would hope the new Director would be
fearless in replacing weak staffing links in the upper echelons of the present management team. Communication
and information flow with the agency between the Director's office - Division -Region -Field is paramount to a
progressive organization.

928

Experience in developing and advocating for natural resource use experiences beyond hunting and angling. The
vision to develop and promote a non-traditional funding scheme for the agency. A demonstrated ability to
develop, support, and practice proactive management actions.

929

As an agency that relies almost exclusively on funds generated from license and tag sales, I believe the next
director should have a strong background in hunting and fishing (preferably this person would be a hunter/fisher
themselves). Also, the next director should clearly understand the importance of hunting and fishing in
conservation efforts. Finally, I believe the next director should make extensive efforts to increase recruitment of
hunters.

930

Have first hand positive experience in the field. Hunting, fishing, trapping, conservation, farming, working with
Animals.

931

Look out for the residents not the timber companies. Spraying in the headwaters of a salmon bearing stream will
KILL the fish in the lower fish bearing stream and soon enough all the stream will be without FISH.

932

the ability to hear and understand the concerns of constituents, but also the strength (and support) to not bend to
political pressures or the minority sqeaky wheels if their desired outcome is not the best for the state overall.

933

The new director needs to have a common sense, science based approach to managing Oregons Fish & Wildlife.
The director should be a TRUE hunter and fisherman. They need to understand what they are managing from the
users viewpoint.

934

Have a keen sense of the political environment which they work and have the ability to confer with the governor's
office and legislature when appropriate.

935

no

936

have some business sense, hire SMART people in ODFW Administration who know what they're doing, hire from
private sector if need be. Be approachable by all employees, don't play favorites. Try to bridge the gap between
management and classified, and field and headquarters employees.

45 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


937

The next Department of Fish & Wildlife Director needs to NOT have some qualities the former Director
possessed. These include: 1) Knee-jerk directives to Wildlife Areas based on personal needs or belief. This
practice was very demoralizing and well known throughout the agency. 2) Directing Wildlife Division to make
hunting regulation changes or charge into studies to appease whiny constituent groups. Staff received the final
printed regulations and had to go thru them word by word to become aware of these changes. Many changes
compromised this State's natural resources and were not well received by the public. The SAK model and Blacktailed Deer Implementation project were and continue to be a major failure for ODFW. These projects were in
response the constituents demanding a deer population estimate. The majority of wildlife biologists putting
together the black-tailed deer management plan knew the SAK model would fail and voiced that opinion before
we embarked on that mission. The BTD Implementation project is wasting a tremendous amount of money and
staff time in a very poorly designed and rushed effort to make up for our failure with the SAK model. This agency
can ill afford to keep rushing into projects. That produces failures. The new Director needs to grant Wildlife
Division the time to plan successful projects. ODFW's wildlife staff is very demoralized and disillusioned with
these efforts. I sincerely hope the new Director is not so reactive, rushed, and possess some knowledge of
science in order to avoid chalking up more losses for the agency. Your field staff is tired of appearing incompetent
to our constituents.

938

Experience fostering an environment of open communication within the agency. Experience directing leadership
to rely on, communicate with, respect, and include field staff in wildlife policy development.

939

Strong skills in budget development and experience lobbying.

940

Ability to work with the Legislators but not let politics control his or her thinking. Ability to work with volunteers!

941

learn that there is more to the state of Oregon than the columbia and the Portland meto area

942

Management of F&W resources is the number 1 priority. It is becoming increasingly difficult to gain access to
public lands during hunting season. Timber Companies are locking the gates and denying access to the public,
yet they pay no property taxes. Either they pay like everyone else or they allow free access to the land. Bear and
Cougar populations are increasing while deer and elk population are decreasing. License and tag sales are down
because of lack of access and fewer animals, yet fees keep increasing on those of us who continue to hunting
and fish. Fishing regulation are so complicated that many people simply choose not to fish in order to keep from
making a mistake and lose their license. A new model of management is needed.

943

Ability to be neutral until all facts are submitted on matters

944

Experience working with ODFW

945

Be more visible to the public - attend random "fish and wildlife" events.

946

The public has to "trust" the director, and have faith in the agency's vision and mission.

947

Experience both at a field level and an administrative level

948

Understanding that human populations are increasing faster than those of Oregon's fish and wildlife species and
the consequences of that reality will be critical to successfully accomplishing the Department's mission. Being
able to work with other state agencies less focused on fish and wildlife, agencies in other states and with federal
agencies to solve issues from a regional big picture perspective will be critical to success. Being able to identify
and prioritize the information gaps that need to be filled will be important and being able to help secure the
needed funds to fill those gaps will be equally important.

949

Human interaction is a wonderful trait that will inspire employees to follow in his/hers vision.

950

Having a strong background in fish and wildlife management is desirable; however, the proper management and
leadership skills are more important. A good Director that lacks fish and wildlife experience can rely on staff to
provide that technical expertise. If a candidate lacks fish and wildlife experience, it is critical that the person has a
good conservation ethic, and will support our mission.

951

It would be nice to have a native or longstanding oregonian with a background and interest in fishing and and
hunting. It would also be nice to see someone more vocal who would stand up for the outdoorsman and women
publicly.

952

Be willing to travel the state to hear from all those that fish and hunt. Not just this in the Portland metro area.

46 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


953

Focus on fish and wildlife management, the last director was more focused on budget while we do stupid things
like sell off the building in Portland to put money in the general fund, then have ODFW rent a building out of
ODFW funds. Hunters and fishermen have historicaly asked for higher fees to support Fish and WIldlife programs
but what has happened is ODFW monies go into the general fund then are re-distributed by the legislature.
Hunters now see fees we thought were earmarked for fish and wildlife programs being diverted to the general
fund.

954

Needs to realize that funding comes from hunting and fishing, not wolves. Hunting and fishing opportunities need
to be enhanced, and seasons liberalized. Scientific management can't bend to political whims. We need more
habitat (which helps all species). I would like to see a director that attempts to foster better relationships with
private land holders to open more access to hunting and fishing.

955

Be a person that hunts and fishes to have a hands on experience in todays outdoor issues to have been there
done that first hand not some desk jockey afraid to get there hands dirty...

956

The ability to work within limited budget constraints.

957

Understanding of the cultural and structural complexities that exist within ODFW and its relationship with the state
Legislature.

958

It would be nice if the Director could somehow establish enough credibility with the legislature to prevent the
agency from being micro-managed by amateurs, but I'm not sure that is possible.

959

Many qualities will be required to be successful as Director of this department. Comittment, communication,
fiscally responsible, prudent, tactful, and above all tenatious.

960

Resorce management, make sure the budget that is allotted alocated appropriately to the resorces most in need.

961

A director who listens to the hunting and fishing public, the people who pay the fees. Someone who will look after
the long standing traditions of hunting and fishing in Oregon. Some who will use common sense in directing the
agency, and not just look for the easy way or put a higher priority on revenue generation and not the states
wildlife.

962

Be aware that a vast majority of the agency's funding is through hunting and fishing licenses and tags and that
proper management of our fish and wildlife is as financially beneficial to the agency as it is important to the
continuation of those sports, and that continually raising fees due to a decline in the number of people involved in
those sports is counter productive.

963

I think a key characteristic is social aptitude or social intelligence. Without this, one would be challenged to
implement even the best science and policy. By social intelligence, I mean the ability to work with people, even
those with disparate views, and be able to develop and maintain a relationship in which people trust you. Integrity
is implied.

964

To be fair and honest. And to get the fish and game back on the map. The last 20 years has been a train wreck.
Get employees out of the office and start working at their job!

965

The new director needs to be a hunter and angler and must show a passion for both. No "conservationist or
environmentalist" need apply. Fish and Game management is where our dollars need to be spent

966

No a new one

967

I feel strongly that the new director should refocus on what ODFW was intended to do, manage our game herds.
Be strong enough to make crucial calls to improve hubting and fishing for everyone, lowering costs, as well as
restoring access to a lot of the places that are now off limits.

968

Make it easier to get tags for hunting and make less year to year changes in rules

969

Strive to uphold what is needed by all the citizens of the state, not just the Valley. Saving native wildlife from the
invasive CL Occidentalis is our top priority this year. This CLO is proven to be hybrids, yet some still think it's just
a "grey" and perpetuate the lies of USFWS . NOT acceptable. The removal of CLO is in full swing and we the
people of Oregon shall get it done.

970

Talk to the fishermen and hunters for their ideas.

971

I want someone who puts wildlife, specifically game numbers, first. Who is willing to do whatever it takes to help
give us top notch hunting opportunities. If this means doing something about base habitat, closing seasons,
eliminating tags, and all out war on predators, then thats what we need. We need someone who is in it for the
animals, not the revenue.

972

Talk with hunters and fisherman Who are in the field and water And listen to them.

47 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


973

Have experience from outside of Oregon and, specifically, with a state that has a known and proven
program(Wyoming comes to mind).

974

The ability to take public input into account before making a decision, not just special interest groups.

975

Strength of caricter enough to go with biological not political decisions

976

listen to hunters and fisherman

977

Open more hunting areas for access; issue more tags.

978

Term limits would be good!

979

Do what is right to build our natural environment, not what is popular.

980

Focus on managing conservation, not people and tag sales. A passion for wildlife and a track record of personal
hunting license and tag sales.

981

understanding of specific issues we face in Oregon.

982

Focuse on having restore a positive future customer base. I feel a great percentage of customers are losing trust
in wildlife management.

983

Someone who truly has an understanding of game management. Someone who puts the management numbers
and animal welfare before the $$!

984

Just seems to me that there is friction between ODFW and sportsman. I started hunting big game at the age of 12
that was 1973. I don't remember over the years except recent 10 or so years, that about every fisherman or
hunter I strike up a conversation with has a issue with ODFW. Wasn't like this years ago at least not as many
there is always complainers. Don't know what or how to get the relationship between sportsman and ODFW on a
positive growing relationship but I feel it's very important.

985

Director needs to stop worrying about money brought in by hunters and fisherman and start managing wildlife.
Stop spending so much on wolves and predators and start focusing in getting wildlife and fisheries healthy with
more numbers. Start focusing on habitat restoration for mule deer. Consider giving out a packets of bitter rush
seeds with license as once was done so hunters can help restore habitat while in the field. Stop limiting new
hunting units by making them draw units because you will lose more hunters who will either stop hunting or go to
other states. Fix the draw system!!!

986

Should be a hunter and fisherman... Someone who is not a large landowner and has experience with having to
draw to hunt in a place that used to be hunting... Someone who used to fish places that are now closed off even
know the fish numbers are higher than ever in catch and release like the willamette

987

I want the director to be an avid fisherman, hunter, trapper and knows the value of these. Will speak outr to our
governor and legislators when defending these. Will desire all moneys paid by sportsmen and women to go to
these subjects not bird watching or saving sea lions or wolves etc, They will speak out against saving all
predators of land and sea and will understand the need for resource management of our forests and rangelands
not the preservationist view. Understands that we are near the breaking point in regards to costs and fees.

988

Should be an avid hunter and fisherman. If you are going to do the job, you should have a great understanding of
how the person holding the license feels. A military background never hurts. Someone who is willing to get out of
the office and get their boots dirty.

989

The ability to stand up to the governors office!

990

TO BE REALISTIC ABOUT THINGS AND LOOKING FROM THE CONSUMERS POINT OF VIEW NOT JUST
THERE POINT

991

we do not have enouph elk or deer!

992

30 + years as an Oregon outdoorsman

993

Manage resources not people buying tags

994

experience in balancing wildlife management, clear plan for wildlife managment

995

It is extremely important that the Director and the rest of the agency ACTIVELY support fish hatchery operations.

48 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


996

I feel that director should be a good leader, and have a distinct vision for protecting and growing Oregon's wildlife.
I also feel that the director should be someone who is passionate about hunting and fishing. I feel that they
Director should look to provide opportunity for the public, but also improve the quality of hunting/fishing in Oregon
for the public. In my opinion scientific research, and experience will not make a good director. Although it is
applicable, the variables that exist in mother nature are a lot different than controlled testing.

997

Must be honest and the furthest polar opposite of a liberal.

998

Must be an avid hunter/fisherman to understand Oregon draw system and how it can be improved.

999

The director of ODFW should be an Oregon native, having purchased a hunting and fishing license since they
were a 12.

1000

Anybody but ############! We can already "catch a trout anywhere in Oregon". Clean house and get
Someone who understands that sportsman are not customers, we are the employers.

1001

Needs to be a true public land hunter.

1002

Common sense is a huge factor and a very good work ethic. They should also be smart enough to know what
hurts our wildlife population and what helps it. I have 3 young children that I want to pass the hunting tradition on
to, but if we don't get the wolves over here in eastern Oregon under control, we will not have hunting left for
future generations. The new director has to take a stand for future wildlife.

1003

Ethics

1004

It's imparitive to understand how to adapt to the present times outdated laws and user standing how to properly
manage fish and game without special interstes and animal rights. So the job the stewards of the land hired you
to do. We conserve the land as hunters and outdoorsman listen to us. Not money.

1005

Remember that without us sportsmen you don't have a job. More animal's with better access and better
opportunity means more money and better programs for odfw.

1006

the director needs to not be swayed by the animal rights terror organizations that currently influence the policies
of the current ODFW regime

1007

In order to be successful a candidate must be willing to take a stand on doing what is right regardless of the
political ramifications. Such a person has to be willing to take a politically unpopular position and stand by it in
the face of opposition.

1008

Must be a hunter and fisherman with recreational and commercial experience.

1009

Must be a Hunter/ fisherman

1010

Be a strong believer in getting youth fishing in greater numbers.

1011

MONEY

1012

The next director of ODF&W should not only have experience in the field, but should have a passion for fishing
and hunting, and be an active participant in both sports. Whomever this person is, they should be able to look at
guiding policy toward managing our fish and wildlife from the perspective of a hunter/angler.

1013

He should be a sportsman in fishing and hunting and not intimidated by other board members or committees.

1014

Give priority to what is in the best long standing interests of the resource first and then the citizens of Oregon.
Not be influenced by special interests but go with the scientific facts in making decisions.

1015

Needs to be an outdoorsman/outdoors woman. Someone that hunts and/or fishes.

1016

Lifelong hunter and fisher

1017

Listening to the sportsmen and applying their opinions to regulations.

1018

They need to listen to the sportsman that pays for the services of the fish and wildlife. The environmental groups
must not control this agency like they do know.

1019

Be willing and able to listen and act on the needs and wants of the hunters and anglers over all else. The ability to
overcome political influences and special interest groups. A strong commitment to the rights of hunters and
anglers.

1020

I really believe the director should have a rural outdoor background staying away from someone affiliated with
any special interest groups

49 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1021

listening to the regular fisherman not the special interest and clubs

1022

Respect & work with the union

1023

Willing to manage the agency based on facts and not politics

1024

Lifelong hunter and fisherperson.

1025

Get rid of the wolves

1026

Must be an ACTIVE hunter/fisher, not just a political appointee with management experience. Should be a native
Oregonian and long term resident of the state.

1027

Must understand that wildlife are not forms of political power. Understand the hunting lifestyle. Listen to the
hunters and fishers, they are the ones that they work for.

1028

Yes, the new Director should have relevant experience in expanding the agency's funding sources. Too few
people are funding ODFW. Feasible strategies to stabilize the agency's funding have be explored and
implemented.

1029

The director will need to be a magician! Seriously, the director will need to reach out to major stakeholders and
build understanding and consensus between large landowners such as timber companies and ranchers, and the
hunting population.

1030

New Director should come from outside ODFW.

1031

Honesty

1032

Common sense leadership skills.

1033

My priority for the next director would be for them to be able to manage an agency and a budget. They should
strive to instill a science based decision making process through out the agency and not one where employees
make decisions about our wildlife based off of political influence. Empower the rank and file to utilize the
education that got them hired in the first place.

1034

Someone that understands who it is that pays his wages and will support that group with the best of his ability.
Someone that understands the predator problems that exist in Oregon and the best possible solution to resolve
those issues. Not just predators vs ungulates but also predators on all wildlife and fish and the balance that is
needed to maintain their existence to it's fullest.

1035

Some that communicates really well, solves problems and does not ignore them

1036

Active hunter and fisherman.

1037

Be a risk taker. Doesn't need to be popular but willing to make tough decisions based on sound data that may not
be popular.

1038

Build wildlife populations for hunting through predator control. No product no sales of tags and license!

1039

Yes ! Not phase out hunters as playing a role in harvesting animals ... it seems Fish and Wildlife is content to
have apex predators harvest our game ! Are you guys trying to put yourselves out of work ? The hippies aren't
going to pay millions of dollars to watch birds, when we quit buying tags due to no animals to hunt !

1040

-Provem experience managing fish and game is a successful program - Actively encouraging youth and new
hunter participation - Strong family values and fishing and hunting experience. - A desire to make Oregon a
hunting and fishing destination.

1041

Make hunting and fishing more affordable for the public

1042

realize that the major task is to provide guidance for taking of resources and management of resources and not
capitulation to United States Human society or PITA who propose an elimination of hunting and fishing. They
provide money to litigate , but not manage and propogate.

1043

An active fisherman and hunter, so he/she knows who the people are and how shitty odfw is right now! Someone
that understands what the best interest of the animals abd those paying the redicoulusly high price of tags

1044

A person's track record says a lot about them. The new Director must have a solid, productive, and verifiable
track record. Must show the ability to make the best decisions for Oregon's fish & game, not for particular groups
of people. Difficult decisions have to be made that are very controversial, human emotion has to be put in check
and decisions have to be made in favor of Oregon's Fish & Game populations.

50 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1045

I feel the Director should have a STRONG passion for hunting and fishing and experience actively DOING those
activities!!! It saddens me to say that I truly feel there are individuals within ODFW that would just as soon see
hunting end in Oregon OR seem directed to follow through with policies from those above them that want to see
hunting abolished. Our state, and Nation for that matter, had done a GREAT job of increasing hunting
opportunities and game species numbers. However, in more recent history with the mis-management of predator
numbers (i.e. cougar, bear, and now the wolf management plan) our game numbers are struggling in MANY
areas of the state. *see your own publications on calf and fawn recruitment numbers across the state. I do not
understand how an agency that has worked tireless hours for decades to increase healthy herds, now has
squandered away all of that work to cower to special interest groups and environmental groups that contribute
extremely limited resources to the agencies mission. I hope and pray the new director will take a stand to focus on
the mission wholeheartedly to ensure future generations can hunt in this state!!

1046

Use only scientific studies to make decisions for the betterment of fish and wildlife. Don't kowtow to groups
threatening to sue if they don't get their way.

1047

It is critical to be able to have a track record of actually improving the wildlife populations. We are not meeting our
management objectives today. We need a strong voice that relies on science not the myths nor the propaganda.

1048

Must be a hunter, fisherman and outdoor person.

1049

I see predation a issue now, and has been for some time. I'd like to see the use of baiting bear and cougar at
least until populations are under control.

1050

Must have an understanding in balancing wildlife, especially predator (wolf, cougar, bear) control. Work with
outdoor sportsman/women to manage and maintain master hunters in the management of wildlife.

1051

The individual selected should have a neutral bias towards existing fish & wildlife interests. In other words, this
person should not have strong connections to either extreme; business lobby or environmental lobby.

1052

A big game hunter and recreational fisherman.

1053

He or she must have a hunting and fishing heritage and must be a progressive advocate for those two entities.

1054

Willingness to pressure state legislators and governor to repeal cougar and bear hunting restrictions to alleviate
predation problems. Also be proactive toward wolf delisting.

1055

Needs to reinforce that hunters and anglers have paid for much of what we have for fish and wildlife resources
that others have taken it for granted . Most Oregonians believe their tax money is the principal means of support
for ODFW. Going forward the Director needs to communicate that other users (besides anglers and hunters)
need to contribute as well, but it still okay for consumptive use. These other users have been reluctant to pay
(e.g. Failure of Teaming for Wildlife and more locally the Bird Seed Bills), and when they do support conservation
they generally oppose consumptive use if involves "their" investment - a double standard.

1056

Gain the trust of the hunters

1057

Must be a sportsman

1058

One who actually hunts and does fish to understand where sportsman come from

1059

Somebody who actually hunts and or fishes, that isn't financially involved with any related industry. Ie truly
nonbias!

1060

Should have a strong business-type organizational background.

1061

Must be a fisher hunter hiker or enjoy the outdoors as much as the people they are working for

1062

Don't do what may be popular, but what is right for the economic and sustainability of our resources. For both the
wildlife and producers.

1063

Yes, the ability to guide the ODFW mission through the legislative process and secure approval from the governor
and other state agencies.

1064

Having strong political sense and ability.

1065

It's time the Fish & wildlife in Oregon Listen to the hunters, We see the Predator impact, The animal counts,
Manage for more hunter quality, not more $$ in the check book!!!!

1066

Strong support for the North American wildlife conservation model including the necessary tools to achieve
balance in Oregon, which means predator management.

1067

Be a hunter and fisherman. So he knows what has to be done in this state before every one leaves

51 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1068

Someone that truly loves the environment who isn't afraid to step on a few toes in order to make the world a
better place for all who reside upon it.

1069

Sincerity, candor

1070

willing to listen to the hunters and fisherman of oregon, we are the people that are out there every day on the
rivers in the mountains, in the high deserts on the lakes. we notice the changes that have occured in the past 40
years.

1071

He/she should be non biased. A non biased director can better judge situations without clouded or biased
judgement when ti comes to strong fish and wildlife issues concerning conservation,enhancement,budget
restrictions,etc.

1072

No familial or financial ties to the commercial fishing industry!

1073

have a life long passion for hunting and fishing in the outdoors.

1074

We need a Director that is a life long Hunter\Angler that understands our Natural resource managenment!!
Someone that is science base bio is more important than contemporary social conservation. Someone that
understands the North American Model of Wildlife conservation is the world model, a user funded, science based
and pay for by the user group. Someone that respects steakholder groups as a guide to the sportsmen vote on
game issues. Someone that understands and shares the passion of the outdoor experance in Oregon!!

1075

have the guts to decide is the resource for profit or should be managed for trophies (big game). if it's profit, fine.
jack the price and let me hunt with my family where I want. If it's for trophies then manage for that purpose with
scientific fact. even if that includes not hunting certain units for periods of time.

1076

Yes, these qualities probably sound vague but I'll try to explain: open-minded and open to change. I used to work
for ODFW. I respect the work that many of my former colleagues do. But it is still viewed as a good old boys' club
and it still has that "hook & bullet" image. It needs to evolve in order to survive, and the new director can either
lead that change or continue to resist it.

1077

Has a strong connection to the work and people of ODFW including recognition of achievements Understands the
Oregon culture and history Open and approachable, good listener, good decision maker

1078

I believe that the person selected should be an outdoorsman/woman. He or she should have experience hunting
and/or fishing to understand the value of outdoor activities.

1079

A strong commitment to the constituents who financially support this agency (hunters/anglers) and focus on
maintaining or improving hunting and fishing opportunities for present and future generations. And an ability to
say "no" to unfunded mandates and requests for agency staff to expend staff time and resources on issues that
do not contribute to these paying constituents and the core mission of the agency.

1080

Knowledge and experience directly related to the cultural and biological history of salmon in the pacific northwest.

1081

The director should be a user and participant in public fisheries and game management.

1082

The director must be able to manage the wildlife in such a way as to allow a sustainable harvest to hunters. I
understand that creating revenue is important but over use of our current wildlife is a real problem and needs to
be addressed.

1083

Willing to listen to and truly take into consideration the public input.

1084

The Director should be willing to try and educate lawmakers on contentious issues and stand ground when the
science is clear, rather than ignore the science to appease the lawmaker. The Director should promote
cooperative relationships with conservation and angler/hunter groups equally.

1085

Personal lifelong experience in the out of doors...hunting/fishing/camping.. Understanding that the environment of
outdoorsmen (and women) is changing and they want different things now vs. then Someone who will encourage
youth involvement in outdoor recreating

1086

Whoever it is they must have conservation of wildlife be there number one priority. Regardless.

1087

Understand Indian treaty rights and their affect on the state's wildlife and fisheries. With this understanding be
able to work with the governor's office and the state police to abide by Indian rights but also protect the resources
and improve public confidence that the tribes are not unfairly appropriated big game tags off reservation and are
properly policed in their tribal netting of Columbia River fish.

1088

I believe the candidate for the director should be an avid hunter and fisherman with an emphasis on Oregon
species.

52 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1089

Field experience at a district biologist level

1090

Be willing to make changes with conservation in mind, and be willing to deal with the folks that will be upset by
the changes. Someone who would rather preserve our natural resources rather than burn them up. Someone that
can come up with alternatives for communities that mainly rely on resource extraction.

1091

Maybe if they were an actual sportsmen... Had hunted & fished and were as pasionate about the outdoors as the
people they serve....

1092

The ability to out politic the politicians so that decisions can be made upon SOUND SCIENCE and not political
pressure (as has obviously driven too many recent ODFW decisions).

1093

They need they are not a money generating body. They are there to work for the people. Habitat for fish and
wildlife should be there only mission.

1094

The ability to look at other states and see if it will work for ours.

1095

I think that the most important factor as with any leader or any position, he or she should have experience in
either hunting or fishing, have held a fishing and hunting license and tag in the state within the last 5 years and
continue to participate in the system.

1096

THE ABILITY AND DESIRE TO SIT OUT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER , TALK TO AND OBSERVE THE
PROBLEM WE FACE AND DEAL WITH ACCORDINGLY SO THAT THE SPORTSMEN CAN TAKE HOME
FISH . THAT IS WHAT WE GO FOR . I WANT GILNETTERS AND SANE NETTERS TO BE ACOUNTABLE .
THAT IS ACURATE ACCOUNTS OF THE # OF FISH TAKEN . NO HONOR SYSTEM .

1097

Needs to have broad and direct experience in all aspects of fish and wildlife management and an understanding
of Oregon state government budget and policy processes.

1098

The ability to bring diverse interest groups together to focus on the resolution of common issues.

1099

Spent time seeing the effects of previous policies

1100

Transparency. More public access.

1101

Ability to remain constistent in management philosophy in a changing political landscape.

1102

Experience dealing with other States, the federal government, and regional agencies in managing transboundary
and regional fisheries.

1103

Understand the importance of a strong hatchery program.

1104

Must be a hunter and a fisherman experienced in the sad state of affairs that we are experiencing now.

1105

We need someone who wants our wildlife back to what it was before predator overpopulation and too many spike
and cow/doe tags!

1106

It would be useful to have someone with political savvy to negotiate with the legislature. We need someone who
can commit to a period of time in leadership and can show that they are willing to move to and stay in Oregon. A
passion for what we are protecting.

1107

We need a candidate with a proven success record of dealing with fishing and hunting management.

1108

I feel to understand the job you need to understand the animals and the people. I believe the person who fills this
job must be a hunter and a fisher also. One who is out in the field with the people and the animals to understand
what they are going through. Not just someone who sits behind a desk.

1109

Person should be an avid outdoors person who has practical experience in fish and wildlife issues. A hunter and
fisher type.,

1110

must be avid hunter fisherman. belief that wildlife resource management will not be influenced by politics.

1111

Be willing to dive into controversial subjects and support those with a vested interest in the issue and not those
with a strictly emotional interest. The $$$'s should support the decision makers, not the whiners. SEA LIONS

1112

Science does not discount hatchery versus native fish so enhance/expand hatcheries and plant more fish.

1113

Have an intrest in predator management and an intrest to help Oregon's poor mule deer population.

1114

Understanding of value provided by different share holders. Economic impact of different share holders to the
overall economy of Oregon.

53 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1115

Preditor control

1116

Knowledge of all hunting and fishing units coupled with on going revisions to species that are doing well. There
seems to be a dormant approach to the review and changes administered by your successes.

1117

Needs to be a die hard hunter and fisherman with real world experience. Preferably someone who will stand up
against the increasing anti hunter movement in oregon.

1118

The director must have a genuine interest and concern in protecting and conserving wildlife in Oregon, and its
habitat.

1119

Understand the economic contribution that sports fisherman and hunters make to Oregon.

1120

Personal passion for the outdoors. Background in statistics or scientific methods.

1121

ability to look past the traditional hatchery model

1122

I want to see my interests as a hunter represented. I am sick and tired of paying increasing fees for the ability to
hunt and animal that doesn't exist. Meaning. Stop over selling elk/deer tags in areas that have very few animals
to harvest. If area X is estimated to have 1000 bucks, and you need 500 to successfully breed the population,
then only sell 500 tags! Oregon has long standing been driven to provide maximum opportunity and choice.
Nowadays, I think the majority of hunters are willing to see less opportunity if it equates to more trophy animals.
As least, try different strategies!

1123

Willingness to place the wise management of fish and game above budgetary and political pressures. Willingness
to tell the commission when they are wrong. Willingness to extirpate commercial gill nets from all Oregon waters,
they are an archaic and outmoded industry.

1124

Ability to trust biologists opinions on best management practices without being swayed by special interest groups
looking to exploit the resource. Basically cut the political crap and truly do whats best for the organisms that live
within it.

1125

Needs to be a comitted long time hunter and fisherman. who understands the view points of the outdoorsman

1126

Willingness to activate partnerships for urban populations to participate/support and contribute to species
recovery.

1127

Stand up for hunters and hunters right against anti hunters, weed out the anti hunters in the odfw currently. we
hunters and fisherman pay for you. not the antis

1128

Keeps politics out of decision-making.

1129

Needs to have a passionate back ground in both hunting and fishing. Needs to work for increasing game
populations.

1130

How about the first and foremost that he works for the hunters and anglers of this state, not special interest
groups who want to see hunters be gone and only predators remain. We as hunters are predators and belong in
the chain under a maximum sustainable harvest in mind. We pay his salary, not special interest groups. Oregon
has been going the wrong direction from wildlife management practices for about 15-20 years now, he better be
able to turn this around.

1131

We need someone dedicated to correcting the problems we have with salmon. The genes have obviously
become weakened we have fish coming back way too soon and to don't want to see our salmon die off because
of poor genetics this needs to be corrected as well as predator management because the deer and elk
populations are down. Cougar and coyotes are way up and bears and there's needs to be a possiblity of using
dogs again or something so that the predator prey ratio is more balanced. As for salmon perhaps you might
consider fish ladders and then maybe the salmon can get stronger in their own. I am probably one of the only
fisherman who would say don't allow salmon fishing for a year and let them come up stream naturally a few years
to wean out the weak ones like natural selection should be.

1132

Experience in a state with a proven record of growing resources not dwindling ones like our current situation.

1133

Born and raised as a hunter/fisher in Oregon

1134

Be raised hunting and fishing in oregon most there life

54 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1135

It is extremely important that ODFW can act quickly to resolve any current problems that we may have. Example,
Wolves in Oregon. Do not wait till it is more serious, action is necessary to keep balance with our valued wildlife.
In regards to our fisheries, hatcheries play a strong role in having healthy runs in our rivers. When the numbers
are up the fisherman come out. Sound practical management that can be acted on quickly will benefit all.
#########

1136

An accurate knowledge of the game management and the ability to implement policies that work for growth rather
than financial gain.

1137

The willingness to make all of his/her employees accountable to doing their part in achieving the goals of the
agency. Employees should have to consistently demonstrate their value to the resource or risk being replaced by
others in the field that bring value to the agency. Public employees should be held to a higher standard because
we are working with public money, however, this is not the case with ODFW. I work for ODFW and see first hand
employees that are no longer playing their role in helping the agency achieve its goals, and although it's sad,
these people will likely keep their position until they retire. I would like to see the new director address this issue,
motivate his employees, and create a system that rewards hard work and punishes lackluster performance.

1138

Should have some research background. Local (Pacific Northwest) knowledge/experience dealing with complex
issues (i.e. wolves, salmon). Preferably hunts and/or fishes to show vested interest in resources we manage and
can empathize with our constituents. Respect and consideration for rural communities which are more tightly
bound to the land and natural resources for commerce and farming/ranching.

1139

Work w/BLM&FS to reestablish game on public lands now used for private grazing.

1140

knowledge of / appreciation for unique environmental and sporting values of Oregon citizens

1141

Of local origin

1142

LISTEN TO WHAT THE PUBLIC WANTS!

1143

Ability to recognize inane laws and provide guidance to correct.

1144

Lists of qualifications will never replace the necessity of having a well educated, thoughtful and sincere person
running the show. Prioritizing this list feels silly.

1145

Be open minded. Spend time listening to employees and discussing the issues. The key word is "listen". Be a
leader. The tone of the agency is set at the top!

1146

Make Oregon hunters and access priorities!

1147

He should manage our wildlife in a manner that does not include killing them when they are designated as
"pests" by certain individuals.

1148

Lifelong personal experience in fishing and hunting. Personal committment to encouraging youth to engage with
the outdoors. Scientific training with masters level education, or Ph.D., if possible.

1149

Understanding the needs of both consumptive and non-consumptive users of wildlife.

1150

Feel that the most important and controversial issues tend to center more about fish, than game. Thus a strong
background in fisheries management and issue resolution would be a plus.

1151

Must understand the benefits of, have proven experience with, and have an ability to "get things done" with
multiple partners.

1152

Focus on his customers. Hunters, Fishermen, trappers and others who spend money on licenses and permits.

1153

Must be aware of the impact of global warming on fish and wildlife. Must not have cultural blinders to various
problems: No right wing Christian crazies please.

1154

We need a no-nonsense, non-political director who will use scientific research to make the hard decisions. We
must reverse the decline of the salmon and steelhead fisheries (although this fall has been an anomaly).

1155

To actively participate in Oregon's hunting and fishing seasons.

1156

To stand up to the anti hunter's

1157

able to build strong relationships communicate vision to law makers to find a path for enhanced funding. build a
case for the need.

55 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1158

I appricate the direction we have been heading, understanding that the next generation of customers
(hunters/anglers) need to be given every opportunity to learn and enjoy these skills. Keeping costs down for
families and promoting opportunities like the menotored youth hunts are key. I think an understanding and
passion for this is a key characteristic we should look for in the director.

1159

Non-lethal predator control. If posible reimbursement for ranchers so that they can live with wolves and other
natural predtors.

1160

Understanding the need to allocate wildlife resources to the maximum benefit of those who pay to keep ODFW
funded; recreational hunters and anglers.

1161

Perferably from Oregon.

1162

Na

1163

He/She needs to be neither hunter OR anti-hunter

1164

1. Demonstrated (time and again) ability to walk on water! 2. Openness to involving and accepting input from user
groups. 3. Ability to cast off the "we've always done it this way" mentality of an entrenched organization and take
on controversial changes against in-house resistance.

1165

I believe it is also very important to harbor an environment in which ODFW employees feel important and in
which the needs and/or concerns of the employees are met and addressed.

1166

Not just a college graduate looking for a job.

1167

ideally would both hunt and fish enforcement experience would be helpful

1168

If we are to be successful in bringing back the salmon, the new director must address the sea lion problem and
the fish eating birds at the mouth of the Columbia River. The sea lions are getting worse every year, and the fish
eating birds are multiplying at an enormous rate.

1169

Can take the heat of the gill-netters. Strongly promotes the use of the outdoors.

1170

An understanding of the agency at all levels, from field projects/positions to administrative/executive


positions/issues. Field experience. An understanding of the needs and desires of constituents, particularly those
that "pay their way" for Fish and Wildlife resources. Ability to work successfully with legislators, governor, F&W
Commission, and other policy makers.

1171

Recognition of the mandate to CONSERVE and support ALL fish and wildlife not just game animals. Its a
changing world and the department needs to reflect that.

1172

Needs to understand, or be able to quickly comprehend, Oregon-specific issues. As with any good leader, needs
to listen (including to employees).

1173

Improve communications with the general public, regarding priorities, strategy and vision.

1174

The head of the ODFW must be able to properly manage fish and wildlife against the political needs of industry.
Many species have been decimated in the past because of over fishing for short term gains.

1175

Being a leader gives the responsibility of having great communication skills. This being said, requires one to be a
listener, advisor as well as informative to those they lead. Keeping all staff informed of "hot topics" or items that
may draw a lot of public contact assists on keeping everyone on the same page and that itself can be seen by the
public. I believe the new Director should have some experience in field work within fisheries/wildlife.

1176

The ODFW is mostly employees. The Director must build strong morale with employees, providing the
leadership and vision for their direction. Lately the ODFW is to influenced by legislation and worry about budget
cuts. The new director must be able to push his own agenda meeting the needs of the fish and wildlife resource.

1177

Conservation of wildlife and lands! Habitat knowledgeable!

1178

The answer no or protect it will always be strong and compelling. The Director should have an understanding that
the numbers of votes will always be strong from that direction as well. It is important to look at whats best for the
big game numbers as they promote business for small communities during the winter. The winter months can be
challenging as logging and tourism is at its low. Species should be viewed in level of importance to both hunters
and the ecosystem. For example what importance do wolves have for anything other than those who like to look
at the pretty pictures of the majestic death machine....

1179

Have a love of fishing & hunting.

1180

Long term considerations of consequences of planning. Understanding of Ecosystem Services

56 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1181

Predator control

1182

Encourage and allow hunting and fishing and grow opportunities of both.

1183

Honesty and have a mindset to be fair to the sportsmen and women who live and work in Oregon.

1184

Need an ultrasonic fish counter at Gold Beach to know what numbers of fish etc. Kenai R in AK has one!

1185

Strive to increase numbers of game and fish for the sport hunter and recreational angler.

1186

A long time resident of the Northwest, fisherman and hunter.

1187

needs to fully understand and use common sense when dealing with bow hunting issues particularity equipment
restrictions and common sense implementation of those rules. Also the director should put the good of the wildlife
first above making money for the State. this should require cutting Eastern Oregon mule deer tags and
implementing new projects to help mule deer to recover in Eastern Oregon.

1188

Long-time Oregon resident!

1189

Also be an outdoorsman.

1190

Strong data management skills and the ability to promote and guide the agency in the direction towards data
systems that increase agency efficiencies and make information more readily available to other agencies and the
general public.

1191

Not prepared to address this.

1192

Should have knowledge of fish hatcheries and there advantages/disadvantages to fish runs. Should not hold a
political office as they are the worthless ones causing problems.

1193

Some one not affraid to fight animal rights activists to do the right thing

1194

Director needs experience in GROWING big Game Herds and is willing to Fight for Our Big Game Herd
Improvement

1195

Emphasize gaining the trust of multiple and often competing user groups. Would also like to see the ability to fend
off both attacks and lobbying from the Legislature.

1196

The director should be an experienced outdoors person (Hunter and Fisher)

1197

Manage wildlife, It must be number one priority to improve the quality and quantity of the animals which reside in
the state of Oregon.. Not sales and promotion of tags which has been done up until now. sportsmans confidence
in ODFW is also at an all time low because of their continued miss management and unwillingness to change
their practices.

1198

An ability to relate to both the sportsmen and the people who value species beyond their consumptive potential. A
true conservationist.

1199

Must be strong and steadfast when making common sense decisions to aid ungulate recruitment and population
growth. This is foremost on the hunting communities minds and will do wonders for the departments annual
budget going forward.

1200

A positive attitude, with high regard in taking care of the employees, and communicating the now to leadership,
not only through ELT, but leadership in the field as well.

1201

Hands on in the field knowledge. An education is great, but really experiencing the resources you're going to be
in charge of gives a better understanding of how best to do the job.

1202

Integrity.

1203

Listen to the people buying the tags. We are your customer, while we may not always be right we are the ones
out in the field more than anyone else and see the problems that need to be fixed..

1204

Working as a team leader of multi-agency multi-disciplinary teams. Collaboration with political leaders including
the Governor and other State and Federal Agency Directors

1205

Yes, They need to be a experience Hunter, fishermen, and outdoorsmen....That way their head doesn't get caught
up in all the money business and they remember what their job really is.

57 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1206

They need to be a strong manager that will not give into the governors pressures and will pring anti huntin and
fishing groups to the table to help with conservation and not just trying to stop it. Have them step to the plate with
money and not just words. Quit making hunters and fishermen fork out all the money just to cater to special
interest groups

1207

He/she MUST be an avid fisher/hunter

1208

It seems the largest issue with ODFW is the current budget. It is pivotal that the new director have multiple plans
and strategies for relieving the department of its debt that will minimally impact the fishing and hunting community
but still maintain strong practices for managing fish and Wildlife state wide. The new director should be open
minded and accepting of new ideas/technologies and ways to make ODFW and its employees more efficient. The
new director should be someone who will protect the hunting/fishing community and their rights. The new director
should have one the ground experience in biology, cooperation with other state and federal agencies, tribes, and
NGO's. The new director should do what is best for the resource not making $$ or what he/she personally feels is
best. The new director should use litigation as a last resort.

1209

track record of honesty and integrity.

1210

Rebuild and provide support to the districts and regions so they can manage and represent the fish and wildlife
resourcesin the particular area - Salem can not be the manager, but the supporter and guider..

1211

Experience with commercial and recreational fishing, and wildlife conservation issues.

1212

The ability to speak comfortably with employees about our concerns and interest within and outside the
Department.

1213

Being able to look at issues from all sides to make a decision, not being swayed by public opinion, public
outcry/outrage, media, and other sources is going to be needed.

1214

All the questions asked in part 1 are about qualifications, I would like to see a question like this- What is on the
top of your list of issues that need to be addressed if hired.

1215

Scientific background

1216

To be a hunter and fisherman/woman. It is pointless to have someone who does not understand first hand what
they are managing.

1217

someone who understands the fish, wildlife and natural resources here in Oregon. We are a very unique state
with a marine zone, high desert, lush valley, etc and the complexity of issues that go along with those habitats.

1218

An understanding and empathy with the people of the state with regard to the fish and wildlife use both
consumptive and non-consumptive. The agency is tasked with protect and enhance for use and enjoyment not
preserve and protect to the exclusion of the citizen.

1219

Manage game not money

1220

Must be personable and demonstrate the ability to relate to both staff and the public on a common level. It is
important for the director to come across as open and honest. He/she does not need to know all the answers as
that is what staff is charged to do or work towards, but the director must be able to communicate this to the public
and other policy makers. It is also important for him/her to understand or appreciate - but not necessarily come
from - the culture within a state fish and wildlife agency as it can be unique among government bureaucracies.

1221

Someone who isnt afraid to say no to special interest groups and support the users who buy licenses.

1222

They need to be able to stand up to state and federal government overreach. Also realize that hatchery fish are a
vital resource we need to enhance for both commercial and recreational fisheries.

1223

Obvious interest in natural resources, displayed by well-rounded activities which may include birdwatching or
wildflower photography. A keen interest only in hunting/fishing is too narrow a focus. Knowledge about
ecosystem management instead of simply increasing a few big-game species at the detriment of all else is
important. Delegate responsibilities to employees without hyper control. Taking input from many sources.

1224

The Director must be strong in dealing with groups that do not want to use true scientific data. Small and well
financed groups can not be allowed to dictate policy for the ODF&W. The Director needs to get to know all areas
of the state and the diverse problems that each have.

1225

The next director should have experience working in state's that have made the shift to wild fish management like
Montana. She should have a deep understanding of the best-available science and a drive to see that the agency
turn the corner from an agency that produces a product for a shrinking number of anglers and hunters, to an
agency that promotes the health of wild fish and wildlife for all Oregonians.

58 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1226

Be willing to foster a culture of professionalism within the Department. Encourage employees to be part of
professional organizations. Be willing to work with professional organizations such as Oregon Chapter of The
Wildlife Society on issues of wildlife in Oregon.

1227

Recognize that every county is different.Example Portland area is totally different then say Roseburg area. We
have a predator problem out of control. If we were able to control some of these predators in the mountains our
problems wouldnt be as severe down here in the valley.Also the predators on Big Game also is way out of
control.We are very upset about the Wolves reintroducing them was un called for and how do i put it STUPID. I
want someone that understands the effects of predators on Game and Livestock and humans too

1228

Budget & fiscal responsibility need to be at the top of the list based on the current budget issues.

1229

Building partnerships with other agencies and NGOs.

1230

Work with landowners,to provide access,to private lands,as well as landlocked public lands.

1231

Yeah....quit catering to the friggin bow hunters. Not a dam thing beneficial to us rifle hunters ever, but you can bet
bow season changes bow tag requirement changes extended hunts added hunts...I refuse to buy another tag in
this state period, until this gets addressed

1232

They need to hunt and fish. These are the people who pay the bills and the Director will not have their full respect
and trust if not a participant.

1233

The Director should be intimately familiar with the business aspect(s) of ODFW and develop an innovative
business model that will propel the agency forward. Understanding the increasing role of technology in natural
resource utilization and management is imperative for future success. The current agency approach--and
generally management personnel as well--is very antiquated and somewhat stale.

1234

none

1235

Demonstrated skills and ability to communicate with Legislators, constituency groups, local, state & federal
agency partners / allies, natural resource advocates, Native American Tribes and elected officials.

1236

I think that the next Director needs to be congnascent of financial Impacts wildlife can have on functioning farms.
Often environmentalists' voices are heard over those of People working 24/7 to make a good living while trying
their best to be good stewards of the Environment.

1237

Ability to defend and stick to you agency positions in face of interest group influence/criticism

1238

the need to understand that oregons fish and game manegment is the worse managed out of all the western
states and we have some of the best wildlife resources!

1239

Experience as a all around hunter (big animals and small) as well as all around fisher (salmon, steelhead and
other)

1240

The ability to identify problems and implement a remedy.

1241

Work more closely with all the outdoor groups and take heed what the say!

1242

Must be an avid outdoors person, hunt, fish, hike...etc. Needs to understand the struggles of the common person
when it comes to fishing hunting and outdoor wildlife.

1243

Understanding committment to core mission of the agency. Demonstrated abilty to build and lead and utilize an
effective management team with appropriate levels of delgated authority.

1244

Ability to manage resource use with conservation, while maintaining financial integrity. Holding managers
accountable for poor management style with employees (increase morale).

1245

I think we need a true leader with a clear vision of how Oregon will be changing in the next 50 years in terms of
rapid population growth and the extra demands that this will place on our land and water resources, as well as
changes to the landscape that will come with climate change. In 50 years, Oregon could nearly become the most
desirable places to live in the U.S.

1246

The ability to to stand for what is right and truly educate the Governor's office. They have to have had some
realistic field biology experience in either wildlife or fishery.

1247

I would like the next directorto be an outdoorsman themselves., it would be nice if they were from the Pacific
Northwest. they not not be afraid to go against what other states are doing.

59 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1248

Integrity is most important. Fear of losing his/her job due to corrupt politicians demonstrates an agency with no
backbone. "Do what is right, let the consequence follow," is leading by example and will give us the respect we
need to succeed in our mission.

1249

Experience with producing innovative ideas that are realistic and can be applied to help generate new sources of
revenue (items purchased by public for enjoyment of both game and non-game wildlife observatory activities) and
maintain or strengthen revenue sources that are already available (e.g., hunting, fishing, etc.).

1250

Experience with political icons both within the State of Oregon and other states. This will help in collaboration
efforts.

1251

Farmer/rancher experience for growing herd population while balancing grazing techniques

1252

The Director should be approachable and personable for both the public and ODFW staff, it is important for
people to feel a true connection and feel like they are understood. The Director should be an avid outdoors
person who enjoys to hunt and fish.

1253

Provide better preadator managment to minimize impact on big game numbers. Well all know a 20% repoduction
rate in Elk will not sustain a healther population.

1254

Love of fish and wildlife. Born and raised in Oregon with deep investment into the job.

1255

Director must also hunt and fish.

1256

Hunting AND fishing background. Understanding law enforcement limitations.

1257

They should be an avid outdoor goer, both spending time personally hunting and fishing.

1258

Listen to the public. There is a reason why Oregon Outdoor Council was formed.

1259

A strong understanding of the diverse viewpoints/goals of employees and also of conservation groups that do not
exploit wildlife and fish resources. These employees/groups are vital to the future of the agency.

1260

the ability to work with and communicate with diverse stakeholders

1261

I would love the director to be an avid sportsman himself as well as have the ability to relate to the less populated
areas of the state aka eastern oregon that has been abused and bullied in recent voting and have not had their
needs and have been trampled by the majority.

1262

Be very, very safety conscious and communicate to the employees. Nothing we do at ODFW is worth a disabling
injury or death.

1263

The next director will need to maintain or increase employee morale while the agency's budget declines. The
next director needs to be a strong advocate for the fish and wildlife resources of Oregon, without capitulating to
business interests. The director must be a strong advocate for hunters and anglers, both resident and nonresident.

1264

One of the most outstanding qualities of our last Director, ########### was his ability to treat everyone he met
with dignity and respect. For employees this encouraged strong feeling that we were working as a team toward
common objectives, I can only imagine members of the public that dealt with ### had the same feeling. I would
hate to lose that quality in our next Director.

1265

Passion for wildlife conservation and demonstrated success in successfully resolving controversial issues
Knowledgeable and experienced in wolf conservation Courage under fire!

1266

Ability to embrace new technologies and techniques both for fisheries research and fisheries participation.
Experience with developing alternative funding - to get beyond hunters and fishers funding ODFW work that
benefits all Oregonians.

1267

The ability to clean house of incompetent managers who got us into this financial mess. A person from outside
the agency needs to be hired. Someone who is a quick learn and hardnosed.

1268

I would like to see a Director that is a hunter/fisherman with a dedication to continue the tradition of hunting and
fishing in Oregon. Communicating well with stakeholders and standing up to all the activists.

1269

Must be able to develop an open and honest dialog with State legislative leaders and other political motivated
entities to build trust and understanding of important resource/conservation issues.

1270

long-term experience working within fish and wildlife or natural resources; experience that includes entry level
through biologist and management

60 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1271

Commitment to the staff and mission to provide them what they need to be successful in the programs they are
tasked with. Preventing the ship from sinking is critical, charting a new (strategic, prioritized, or focused) course
comes second.

1272

An explicit interest in equity: how it applies to the agency's work, both internally and externally. Is the agency
serving the needs of all Oregonians, beyond those who have traditionally been in mind when policies and
programs are developed?

1273

Must work with the legislature cooperatively.

1274

Demonstrated commitment to communication and transparency with employees and the public. People may not
like your decision, but they will trust you more if they know why you made the decisions you made. Even better if
you ask employee and public opinion prior to making that decision. Also demonstrated commitment to
conservative fiscal practices - we need someone who isn't afraid to take risks, but isn't willing to over-extend us
or gamble with our finances.

1275

Courage to do the right thing, even when it isn't popular. Ability to communicate why the right thing is the right
thing. Vision to stay the course, even when small fires are erupting right and left which may distract from overall
direction. Positive, yet realistic, attitude. Thick skin! Will be a tough period, to say the least!

1276

An employee from the agency would be best to guide the agency through the next decade. An outsider would
only decrease confidence in the public perception of the agency and would decrease the confidence of the
employees themselves would have in the agency. We're having a hard enough time recruiting and keeping good
employees.

1277

In my opinion, the next director needs to have the ability to synthesize and the lead decision making process
around complex biological, social, and political issues in a timely manner. He or she needs to be willing to listen
to a wide range of opinions and make sometimes difficult decisions. It is key that the new director demonstrates
an ability to lead in an environment in which science is the foundation but social and political contexts are
influential is key.

1278

A thick skin and a person that has no family life because there will not be tome for any. Strong leadership and
someone that holds upper management accountable. Good communication skills to the field personnel and
understands that staffing needs have dramatically increased in the field. (speaking for wildlife) I understand there
are needs in HQ also.

1279

I strongly believe recruitment should come from outside of the Agency. This will provide a broader experience
and a clean slate. For lack of a better term, there is too much inbreeding in the agency. It is a good old boy
system that struggles to create and implement new, dynamic vision beyond the traditional fishing and hunting
paradigms. The agency operates with 20th Century tools - it is unheard of in this day and age for a resource
agency to not support GIS and database development. It should be the anchor of the agency. Data collection (not
just on fish) is paramount at a time where climate change will have drastic effects on our landscape, and we
barely know what species we have where. The new director should be willing to consider novel approaches to
conservation, even if controversial. Look to California or Washington as model agencies. The new Director
should prioritize conservation, not hunting and fishing.

1280

Needs a good sense of humor; the agency is, by nature & conflicting mandate, schizophrenic.

1281

Willingness to listen to employees ideas and concerns. Foster on environment for career growth for ODFW
employees.

1282

Excellent record as a supervisor, should be well respected by past employees

1283

Needs to know how to get control of our cougar problem. Without the use of state hired bounty hunters. This is
not a difficult problem to solve, we just need Someone willing to use the facts to show the opposers what a
derelict system it is NOW. Basically we need someone with balls that's not afraid of the yuppies in this blue state.

1284

Vision is essential. Status quo is failing the agency and stakeholders. Finding a director with an understanding
right now on what the next steps should be and who can work collaboratively with the commission to grow the
agency's mission and the agency's essential role in economic development and conservation.

1285

Makes tough sound decisions on time Clearly explains mission, standards and priorities Keeps cool under
pressure Sees the big picture, provides conrext and perspective Gains trust and build teams Is positive,
encouraging and realsitically optomistic Knows the right balance between confidence and arrogance and the right
balance between humility & insecurity

61 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1286

I would like the next ODFW director to have experience working within an existing or forecasted budget. I would
like the next ODFW director to have demonstrated in the past that they don't have a record of establishing
budgetary needs first, and then trying to figure out how to acquire those funds. The next ODFW director needs to
know how to prioritize projects given a limited budget.

1287

1. Charismatic and like-able. 2. Good communicator; able to clearly articulate expectations and delegate
assignments to subordinate staff.

1288

Fortitude in resisting special interest-based programs that are pushed on the agency for reasons other than valid
biology and management of the state's resources. Example: Marine reserves that serve no management purpose
but are instead a "feel-good" PR opportunity.

1289

Interested in the success in field offices and be inclusive.

1290

a. Experience with elected officials. The greatest challenge to ODFW is reduced resources at a time when the
issues and competing values are getting more complex and require more visionary leadership. b. Ability to recruit
top talent to do the management required to demonstrate that ODFW is a good steward of the resource, and to
motivate staff when traditional motivations (advancement, financial) aren't available. All of the ODFW staff I know
are intrinsically motivated by what they're doing -- they can be coached, but aren't fundamentally the problem.

1291

The director needs to be able to converse and interact with all employees (executive to EBA) in a manner that
shows he/she truly values and cares about that employee's opinion and job.

1292

A true desire to allow science to manage fish and wildlife and not politics.

1293

Productive and result oriented; committed to spending the time necessary to manage and communicate with
team; confident without arrogance.

1294

An understanding of how a government agency works, including the political side of things.

1295

Have an understanding of what our major constituents (hunters and anglers) desire and prioritize fishing and
hunting opportunities to the extent possible. Understand that many, if not most, equate harvest with opportunity.
The director should be able to connect with the employees in the field, not become a figurehead that appears out
of touch with what is going on around the state.

1296

Solid comprehension of the research that has been conducted on PNW Fish and wildlife, and ability to
incorporate that into policy discussions/debates on an ad-hoc basis.

1297

Oversight and administration over deputy department administrators job performance: meeting the mission, goals
and priorities of the ODFW.

1298

The next ODFW Director should possess a deep and abiding respect for the principles of the Endangered
Species Act with regard towards agency actions/practices that could potentially impair recovery of listed species
and top use the best, most recently available science to guide those decisions.

1299

They need to be a people person who is approachable.

1300

Get ODFW out of our massive debt without continually raising licensing fees.

1301

The ability to identify and measure desirable traits (e.g. performance, accuracy, timeliness, effectiveness, etc.) in
an organization and focus on enriching those areas most in need of improvement.

1302

I have always admired a Director who is personable to everyone even the "Worker Bees."

1303

Have experience or knowledge of the regions natural resource issues.

1304

He must like to fish and hunt and be active in doing so. (He must have had hunting and fishing licenses every
year for the past 10 years).

1305

We need a person, and a leadership team that promotes thoughtful, professional approach to solving complex
fish and wildlife management issues. Someone who does not react to every crisis, but rather relies on their
experts, and provides support for sound decisions using a team approach...not just a top-down dictatorial
approach. Someone who maintains a calm in the face of a storm, and who does not "give-in" every time there is a
short term decision to be made only to find that decision affects long term management of fish and wildlife.
Someone who actually knows what fish and wildlife resources, and our constituents, need to be successful.

1306

Not micro manage, ability to trust field personnel and the scientific solutions to manage Oregon's wildlife. Not
interested accomplishing in personal pet projects which go against field personnel's recommendation's.
Understand Oregon's political system able to understand landowners concerns about fish & wildlife issues that
effect not only them but the people of Oregon

62 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1307

The Director should be aware of the very real divide between Eastern Oregon and Western Oregon wildlife
issues and needs of the residents dealing with damage and depredation, as well as the challenges employees
face with different weather and terrain to complete their job.

1308

Ability to listen and respect staff viewpoints and information, especially if not from Oregon and needs to learn
about the historical evolution of Fish and Wildlife and understand the existing relationships and needs of the many
concerned citizens and groups around the state.

1309

A mindset that brings an understanding that the "experience as a skilled consensus builder working with multiple
stakeholders, often with competing interests" applies to internal operations as well and who's mindset includes
the totality of all staff's contribution to the work that we do - one that integrates and honors the responsibilities of
each function of the organization to the work that we do - e.g. HQ and the field, Operations and Administrative
Offices. Change is coming. Someone who has not only the vision of the future of the agency's work but who is
also able to make the hard decisions that I believe will be necessary for the agency to operate within the
resources it has and who can communicate that vision/plan to stakeholders (including employees) with sufficient
lead times for individuals/entities to plan exit strategies for those endeavors that ODFW will no longer support.

1310

Get over the fact that the future of natural resource funding is hunter/angler dollars. The department must diversify
itself and be a stronger advocate for habitat and work with conservation groups such as RMEF that are
willing to financially support fish and wildlife conservation. Not only will this diversify ODFW's funding source but it
will increase public support! Invest in ODFW's infrastructure. Specifically technology.

1311

1. Demonstrated ability to foster partnerships with hunting/fishing industry and sporting groups with the intent of
growing participation in these activities. 2. Strong, charismatic leader who has the ability to align and inspire
employees. The Department needs 1 person to set the tone and who is willing to be strong enough to ensure it is
followed through on. 3. Both resource and business/customer focused. Needs to be able to weigh conservation
benefits vs. business (funding via license sales) costs.

1312

LEADERSHIP! Clear and concise directions and goals. Less political BS and greater vision for ODFW's future as
an agency.

1313

Yes. This person should be an energetic and trustworthy leader who will listen to employees' concerns and help
boost the sagging morale of agency employees. Listen to your employees who are the ones doing the biological
research and make your decisions based on that instead of solely for political purposes. We, as employees,
understand the need to balance science and public opinion, but making natural resource decisions based on
politics really undermines us. Example - the timing of spring bear season in Southwest Oregon was a political
decision made several years ago because ########### has timber farm that bears are damaging. Never mind
the research showing when female bears with cubs exit their dens. Perfect example of a natural resource
decision based solely on politics! We also need a leader who, like ###, will work collaboratively with SEIU.

1314

Have an understanding of other natural resource agencies and organization missions and restoration plans so
better collaboration can take place with less contradiction in the desired end results.

1315

A mindset of an "open door" policy for the public and employees of ODFW. The only reason employees became
aware of Director #######'s retirement was that a news story was going to break within minutes of the email from
his office to all employees. In addition, the current budget shortfall came as a compete surprise to the majority of
ODFW employees (and management) even though someone had to know earlier. This budget shortfall causes
distrust of statements made that ODFW was in a strong financial position during the remodel of the new
headquarters and extremely beautiful interior that seems more than half empty most of the time. If we were
strong, how did the shortfall occur. How would a new Director learn from this and would s/he make changes
about how this was communicated to the employees/management? If yes, describe how.

1316

I offer this suggestion and all others here as a grateful recipient of a stewardship awards from ODFW, ODF, and
the Oregon chapter of The Wildlife Society, and I offer them in light of my subsequent master's thesis. The latter
concerns "Risk to maintenance-dependent species from orthodoxy in species-based land-use regulation" (Novick
2013, ). In it, I argue such regulation risks exacerbating the loss of maintenance-dependent species on private
land, as actors widely seek to use such regulation to seek other benefits, such as to secure scenery on the
property of others, with at best limited regard for consequent risk to species. As I argue, such species-based
regulation poses a risk to maintenance-dependent species by inadvertently tending to it self-defeating for
otherwise willing individuals to conserve or maintain declining species on land they own, such as by controlling
invasive exotic vegetation. In this light, I hope the next Director might have the vision and courage to overcome
the momentum of bureaucracy and received wisdom, to seek a fresh understanding of the intent and effects of
species-based land-use regulation and to consider potential opportunities for policy efficiencies to help species
and humans alike.

63 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1317

To have the ability to not cater to user groups that do not use science as a justification for management
reallocation To have the ability to see that resource management of natural populations that don't appear to be in
danger of being listed as a sensitive status is still important. This includes the funding associated with such.

1318

education and work background in wildlife or fisheries management

1319

Be more visible to all departments in the agency have a open door policy to all employees.

1320

I believe that the new director needs to have the ability to stand firm in the ongoing struggle against hardcore
environmental groups that seek to end hunting and fishing opportunities in Oregon. I believe we need someone
who can see that without selling hunting and fishing licenses our agency is slated for failure.

1321

Ability to communicate quickly, directly, and honestly with employees about the budget and other organization
issues. Ability to work well with the legislature. Willingness to listen to employee points of view regarding
conservation and resource issues.

1322

We need someone from the outside who can bring a new set of eyes to look at our situation. The status quo will
not work in the future.

1323

It would be extremely valuable for the new director to have experience in replacing hatchery infrastructure and
the costs associated with that work. A couple other experiences that would be beneficial would be a working
understanding of water right laws and state and federal fish passage and screening laws.

1324

-creative thinker -respectful of employees -conservation minded -able to build bridges

1325

I feel that a director from outside the agency with new ideas and perspectives would be good for the agency. The
way the agency is headed hasn't been overly successful and we need to take a step back and get some fresh
ideas on how things need to be done to be successful.

1326

To be approachable to all ODFW employees no matter where they meet or what the circumstances are. To listen
and value all ODFW employees ideas. The recent director was great at this.

1327

Someone that can stand up to the majority if the majority is wrong and not using sound judgement with facts.

1328

Fnding creative ways to bring in money for the protection of non-game species and ecosystems. Much of the
focus seems to be on game species which is understandable due to the financial aspect that is needed for the
agency to function.

1329

1. Personal integrity - must not allow personal biases influence policy decisions affecting management of fish,
wildlife and/or wildlife areas. 2. Strength of character to speak the truth even when the truth is unpopular or is not
politically beneficial. If ODFW does not educate the public about the realities of wildlife management, who will?

1330

I think ODFW could do better with public relations. We need to be more open about what we are doing and why
we are doing it.

1331

Experience interacting and building trust/support from a governor's office/legislative body.

1332

Foster relationships with employees at all levels of the department.

1333

A solid understanding of invasive species impacts to ecosystems. In this day of extreme transport of animals and
plants around the globe, and the potential for invasive species to severely harm native ecosystems, it is
imperative that the Director of an Agency which moves fish and wildlife all around the state, and which may be
asked to introduce game animals into new areas, understands the ecological implications of animal
translocations. I am not impressed, for example, that an infestation of New Zealand mudsnails was likely present
at a fish hatchery (in Washington) for several years before being reported, and fish from that hatchery were
moved to many locations. Fish & Wildlife agencies need to do a better job of understanding these issues and
training their staff.

1334

No more status quo. Needs to hold upper management responsible for their mistakes, up to and including
dismissal. No more favoritism, pet projects, and the good ol' boy's club.

1335

Be a Duck! University of Oregon Fan.

1336

Inside knowledge of how ODFW operates. Understanding the people within the organization.

1337

Follow the laws and rules established rather than letting a person or group undermine our integrity by allowing
exceptions to the squeakiest wheel.

1338

Political skills; ability to work with legislators and governor's office to win support for needed changes.

1339

Experience working with legislative bodies, although not necessarily as a department head.

64 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1340

The director should exemplify the highest standards of moral and ethical conduct.

1341

The director must follow state and administrative law, tell the truth, and not blackball individuals or groups that
promote a high standard of conservation of fish and wildlife, in the state and region. The director and his agency
leadership does not punish staff that are dedicated to following the agency rules and mission, and is provides the
public and staff with a fair and open minded assessment of ideas, proposals and work.

1342

Humor

1343

The ability to foster a sense of community within the fishing public, and bring together opposing sides.

1344

Use science to back policy. Don't bend to user groups if their views are not in the best interest of the resource.
Put the resource first, and the bottom line second.

1345

An understanding that ODFW has great personnel and decisions should be weighted heavily on ODFW experts
opinion. If decisions must be political then the director should be able to articulate the reasoning behind decisions
to their employees.

1346

Ability to work independent of current political climate to protect Oregon's natural treasures: streams, fish and
clean water, and forest buffers.

1347

Absolutely must have a hunting, fishing, and conservation background.

1348

Abilityto communicate with Legislators in a manner that explains the issues of the agency and clearly explains the
budget implications of any policy considerations. Ability to have a good relationship with these decisionmakers of
all parties and personal beliefs is critical to the success of the agency.

1349

ability to develop partnerships vision and leadership--forward looking--willing to reimagine the future for ODFW

1350

Need to be able to lead the development of new funding sources!

1351

Coordinate activities/mgt./conservation across state boundaries and regionally

1352

I would like to stress the importance of dealing with emerging problems. Hunting revenues are declining for
ODFW, but various non-consumptive wildlife uses (e.g., birdwatching) are very important to Oregonians. How to
capture some funds that allows the agency to reflect a broader policy of wildlife management is an emerging
problem that is very important. Likewise managing for some threatened or sensitive species that have potential
conflicts with resource extraction or ranching. Wolves and sea otters come to mind. ODFW must take a lead role
in managing conflict and providing leadership for co-existence.

1353

Budgeting experience and sucess will be key so that should automatically disqualify any applicants from ODFW
Fish Division. The agency also needs a person familiar with western fish and game management. ODFW needs
a creative visionary leader. It may be time for an outsider.

1354

An understanding of the relationship between employee morale and optimal performance. Someone who has a
high level of critical thinking skills and has demonstrated problem solving ability. Willingness to implement
innovative changes to address issues. Experience in developing short term and long term goals and benchmarks.
Ability to communicate the importance of and guide the evaluation and assessment of programs and measure
their progress toward established goals. Ability and willingness to prioritize the collection of data necessary for
scientifically defensible decisions.

1355

Better balancing resources to meet agency mission related to non-game wildlife conservation.

1356

Understand what a customer is and listen to them

1357

Someone who will follow ODFWs mission statement.

1358

An understanding of and experience with Oregon conservation opportunities and challenges

1359

The new director should direct the staff to prioritize the needs of the native fish and wildlife under the agency's
management as the first order of business. Fully implementing the conservation directive in the state wildlife
policy (ORS 496.012) would be a great place to begin. Always following the law and telling the truth is the best
way to restore the public's trust in the agency.

1360

DEVELOP SUBORDINATE STAFF!! 1. Honesty & integrity 2. Direct experience with fish or wildlife field work. 3.
Good team builder and team player. 4. An agency builder rather than a resume builder. 5. Learn about and
continually support both the field staff, regional, OSP and management staff. 6. Deliver on what you promise. 7.
Fiscally skilled and accountable. 8. Have teaching/ training skills. 9. Delegate effectively and hold the staff
accountable.

65 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1361

be an avid hunter and fisherman who won't bend or compromise to political interests.

1362

The Director needs to be able to reach out to all employees of the agency, not just the deputies who surround
him/her.

1363

blah blah

66 / 66

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

Q3 The mission of the Oregon Department


of Fish and Wildlife is to protect and
enhance Oregon's fish and wildlife and their
habitats for the use and enjoyment by
present and future generations. The
Director is responsible for managing the
Department in a manner that serves this
mission. What are the critical issues or key
challenges you believe the new Director
and/or the agency faces over the next 10
years?
Answered: 1,665

Skipped: 731

Responses

Round Butte Dam and the fish passage. Does not seem to be working and PGE playing God

I believe the key challenge has always been and will always be the eternal "balancing act." This organization has
the hard job of balancing out conservation and production for recreation, and usually both of those folks have
traditionally been on opposite sides of the fence. However, I believe with new technologies and research coming
out of the hatchery world that we should be able to bring the two crowds a little closer together. This is an issue
that will be extremely hard to manage though.

Poorly run organization that is not accomplishing its mission of enhancing wildlife habitat, what's happen to the
pheasant hunting in Ontario? Just an example Budget issues as the state legislature continues to raid sprortsmen
fees and taxes to balance their out of control spending The lack of understanding of the impact that eliminating
hatcheries have on communities that rely upon sportsman to survive. Hatchery vs wild , same damn fish

The biggest challenge will be the rise of fee based hunting areas and the effect that will have on public and nonfee based land.

Fish habitat and water preservation. Turning the General public's view back to the fact that tap water is safe, fresh
and so much more environmentally friendly than bottled, trucked in water.

The new Director will have to face the tough questions on Hoof rot and its root cause. Will that Director be willing
to look at all of the science and not selected or biased science in order to direct employees towards finding the
cause. Transparency and honesty with the public will be essential as well as willingness to publicly and fairly
show the cause while developing a plan on how to help the suffering animals.

Preventing the depletion of resources and creating a public climate for their protection even if license revenues
decline or fail to keep up with needs.

ONE KEY ISSUE IS HOW TO MAINTAIN REVENUE IN THE FACE OF DECLINING NUMBERS OF LICENSES.
WHEN ODFW RELYS HEAVILY ON HUNTING AND FISHING LICENSES, CONSERVATION PRIORITIES ARE
OFTEN IGNORED.

Climate change. Privatization of what should be in public trust.

10

Replacing the trees that once cooled the earth.

11

Increasing salmon restoration efforts. Protection of top predator species. Increasing wolf protections and finding
ways to financially compensate ranchers for livestock losses, rather than killing predators. Ending springtime
bear hunting which puts cubs at risk of being abandoned. Working with other agencies and conservation
organizations towards more funding and support for dam removals and river restoration. Working with other
agencies for increasing protection buffer zones around rivers and streams. Working with other agencies and
conservation organizations to protect our forests and river habitats so fish and wildlife flourish to the maximum
extent possible.

1 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


12

The new director should protect our public water resources and not give them away to corporations such as
Nestl that have no concern for future generations, only for current profit.

13

1. water 2. water 3. water 4. habitat reestablishment 5. apex preditors

14

Competition of priorities between management of habitat for wildlife and influence of ranchers/farmers and
fisheries.

15

1. How to manage non-native species that are in direct competition with native species. For example, warm water
non-native fish species versus salmonids. 2. Climate change and its effects on streamflows, especially in
watersheds with ESA listed fish.

16

To allow for wilderness areas where flora and fauna can thrive. To determine and mitigate impacts by people on
the wilderness. If the full complement of plants and animals are not protected, there will be no wilderness for
future generations to appreciate.

17

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

18

Hatchery fish impacts on native salmonid populations - take the science and act on it Climate change - mitigation
and adaptation and impacts on native species Budget - maintain services, collaborations, technical assistance in
difficult budget times

19

1.Land use changes particularly in urban/rural interface. 2.Increasing population. 3.Increasing urbanization of
population that does not directly utilize fish and wildlife (i.e. hunters and fishermen) 4.Decrease public desire to
pay fees or taxes that fund conservation measures 5.Climate change

20

No bottling plant in the Columbia Gorge.

21

Revenue shortfall due to less interested parties.

22

The key challenge will be charting a new course in the face of declining hunting and fishing. We need to be taking
an ecosystem approach to conservation and responding to the needs of new stakeholder groups.

23

BUDGET CONCERNS HUNTER AND FISHERMAN RETENTION AND RECRUITMENT

24

Protecting public lands from commercial enterprises, clean water, protecting endangered species.

25

Effective mitigation for impacts to fish and wildlife due to development and operation of the Federal Columbia
River Power System. Sustained funding including for conservation needs of non-game fish and wildlife.
Succession resources to replace retiring staff. The Federal Columbia River Power System 2018 federal Biological
Opinion. 2019 amendments to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 2014 Columbia River Basin Fish
and Wildlife Program. Preparing for climate change impacts to fish, wildlife, and their habitat.

26

The conflict between human development/use and resource sustainability. If the agency mission is successfully
fulfilled, it will become increasingly difficult to achieve the "future generation" part of the mission - the resources
will be squeezed out and challenged like never before, with pointed conflicts (case-by-case development
projects) as well as non-point source conflicts (climate change and its associated effects). Natural resource
management policy is not prepared for the non-point source conflicts, in particular.

27

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

28

The new Director needs to use sound science, not adopt policies that cater to those wishing to capitalize on our
natural resources. Should take conservation, especially native species management more seriously.

29

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

30

ODFW is too much of a hook-and-bullet agency. Many of the agencys biggest challenges have to do with
managing dwindling fish & wildlife populations in the context of an increasing human footprint. Yet much of the
agencys emphasis remains on selling more hunting and fishing licenses. ODFW needs to take seriously its role
as a regulator (not a promoter) of hunting and fishing. The agency needs to learn to appeal to the nonconsumptive population in order to remain pertinent to all Oregonians and before it will be able to justify new
revenue sources.

2 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


31

It is important that ODFW listens to all Oregonians, not just the special interest groups of the ranchers, hunters,
and anglers. There are many of us who believe that wild animals have the right to exist and be left alone to live
out their lives as nature intended. We hike, camp, bike, climb, and photograph, among other things. Some of us
are urban dwellers who realize the importance of natural wilderness areas. Some of us are rural dwellers who
love to quietly watch the deer and birds in our backyards and cringe at the continuous gunshots all around.
Please protect our state's wildlife for future generations and stop the unnecessary killing.

32

Developing a sustainable financing structure for the agency. Managing natural resources in the face of climate
change.

33

Managing a budget that will allow the accomplishment of the mission is likely to be a big issue.

34

Handling highly volatile issues.

35

diversifying the agency's budget right sizing the agency programs to meet statutory requirements to manage fish
and wildlife building partnerships and support with a broader base managing hunter/angler expectations

36

Climate change, development, over-fishing, hunting.

37

Maintaining the agency's mission during a time of changing priorities, financial resources, and public interests.
Hunting and fishing license numbers are going to continue to decline, and an entirely untapped customer base of
citizens interested in wildlife viewing and enjoying high quality natural resources is available. Additionally, as
government agencies (state, federal, and local) look to ODFW to provide information in accessible formats on
where to develop, ODFW needs to be ready to lead these discussions.

38

Hunter opportunity. Access to private lands program need to be better. Stop managing non native fish as sport
fish. Do away with the two pole license, just include that with the costs as the rise. Balance the Tribal deer and
elk harvest with non tribal harvest. Fishing and hunting access

39

Balance of resource use between user groups

40

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

41

Lack of hunting /fishing properties.

42

"to protect and enhance" would require you to move away from MSY as a management philosophy. Your
management strategies are outdated and obsolete.

43

How to restore streamflow sufficient for fish and wildlife habitat within the current water rights system. How to play
productively in this arena.

44

Director should protect public water resources by negating ODFW's application to give Oxbow Springs in the
Columbia Gorge to Nestl's bottling plant.

45

Moving away from management of non-native species in sport fisheries

46

Habitat loss and degradation is probably the most critical and contentious issue facing the department, as well as
the broadest. Public relations and outreach will be very important, especially when it comes to predator species
and animals that are not hunted by people, but are still included in the department's mission of preservation and
enhancement.

47

Keeping for profit organizations like Nestle out of Mt. Hood. I understand the need to be practical and provide jobs
to working Oregonians. However, these types of business ventures do not serve the interest of Oregonians nor
their future. We have challenges ahead, specifically climate change. Some may deny it out of self interest or
other reasons but climate change is already affecting many already around the world and it will only get worse.
Our new leaders need to be willing to embrace this knowledge and take the necessary steps to safeguard our
resources such as water. I would hate to see Oregon struggle as California does because of poor resource
management (Even if there are other contributing factors). Countries like Spain and Germany are at the forefront
of using alternate forms of energy and food production. Oregonians should be like the first settlers, true pioneers
but this time in conservation, and an example to the rest our great nation. Our new Director should have a clear
vision of how to accomplish this.

48

stop stocking of rivers and lakes with game fish. reduce dependence on hatchery operations to mitigate
hydroelectric projects. stop trucking salmonids around dams. educate the public on the need to prioritize the
protection and enhancement of biodiversity, even to the detriment of hunting /fishing interests. protect our public
water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

49

Increased direction from regulating agencies to focus restoration efforts on more targeted areas.

3 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


50

Climate Change Maintaining healthy fish and wildlife populations without impacting habitat Restoration of
degraded habitat Invasive species management

51

predator control

52

acidification, erosion, and other climate related issues resource allocation

53

managing recovery efforts, while being vilified by groups that have no scientific understanding of the subject
material.

54

The protection and preservation of local and global ecosystems is the greatest concern of our era. This means
taking steps to counter global warming and the privatization of natural and public resources for the corporate
profits. For example Nestle should be blocked from bottling water in the Columbia Gorge. Bottling water in plastic
bottles and trucking/shipping it is an unsustainable process that pollutes the environment through the production
of plastics, the waste of disposed bottles, and the carbon emissions of manufacture and transport. The second
issue is the dangers that hatchery fish pose to wild Salmon runs. The new director should place science and
preservation of wild runs over the political and economic pressures of commercial and sport fishermen.

55

To stabilize and enhance funding and staffing for all the elements of fish and wildlife conservation mandated by
our statutes and mission. Provide leadership on important conservation priorities identified in Oregon by U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service; and collaborate with our neighboring states on regional fish and wildlife management.

56

1) The next director must address the misalignment of the agency mission with the agency revenue. This means
a fundamental change in agency philosophy. More of the same cannot work. We will continue run this agency
into the dirt if we continue to try to meet our broader statutory requirements on the funding of hunters and anglers
(dwindling licence $). 2) The next director must be a visionary and inspirational leader able to communicate an
agency vision which allows employees to understand how their work fits into the bigger picture. The agency has
been without this leadership style for over a decade and it shows. See #2 above.

57

One thing I am concerned with is how far the pendulum swung towards commercial interests over conservation
efforts for our public lands. I do understand that many of our fellow states-people have suffered economically as
a result, and feel that the rules have changed on them. But fact of matter is that the rules have changed, and the
future demographics of out state will want more towards conservation from ODFW. People should still be able to
make money of *their* land, but I want to absolutely minimize their impact on *our common land*. I am not happy
at all concerning the pending application by your agency regarding Nestle and Oxbox Springs. Please don't go
down this road, and start something that won't be stopped. Thank you for your time and consideration.

58

Yes, the mission includes the protection and enhancement of Oregons fish and wildlife and their habitats,
however, habitat protections often get the short end of the stick. The ODFW Habitat Resources Program and field
Habitat Biologists are slated for being cut. You can't have fish or wildlife without habitat. Land use issues are
critical for ODFW to be engaged in. We need to be proactive with land use planning not only for growth but
habitat connectivity. The new Director needs to be strong in discussing these concerns and leading ODFW to be
involved in land use planning processes. We are the fish and wildlife agency-without us-no one is speaking for
habitat. We need to integrate the fish, wildlife and habitat data into policy decisions. ODFW can no longer depend
on Goal 5 protections, we need to be proactive and integrate our data into the processes for land use and
development.

59

Relationships! With the public (trust at all levels non-existent. or nearly so) With implementing partners (very
difficult to effectively work with ODFW Passage & Protection Program) With other key constituents and
organizations, like the State Legislature (who always seems to have questions for ODFW) We have tried our best
to remind agency staff about how important long term relationships are in terms of getting work completed on the
ground, but to no avail. This issue does not seem to resonate at all with the leadership at ODFW. I think this
needs to be different with new director.

60

Funding. Engaging non-consumptive wildlife users and developing new funding sources. Addressing critical
issues such as hatchery management, predator managment, declining mule deer herds, lead poisoning in
raptors, and others using sound, supportable scientific reasoning regardless of political pressures to do otherwise.

61

Continuing pressure to weaken ODFW's ability to implement its mission. Convincing the legislature to allocate
General Fund money to ODFW.

62

The new director will likely be facing greater pressure to privatize our natural resources. One example is the
application of Nestle to site a bottling plant in the Columbia River Gorge. I feel very strongly that said director
needs to see the long term harm of privatization in general and the Nestle bottling plant in particular and should
be protective of public resources for the public. A first step would be withdrawing ODF&W's application for the
Nestle bottling plant at Oxbow Springs.

4 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


63

Water. Water cannot be given or sold to any entity who would then make a profit from selling that water, bottled or
otherwise.

64

Battles over water rights, land use, noise pollution, forest preserves and and the destruction of native wildlife and
habitat for corporate and personal greed. This will especially be important with global warming and we need
someone who has a vision for the future that protects and preserves our state heritage. i.e. someone like
Theodore Roosevelt, whose vision created National Parks and Monuments to preserve these things for the next
generation.

65

Water allocation, toxics in the environment, air quality, the intersection of human and nature, the importance of
the natural in our world, leaving other species their own room to grow and live.

66

One of the key challenges will be dealing with bottled water companies that would like to bottle, transport, and
sell our water. Water is a finite and vital resource. It should not be bottled and shipped for commercial profit of the
few.

67

The corporate theft of Oregons pristine water sources.

68

Enhancing and encouraging public access while protecting the natural areas and species. Nestl - protecting wild
spaces to keep Oregon the way we are proud to have it be. Wild and free. Director will need to have ability to
deal with nestle and other similar situations that will arrive, and to recognize that multinational companies make a
lot of promises about how they will operate that they often do not keep.

69

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

70

Increasing natural resource restoration and protection with limited or decreasing resources

71

The most critical issue facing the new Director is the decline in license sales. The agency is in a budget crisis and
without general funds or other long-term funding sources the agency will need to make hard decisions. The
agency cannont continue to raise the fees. The next critical issue that the Director faces is the workforce, with
budget constrants workers are being asked to do more with less. The agency and the Director also faces tougher
political pressures.

72

That mission and even the name "Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife" is a joke. You are the Department of
Hunting and Fishing. I worked hard to be able to afford a house in the country. Every year in deer and elk season I
feel like I live in a war zone. Expensive trucks are parked all up and down our road and bow hunters and rifle
hunters prowl all around our property, sometimes shooting right over our property. I can't even hike on public
lands safely in the autumn. My neighbors and I are all angry, but we have no say in the hunting regulations where
we live. We pay taxes to support you, but you do nothing for us. Oregon has almost 4 million residents. Under
7% are hunters. When is ODFW going to represent the rest of us?

73

Access to land, so older hunters can still hunt with limited mobility. Keep roads open! Stop selling the Oregon
wildlife, charging to hunt of their land.

74

Educating the public that what they do at home effects all nature and the environment around them. As I wrote
above, people cannot expect to pollute the waterways from toxic run off from chemical fertilizers and expect to
have healthy rivers with plenty of fish. There are organic and non toxic sustainable alternatives to all the sources
of pollution today and helping provide such information to people, to make that change, is paramount to
maintaining a healthy environment. Chemtrails and the toxic chemicals sprayed is also polluting our waterways
and notably caused the decline of insects and birds, and is slowly killing trees. I think a big challenge that's
important is for more public involvement and cooperation. I also think more land should be protected and a focus
of keeping these areas connected prevents 'management issues' such as the wolves and animal farmer conflicts,
etc.

75

Corridors Biodiversity Climate change Over management OverPopulation Integrity Water rights Restoration

76

Being educated in the ways that nature has shown work best and implementing them with as little disruption as
possible.

77

Keeping Nestle out of Oxbow Springs and the Columbia River Gorge, as well as the rest of the state of Oregon.
Allowing Nestle to bottle and profit from our public water is not okay.

78

Unremitting decreases in water, wildlife, plant resources unless #1 and #2 above are accomplished and extended
indefinitely . Unremitting destruction of air, water, land, wildlife and plant species unless #1 and #2 are adhered
to.

79

Boycott nestle

5 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


80

Manage wildlife better, we need to manage the deer and elk units more as a unit than the whole state. You seem
to give (sell) more tags for units that population's are down. You (we) need to do a better job. Also there needs to
be more predator control hound hunting would help that.

81

I think that the general public believes the department does the opposite of protecting fish and wildlife. Many
would consider the department's policies toward fish and wildlife to be inhumane. Too much of the department's
revenue comes from license fees, causing the expenditures to be weighted toward management of populations
for the purpose of fishing and hunting, rather than for the mission stated above. It is critical that the agency identify
and pursue revenue streams from the 3,054,065 Oregonians who do not kill fish or wildlife. I would gladly
pay to protect and enjoy Oregon's animals and their environment. I deeply resent having hunters and trappers fire
guns and set their traps in my neighborhood. I would love to have a director who was willing to survey a broad
sample of Oregonians about their views on fish and wildlife and their expectations of the department.

82

Loss of bees due to fertilizers

83

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

84

Giving Oxbow Springs to Nestle is absolutely and completely in conflict with the mission statement. The new
director should withdraw ODF&W application to give our public water- necessary to people, fish, and other
wildlife-to Nestle.

85

$$$$$$$$$$$ and. Politicians

86

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

87

Working to educate businesses and the public in how they can help with this mission and monitoring to be sure
they do. Preserving areas we have now and looking for more - perhaps working with private sources to establish
wilderness areas within private properties too. Being honest with the public about clear cutting and other
damaging projects over the long term

88

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl

89

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

90

Retaining control of our natural resources. Protecting them and increasing their usable value to the public and
wildlife. Protecting forest by not allowing any clear cutting. Never giving control of water sources or access to
flow to businesses.

91

Dealing with the logging industry. A lot of the timber sales are on Federal land but if clear-cuts affect the wildlife
which the state owns then the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife should be interceding in the case of salmon
runs, loss of habitat and any other destructive damage the logging is doing to our eco-structure.

92

Preparing for climate change Maintaining habitat connectivity in the face of increasing development and urban
expansion Connecting with and gaining the trust of the citizens of Oregon

93

Climate change, over-"harvest", too many roads in the forests, CO2 pollution, and GMOs.

94

Indians

95

Facing corporate take over of public water.

96

See above

97

The new director should withdraw the ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs to Nestl, prioritizing the
protection of public water resources.

98

Protecting wildlife from disease. Avoiding degradation of wildlife health from unhealthy private wildlife
management, such as unnatural over population of game species. Control of introduced game species such as
turkey which may adversely impact native species.

99

Creating a budget that doesn't continue creating a burden for the every day hunter/fisherman.

6 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


100

1.. Using available science in the natural resources to guide decisions. 2. Not catering to minority interests, such
as hunters and ranchers. 3. Adopting a new attitude that encourages respect for ALL animals that live around us,
including cougars, coyotes and wolves, and making sure that their place in the natural cycle is kept strong. We
cannot continue to take territory away from them and then take it out on them when they cross "our" borders. 4.
Protect the beauty of Oregon from those who would plunder it for their own uses.

101

hatchery vs. wild, and good big game mangement

102

Fishery and stream restoration Keeping corporate interests from exploiting our natural resources (Nestle)

103

The collapse of hunting as a sport -- Fish and Wildlife needs to map out a survival plan for the work you do that
expands to cover habitat protection and is less reliant on hunting and fishing revenue.

104

No Nestle as an example of protecting resources for the common good, not for profit by the few

105

The most important issue is threats to our public water resources. The new director should prioritize protecting
these public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give water rights for Oxbow Springs in the
Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

106

keeping the land and water safe from every kind of harm.

107

I believe we have very little time left to save our natural outdoor resources from complete distruction. The new
director sould be stringent in protecting what we have left. The balance between old traditional outdoor practices
and new forward thinking ideas such as "clear cutting" vs "selective cutting", spraying chemicals vs manual
release should be paramount in this person's reasoning. Changing our old habits could be very difficult, but
necessary for the continuation of our earth. With the basic knowledge and focus, that trees are our lungs, that we
need trees to continue the cycle of weather (ocean evaporation- trees pulling down snow and rain- snow melt
filling streams/aquifers) without clear waters we all are at risk, that corporations need a strong force to help them
to be responsible conservators. Without a strong conservationist attitude our future generations will never stand
under an old growth tree, never have even a slight chance of seeing a bear, never be able to catch a fish in a real
stream. To say it very strongly we are killing ourselves! This agency and the director hold all of our lives in their
hands!

108

Keeping costs reasonable.

109

Habitat protection

110

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. No Coal exports through the Columbia gorge

111

Increases in extintion if native flora and fauna, to include predators, which are a vital part of their ecosystems.
Invasive species Freshwater impacts. Physical, chemical and biological issues. Political bullying such as the
budget rider which impacted protection of Oregon's recovering wolf populations. All driven by climate change and
greed.

112

Stay under budget.

113

S/he will probably face quite a bit of croneyism and pressure to exchange political favors. If the Director is a good
one, they may even face threats from corporations who can afford well-funded lobbying and legal teams. I ask
that the new Director and the agency remain steadfast in their mission and stand up to these pressures for the
sake of Oregonians present and future.

114

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

115

In addition to the previous comment, we need to take into consideration the needs of wildife within the balance of
nature. An occaisional lost cow or sheep should be factored into a ranchers budget as the benefits of maintaining
preditor species in the balance of nature is a higher priority than the minor loss of income.

116

Decrease in funding

117

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. No other such applications should be submitted that draw from Oregon
resources for private gain. In addition, working with the Dept of Forestry, protect the wildlife in the Elliot State
Forest from recent threats.

118

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

7 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


119

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. Committ to restoration of the rivers and the removal of river killing
dams. Restore Celilo Falls

120

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. in other words, DON'T GIVE AWAY OUR RESOURCES!

121

Climate change and competing resources for finite resources. The ability to preserve wildlife.

122

Stop pesticide runoff into our streams and waterways.

123

1. Reduce size of department. Your employee per capita ratio is MUCH greater than Washington and Idaho. 2.
Lower out of Stat licence fees to bring back the revenue lost when your previous director DOUBLED them in one
year. You are costing Oregon businesses a lot of money. We NEED those out of staters you've turned away.

124

Ocean acidification and the effect on the shellfish industry

125

There are so many opposing/conflicting factions of Oregon citizens that the Director may have a tendency
toward the Status Quo rather than setting new policy and/or direction of ODFW. Fisheries seems to be spread
widely in the state with duplications of efforts resulting in small self-preserving enterprises. Trapping by body
gripping traps is an indiscriminate misuse of Oregon's wildlife by a small number of citizens that ODFW endorses
rather than questions licensed trapping being an exemption of both State and Federal Anti-cruelty laws.

126

I would like to see a director that is willing to rethink the ODFW's existing culture and help craft an agency that is
in touch with the changing demographics of Oregon. To me, this would reflect a population that, more and more,
engages with public lands through quiet recreation and values habitat conservation in a holistic and ecologically
sound way, as opposed to just increasing numbers of game animals. I'd like to see public resources defended
(for example, Nestle should not be able to bottle water from Oxbow Springs) form private interests. I'd like to see
predators recognized as a vital part of a functioning ecosystem. I'd like to see the rewilding of compromised
landscapes. Thank you.

127

Give back the licsense and tag income to the ODFW.

128

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

129

Providing the best customer service programs possible and preventing overharvesting

130

Protection does not equal exploitation or "resource extraction"

131

Wolves. Special interest groups. Funding is there, just how it is used. Hunters and fisherman are a huge asset to
the funding, but it seems we are the ones paying for all forest recreation. You go out to hunt, and run in to
bicyclists and everything. Who is paying for all of that?

132

Global warming and threat it poses to ecosystems will be a huge problem, that could well result in extinctions.
Given that, I would like the director, and to department, to consider the following important issues: - conservation
as a real goal by including refuges from hunting - ensure native predators receive protections more in line with
other species - implement and maintain predator plans that will require nonlethal strategies as a first response eliminate trapping and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting - consider no
hunting of wolves when they are delisted - effect an outright ban on killing contests

133

Number one is conservation of our recorces we do not want to sell or lease out our public waters we use for our
habitats.

134

. dealing with conflicting perspectives that are all labeled "science" . keeping the concept of ecological balance
central to the task - ie, healthy relationships among all species . standing strong against profit motives . educating
the public - truthfully - about what is at stake in every instance

135

The preservation of natural habitats is a top priority of our age. And the ODF&W is tasked with making that
happen in Oregon. I understand that job development is very important, especially in the rural areas where most
of these habitats exist. But in the long run both the economic health and the actual health of these habitats
depends on the preservation of clean, abundant water and healthy ecosystems. The number one job of the
ODF&W is to protect these ecosystems and keep them healthy. As and example: Giving/selling/trading the water
at Oxbow Springs to Nestle so they can bottle that water is wrong on so many levels. Natural waters need to be
treasured and preserved now. Also there is no scientific reason for bottling water for consumers to buy to take on
their picnics, consume at their staff meetings and otherwise drink for convenience. And Nestle doesn't need the
water from places like Oxbow Springs.

8 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


136

The biggest challenge he will face will be pressures from minority hunters to eradicate Oregon's large predators
and to protect those predators, as the majority of his constituents would like. Hunters are important to Oregon
but outdated, barbaric, destructive means of hunting should no longer be tolerated. The few should not be able to
profit from the resources that belong to everyone.

137

Keeping development to a minimum in areas that are sanctuaries for animals and for people seeking solace,
quiet, and experience in the natural environment.

138

Rampant development. Animals forever on the back burner.

139

Continued public ownership/use of water resources.

140

Keeping our water out of Nestle's plastic hands.

141

Keeping our water clean and safe. Protecting endangered animals. Balancing conservation and hunting.

142

Over development of wildlife habitats, balancing with the ecosystem, and maintaining these for Oregon.

143

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

144

Loss of water stable aggregates is one of the biggest problems facing fish, wildlife, and humans today. Bad
logging practices have lead to stream channelization, loss of organic matter in waterways and in the forest
(burning slash instead of spreading it), compaction of the soil by heavy logging equipment, loss of biodiversity
through herbicide and monoculture plantings, and fire-prone forests from clearcut-replant practices and firesuppression. All of these issues should be priority of the new Director.

145

predators and anti hunters,anti trapping

146

Protecting salmon and steelhead native runs.

147

Keeping companies from using our natural resources for profit.

148

Declining populations of animals

149

Nestle and other corporations with no respect for OUR property as Oregonians and have no business trespassing
in OUR home. Also, population increases and logging companies.

150

Do not give away public water to Nestle!

151

A burgeoning human population with exponentially increasing demands on resources that will diminish wildlife
habitat.

152

Non lethal methods used first when there's predator conflict. Endangered Species protection for wolves.

153

Protection of wolves Removal of lead in hunting and fishing so condors may be reintroduced to oregon

154

Enhancing wild fish runs. Culling invasive species.

155

Stop illegal fishing and hunting. protecting wildlife and fish.

156

Sportsman verses commercial gillnetters

157

I see the above issue as being an overarching vital challenge that any Director will have to confront in the next 10
years, especially, as we grapple with added pressures(of an economic nature)of climate change and all its
ramifications.

158

I am concerned that Nestle and other water bottlers not establish themselves here. Other states- Maine is an
example- are now struggling to maintain public control over water wells and streams. After Nestle gets its foot-inthe-door permit approved, it will proceed as it has elsewhere, increasing water withdrawal and decreasing the
resource, and community rights to the resource. I live along the Willamette River Superfund site, in a small
Portland neighborhood where three of my neighbors have recently dealt with breast cancer. No state agency
leader should assume that the river, nature, and the people living here are all deservedly and willingly in the
"sacrifice zone", and that adding more risk (Arc Logistics transload, currently increasing in size) is acceptable.

159

Supporting wildlife rehabilitation programs, non-game wildlife, keystone species, and ESA.

160

Protecting and preserving land and water resources and ensuring the wellbeing of wildlife.

161

The Nestle application needs to be withdrawn. ODFW needs to set the tone that their job is to protect fish and
wildlife, not help corporations profit.

9 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


162

Controlling the greed of the timber companies

163

Climate change and warming, population pressures on wildlife and habitat, inadequate funding, politicians looking
for short term fixes to satisfy constituents and lobbyists..........

164

I believe it is essential and important to prevent Nestl from having any access to Oregons water. The water
belongs to the public if it belongs to anyone and should not be sold off and bottled for the private profit of any
business. Protect the water and the land for future generations.

165

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

166

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. Nestl can make their profits without taking public water!!

167

Keep our water public. No Nestle!

168

Corporations wanting to mine water, logging, or other minerals. Building of roads that harm wildlife and lead to
erosion. Finding ways to meet challenges of climate changes.

169

See above.

170

Thave & be committed to the large picture of Oregon & not any companies wanting to harm or deprive
Oregonians of water & it's resources.

171

The greatest challenge facing the new Director and the agency in the next and succeeding decades will be to
carry out their core mission of protecting and enhancing fish and wildlife and especially their habitat in the face of
ever increasing political pressure to commoditize and commercialize and thereby irreversibly diminish and
degrade their habitat. This core mission is intrinsically incompatible with industrial scale commoditization and
commercialization of already greatly diminished and degraded habitat due to that conflicting imperative of
insatiable natural resource extraction interests.

172

Privatization of public resources is an increasingly important issue, particularly in the area of water management.
The Department should take particular care in preserving water rights in the Columbia Gorge for local people,
rather than for transnational corporations such as Nestl.

173

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

174

Protect the word 'wild' in wildlife. The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing
ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

175

We had an election and as far as I understand it, we voted the gil netters out of the columbia river. Time to uphold
that decision. The jobs and the the salmon/ Steele Head run would bring tourists here in droves if it was allowed to
flourish. You could also take a lot of the rulings on us off of us.Sport fisherman. I do not feel the ODFW should be
in the business of commercially selling off the fish which is what I am led to believe. I do not feel like
subsidizing ODFW to have it's own business. Unless you can make me understand the reason we are so put upon
so that ODFW can sell off the fish??? If you do not know the syntax you can not have the conversation.

176

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

177

consider all constituents' desires, including those that promote a more scientific and diverse approach to wildlife
management. consider conservation as a real goal by including refuges from hunting ensure native predators
receive protections more in line with other species implement and maintain predator plans that will require
nonlethal strategies as a first response eliminate trapping and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically
destructive forms of hunting consider no hunting of wolves when they are delisted effect an outright ban on killing
contests

178

Preservation of natural areas in urban settings.

179

Manage wildlife using sound scientific principles. DE-EMPHACISE HUNTING!!!!

180

Improving salmon populations by looking at human impact on their habitat instead of blaming predators for their
natural impact Increasing northern spotted owl populations by reducing habitat degradation instead of blaming
predators Reducing poisoning of wildlife by government agencies and individuals Coexisting with wildlife and
educating to this effect instead of using lethal methods Allowing the continued success of wolf populations
without hunting them Reducing/eliminating the continued release of non-natives for hunting, thus contributing to
habitat decline and competition for native species

10 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


181

* Habitat conservation. * Pollution control. * Ecotourism. * Unbiased scientific education for a well-informed
citizenry. * Resolution of conflicts between different user groups on multi-use lands.

182

I believe that managing for biodiversity and conservation will be increasingly important with continued habitat loss
and climate change. Maintaining ecosystem health and good habitat for many species will be critical. For
example, I believe that ungulate numbers should be managed by increasing habitat rather than focussing on tag
numbers. I hope that good science will be used to make decisions regarding wolves, threatened and endangered
species, and working with private landowners to enhance conservation on private land. Conservation on private
and working lands, including agricultural areas, rangeland and forestry areas should be a priority.

183

Corporate access to F/W areas or areas that share ecological significance.

184

The new director should protect our public resources. One specific instance of this should be by withdrawing
ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl and help block further attempts to
privatize public resources.

185

Climate change!

186

Climate Change Flooding Lack of Water Resources

187

What is good for wildlife, wildlife habitat, is good for us, we the people.

188

Don't trade animals to other states that are doomed from the beginning. If you are going to trade elk with another
state then trade the Rocky Mountain elk for drier climates. Don't send Roosevelt elk to New Mexico.

189

Water should not be given away to private companies for bottling water!

190

"The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl."

191

Stop Nestle from taking our water! Downscale or eliminate hacheries that are scientifically shown to harm natural
salmon stocks. Close or significantly downscale operations at hatcheries at a rate of 2 per year until done. By
downscale I mean reduce hatchery outputs by 50% or more. Treat it as an experiment, monitor overall salmon
populations and report the results. De-emphasize the use and enjoyment part of the mission if it is not
sustainable. Add the word sustainable to the mission before "use and enjoyment. The "and future generations" is
related concept but it is often ignored. How many future generations? 1? 2? Sustainability is forever. Get rid of the
2 per year wild coho tag allowance - these stocks are too low for a legal harvest. Monitor to determine when or if
a limited harvest can be allowed. Educate anglers as to the value of improving wild coho runs by laying off them
for 2-3 more life history cycles.

192

Balancing the environmentalists agenda over sound wildlife management practices

193

Climate change. Need to shift away from resource extraction based economy.

194

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

195

Wildlife conservations vs. competing interests of hunters

196

Getting Nestle's out of the Gorge. Mobilizing the general populace to understand the importance of our forests.
Education about ecosystems. Campaign and education about pesticides and unnatural fertilizers. Get additional
byin from those currently stripping the earth. Protecting existing forests. Creating corridors for wildlife and fauna
in urban areas. Work with the farmers. Educating our youngsters. When I was a child we all knew about smoky
the bear and only you can protect forest fires. Educations such as this around many of the major issues.
Protection of all species. Prevention of introduction of foreign species.

197

The new director should protect our public water supply and should NOT sell our water to Nestle, or any other
coorporation!

198

Sticking to the facts

199

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. Should fight to make Oil and Coal companies use other transportation
instead of the Columbia river. Also require the Companies to pay for all the training and equipment required to be
poised to clean up their messes before they happen. Taxpayers shouldn't pay while they make all the profits.

200

Same as above

11 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


201

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. The resources of Oregon belong to Oregonians, and should not be
traded away to a multinational corporation.

202

*The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. *Continue protecting critical habitat. *Convincing the public and policy
makers to take climate change seriously.

203

Commercial interests versus public interest. Foster coexistence between ranchers and wolf advocates.

204

water and soil conservation, quality and stewardship

205

To stop the killing of animals for sport.

206

The new director should: protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give
Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. Protect the health and diversity of all wildlife and habitat. Be a
strong, tireless advocate for wildlife Seek creative solutions

207

sustaining the beauty of our natural areas while at the same time allowing useful access of these areas

208

1. Preventing the sale of any water rights to Nestle or any other bottling company. 2. Preventing timber
companies from expanding their harvest areas and protecting the watershed and ecosystems from reckless
logging activity. 3. Ushering the dismantling of unnecessary dams to let rivers flow once again unimpeded for the
free movement of fish. 4. Any other actions that improve or maintain the health of our surroundings at all costs,
because without their health, our health and stability is compromised.

209

preserving our water purity

210

Water (the next Oil) and forestry management. Trees harvested from Oregon should be processed IN Oregon.
Support processing facilities and forbid export of raw timber.

211

Diminishing habitats

212

Increasing pressure for privatization in the form of bottling plants, park management and issues related to
extraction of resources needs to be countered with fierce advocacy for the legacy we leave our descendents, in
order that they may benefit from the natural world we were born to that is rapidly being depleted and eradicated.
The degradation of our natural systems, including watershed destruction, habitat loss, and extinction, needs to be
countered with forceful advocacy in the face of political and economic pressure to create "prosperity". We need
someone who will stand up for the future of the natural bounty of the region and it's ability to regenerate itself.

213

Making sure that the animals and nature as a whole has the resources necessary to benefit and sustain
themselves in a long and sustainable mannerism. To which extent allows for greater populations of fish and
wildlife to thrive in the is ever dominating and changing anthropocentric world of ours.

214

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl."

215

One key and critical issue is the defense of our public water supply against private corporations. Our gorge water
is ours! Tell Nestle to go home. Their CEO stated "Water is a privilege not a right" This is an assault and an insult
to the benefit of the Oregon commonwealth.

216

Work w/ the conservation community to articulate and advance a vision for the states' community growth that is
compatible with fish, wildlife and habitat conservation

217

Prevent the transfer of water resources to private interests. Dam removal. enforcement of laws governing logging
near streams elimination of clear cutting stop development of any new logging roads proper removal of
abandoned logging roads

218

Water privatization attempts; the effects of climate change and polluting industries.

219

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl!!

12 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


220

I think the number one priority should be that ODFW is guided by sound science and not by the loudest, most
deep pocketed stakeholders like hunters and ranchers. I strongly oppose managing wildlife more for hunting and
fishing interests than for conservation, and I feel that ODFW is too dependent on hunting and fishing dollars. I
don't know what the answer is, but there are stakeholders such as myself who would like to see things done
differently. I would like to see more funds and effort directed toward habitat conservation and non-game
management. I would like to see more emphasis on preserving ecosystems rather than mostly the game species
that bring in money via hunting fees. I would like ODFW to promote wildlife watching in addition to hunting and
fishing through public outreach. As for predator management, I think ODFW should rely on sound science just
like with everything else. If lethal management is the only way to solve some instances of chronic wolf predation
of livestock for example, I agree with it. The conflict between wolves and livestock is only going to get worse in
the next 10 years. I would like livestock operators to be held accountable in cases where their practices have
helped to habituate wolves to killing livestock. I am working in NE Washington on a wolf-livestock interaction
study and the relationship between WDFW and livestock operators could hardly be worse due to perceived lack of
transparency. Don't let this happen in OR if it hasn't already. On a final note, I STRONGLY oppose predator
derbies and I would like to see a director put a stop to them.

221

Protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia
Gorge to Nestl. Oregon is a special place, and we need to save our resources for future generations, not sell to
the highest bidder.

222

Critical habitat available for animals to migrate through and reproduce in with out roads and with out harassment.
Things have to change, the population that doesn't understand wilderness is going to grow - it's important to
protect our water, natural lands and wildlife for all of our well being. Work on better boundaries so there is a buffer
between wild lands/animals and people. The more people encroach, the more problems we'll have. Wild
lands should be priority and people will be able to change and adapt, much better than the animals/fish/trees/etc.

223

Water. Dam removal or maintenance? Competing desires for water.

224

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

225

Nestle's effort to privatize our water.

226

Budget. As fees go up tag amounts go down? Sensus. Are they in field counts or computer estimates?

227

The increasing effects of climate change. Special interests who think they are more important to our state than
the residents of our state.

228

Keeping corporations out of Oregon wildlife areas.

229

wildlife will "mange" itself, he/she will need to "mange" the people who want to kill off animals to near extinction
and want to poach and abuse them

230

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl and prevent Nestle from using our public water for profit in any future
attempts.

231

Forest protection & water quality

232

Best protecting and enhancing current non-exotic species population in the face of population increases,
extractive industries, and other development pressures. Working cooperatively with stakeholders to creatively
accomplish this.

233

Protecting the environmental resources of the state and not giving in to short term economic ideas. Long term
outlook is of the most importance in protecting resources for generations and helping preserving the environment.

234

In a follow up to my answer to question 2, I am seriously concerned about Nestle's continued pushing to use our-Oregonian's-- water for their private profit. The new director should be committed to protecting our resources
and should withdraw ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs to Nestle. In your words, protecting and
enhancing "Oregon's fish and wildlife and their habitats for use and enjoyment by present and future generations"
can only be done when our public resources stay public and don't go to private profit! The new director should
prioritize withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

235

1. Scarcity of resources 2. Shift in public interest - fewer people are hunters 3. Water and habitat quality

236

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. When small, local farms need access to water to survive, they should
be in line ahead of multinational corporations for access to resources. Nestle is producing a product that
undermines the mandate to keep local water clean.

13 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


237

Funding the Conservation Strategy is the key issue. Firest- communicating to the public that OFW is for
conservation, Second- getting high powered help- Like Liz Kaufman of Portland as an example, some effective
communicator to convey the huge disconnect between what Oregonians want ODFW to do and think ODFW
already does, and what ODFW can afford- also somehow to let people know that the agency is hampered every
day out of fear to be controversial so it won't hurt its funding. Wolves are returning and OR-7 was the biggest
news story in a decade. The public- i.e. the people who have the money to fund ODFW, as opposed to the entire
hunting population, which does not have the money to fund ODFW- like wolves. There are so many ways to
incorporate predators into our lives- for example in the Pyrenees Mountains, being a shepherd is a regular job.
Shepherds should be a no-brainer- all societies have always had them, why do ranchers feel somehow entitled to
not have to manage their livestock by hiring shepherds- when the public has already declared its preference to
incorporate wolves into the ecosystem? Why should the public have to pay- by wolf deaths- for rancher's
laziness or incompetence or mismanagement of its stock in an Oregon that legally contains wolves?

238

It would not be good for Oregon to sell bottled water or allow corporations access to our natural resources.
Please protect our public commons from corporations.

239

The new director must be dedicated to protecting our public water resources for fish wildlife and their habitats by
withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

240

One of the immediate tasks facing the new Director is Nestl's on-going attempt to bottle public water in the
Columbia Gorge. I truly hope that the Director will share my view that we should protect our public water
resources, rather than giving them away to a huge multinational corporation such as Nestl. I further hope that
the Director will withdraw ODF&W's application.

241

Pressures to put corporate profits ahead of the agency mission.

242

Public education

243

The new director should protect our public water resources. A start would be withdrawing ODF&W's application
to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

244

The proposed Nestle bottling plant. I want a new Director who opposes this proposal. Estuary protection in the
face of proposed and plan petrochemical shipping in ports. Protecting the nascent wolf population based on the
scientific research showing the positive impact of this apex predator.

245

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

246

Put the Wolves back on the Endangered Species Act and protect them from extinction. Stop and outlaw all
trapping and hunting of wolves and encourage this action for other states as well i.e., Idaho, Montana,
Washington and Wyoming.

247

How to stand firm on behalf of biological systems of our rivers and wild areas in regards to industry, farming, and
recreational hunting. This agency really sets the example for supporting our last remaining natural habitats and
folks in charge need to be fully aware and capable of advocating for the preservation of these areas. Amazing
examples of wolves returning to Yellowstone and the amazing positive impact environmentally are what we need
to be looking at - less human intervention and more balance created by the species that thrive on biodiversity.
Working with progressive organizations that have good track records and staying open with the public on what
ideas are percolating. Basically, I want the wild areas to be wild once again and with the lightest possible human
footprint. Nature Conservancy has done quite a few great projects in land stewardship and I am sure many other
Oregon environmental groups too!

248

TO END THE BARBARIC PRACTICE OF TRAPPING!!! TO BAN THE USE OF POISONS. How to end the
dreadful history of government-sanctioned cruelty to animals by the Department's go-to agency for killing and
torture: Animal Damage Control. Ultimately, this person's greatest challenge will be how to prevent more species
from going extinct. Currently the global track record is 200 species PER DAY. It's time we shifted the focus from
"for the use and enjoyment by present and future generations" to "for the health, wellbeing, freedom and longevity
of the natural ecosystems REGARDLESS OF THEIR INSTRUMENTAL VALUE TO HUMANS. This is called
INTRINSIC VALUE and should be something the Director holds as top priority. Only then will future generations
have something to enjoy. To "use" nature implies that we are not nature.

249

Maintaining/retaining the availability and use of water, a public resource. Balancing the protection and nurturing
our public lands that are fish and wildlife habitats with the demands of agriculture, businesses and encroaching
development.

250

Pressure from those who would claim that economic benefit comes from exploiting our natural resources rather
then preserving them. A case in point being Nestle's continued push to bottle water from the Columbia Gorge.

14 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


251

Water quality and salmon recovery Maintain existing old growth forests - no more logging there Advocate for wolf
recovery efforts and educate against wolf-hatred Promote conservation of natural resources including wildlife
Protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia
Gorge to Nestl.

252

Not selling our natural resources such as water to bottling companies or rampant clear cutting especially with
follow up herbicide spraying

253

Recognize climate change is an unremitting trend that requires conservation measures that have been thought
unnecessary in previous decades.

254

Protecting depleting natural resources in a culture that consistently places money & material gain as the highest
priorities.

255

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

256

Keeping natural areas and resources accessible to the public and resisting attempts to privatize public resources.

257

Climate change with southern states scrambling for water, there will be increasing pressure on Oregon for
several decades to come. Making sure the right priorities and policies are in place before the tension starts
skyrocketing will help prevent future conflict during what will be a very bad time.

258

Maintaining the state's resources for the sake of our wildlife and human residents in the face of ever increasing
commercial pressures to harvest our resources for the sake of financial gain will be a critical issue to be dealt with
on an ongoing basis. Protecting our water is a key challenge we are currently facing; companies such as Nestle
need to be delivered the message that Oregon's natural resources belong to the state's population and wildlife
and will not be forfeit for corporate profit. I believe the Department of Fish and Wildlife is key to ensuring that
Oregonians retain ownership of the state's natural resources.

259

Forest Management/Fire Climate Change Water Quality in watersheds

260

The health of the forest and streams, protecting water, protecting habitat for animals rather than human gain.

261

Protect old growth. Protect the air water and habitat. Keep a 0 carbon footprint.

262

Natural anadromous fish reproduction by habitat improvement.

263

I'm concerned about external interests that want to purchase access to our natural resources for export. Nestle's
desire to buy water for bottling and shipment out of state is particularly concerning to me -- Nestle is a bad
steward of the environment, and we need our water for fish and farming (and drinking).

264

Ensuring appropriate water allocation, protecting from gracing technology, fighting attempts to build bottling
facilities

265

To preserve public water rights. If they fall under corporate control the agency will have failed in its mission to
serve the people.

266

Encroaching development and strong arm tactics wielded by business interests.

267

Water shortages in other areas of the country will move people, farming and industry to Oregon's west side and
the Gorge. We need to plan now for proper conservation measures and a conservative approach to granting new
rights - e.g. NO Nestle.

268

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

269

Ability to bring communities to consensus about use of natural resources. Also to protect staff. Many OFW staff
have been threatened by shooters and armed people who want to enforce their views with violence

270

I would say the issue of balancing resource protection and conservation with the almost constant demand for jobs
using those very same resources.

271

The word to focus on is to "protect'. Nature has a complex life cycle for sustainability. Humans inevitably change
that life cycle usually to it's detriment. Our goal then is to protect, preserve, and enhance our fish and wildlife in
the most natural manner. "Sport" is in our society. It's not going away anytime soon. But by it's very existence it
does almost nothing to "protect" our fish/wildlife. The new director needs to understand that element and
embrace/incorporate all visions - especially ones that have no direct need to "take" from our fish/wildlife.

272

Stop Nestle

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273

Commercialization and development of habitat. How to limit and even prevent impact.

274

It is essential that the new director withdraw the Oregon Dept of Fish and Wildlife's application to give our public
waters - Oxbow Springs - to private corporation - Nestle. This is essential to protect Oregon's public resources.

275

The new director should protect oregon's water resources by withdrawing the application to transfer water from
oxbow springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

276

Keeping our water clean, keeping anything toxic out of the water/fish.

277

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

278

Nestle should NOT receive a permit to bottle Oregon's public waters in the Columbia Gorge.

279

protect Oregon's public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the
Columbia Gorge to Nestl

280

* Elimination of trapping and snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting * To
consider conservation as a real goal by including refuges from hunting * To implement and maintain predator
plans that will require nonlethal strategies as a first response

281

I am very concerned about the ODF&W's application giving Oxbow Springs in the Columbia River Gorge to
Nestle. It is an inappropriate use of our state's natural resources for profit and the new director is charged with
protecting our public water resources. The application should be withdrawn.

282

ODFW should be protecting habitat from being used by private companies for monetary gain. They are not to
sell, lease or otherwise give away the resources they manage, especially water resources such as Oxbow
Springs, to private or public entities for commercial purposes. This is not in line with the mission given above.
This is one of the critical issues in a broad sense that face the agency in a time of continuing underfunding - the
impetus to find alternate sources of revenue to fulfill their mission. The other critical issue is finding ways to
communicate to the public at large and community stakeholders in areas where conflicts over habitat/resources
are endemic, the rewards and limitations that scientific knowledge provides. How can ODFW make a place for
citizen science where stakeholders of different perspectives work together to examine the issue at hand and find
compromises/new ways of mitigating conflict? Especially in the face of a growing urban population that will likely
exacerbate the tensions between urban and rural perspectives on how best to manage natural resources? I do
not envy the new Director's position! It will be one that requires a belief in the resiliency of nature and human
communities and a good sense of humor.

283

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

284

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

285

Proactively managing apex predators namely wolves and mountain lions. Oregon has such great potential to host
some truly outstanding hunting opportunities, but is being over-run by the extremist attitudes of those who do not
practice "conservation via hunting". The management of the gillnetters will be an ongoing issue along with the
plethora of fishing guides.

286

He or she should understand that giving public water away so that Nestle or other private companies can bottle
and profit from it is wrong for Oregon.

287

Privatization of public resources - e.g. resisting the influence of organizations like Nestle. An unpredictable
environment creating new or more extreme problems that require creative solutions.

288

Climate change

289

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle. This water is critical for the salmon.

290

Keep public resources public, for example by not turning over water rights in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

291

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

292

No Nestle taking our water resources. Keep multi nationals away from our resources

293

Climate change and it's effect on fish and wildlife

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294

Increasing pressure from big business to extract precious land and natural resources...CLEAN WATER must be
protected..especially from those who wish to profit from selling it and corrupting it -Nestles for one

295

it's very important to me that we not allow nestle to bottle our water for private profit

296

Building consensus with other Oregon natural resource agencies to withstand increasing corporate interests and
their well-financed lobbies.

297

Declining number of hunters funding funds for wildlife enhancement. Hunter fees have increased dramatically,
but still not enuf to fund needed projects. Develop alternate sources of income from other wild land user groups
(hikers, twitchers, paddlers, campers, etc) while acknowledging the financial contribution of hunters in past years
so as not to diminish their rights and access wild land resources. Isolate funding for domestic/suburban style
camping (showers, electric service, pavement, etc) and parks with primary focus on user fees. These state run
facilities have dominated many priemium, easy access locations, especially on the coast, and have eliminated the
only rough camping options in these locations, while inviting crowds of RV "campers" who expect/demand costly
landscaping, roads, and domestic services. Let them pay the entire cost of this develoipment thru user fees. The
other public pays by loss of public access to unrefined camping and outdoor experience environments.

298

The challenge in such a position is the combination of the public policy face of it, business interests, and the
detailed nature of conservation policy. Conservation -- if well done -- is our ace card for Oregon's future. Don't
repeat mistakes such as logging a large part of Bull Run for short term profit. We need a visionary able to carry
the message to the public and articulate enough to be able to stand up to the inevitable (false) 'jobs vs.
environment" game.

299

I am deeply concerned about the development of Neslte in Oxbow Springs. I do not want to see the water
resources of the Pacific Northwest damaged by giving Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. We need
to focus on conservation of the fresh water that still exists in the Northwest and not bottle it up and ship it out. The
new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

300

The pro-hunting lobby has too much power over the ODFW. An excellent example is the repeated efforts to
introduce Rocky Mountain goats to various places in Oregon so that hunters can hunt them. As part of this
controversy, numerous false public statements were made by ODFW employees that Rocky Mountain goats are
native to Oregon, even though there is absolutely no proof of this allegation, which is disputed by multiple
reputable scientists and historians. ODFW needs to focus on protecting truly native fish and wildlife, not messing
with nature by introducing invasive species like Rocky Mountain goats. I am also concerned about ODFW's
apparent willingness to trade away its water rights to natural springs in Cascade Locks for municipal well water.
Why would ODFW agree to this?

301

Big business using the gorge and its resources for their profit.

302

Streamside bufffers. Gillnets in the Columbia. Wild fish protection Science based hatchery operations congruent
w/ sound wild fish enhancement

303

Hatchery fish programs versus wild only rivers, water rights, conservation and land management

304

One big issue is the water/nestle issue. The new director should protect our public water resources by
withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl. We should not be
selling our natural resources to corporations whose only interest is profit. There is no evidence that the Nestle
Corporation has any sensitivity to long term environmental issues. Overall the director should lead the agency
towards greater conservation of our natural resources. We have lost too much already in this regard. I want
someone who cares for the environment and who will protect our resources for future generations. Overall,
because of outdated laws (stemming from the time of Manifest Destination) we have given too many of our
resources away. We should quit selling them and protect them instead and we need a director who has the vision
and people skills to accomplish this.

305

Giving public water away to Nestle, or any other corporate for-profit is an ethical cesspool and needs to be taken
off the docket. Support re-establishing wolf and other threatened species' population. Again, stop giving away
public land rights to private for-profit entities for pennies... and then letting them "rule" that land as nothing but
pasture or lumberyards. Basically, reign in and re-distribute land/water use policies to reflect environmental
responsibility and diversity as is acknowledged by science, ... rather than continuing to cater to a few private
parties.

306

Global warming Water scarcity in Southern Oregon Protecting public interests against corporate pressures

307

Drought, competition for resources (human vs. environment), loss of habitat,

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308

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

309

Water is a critical resource, ever more critical with climate change. The new director should protect our public
water resources for future public need. One way the new director should accomplish that mission is by
withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

310

Commercialization (logging, water rights) Climate change

311

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl and encourage ranchers to work with state wildlife biologists to keep
wolf population healthy.

312

Water rights! Wildlife should be a priority.

313

The new director should take leadership to protect our public water resources. One critical step the new director
can take is to withdraw ODF&W's application to provide Oxbow Springs water in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

314

Climate change. Preservation of natural areas in the face of increasing population and conflicting outdoor
recreation needs (ie hikers and hunters)

315

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

316

Director needs to limit encroachment by commercial interests on our natural resources in the wild.

317

Climate change, water quality and protection, and environmental protection

318

Promote and protect refuges that are free from hunting. Stop all killing contests.

319

Climate change and habitat loss are key issues that will be facing the agency and the new director over the next
10 years. Science has shown that native predators are helpful in fighting climate change and in maintaining
balance within ecosystems so they should be protected like other species.

320

- consider conservation as a real goal by including refuges from hunting - ensure native predators receive
protections more in line with other species - implement and maintain predator plans that will require nonlethal
strategies as a first response

321

keeping the integrity of this mission without conceding to extraction industries who wish to use these resources
for their own purposes

322

Oh well should have read further. Predator control of wolf and cougar. And yes I am happy to have recoveries of
both populations, but recovery has also has to be acknowledged by the Agency. Protection f habit for both fish
and wildlife is necessary and critical. Protection and limitation though does not or should not reach to closure.
Also is you want to raise funding, then open rifle season to bow hunters as does Idaho and Colorado, for
example. Limit to harvest to one animal, that is you ca purchase archery and rifle tags, but only harvest one
animal total be it elk or deer. This way hunters can hunt multiple seasons, but still be allowed only one animal.
Similar to general and controlled hunt tag policy. There would be some increase in tag purchases as most bow
hunters I know would also consider buying rifle tags too.

323

Protecting the wolves an other endangered wildlife

324

1. Recognizing the variety of interests shared by Oregon residents and visitors and attempting to balance them.
2. Working with non-profit organizations and other agencies to attract more young Oregonians to enjoy and
appreciate the state's rich natural resources. 3. Adapting to changing economic and regulatory constraints.

325

Funding. Licensing revenues should not go into the general fund! These are pay for services revenues that are
collected to support this department not the Oregon Government.

326

dont allow gun control

327

Educating the public. This can be done in schools as a start. Create more free and low cost learning experiences
for both children and adults such as the Outdoor Women's program. If we can't get people out to see the beauty
and necessity of preserving such beauty the task remains an uphill struggle.

328

To be aware that many people define 'for the use and enjoyment by present and future generations' to mean
protecting our wildlife and their habitats for things other than fishing and hunting. Just for the enjoyment of having
them present. You don't need to be a fisherman or a hunter to want to protect our wildlife and their habitats.

329

Habitat Pollutions Overuse

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330

Changing this department from one that looks at nature as a resource to plunder and moves to a model of
preservation, conservation and education.

331

Keeping the hunters away from endangered species and promoting balance in the Eco system

332

Hunters they seem to justify every need to kill and line the pockets of the government to achieve their aim. We
need someone strong enough to stand up to them to protect the wildlife.

333

Key challenges will be 1) finding ways to fund the Department with dwindling hunting and fishing revenue. 2)
Weaning the stakeholders off of agencies such as Wildlife Services and into a ecological management based
approach to living with large predators. 3) Preserving natural habitats and ecosystems and not allowing oil, gas,
ranching interests to pollute the environment. 4) Fostering a passion in the public for being in nature without
compromising the natural space. 5) Balancing climate change and industry interests. Preserving the habitat that
will be needed for wildlife to exist in the coming centuries even with strong opposition from the timber, fishing, oil,
and development industries.

334

This does not mean living in the pockets of people who want to kill them!

335

The continuing battle between ranchers & wolves and hunters & wolves.....both of whom think wolves should be
eliminated. F&W have been more favorable to these factions than they should be...the animals need protections
from humans and F&W need to project their focus to maintaining those protections.

336

I believe the most critical issue will be to protect wildlife from being destroyed, and this will be a major challenge.

337

As mentioned in question 2, each stakeholder has its own agenda. In today's economy it may be easy to favor
where the money comes from. Although finances are important, focus on mission accomplishment by spending
within your means. I love Oregon because we have a little bit of everything. I love the ODFW mission; keep it in
focus

338

Maintaining the opportunity for fish and wildlife harvest given difficult funding constraints. Can not fund all the
management needs with only funding from license buyers. Recruiting new anglers and hunters Finding alternate
funding sources Hiring fish and wildlife biologists that have knowledge and experience hunting and fishing

339

To discontinue the practice of indiscriminately culling of wildlife. This practice traps & kills threatened &
endangered species. It is a huge risk to domestic pets & livestock & children. It is good ol' boy killin', that needs to
be eliminated. This practice has become, in large part, what defines fish & game (sorry-when your organization is
responsible for large scale maiming & killing if wildlife, you do not get the honor of defining your organization as a
friend to wildlife by including that word in your title).

340

Ensure native predators receive protections similar to those of other species. Stop harassing, branding, killing
sea lions, and make their interest paramount over sport fisherme's. Make controls and limits on commercial
fishing more stringent to protect salmon and other wildlife. Implement and maintain plans to protect predators.
Ban killing contests, traps and snares. Consider not allowing hunting of wolves after they are delisted from
endangered species protection.

341

Welfare ranchers who are trying to take public lands away from wildlife. Educating ranchers and farmers to
coexist with wildlife.

342

Unsustainable hunting practices. Population growth. Loss of animal habitat.

343

Moving beyond the antiquated and regressive predator "management" approaches which have failed. Proceed to
eliminate trapping. Regulate hunting of all species whether non-game or game. Embrace the movement away
from animal proteins in the American diet as increasing numbers of ranches will be eliminated due to lack of
profitable market shares. Develop new protocols for enjoying wildlife that do not involve killing as in photography.

344

Human overpopulation and wildlife being culled and killed due to us overtaking.

345

1. The success of the Wolf Recovery Program must continue using the same tools and Plan. ODFW has allowed
the ecosystems to prosper by getting ranchers to cooperate with non lethal protections for livestock. 2. Cougar
and bear hunting must be reduced near populated areas so orphans don't roam into towns as much. 3. There
needs to be a better Cougar Plan based upon science, that recognizes Cougars as of integral value to the
ecosystem in order to prevent human conflicts and danger of people being shot by hunters. This means ranchers
must stop feeding sheep and livestock to them and practice the same conflict avoidance activities as for wolves,

346

Salmon habitat; includes managing agricultural runoff and commercial animal waste NO CLEAR CUTTING! This
utterly destroys habitat as well as endangering both recreational users and nearby homes.

347

I think there is a conflict of interest between those that are interested in biodiversity and those involved primarily
in the hunting aspect of wildlife in Oregon. Livestock further complicates the issue.

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348

Protection and preservation of wildlife and their habitat as human populations grow.

349

Since wolves are living in various areas of the state a scientific study should be undertaken in deal- ing with wolf
numbers and habitats. I'm so sick of anti wolf sentiment and shoot on sight beliefs. A new director must send a
stark message to the public that the predator policies that are present in Idaho will not be tolerated or used in
Oregon. I believe that shooting or trapping should be the last possible decision used to deal with problem wolves.
I believe the new director should meet with all the ranchers and the areas of wolf recovery to discuss all options
available to them in dealing with problem animals.

350

Changing the old culture to embrace the new (see 2.)

351

Defining what "use" means. Oregon has many programs that cater to "sportsmen" and industry that are highly
damaging to those resources under the current definition of "use." Repairing and changing policy to prevent
future damage should be a high priority.

352

I think it is critical that we begin to see the necessity of protecting wildlife and their habitat for the sake of the
wildlife, not simply "for the use and enjoyment by" people!

353

Past Director did not see the wider picture of states fisheries resources. Just focused on Columbia and big money
fisheries. Majority of fisheries and angler effort not always in these areas

354

Deterring false scientific data used by liberal groups to lie to the public and scare people

355

Declining user-pay revenues and participation. Increasing constraints and demands on fish, wildlife and their
habitats. Volatile climatic conditions. Increasingly litigious stakeholders. Increasing conflicts among interest
groups.

356

budget cutting: The director needs to advocate the critical role the DFW plays in the future of our great country.
Maintain the budget and continue protecting and managing America's wild places

357

Among the challenges would be: Managing the shift from funding ODFW primarily by hunting/fishing license fees
to funding from the general fund and non-consumptive user fees. This will require political expertise as well as
imagination. Managing the transition within the ODFW from a game-oriented policy to a conservation-oriented
policy which will among other things extend more consideration towards predator populations, and rely more on
new scientific evidence regarding the ecological benefits they bring to the land. Also, the ODFW will have to
become more aware of the complexity of behavior and dynamics of a variety of predators and game animals such
as wolves, coyotes, cougars, big horn sheep, and others. The example of the timing of the sheep hunting season
raised by Commissioner Akenson at the 10/10 Commission meeting shows the lack of understanding of the
subtleties of animal behavior and biology sometimes exhibited by ODFW staff. The matter of the Siskiyou-plus
bear hunt raised at the same meeting shows the tone-deaf attitude towards the non-hunting public often
demonstrated by ODFW. I notice the list of options in Question #7 includes 7 hunting/fishing choices and only two
non-consumptive ones...

358

Transitioning from a hunting/fishing mindset to conserving non-game wildlife. As hunting and fishing decline the
huge economic value offered by non-game wildlife deserve special attention.

359

Do not kill wolves!

360

Native fish must be protected for future generations. Put the "put and take" fish in areas where they will not
compete with Native Fish.

361

NO tree loving hippy please.

362

-Access issues. Game is increasingly concentrating on private lands. As well, increasingly large private
landowners are denying access (e.g. Weyerhauser). Additionally, many waerbodies lack even primitive boat
access (e.g. Siletz Bay). -The lack of ODFW's ability to affect terrestrial land management (federal timber harvest
intensity, urbanization, and federal grazing). -Sport versus Commercial fising interests

363

Working with multiple stakeholders while advocating for Oregon's wildlife health

364

No contest for killing animals should ever be legal. Traps should be banned because is a cruel method of
conservation.

365

Salmon/Steelhead populations I & E on fishing/hunting opportunities in Oregon

366

Controlling predator populations. I.e. hunting w dogs, wolf introduction. Impacts arising from predator
overpopulation/human interaction. Rising number of illegal immigrants and poachers and the tolls they are taking
on wildlife.

367

Growing population in the Willamette Valley, climate change

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


368

The raising prices and regulations that are making it more difficult to hunt/fish in this state. The hunting is getting
way less affordable for tags and the diminishing deer population is making it harder to fill a tag. The increasing
cougar and bear population is causing a lot of the deer population to decrease.

369

Continued pressure and political interference from cattle mismanagement. False claims and fear mongering by
people who consider our public lands part of their domain for the purposes of business and personal gain. The
ability to keep the proper funding needed to adequately safeguard the extremely valuable assets that these lands
offer. Access to modern equipment that aids in keeping track of sensitive species.

370

Education. Initiate and encourage fish and wildlife conservation and protection programs in schools, colleges and
universities, continuing and adult education, and outreach programs within communities, including Boy Scouts,
Girls Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, etc.

371

He needs to look at the real data for hunting units and establish correct tag ratios to match scientific numbers of
animals not just management levels

372

A re-definition of the term "use" in the Department's mission needs to be done. No longer should "use" solely be
hunting and fishing. Indeed, hunting and fishing should be the least important and most restricted "use" of
Oregon's wildlife, given the other pressures on wildlife and wild places that human activity is creating.

373

Water conservation; Wildlife habitat conservation; Land use planning to avoid the sale of State Lands and assure
that we do not further fragment resources that are needed by wildlife; A review of all practices that might harm
wildlife (e.g. what chemicals does the department use? How could practices be improved and hazards be
eliminated.) There will, no doubt, continue to be challenges related to what industry wishes to glean from
Oregon's natural resources, so a strong backbone and focus is paramount.

374

Maintaining wolf and salmonid habitats. Deciding on what to do about invasive species like ring-necked doves
and barred owls.

375

Predator control or we will not need fish & wildlife cause all wildlife will be extinct!!!!!

376

1. Funding and declining revenue as numbers of hunters and fisherman decline. 2. Continue to emphasize
recruitment of young people in to the fishing, hunting, viewing, and other associated outdoor activities. 3.
Continued decline of black-tail deer, mule deer, and elk numbers due to increasing depredation, disease, stress
from harassment, and loss of key habitat. Similar declines to trout and salmon stocks from marine predators,
over-fishing, water quality declines, and habitat degradation.

377

Continuing to deal with the decline in license fees as fishing and hunting evolve. Think out of the box about ways
to generate revenue from all the folks who appreciate the existence value of fish and wildlife, even if they don't
fish and hunt. Engage in proactive analysis and policy development to contend with competition for water
accompanying climate change. Review the in-stream water rights program, and perhaps create geographic
priorities for ramping up in-stream rights to head off future crises. Ongoing challenges over appropriate use of
hatchery supplementation versus natural reproduction of fish species, and emerging technologies for commercial
pen-based breeding at sea.

378

1) Declining demographics of consumptive users- lack of funding diversity. 2) Population increases in response
to climate change and the impact of this increased human population on habitat loss 3) Climate change impacts
4) Loss of non-game wildlife species and their habitats 5) Lack of gender diversity in positions of management 6)
Decline in federal funding support

379

In any decision made regarding the protection and enhancement of Oregon's fish and wildlife and their habits for
the enjoyment by present and future generation, climate change needs to be a key consideration. Balancing
hunting, fishing, recreational and preservation of wildlife and our resources will be key components and
challenges over the next 10 years given the added stressors on wildlife due to climate change. Another challenge
will be dealing with the issue of human population growth. When the human population expands, the natural
environment and wildlife habitat shrinks, so the public needs to be better educated as to how to co-exist with
wildlife in the 21st century and not be quickly granted LOP and Kill Permits.

380

Prioritising the stability of healthy wildlife populations

381

Keeping the agency viable and solvent. Making the difficult decisions.

382

Use Nd enjoyment of ALL not just a minority of hunters.

383

I doubt there will be a lot more public money available for ODFW. Can they work on developing mutually
beneficial partnerships with other state and federal agencies to move each others missions along? At this point
ODFW is more of a roadblock than a help. The roadblock mentality is not helping protect or enhance fish and
wildlife resources.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


384

I believe the agency will face increased pressure from livestock handlers opposed to wolves to delist their
protection and allow wolf hunting, and I adamantly oppose the policies. I believe ODFW has a strong and effective
wolf management plan that should stand as a model for other states and should not be altered or weakened
in the future with resilient wolf populations. Rather, I believe the director should continue to emphasize
consensus building with the goal of protecting wildlife, not cattlemans' property or ranchers' interests. Other key
challenges will be to enhance stream habitat to further the stabilization of chinook and other salmon populations,
and should this mean the dismantling of certain dams, then I would advocate for the director to be open to this as
a possible approach, at the very least.

385

Increasing users understanding of the whole system not just with harvest success. Preserving the integrity of
habitat as climate change diminishes flows of cold streams. Finding resolution between wolf habitat and ranch
land.

386

Must realize that the cost of reversing years of damage to fish and wildlife populations and their habitats is
immense and the limited resources available for restoration and mitigaton must be used to produce the biggest
bang for the dollar. Rules should not be "pie in the sky" but realistic.

387

Wildlife protection, addressing need for more resilient wildlife populations in face of climate change, supporting
return of carnivores to landscape including wolves and mountain lions.

388

See above

389

I really hope that Oregon and this Agency hires a person that really has a conservation mind set. We don't live in
a time where we need to hunt! People are getting educated and find this repulsive! What we should care for is
conservation! So that there may be some animals left for our children's enjoyment! It's your responsibility to care
for wildlife and not exterminate! Please acknowledge that times are changing and that people want conservation
not destruction!

390

Public education on how ecosystems work, with emphasis on the roles of threatened and endangered species,
and the roles of top predators in general

391

Getting trust of public back. Most people I talk to think ODFW is a joke. Numbers of game animals are down and
all we hear are excuses not solutions. Fish same thing.

392

1. Dealing with, and working to fix, the fundamentally flawed funding model that has been in place for nearly the
last century. The mission and responsibilities of ODFW have expanded far beyond being funded primarily by
consumptive uses. (Yes, some would quibble that we do have other funding sources, like the tax checkoff,
license plates, etc., but all of these sources together are far from adequate) 2. Dealing with declining participation
in hunting and fishing. 3. Developing support for conservation in the rural, more conservative portions of the
state. 4. Developing support for conservation within environmental groups, some of which are fundamentally
opposed to consumptive use of fish and wildlife. The director and department need to find a way to work with
these groups on the common interests, while agreeing to disagree on consumptive programs. 5. Learning to work
with the conservative political interests, and convince the department that THEY need to support this part of the
mission if there is to be any hope of success long term. 6. Become more successful at supporting and
encouraging habitat protection and restoration where the legal mandate lies with agencies/entities/private
landowners rather than with the department.

393

He must be able to manage all attributes for a healthy ecological system and not give in to the Hunters and allow
them free reign.

394

Over the next ten years a critical issue will be the increasing impact of human populations on natural resources
and wildlife. With relatively favorable conditions in the Pacific Northwest, we can expect to see a migration of
people from other areas of the country who are suffering the worst effects of drought and flooding and
destabilized climate.

395

Protect and preserve ALL natural wildlife so that they not only thrive but remain protected from all who would do
them harm.

396

More information on the potential competition between hatchery salmonid stocks and endangered salmonids.
Collection of information on public priorities for fisheries and wildlife management in order to refine policies or
activities which are outdated. For example, is the cost of supporting hatcheries worth the return on the
investment. What does the average citizen (taxpayer) think? As opposed to knowledge only of what special
interest groups desire.

397

Nonlethal strategies for predators. Not condoning hunting of predators because it serves the purposes of other
groups and/or because of money (the money it brings to the Fish & Wildlife service)

22 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


398

The director should strive to achieve the mission of the department, by ensuring that the resources and habitats
are protected for the use and enjoyment of the vast majority of the citizens. A very small number of people want
to destroy wildlife, while the vast majority of us want to passively enjoy these wild animals. The Director should
work to ensure that the wildlife and habitats are protected and enhanced for future generations, not at a bare
minimum threshold with hunting and trapping artificially decimating the animal population.

399

The new director will need to be innovative, even in the face of those who don't think change is a good thing.
Some of the practices that were implemented in the past were well-intentioned, but some turned out to be very
bad ideas for Oregon's fish and wildlife. We need someone who can show his or her colleagues and the public
that new policies need to be implemented to turn the damage around.

400

Increase and decrease in wildlife catch and kill quota for present and future sportsman. habitat growth

401

Climate change and its effects on Oregon's ecosystems.

402

Educating the public, especially hunters and ranchers, on the destructive nature of the mass killing of predators.
Wildlife is precious to ALL citizens, not just the 5 -10% of the population that kills for sport, along with the small
percentage of ranchers that have been subsidized by government "management" of wolves and coyotes so they
can turn a greater profit. The remaining 90% of US citizens do not believe in the wanton killing of any animals
simply for fun or profit. The scientific community has made it very clear that predators are critical to the balance
of the environment, and that the archaic methods of wantonly killing them typically result in their more likely killing
of livestock. Compensation works if managed properly. But ranchers should be required to take a reasonable
effort in preventing their losses. Two sheep dogs for 10,000 free range sheep with no human presence is absurd.

403

Invasive species, declining interest in fishing and hunting, degradation of habitat.

404

Hatchery vs native fisheries. Surely a srtong native fishery is vital to current and future generations, but any
transition should recognize the hatchery program as important at this time. The hatchery progrom should be
phased out only in direct relation to the imporvement in native fishery numbers.

405

Funding the agency in a way that allows more attention be given to non-game species and habitat. Way too much
focus is on managing animals for sport. The general public vastly outnumbers sportsmen and expects the
department to manage holistically and humanely.

406

Less revenue and poor habitat conditions due to previous environmentalist political and legal efforts forcing
natural resource management to abandon proven procedures. The agency must find a way to more a stronger
influence on Federal Management Agency habitat land management planning and management activities.

407

Overgrazing Loss of safe fish runs and habitat Clearcutting The environment is in danger. Business interests will
be pushing to eat up our natural resources at top speed in order to make a fast buck. We need to protect the
future environmental quality of life in Oregon now.

408

A slow return of wolves to Oregon's wild places. Also the facilitation of the return of salmon to our fresh waters, not
just chinook, but also coho, sockeye, and others that once were much more abundant here. Managing and
limiting clearcut practices, encouraging selective logging instead. And when clearcuts are done, improving
replanting to include more than just a single species and creating a more natural regrowth. These three things are
paramount to returning the forests of western Oregon to a healthy state. Anyone that thinks they are healthy now
mush have blinders on. Healthy means they look like they did when Lewis and Clark arrived.

409

balancing hatcheries for harvest and conservation

410

Key Issues: 1. Acquiring additional wildlife habitat. 2. Gradually steering ODFW from promoting "consumptive"
use of wildlife to one of "non-consumptive" use of wildlife. 3. Use only science rather than politics to protect and
enhance Oregon's wildlife predators, including mountain lions, wolves, bob cats and coyotes. 4. Taking into
account the voices of non-hunters/trappers as priority, rather than being dominated by the views of the small
minority of consumptive wildlife users.

411

The Departments of Fish and Wildlife often have to deal with competing interests vying for control. With climate
change emerging as a lead problem for wildlife and fish, the Director needs to be able to place the interests of a
viable environment, with the needs of fish and wildlife first, over the needs of ranchers, hunters, and other
stakeholders. Other states, such as Idaho, are experiencing problems in this area, and hunters' rights prevail, all
the way to the governor's office.

412

There needs to be a real look at the number of employees and the budget the department has. There is more to
wildlife management than serving the hunting & fishing population. More direction needs to be given to protecting
the environment allowing our wildlife to live. Not to just live to be killed. We need more protection of habitat. I fail
to see why the number of employees the dept has are needed and I hate that precious tax dollars are spent to
teach people to hunt.

23 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


413

managing the landscape for wolves and other predators human wildlife conflict climate change decline of song
birds, amphibians and pollinators wildlife corridors wildlife crossings

414

Continuing to protect and hopefully restore and enhance fish and wildlife habitat and populations in the face of
climate change and global warming.

415

Hunter decline because of the cost to puchase tags Revenue decline because not enough hunters purchasing
tags Private lands open to hunting being closed due to extreme cost for access permits

416

As stated in #2. Plus, earning back the trust of the average license holder. The person that buys licenses for their
family and coordinates vacations and schedules throughout the year to enjoy these resources.

417

Budget, Predation Control, Loss of Habitat

418

1. Managing Oregon's growing wolf population. Sometimes wildlife needs to thrive simply for their own purpose,
not just for the "use and enjoyment by present and future generations." Enjoyment can simply mean knowing that
there are wild lands and wild animals out there. 2. Protecting fish habitat in areas with competing interests. 3.
Protecting salmon on rivers with dams and over fishing. 4. Protecting wild areas and animals from encroachment
by humans. There is increasing pressure to open areas to motorized uses such as snow mobile and OHV's,
horses,too many boaters, or hikers. We may need to limit access to certain areas for certain users. 5. Need to
work with federal agencies and all users to balance the needs of everyone. But, the focus needs to be on
protecting the land and the wildlife.

419

Needs to be an advocate wildlife conservation. Have an objective position on wolves and recognize their
importance in perpetuating a balanced ecosystem.

420

The continuous attacks on the commons from the timber industry, their lackey's in the Oregon congressional
delegation and our slash and burn governor.

421

Allow nature to be nature. Management should NOT mean killing of wildlife in order to appease a minority of
individuals, whether they are ranchers or hunters. Use scientific and proven methods of non lethal ranching
practices in order to eliminate conflicts between livestock and wildlife. Ranchers who refuse to participate in such
programs should be held accountable. N ANY BUSINESS, whether retail or agribusiness, it is the responsibility
of that business to protect inventory. In a retail situation that may include video surveillance, alarms systems,
security lighting and possibly a security guard. In ranching there are equal and effective programs available to
reduce or eliminate predation by wildlife.

422

Lack of access to hunting areas which will decrease the number of people that buy licenses and then will increase
the fees for the rest.

423

This survey is apparently available to persons who are NOT Oregon residents. Please do not be influenced by
their input, especially on over-protective wolf management policy, or other radical environmental policy agendas.

424

Way more than I'd want to have to deal with, but the main things, in my opinion, are finding new ways to clean up
our waterways and land, and the knowledge and flexibility to efficiently deal with emergent issues as they come
up - like forest fires, landslides, long time erosion issues, etc. etc. Whoever it is, I wish him/her the very best of
luck in all of their endeavors!

425

To stop incursions on habitats by developers, fracking companies, ranchers and such like!

426

retain vital intact ecosystems resist the false dichotomy of profit vs environment restore and maintain habitat

427

Non lethal methods for living together with all animals, also the predators Education of the publik and foremost
the ranchers

428

The new director needs to be part of the 21st century -- NOT the 19th.

429

1. The impact of hatchery production of salmon and trout on sensitive, threatened and endangered wild species.
2. Successful reintroduction and maintenance of wolves in Oregon despite hunting and livestock lobbying
opposition. 3. Reigning in County land use managers intent on allowing residential and other types of
development on every inch of class 1 and 2 stream banks.

430

Stream recovery/protection ICW logging.

431

The key interests are respecting and valuing the voices of the non consumptive users who far outnumber the
consumptive users, yet are often treated as afterthoughts. Most wildlife viewers would be happy to pay some sort
of license, fee, tax or whatever it takes, in order to have a voice in wildlife management policies. It is time that the
policies accurately reflect the wishes all Americans, not just the ones that scream the loudest.

24 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


432

Management of water in Klamath Lake and surrounds to preserve sanctuaries for birds and their migrations, and
fish there. Intelligent management of wolf recovery, aiming for full recovery for wolves in their original habitat, and
firm guidance on non-lethal means to avoid conflicts with livestock operations. Making sure our oldest and most
beautiful forest habitats are preserved for wildlife and recreation, and ensuring that preservation, not short term
economic gain (as for the O and C lands) be the highest priority in managing our Northwest Forests. With the
urban area growing, there will probably be more and more pressure on Mt. Hood. Careful management will be
necessary there.

433

Additional development pressure on natural resources, adaptation in the face of climate change

434

Use of water. Some very tough decisions will have to be made that may hurt farmers and ranches.

435

Conflict of interest. Understanding the vast and complex needs of a specie. Not compromising a specie's best
interest due to peer pressure or politics.

436

Revenue generation Species conservation with utilization Development of new revenue streams

437

1. Curbing habitat loss but still having sufficient land for agriculture and housing. 2. Management of endangered
species. 3. Reducing the causes of climate change.

438

Forestry practices, specifically the use of herbicides.

439

Keeping the balance and diversity in the wildlife and ecology. Making sure all of our children and grandchildren
can feel that this director and department cares for our ecosystem which includes our wildlife, flora fauna and all
their inhabitants. That this director and it's employees make decisions based on these concerns and not for
special interest and big money that might only be interested in water rights, oil and fracking rights and similar
destructive interests groups. Someone being able to think outside the box, being creative when making decisions
and presentations. We want to keep our nature free of toxic chemicals and restore the balance between wildlife.
Keeping our diversity alive and free to expand. Protecting rather than exploiting. We all want some one we can
trust to protect our terrestrial and aquatic biomes including all of our creatures. Maintaining our predators is
hugely important in keeping our ecosystems balanced.

440

climate change and overuse of resources.

441

Dealing with the impacts of human population pressure, agri-business pressure and global warming.

442

Outside the Box thinking is critical. The public at large is more and more critical of hunting in general and wildlife
killing contests in particular as tools of wildlife management. We are looking for non-lethal management and an
enlightened approach toward understanding wildlife behavior. Managers with Ag school backgrounds have, in
large part, a 19th century bias and are steeped in enduring myths which are then buttressed by policies. We are
looking for peo

443

To restore fish and all types of wild life, especially Wolves, and keep them all protected. (even if it means to put or
keep them on the endangered species list).

444

The important issues today include the reversal of anthropogenic damage to wildland ecosystems due to overuse
or unsustainable and destructive uses. Representing these natural resources so they can be enjoyed in a
sustainable way by this and future generations must take preeminence over corporate, government and specific
interest groups desires and demands. As we've seen many times over during the last year or two, the Director
must be willing to stand up to vested political and commercial interests and to represent his sector strongly.

445

Pollution erosion over consumption

446

Grazing of cattle on public land Keeping wolves on The Endanger Spies list Preserving our forest and land

447

Protecting endangered species at all costs and using science in decision-making. Raise funds to protect the land
and showcase it through promoting it to tourists with a fee rather than raising money through unsustainable
hunting tags and licenses. People nowadays want to see wildlife alive rather than dead.

448

Restoring healthy streams by decreasing logging and allowing predators to help with the restoration through
healthy tropic cascades. Seeing healthier wildlife which will lead to a healthier Oregon for animals and people
alike.

449

It would be great to have the funding for DFW come from the General Public. All public should have a say as to
how to Manage or not manage wildlife and fish, not just hunters and fisher persons. It is more important to take
care of our natural resources, such as migratory birds, wolves, bear, cougars, coyotes and all of the smaller
species too than to manage just for those who want to kill the resource. Oregon has a lousy wildlife population in
comparison to Montana or Idaho. There's no reason this State with it's diverse habitat and public lands can not
support and increase wildlife numbers. We need someone who will make this a priority.

25 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


450

Improve wildlife popuations and develop more quality hunts like Wenaha Elk, Blue Mountain deer, etc

451

Protection of our wildlife.

452

Logging and mining are destroying our planet at alarming rates and must be challenged.

453

The next leader of ODF&W needs to recognize that Oregon must not stay wedded to the hunting and fishing
community and cater to only that constituency. Oregon needs a creative, far reaching and thinking leader and that
recognizes the challenges and multifaceted solutions required to address; climate change, habitat and wildlife
loss and ecological degradation of oregon's marine and freshwater ecosystems.

454

wolf and salmon population restoration. protecting wolverines, mountain beaver, murrelets and other
uncharismatic megafauna.

455

fish and wildlife are not ours to "use". PERIOD. It is to be left alone and allowed to just be for the sake of being. All
animals have the right to live unmolested by humans. Changing the mentality of people to stop them seeing
animals as beings that we have the right to kill.

456

The wolf controversy!

457

pressure from big business whose first priority is profit without commitment to Oregon citizens..i.e. take the
money and run.

458

Understanding conflicting desires e.g. OTV use that destroys critical habitat. If a use is valid it needs to be
confined to appropriate areas. Some uses simply cannot coexist.

459

This is why I ask that the new manager be well trained and experienced in Permaculture Design. They will then
have the skills and knowledge to use whole-systems thinking in their position. This is critical with our dwindling
resources and fragmented ecosystems today. Our children and future generations deserve to inherit a working,
intact planet, not a destroyed ecosystem. So far humans have been going toward destruction, not healthy,
balanced function. Let's change that! There is a huge Permaculture community in this region and the new director
would enjoy a massive amount of support, coordinated effort and assistance from that community, if it was known
that the director was trained in this science. Permaculture is not just carbon neutral, it is actually Carbon Positive
in it's abilities to increase topsoil, biodiversity, aquifer capacity, carbon sequestration, oxygen generation, wildlife
habitat and corridors, the use of sustainable technology, pollinator populations and a host of other important
ecosystemic functions. Lets team up with Nature and reap the benefits of that relationship!

460

Protecting species and habitats in the face of population growth and energy interests.

461

over fishing and hunting/poachers /inhuman trapping/battle between public and hunters/ranchers and on PUBLIC
land use.

462

The challenge is to keep extremist hunting/angler groups in check and NOT let them hunt/fish on PUBLIC lands,
especially around ENDANGERED/PROTECTED wildlife! A SCIENCE based Director that follows SCIENTIFIC
Research and does NOT bend to extremist hunting/angler groups!

463

Foremost I believe the future potential delisting of the fledgling populations of wolves is going to be a major battle.
Increasing aggressiveness by the states ranchers and threats to collared wolves is increasing. Threats of
poaching is increasing as well. Non lethal methods need to be continued as they are working. The wolf
population in the state is still young and mistakes made on these topics could result in disastrous consequence
for the species

464

The controversy over wolves. Keeping the cost down for hunting to ensure that future individuals will continue to
hunt and future people will start to hunt. As an example, I am an out-of-state resident who hunts both deer and elk
in Oregon. I chose not to go deer hunting this year because the cost of the deer tag is too high now. I am fed up
with continually increasing costs, that is only passed on to non residents hunters.

465

habitat loss, hunting, animal traps, overfishing

466

Climate change, lack of resources, an evolving understanding that animals are sentient beings and deserve
protection and dignity. The earth is not ours to do with as we shall.

467

Habitat protection.

468

1. Water and who will try to control or own it; the government (public) or multi-national corporations. 2. Land
development 3. Mining, oil, and natural gas development 4. Adequate funding for conservation and habitat
development

26 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


469

Wolf management! There has been so much going on in wolf management by way of killing, ie, Washington,
Idaho, Wisconsin, Alaska and Michigan The thought of that going on in this state is the most worst thing I can
imagine for Oregon. People are really polarized on this issue, including me. Before that ever happens in this
state, there had better be a good reason. That rancher who did nothing to protect his sheep (in Washington),
ending up with the death of the alpha female should be a good lesson on what not to do. I never want to see
Oregon in the position. That, I believe, will be a key challenge in the future years.

470

Preserving endangered species.

471

Budget managing with potential governement funding cutbacks, green energy development, protection of critical
wildlife areas & species

472

1. Preserving Oregon's plant and animal species in the face of pressure to exploit. 2. Enforcing law against
damaging violation sufficiently to deter illegal and unethical activity.

473

Figure out how to take a broader view of wildlife management that is science based and not so hunting and
fishing centric. We need to do a better job of engaging and involving a bigger slice of the public outside the
hunting and fishing community. We need to expand our core audience, and find new sources of revenue.

474

SAVE & PROTECT ALL ANIMALS & ENVIRONMENTS. CURTAIL LOGGING. STOP POLLUTION.

475

Habitat preservation, non-human species protection and conservation. Preservation of all native species,
including predators, not just game animals. Serving the interests of those that enjoy nature but do not hunt and
fish, as well as those that do. A focus on the realization that nature has intrinsic value, not just instrumental value.

476

Dams should be removed and wild Salmon given a chance to thrive. Corporations that dump waste into rivers
must be stopped, fined, and made to clean up the waters.

477

Conservation and enhancement of our salmon and steelhead resources.

478

Gaining public trust incorporating successful management of tribal fishery methods into state practices

479

He should represent the 99.45% of NON consumptive outdoor users. A true conservationists that knows wildlife is
priceless and a gift for ALL Oregonians to enjoy. It's not just for one to kill and display as a prize.

480

The mission should not be about human use and enjoyment; it should be preservation of the habitat for the nonhuman inhabitants.

481

I would like to see the Department think about wildlife other than game animals, to look at ecosystems as a whole
and to work toward a better management paradigm that prevents wanton waste of predators and other animals
that some farmers, ranchers and trophy hunters typically hate. I want to see an end to killing contests, unregulated
seasons, open seasons, no bag limits, trapping and snaring and other inhumane and ecologically
destructive wildlife management practices that might have been useful in the 1800s but that are now egregiously
inappropriate. Trophy hunting is also the perfect example of wanton waste and it should be eliminated. I do not
want to see wolves hunted.

482

CLIMATE CHANGE and the disruption of natural systems. Human overpopulation and too many demands on
resources. Sustaining natural resources for future generations WILL MEAN placing some limits on current uses.
Sustaining ecosystems for the future must be the highest priority. Limiting uses on public lands that degrade
habitats (i.e. motorized recreation). It is impossible to provide all things to all people so decisions must be
science-based for sustainability. ADDRESSING CLIMATE CHANGE which means an END to promoting the
burning of fossil fuels as "recreation".

483

Keeping the gains we have made in favor of our environment and be able to impliment visionary changes for the
years ahead.

484

Ability to avoid political and economic pressure.

485

Logging: How to protect fisheries and wildlife habitat from logging and esp. clearcuts. The Director must adopt a
forestry policy of completely sustainable management which means selective cutting, wide riparian buffers, and
absolutely NO CLEARCUTS, monocrops, or pesticides. Pollution of air and waterways. Rivers such as the
Columbia and Willamette need to be cleaned up even more because as of now, they contain toxic contaminants.
Air quality in the Willamette Valley can be poor sometimes due to businesses and vehicles. Lobby the state to
create more stringent clean air and clean water measures. Thanks~!

486

Likely the most critical is mitigating the continuing demise of native populations, particularly of both freshwater and
anadramous fish. It is absolutely critical that habitat restoration and improvement are moved to a top priority for
ODFW, with an increase in education/outreach a close second. I would really like to see a significant portion of
the funds allocated to outdated fish hatcheries instead repurposed to these purposes if this is possible.

27 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


487

The single largest wildlife issue in Oregon is the trend toward mismanagement of wolves. Oregon has the best
Wolf Conservation and Management Plan in the entire United States. It incorporates competing interests of all
sectors of Oregon society. It is a single document upon which conservationists, ranchers, biologists, everyday
citizens, and countless others have agreed as the wolf policy of the state. Wolves are by no means recovered in
Oregon. There is still much to be done. Look at OR7. His pack is the first west of the Cascades in over a half
century. Without the work of ODFW and the community, this miraculous event would not have occurred. Now,
however, it seems as though Oregon is taking notes from Idaho, where wolf management is as bad as anywhere
else in the nation. We have nothing to learn from Idaho except that which we should not do. With federal delisting
of wolves nationwide, Oregon's wolves cannot suffer an indifferent or hostile Director. The Director will have to
stand tall and firm in the face of immense pressure to reduce and maintain wolf populations at the absolute
minimum. Wolves are good for Oregon's beautiful ecosystems. The Director must be willing to do what is right.

488

A short to mid term issue is the proposed Nestle water transfer in Cascade Locks - which seems only to benefit
one of the world's largest corporations and not the fish & wildlife of Oregon in any way. The new Director should
immediately pull ODFW out of those negotiations, to restore the broken trust that many Oregonians currently feel.
Another issue is the ODFW's relationship with Wildlife Services - the federal animal killing agency whose
motivation for killing is purely economic. Also, wolves are just beginning to recover in Oregon and ODFW will be at
the forefront of ensuring that recovery continues. Again, it is important that the Director be an ADVOCATE for
wildlife, and not be afraid to take an economically unpopular stance in order to protect wolves.

489

Changing environment, staying a step ahead of the curve as to progressive ideas to preserve our beautiful areas
and animals.

490

There will be increasing pressure from hunters and owners of livestock to eradicate intelligent predatory species
that have in the past been protected. The Director must be prepared to prioritize the protection of these species
over the self-interest generated, primarily by hunters who unwisely fear that the species they hunt will decline if
species such as Wolves, Coyotes, Foxes, and Bear are allowed to exist and flourish.

491

Fish and Wildlife habitat are being decimated...there is a change in how we are viewing animals from one of a
resource to be used. It would be nice to see a plan in place that contemplates the human impact in terms of
global climate change on how we should protect and conserve our wildlife instead of a plan that focuses on how
we will "use" them.

492

Explosive human population growth that encroaches on wildlife habitats, causing more opportunities for problems
for humans, which in turns bring about even more problems for wildlife because after all they got the shorter end
of the stick in life. I think unless there's greater coordination among agencies to generate some type of master
planning, the Director's role is simply to respond to situations which have become problematic. It's of course
preferable that the person in this role would be visionary and proactive, not to mention being a true nature lover.

493

Budget. Increasing the voice for anglers and hunters and providing predator control. Protecting habitat and public
access to hunt and fish.

494

"Use" means more than "kill and eat." I use Oregon fish and wildlife and their habitat on a regular basis but never
to kill or eat any of it. I want a director that understands that my way us using wildlife and habitat is nonconsumptive and in the majority.

495

Encroachment of the land . Oil, gas, and logging companies endangering the wildlife .

496

Herbicides and pesticides will remain an issue Establishing truly safe buffer zones will remain an issue
Coordinating fish and wildlife goals with actions of the Department of Forestry will be paramount Controlling
private pollution, from individuals and business, to enhance fish and wildlife habitat

497

Effects of climate change

498

Loss of salmon and steelhead hatcheries and the participation that accompanies them. This will in turn add
continued increases to license fees which will shrink participation...and downward the trend will continue.

499

Climate change and its effect on fisheries, wild life, and key ecosystems

500

Pesticide uses; agreement between forest users and takers.

501

Wild fish!!!! Do every thing we can to bring them back..!! Remove dams stop hatchery programs enforce the
fishery more. Employ more game wardens.. maybe start a Program so we have game wardens not just a couple
state police in a wildlife unit..let's fix what we messed up.an make an example of what other states can an will do
if some one starts!!

28 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


502

1, Habitat degradation due to A Climate change. B. Invasive species. C. Exploitative businesses. D. Population
pressures on water, land, power grids. 2, Preservation and protection, even re-introduction, of many species,
including and especially top predators such as wolves and, let's hope, wolverines.

503

Working to preserve wild populations and habitat from special interest groups like ranching and timber companies
Climate change

504

The corporate take over of our natural resources.

505

Wolves and all predators conservation and co existance tools for ranchers enforced.

506

Fish management obviously, that holds fish and streams and riparian areas in high regard. Whether direct or
indirect, working to keep public lands open and accessible to the public. Designating biologically diverse special
places as protected (or working with others to this end) and not for sale as TIMBER or for DEVELOPMENT.
Facilitating the public's enjoyment by making sure spaces are open, free, and that photography is NEVER
something a person could be fined for unless it's a commercial enterprise. We need someone who will fight for
nature, not someone who is driven by greed. A critical issue anyone in leadership faces is the potential to be
bought - so we need someone who is NOT FINANCIALLY DRIVEN, but rather driven by love of and respect for
nature.

507

use of nonlethal management of apex predators, especially the wolf. teaching coexistence between the apex
predators, especially the wolf, with hunting groups, outfitters and agriculture industry. preserving good habitat for
all wildlife.

508

Growing challenge posed by climate-change wrought factors inc. loss of forest cover and increased pressure for
resource extraction outside of a forest maintenance and conservation model. The ability to finesse the demands
and idiosyncracies of people to perform the Agency's core mission while being flexible to current and changing
needs for wildife, fish, and people contingent to the landscape. Water issues--maintaining a strong voice for fish
and wildlife.

509

Climate change and a changing environment.

510

This is the mission: The mission of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is to protect and enhance
Oregon's fish and wildlife and their habitats- YOU JOB is ensure that that wildlife IS PROTECTED AND
ENHANCED!!! Adherence to science, and not tainted, biased agenda's parading as science: and make sure that
there is strict adherence to quotas and opening and closing of seasons- make examples of poachers and those
that hunt earlier or latter than allowed. Enlist volunteers if necessary - they cost nothing!!!

511

Climate change -- recognizing it, communicating about it, and doing as much as possible to help remediate it and
deal with the changes that are here and on the horizon. Unstable budgets -- making the most of what's available,
prioritizing needs, an communicating budget realities to staff and others. Disconnection from the outdoors on the
part of a lot of the public -- the director needs to inspire Oregonians to live and and love the wilderness! This is a
critical time and only someone who is experienced and deeply committed can run the Oregon Dept. of Fish and
Wildlife.

512

Forest Management, preserving our public forests and finding a different solution for the school fund. Preserving
and supporting biological diversity. Water resources and preserving their quality.

513

1 .species conservation 2 .recreational land use policy 3. expense and revenue management

514

Unnecessary destruction of wildlife and the importance of all wildlife on our ecosystem.

515

I believe the number one issue that will be the greatest challenge is coming to a state where wolf recovery is such
a divided and contentious issue. This person must display the utmost skill in communication abilities, negotiation
with all perspectives on the wolf issue, and realize what they are coming into. I also believe they need to have a
deep understanding of the complexity of the ecosystems here in this state, and how old-growth forest, for
instance, is vital to the survival of many species. This person needs to know and understand these connections
to be able to do an effective job as director of ODFW. Another example would be how stream dredging
negatively impacts salmon and other stream species. The list is endless, but these are just two examples.

516

Salmon runs are very important, and there are many potential coal, oil and natural gas developments that would
be located on salmon runs. The director needs to prioritize the salmon and speak against some of the most
damaging developments. Wolves. The ODFW has developed one of the most comprehensive wolf management
plans in the world, and they need to continue to prioritize nonlethal deterrents and work towards a healthy wolf
population in Oregon. Other Endangered Species: With the onset of climate change, the ODFW should be
monitoring and listing species in Oregon that need protections, and also working with the FWS to list species
under the federal ESA.

29 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


517

CLIMATE CHANGE and its deniers.

518

1. The continued re- introduction of predatory animals back to their native habitat. 2. Stronger protection of our
natural resources from predatory corporations and political interests. 3. Cooperation from conservationists and
hunters. Since when did the hunter stop being a conservationist? 4. Opportunities to introduce more of our
youngsters to nature and get them interested in the outdoors. 5. Continued support for our scarce natural
resources and wild lands.

519

Lessen fiscal reliance on hunting tags for agency funding. More focus on working with federal and state agencies
and the private sector to conserve and enhance wildlife habitat.

520

A very small percentage of Oregon residents hunt, and the majority of us view wildlfe as a public resource to live
naturally. We want to have both predators and prey living in a healthy symbiotic relationship. We do not expect the
predators to be 'managed' (i.e.killed) so that the small percentage of hunters have easy prey. Here in Wasco
county, hunters prefer to perform "drive-by" hunting, rather than get out of their truck. I've reported these illegal
hunters with no results.

521

Pressure to favor resource extraction over environmental protection. Climate Change

522

Limiting the timber industry's encroachment and destruction of late-successional forest habitat. Prevent aquatic
contamination. Limit grazing activities. Limit pesticide and herbicide use. Plan for a changing ecosystem with a
changing climate.

523

Urban/rural divide on issues, use of public lands. Please take non-lethal measures to protect wolves before killing
them. What is happening in WA and ID is horrific, and as the wolf population grows here, I do not want to see the
practice of killing them spread into this state

524

Increase all species of wildlife in the PNW. Get private livestock off public lands.

525

Facilitate non-consumptive uses including education at all age and expertise levels

526

Critical habitat depletion - so little old growth left to manage. Decisions should reflect and honor the scarcely
remaining resources.

527

Conservation and education needs to be front and center, they must be able to to stand up to special interest and
hunting group pressure.

528

Not caving into industry. Putting these species interests first.

529

Wolf conservation and allowing wolves to reclaim their historic territories without human interference.

530

Wolf Management Plan Climate Change and Natural Resource Adaptation Protection of Threatened and
Endangered Species and their habitats Dam Removal

531

Continued pressure to overuse public resources

532

Balancing the hunters and the environmentalists needs and desires for the best outcome for the animals and the
environment.

533

Need someone who will cater more toward the middle. Even this poll is somewhat scary because what agency or
business would be run profitably by listening to people who have strong feelings but may not have the
background to make a good long term decision. At many public meetings the majority do not attend and their
views aren't captured, the only views captured are those of people who are on the extreme ends of the spectrum.

534

Decreasing revenue from anglers and hunters. Finding a way for all non-consumptive users to pay an equal
share. If the cost is spread more equally among all users it will be easier to manage on science instead of
politics.

535

Hunting is losing popularity and hunters represent only a small minority (less than 5%) of the public. The agency
should shift its focus from managing wildlife to benefit hunters to benefiting recreation activities like hiking,
camping, wildlife watching etc. This entails changing the composition of the commission to represent true
demographics of Oregonians and changing the funding of the wildlife department from revenue generated by
sales of hunting tags, licenses etc. The future movement away from hunting is clear and has been for many
years, yet there is no change in decision making, oversight, or management which is still dedicated to benefiting
hunters, often at the expense of or disagreement with the majority of Oregonians.

30 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


536

I see the biggest issues as battles between those who use public lands to generate income (grazing livestock or
using water) in ways which degrade the environment and are hostile to certain species (coyotes, wolves and
mountain lions, for example) and those who advocate for sustaining the environment/vulnerable species. Aerial
spraying of pesticides on private forests, an unbelievably harmful practice, with drift and runoff affecting
waterways and migrating wildlife, is now in the news and needs to be addressed for the environmental and health
impacts. These are critical issues and the state needs to move away from outdated practices and address the
ecosystem as a whole, which will impact certain human practices/industries.

537

Public trust and breaking down the good old boys club perspective is going to be a big issue that the new director
should be ready to tackle. Moving the organizatin away from the current public perception of an autonomous
bureaucratic agency with no interest in supporting the public needs to one of building public confidence and
embracing a working for the public attitude. Looking at new ways of funding the organization knowing that relying
on hunting and fishing revenue will not support the organizations future needs. The future appears to be heading
in a direction of more people and fewer resources for everyone get ahead of the situation be pro active. Forge
partnerships with universities and organizations that can add credability and add resources.

538

Sage- grouse ESA listing, phase out hatcheries, work toward removal of dams

539

A declining habitat for the animals in which the department obtains its licensure fees due to a vision of promoting
the predatory animals over the hunting animals of deer, elk, and pheasants. The hunters are being left out by the
inclusionary "vision" of returning wolves and promoting that aspect over all else. I think unless the new Director
realizes that the department's enjoyment of tags and licenses (which increase every year, it seems) will diminish
significantly over time due to declining returns on the tags "investment", that the lesser numbers of hunters will
ultimately doom hunting in Oregon. My children ask me if there will be hunting when they grow up, and I have to
tell them, "I don't think so, at least not how it is recognized now, it will probably be a very limited amount of people
who will hunt every year." I am saddened and yet I understand that the majority of people in Oregon
(particularly the Valley) would rather see the predatory animals in place because that is how it "used to be"...(will
the new Director also place Grizzlies, as I understand they also were present in Oregon. ), so I hope the person
in charge will bring some common sense to the position first and foremost! Thankyou.

540

Allowing wolf packs to grow out of control and then issuing 75 cow tags in the same area (Snake River) is a
prime example of not enhancing Oregon's wildlife. The director needs to get a handle on this situation before elk
populations plumet! The feds and courts have tied our hands, but we need to get beyond that!

541

Access for fishing and hunting, I believe the agency has gone overboard with the conservation thing and less
restrictions may actually help . Example, the Siletz river from the confluence of the forks to the falls is closed to
fishing to protect native summer steelhead. This portion of river is easy access for fisherman of all ages. All
summer steelhead planted in the Siletz are from Siletz stock but not planted in this section. Plant summer
steelhead in this section and there would be more fish to reproduce, therefore increasing the wild population.
This section of river would only be open to fishing on weekends, the logging company that owns the road closes it
during the week. I might point out summer run fishing on the Siletz the last few years has been poor.

542

Banning canned hunts once and for all. There is one infamous operator that continues to operate business as
usual -- essentially has a monopoly on the practice. Phase out lead ammo for hunting Diversifying income

543

Preserving our natural resources from development.

544

Supporting wild fish populations (vs hatcheries) developing support in rural OR for non-lethal predator conflict
measures, particularly regarding wolves

545

Balancing the desire for a larger population to fish and hunt with the need to conserve and protect habitats for
future generations.

546

cougars

547

Passion and zealous advocacy for preserving our wildlife and natural resources, and far less pandering to hunting
and fishing constituencies.

548

The rise in cost for licensing and tags. Show the public how those increases have improved fishing and hunting
through out the state.

549

Poaching, over fished commercial zones, pollution, and need to be keyed in to the real problems were facing

550

1. Hatchery reform and maintaining access to recreational harvest of salmon/steelhead on our rivers. 2. Shifting
management from focusing on maximizing commercial output of fisheries to increasing recreational opportunities.
3. Continue to enforce and reduce non-selective gillnet fisheries on the Columbia.

551

Killing something is not a good way to "manage" them...

31 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


552

Climate change and its affects on natural resources Expanding wolf populations Decline in some forms of
outdoor recreation--shift away from hunting and fishing Increasing human population with attendant loss and
degradation of natural areas East/west divide in Oregon politics and conservation values Sluggish modernization
of fish hatcheries Constituencies for incompatible uses of parks--ORV versus birdwatchers, for example These
are in no particular order.

553

1. Loss of natural habitat. 2. Corporations like Weyerhauser charging $5,000 for a month of hunting. Making
money necessary for citizens to be able to hunt. 3. Allowing some ODFW employees to give special privileges to
persons for favors in return. 4. Not separating State Police and the ODFW. In other words, having game officers
be a part of the same department. 5. Have the game officers be present throughout the state several days per
year to answer questions and explain difficult areas of the law. There have been some really bad examples of
game officers in the past and they did not have to answer to ODFW.

554

keeping man propagated salmonids in our waterways at numbers that benefit communities, sportsmen, and
businesses.

555

get rid of sea lions in the interior river systems

556

Growth

557

Reorganizing ODFW's funding strategy to take advantage of the demographic group that is expanding; i.e.
consumers, who want access to locally caught salmon. Fewer and fewer sportfishing licenses are purchased
every year, despite record runs. The Department needs to reprioritize its funding strategy.

558

Facing challenges with hatchery production and planting programs that have been reduced due to budget cuts.
Finding solutions to problems that are costly without eradicating the programs completely.

559

Wildlife management for hunters without undue influence by liberal activist. Management of the developing wolf
packs and not allowing wildlife management decisions to be voted on such as when dogs and baiting were for
cougar and bear were voted on by a emotional and poorly informed public.

560

adequate funding given declining license sales showing ODFW relavence to citizens of Oregon and their quality
of life hatcheries vs wild fish providing strong oversight role in guiding development in OR in a way that
conserves and restores F?WL Establishing strong partnerships

561

Getting new management staff in the HQ wildlife division. Out with the old, in with new ideas and staff with
backbone to change up the stagnant wildlife depression the state is currently in. Land use and energy
development taking over Oregon's fish and wildlife habitats. Stand up to DSL, DEQ and other regulators to
protect fish and wildlife habitats for future generations. Trim out inefficiencies in HQ fish and wildlife divisions.
Give more credit to the biologists in the districts and listen to what they have to offer as they know what occurs on
the ground where they work.

562

1. Creating a broad base of funding that diminishes the role of license revenue. This would help reduce the bias
toward creating and preserving hunting and fishing opportunities even they are bad for fish and wildlife and their
habitats. 2. Shifting the agency's culture to represent the interests and desires of all Oregonians and not just
those who hunt, fish and trap. 3. Learning to say "no" again to permit and development proposals that threaten to
harm the public interest (or when there is not enough information to say if they will harm the public interest).

563

Balancing public use, species protection and commercial use, with emphasis on the first two. The fish and wildlife
of Oregon (and the environmental system that makes them healthy) belong to the people--not to business, large
or small.

564

1. ODFW needs a strategic vision for success that includes, but moves beyond traditional constituencies. 2.
Public funding for ODFW will continue to decline until the agency can demonstrate a much greater level of
relevance and value added to the general public. 3. The much-needed change in strategic direction for the
agency will require steering a very large ship in a very different direction - maintaining a good relationship with
staff and traditional stakeholders while continually pushing the envelope toward greater fish and wildlife
conservation outcomes will be extremely challenging.

565

Back away from the too-cozy relationships between ODFW and traditional hunting/fishing/ranching interests and
embrace new relationships with other stakeholders.

566

The development and promotion of incentives for the public and landowners to manage natural areas with
conservation as a priority is a solution to the problems created by land use and watershed degradation. IE
https://www.salmonsafe.org - I feel these programs are key to conservation, as they blend an economic and
conservation minded ethic into one. It seems like the state could invest time in developing partnerships that are
mutually beneficial.

32 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


567

Endangered Species Act

568

Issues: lead ammunition, trapping, hunting with dogs or bait, multi-use forests and other public land.

569

Vastly emphasize preventative and non-lethal strategies for reducing conflict with wildlife and end all predator
hunting/trapping, while using the absolutely best science (use the precautionary principle) in all management.

570

The protection of wild salmon and steelhead and trout, even if this means the closure of fish hatcheries. Funding
and the impact on the management native wildlife. The director must have the ability to explain that many old
wildlife management techniques are not cost effective or positive with the scientific knowledge we now have. The
director must be able to get the public trusting of ODFW.

571

Predation on the engulates! Restoration of deer and elk populations in Eastern Oregon

572

when you hire a new director, please be sure it is someone who values the opinions of the overwhelming majority
of Oregonians who like to use our natural areas for hiking and photographing wildlife. Most of us do not want our
wildlife to be killed for sport, or trapped for fur. In fact, it is very disturbing to take a walk in the woods and hear
gunshots all around you in the Willamette Forest for instance. Or to see traps laid across streams and know that
some poor animal is going linger in it for a long painful death. We are also taxpaying citizens and our voices need
to be heard, not just those why buy licenses to hunt and fish.

573

While understanding how to manage natural resources is critical, it can't be separated from the social aspects of
resource management as well. Attention should increasingly be paid to the social science and human dimensions
of natural resources management...if you don't understand how and why people do what they do, your natural
resource management decisions will never fully succeed. Also, it concerns me that funding challenges are an
obstacle to the department being able to do the monitoring that is necessary to understand if management efforts
are succeeding and/or to identify developing problems early.

574

*eliminate fatal trapping practices to monitor wildlife populations *re-examine as other state have, whether it is
truly in our best interests to allow trappers to kill our fur bearing animals in order to profit from their pelt sales to
oversea interests. This provides NO income to the 97% of state taxpayers who supplement public lands. Hunting
and Fishing licenses on the other hand have a positive effect on income and are strictly regulated. *establish and
nurture Marine Reserves to provide a strong foundation for aquatic species survival while investigating current
problems such as the massive sea star die off which is currently occurring along our coast. *divest ourselves of
predator control $$ for people ranching on public lands for pennies. We need to protect heritage species such as
the Western Sage Grouse.

575

Providing for use of the resource so that present and future generations still have adequate opportunities for
recreation. Utilizing hatcheries and fish culture to supplement sport fisheries in the face of "anti-hatchery"
sentiment from a small vocal segment of the public. Balancing use of our natural resources with protecting those
resources.

576

Growth and population is increasing rapidly. We can't let that encroach on our land. Protect the areas that are
already set aside. Don't let it go. Keep fish and wildlife habitat the #1 priority. Keep the land safe from those who
want to mine, fracking, or anything detrimental to the environment. We have to protect what we have. Once
gone, it's gone.

577

To ensure that protect and enhance habitat by present and future generations of ranchers and hunt clubs is no
longer the ODF&W primary motivating goal. In fact,a more specific mission statement that addresses the
preservation of fish and wildlife and their habitats for their own use,and strict limitations of private individuals or
groups utilizing those habitats being limited to those which provide public access and enjoyment of those
habitats for futrue generations( ie: River guides,sub contracted trail management,campground employees)and a
cessation of those habitats being cleaned out and leased to private agriculture,mineral,gas,oil and hunting
ventures. That would be a more true,transparent and direct fullfullment of the original vision of the ODF&W.
Otherwise,this branch of Federal Corporation needs to be discontinued as not in the best interests of the public.

578

Much of our land is controlled by a few industries that have multiple negative impacts. The extensive use of
range land for cattle impacts the lives and well being of "non-profitable" species such as wild horses. I am also
concerned about the effect it has on soil and water quality. That Oregon still uses steel traps is abhorrent . In the
past ODFW has not seemed to be concerned about the use of public lands or the animals native to them aside
from how to manage game animals and when catering to the special interests of hunters and ranchers and the
natural order of the eco system suffers. There needs to be a broader and long term view of the environment and
be mindful that we must preserve diversity rather than just a few key species. I am not suggesting that grazing
and hunting be banned but that past policies have not implemented wisely and have largely ignored scientific
knowledge.

579

KEEPING COST DOWN. GETTING THE PUBLIC TO BELIEVE IN YOU. KEEPING RIVERS AND BLM LAND
OPEN TO FISHING AND HUNTING.

33 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

580

The department seems to be very focused on game species. I would like to see it expand to further encompass
non-game wildlife.

581

Pressure from corporations to devour all the natural resources with little regard to the residents. Selling or
leasing out OR public lands under market value, for small interest groups. Making sure fresh water is a priority
and protect it at all costs. Allowing species like the wolf and wild horse to maintain their freedoms on public land.

582

The greatest challenge the new director will face is diminishing ungulate populations due to lack of predator
control, loss of habitat and several other factors which have been brought to light by sound scientific evaluation.
Part of this challenge is the fact that our hands are tied by state law when it comes to predator management. The
new director should be strong enough to make the argument that, the feelings, and persuasive ad campaigns of
anti-hunting groups, are not a sound means for management of wildlife in our state. Less Deer and Elk mean less
opportunities for success and there by less hunters especially in the face of rising licensing fees.

583

Getting fish and game away from Politics. Do away with the way is Has been managed under the last Director.

584

Protecting predators like wolves, bears and mountain lions. Making sure there is protected habitat for our
endangered, rare and struggling animals and plants. There is increasing pressure by small but vocal
constituencies to eliminate or drastically reduce predators. This is not OK. There needs to be better
understandings concerning the decimation and brutal treatment of our wildlife by cruel events such as predator
killing contest. The FBI is now investigating animal cruelty. These events fall under that. F&W needs to get on top
of this and realize Americans overwhelmingly want to protect our wildlife and its ecosystems.

585

The travel management plan is making it much more difficult for residents (hunters and fisherman, hikers, etc.) to
go out into the woods to enjoy the creation. Even though the plan is indeed in line w/ the mission statement, what
good does it do if we can't go into the woods to enjoy the resources? The new director should either scrap this
plan or find ways to improve it so we can go into the woods.

586

Eliminating lead from ammunition. Ending spring bear hunting. Participating in the movement to clean up US
Wildlife Services' practices in the state of Oregon. Implementing stricter trapping regulations - no leg holds,
shorter required check time periods. Eliminating the over production and adding of hatchery fish to our rivers.
Give native species a chance to rebound.

587

nnnn

588

1, Managing for "WILD FISH" in the areas of Salmonids and Steelhead in preference to Hatchery grown fish. 2.
Providing water in streams and for our Refuges 3. Continuing the restoration of Wolf Populations in Oregon.

589

Cougar hunting, bear hunting, preservation of sea lions, salmon and cormorants. I believe the Director should
use external scientists outside the agency and not reply upon internal wildlife biologists who are influenced by
hunters/fishermen already on the board or pressured from animal agriculture corporations.

590

Recognize that the hunting and fishing licenses DO provide an important income stream, but are not always the
priority in decision making.

591

Inclusion of non-consumption constituents as stakeholders and voices in policy-making.

592

The earth has lost half of the wildlife population in the last 40 years due primarily to loss of habitat, pollution of
ecosystems, and exploitation of wildlife (hunting, fishing, poaching, etc.). I believe it is imperative the new
Director work to halt the loss of habitat for wildlife and restore that which we have already destroyed. Clear cut
logging and the use of chemicals in forest management needs to be addressed. He should support and
encourage those who want to rehabilitate wildlife for a return to the wild and those who would educate the
population (especially children) in regard to the value of OUR natural world. And, probably the biggest challenge
will be building and maintaining working relationships with lawmakers and other agencies in achieving these
goals.

593

As license revenue declines, the director should think outside the box to develop other sources of revenue and
bring other stakeholders into the fold.

594

To listen to all parties concerned/interested. To not be led/influenced by any one special interest or monied
group, but rather to act from the point of view of protecting and enhancing Oregon's fish and wildlife and their
habitats for the use and enjoyment by present and future generations - as well as the fish and wildlife
themselves. They need their habitat.

595

Hatchery production or non production. The future generations need a reason to buy license and tags. No fish no
reason. Cutting back hatchery production in every close to home river makes no sense.

34 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


596

See above answer. I believe there should be a shift away from hunting etc. as a source of revenue generation.
Wildlife and wild lands can generate money in different ways that don't involve destruction. I don't expect hunting
to disappear, just not to dominate the discussion as it has done for far too long.

597

Individual accountability to protect livestock from wildlife. Humane treatment of all wildlife. Protecting wildlife
habitats, wildlife populations. Creating wildlife corridors and mitigating past encroachments that have devastated
wildlife populations. Balancing wants of the few (hunters, fishermen) with the needs of the many--all Oregonians
and the wildlife themselves.

598

please refer to #2 - IF WOLVES ARE CONTINUE TO BE MANAGED WITH POLITICS AND EMOTIONS THEN
OREGON CAN KISS OUR ELK AND DEER POPUL;ATION GOOD BYE

599

Lead ammunition, Spring bear hunting, leghold traps and snares, the war on predators....all these horrific issues
need to be a thing of the past in Oregon.

600

Climate change and its effects on our fish and wildlife.

601

To keep our wildlife safe reguardles of financial gain ..

602

Encouraging the public to practice sustainable use of resources.

603

Human encroachment on wildlife areas, financial cuts leaving them impotent to actually enforce legislation.

604

The key question here is the definition of what constitutes protection and enhancement and how to manage best.
Challenges are our growing population and diverse interests, smaller budgets and loss of trust in government. My
hat is truly off to the person who steps into this arena, but my personal interests have to do with less consumption
and a very careful attitude towards protection of habitat and species that depend on what we left.

605

1. Revenue diversification; 2. Increase opportunities for engagement and input from nonhunting constituency; 3.
Work to transform the dominant wildlife management paradigm that favors cultivating ungulate game species at
the expense of all others, and treats predators as vermin to be exterminated, toward one that increases overall
biodiversity and the health of the larger ecosystem. 4. Begin a new process of incorporating humane
considerations into all wildlife management decisions.

606

Controlling the cougar, bear, and wolves. Put more hatchery fish in rivers.

607

Lack of pay and hiring quality employees who don't cheat the system.

608

Allow the use of dogs in hunting Cougars. The use of expandable Broadheads and illuminated knocks. Both give
no advantage over traditional methods except for aiding in the recovery of equipment/game. Wolf management.
The use of motorized decoys for waterfowl hunting.

609

environmental impacts that are taking place and how they are changing wildlife abilities.

610

Habitat loss and degradation.

611

He should recognize the fact that hatcheries are harmful to native fish stocks and strive to cure the current
mindset in ODFW that hatcheries are saviors. He must realize that the millions we have wasted on hatcheries
would have been much better invested in habitat protection and improvement.

612

get rid of the wolves.

613

Be fair to all, to listen to all, place attention to all fishermen and hunters, and don't forget the other wildlife that also
is in the state of Oregon.

614

Attention to, and focus on non-game wildlife issues such as raptors, marbled murrelet, mountain lions, wolves, etc.
I think ODFW should aim at working with more wildlife rehabilitators to see WHAT types of injuries Oregon's
wildlife is seeing. Then, trying to mitigate such injuries/fatalities by implementing a public education sector that
allows citizens to see how they could have a less harmful impact on Oregon's wildlife. I also think predator outreach and public education classes/educational brochures should be created. Often, the general public has a fear
of apex predators, without knowing the ecology of these animals. If education were implemented, people could
understand these animals better, fear them less. Also, information on non-lethal methods of deterring apex
predators from private lands. As habitat is crucial to the health of wildlife, creation of conservation easements,
wildlife corridors, open parks and spaces and natural areas is a must. Many Oregonians enjoy wildlife, just for the
sake of watching them exist or knowing they live near wildlife. As stated previously, I think more of a focus needs
to be on non-game animals.

615

Commercial fishing issues. Prioritizing competing issues, such as commercial vs. sport fishing interests. Manage
our resources on science, not politics.

35 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


616

Serving the general public beyond the narrow interests of hunters.

617

Oregon wildlife is not just about "can it be hunted or fished." It is also about wildlife viewing and the incredible
amount of personal enjoyment and income generating potential this state has in maintaining a diverse, viable and
scientifically significant collection of ecosystems.

618

Wolves! they need to be controlled I am all for having a few but to allow them to run AMOK while being protected
is just not smart. Other predators such as Cougar are also diminishing Deer and Elk herd at alarming rates in
other parts of the state.

619

Working with Latinos.

620

For many years the Department has been organized around hatchery programs that appear to be its de facto core
mission, rather than to "protect and enhance fish and wildlife and their habitats" for the longer term. This is
despite the avalanche of scientific findings in recent years demonstrating the downsides of large hatchery
operations. New management, not entrenched in this culture, is essential to reforming this department. Education
of the public about the trade-offs and downsides to large hatchery operations is critical.

621

as a sports fisherman,i have always felt there is a bias at odfw in favor of the commercial fisherman over the
sportman ie. {the gil net issue] that never seems to be resolved..

622

STOP MESSING WITH THE OUTDOORS PEOPLE THAT FUND THIS DEPARTMENT WITH THE PURCHASE
OF TAGS, LICENCES AND PERMITS. STOP TRYING TO OUTLAW LEAD BULLETS WITH UNDOCUMENTED
STATISTICS. THE OREGON DMV HAS ONE STANDARD FOR A HANDICAP PERMIT, THE ODFW
ANOTHER - RIDICULOUS! ENCOURAGE MORE INDIVIDUALS TO BUY TAGS AND LICENSES WITH
REASONABLE REGULATIONS - DON'T OVER-REGULATE THEN HAVE TO RAISE LICENSE PRICES TO
COMPENSATE THE DOWNTURN IN SALES - STOP THE INSANITY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

623

Finding a revenue stream which can take the burden off of the hunting and fishing public of funding the many
activities our agency does that are unrelated to hunting and fishing (e.g. wolves, endangered species, non-game
species, and other regulatory and planning processes).

624

Wolf management, increasing deer/elk herds.

625

As the population of Oregon increases, and spreads into wildlife habitat, the agency must give more attention to
human-wildlife interaction issues. The foolish theatrics, and ridiculous expense, involved in the "Snowball the
Deer" fiasco could have been avoided if the family had simply been brought into the fold of the Wildlife
rehabilitation/ certification education programs that are now so scarce and so highly guarded. Why not let people
be trained to rehabilitate wildlife? Isn't training and more extensive education the key to guiding wildlife/human
interactions into more sensible and safe practices? Education is the answer to the next dilemma before us, the
problem of avoiding the negative consequences that the pressure of the human population is exerting on wildlife
and wilderness. Let's train a whole generation of eager minds to meet the challenges. Why keep good practices a
secret? Who benefits when you won't allow the public to know and understand it's own inheritance? We must
broaden the programs that teach Oregonians to help in the everyday management of our wild lands, so that each
border between man and wilderness becomes a place where our minds and spirits are elevated to our highest
function- service to our planet and its fellow inhabitants.

626

1) Habitat is the key issue for all our managed species, and yet habitat programs are often pinched during budget
downsizing. Wise management of marine, freshwater, and wildlife habitats, are all critical matters to address in the
coming years in the face of increasing and competing new industries and climate issues (e.g., offshore energy,
marine aquaculture, drought-stricken areas). Need strong leadership to make tough choices that are not
necessarily popular with harvesters or land owners. 2) Must support efforts to gather needed data and conduct
analyses for sound decision making. Ocean development is far behind terrestrial development, yet moving at
very fast pace due to substantial federal funds for investing in OR, 3) Justifying and paying for programs that are
not funded by fishing and hunting licenses, particularly if we stay stuck in the 1960's model of supporting our
programs with license fees. Must be innovative, or draw in innovation to find solutions to this problem. Need more
partnerships with conservation programs (TNC, USFWS, World Wildlife Fund, etc.) to gain general public support
and funding for ODFW conservation programs.

627

Balancing conservation and preservation in conjunction with competing commercial and recreational demands
and opportunities.

628

Keeping funding could be quite difficult. As the cost of permitting, and licencing goes up, and the success rates
decline I believe there will be less fisherman/hunters buying in.

36 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


629

1. Invasive and non-native plants, animals and fish threaten the ecology of Oregon wildlands. 2.The ecology of
land and water in Oregon is degraded by fish (salmonids, bass for example) and animals (Wild Turkey)
introduced by people (often by ODFW), whether these are native or non-native (feral pigs). Many of these
habitats were fishless, and home to native animals (amphibians, Signal Crayfish, Western Pearl Shell mussel)
that ODFW helped displace by introducing fish or allowing bait fishing. ODFW must move to stop hatcheries,
stop stocking fish (high Cascade lake stocking is the most egregious), and explain this to anglers who will want to
do it themselves. Turkey poplulations are a nuisance to all of us who don't hunt, and Small Mouth Bass in the
Umpqua River is a disaster and an embarrassment. 3.Education and enforcement of ecologically sound
management of Oregon's fish and wildlife and habitat. 4.Global warming is making Oregon more hospitable to
non-native and invasive species, and ODFW must combat them.

630

1. Balancing the conflict between the need for hatcheries, the cost of hatcheries, and the impacts on endangered
fish. 2. Balancing the needs of fish and wildlife with the needs of commercial and sport fishing and hunting needs.
3. The need for more staff focused on fish and wildlife habitat and recovery.

631

Making science, the natural environment, wildlife, and wildlife habitat the top priority over the demands of hunters
and cattle ranchers.

632

Managing the predator population that is taking a large toll on the herds throughout the state. Stop the shut
downs of the hatcheries on key rivers throughout the coast systems. Control the privatization of the vast amount
of huntable properties in the state of Oregon. try to do away with the limited entry into warehouser property.

633

Private land access, wildlife concentrating on private lands, control of the wolf population.

634

-Hunting, it will be difficult to entice a future generation to hunt when we only receive tags every 3 to 6 years for
large game and small game has become a high income sport. ODFW does nothing we can physically see to
improve hunting. My children have no interest in a sport that makes me spend 3 months a year bitching about the
fees I paid to wait and see if I can use my license, multiple years complaining about no tags and then again the
fees I paid to not get them and finally having to spend a week in the woods looking for an animal we see every
day in our yard in town but we cant find during that week. How is there a realistic future in that? I would spare my
children the heartbreak that has become hunting. Fishing, there will be a future sport here but not because
ODFW has done the things necessary to entice future generations. It is tradition and values that ensure this
sport. It can be credited more to the campgrounds and not the fishing. Children are happy catching a few small
kokanee or rainbows as long as the whole family is out there having fun. But don't think for a second that as they
grow and realize that the fish they pay to mass produce are not fishable because the predators have eaten them
and the season is closed early or that the money and power behind the fly fishing community has managed to
lobby regs keeping traditional angling out of any good freshwater fisheries that they wont drop this sport like a bad
habits. At least until they have children of their own to pass on the tradition and values they learned while fishing
as children themselves.

635

Hunter / fisher participation is always going to be an issue. We need to keep participation up. Policies that
increase the resource (game and fish) and access to the resource will drive up (or at least maintain) participation.
Additionally, another big issue over on the east part of the state is water (drainages, reservoirs, etc.) ODFG
needs to be long-term sighted in figuring out ways to preserve existing water sources and the habitat they
provide.

636

climate change and water resources

637

Funding shortfalls are current and will continue to be a major challenge to keep the agency effective in
management. Director must find different funding sources other than request hunters and anglers to show support
at legislature hearings for self-imposed fee increases. Wildlife Division programs are being held back by
using some of dedicated hunting license dollars to support Fish Division programs. This needs to change and
reflect balance based on funding. Respective program should pay their own way, including programs that are
marine oriented and non-game oriented. Recent changes that have cut region directors down to two and at same
time increased Salem Division staff is very much what happen several years ago and agency became very
centralized and not field staff oriented. Director will be challenged to hear all sides of issues from with region staff
and have decision makers within agency on level playing field for critical issues with local biologists not
represented as much as Division staff.

638

loss of habitat access to hunting/fishing areas. control of invasive species, mammal, fish, plants,

639

A human population that is expanding in Oregon and how best to protect wildlife from the detrimental aspects of
that population shift.

640

Resist the political garbage from those who would like to see hunting eliminated. No compromise!

37 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


641

Declining hunting and fishing interest by the public. Complex regulations and higher fees discourage participation
from new and non-resident fishing and hunting participants. Understanding the complexity behind evasive and
exotic species and their effect on fish and wildlife.

642

643

loss of habitat. loss of hunting and fishing opportunities as more land is closed to public access.

644

Management of our resources for maximum sustainable harvest is a very short sighted way to operate the
department.

645

Wolves, anti hunters, allowing the voices of a few sway things and the voices of people who know nothing about
or never make responsible use of the fish and wildlife of Oregon to sway things.

646

1. Wild fish management: More of a focus needs to be placed on identifying key rivers where wild fish
management will be most successful, then make management changes to protect those wild fish. Why is Oregon
not setting aside key populations as wild steelhead sanctuaries, like the Washington gene bank rivers? Other
management measures like low flow closures and water temperature closures, more selective gear regulations,
and mandatory retention of hatchery fish, aimed at protecting the wild salmonids in our rivers are just a few
examples of management strategies used in neighboring states to great success. 2. Hatchery reform: Bring
Oregon's salmon, trout and steelhead hatcheries into the 21st century when hatcheries are absolutely necessary.
Use current science research to guide hatchery methods and protect wild fish whenever possible.

647

Alternative funding for fish and wildlife habitat restoration and management. Advocate for managers and
administrators who have suffered because of the legislators who pander to the union

648

A few years ago there was not a deer management program in place west of the Cascades. Unforgivable for an
agency that stresses the only way to manage is to have plan in place. Go figure! This should be in place prior to
any thing else. If you can not get this done you better not apply. If anybody gets in your way of getting this in
place, fire them on the spot.

649

The conflicts between resource consumers and other groups. Non consumer groups have been asking for a
equal partnership with consumer groups in the management of the State's wildlife, weather the wildlife is
classified as a hunted or predator species. All classifications of wildlife should be managed for all citizens of the
state.

650

Needs to do something about the privat land pay to hunt issue We need to hunt preditors with dogs now

651

Creating urban wildlife corridors is KEY! Animals need a way to move through the areas that we have made less
inhabitable without coming into contact with cars and humans who would seek to harm them, or who the animals
may seek to harm if threatened. Urban planning, development, and refurbishment is also critical, especially when
it comes to planning for areas where habitat loss can be replaced with suitable man-made environments that
mimic the habitat being lost to development.

652

Issue: The decline of forage habitat for big game, deer and elk, on public lands in Oregon is driving downward the
big game populations the tag sales of which fund the wildlife programs. The new leader of ODFW must address
this big game forage issue directly with the top USFS and BLM managers and gain their cooperation in provision
of big game forage on federal lands as federal law and regulation require. Issue: Currently big game species,
deer, elk, cougar, bear and wolves. are each managed independently, not in concert with one another. Deer and
elk are the life blood of the, the revenue producers(license and tag sales) for the Department and must be
managed as such. Cougars, bears and wolves prey on the on the deer and elk (the capital), as do the hunters, but
the hunters provide the revenue. The new director must lead the Department's wildlife management into an era
where predators and prey are manage in concert with the objective to increase deer and elk populations in order
to provide for increased harvest opportunity and thus increase lice and tag revenue. Issue: The sport
fishing and hunting community have lost faith in ODFW. The new ODFW director must be will and able go to the
table with the stakeholders, assess the situation, identify opportunities and direct the department in taking
initiatives to restore stakeholder confidence and support..

653

Climate change Population decline of species Increasing water demand

654

maintaining the integrity of natural genetic strains in wild salmon populations

655

Loss of critical habitat, too much urban sprawl and too damn many people!

38 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


656

Experience working with wildlife rehabilitators is also very important. Attention to wildlife rehabilitation and public
education can help prevent problems for wildlife. Also, a focus on developing conservation easements,
restoration projects in non-game wildlife, watchable wildlife programs, creating urban wildlife corridors, backyard,
business and school nature-scaping to re-establish some wildlife habitat in developed landscapes are KEY at this
point in time to conserving wildlife & their habitats for the present and future generations.

657

I am a veterinarian with a background in wildlife medicine and rehabilitation. Over the past few years I have
witnessed first hand the amount of care the public has for injured wildlife. I would like the new director to have
experience and knowledge of wildlife rehab policy, licensing, and education. Wildlife rehab is more than a cottage
industry nowadays, and commands a large amount of funding from grants, private and public donations. It also
provides jobs and careers for some, and valuable volunteer and education experience for many more. With so
many resources being allocated to this field, I feel it is important that ODFW has a greater presence in both
monitoring and regulating wildlife rehab facilities. I have visited several wildlife rehab facilities during my time in
Oregon. While many are run in a fastidious and professional manner, there are some where animals are not
getting sufficient care and are suffering. I believe ODFW has a responsibility to monitor wildlife rehab facilities
more closely, ensuring that animals are receiving veterinary care, adequate analgesia, and proper monitoring. A
director of ODFW should be aware of wildlife rehab facilities, be able to implement new policies concerning the
medical care and rehabilitation of wildlife, and be willing to listen to Oregon citizens about the care and
maintenance of wildlife species that are not utilized for sport. Oregon is a progressive state. As such, I believe we
have a good opportunity to make policies that will benefit wildlife and the people who appreciate it for many years
to come.

658

meeting demand for services with limited and shrinking budget and staff in the face of increases in increasing
conflict at the human/wildlife interface due to habitat loss and encroachment.

659

Climate change and too many people on the planet.

660

I believe that the director should focus resources into proactive agencies working to help strengthen ODFW's
mission. For instance helping fund some of the numerous nonprofits in Oregon working hard for wildlife, either
with conservation, rehabilitation, or education.

661

ODFW needs to have the state provide a budgeting process that is less dependent on the direct sales of hunting
and fishing licenses. There is so much more to fish and wildlife management than just the "taking" of species
through permits. Oregon is blessed with an incredible diversity of fish and wildlife species, so more emphasis
should be placed on "non-game" species and their welfare. For instance, put together a program and timeline for
reintroducing the California Condor into Oregon. In order to do that, the problem of lead ammunition for hunting
must be addressed.

662

I think we depend too heavily on fees from anglers and hunters for the budget. Fees are already rather high, and
continue to increase while participation decreases - it's a death spiral. The conflicting mission ( as i understand it
- environmental protection and public use of natural resources) of the agency contributes to anger about the
decisions the dept makes. Anglers are irritated by special regulations for sport fishing. They feel that the rules are
difficult to understand and keep changing (and they have a point). I also wonder, how will the new director shape
the future of the agency as we face climate change and the associated problems - such as water quality issues,
invasive species, etc.?

663

Revenues Sport and commercial fishing opportunities Wildlife opportunities.. hunting, viewing etc. Infrastructure
upkeep How to attract more anglers, more hunters

664

The new director needs to have vision for the future and how the publics view and use of wildlife has changed.
We need someone to see beyond the hook and bullet mindset and integrate public interest and importance of
non-game and conservation issues as well.

665

Conservation of endangered species, limiting man made problems such as mentioned above.

666

trying to increase the states mule deer herd. Hopefully without increasing licences and tag fees too high. Keep
incouraging youth oppurtunities.

667

As urban populations rise, hunting and fishing will continue to decline, along with the fees that fund much of the
department's operations. I would like to see an emphasis on developing creative funding sources for non-game
wildlife, for public education in creating wildlife-friendly ("nature-scaping") landscaping to assist our embattled
wildlife with wildlife corridors and habitat, and general education around friendly co-existence with native wildlife.
Would love to see conservation programs to reinstate, for example, burrowing owls in the Willamette Valley and
help for other Sensitive-Critical species in different parts of the state; decrease in grazing in sensitive habitat,
decrease in wind power farms in sensitive habitat; conservation of wolves.

668

Financing the agency Collaborative solutions

39 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


669

Some means of acquiring revenue from those who do not now pay anything, such as the anti-hunters who are so
vocal on these issues.

670

Actually managing our fish and game resources which have been in severe decline. Make the hard decision to
eliminate general seasons when data predominantly shows progressive declines over periods of time, rather than
keeping general seasons in place as revenue sources. If this means limited entry but the need to raise the cost of
tags/licenses has to be done, so be it. It is time our state got serious over real game management

671

The agency needs to reach out to the hunting community, remembering that they finance wildlife management in
Oregon and their collective views should be seriously considered.

672

predeters and blacktail deer numbers that have declined a lot .

673

Predator management Improving quality rather than quality of hunting opportunities Columbia River harvest
reform Employee retention

674

Apparently decreasing revenues while increased overhead costs sap the ability of the agency to respond to its
mission. The specter of climate change impacting the fish and wildlife populations that the department will
manage. Human interactions and demands on the natural environment increasing as the population increases
and competition for diminishing natural resources

675

growing urban and recreational human population, habitat fragmentation, invasive plants and animals.

676

Increasing the numbers of deer and elk in parts of Oregon east of the Cascade range.

677

Hatchery reforms, commercial and sport conflicts. Expanding opportunities for hunters and anglers to encourage
participation.

678

BUDGET SHORTFALLS AND CHANGING THE DEPARTMENT TO DETERMING TAG SALES BASED ON
BIOLOGICAL DATA INSTEAD OF REVENUE BASED DECISIONS. HAVING THE BALLS TO USING
PREDATOR MANAGEMENT TO INCREASE TAG SALES.

679

the new director must face growing non-consumptive uses of natural resources, growing urban areas and
reaching those audiences, increased land use pressure, and increased herbicide and pesticide use that affects
habitat, game, and non-game species. Generally needs to see that everything is connected and understands the
critical importance of habitat work and conservation work to support the success of all other programs in the
agency.

680

Support restoration of the PERMANENT pioneer license with no annual (non permanent) component

681

Almost every hunter I have talked to are no longer excited about hunting in Oregon. Most hunters I know are
looking at other states that have managed their populations well. Hunting is conservation and a good director can
turn our current situation around and make Oregon a hunting and fishing destination for all of Oregonians and
nonresidents alike.

682

Protecting wildlife! There is so much habitat loss and so many other issues facing wildlife. Protecting the animals
needs to be the top priority. Wildlife needs to be protected! Government agencies should represent all the people
and not just cater to the desires of ranchers, hunters and fishermen.

683

Political pressure to end hunting. Funding problems. Distractions related to things outside of ODFWs ability to
control like climate change. Predator population. Mule deer population. Wolf reintroduction.

684

Habitat is being lost. Recently I was in the woods and noticed that the ladder fuels were out of control. These
ladder fuels don't allow sunlight to enter the lower vegetation that many animals feed on and causes a serious
and devastating fire threat to the public. With ladder fuels so thick if there is a wildfire it grows out of control and
threatens towns and human lives. With proper management of the ladder fuels more food is provided for the
forest animals and makes a safer place for people and animals alike.

685

Funding the agency appropriately to continue Oregon's commitment to preserving and enhancing our natural
resources

686

Making sure that science not perceived politics drives the program decisions of the Agency. This is especially
important where protections and enhancement of endangered or threatened species is the issue. The Agency
should not have to be sued to do what the Endangered Species Act requires. If you want public trust, then do
what the law calls for without having to be sued to make you do it. That will also save money (the cost of
unsuccessful lawsuit defense) that could be better spent on programs.

687

anti hunting/ trapping agendas predator management wolf management/opportunity to hunt/trap decrease in
hunting fishing due to changes in recreation and increases in license prices funding

40 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


688

Protecting threatened, endangered or sensitive species. Protecting, enhancing and expanding healthy
ecosystems.

689

690

dwindling fishing and hunting interests and increasing non consumptive citizens. Tax on optics should be pursued
again. Priority should be on managing in the face of continueinig climate change and impact on declining
numbers of birds and insects and changes on flora. Deer, elk, geese, should not be the only priority, but habitat
for shorebirds, passerines, native plants and invasive species management is important. If the money isn't coming
from licensing and parking fees, legistlate for income from state budget. If the non game checkoff box on state
tax forms is promoted for non game benefit, some of us would use it again.

691

There are two critical issues. 1. Protecting and enhancing populations of non-game wildlife. 2. Developing nonhatchery strategies to protect native fish species.

692

Ever increasing demands of recreational fishing is pinching commercial harvest on the Columbia in particular.
End result appears to be that only wealthy recreational fishers will get access to the resource . Commercial
harvest allows fish to markets and restaurants . Rebalancing these competing constituents will be a big
challenge.

693

Out game in Oregon is rapidly declining due to poor management. The romantic notion that wolves are more
important than the herds of elk is causing more problems than this space allows. Oregon was once close to
having more game than any other state. Now, pretty bad.

694

protecting enough land/habitats for diversity of wildlife.

695

Climate change, conservation, invasive species

696

Declining big game herds (Elk, Deer). Poor funding model. Predator management (Wolf, Cougar, Bear).

697

Continue to practice conservation but fight the environmentalists.

698

Must be able to relate to the commission, and make the commission understand all aspects of the department's
responsibility. Play fair with all divisions.

699

Management of fisheries with the priority of Sport Fisherman must be done.

700

Mule deer management. Eastern OR herds are in trouble. Too much harvest, especially in uncontrolled archery
hunts. January chukar hunts on critical mule deer winter range should've been terminated long ago. The multifaceted problems these animals are facing are going to provide major challenges.

701

Rangeland management pertaining to sagegrouse. The loss of B run steelhead in Region 6 on the Columbia
River, due to unsubstainable native gillnet practices. Management in regions 6 should be a priority, I fear we are
losing B run steelhead due to the larger Chinook runs the last two years with gillnets out for 24 hours a day, 30
days straight and a mesh size that does not allow a fish over 7 pds to get through. This is serious.

702

Same as above. Without money and respect from legislators the agency is not meeting its mandate with respect
to non-game wildlife. All the money and emphasis goes into fish, hatcheries and game species. In addition to
getting more money from the legislature, cutting game bird programs should be done to free up money for nongame research, monitoring and participation. Compared to WA and CA, there is no non-game program in OR and
no participation in things that matter to non-game/listed species.

703

1) Funding 2) Rural/urban conflict 3) Given the uncertainty of ODFW's traditional funding source
(hunters/anglers), how will the agencies mission be implemented in the real world? Will our programs and
activities characterize us as a conservation agency? A preservation agency?

704

The further destruction of the fish runs from over fishing. Take a lesson from WA and start declaring streams
native only with no hatchery release. Take a lesson from WA and start to manage the razor clams and mussels.

705

Salmon Management Big Game Management State Revenues / Budgeting Issues Address declining morale of
ODFW staff

706

Create a way that the general public can e-mail ideas and problems that can be talked about .

707

As stated previously, I believe that there needs to be a stronger focus on the primary mission, as stated in this
question. I believe that one of the major challenges might be finding people to hire into the department that are
sincere about their passion for Oregon's fish and wildlife current and future populations and habitat quality and
quantity.

41 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


708

Working with ranchers to solve wolf-livestock interactions Manage wildlife interactions with a rapidly growing
human population Doing more with less, stopping budget cuts and investing more money into natural resources

709

ISSUES FROM SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS THAT BLOCK COMMON SENCE. LIKE HAVING LARGE
NUMBERS OF CATS AND WOLVES WITCH ARE MAKING A HARDSHIP ON OUR HERDS.WITH OUT THESE
HERDS YOU WILL HAVE NO HUNTERS AND NO REVENUE.

710

Loss of Habitat, loss of revenue due to decrease of license sales.

711

The Director will face an increase in fishing, so improved fish stocking strategies are required. Increased
strategies includes the necessity of additional fishing ponds and resources. For example, St. Louis Ponds was
"fixed" to become an outstanding fishing area, but beaver and other animals are damaging the surrounding trees.
Soon the ponds will not have any shade areas because of the loss of pond side trees.

712

Fiscal accountability and integrity

713

Over the next 10 years issues of resource scarcity will increase as development and climate change advance.
Human-wildlife conflicts should be mitigated swiftly and effectively before they become too large by defining
jurisdiction and policy in context to areas where problems are currently happening or will likely occur in the near
future. Then communicating these expectations to all stakeholders and tailoring activities to best meet agency
goals.

714

-Balancing wolf population with livestock demands -Providing good hunting and fishing opportunities for all -Reevaluate the mule deer management -Crack down on poaching

715

maintaining our hunting rights on public and private land.

716

Developing a more sustainable and predictable basis of funding. Managing fish and wildlife resources in a
changing climate and in an environment of changing demographics (fewer people engaging in outdoor
recreation, including hunting and fishing).

717

bureaucratic obstacles.

718

being sure that ODFw keeps its mission primarily as hunting/angling management.

719

Too many enviro-crazies dominating the process

720

ODFW needs to recognize that its mission is to protect and enhance all native fish & wildlife in the state, not just
game species. It needs to adapt to long-term demographic trends of declining participation in rod & gun sports, by
improving its engagement with the broader wildlife-interested public. The director needs to rebuild ODFW's
credibility as an agency that is committed to managing habitat for threatened/endangered non-game species, so
that the wildlife-viewing public will be supportive of proposals for broadening ODFW's funding base.

721

Gill nets on the Columbia, declining revenues due to declining fish stocks in the tributaries for the Columbia (the
large runs are thanks to the Tribes upstream), facing groups like NFS that want to take away the sport catch
fisheries on some of our streams.

722

Secure better funding sources so ODF&W isn't tempted to allow over-fishing/over-hunting to pay its bills. Secure
funding for better law enforcement to cut down on poaching. Working with other agencies to better protect fish
and wildlife habitat.

723

Cougar overpopulation.

724

1)Loss of habitat due to development & climate change, 2)invasive species, and 3)increasing use of natural
resources by a growing human population.

725

Deal with the issue with the lack of deer that nearly 15 years of no dog hunting has caused.

726

The right of the People to harvest wild fish and game. Not only so-called "Native" People, but ALL people.

727

Issues 1. Wolves. Hunters are the real conservationists in the state, not the hippies in Portland and Eugene who
don't hunt and have no idea the damage the wolves do to livestock and to the elk herds. The hunters don't want
wolves in the state of Oregon.....period! It's not negotiable and the new Director will need to get it right before
hunters and ranchers take it completely into our own hands and it's already happening. 2. Lessen the number of
hunters in each unit by finding ways to move hunters to units in the farthest reaches of Oregon. Close down at
least 1 unit each year and have it rotate to a different unit the following year. 3. Revenue generation - Think
outside the box like a real businessman. Science and conservation experts are great but if you aren't good with
math then it will be all for not.

42 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


728

Transparency with the public. Sportsman must be able to understand why a regulation is made to trust F&W, at
this time nobody I run into understands why reg changes take place or tust F&W to not favor one group, such as
fly fishermen, over others. Public should have access to all information, studies F&W has. Need agents in field
during hunting seasons, self reporting is probably not a reliable way to gather hunter success info.

729

The proposed Nestle bottling plant is hugely unpopular and anti-conservation, and will compromise both fish and
public reasources (see above.) The new director should withdraw the application to give away this resource.

730

wolves and other predators being managed effectively

731

We haven't spent hours, years, millions of dollars and enhancing our big game species like Mule Deer, Elk,
Bighorn Sheep, and Rocky Mountain Goats to have them decimated by predators like wolves and mountain lions
which is at this time happening throughout not only our state but the west as a hole. We also must look beyond
10 years and ask ourselves what about 50 years or 100 from now.

732

1. Taking a leadership position in protection of wild salmonids. 2. Dealing with the public during times of
decreasing budgets; communicating with the hunting and fishing communities to explain priorities. 3. Dealing with
impacts from climate change and communicating effectively with the public.

733

The issue of nuisance wildlife is unfathomable to me and my family. How can the Department of Fish and Wildlife
do its job when it hires people to go out and trap and shoot our wildlife, and we are talking in the millions. It is to
the point that we just consider the Department of Fish and Wildlife as a rogue department with no ethical direction
and no responsibility to the citizens of the State of Oregon.

734

The Department if not respected by fishermen, hunters, bird watchers -- the list is long. Set clear goals and follow
up. We don't want the director to be a yes man to every leader in the fishing industry or hunters. Go out and
develop new ideas to the same old problems.

735

1.Predator control 2. increased hunter opportunity 3. Native vs hatchery fish 4. Habitat conservation 5.
Private/public access program. (Crp)

736

aintain habitat and public access

737

Stop the continual increase in the creation of controlled hunts that makes for less time in the field for general
hunting sessions. These controlled hunts do not increase opportunity, but serve mainly as income generators. As
things now stand there are hunters afield from August until February. This does not serve wildlife management

738

The agency is on an unsustainable path. It is too focused on present generations and not future generations.
Furthermore, the agency is singularly focused on current licenseholders and not the people of Oregon who reap
benefits from sustainably mananaged, thriving populations of fish and wildlife. Here are its key challenges: An
aging, male dominated constituency. Women control the finances in over 50% of households and make up 55%
of the Oregon population. While they are less likely to fish or hunt, they are more likely to hike, birdwatch,
volunteer and instill stewardship in their children. Children simply have too many demands on their time - trying to
focus on getting kids into fishing to build up a license base has been a failing strategy for the agency. The agency
is also dependent on federal funds for over 40% of its budget, which is at risk of declining. There is 1-2 new ESA
listings in Oregon every year. ODFW's track record of taking care of it's resources is abysmal. On ever river with
listed fish, there is an expensive and destructive hatchery that is exacerbating the ecological and financial
situation. ODFW is failing to manage based on the current, best available science and deferred maintenance is
growing. Hatcheries aren't and shouldn't go away, but ODFW needs an entirely new paradigm and management
approach to hatcheries to meet the reality of the ecological and financial needs. Finally, ODFW has lost a couple
of major lawsuits in the last few years. The status quo is no longer an option. The next Director will need a very
strong backbone to be able to say no to some constituents and their legislators.

739

Regulations governing construction projects in streams, rivers and bays. It seems that all the agencies have a
different view on when projects should be done and how certain phases of construction projects need to be
accomplished. The time to get a permit to do a project takes longer than ever before.

740

predator control disease management

741

ODFW with it's commision appointed by the Gov. needs to change it's direction. I travel to other states, provinces
and countries hunting and fishing, Oregon by far has the least effective Fish & Wildlife dept. With the present
political agend in this state I don't know if this can change?

43 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


742

Like most fisherman I like taking a fish home when I catch one! So lets manage our resources for the people
rather than some biologist ideology! Raise the big game numbers! Increase habitat, more enforcement of
Game/Fish regulations. Stop with the stuff that looks good and doesn't work, you know your job do it! Start a
more aggressive stocking program with Salmonoids, wild fish was a nice thought, hell the fish doesn't know he
was raised in a hatchery or where he came from, only the bio does and that the problem. Don't for get with out
license/tag sales you don't have a budget!

743

Predator management. Specifically the issue is that of a much too high and rising cougar population combined
with to low and unhealthy deer and elk herd populations.

744

Ocean conservation, fishing sustainability, renewable energy, partnership with first nations.

745

predator management in relation to big game populations. increasing youth participation in


fishing/hunting/outdoor interaction

746

I think money is always an issue but the person stepping into this placement will see many challenges about
distribution. Above all the land and animals come first not who's going to look good in the news.

747

Appropriate balance between conservation and over regulation. People are becoming so overwhelmed by the
number of regulations, increased cost, and reduced seasons that they are not buying licenses and tags.
Sarcastically, they can't afford the lawyer to interpret the rules every time they catch a fish or shoot a deer.

748

Predator control is needed in both fish and game areas. Hatchery supplementation must be priority one. Keeping
John Kithaber out of fish and game is important. He uses the ODFW for personal gain.

749

Efforts to ban lead bullets to protect condors. Predation on Oregon's deer and elk by wolves. Higher and higher
fees driving older hunters out. Hugely complicated regulations discouraging participation. Greatly increased ATV
use causing wildlife harm. Herbicide spraying on private timberlands hurting wildlife.

750

A governor who will not allow decisions to be made on a scientific basis. The people of the state of Oregon need
to let the commission decide how best to manage our fish and wildlife.

751

Enhancing habitat and opportunities for "sportsman"

752

Admit that it's impossible to manage the growing wolf population and target those packs that are continual and
repeat offenders in killing domestic livestock on PRIVATE land.

753

Lead ammo ban, ferrel hogs, bear, cougar, coyote and wolf predation and urban sightings

754

hunting and control of apex predators (such as wolves and cougar) since the predominant media view and dense
population area view is that they are just big cats and dogs with little impact on an ecosystem

755

declining hunters cause of less chances to hunt big game getting too hard to draw for elk & deer..

756

More hatchery salmon and steelhead.

757

SEALS GILL NETS

758

Reducing predatory animal populations, which will automatically increase game animal populations. Bringing back
dog hunting for cougar and bear will help greatly. Stopping the increases in fees will bring more sportsmen back
to the sport. Doing the right thing for the conservation of wildlife, even if it is not politically expedient, is the only
way to increase public trust in the ODFW.

759

Removing gill nets from the Columbia River, showing that ODFW acknowledges the contributions of the
recreational industry versus the commercial industry. The recreational fishermen are aware of the potential of
using seine nets, but right now it seems that ODFW intends to replace gill nets with the seine nets. This will not
increase the recreational fishing use but will cause another downturn for Oregonians.

760

Stopping the political agenda push to ban lead ammo for hunting.

761

Secure funding for future program implementation. Establishing creditability with the people who fund the agency.
Improve mule deer populations. Maintaining the fishery runs in the Columbia. Bring together the commercial and
sport fishing interests be a force to stop the animosity between the two groups.

762

You must reintroduce HOUNDS for predator management. Hiring an outside source is no longer a viable option.
You are there to manage the game above and beyond everything and predator control must be at the top of the
list. Take control, stop letting people tell you how to do things you are hired to do (like I am) and do what you need
to do without costing the tax payers money to hire an outside source.

44 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


763

Climate change and its impact on endangered species, such as wild steelhead and salmon. The impact of private
timberland logging, road-building, pesticides and development on riparian areas. (Many county governments in
Oregon are refusing to deal with these issues.) Balancing recreation and protecting endangered species at a time
when fewer Oregonians are buying hunting and fishing licenses. Bringing the agency up to date on the latest
scientific data. I get the impression that change comes slowly to the agency, a source of frustration to the bright
new biologists who are eager to work for the agency.

764

The ability to listen to both side of interested parties and use real science, not emotions or money influences, to
come to a common sense decision.

765

A successful candidate must be able to maintain balance between harvesting natural resources and protecting
native species found in the State of Oregon.

766

Deterring logging in sensitive areas to maintain healthy streams.

767

Environmental extremism and anti-hunting that undermines science based wildlife management. Loss of trust in
ODFW by hunters and fishermen. Agency employees in decision making position with personal agendas.
Science based, politics, emotions and lawsuits free Wolf management Replace retiring biologists with qualified
ones that do not have a prejudice against hunting and rural culture.

768

Get out of the office and in the field, see what is going on there.

769

Usage. Denial of access to any of Oregon's natural resources constitutes dereliction of duty.

770

Allow wolf hunting in the state like Idaho has. Use Idaho as a model and see where it has benefited deer and elk
survival. Quit allowing farmers to lock up their land for lease hunting only. They may own the land but don't own
the animals! Regulate net fishing on the Columbia river. Too many nets by Indians and too little fish left for the
rest of us.

771

The deer populatin in eastern Oregon is down to nothing. Not being managed. The new director needs to
manage game not money.

772

Declining game numbers, raising fees, lack of land to hunt and fish.

773

Bringing our hatcheries back to life. They are under staffed. And under funded. Fund the biologists for real big
game population surveys. Quit spending money on research.

774

1) Predator management.

775

Demecrats

776

Stop killing top predators. They are a part of our natural ecosystems and need to be protected. Protect our public
water resources. Our water is precious and will only become even more precious as water supplies diminish. Do
not jeopardize our water resources by giving Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

777

Increasing communication between the scientists and the hatchery and field personnel. Reasoning behind policy
decisions needs to be understood at the level that the work is being done. Ways to maintain interest in hunting
and fishing, without changing current releases or causing lawsuits with other companies

778

Limit the # of wolves in Oregon. And let Rancher's shoot ones killing livestock

779

Restriction of gill netters. Preservation of sport fishermen seasons.

780

To keep the wilderness areas and all the flora and fauna that depend upon it intact and healthy for generations to
come.

781

Human intrusion on public lands is degrading habitat and wildlife displacement.

782

Wolf decimation of other species and the resulting lower number of animals available to hunt legally.

783

Decline of deer on public lands. Predators!

784

Predator management should be a top priority. Elimination of non native predators and aggressive control of
native predators should be the number one priority of odfw.

785

Maintain use of common ammunition, and tell the Californians and hysterical environmentalists to pound sand.
Caving to pressure to change ammo will severely restrict the 260k hunters in Oregon, and will result in maimed
animals due to lack of pre hunt practice due to foolish ammo requirements. Ps--make deer season longer and
offer more deer tags instead of separating buck from doe.

45 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


786

Wildlife management cannot be left to mother nature with humans inhabiting the same ecosystem, or the natural
ebb and flow of wildlife populations will negatively impact our resources. Just like the ten year cycle of rodents
effects the coyote population, the ungulate cycle effects the large predator population. Nobody wants to see the
predators eat until the prey population is so low they starve to death. We don't have to make the same mistakes
as Idaho. We also do not want to see the ungulate population swell so much that they eat the farmers out of
house and home. We have the tools available to maintain a stable, sustainable population of deer and elk, along
with the predators that feed on them. Do the right thing for the ecosystem future director.

787

Balancing interests of multiple users.

788

To not allow politics to cloud perspective and function.

789

Recreational angling vs commercial fisheries. Establishing a means for our future generations to continue to
enjoy angling, hunting, and all around outdoors. These areas are rapidly getting smaller, and disappearing.

790

I would like to see better communication between ODFW & other government agency's, such as the US Forest
Service. I think a challenge will be to listen to everyone's input and to bring the outdoors back to the families of
Hunting, Camping and Fishing heritage. ODFW has become politically motivated to serve the special interest
groups and has lost sight of the average PAYING customer.

791

Spend our money wisely, cut back internal positions as you have grown too big. Put our money back Into the
field!!! Bring back, hunting dogs for cougars!!! Quit killing our deer and elk!!

792

Cougars and wolves are a serious problem to our game populations.

793

I believe that the challenges and critical issues facing The Director, as head of the ODFW in the coming years are
as follows: 1. Proper management of hatcheries - (avoid an "experimental" hatchery management style that
seems to be prevalent in the state of Washington especially); 2. Avoid wasting money on ill-conceived decisions
and experiments like Oregon's governor made regarding moving all gill-netting "off-channel" in the Columbia
River to the detriment of consumers and coastal communities. Any future ODFW Director needs to have a
Governor's ear, and be the unbiased expert advisor when important decisions are made that impact Oregon's
fishing resources and industries.

794

Stop raising fees, we pay more each year and we are getting a lot less. More hunters are hunting out of state
because of the extremely low quality of game management in oregon.

795

Reduction in general fund dollars.

796

I think ODFW needs to do more to stop Nestle from bottling water in the Columbia River Gorge. I'm also not
happpy about the cougar or bear kills. I feel like ODFW is failing to protect Oregon's natural resources.

797

CONTROL PREDITORS

798

Moving wolf recovery forward. Salmon recovery.

799

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODFW's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle. We should not be handing over or selling public resources to private
corporations.

800

increase fishing/hunting land opportunities devalue marine reserves/marine protected areas- we don't need them
reduce commercial harvest both ocean and Columbia river- those are the real reasons we have reduced number
of fish Increase water spills- fish need water to live It is that simple no water, no fish

801

Loss of particpants loss of habitat.if the monies not there trim budget not raise fees more.

802

Less interest for hunting and fishing, more demand for improved wildlife and fish management, & changing state
demographics.

803

Fulfilling the mission with a realistic budget and getting out of the intrusive bs that ODFW has no business being
in.

804

Listen to the field biologist . They are the ones that know frist hand what is going on in there region .

805

Population growth, increase in declining native habitats/species, water, top predators, invasive species

806

Keeping sporting venues affordable and attractive and able to compete with other activities.

807

Finding a way to successfully manage our predators, currently the management is well to be honest a joke. The
new director is going to have a problem winning the trust of outdoorsman, ODFW has fractured that trust to the
point people debate hunting out of state.

46 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


808

Conflict between commercial and sport fishermen. He should have no private or buisness ties to the commercial
fishing industry. Needs to be able to stand up to native societies, and let the restoration of fish runs happen with
the hero of man (Indians)

809

Everybody sharing the outdoors; hunters, atv, hikers, fishing, snowshoeing, snowmobile trappers, there are more
and more people out there that don't understand each other because they just don't know.

810

Following through with the voters decision on nets in the rivers.

811

Predator management WILL destroy this states wildlife balance! There is a lot of organizations that will do
anything to stand in the way of how wildlife management should truly be done.

812

Make the hunting and fishing the best it can be. Oregon should have more elk and deer for hunters to harvest.
That means you need to deal with the over abundance of predators especially Mt. Lions and we need to get
wolves out of our state. Wolves will be an environmental disaster and if thing continue Oregon will be a
wasteland for deer and elk. This is what all the scientific studies point to and all you have to do is look at Idaho to
see what is happening to their herds in a short time.

813

Resource Privatization Attempts

814

It is a balancing act between healthy environments and industry. Each "side" thinks their position is the only right
one therefore the biggest challenge is to find stakeholders who are also pragmatic to weigh in wherever possible.
Beware the money behind the science - make sure scientistific studies used for decision making are sound and
as bias free as humanly possible.

815

Corporate pressure to soften or do away with rules that discourage corporate/industrial expansion and/or profit.

816

speed up the managment process, wolves and Columbia gillnets , all gillnets in the Rivers here in the NW are BS
everyone knows It.

817

The challenge always is maintaining the balance between the needs of man and the needs of nature. It is a
delicate balance, but it's important to remember than man doesn't always need everything he wants. There is a
difference between need and desire.

818

1. Get commercial gillnetters off the main stem Columbia by 2017. 2. Demand that NOAA delist the California
Sea Lion and Eastern Pacific Stellar Sea Lion off the Marine Mammal Protection Act. 3. Work diligently with the
Native American Tribes and CRITFC for better runs of salmon, steelhead and sturgeon.

819

Funding Loss of quality habitat Political inability to manage that habitat Allowing the antis to permanently close
down our oceans to fishing with Marine Reserves. If overfishing is occurring alter the season, methods of take.
Establish rules, regulations and the enforcement of same that encourage participation.

820

predator control, fee's get the younger generation into hunting and fishing

821

Eliminating the use of lead ammunition. Enhancing and maintaining predator populations to balance ecosystems.
Making sure there is enough water for birds and wildlife as water becomes more scarce. Increasing wilderness
areas. Monitoring and rescuing at-risk species.

822

declining game numbers......resulting in reduced hunting opportunities.......which eventually results in fewer


hunters and fewer tag buyers.......leading to less money for the agency and a loss of public support for
hunting.......

823

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

824

Manage a social climate that is drifting toward animal management for conservation and away from managing for
hunting.

825

1, Predation Management 2. Habitat 3. Increasing number of wolves in Oregon and the west 4. Hatcheries, wild
reproductin was great when there was a small number on people consuming the resource. Now with the demand
on fish hatcheires must be maintained.

826

The new Director and agency needs to oppose and strike down any proposal for a Nestle bottling plant!

827

predator control. As the predator population increases, the game population decreases.

828

Re-balancing the priorities of the Department. Lets serve all the public, and not just part of it.

829

Dealing with the effects of climate change.

830

At this time, it is all about money. Too many tags are issued for too few animals.

47 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


831

Try being honest not stating that wolves don't have an effect on deer and elk herds in eastern oregon.Probably
will state that cougars and bears have no effect either yet how many studies have they done over the years

832

coming up with a balance betwwen sport and commeric

833

Climate impacts to fish and wildlife habitats. Forest Service silvicultural practices and prescribed fire impacts to
wildlife habitats. Wild Horse populations impacts to wildlife habitats. Increased ATV and off road vehicle activities
on public land. Wind and Solar Energy development. Declining big game populations. Expanding wolf population,
delisting and managing damage.

834

Provide additional recreational opportunities and begin to halt the long-term decline in hunting and fishing license
sales.

835

Habitat loss, climate change, diminishing interest and participation in nature-based activities, increasing
competition for scarce resources. The department cannot possibly address these challenges without a more
diverse funding base and a stronger, broader constituency. The current funding model focuses too much on
consumptive users and their interests.

836

The new Director will face his or her biggest challenge in protecting native wild fish and wildlife habitat from
threats . They will also have to look at changing, eliminating or modifying ODFW's current hatchery management
operations as a threat to wild runs and an economic liability. They will also have to look atadopting the agency to
face a fuure of less license fee funds and look to generate mor emoneyt from othersources to keep the agency
operating. They will also have to look at rebuilding the agencies image with different stakeholder groups.

837

Apathy about wildlife policy from elected officials. Disconnect between the health of Oregon's wildlife resources
and our economy. Responding to impacts on land and water (and thus wildlife) from climate change. Slow and
steady degradation of habitat located on public lands from exploitive agricultural and timber harvesting interests.

838

Habitat improvement, including culverts, impact of logging, farm runoff, etc. Impact of changing climate (generally
warming) on game and non-game species, including lots of fish species, the "poor little" pika, predator birds,
predator animals, game birds, game animals. [There are no doubt more, but I am filling this out without reviewing
my extensive notes from many meetings on discussions on hunting and fishing at many different places.]

839

Waning participation in hunting and fishing and the commensurate impacts on Department revenues. Allocation
of a scarce resource between hunters (revenue source) and predators.

840

increase of predatory animals

841

I think it is important that the new Director and the agency place a much higher emphasis on "non-game" fish and
wildlife in the next 10 years. The vast majority of fish and wildlife habitat in the state is "non-game", and I think it
is very important that the Director and Department shift emphasis and resources in recognition of this.

842

Keeping the habitats for the fish and wildlife sustainable for them to thrive and flourish. Also when it comes solely
to fish, maintaining the balance of hatchery and wild fish by using the best possible practice for both types of fish
to flourish.

843

All Oregonians have a stake in Oregon's natural resources. However, whenever there is compromise over fish
and wildlife resources, in space, time or numbers, those resource populations lose by definition since the status
quo is reduced rather than maintained or improved. The fish and wildlife resources appear to all be in decline
overall, though with occasional bright spots. The science seems to be gone from management decisions or at
least trumped by politics and/or economics. All too often, decisions seem dependent on the money. Creative
ways to improve fish and wildlife populations need to be found, e.g. through the use of volunteers or by changing
policies which do not require money. Critical Issues: 3.1 Loss of Fishers and Hunters buying licenses due to high
prices relative to their income which reduces economic and political support of, and volunteer participation in,
Department programs. The critical issue here is Money, both from a resource user's perspective and from
government's perspective as a resource to foster programing. 3.2 Predator population management, primarily
cougars, bears and wolves. 3.3 Loss of hunting and fishing opportunities, a new and increasing issue, especially
where large timber owners close their lands to all but their own fee hunters. Here, state resources should be
restricted or withheld if private land owners request help with wildlife damage, but do not allow the public to hunt
their land. 3.4 Water, water, water! Whether in its natural state or when converted to energy, water is liquid gold.
Water and land are the foundations for fisheries and wildlife management. Assuring their availability for fish and
wildlife resources will be an ever increasingly important issue. These issues relate to habitat loss for fish and
wildlife, a critical issue, whether in the physical three dimensions or the time that fish or wildlife use the water and
land. 3.5 Out of state and out of nation exploitation of Oregon fish resources, e.g. commercial fishing of Oregon
salmon stocks in Canada and Alaska, significantly impact returns to Oregon rivers. Sharing these fish stocks with
other states and nations, including the nations of native americans, will be a critical issue. These are only a few of
the many issues to challenge the Department and its Director over the next ten plus years.

48 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


844

Wolves are a critical issue that needs to be addressed before they grow to excess numbers. Quality of hunts and
fishing needs to addressed instead of trying to sell tags and thinking about the animals later.

845

predator control falling game numbers declining hunters too costly licenses and tags waning confidence from
those who have been lifelong (50+years) sportsmen in Oregon

846

Public hunting places and no longer allowing gill netting on the Columbia River period..

847

Access, habitat encroachment and ensuring decisions of the agncy are based on scientific, not emotional or
social positions by persons or groups who have little or no investment in the present or future populations of fish
and wildlife and how they will be utilized.

848

* Water quantity and quality * Threats habitat from continued human growth and urban sprawl * Threats from
California Farmers moving operations to Oregon due to lack of water or mismanagement of water in CA. * Lack of
funding for habitat conservation/restoration * Less opportunity for outdoor activities and engagement for next
generation of outdoorsmen and women who would become the next generation of conservationists. * Declining
number of hunters, anglers

849

How to maintain services despite fiscal shortfalls.

850

politics

851

Developing a sufficient budget and encouraging those no paying customers to pay

852

The key challenges in my opinion would be what to do about all the cats. I always deer hunt the hood unit and
only saw six does the whole season. A normal season I would see at least that many per day. I personally saw a
bobcat and had four other hunters say they saw cougars. I'm sure it's just a matter of time before the wolves start
moving in.

853

It is always about budget issues for this department...raising tag and license fees is not the total answer. There
are a lot of older people and people that cannot afford to pay higher tag fees to enjoy the hunting and fishing
experience..our state government needs to figure out a way that ODFW can be funded more from them and not
just the tax payers.

854

Predator control High cost of loving this sport because of high state costs. Open more logging on public lands to
improve habitat for deer and elk in keeping waterways clean.

855

Delisting of the wolf fed status. Better management of animal hunting herds. Tighter control over invasive species
in our waters. A one time settlement with natives to eliminate special fishing rights. Control over the wild horse
problem. Habitat enrichment not based on PC "current " special lobbying interests.

856

1. The proliferation of out-of-state guides overfishing Oregon coast waters. They want to fish it? Make them pay a
hefty price! 2. Keeping motorized boats/jet sleds out of areas that traditionally are used by non-motorized boats
and bank anglers (see #2!). 3. Putting programs BACK INTO PLACE that one had us seeing large and healthy
runs of hatchery steelhead in such rivers as the Southfork Nehalem, Miami River -- to name a few. For YEARS,
the native steelhead did just fine without the interference of man, and I am sure they can continue to do so.

857

Balancing short-term stakeholder/constituent interests with implementation of scientifically-backed and


ecologically sound management strategies that will ultimately benefit the resource (and the constituents) in the
long term.

858

Protecting commercial fisheries from over zealous sport interest groups. Use science in these decisions, not
political pressure and rhetoric. Protect and provide the resources for the larger, general public.

859

Keep use and license fees to a minimum.

860

Drawing more students/youth into wildlife issues and education.

861

Bringing back a healthy non native salmon population.

862

Uniting hunters and birders and other nature lovers together in the conservation cause.

863

Rising threats to water quality from industrial sources such as timber and farming.

864

Maintaining a balance between wildlife management/conservation and public uses of those resources. Hunting
and fishing have a long history in this state. The past several years it seems like ODFW has been clashing with
outdoors man and effectively making hunting and fishing less attractive. With several of the policies/regulations
that ODFW is proposing for the coming years it appears as though this problem will only get worse.

49 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


865

If this mission is true, why have past Directors bow to pressure from outside entities? Environmentalists have
done everything to all but ban hunting and fishing altogether. The Director needs to mange wildlife and not the
people who hunt and fish for wildlife (game). Management of predators has been an embarrassmet to ODFW.
Letting voters from Portland dictate how predators can be hunted. What does someone from a large city know
about predator management? Mule deer have to be better managed. How about a Director who will bring Mule
deer populations back up to standard?

866

Anti-hunting activism veiled as environmental protection

867

Critical challenge is supporting conservation work so that habitats are still available for use and enjoyment.

868

Wildlife habitat, maintaining fisheries, expanding or offering incentives to property owners to improve habitat
conditions on private property. The largest challenge is to counter the anti hunting, fishing, etc groups to enhance
the image of those who partake in outdoor sport activities

869

the balance between enviromentalists and the fishing and hunting community.

870

I have hunted and fished this state for over 40 years and it appears that numbers have consistantly been
dropping.The biggest issue I see and most other people I talk with is predation the quality of the hunt is getting to
the point that alot of people are to the point of spending thre money in other states or not getting tags at all.

871

Wolf depredation in NE oregon is devastating wildlife numbers. Wolves are a serious threat, and need to be dealt
with

872

Funding. Diminishing participation. Increasing funding support from general fund/non consumptive users.

873

Accessibility by Oregon's youth and greater opportunities for children and adults of all ages to enjoy and afford
hunting and fishing opportunities in their home state. Greater opportunities for those in rural Oregon to enjoy
hunting and fishing opportunities in the area they live. Urban/Rural divide and managing priorities between "take"
related activities such as hunting and fishing and "non-take" related activities which are usually used by interest
groups to indirectly limit the "take" activities Predator management and ESA including the extreme environmental
strength which is very litigious and rarely focused on balance.

874

Attaining funds that will allow for the improvement of the departments facilities. Field offices around the state are
located in older office facilities that are in need or replacement. Continue to staff at and adequate level while
providing for salary advancement for employees.

875

1. PREDATOR OVER POPULATION=cougar, coyotes, and now wolves. 2. Shrinking deer and elk populations
due to predators and poaching. 3. OVERLY COMPLICATED AND VERBOSE BIG GAME AND ANGLING
REGULATIONS that take a 4 year college degree to understand. 4. Getting rid of gill netters on the columbia
river. They can go find a new occupation. 5. Lack of public hunting opportunities due to too many big game tags
being issued (FOR REVENUE) in proportion to available game, and the fact private property owners are charging
fees for everything from big game to ground squirrels.

876

- make sure to also focus on the non hunting component. That means protecting species for birders and other
related wildlife viewing. - protecting biodiversity in the state is also important, and needs to receive additional
focus by this agency.

877

Decrease in sport fisheries means a decrease in legal anglers. More fish for everyone equals more revenue and
prodives more resources to improve fish habitat.

878

Enhancing Hatchery Fish for harvest. Protect and Enhance Wild Fish while enhancing Hatchery stocks.

879

Wolves and non-hunters!

880

Climate change. Education of those unwilling to learn. Communication with those that "don't want to hear it'.

881

Land access Opportunities to teach youth to continue the sport Banning gillnets from our rivers Continued fish
stocking of salmon and trout in remote and close by rivers/lakes/etc

882

Gill netting in the Columbia

883

Gill nets

884

Keep focus on hunting and fishing and expand agencies role in on-hunted/non fished species.

50 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


885

THE MANAGEMENT AND CONTROLS PUT ON COUGARS AND WOLVES , THE FACTS ARE AVAILABLE ON
THERE HABITS , KILL CONSUMPTIONS AND KILL RATIOS ON DEER AND ELK . THESE STATS SHOULD
BE REPRESENTED FOR THE TRUE KILL RATIO ACHIEVED BY THESE TWO PREDATORS THAT ONLY
HUNT BY NATURE. HATCHERIES , SHOULD BE INHANSED AT EVERY LOCATION , THE PEOPLE
OF OREGON PAY PREMIUM FEES TO HUNT AND FISH THERE SHOULD BE STRONG RUNS OF STOCKED
AND RETURNING FISH FOR THE SPORT FISHERMAN. THATS ALL I HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THAT . F.G.

886

Budget, funding from non consumptive users, good relation with legislators to get general fund and seek out ways
to bring money to the department

887

Allow crossbow hunting. Allow lighted arrow knocks to aid in recovery of animals. Allow dogs for hunting bear &
cougars like "the old days" to aid in recovery of ungulets.

888

Keeping our water clean .

889

Drought

890

Fish and game habitat.

891

Since the early 1930's hunters and anglers have driven the conservation movement, paid for management, paid
for habitat aquisition and improvements (refuge system) etc., either through licensing fees, excise taxes or
organizations like ducks unlimited. An increasingly urban population now is increasingly driving management
decisions put paying a fraction of the bill. (6% of ODFW budget is from the general fund) Hunters and anglers are
increasingly being disenfranchised by an agency that relies on them for its existence. The new director needs to
increase funding for the agency from non-hunter and angler sorces proportional with the general population.
Management decisions need to reflect the objectives of those paying the "freight" e.g. predator management. We
need to somehow simplify regulations so that you don't need a law degree and an internet connection to lawfully
hunt and angle. ODFW needs to remember who its paying customers are!

892

Improve big game herds through better management (not maximum revenue from tag sales) Continue to protect
and restore habitat both fish and wildlife Work closer with OSP regarding poaching, both fish and wildlife

893

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

894

Changing our hunting seasons to correspond to appropriate seasonal parameters. Not just the weekend closest
to October 1st. Our climate is changing.

895

Wolf and Cougar management

896

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle

897

Removal of wolves from endangered status. Ability to stand up to powerful lobby groups.

898

The new director should protect our public water resources at all costs. A good specific step would be
withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle. Government needs to
take care of resources as precious as drinking water, not corporations. Having a solid strategy for managing
Cougar and Bear populations now that effective hunting means have been politicized and removed from the
management schema. Increasing real and lasting solutions to dwindling salmon habitat. Lets stop pretending that
sea lions at the dam are anything more than a PR nightmare, and get to protecting breeding tributaries and
means for escapement.

899

Keeping the environmentalists from ruining the state for everyone except the tree huggers.

900

climate change attempts at privatizing water (reject Nestle!

901

Enviromentalists

902

Resisting pressure from various industries ie Nestle to exploit our natural resource. Continued recovery of various
species and natural areas.

903

Loss of Hunters and Anglers competing interests and time for young people (retention and recruitment) Loss of
state authorities regarding wildlife managment

904

Predator control

905

Rising costs of hunting. Lack of predator control. Dwindling populations of deer and elk, particularly on public
land. We will continue to lose younger generations due to lack of quality hunting opportunities.

51 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


906

Increasing wolf bears and Cougars that will continue to add pressure to our wild life herds and safety on humans.
Also the director need to support hunting and fishing as this is the basis for having a fish and wildlife.

907

Keeping deer populations up, tag availability up, and habitat in good condition.

908

Negotiating a new Pacific Salmon Treaty that currently accounts for up to 40% of our coastal chinook harvest.
This needs to be balanced out without serious impacts to Oregon's economy by cutting our sport fishery harvest.
Currently guided and charter boats are being treated the same as regular sportsmen. This needs to change. Up
guide and charter fees to help balance the budget.

909

having the proper research to back the decisions made by ODFW

910

Specifically addressing water quality from headwaters to ocean conditions as a critical factor in protecting
fisheries and wildlife. Industrial logging practices which create loss of canopy affecting transpiration, increased
sediment load with resulting turbidity detrimental to fish.

911

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle. Also, stop it with killing top predators.

912

A large percentage of the public with very little daily experience with wildlife.

913

Maintaining a budget but at the same time keeping fees low for the hunter and outdoorsman or woman. In this
troubled economy it would be advantageous to somehow encourage out-of -staters to come here and enjoy our
hunting and wildlife.

914

don't privatize our water resources. as climate change intrudes more and more onto economic questions, selling
off such a vital resource as water to private interests is short sighted and dangerous. we could be left high and
dry while our water is shipped off to the highest dibber.

915

Deal with the preditator problem that is destroying the big game resource in this state. I have watched the decline
first hand over the past ten years.

916

1. Avoid the influence of environmental activist who have a mission of their own that is contrary to the mission of
ODFW. 2. Maintain a steadfast focus of the mission and the realization that the sportsmen and women are the
true "conservationist". Without these people ODFW is not needed. 3. Realize that current opportunity for Oregon
youth hunters is not assisting recruitment. Greater emphasis must be put on making quality tags available for
youth.

917

Not giving in to those who push for corporate or business agendas, and perhaps take a stronger advocate role
against pollution and destruction of habitat

918

Decline of elk & deer herds while tag fees increase

919

Managing wolves in OR and having current up to date counts on breeding pairs so that they can be managed
before they destroy unneeded numbers of ungulates. Also, make special concessions for damage control hunts
with dogs for problem cats or bears.

920

Control the wolf population before it gets worse

921

Keep Nestle out of the Gorge. Keep fracking out of Oregon. Oppose GMO's introduction into our environments.

922

Protect the sale of Oxbow Springs water to Nestle.for nothing but financial game and threatening an invaluable
fresh water source invaluable to the Tribes and the people of Oregona few jobs does not justify this profound
infringement. Bottled water is harmful to the environment on multiple levels..plastic trucking, etc..Nestle has a
terrible legacy in other impoverished areas that they prey on..Columbia Gorge is a treasure and long ago stolen
Indian homelandit needs to have renewed respect and voice.

923

Dam removal, old growth protection, stream and habitat restoration. She will face unrelenting pressure from the
corporations their political supporters to over use and privatize public resources. She must resist those efforts.

924

Predator management is far and away the number one priority. We have an unsustainable number of Cougars
and we long ago reached the goal for breeding pairs of wolves, time for the gloves to come off. Understand that
the bunny hugging leaf lickers in Portland and Eugene do not fund ODFW and the rest of us are beyond pissed
off.

925

Damage by dams to anadromous species habitat. The phasing out of the hatchery programs and dominance of
native/wild fish. The establishment of refuges primarily as refuges, not as prime hunting grounds. The
disappearance of wetlands that will occur with climate warming Pollution of waters and feeding grounds

52 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


926

Predator control and management. Addressing fee hunting. Bringing more young people into the outdoor
experience.

927

Rebuikding severely depleted deer and antelope populations

928

Control predators..reverse our declining deer and elk herds

929

Predator control for big game. Mostly mountain lion and wolf.

930

Quit with the logging roads and clearcuts already. No selling our resources to companies like Nestle Stop
activities that kill large predators; there aren't a lot of new hunters and the big critters are needed to take care of
the deer and other munchers

931

Getting as accurate as possible information from work groups so that he/ she may make informed decisions
regarding protocol. Do not let special interest groups dictate policy by political pressure or monetary persuasion.

932

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

933

Keeping hatcheries open by helping the public better understand their role. Finding ways to increase the amount
of hunters and fishermen. Keep a balance between the emotional "conservation issues" and science.

934

The new ODFW director needs to keep hunters and fishermen in his mind and work with landowners into getting
more and better accessible lands. Habitat is a key component ODFW needs to work on with the the USFS in
creating better deer and elk habitats. Upland bird hunting lands are scarce and the ODFW needs to work on that
with land owners in creating established accessible land this also applies to bank access for fishing.

935

Wolves, salmon, and reintroducing grizzly bears.

936

Reduced game numbers Reduced Hunter numbers Reduced access to huntable land Predator reduction for Big
Game improvement and Hunter success Keep cost of Hunting and Fishing affordable Bring involvement and
interest of Hunters to trust and believe in the ODFW policies

937

Not allowing the anti-hunters and wolf advocates to control what happens in the state of Oregon.

938

Maintaining resource availability to the public, while meeting conservation needs of our natural resources.
Dealing with invasive species. Establishing a functioning departmental budget.

939

He needs to have a understanding of predator management as it is getting to be a problem that will only grow
and become worse.

940

Water conservation in the southern Oregon farming districts. A comprehensive water management system.
Reduction in clear cutting of forests and proactive management of reforestation. Equal voice across political
lobbies for land use. Eg; coal trains crossing sensitive areas.

941

An absolute commitment to science-based, real life wildlife management planning for the long term preservation
of Oregon's natural resources, along with a commitment to Oregons great Hunting Heritage. This new leader will
also have to have the backbone to stand up to and defend against emotionally charged and poorly educated
western Oregonian electorate (and their lobbists) on issues such as; a REAL Predator Management Plan,
functional Grey Wolf policy that included hunt seasons as possible population control piece, and an Ungulate
recovery plan for 2015-2020.

942

If the Department does not receive additional general funds this biennium it must cease incurring expenditures in
program areas that do not receive any user/beneficiary funding. Currently non-game programs are being
supported by sportsmen's dollars. The Department can not expect sportsmen to continue footing the bill for nongame programs. The Department can not expect sportsmen to continue paying escalating fees to hunt and fish
while the opportunities to hunt & fish decrease. One of the manageable factors for the decrease in hunting &
fishing opportunities is the impact predation plays on species sportsmen pay to harvest. Wildlife is a renewable
resource if you manage it properly. Wildlife management in a man modified environment requires wildlife
managers to actively manage wildlife including the impacts that predators have on prey populations. While this
may not be politically correct or popular it must be done or the support from sportsmen will go away and all
wildlife species and the public will suffer.

943

Better communication with the public...

944

preditor control

945

Continuing pressure from special intrest groups to stop/curtail hunting and fishing which would eliminate all
funding for all wildlife projects.

53 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


946

Successful long term management of our fish and wildlife habitats is tied to fostering an environment that reduces
our dependence on fossil fuels. A key component in our being able to protect Oregon's fish & wildlife and their
habitats is by realizing that projects providing short term economic gains at the cost of the environmental damage
are a net loss for this region and its citizens.

947

To do whats best for the fish and or wildlife. The radical environmental groups shouldn't sway the department
decision making you have experts inside the department that should make tough decisions to do whats best for
the wildlife.

948

Wolves, hunting bear and cougar with dogs, sage grouse, salmon, bull trout, increase in licence and tag fees,
issuing a fair number of tags to each unit and more.

949

Control predators! They are eating your major income source. Reduced deer and elk mean fewer tag sales and
hunters. Manage by science not politics!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

950

WOLVES, and CATS, that impact the Elk and Deer populations. and the Seals and cormorants and turns that
GORGE themselves on Salmon and Steelhead smolts.

951

Funding the mission and convincing the legislature that license sales cannot be the only source of dept income.

952

Keeping hunting and fishing license and tag fees within range of the common folk. Work harder at moving our
wildlife off of private land back onto public land.

953

If the departments mission was really to enhance the fish and wildlife for future generations then why so you let
gill netters have so many days on the river? I believe the department could care less about enhancement they
just care about the stakeholders and lobbyist for the netters. Try getting a director who is truly for the sport
fishermen we are the ones that by the licenses that fund your agency I wish we could get every sport fishermen to
not buy a license for a full year untel the nets are out of the river and see what that does to your budget.

954

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle. The new director should focus on the role conservation of our wild and
forested lands can protect our communities from the harmful effects of climate change.

955

Number issue on the aquatic side is lamprey numbers dwindling to zero in many drain-ages across the state.
They are a heritage species for local tribes and their needs should be addressed with a wholesome approach.
Next on aquatics is large-mouthed bass. They are supported nationally yet are not an Oregonian species. To
protect salmon runs and other species of importance in Oregon aquatic systems, we honestly need to consider
listing them as an invasive species and work to remove them from our river systems. Bass do provide some an
economic benefit and revenue via off-season guiding and license sales but if salmonids create jobs from the
coast all the way to the headwaters via the ocean fisheries to fly-fishing guides in the Cascades and beyond; why
would spend millions in hatcheries and restoration for salmon only to have bass undercut our progress via their
consumption of smolts? Terrestrial factors of the future should focus on wolves being praised as a high-trophy
species with tags being highly prized. This will cause unimaginable benefits to ungulates and other species.
Thousands of cattle freeze to death every winter and yet we focus on the few dozen take caused by wolves. The
economic benefit from hunting of deer and elk should be accounted for when factoring wolves. Their presence in
the ecosystem will ensure the visions of trophy bucks more and more a reality. I wish the new director luck and
hope they give attention to these ecologically centric concerns presented here.

956

We need to balance our conservation and consumptive programs and not favor those special interest groups that
make the most noise.

957

The cost of the license, the poor odds of getting a deer or elk tag, and the poor results of those hunters who
actually get to hunt are making hunting in Oregon a rich man's activity. If I decide not to buy a hunting license
because the price is too high the ODFW raises the price. No business on earth operates and succeeds with a
business plan like that. Manage the ODFW to satisfy the hunters and fisherman with a much better opportunity
for harvesting game. Stop making rules based on political considerations and/or junk science to further a political
agenda of those who would ban hunting altogether. Stop all efforts to ban ammunition that contains lead. Even
those who promote it have admitted that it doesn't work. That's not important to them because they are
supporting the ban based solely on a political agenda that does not include active game management for a
quality sustainable resource.

958

Predator control - wolves and cougars are eating all our game. Give the people who buy the licenses and thus
fund the operation some consideration. If non hunters/fishermen are going to control the decisions, they need to
pay the bills. Clean up the controlled hunt situation - internal processes are not trustworthy at best and appear to
be corrupt.

959

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Nestle
authorization to use Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge.

54 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


960

#1 Predator control # 2 increasing deer and elk populations. Without these two key factors there will only continue
to be a decline in the number of hunters and revenue.

961

You can't fix stupid but you might be able to assist in direction. The agency will continue to be forced to use funds
in directions that they are not intended. Split fish from hunting. Fund each by the amount of received from license
and tag sales. Our law makers should, out of the general fund, financially support any of the other I want crap
such as wolves and any other critter that does not fall within the license and tag sales.

962

1) Balancing income and expenditures in the face of declining financial sources 2) Creating new sources of
income without hammering the already-discouraged public sportspeople 3) Communicate much closer with field
staff who accomplish the bulk of on-the-ground work and handle the bulk of communications with the public on a
one-on-one basis 4) Some upper-level decisions may be better made using a survey such as this to identify the
level of intra-company support that may be available...the agency employs a huge group of people possessing a
great deal of common sense!

963

Pressure from many special interest groups and state and federal governments. He/she must not be a yes
person, but a strong independent thinker. Rebuilding deer and elk populations.

964

cutting back the numbers of tags drawn per unit in most deer and elk management units (temporarily) to allow the
numbers to climb, thus producing greater success rates and bigger, more mature animals. Stop issuing doe/spike
tags for several years, and make a rotating trophy unit every year, where in Tioga, one year, three point or better
for deer, and three or better for elk, the next year, make it the Sixes Unit, and so on, could even include sveral
units per year in the case of Eastern hunts.

965

Protecting top predators from human attack Supporting sustainable and quiet recreation Enforcing anti-poaching
laws

966

1. Finding stable, alternative funding for programs not specifically related to game management or research. 2.
Accountability of staff (starts at the top) to perform per expectations.

967

The declining deer herd. Why buy a license when the hunting is so poor? I don't buy a license anymore.

968

Raising the agencies profile with urbanites. This means expanding education and non-game programs such as
bird watching that can attract this population. It should also reaching out to not for profit groups that have these
affiliations already.

969

stop denying that predators are destroying the wildlife in the state of oregon.

970

Climate change and related stress to wildlife and habitat.

971

1. Note that nothing in the mission statement deals with ensuring all animals that have ever lived in the state are
reintroduced. 2. Realize that the hunters and fishermen of the state are his customers NOT people who do not
hunt and fish. Managing for "use and enjoyment" does not mean keep the strain of fish pure. It means ensuring
there are a lot of fish, deer, elk, etc. for the hunters and fisherman to go after. 3. Balancing the needs and wants
of the hunters and fisherman with those of non-hunters and non-fishermen. Don't let the Sierra Club run the
department. 4. How are you going to encourage new hunters and fishermen when the number of animals and fish
continues to decline?

972

Water: how to ensure that river/fish resources are protected in the face of increasing development pressures and
climate change.

973

Control, not elimination of top predators such at cougars and the emerging wolf population in Oregon. Counties
need to be allowed to decide at their level wether to allow hunting of cougars with dogs.

974

Dealing with the predatory problem that the government brought upon itself without listening to the citizens.
They've now brought upon themselves several new problems with not only dealing with more predators but now
declining numbers of big game herds. The hunter's hands have been tied on how to best hunt/manage the
overpopulated predator and the landowner is afraid to invest too much into what he'll most likely lose. Not good
for our wildlife & not good for our economy.

975

Preserving the interests of hunters and fishermen.

976

The continued attack by anti-hunters and environenmental groups is an increasing issue we will face. The lack of
decisions based on actual science, not on emotion.

977

Conservation of resources for future generations requires not capitulating to corporate pressure to redirect the
use of those resources for the sole purpose of financial gain by that corporation (i.e.: Nestle).

55 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


978

Ongoing budgetary/ funding issues in a climate that requires more of the agency every year with regard to
stewardship, endangered species, economically vital species, etc. Critical fish and game conservation verses
water rights, water management and land use issues. Critical habitat fracturing and isolation related to population
growth, land use, and climate change.

979

Protecting habitat in the face of climate change and human population pressure. The state agency I work for
(State Lands) relies heavily upon ODFW expertise for issues pertaining to wildlife habitat and fisheries. With the
current proposed budget cuts, ODFW is losing important positions and the ability to weigh in on important
decisions regarding how land is developed and whether or not habitat is protected. The mission of ODFW
encompasses so much more than just selling hunting and fishing licenses.

980

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

981

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle. They should have extended and informed knowledge on climate
change and work towards helping to solve and further educate the public about climate change. Walking the talk
in the offices and homes as well as showcasing the destructive effects to the land we all enjoy.

982

Conflict between conservation and harvest. Impact of climate change on habitats and resulting impact on fish and
wildlife populations. Continued declines in water availability and increased demand for it by multiple
stakeholders.

983

Stop focusing so much effort on regulations like requiring licensed, tag holding hunters from possessing
controlled hunt tags to hunt for a different animal than the tag you are asking them to possess in certain locations
during certain seasons (example, you must possess a controlled buck archery tag in Ochoco unit while archery
hunting for Elk during Elk season).

984

I think the new director should protect public water by withdrawing permits to give oxbow springs to nestle.

985

Wolves in Oregon Tag and license prices Access to areas where people can hunt and fish Bear and Cougar
population control

986

If you can't raise animals to the level that a person has better than 30% odds of harvesting an animal then your
going to see folks going out of state to do so. I think that ODFW need to look at state like Wyoming, Utah, and
New Mexico to see how they are building up there deer and elk populations so that when someone odes get
lucky enough to draw a tag they stand a great chance at harvesting a trophy animal. I also think they need to do
more to promote youth and women in the outdoors. The biggest thing that they need to do is star growing animals
instead of trying to raise money if you produce the animals the money will fallow.

987

How to protect our water and resources.

988

Attract new hunters - I would like the department to help encourage newcomers to the sport - especially those in
urban parts of the state who are becoming more and more isolated from this legacy activity. Create more
opportunities for hunting Acquiring access to private lands to expand opportunities

989

Finding ways to balance the demands of the hunters and fisherman who directly provide financial resources to the
department and the needs of non-hunters and fisherman to have opportunities to view, understand, and support
fish and wildlife.

990

The corporate take-over of our natural resources that should be preserved to protect wildlife and people.
Encroaching budget cuts, and being able to devise creative and strategic means to protect the mission of ODFW.

991

Protecting our water against corporations Aka. Nestl wanting to bottle water from oxbow springs. I would ask the
new director to withdraw ODF&W application.

992

To have public areas that are multi use for the public enjoyment, the budget and keeping good employees as
well as having enough funds for different programs

993

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle. They should also ban all clear cutting on public lands.

994

It will always be hard to balance economic interests with doing what is best for public resources. I hope we have
a truly conservation oriented director who isn't afraid to take the lead in solving controversial issues, like the
Nestle water bottling proposal.

995

Understanding the role of technology in making advancement in making it "easier to do business" with ODFW.
Not only understanding, but making the use of technology a key set of tools to bringing the vision to fruition.

56 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


996

Reducing the impact of industrial logging and proposed invasions of gas pipelines and coal trains.

997

Oregon is facing significant population growth in the coming years. Figuring out how to keep the public up to date
and engaged with what's happening with our native species is going to be more important than ever. The director
will need to find new avenues to communicate with the public (not just fishermen and hunters (for the record, I am
both)).

998

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

999

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle.

1000

Lower fee's and extend seasons which will help maintain and encourage present and future generations to fish
and hunt. Due to current fees and increased restrictions the next 10 years for ODFW does not look good.

1001

Resisting a push toward "popular", poll-based management Developing a sound science based program in times
of reduced budget Hiring and maintaining a staff that has the experience and scientific knowledge to design and
implement programs based on science and practical experience

1002

Water. Water. Water. It will affect human health through drinking water. It will affect fish mortality rates because of
droughts. It is necessary for all human and animal health and it is not a resource to give away.

1003

In my opinion the most critical issue or challenge is public participation in hunting and fishing activities and how
current declines in participation are impacting our funding/revenue problems. The increasingly maligned "hook
and bullet" folks are critical for supplying the funding necessary to accomplish ODFW's mission. Unfortunately for
the present generation, current interpretation of our mission is generating excessive emphasis on conservation
ideology, particularly on the fish side of things. For decades this has and continues to constrict opportunity while
at the same time diverting funding to issues that do not directly benefit consumptive users.. This situation
combined with increased costs to the consumer continues to alienate more and more folks, contributing to the
decline in participation. Under the current funding structure hunter and angler participation is critical. Given the
political majority opinion in this state it will be a key challenge to balance our mission in a way that encourages an
increase in our financially contributing constituency.

1004

To realize how important hunting and fishing is to the economy and culture of our state. Cutting bag limits and
opportunity is not the only solution to the state's problems. Hunters and fisherman are the most important asset
the director will have to manage.

1005

In the name of job creation business interests are seeking to roll back regulations that protect the environment.
We need strong leadership to counter these efforts.

1006

1) re-orientate balance between commercial and non-commercial needs towards the non-commercial side in
order to generate the greatest economic revenue for the region 2) shift hatchery production goals from greatest
output numbers to quality output in order to protect native fish 3) shift focus from micro management of the
resources and issues to macro view

1007

One immediate challenge is the threat of privatization. The new director should immediately withdraw ODF&W's
application to Nestle water rights in Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge. I would like to see a director who
works for equity and safeguards public resources.

1008

Energy issues Water issues Decline in revenues

1009

It is extremely vital and important that Nestle is not allowed the opportunity to reap profit from our public water
resources.

1010

The ODFW should adopt a policy that their will not not increase impacts of non-native species. For instance, the
ODFW should reconsider the policy of stocking naturally fishless lakes, especially in wilderness areas. The
ODFW should consider that there is currently no empty habitat not being used, and by introducing non-native
wildlife, like turkeys, native wildlife will suffer. The ODFW should have a strong monitoring program for their
actions that would answer questions like: Did the introduction of turkeys, or eastern-brook-trout accomplish what
you had hoped? Is the money you make off of these non-native species enough to justify the reduction of native
species they cause? The ODFW should reduce the target number for elk populations in the Cascade Mountains.
It's too high, and has caused ODFW to even consider shooting cougar to increase elk numbers to unrealistically
high numbers. The ODFW should not consider the elk population from the 80's, the time of intense clearcutting,
as a normal elk population. Instead, the ODFW should consider the per-european natural elk population, and
then only increase from that due to the lack of historic predators, such as wolf and brown bear. The ODFW
should protect any wolves moving into Oregon so that a natural process can begin to evolve, which can impact a
huge array of natural processes, like it did in Yellowstone.

57 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1011

The new director should protect Oregonians water rights by withdrawing the application giving Oxbow springs to
Nestl

1012

1.) Address the most critically damaged watersheds first. There are no sacrifice river systems. Develop a
comprehensive strategy to restore damaged aquatic habitat in order to bring seeding capacity back to its highest
potential. 2.) Create an atmosphere of resilience and creative thought in the agency that in turn will raise the level
of credibility in the public. 3.) Be courageous enough to stand on sound scientific principles when it flies in the
face of economic, social or political resistance. 4.) Address the actual impact of the Oregon Forest Practices Act.
Clearing cutting must go the way of the fish wheels of the past.

1013

It is critical that the new Director withdraw their predecessor's application to give our public spring water to
Nestle's proposed bottling plant in the Columbia River Gorge.

1014

Please the people with good rules and regulations . Bring in some revenue by setting good seasons for fish and
wildlife.

1015

1. Standing up to the corporate domination of the timber industry in Oregon. 2. Fighting the jobs at all costs to the
environment mindset of Oregon's policy-makers. If we have no planet, we have no jobs. 3. Better defining the
mission, what does "USE," mean and how is it applied in protecting and preserving fish, wildlife and their
habitats?

1016

Adapting the Department to a changing attitude in the state towards wildlife, away from hunting and other
consumptive uses to a focus on conservation and catering to non-consumptive users.

1017

Developing funding that separates the department dependnece on hunting and fishing; helping to implement a
conservation vision robust to a changing clmate and growing population

1018

Fixing all the downfals and shortcoming of the past 20 years. The state has been on a steady decline since I was
a kid. It needs to be fixed. NOW

1019

Ultimately, ODFW is funded by fishing and hunting licences. The new Director needs to remember that and
manage wildlife populations in way that provides quality opportunities. Predators have to be managed. Wolves
will need to be managed before the population gets too large. Montana and Colorado provide examples of this.

1020

Being caught up in all the political stuff and not being able to focus on real issues such as dwindling mule deer.

1021

Increasing competition over increasingly scarce natural resources. Developing a way in which department
employees are recruited where the best qualified candidates are actually hired instead of the current system
which hires individuals based on how well they regurgitate predetermined point scored words during interview

1022

More allowance for public input/involvement in decisions and programs. Seems decisions are made at the top
with seemingly misguided information or knowledge. Those in the field [public] actually may know better. Allow
for that. Regs are getting way to convoluted. Private vs public lands and impacts to wildlife are out of balance.

1023

Oregon has a lot of private land. Hunters are losing access to a lot of timber lands owned by large corporations. In
some cases we are having to pay large fees to access lands that used to be open to the public. Loss of access
and higher cost will mean less hunters. Relationships with private lanowners needs attention.

1024

Increasing focus on conservation and preservation of habitats exclusive of human enjoyment.

1025

1. Annual grass conversion of sagebrush habitats. 2. Maintenance or increase of hunter access and opportunity.
3. Mule Deer 4. OHV use

1026

I think that a huge challenge for the new director will be to make sure that this agency does not become more topheavy than it already is. After working for several state and federal natural resource agencies, ODFW is set apart
by its presence on the ground. We need to ensure that we have adequate personnel in the field collecting data to
for managers to make informed decisions, NOT more people with high-dollar jobs in Headquarters.

1027

Balancing the competing interests of native (wild) and non-native fisheries.

1028

Decreasing reliance on massive hatchery programs

1029

Odfw needs to do some serious soul searching. Public opinion of the agency is at a low. Department needs to
downsize while at the same time become more progressive and conduct more work on other wildlife besides
those that are harvested.

1030

Lose of habitats

58 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1031

Funding, Funding, Funding!! I feel we have an exceptional group of employees in the Agency, having met and
worked with many of them over my 50 years in the state. They deserve the backing and monies to do the job they
have trained for.

1032

getting everyone to consenses for migratory fish management. And part of that is getting commercial netters off
the columbia river.

1033

1)Commercial vs. sport harvest regulations of fisheries. Examples would be non-selective retention of species,
allowable by-catch, tax dollars from sport fisherman spent to benefit commercial fishing. 2)Timber companies
reducing hunting opportunity in the state by going to a pay to enter program. 3)Predation of fish by sea lions.
Poaching of fish. 4)Reduction of the ungulate population due to many factors including lack of timber harvest on
government land, poaching, wolves, cougars, and disease. There are a lot of people who, over a couple beers at
the bar, could tell you exactly how to run ODFW because they have hunted and fished their whole lives.
Unfortunately most of them are completely ignorant when it comes to game management. Maybe more
transparency of the departments decisions and actual numbers/facts of why decisions are made would help lift
the fog from Johnny want to be biologist. If your managing a declining resource and people feel like they are
getting diminishing returns every year on their investment into hunting/fishing you will lose your consumer base.

1034

Finances, lack of interest by the fishing and hunting public due to cut back of season, access and poaching. Must
deal with climate change and industry affecting wildlife.

1035

Pr editor control and management. Improvement of big game herds.

1036

removing 30 years of crap policies and rules that inhibit wildlife management.

1037

Fiscal hardship, anti gun/hunting/ammunition groups providing political pressure

1038

Gill nets in the columbia river. Lack of fish in rivers close to metropolitan areas. An understanding of non
commercial fishing and hunting from the ground up so they can solve the problem of losing licensed hunters and
fishermen each year. Portrayal of hunting and fishing in a better light while handling the public and commercial
pressure.

1039

I believe one of the biggest challenges the agency faces in the next ten years might be related to fish
conservation & restoration in the Willamette Valley. Currently, each year there are millions of pounds of
pesticides and herbicides spread across the farmlands of the Willamette Valley which seep into the ground water,
making their way into the creeks, steams & rivers. Not all of the chemicals are harmful, however, many of them
are. Killing off insects & vegetation that are critical and essential for a healthy ecosystem which native fish need to
survive. The root cause of the issue with hatchery & native fish competing for food is not the presence of the
hatchery fish, it is the fact that there is a lack of food to support all the fish due to all of the chemicals killing what
is vital. eventually people will stop targeting hatchery fish as the problem and start targeting the agriculture aspect
of the issue to remove the chemicals that are hurting the ecosystem. the people are going to want/expect/need
ODFW to assist with resolving this future issue.

1040

the falling deer populations and over populated predator in OR.

1041

Reduce poaching. Reduce predator numbers. Control wolves and admit there are more in the state then
reported. Increase populations, even if it means reduced tag opportunities. Gain more access to the vast private
timber land in Western Oregon. Insensitivise private land owners to allow public access programs.

1042

Delisting Wolves , hunting predators with dogs, removal of gill nets commercial and Native American, mule deer
decline, delisting of sea loins

1043

Climate change and growing impacts on species and habitats Integrating landscape-scale conservation priorities
and Conservation Strategy across all levels of the agency

1044

Price of licenses. Predators. Fish numbers

1045

1) Mismanaged habitats 2) Lack of enjoyment of the current generation of hunters 3) Funding non-game specie
management 4) Perpetuating a future generation of hunters and fishermen 5) Regaining the trust and support of
current hunters, fishermen, and those who utilize the natural resources of Oregon to generate their living and
support their families.

1046

The average age of those who fish and particularly hunt are growing with each passing year. In other words fewer
kids are hunting and fishing. This is a major problem that I'm afraid has no easy fix(es).

1047

1048

Predator management is number one in my book. If everyone hunters and non hunters a like want to keep
enjoying the wildlife we need better tools to manage predators.

59 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1049

The agency has forgotten their mission statement. Instead of giving out numerous disabled permits to the elderly
because they are old (doctor's disability permit) they should draw fro those permits also, why is it the first time
hunter are down to just a few areas that have over 50 tags (high competition) to hunt in ...MAKE IT EASER FOR
THE YOUTH! really who cares it some old dude shoots another elk!!!

1050

Being able to balance the needs of the treaty gillnet fishery and sportsmen's expectations, while keeping the
commercial gillnets out of the mainstem of the Columbia.

1051

1. Be willing to acknowledge the glaring incongruities outlined in the department's mission to recover and protect
native fish and wildlife. For example, spending tens of millions of dollars each year to operate hatcheries that
impair the production and recovery of native salmon and steelhead to cater to a small minority of the state's
population that adamantly expect a large return on every angling trip they make is unsustainable and
irresponsible. Licensed anglers don't own every fish in every river. There are many, many more non-anglers in
Oregon that are interested in recovering wild fish over the long haul than they are in trying to catch them or
exploit them for temporary entertainment. ODFW needs to recognize the interests of Oregonians that are
conservation-minded, and respect their objectives too. As taxpayers, they trust that the department will manage
their resources using the best available science and most qualified means and methods. 2. The new director
should consider the importance of splitting the agency into two factions. One would take over the conservation
duties tasked with recovery of species, and the other would cater to the hunting and angling communities. It's
glaringly obvious that one agency cannot effectively do both. For instance, managing resources that protect a
fishery for non-native, warm-water species like large and smallmouth bass or carp in cold-water habitats where
salmon and trout struggle to survive is absurd. Offering a bounty on a native fish because they "threaten" existing
fisheries is also absurd. As voracious, non-native predators of salmon and trout, bass don't belong in Oregon.
Yet, there are policies in place that prohibit taking them as bycatch from rivers, lakes and streams without a
permit; this flies in the face of the primary objectives to recover native fish in multiple state and federal recovery
plans. Pressure from the harvest communities should not influence the best management practices employed by
the department to manage our fish and wildlife populations.

1052

Safe guarding, and enhancing opportunity.

1053

Predation proper application of funding protection of wildlife against the spread of disease

1054

Wolves, ungulat population balance, gill nets, native treaties, over harvest of big game, native VS non-native fish
populations, and harvest, future hatcheries,

1055

Managing wolves to protect big games species and luvestock.

1056

Dealing with strong anti rights activists wanting to take away all hunting rights and managing out of control
preditor populations. Non existing Wildlife habitat in national and state forest lands do to no logging.

1057

Being under-funded. Lacking the sincere support of the majority of Oregon citizens. Special interest groups who
oppose hunting and fishing, as well as Federal Government meddling and intervention into State policy.

1058

The new Director should put the Mo's first and Quality of big game.Hunters should be second. To me the best
Director was DR. Donaldson. The Mo's are low with a lot of units having only 4-5 branch antler bulls to 100 cows,
We should have at least 10 branch antler bulls per 100 cows. Most other states have 20 branch antlers to 100
cows. Crossbow Should not be in Bowhunting Seasons for sure in Oregon.

1059

Climate Change Endangered Species

1060

The agency MUST shift from a hook and bullet priority to a wildlife/conservation role and develop innovative ways
to generate revenue from that. Hunting and fishing licenses are declining. Period. While these programs can still
be addressed, they must start moving to the background as the needs, trends, and desires or our Oregon
population changes to become more urban and enjoy natural resources in a less hunting and fishing way.

1061

Budget issues will be overwhelming.

1062

Fish, wildlife and habitat conservation in the face of development.

1063

clearly defining use and how use relates to protecting and enhancing the resources.

1064

Span of control and adequate supervisory staff to manage statewide employees effectively. Prioritizing and
eliminating work/projects versus burning out staff trying to maintain all current program levels with reduced or flat
funding sources.

1065

Lawsuits from Wild Fish Society and changes to hatchery practices, Improving access to retainable Salmon and
Steelhead

60 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1066

We need to find alternative funding. We can not continue to survive on the backs of license holders. The new
director needs to clean house of managers who are not following the budgetary rules and laws. Enforcement
continues to be a huge issue. We need to figure out how we can fund more enforcement. People have figured out
that they don't really need to get all the licenses required because the chance of running into a trooper is slim to
none. This only adds to our lack of income. It is a dangerous circle we have fallen into.

1067

Climate Change Connectivity Species Decline

1068

Poachers!!!! Gill Netters! Find a way to fund your own police force and take down all the illegal killing and
harvests! Oregon is failing due to politics! Look at other states like in the Midwest who have their own legal force!
Get out there and make revenue the old fashion way and stop hiking up our prices! work with landowners to open
up more hunting opportunities and when we turn in poachers and criminals do something about it! Help us help
you stop illegal dumping! And get rid of the damn politics! There is no reason to have a group of people who
know nothing about natural resources and biology sticking their money grubbing hands into the situation!

1069

Wild fish vs. hatchery fish management Increasing license/tag sales More opportunity for sport anglers
Conserving/restoring wild fish habitat

1070

The agency needs to reduce its reliance on license sales and develop alternative revenue. Increasingly, the
population is moving away from fishing and hunting. ODFW's constituency, if you are truly considering the
citizens of Oregon, increasingly value clean water, healthy habitat and biodiversity. As the natural resource
trustee for the state, ODFW needs to rise to its responsibilities and will need strong leadership and clear vision to
chart that course forward. One metric of success could be that the agency is no longer considered "hooks and
bullets". Another could be stable funding, or stable staffing, that addresses the full range of wildlife and fish under
ODFW's care.

1071

I see that the person will be able to make the right decisions for the animals and their habitat and not bend to
political pressure or political agenda's.

1072

Since the vast majority of Oregonians do NOT consume wildlife, and a very small minority do consume, it
behooves a Director to serve all citizens and not favor a very small group. The critical issues are that more people
will want to hunt wildlife with cameras or just to get a glimpse--not to kill. Nature must be allowed to run its course
without undo influence from those who kill/take our natural resources.

1073

live animals should be worth more than dead. Dept. needs to create more revenue streams not associated with
declining take activities. There are incredibly hard working staff at ODFW that do far more than they are paid to
do. More staff are needed to do the work. Need to appreciate the world is changing and their is a large potential
constituency that isn't cultivated or listened to. Opposing the ban on shark finning was an example being out of
step with the times and alienating a larger consituency in support of an industry that doesn't exist.

1074

predator issues wiping out big game numbers

1075

Transforming the agency out of the Iron Triangle of ODFW/Hunters-Angers/Wildlife Commission into a
department that is representative of the state's citizens. Hunters in Oregon and aging, overwhelmingly white and
male, and decreasing in number, according to the 2011 Survey of State Fish and Wildlife Agencies published on
census.gov. This is not representative of Oregon's current population, of which a ten-fold number enjoy watching
- not killing - wildlife, much less Oregon's diversifying future. For the agency to even survive for the next 10 years,
it must focus its energy and strategies on engaging the non-consumptive users of Oregon's wildlife, and create a
new funding structure that support these activities. Stubbornly relying on and clinging to an old and outdated
model of relying on hunting tags and gun/ammo/archery sales has brought the agency to a financial brink. The
next leader must be bold enough to take on the current power structure and lead ODFW into a future that truly
represents its citizenry, their interests, and their economic contributions to wildlife conservation.

1076

Working on species that aren't threatened/endangered/sensitive/species of concern. In a changing climate, and in


a political climate that is spending less money on natural resources, we will see decline in more species. It's
important to pay attention to terrestrial wildlife in addition to the constant focus on salmon populations.

61 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1077

The ongoing decline of license revenue due to hunters and anglers aging out of those pastimes is the #1 issue,
and the lack of interest by younger generations. Rather than continuing to waste resources trying to reverse this
(it is a problem everywhere in the country), the next leader needs to focus on establishing new funding models
that allow the agency to focus more on its statutory obligation to protect and enhance all native fish and wildlife. I
would add increasing the agencies' capacity, and role, in recovering endangered species and preventing species
from declining to the point where they are on the federal ESA. This is a huge role the agency should be playing on
sage grouse, wolverine, marbled murrelets, etc..., but it is not due to lack of resources and an excessive focus on
hunting and angling. Finally, I would say increasing the agencies ability to provide resources and incentives to
landowners to restore and preserve habitat and species, and to avoid conflicts. The Oregon Wolf Plan, as it is
currently being implemented, is a prime example of what the agency should be doing. I hope the new director
does not allow the agency to abandon that role due to pressure from livestock interests and others who are
hostile to wolves.

1078

Continued decline in mule deer numbers and hunter participation. Delisting wolves. Rising cougar population.

1079

Declining participation in hunting and fishing. Putting the agency on a sound financial footing Expanding our
constituency base beyond traditional hunting and fishing groups

1080

We worry that fewer fishing licenses are being sold while we reduce opportunity. We can update our hatchery
system to help rivers systems recover if the Oregon Hatchery Research Center can come up with "surrogate wild
Chinook" for the Corps of Engineers. Isn't this the goal of the OHRC?

1081

The new Director must strive to protect and enhance "all of" Oregon's fish and wildlife, not just the selected
Salmon and Steelhead fishers. Too, too much money and resources are devoted to so few fishermen. Less than
$150,000 a year are spent on warmwater programs by ODFW. Yet over 25% of the license buying public are
specifically targeting warmwater fish. How about the new Director protecting and enhancing warmwater fish and
their habitats for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations?

1082

secure adequate funding for ODFW make progress in solving water issues

1083

Funding will be huge. I am not sure that the current Governor is a huge supporter of the fishing and hunting
public, although these people make a huge contribution to Oregon's state economy, especially local economies
of a number of rural communities. Conservation is important, but let's not forget both our roots as Oregonians,
and the roots of the agency. I would love to see both more understanding (and valuing) of what we do, and more
financial support of ODFW in the legislature. Suddenly I feel like we're not "green" enough, although we probably
were the original "green" agency

1084

-Habitat. It is key to thriving wildlife. Problem: ODFW doesn't really manage habitat except for the wildlife areas
under its management. The majority of lands are in the hands of the BLM or US Forest Service and they have
their own marching orders. BLM lands have WAY too many feral horses and USFS needs more sunlight hitting
the ground in Western Oregon. The overall impact of the Northwest Forest Plan needs to be revised to strike
more balance in our federal forest lands. Both these actions will improve habitat for wildlife (sage grouse,
antelope, deer, elk, etc.). ODFW does control the regulations for hunting. The recent decision to NOT approve
the Siskiyou Plus spring bear hunt was done so with very flawed logic and now opens ODFW to losing its existing
spring bears. To deny the proposed hunt based on fear of orphaning cubs means we are already doing so under
the current spring bear hunts which are being done in the same areas and time period. That leaves ODFW wide
open for an assault on spring bear hunting for the same reason. -Wolves. As they expand their range in Oregon,
they will require more attention from ODFW and the enormous energy required to address the conflict with
livestock loss (investigations, etc.). Then there is the additional hit to big game species which will compound
matters with the poor habitat conditions mentioned above. -Loss of Trapping. ODFW needs to keep the ability to
trap (recreational/damage) as a viable wildlife management tool. -Declining participation in hunting/fishing. Need
to increase participation in tomorrows future supporters of fish and wildlife management. The North American
Model is the envy of the world when it comes to financing wildlife management. It relies on public
support/participation. Without this support, you cannot fulfill the mission statement, period. -Private Land Access.
More timberland is being leased and/or gated which is restricting access to public hunting. Keeping lands
open/available to hunters/anglers is critical if you want to keep participation up or at least prevent it from
declining. -The Change Within. Over the years, DFW staff has changed to those who are not able to
communicate with the constituency about hunting and fishing. These staffers (field/admin) cannot relate to their
constituency because they don't know enough about hunting/fishing and that is amplified within the hallways of
ODFW as more staffers feel the same way. There are those who don't hunt/fish and those who actually think it is
cruel and don't support it. How is it possible that a fish and wildlife agency would hire folks who harbor antihunting/fishing sentiment. There are a lot of well qualified people out there who can fill these roles who also are
passionate about hunting and fishing. Stop hiring folks who don't hunt/fish, it doesn't serve ODFW or the
constituency very well.

1085

overcoming existing cultural bias within the agency. "It is the way we have always done it" isn't good enough.

62 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1086

Deer and elk population management, predator control, financial burden on existing hunting population with % of
hunters going down.

1087

There are many natural resources challenges out there, e.g., Columbia River Hydro, Columbia River Fisheries,
wolves, ESA listings, etc.. That being said the biggest problem/challenge facing the next director and the agency
is a broken revenue stream. It doesn't take a highly skilled budget analyst to see that all of the hunter/angler
recruitment and retention activities are at best a stop gap. The trend is pretty much national and mirrors the
country's urbanization trend. A different source(s) of revenue will be needed for the agency to have any kind of
stability. With stability we will ultimately fail at our core mission.

1088

Predators. Cougars, bears, and the gray wolf. The major problem with these predators is the emotion based
management practices that have been in place for the last ten years. You have allowed people who have no
business voting on hunting/wildlife issues control how we manage game. Namely, peta, humane society of
America and a bunch of other anti hunting groups with an agenda. That don't care about wildlife... They just want
no hunting. And pretty soon they will win as there won't be anything left to hunt.

1089

Non-game species management. Ensuring federal funding for federal mandates. Wolf management/delisting.

1090

Much of Oregon is off limits to the general population. I think this is due to the use of machines that have adverse
impact on roads and terrain. Too much deer and elk hunting is done without walking.....quads need to be
outlawed as a method game hunting.

1091

Improving and enhancing the resource so that current and future generations can continue to enjoy it.

1092

Impacts from harmful farm & urban developments and ability to direct policies to enhance fish and game
populations with opposing viewpoints and motivations.

1093

1. Transitioning from a department that has heavily favored commercial fishing interests to a department that
recognizes the economic impact that recreational anglers have on the State of Oregon and their direct impact on
the ODFW budget. 2. A willingness to improve hatchery management and policies while defending hatcheries
against those that are waging a battle to shut down all of the hatcheries in Oregon.

1094

Loss of sportsman due to increased fees and fewer animals to hunt

1095

Getting rid of the wolves and not caving to special interest liberal whackos!

1096

They need to do more for our Mule deer. PLEASE cut more tags to help out. We understand the hit to the budget,
but we want our kids to have the same type of hunts we did. Please consider this.

1097

* Do not make decisions based on politics always base them on "good" scientific facts. *Listen to the stakeholders
(public) and their concerns regarding Oregon's hunting and fishing future. *Get a handle on the rising costs of
hunting and fishing licenses. *Find more creative ways to generate revenues for the department instead of
always raising hunting and fishing licenses. *Decide if the department is going to base the wolf issues on sound
science or bend to the will of special environmental groups and judges. *Recruiting more hunters into our sport
and keeping the ones who currently enjoy hunting opportunities in Oregon. *Be obtainable to the public. We really
want to know our director.

1098

see above

1099

Wolf control and harvest to protect our wildlife. Dog hunting by the general public, not government personnel.
Listening to the hunters and fisher person and the issues they see in our outdoors. Stop letting the fish and
wildlife personnel have the final word on game management. We don't set at a desk all day, but live in the
outdoors and see the effects of mismanagement of the Fish and Game.

1100

Not allowing over hunting to occur. Big game species have been declining over the last decade and it can be
attributed to over hunting by humans and natural predators. We need to do a better job in protecting deer and elk
herds and that can be done by limiting the number of days and seasons hunters have to hunt, and allowing
hunters to use dogs to hunt cougars.

1101

open more property for hunting and fishing and Oregon needs to get its deer and elk population back through
predator management and quit raiseing the prices on tags and lisences more people are going to quit hunting
and fishing because of this

1102

Wolf Policy Public Lands Ranching Watersheds and environmental impact of livestock on wildlife in ongoing
drought and wildfire conditions.

1103

maintaining access to commercial fishing grounds that will be competing with other ocean uses such as wave
energy, wind energy, etc.

63 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1104

Endangered spieces

1105

good luck to whoever winds up with the job. i'm an old geezer and i have watched the hunting and fishing in this
state go to hell'.

1106

Farness in use of sport fees. Getting general funds to pay for functions not directly and specifically benefiting
those paying these fees. Non-game species and habitat management, much of enforcement, Interagency
coordination and consultations, development consultations, are examples of expenses sport fees have
supplemented but should not.

1107

To appeal to the minorities who are underserved.

1108

Assist with the Sports and Recreational Priorities on the state fisheries vs Commercial. The true stakeholder are
those who retain a license and pay their salary, not the bird watchers, boaters, and hikers that take advantage of
ODFW projects paid by those licenses. So how about some humble respect..

1109

Hunters not haveing as much access to lands that hold game. Fish numbers. Public veiw.

1110

Shrinking game populations and shrinking hunting populations and budgets in repsonse. It is the same for fishing
as conservation measures are implemented...shrinking budgets and fishing populations. The new director needs
to bring sportsmen back to Oregon as they are seeking better quality hunts in other states paying 5 times the
value. Predation is a major issue.

1111

Land protection and explanding ODFW's footprint of publically accessible conservation lands

1112

ODFW needs to make changes from the mission on up. This mission statement is anchored in a 20th century
paradigm of wildlife management and falls well short of modern conservation thinking. I challenge ODFW and the
new director to consider a more holistic approach to managing and conserving Oregon's natural resources that is
more ecosystem rather than human-use centered.

1113

Fish and wildlife habitat conservation and restoration

1114

1. Population growth - habitat infringement 2.ESA listings of salmonids and sage grouse 3. BUDGET - creating a
finically viable agency 4. Climate/drought-fire/ocean acidification 5. Closing Hatcheries and Creating Wild Gene
banks for salmonids

1115

The new director MUST find a method for non-harvestors to fund the conservation measures that this sector
insists that the agency undertake. The budget for the agency is increasingly funded by license dollars, focus must
be on ways to increase opportunity for those who fund the agency. The new director must also devise a method to
recruit new hunters and anglers with input from groups representing these sectors.

1116

I believe that the key challenge for the new director and the agency over the next 10 years, and continuing into
the future, is the downward spiral of increasing fees and decreasing numbers of hunters and anglers to pay them.
Unfortunately, there is a concurrent appearance of decrease in opportunity that is further driving this cycle, which
is making hunting and fishing in Oregon less and less accessible to people of modest or even moderate means.
Finding a way to break this cycle will be key to the success of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

1117

Moving the agency towards management of Oregon's native fish and wildlife and away from a hook/bullet themed
agency. Emphasize conservation and maintaining native habitats rather than prioritize mgmt of
hunting/fishing/hatcheries. Moving the agency away from hatcheries towards managing for wild fish, including
habitat protection. Meaningfully address climate change in the management of Oregon's native fish and wildlife
and their habitats, including when identifying permit conditions in permitting processes before other agencies.
Evaluating and phasing out some of the currently allowed hunts (Why do we still allow people to shoot a bobcat
or kill a river otter, for example? How does that meet the agency's mission? Continuing those types of hunts gives
the agency a very out-dated feel).

1118

The purchase of land by hunting and fishing "clubs" that take away traditional areas for everyone to use.

1119

Realizing that the demographics of the state are changing and that Agency needs to move away from the Hook
and Bullet approach to management and support non-consumptive wildlife activities as well as non-game
conservation. Need to phase out the use of lead. Hiring a more diverse work force and eliminating the inveterate
good old boys club.

1120

Predator management, Sportfishing priority, and wolf management.

64 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1121

To focus on the fish and wildlife resource as the primary goal with the secondary focus being the public and
constituencies. When this priority is reversed, the resource tends to be managed by the squeaky wheel and
loudest constituency. Focus on preservation of the resource over a long period, 50 or 100 years versus 10 years.
Realize that the agency is going to need to be leaner and more specialized, with many new employees. And
predictably one of the most critical issues will be fish and wildlife health. Without an agency-wide, statewide,
comprehensive surveillance and prevention program integrated into all aspects of fish and wildlife management,
and a program that is adequately funded and staffed, a Director and agency increases the risk of catastrophic
loss to populations, herds, or species from disease - a loss cascading into declining revenues and support by the
public.

1122

Managing for non-consumptive natural resource experiences Supporting science-based adaptive management in
the face of climate uncertainty Promoting an agency-wide shift toward honoring the ENTIRE agency mission
under increased public scrutiny Providing timely, and appropriate information to constituents through a variety of
outlets Support agency employees' professional development within current fiscal constraints Develop plans for
employee retention, including non-traditional work schedules, rotation/promotion opportunities, and continuing
education

1123

Ongoing loss of critical habitat of wildlife species. While land management is often outside of direct influence of
ODFW, the agency should take a greater role in making sure fish and wildlife are at the forefront of land planning
decisions.

1124

As of now, serious attention needs to be paid to the predation rates occurring on ungulate populations. Most
immediately the mountain lion population needs to have some effort of any kind to put it back towards the desired
population as stated by odfw.

1125

Predatory Animals moving into cities and towns. Due to high numbers. Toxins in our Water killing off fish. Low big
Game numbers due to predators. Increase in predator illness spreading to domestic animals.

1126

Dealing with LOGGING, see above and sediment runoff, also logging right up to the stream, no set back!

1127

funding. "balancing" the budget by spending the most dollars on the highest real priorities. ensuring that
substantive communication actually happens from the top down and then back up.

1128

The new director should have a vision to turn the entire agencies funding aproach around so the major portion of
the budget does not come from Hunter and Fishermen license and tag fees. The new director needs to recognize
the current budget structure is a major flaw in the system. For the past many years ODFW has been managed
from the user standpoint focusing management on the hunter and fishermen. This agencie should first and
foremost be managing for fish and wildlife not hunters and fishermen. The human element should be a secondary
focus. Oregon will continue to see a decline in hunters, fishermen, wildlife and the overall populations of both if
this most important element is not changed.

1129

Developing a budget that will continue to foster sound scientific methods to improve both fisheries and wildlife
habitat. Foster a relationship with sportsman so that budget funds from sportsman's fees are allocated to
activities that will enhance fishing and hunting opportunities. Develop a positive working relationship with the
commercial fishing industry and encourage their continued pursuit of sustainable fisheries for future generations
to enjoy and maintain a sound commercial fishing market. Find additional funding sources to help with nongame
wildlife management.

1130

It seems that there has been a blatant discrimination against disabled hunters. We get a disability tag only to find
out that the benefits of that tag are only allowed to be used on private land, no longer can we use them on forest
service or National forest land. This needs to be fixed

1131

Planning for the effects of climate change. Redirecting the organization to meet the needs of non-hunting/fishing
stakeholders. Developing funding to replace diminishing license and PR/DJ revenues.

1132

ability to get ODFWs financial house in order, so existing programs that do protect and enhance our resources
can continue, and additional programs/projects added

65 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1133

The quality of hunting is poor. The key is increasing the quality of habitat. The former Director allowed regulation
changes that compromised wildlife populations and promoted illegal harvest in the hopes of providing short term
gains in hunter satisfaction. Next will be going down the predator control road, which is a short term band-aid.
The key issue is being ignored and the result will be the continuation of poor quality hunting. The west side of
Oregon still offers general deer and elk seasons. These seasons generate a significant proportion of the agency
income. The west side US Forest Service lands are dying because of the inability to actively manage these lands
for healthy ecosystems. To further complicate this matter, a major private landowner may be moving towards fee
access on their lands, which currently provide some of the only quality hunting in the western half of the state.The
average Oregonian hunter will likely not pay these fees (depending upon the amount). These displaced hunters
will either overrun the other private lands or quit hunting the west side of the state. ODFW's wildlife staff may be
facing some severe reductions in the near future should these events come to being. Currently, most west side
wildlife staff spends the majority of their time addressing wildlife damage (both game and non game), fielding
public inquiries (many unrelated to hunting), and implementing various statutory requirement (most unrelated to
hunting). The new Director needs to take a hard look at non license and tag sources of revenue, direct and back
up wildlife staff to turn away non hunting related work, take a hard look at removing some of the non hunting
related statutory requirements from our workload, and allow wildlife staff to spend some time trying to improve the
quality of hunting. Oregon's hunting community cannot continue to foot the bill for the rest of the non hunting
community. If we continue down this path, the agency will be handing out pink slips to the wildlife staff. Then who
will be left to complete all the work we are currently overloaded with?

1134

- habitat protection/development pressure- creating protections so that ODFW comments have teeth - growing
into the role of managing, monitoring and protecting all wildlife, - leading becoming a face for wildlife management
for a greater constituency beyond game management - facing political pressure with vision for the future funding the implementation of ODFW's mission statement - creatively funding the agency as it weans from
license dollars - climate change

1135

Budget shortfalls Backlash from increased license fees

1136

Finance, PR and pulling all groups together to build consensuses.

1137

maintaining strong hatcheries and taking a second look at our wild fish policy

1138

Listed above. If something does not change, their will continue to be fewer hunters and fishermen to purchase
licenses and tags. New management techniques are needed to promote deer and elk and keep predators in
check. No dog hunting for predators, but regulated bail hunting like most other states to help manage the
predator populations is needed. Fishing regulations need to be simplified/clarified to promote worry free fishing.
Resolve this ridiculous debate that there is a difference between wild and hatchery fish. Fish are fish, and if they
can go to sea and survive to return to swan, they are hardy enough to reproduce. Maybe, fish runs would return
to previous levels. Timber companies should be required to allow public access to Oregon lands as a condition of
their lease, or they should have to pay property tax to the counties like everyone else; Local, state then federal
priority on the lands as intended and not the other way around.

1139

Tribal trying to exploit their share of allocation, alternative gillnet, loss of hunting tags which will result in fewer
hunters,

1140

Hatchery vs. Wild fisheries Poaching

1141

A key challenge will be to guide ODFW with the limited resources. The director should be able to reconstruct the
resources to accomodate the goals and objectives of the agency as a whole.

1142

funding, more demand on natural resources, protection of fish & wildlife

1143

Balancing conservation and use of wildlife and fisheries resources

1144

Doing more with less.

1145

Changing constituency - going from "hook and bullet" to broader constituent base Alternative funding sources hunters and anglers can't keep paying for it all Aging leadership - how to we foster the leaders of tomorrow
Marketing the agency and the product we provide Continuing the agency's progress on recruitment and retention

66 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1146

Financial issues will likely continue to challenge the department. Having adequate funds to accomplish the
ODFW mission will be critical, but securing those funds through the political processes required will be an
ongoing challenge. Climate issues affecting fish and wildlife species and their habitats. Ocean acidification.
Prioritizing issues affecting fish and wildlife, their habitats and use by present generations, while anticipating the
issues that will affect future generations of fish and wildlife their habitats and their use by expanding human
populations of future generations of Oregon residents. Humans are increasing in population at a greater rate than
Oregon's fish and wildlife populations. Communicating that fact in a way that helps shape Oregonian's view of the
need for wise and effective management of fish and wildlife resources has been and will continue to be a
challenge, especially given the political realities of doing so in a state with very diverse constituents.

1147

I feel that the Wolf/Rancher issue will become a huge topic of distress. Our (people) interaction with the Ranchers
and Wolves will be a sensitive issue to navigate and have reflection on. I feel the Director should take this to
heart and tread carefully both with inside and outside forces. Best of luck.

1148

The agency is facing a budget crisis. Our funding comes primarily from hunters and anglers, yet the work we do
benefits all the citizens. We are spending more and more of our time dealing with issues that are not related to
hunting and fishing. It is time for the public as a whole to pay for the services we provide that they benefit from.
Diversifying our funding becomes even more critical as the participation in hunting and fishing declines. (While
there are benefits to programs to encourage participation, they are not going to have a significant impact on the
decline in the popularity of hunting and fishing.) The new Director will need to work effectively with the legislature
to adequately fund the agency, and to make funding the agency equitable with the services we provide.

1149

Hatchery funding vs. Economic impact of the sport fishing community. Wolves impact on our herds. Diminishing
habitat for our deer and elk due to a lack of logging. Impact of predation on fish by birds and seals. Emulating the
best practices to maximize abundance and opportunities for hunters and fisherman. After all, this is a public
resource and the odfw works for the benefit of Oregonians.

1150

Conserving habitat and protection of wildlife species as human population and development increases.

1151

Realignment of predator management hunting.

1152

PROBLEM ANIMAL SOLUTIONS Problem animals like sea lions or wolves should be shot. When a few problem
animals are shot, the rest of the population reacts and will not be problem animals anymore. When problem
animals are not removed from the population, they encourage others to be problem animals. When a pack of sea
lions take over a million dollar dock and we can;t do anything about it, the Director needs to take some
leadership, not pandering to the PETA crowd. The wolf solution the last director worked out is a bad joke. Four
strikes that are confirmed without a doubt by agencies that do not respond in a timely manner before any action
is taken? What is happening is wolves are getting bolder and bolder because they are smart and as a learned
behavior they can push man around. Same with urban pests. Re-locating problem animals? The reason they are
a problem animals is we have developed all their habitat. They have no where else to go. Shoot them, don;t relocate them to a different nieghborhood, or place them in the woods where they starve o get eaten by another
animal. The ODFW director should be able to help set policy in a scientific manner rather than the easy route of
re-locate.

1153

Wolves, and other attempts to improve non game species at the expense of traditional game species.

1154

Private land access. Better hunting and fishing opportunity for every one wolfs big game diseases need more
input from the outdoor community..

1155

The Director needs to take a proactive approach to increase fishing and hunting opportunities. Promoting
increasing number of predators does not do that. Wolves and cougars are rapidly diminishing big game numbers,
thus a diminishing number of hunters. Increasing tag prices has always been the option. Eventually this source of
funds is going to dry up.

1156

Science-based management of fish and wildlife resources state-wide. Policy and law enforcement-based
protection of fish and wildlife resources. Restoration of impaired fish and wildlife resources.

1157

Protecting and preserving aquatic and terrestrial habitats; educating the public about risks of loss of habitat from
future development and effects of climate change; seeking support from the other state agencies to get tougher
land use laws in place requiring waterfront landowners to protect and restore riparian habitat. If you own the land,
you must be a steward for future generations!

1158

Revising the funding and management model for the agency to obtain more general fund support for conservation
and then allow the use of hunter/angler dollars more for programs that maintain hunting and fishing opportunities
and enhance retention and recruitment. Clarification of the role of hatcheries as a tool needed to maintain the
social and economic benefits of fisheries and moving away from the "either/or" depiction of hatchery vs. wild fish.

1159

habitat modifications and land use effects on fish and wildlife species. managing esa listed species

67 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1160

Developing or altering revenue streams to avoid the basic conflict of needing to sell licenses, but also having to
serve conservation needs; each of these things often being in direct conflict, particularly through the hatchery
system, which is expensive, and at times ecologically impactful..

1161

We must enlist our next generations in the goal of enjoying the great outdoors in all of its grandeure. Hunting,
fishing, hiking, habitat, renewable resources, sustainable etc. The biggest challeng will be to instill in our
upcoming generations the desire to get out there and experience it.

1162

Increase in predatory animals and how to control them that is acceptable to all the public.

1163

The current focus of the ODFW seems to be generate revenue not increasing habitat or wildlife for "the enjoyment
by present and future generations." Predators such as wolves and cougar are probably at the top of the
list of challenges. Poaching How increasingly complicated the regulations have become. Retention and
recruitment of hunters and fisherman. The belief that the department does not use a common sense approach to
wildlife. The belief that hunters/fisherman make up a small portion of the department and that it is more and more
run by people who would just assume take hunters and fisherman out of the equation.

1164

Proper and effective predator and invasive species control

1165

Offering out of state and in state hunters trophy opportunities that keep people looking for those great chances to
take a true trophy in Oregon. This should h a top priority for getting out of state hunters to come pay the fees and
generate the revenue to continue improving the wildlife .

1166

Increasing demand on department resources, while available resources shrink. Conflicting views on the
benefits/impacts of hatchery production and wild fish harvest. Striking a balance. Reductions in big game
populations, challenges addressing the cause of reduction. Wolf management.

1167

The key here is to enhance! Odfw has failed at this! Next ten years is to deal with the predator problem!

1168

1. Opportunities for hunters and fishermen have dwindled steadily for years now, even though costs have
increased dramatically. I find that unsatisfactory and a major problem. The fact that I now have to wait, in some
cases, 6-8 years to hunt an area that I once hunted every year is unacceptable. 2. Predator control, specifically
cougar, is paramount in the effort to get our deer and elk herds back to proper numbers, not reducing hunter
numbers. 3. Wolf management is going to become a major problem. 4. Reduce the overall ODFW operation and
concentrate on big game, upland game and fish. Eliminate non-game species studies, programs and personnel.

1169

Open all areas to hunting

1170

Predator control. Predator control. Have the guts to allow some hound hunting of cats. I'm starting to see more
Cougars than deer while I'm hunting. The deer and elk populations are struggling. I haven't even mentioned the
wolf problem that will continue to get worse. I've hunted Idaho for years and it is amazing the damage that has
been done to the elk herds in that state. That's coming here.

1171

I touched on them a little bit in previous questions. But over crowding due to private lands being closed, lack up
game in the more popular units, and a general disrespect of hunters towards each other. Make the synopsis
more black and white, less gray areas. Change bag limits, more doe tags? Less buck tags, not enough with
horns out there. And listen to the people like myself who are out in the woods more often then those stuck behind
the desk

1172

Court actions as the result of law suits. Hatchery management.

1173

More hunting tags Less rule changes

1174

Recognizing that the USFWS introduced a non native hybrid and taking the steps towards complete and timely
removal.

1175

Gill net removal from the Columbia. Wolf and cougar issues.

1176

Loss of habitat. ( At least thats what I have been told) Predators Dealing with a public that is emotional and not
factual. Dealing with Wolf issue. Dealing with loss of hunters, that is going to happen due to higher prices and
loss of quality of hunting.

1177

Game population Private land hunting

1178

Repairing the current big game populations. Regain the trust of the hunting and fishing (tax payers) trust in the
department. Make tough decisions that will be unpopular to all users but, that are necessary to rebuild the wildlife
portion of the department specifically.

1179

Wolf population, bear and cougar hunting, how to allocate larger salmon and steelhead populations for harvest.

68 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1180

WOLVES

1181

extend general elk hunting

1182

Preservation of our big game. Re-introducing the wolf back in to the wild and not managing them is a BIG
mistake. Not allowing cougars to be hunted with dogs is a BIG mistake.

1183

Gill nets and overgrown forests (fire danger)! Also share HONESTLY the predation issues all that hunt our forests
know are much worse than currently reported (GET REAL).

1184

If predators are not controlled in a good manner there is not going to be any wildlife for us, much less future
generations to enjoy and harvest.

1185

Hunting for cougar and bear with bait and hounds. Also, opening up gates for use. Half of the people can not
walk long distances.

1186

Recruiting and retention of hunters and fishermen. Finding revenue sources that do not strain recruiting and
retention of new hunters and fishermen.

1187

Are deer population need's much improvement. Let us cut doe tag's for 2 year's and go forked horn or better for 2
or 3 year's to build our deer population back up.

1188

Declining tag sales due to poorly managed resources. We need to focus on rehabilitation of our game species
and use that to sell more tags, not the other way around. This director should come in with an immediate
understanding of the current issues, preferably from experience as a hunter in OR. Something needs to be done
to address our draw system. It needs better structure so that people will stop putting their wives and daughters
(who don't hunt) in for preference points with the intent of using them for party hunt boosters.

1189

pollution of waterways, fish contamination,

1190

Having customers that fund this department, vote, and have a decision in future wildlife management. If your not
a repeating customer, then you do not fund your program, so you cannot vote.

1191

At the rate our animal populations are declining he or she should have one concern. Bring up the numbers!!!

1192

public access to forests

1193

1- Spring salmon fishery. 2- Predation. Even though I personally hunt almost exclusively western Oregon over the
years populations are up and down. But it seems like many central and eastern units the populations are low and
remain low. Many I've talked with that wait for several years to draw a tag are very disappointed in the
experience. Claims of seeing very little deer or elk but see a lot of predators. I feel this can cause people to loose
interest in hunting.

1194

Wolves and predators along with lack of habitat. Stop spending money on wolves!!! Wolves are not afraid of
humans, especially in Imnaha unit. This year they killed cattle and circled a rancher. Start spending money on
habitat restoration and on mule deer.

1195

Rising cost of licensing. Can't afford to take family fishing on a regular basis like my parents did for me. To go
catch and release fishing we all need a license... And a harvest tag (even when there is no harvest season and
it's catch and release) and a Columbia basin tag. Just getting stupid. Or the fact that we have to spend 8
unrefundable dollars per hunt for the CHANCE to win the opportunity to spend more if you are actually succesful
in the dwindling lotteries

1196

we need a leader ready to go up against our Governor and legislators in regards to this anti bear and cougar
hunting with dogs. Each county should have a say not three counties speaking for the whole state. To tell enviros
to get lost on this anti lead debate by showing much to be untruths and out right lies. To quit spending any money
on non game projects, such as wolf,seal lions,bird watchers, etc. With tried and true science quit listening to the
junk science of preservationists. Work with dept. of forestry in trying to log more as well as fire areas faster, to
improve habitat much faster.

1197

Take factors such as license fees vs actual game numbers in to account, as well as common sense about
hunting seasons and current weather trends and how they correspond. Someone who sees hunting and fishing
with a touch of reality and not the pocket book funds.

1198

Unlimited tribal permits will devastate our public land wildlife. A new direction must proposed!

69 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1199

The department is underfunded. The new Director will need to be able to build public and political support for
increased funding. A truly visionary leader and a strategic communications campaign could accomplish this. In
terms of specific conservation issues that are important to the state, the following are likely to be a priority in the
coming years: -thermal pollution in rivers. Riparian habitats need to be restored in order to preserve Oregon's
aquatic resources. -climate change. Natural resource management moving forward will need to address the
impacts of climate change on habitats. -increasing habitat fragmentation as the state's population continues to
grow and more natural areas are urbanized. Coordination with DLCD will be critical in addressing the issue of how
to plan for increased growth and development in the state. This will have an impact on habitats, and there needs
to be a plan (better than the Goal 5 state planning goal). -to do all of this work, the department needs more
resources, and more staff. This (as stated above) is the greatest challenge.

1200

Critical issues are population numbers, predator control, wolf reintroduction and management, fish and game
habitat enhancement, and quality vs quantity/opportunity for hunting.

1201

MAKE FISHING WORTH WHILE

1202

too many wolfs and not enouph deer and elk.

1203

Stopping the Gillnet lobbyisst and getting a handle on predator control ( Wolves, Cougars and Sea Lions )

1204

I think it is unreasonable to have to buy a hunting license to apply for a big game tag. It is a form of extortion. I
agree with paying for the application fee and then buying a license after being successful in the draw.

1205

Predator control, decline in deer and elk populations, declining revenue due to decrease in the numbers of
hunters and fisherman.

1206

land access and predator managment

1207

The influx of a particular predator is probably at the top of the list. As well as keeping the deer and elk herds from
falling even further. Also the "emotions" that the anti-hunting groups bring up. The new director needs to
remember they are only EMOTIONS, not scientific facts!!!

1208

#1. Efficiently Enforcing game laws (too many poachers that never get caught because there is a lack of law
enforcement in our state) 2.Successful Wolf and predator Management #3 Improving/implementing Broodstock
hatchery salmon/steelhead programs #4. cormorant/sea lion control plans to protect fisheries #5. Creating a
better quality hunting experience by limiting more units and tags to designated draw areas.

1209

Predator management! It is sickening to see what has happened to the big game of this state.

1210

The fact that most decisions appear to reflect self-perpetuating policies of industrial fish production (so-called
enhancement) on the fisheries side, hoping perhaps to sell more licences with policies that in reality mostly
benefit a very few highly consumptive anglers. rather than protecting and enhancing self-sustaining populations
for future generations

1211

Preserving our hunting rights, wolves and coyotes taking over

1212

Needs a better hunting draw system. Research what other states do.

1213

In my opinion there are two major threats. One being the control of predators because we continue to pass laws
to protect them as well as bring more into our state! The other being illegal hunting activities and poaching. In the
past few years I'm hearing of more and more illegal things going on and less law enforcement.

1214

Management of predators is a vital issue to the management of big game population. Have a plan to eliminate
sea lions on the lower Columbia. None native species have no room in our fragile ecosystem. This includes the
Canadian timber wolf and California sea lion. Creating a plan to serve commercial fisherman, rather than
dictating an agenda.

1215

Manage predators and get the deer and elk herds back to where they were before doe and cow hunts became
cash cows to buy fancy buildings.

1216

Rising costs of tags and licenses. You need to stop raising prices and wondering why less people are buying
tags and more people are hunting illegally.

1217

Look at the answer to number 2.

1218

Too many rapacious influences decreasing viability of wildlife Toxic lumbering run off and other direct poisoning.

1219

You can't have a foreign apex predator introduced into the wild and expect to have a good ecosystem. Learn
from the idiocy of your predecessors. Take action when it's needed not wait because I am animal lover says so
with money.

70 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1220

Cut back on elk cow tags, I.e- tomany youth/handycap long season tags.(trask/wilson units) try to get more kids
involved. Stop raising the price if tags.

1221

the ODFW has not done any good for the fish and game of this state for well over 2 decades now. The ODFW
needs to get back to their mission statement and actually manage the fish and game for the residents of this state
and not to benefit the current socialist ideals of the ODFW

1222

Over the next 10 years ODFW is going to have to take a stand on the conservative use of hatcheries as a means
to generate harvest. raising fish for harvest has been a failing policy for over 100 years. Public outcry because of
perceived lost harvest opportunity is going to grow even if the number of fish harvested increases. ODFW will
need to be able to stand it's ground on the reduced role of hatcheries.

1223

Decreasing hunter/angler numbers due to lack of opportunity/success (which results in diminishing appeal of
outdoor hunting and fishing activities). Increasing costs for both hunters/anglers and the Department. High
likelihood of continuing expensive litigation from special interest groups regarding the Department's management
choices. Potential for special interest groups to subvert intelligent, sensible, and traditional outdoor recreation
activities (hunting, fishing, trapping, etc.) via ballot measures.

1224

Biggest challenge is Governor Kitzhaber. The new director will have to do what ever the Gov. wants.

1225

Allowing dogs for a better predator managed program

1226

-Climate change -Population growth and urbanization. -

1227

Increasing the output of fish hatcheries.

1228

LARGE PREDATORS!!

1229

1. Predator Management - As our population of predators, primarily cougar and wolves, continues to rise, we will
continue to see dwindling game numbers across the state, as well as predator/human interaction outside of their
traditional ranges. This must be dealt with if wildlife populations are going to be available for the enjoyment of
future generations. 2. State Wide Antler Point Restrictions - As an avid hunter, I try to spend as much time in the
field as I can with the tag that I have. I am not a trophy hunter, and admittedly, do take the first legal animal that I
have an opportunity to. I value the experience of hunting, and have finished more seasons with an unpunched tag
in my wallet than with a meat in the freezer. As a hunter, I want to see animals when hunting, and am not
concerned with harvesting one each and every year. I feel that a lot of hunters share this feeling. In my opinion, a
lot of the units that I have hunted in the past give ample opportunity at young animals, but I see a problem with
this...too many young animals are taken out of the herds each season. This leaves a smaller population of males
for the future to breed, thus decreasing the amount of animals total in the herd. I personally think that in the next
couple of years, antler point restrictions are going to have to be a real consideration for all of our state with regard
to deer and elk in order to sustain population goals for most units. I think most hunters in Oregon would support
this. Along the same lines of thought, I think the number of spike only elk hunts in Eastern Oregon will need to be
reduced. Again, too many young bulls are being taken out of the herds, resulting in a population of breeding age
bulls being much smaller than it should be to maintain a healthy herd. 3. Choose Your Weapon - I am a hunter,
and do not have a preference to how I am able to hunt. I traditionally put in for the rifle draws for both deer and
elk. Occasionally, but not annually, I will purchase an OTC archery tag if I do not draw. I have been successful with
a controlled rifle tag, and I have been successful with an OTC archery tag. However, as a hunter who wants
to have a good experience in the field; one that I have opportunities to see game each trip out, I believe that we
have way too many hunters in the field during the general archery season. I recognize that I have contributed to
this, and for that reason, I have opted not to purchase an OTC archery tag for each of the last three years. It just
isn't fun to hunt a general season with so many people out in the woods. Animal populations don't support the
number of tags that are available, and the experience is not what it once was. As a hunter, I have made the
decision not to hunt rather than hunt and have a bad experience. Choose Your Weapon is something that really
probably be a consideration by ODFW, and I expect this to be a key issue for our next director.

1230

Gillneters, barbless hooks and sturgeon reopening.

1231

Not be influenced by non scientific information but be swayed by politics and cry babies.

1232

Too much money being spent on non-game animals. Too little predator control. Fees increasing and opportunity
decreasing.

1233

Predation

1234

High fees, too many big game tags for units to make more money, strict hatchery fish limits when they are very
abundant, zone endorsements are ridiculous. We pay an incredible amount already it's ridiculous. If you want to
save money then stop building extravagant facilities and paying people to cut the head off my fish to study age.

71 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1235

Number one is our predators they have not been manage and a lot of the big game numbers are way down. Then
we got wolves and we have a wolf coordinate that seems to be on the side of the environment list and not for the
sportsman.

1236

Liberal political persuasion from extreme environmentalist groups, tree hugging wacko's, and animal rights
activists extremists. The director must not give in to big money or popularity contests among the lefty's in
Portland.

1237

Habitat loss Non science based decesions being put to voters by special interest groups...based on budget dollar
allocation nothing should ever reach voters. ..if uou dont purchase a hunting/fishing license you have no say.
Decesions should be based soley on science established by dept biologists

1238

getting more fish in the rivers and lakes that are retainable. Like hatch boxes and letting you keep wild fish when
there are enough in the system.

1239

To honestly look at commercial / sport fishing to weigh which one will have the greatest financial impact for the
State if developed properly.

1240

keeping employees.. reality of raising fees.. developing relationships with all stakeholders..

1241

lower numbers of hunters, predator over populations and maintaining the publics access to game

1242

Declining deer and elk herds. Increased predation by cougars, bears, and wolves. Loss of hunting participation

1243

Rebuild the herds that wolves and cats destroyed

1244

Aggressive management (reduction) of land based apex predators (cougars, wolves, coyotes, bears), by any
legal means. Aggressive management and reduction of aquatic predators (Caspian terns, cormorants, and
pinnipeds). Recruitment of the "next generation" of hunters/fishers. Large reduction in the harvest of female
breeding age ungulates. Implementation of DRACONIAN fines/loss of privileges for convicted big game
poachers.

1245

Cougar hunting with dogs. Cougar population. No tag and lisence cost increases. Make hunting affordable. Don't
allow extremist to run the organization.

1246

1. Stabilizing funding by implementing ways that all Oregonians can support the agency. 2. Increasing
fishing/hunting opportunities (particularly fishing) for the license buyers that are providing significant funding to
the agency. To date, while acknowledging legislators' influence, the agency has tied itself into knots trying to
accommodate a handful of commercial fishing interests.

1247

ODFW's new director must understand that the solid financial existence of the agency is dependent upon solid
big game populations.ODFW has been reducing the population of big game , most notably elk and deer, as a
strategy to reduce damage complaints. Unfortunately, this short sighted approach is a bit like killing the golden
goose. Strong big game populations help recruit hunters into the sport which also serves to fund ODFW.

1248

Addressing integrity issues within ODFW leadership.

1249

Climate change and pollution

1250

Loss of fishing and hunting opportunities due to private properties closing off access.

1251

Predator management! From the woods to the water.

1252

The most critical issue facing the agency is the lack of interest of the citizens of the state of Oregon. Were at an
all time low of fishing and hunting license holders due to lack of success in the field and the complex issues one
faces in going on a simple fishing or hunting trip. With out license holders who fund the system the agency is
moving toward a slow but inevitable implosion. There must be a concentrated effort in recruiting youth to become
engaged in outdoor wildlife sporting activities if the agency expects to sustain its self into the future. There is also
a huge opportunity to tap into the citizens to get engaged with habitat restoration and taking on ownership of the
resource.

1253

Reducing predators to a level that allows a balance on wildlife and fish. As of now, the predators are too plentiful
by large amounts and the fish and wildlife are suffering because of that. We need to have people that are willing
to stand up for humans, especially the humans that are financing your job, and start managing the predators to a
level that is sustainable for all wildlife and fish to exist but also to maximize the potential that allows for humans a
chance to harvest fish and wildlife with some degree of success.

1254

Budget, technology

72 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1255

Declining deer and elk herds. Improving the habitat we have to support more deer and elk. Reversal of current
predator management practices.

1256

Declining Mule deer populations, increasing predators and no real plans to help. Current mule deer initiatives not
working

1257

additional fish hatcherys are needed.

1258

Change your mission to include HUNTING! !!!!! Not just to protect wildlife for "use and enjoyment". A critial issue
is not caving to the tofu eating, patchouli smelling, tree spikers !!! Another critical issue is $$$$$ Remember
where you get it !!!!

1259

Budget and business management issues related to the decline of herd populations in Oregon and the declining
hunters as a result. Increase the game, increse the opportunities and the hunters will return. Engaging youth in
hunting and fishing. Working in an era of acticvist environmental groups who are binding the department with
lawsuits.

1260

Oppose further development of wilderness and road closures on national and state lands. Further closures are
not needed and discriminate against war disabled, all disabled and aging Oregonians. You are doing a good job
of managing wildlife in Oregon. There is no need for further restrictions.

1261

1. replace the restrictions ( dogs and bait ) on harvesting of bears and cougars. eventually a cougar or bear will
kill an innocent human and PITA doesn't care about that. 2. Base decisions on a scientific basis and not political
pressure. 3. Be able to stand up to a sometimes adversarial legislature.l

1262

Diversification of revenue streams to support ODFW mission.

1263

Getting rid of the invasive wolves, creating new trophy tags, low numbers of tags but enough to spread the very
high point creep

1264

I feel like increasing predator populations with decreasing deer & elk populations is a matter of concern. As I
understand the ban on hound hunting was installed in 1994 by voters. This decision really shouldn't be made by
masses of uneducated people all with different opinions but should be made by Biologists who have a much better
idea on how many bears & cougars Oregon needs to be in better balance with nature. Logging Public Land
is also a very controversial issue. I know lots of people are opposed to it, but I believe it is needed to help sustain
robust deer & elk populations. Studies have shown a much greater increase of food with managed forests over
unmanaged forests. Ability to maintain general seasons with increasing hunter pressure and harvest all while
maintaining populations and bull/buck to cow/doe ratios I believe is an issue. There are many more challenges
ahead but these are the ones my simple brain worries about most.

73 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1265

1. The Wolf Management Plan - I do not feel this is a sustainable plan for OR-7 and his newly established pack in
Western Oregon. There are NOT enough deer and elk numbers in his current range to sustain the # of allowable
packs and wolves in the plan AND still allow hunting by humans in the area. It is ludicrous that 1 species has
been protected and studied so much at the detriment of our other species. Our herds have been lowering steadily
for years, from the shut down of habitat enhancement from logging, high predator numbers (cougar and bear)
due to regulation changes from banned hunting with hounds, and again a steady decline in fawn and calf
recruitment each year. With the addition to the wolf I feel our current predator #'s are going to tip this to a
breaking point...less and less hunting opportunities AND/ OR quality of hunting opportunities. Once Oregon's wolf
plan is met (which I think is an enormous amount of wolves) it will be too late to regain the number and quality of
ungulates. As history has shown in other states even after the magic number of wolves has been reached, the
special interest groups and environmentalists will do everything in their power to delay/ban the hunting of wolves.
This will further hinder and lower our deer and elk populations. Our hunting dollars for tags, and licenses will
continue to drop because of fewer and fewer opportunities...which affects ODFW's budget! I hope the new
director will be prepared to deal with this mess and hopefully reign in and change this plan!!! 2. Overpopulation of
Cougars - More and more cougars are getting pushed out of their ranges and into more populated areas due to
high densities in wild-lands. There have been MULTIPLE human encounters over the past year in highly
populated areas. I hope the director will take serious measures to address this issue. Without the use of hounds,
hunting cougars is pretty much an impossibility. Those that do get cougars typically do so by accident or tireless
scouting and hours searching (which many hunters do not have time to put in) for these high illusive cats. If it
wasn't so sad it would be comical about ODFW's reports about populations around the state that actually are
improving due to ODFW's efforts (which often involves the use of a houndsmen) to reduce cougar numbers. In
areas where such measures are not taken, the elk and deer recruitment remains in a downward spiral!
Outdoorsmen would GLADLY pay for the opportunity to hunt cougars with such measures but instead our tag
fees are used to pay someone else to do this for us...this is nonsense! I would hope the new director would be
onboard to push to re-instate hound hunting in Oregon, even if it's in a county by county basis. Just because the
Willamete Valley has the # of voters, many of them do not deal with consequences of their votes. 3. The Decline
of Hunting in Oregon - This is a major issue for the ODFW agency...as hunter numbers decline, funds drop due to
loss in license and tag fees. This means a smaller budget for ODFW. I hope that ODFW continues to establish
opportunities for youth to get involved in the outdoors. I have been impressed with the mentored youth
program...things like this program should be sought out and established. I do feel that if the hunting opportunities
(by choosing policies to INCREASE game herds rather than limit them) increase then the # of hunters will rise
with them. This can also attract out of state hunters to our state which brings in a higher revenue stream to
ODFW...a win-win! If populations continue to drop and tag #'s continue to be reduced even those that have been
hunting will slowly decline OR it will put more hunters in limited spaces which reduces the quality of the hunt. This
can and has made hunters I know look to other states to hunt. I also hope that ODFW will not put the burden of a
lowering budget upon those that do hunt by continuing to raise tag and license fees. I fear this could deter more
people from hunting legally because they cannot afford it. This is a VERY tough issue and I know the new
director will be faced with these challenges. Bottom line...if the director will adhere to the MISSION of the agency
buy increasing habitat and the numbers of deer and elk herds in Oregon, the budget and number of hunters in
our state will take care of itself.

1266

Wolves are responsible for predation and wildlife loss. Conduct a study to either support or refute this position
and then make plans based on that data. Declining deer and elk populations need to be studied and appropriate
plans put in place. Be very open and transparent in everything the department does to the public.

1267

Declining numbers of hunters and fishers. Increased predation, lack of predator control. Increased pressure to
have f&w policy made by people without the scientific education to make those decisions.

1268

Public access to land and opportunity, Rising costs, poaching, wolves, public perception,

1269

Find a stable funding source. As the number of license and tag sales dwindle, you can't keep raising prices to
cover the costs...

1270

Cougar and bear over population now, wolf likely an issue in the future. Deer/ Elk predation. Appears to be an
issue with salmon/ steelhead(sea lions?)

1271

Re-introducing wolves was a bad idea, we are beginning to see deer and elk populations start to decrease.
Before our resources are so depleted we are not able to enjoy them.

1272

The individual selected must have a strong understanding of the challenges of global climate change and the
impacts it will have on managing natural resources under his/her guidance.

1273

Expanding predator populations.

1274

"Managing" predators...cougar and wolves respectively.

74 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1275

Increased predation, poaching, loss of revenue due to fewer hunters because of declining big game herds. Also
paying professional hunters(hounds men) to target problem predation areas instead of re instituting methods to
allow regular hunters to do the same thing while paying for tags which would be a huge financial savings for the
department.

1276

Quit allowing these private hunting ranches to fly helicopters to herd the deer and elk on their private lands. I have
witnessed this first hand in hepner and the ranch i am talking about is battle creek out fitters.

1277

Fewer hunting and fishing licenses being sold, due to decreased public involvement due to BS policies forced on
OLDER hunters who are unable or have limited capabilities to hike uphill and long distances to go hunting.
Inability to draw a tag, or scout hunting areas out and get a tag for that area. Decreased public access for fishing
such as moving Wilson River smolts over to the Trask River...which in effect moved fishing from a public river to
one that is all Dairy Farms thus off-limits to anyone without a drift boat. The older sportsman are NOT passing
these values down to their children. Good luck with the future...I will never waste my time hunting in this state
ever again.

1278

Please see above.

1279

Encourage Youth to participate

1280

Managing resource for the benefit of the majority of stakeholders in Oregon particularly the sporting community
while ensuring small self interest groups with deep pockets do not dictate policy through the courts.

1281

Predator management is the highest priority and with the growing population of wolves after seeing the decline in
human hunting opportunities after dogs were no longer allowed to hunt cougars.

1282

Issues with elk on private land Westside such as the Weyerhaeuser lockout. Mule deer and blacktail still in
decline.

1283

Declining license sales. Increased litigation Wolves

1284

The declining elk and deer population and increasing predator(cougars) population. Getting old and new hunters
to start hunting and fishing again and enjoying the outdoors so prices won't continue getting higher

1285

Wolves I think will be the number 1 issue with cats and bears being a close second. We need to balance predator
prey relations as well as help livestock owners do what they need to do to keep their lively hood growing!

1286

Keeping the budget robust to fund enforcement and yet keep fees low enough to keep the public buying licenses.
Move forward with the public paying for non-game wildlife issues. Seek out funding from other sources for the
budget.

1287

Politics v. science. Financing. Reversing the downward trend in the number of anglers, hunters and other
supportive users.

1288

Wolves and Cougars. Predator management. Realize what they are truly doing. Control draw on all hunts. Rotate
units to 3 point or better. New wolf hunt to bring in revenue and Eliminate a huge problem with our sustainable
resources. This isn't 200 years ago.

1289

Decline in tag sales, Oregons hunting is going down hill, We need to manage for quality hunting, even if it means
fewer tags to adjust for lower animal numbers. Cut back on Landowner tags, They are just being sold Anyway!

1290

Due to ODFW's inability to address predator management they will continue to face a decline in Hunter
participation at a time when it is on the rise nationally. The new director must be willing to follow the leadership of
states with thriving big game populations in order to turn around the status quo.

1291

A realistic way to control predators

1292

Getting laws to pass so they can manage how they see fit.

1293

Pollution, loss of habitat, dwindling animal and fish populations, public education, and overall resource acquiring
and administration

1294

Transitioning to less extractive use and adapting the budget to such public expectations.

1295

Too much to do with not enough money, and too much reliance on user fees. The new Director will also need to
refocus energy on the conservation mission of the agency.

1296

herd management! our mule deer herds are struggling, i have 2 words predator control. we need to be able to
hunt mountain lions with dogs.

75 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1297

Stopping the reduction of successful angling opportunities by adding hatcheries, more harvestable fish and
making Oregon a destination for angling.

1298

Conservation. Especially fish wise. Native species conservation and enhancement vs hatchery fish has been a
very very strong and prolonged debate for so long it seems there will be no end. The director needs to address
issues like this and do their best to solve them in a manner that reflects the mission statement of ODFW. Rather
than doing what will make the department more money in the short run, they need to work hard and use
resources to find a solution that will enhance the resource, and maintain the budget. Rather than having a biased
decision based on what will make more money. Oregon's fish & wildlife are in grave danger, and there needs to
be someone that breaks the cycle, and knows when to say STOP and take action. This is a huge issue to take on.
The new director will have to dig deep and find a way to fix this issue on a shrinking budget and a large deficit
with many angry sportsman groups keeping the director on their heels.

1299

The proposed ban on lead projectiles. The need to stop protecting wolves. Seeking more help from conservation
organizations for habitat improvement. Keeping price checks on fees.

1300

1. lack of youth interest. 2. rising cost. 3. imbalance of resources between fish and wildlife. 4. dwindling herd
sizes. 5. reduction of salmon and steelhead runs ODFW expenses staying static while revenue falls, because of
the previous five points. Will need to either generate additional revenue in a manner that embraces the sportsman
or reduce expenses. However, increasing tag and licence cost will only separate the ODFW and public even
further.

1301

1). Lions, bears vs. Elk and Deer numbers, right now we are loosing hunter numbers 60,000 in the last 15 years.
This is directly tied to elk and deer population numbers. With the loose of dogs for lions, has left us with no tools
for management on predators. This was all lost with Messure 18 in 1994. 2). Wolves, six wolves brought Idaho
elk herd to its knees. ###########said that Oregon wolves have no effect on elk populations. We need a
Director that would not allow bio's like #### that who is ignoring science based biology and has traded it for social
based propaganda. Wolves is the beginning of the end of elk and deer in Oregon. 3). Need some first time hunter
programs, we have a ton of people interested in hunting. Need a more user friendly game populations, so that
success is a part of the hunt.

1302

The decline in deer numbers in most of oregon is what I see as the states biggest problem. I only see about 20%
of the deer i saw 20 years ago. I do not believe the state has accurate numbers , I know I spend as much time in
the field as any of your employees. a drastic change needs to be made in how the big game is managed here. it
is at best sub par . we have the most beautiful state in the country and we lag far behind in our quality hunting
opportunities, I fail to see why, if not mismanagement ? then what?

1303

Reviving interest in fish & wildlife among younger generations -- not only current children but millenials (who will
have children) and even gen-Xers. Get beyond the hook & bullet. Really reach women (rebrand and expand
"BoW"). Tap into some way to generate revenue from seniors (like my dad) who don't pay for fishing licenses
anymore -- maybe through classes or workshops for retirees (like "BoW" but for people who suddenly have a lot
of time on their hands and want to learn something new).

1304

Managing revenue streams in declining fish and hunt participation Build organizational strength that is innovative
and sustainable, considers new ways of structuring ODFW to meet changing business or opportunities

1305

1. Recruitment 2. Predator Control 3. Poaching

1306

Diversification and expansion of funding sources to support agency activities not related to hunting or fishing. The
agency mission is broad and public expectations for services are beyond what is being financially supported by
hunters and anglers. Retention of experienced agency employees and recruitment of "the best and brightest" for
the succession of this agency. The agency is losing key employees at both the leadership and field levels due to
extremely high workload and compensation lagging behind other governmental (local and federal) and private
sectors. The problem is most acute in the Willamette Valley. The strength of the agency has always been in the
quality of it's employees but the recent trend has been an inability to retain many of the best. This needs to be
addressed ASAP.

1307

The Director will need to address the basin plans with an eye towards the non-point source factors which
deteriorate habitat including forest practices and urban run-off from roadways and lawns. The Director will need
to manage potentially large and politically powerful interest groups which base their positions on emotion and
conflicting objectives.

1308

Expansion or at least preservation of the publics opportunities to harvest game while protecting the health and
vitality of game populations.

76 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1309

Ensuring that hunters and angler fees go to managing the resource to provide them with opportunity and a
valuable experience and not all the competing agency demands. With license sales decreasing and other
budgets decreasing this will be a continued challenge. Our focus must be on management the will recruit and
retain anglers and hunters.

1310

Our over deer and elk populations vs predator populations are a huge concern.

1311

Declining budgets. I feel that Oregon manages game and fish for money rather than game/fish itself. i hope the
new director can change that.

1312

Declining revenue from license sales requiring new funding sources. How to interface with the general public
more on fish and wildlife management issues. Protecting habitat for fish and wildlife as climate change advances.

1313

youth and women recruitment manage by science not by emotion...why have wildlife degrees if you cannot apply
the science to managing the resources Predator control..goes back to second point...someone needs to fight for
the right to "manage" in a way that leaves Oregon better than "we" got it

1314

Predator numbers are outrageous.

1315

Balancing a sustainable budget. Increasing revenue from sportsmen by improving the draw to hunt and fish in
Oregon. Currently non-residents tend to not be interested in applying for big game tags due to quality of trophy
potential and low % of tags. Increasing non-resident applications such as other western states should bring in
more money. The new director needs to run the state's fish and game - not the Governor.

1316

In order to recruit and retain hunters and anglers we need to focus on rebuilding game populations and add (or at
least maintain) any fisheries that are biologically feasible. To continue on the course of reducing opportunity to
appease a small percentage of extremists would eventually be the demise of the agency as it stands today.

1317

Paring back workforce to meet budget constraints and then to work within or below the budget.

1318

PROTECTING AND RESTORING HABITAT FOR NATIVE WILDLIFE! (This is so important it deserves to be on
it's own - anything else is a futile effort without it) 1) Direct some funding away from hatcheries and towards
habitat restoration. Reducing hatchery programs on rivers with healthy wild runs of salmon and steelhead, with
the long term goal of sustainable, wild salmon and steelhead harvest in as many rivers as possible. Focus
hatchery fish in rivers with limited potential for self-sustaining wild fish returns. 2) Access rights to water (rivers
specifically - I understand this is a legal issue, but the Director of ODFW should come down firmly on the side of
expanding public access) 3) I have heard some chatter about ODFW changing hunting regulations in ways that
would further restrict archery opportunities for big game (namely Elk and Deer). Mainly because powerful progun hunting groups are advocating for it under the guise that archery hunters somehow have an unfair advantage
due to the earlier and longer season. This should be opposed at all costs! Hunting regulations should be
managed for healthy wildlife populations first and foremost, the second priority should be expanding, not
restricting, opportunities for all types of hunters. If opportunities must be reduced in response to game animal
population structure, then all types of hunts should be impacted equally. Success rates for given seasons and
hunting methods should be considered in these decisions.

1319

Money and politics the very two things that shouldnt be involved

1320

The ability to access land. The low wildlife count.

1321

Instead of managing Oregon for predators, Oregon needs to be managed for opportunity.

1322

Rehabilitate depleted fish populations.

1323

Cougar & wolf population effecting our deer & elk population thus lessening hunting license and tag income and
entering a vicious circle of raising tag prices and loosing hunters. Through politics out and manage cougar.
Watch our neighboring states who are ahead of us in regards to wolf population and prepare us for what you are
seeing there, THROUGH THE PRESSURE OF POLITICS OUT THE WINDOW AND MANAGE.

1324

THERE COULD BE PEOPLE FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD COMING HERE TO CATCH FISH IF WE DIDN'T
HAVE COMERCIAL FISHING IN THE HEART OF SALMON SEASON .

1325

Continued reduction in state tax support for fish and wildlife related work and the commensurate reduction in
workforce and programs.

1326

The biggest challenge will be to change the direction of focus of the past 20 years (conflict between hatchery and
wild fish). There are no more wild fish, they are all products of many years of interbreeding. We will need to move
forward and fast if we hope to maintain the financial resources to maintain or restore a fishery habitat. Enough
with the bickering and decade long studies of little value.

77 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1327

Timber companies charging to have access to the land that animals go to for food. Most USFS and blm land is so
grown up that the animals go to the private land for freedom of movement and food. If people cannot afford to
purchase passes for these lands they will cease to continue hunting therefore decreasing revenue for ODFW.

1328

Commercial fishing in the Columbia river needs reform.

1329

Integarting local, County, State, and Federal programs that results in as near seemless strategy to the public.

1330

Increasing demands from the agency at a time of decreasing budgets. Maintaining a balance between the needs
of commercial, sport, and tribal fisheries in spite of outside pressures. Providing commercial fishing opportunity to
preserve our coastal communities. Encouraging the younger generation to actively participate in fishing and
wildlife activities.

1331

Removal of gill nets and enhancing hatcheries.

1332

License fees (Too High) Access Wolves

1333

Wolves!! Cougar!! Bears!! We have seen many more wolves than have been acknowledged and in places they
aren't supposed to be. Lack of game population in units that typically have thrived, yet now suffer from predators,
poaching, and the over abundant number cow/doe/spike hunts. You don't kill off your breading and youth stock
when trying to manage your animals..... Try going for quality hunts to get people to spend money not just sell
tags!

1334

Stabilizing the budget for the agency and securing funds that are not tied to license dollars would go a long way
towards preserving the state's natural resources for generations. Our actions need to be more scientifically
based, and less focused on raising revenue from hunting and fishing opportunities. We create those experiences
at the expense of the state's natural resources.

1335

We must resolve the issues associated with hatchery management. We need hatchery fish and lots of them that
do not cause problems real or imagined with wild fish. ODF&W needs to find ways to encourage more people to
buy fishing and hunting licenses, raising prices will only drive more people away. Regulations need to be
simplified, so that common people can understand them.

1336

I believe one of the most critical issues is animal welfare and I mean that of all the "native" animals. The nonnative wolves are bringing in diseases that the animals have never been exposed to and they are getting these
diseases, they are sick and passing them on to the next generation and eventually to humans. Chronic wasting
disease is another serious problem. The number of Salmon and Steelhead running the rivers. Over hunting in
area's has decreased the number of wildlife in many areas as well. I see it living near the Ochoco's there are
many times I will go to the woods and might only see a doe or two.

1337

Wolf issues, maintaining game populations, and enhancement of salmon runs.

1338

increasing deer and elk herds. more big game means more tags issued which means more revenue. gillnetters
off main stem cr.

1339

To run ODFW as an independent entity and not at the discretion of the Commission. Dissolve the commission.

1340

Hatchery vs native fish Out of control populations of bears, lions and wolves License and tag fee increases

1341

dwindling fawn and calf elk population and proper predator control.

1342

Declining interest. Less fish/animals to harvest. Over harvest. Over harvest by non Oregonians. Lack of access
and over crowding.

1343

The number one issue with wildlife would be predator management. Their population is out of control. With the
fish side of the coin the gillnets are killing too many esa listed fish while we have to relase then and in some
cases they die. Making it worse is using barbless hooks that cause a prolonged fight to make sure they don't
make netting them impossible

1344

Decline in interest among youth for hunting/fishing. Decline in interest of adults who are tired of paying for a
license when there's less and less to harvest...

1345

keeping the balance of our freedoms from erosion from special interest groups and their continued attacks.

1346

Increasing wolf population along with the lawsuits it will bring. Major predator problem that has caused a
downward trend of big game population in this state. Retaining hunter will be a huge challenge. Budgeting and
keeping odfw running efficiently.

78 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1347

Resolving disputes between people and animals in Oregon, must importantly making sure there is enough
habitat and natural resources for wildlife to thrive in Oregon. The director will have to find a way to get the
financial resources to do so.

1348

Banning gill nets. Re - building our big game herds Opening (re-opening) more public hunting areas

1349

overcoming bias for hatchery model and promoting wild stocks for each river

1350

Hunter recruitment Below objective animal populations Above objective predator populations WOLVES.

1351

Restoring public and employee confidence and trust in the agency. Facing off with the legislature for increased
funding, especially for law enforcement.. Fighting back against the anti-hatchery populist movement. Ignoring the
commissin and placing confidence in the biologists. Lobbying the legislature for disbanding of the commission
(politicians by another name) and replacing them with a biology-qualified professional.

1352

Creating higher quality outdoor experiences through better management practices and much better
communication of these decisions and the reasoning behind them. Creating transparency within the dept and the
decisions being made to help the public understand why you make the choices you do. 1. Special interest groups
looking to exploit a resource for financial gain. 2. Putting the correct people in the right positions. 3. not allowing
odfw employees to take advantage of their positions for personal gain.

1353

the use of hatcherys and how to use them the most efficiently. also to rebuild the game herds state wide.
predator control, w/o raiseing fee's

1354

The evolving retirement wave as boomers exit the workforce and desire to stay involved.

1355

Bring back sound predator management. Bring back dogs for bear and cougar hunting! Stop bending over to the
anti hunters.

1356

1. More hatcheries and keeping the "wild fish" advocates from dictating the future of fishing in Oregon 2.
Resolution of the gill net issue on the Columbia River to include rescinding the "barbless" rule. 3. Allowing for
higher angling limits in good years like 2014.

1357

Finding a way to get things done with out bowing to politcal correctness. Our game populations have dwindled
over the last two decades and we want a reverse in the course that we're on.

1358

1. Decrease predator populations and increase ungulate populations. 2. Decrease predator populations by
working with hunters to reverse standards created by Urban Oregon that instill false beliefs of wildlife
management to rural Oregon. 3. Decrease Predator populations. 4. Work with private timber companies and
public lands administrators to improve wildlife habitat to start increasing ungulate populations. 5. Decrease
predator populations MASSIVELY!

1359

Budget issues and/or shortfalls. Understanding how climate change will affect/is affecting Oregon's fish and
wildlife. Bringing new ideas into fish and game management.

1360

Over population of predators unless changes are made, salmon population declining further unless changes are
made, and further declining deer and elk populations due to over population of predator as well as habitat loss for
all due to people building more and more homes and businesses.

1361

Currently we manage for opportunity. We see less and less opportunity every year. I dont have faith my kids will
have opportunities to hunt unless we change the way we are doing things. Fix it!

1362

Lack of quality oppurtunity to harvest game

1363

Work on making the time on the water and in the field easier for all of us. Take a close look at the restrictions
towards hunters both rifle and archery. Try to get it back to where we used to be with traditional values and
opportunity. #########

1364

predator management fish & wildlife, recruitment of new hunters, cost of licences and tags with declining
opportunities. I have decided that this is going to be a tough job. I have also decided that I will hunt out of state
because of poor management and rising costs. I have hunted this state since I was 12 yrs old and have seen the
our deer herds decimated by people who don't understand science! ( voters ) I wish them the best of luck. I doubt
they will be able change much because of politics involved. I see the revenue going down despite rising costs,
because people like me are giving up on our state. Sorry but that is the TRUTH

1365

a decline in the hunting population. A decline in deer habitat due to poor management of forest resources. The
growing fight between commercial and private salmon fishermen.

79 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1366

Providing ample hunting opportunities to the public while maintaining high quality hunts. Budget issues stemming
from continued inflation of prices, and maintaining a happy and robust hunting community even as tag prices will
inevitably increase.

1367

Coming up with a plan for funding the agency other than license sales. It won't matter how good we are at
managing resources if there is no agency. Quantifying effectiveness of restoration projects and habitat
improvements. Re-structuring our EBA classification (especially in fisheries research) with different levels, or a
different name altogether to reflect diversity in education and experience and comparable wage to federal
positions. Promoting to the public the work that we are doing to improve/restore hunting and fishing opportunities
(radio, NPR, television, OPB, etc.). Maintaining or improving general public access to fishing and hunting areas
(primarily private timber access - ex. Weyerhauser) and for disabled sportsmen. Engaging youth and
encouraging outdoor activities (birding, hiking, camping, fishing, hunting).

1368

Reestablish game herds (all) in E. Ore.; enhance habitat to reestablish mule deer, elk, antelope in E. Ore. prior to
trying to recruit more hunters; modify wild horse numbers; remove most if not all cattle/sheep from public lands at
least until game herds reach management objective numbers; don't be afraid to raise lic./tag fees as necessary
(we need more money not more hunters)

1369

standardizing bag limits as much as possible while avoiding over-harvesting. A lot of confusion has been
introduced in recent years by micro-managing limits.

1370

INCREASED DEER NUMBERS IN ALL UNITS!

1371

gill net industry in columbia

1372

Predator management including wolves. Managing the cost of fees and inconveniences that are driving the public
to other pursuits. Protecting the public image of hunting and fishing as a worthwhile lifestyle and health choice.
Encourage the broader non hunting public to view fishing and hunting in terms of outdoor benefits, food choice
benefits, self sufficiency benefits and as a natural process in a natural world. The "sport" view of hunting has
severe limitations. We do not kill animals for "sport" or "fun" we kill them because we are a natural part of the
food chain and this needs to be part of the intentional public image of hunting. While "sporting" ethics and
regulations are necessary because the resource would not hold up to massive subsistence hunting the key public
image focus needs to tie hunting to our natural place in the world and more closely to food gathering and the
natural process. Hunting is much more natural than buying food at a grocery store and while hunting and
gathering cannot replace our food system it should be purposefully framed as a healthy and natural part of the
human experience.

1373

Stable funding. Columbia River. Clean house of top management and HR. Be honest and open. Start over by
being transparent and willing to face problems and fix them. CWT data system failure. Restore scientific
credibility.

1374

Getting the youth programs easier to understand and implement!

1375

Our dwindling wilderness due to construction and our changing weather patterns.

1376

Diminishing game populations due to habitat changes (particularly on the westside) and predators (primarily
cougars). Diminishing revenues from hunting license sales due to #1 above and a changing demographic.
Adequately funding the Department due to #2 above and other factors.

1377

Provide fair balance between recreational and commercial interests.

1378

Predator control and political issues surrounding it. Balancing hunter/angler opportunity and success with
maintaining or growing species populations.

1379

There has been a shift in the needs of the state, its resources, and its citizens since the inception of the Agency.
A majority of the key challenges facing ODFW over the next ten years will of course center on the
acknowledgement of and willingness to work proactively with this shift. This indeed involves the need to adopt a
new mission for the Agency. We must understand that while consumptive use of fish and wildlife resources may
have been in decline for twenty years now, people will continue to hunt and fish. As a matter of fact, we are
seeing a slight upswing in these activities, particularly as we endeavor to "get kids off the screen and out of
doors!" (you may quote me ;-) -#########) We can and will find a balance between fostering an understanding
of nature on many levels, an acknowledgement of the benefits of subsistence hunting and fishing, the continued
enjoyment of hunting and fishing, and an appreciation for the non-consumptive approaches to our fish and wildlife
resources.

1380

1. Getting enough money from the general fund to run the department without raising license charges and other
fees. 2. right sizing the department to stay within budget limits. 3. Communicating that right sized concept to the
customers. 4. Surveying the customers to find out what they want the available budget spent on.

80 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1381

1) Facilitating the spread of wolves and protecting them from the welfare ranchers. 2) Understanding the impact
of global warming on fish and wildlife in Oregon and in connected ecosystems.

1382

Working with the State of Washington in protecting the sturgeon population in the Columbia River, primarily
dealing with sea lion predation. Also, dealing with the predation of juvenile salmon by cormorants and other
"protected" predators whose populations are now out of balance with the fish populations.

1383

Changing population dynamics as the urban areas continue to expand, causing loss of habitat, encroachment of
urban areas into areas critical for healthy wildlife populations (winter range, critical nesting or rearing habitat,
etc.). As the human population grows wildlife can by impacted by people accessing areas that may have roads
closed to protect winter range or critical nesting areas. Increased urban populations also become less connected
to natural systems. As loss of hunter/fishing licensing fees occurs, there needs to be some way to benefit from
non-game activities such as bird watching, nature trails, etc. Climate change and the associated habitat changes
which will affect some wildlife species more than others. Habitat loss and change due to large areas impacted by
wildfire.

1384

An ever changing climate and population growth will continue to be a challenge over the next 10 years.

1385

I believe strongly in conserving Oregon's bio-diversity and I feel that ODFW's mission reflects a desire to achieve
that goal. However, it seems that at times hunters and fishers are marginalized in order to give the impression of
conservation using policies that may not even be the best management tools for the species in question. In this
time of shrinking license sales I feel it is important not only to increase hunting and fishing opportunity. I feel that
better effort needs to be put into the quality of those opportunities.

1386

I would like to see more active management of wildlife resources. I understand that lots of people plan their
vacations around hunting seasons and projected tag draws (if applicable), but the relatively static tag numbers
only signal to me that the Department doesn't (or can't?) manage wildlife resources with the most relevant data
available. Continuing with this example, why are there doe tags in any unit below management objectives? Why
are bull tags static if the bull/cow ratio drops below management objective? These seem like no-brainers to me,
but I'm just a lay person. The second challenge I see is the issue of public access. Securing public access in
places like Willamette Valley and Columbia Basin (I really appreciate the UCAP program!) should be paramount.
I would also like to see a consolidation of such efforts. Why do I need to go the UCAP section, the A&H section,
and so-on-and-so-forth? It would be in the best interest to consolidate all those programs to just focus on public
access.

1387

One of the key issue the new Director will face is the balance between predators and Oregon's big game
populations. With cougar population well beyond targets and wolf populations rising at a dramatic rate, this issue
is one that has been lacking attention. The other major issue the new Director must face and resolve is the
current method of funding wildlife management. Currently the bulk of the funds necessary for this management
comes from hunting license and tag sales if I'm not mistaken. This has created an increasingly downward spiral
over the last 10-20 years, as big game populations suffer, hunter numbers decrease thereby providing more and
more pressure on the remaining hunters and more pressure to sell tags that current populations can't support
(see nearly ALL current antlerless tags).

1388

Predator-livestock conflict, critical habitat protection and restoration, budget cuts, and encouraging/promoting
citizen science

1389

Predator control. Reopen dogs for cats. And baiting bear.

1390

finding funds to carry out the mission. esa issues with successful species like sea lions for better management.
find a way to engage social users in the permitting process so those who want limited use don't have to pay for
full use. manage healthy populations and environment. how do you manage the department without more
funding. retirement replacement plan.

1391

Budget, Decline of hunters/anglers through finacial constraints, regional energy demands vs fish and wildlife
conservation.

1392

Habitat preservation during population expansion

1393

Changing from a "resource extraction" mentality that allocates too many fishery resources away from recreational
users. Recreational users generate vastly more economic stimulus per fish than commercial users. Support for
removing dams whenever feasible (especially on the Columbia), and making dam operators put in fish ladders
where none currently exist.

1394

Poaching, land access, predator control, stream line the fishing and hunting regulations, put them in lamens term.
Develop more and advocate more voluntary programs.

1395

Na

81 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1396

Balancing commercial fisheries with sport fisheries. Recognizing the very significant economic benefit of sport
fisheries. Balance between returning and increasing species such as wolves and cougars and the negative
impact that they have on deer and elk populations and therefore the opportunities for hunters.

1397

Predator control!!!!!!!

1398

1. Recovery of Mule deer populations in central and eastern Oregon. 2. Effective management of apex predators
(wolves, cougars, bears) in balance with human needs and prey species populations in the face of ever-greater
emotional opposition from predator support and anti-hunting groups. 3. Ability to fund ODFW operations as fewer
people "invest" in hunting or fishing licenses, tags, etc., as sporting opportunities or quality in Oregon become
more and more restricted. 4. Balancing sustainable harvest (fish or game) limits against the desire for opportunity.
5, Coordinating with and/or meeting demands of federal agencies involved in fish and wildlife management and
federal lands management.

1399

Protecting habitat so that we are able to sustain and hopefully grow our fish and wildlife resources. Our world has
changed dramatically over the past 50 years. Perhaps we should take a hard look at making sure "traditional"
concepts are not outdated in today's world. Perhaps some non-traditional ideas should be considered.

1400

I believe that some of the major issues facing the agency over the next 10 years includes dwindling hunter and
angler recruitment, budget issues, and declining public trust and support.

1401

Keeping Federal Government and special interest groups out of state and local issues, ie wolves, cougars, bull
trout just to name a few. Be sure that scientific facts are the basis for department decisions.

1402

budget (revenue stream) wolf delisting commercial fishing re-tooling reductions in OSP enforcement officers sage
grouse listing hunting/lead ammunition issues in south-central/southwest Oregon related to condor reintroduction
by the Yurok tribe poaching on both wildlife and fish sides of the house

1403

Stated above. And the gill nets are another problem. Why should the sports fisherman be the last priority.

1404

#1. Protecting habitat. #2. Developing programs that allow 'families and friends' to recreate together. Without this,
sales of licenses and tags will fall, and the budget will suffer. #3. Eliminate many of the 'special' or 'extended' big
game seasons, and LOP tags.

1405

Pressure of hatchery versus native fish populations.

1406

Funding fish and wildlife programs. Recruiting and retaining hunters and anglers. Maintaining public access to
fish and wildlife recreational opportunity. Maintaining fish and wildlife habitat quantity and quality in light of
expanding urban, energy, and economic development.

1407

Reestablsih credibility as a CONSERVATION agency.

1408

in no particular order: **species changes resulting from climate and ocean change **funding (i.e., new or nontraditional sources) **outreach and public relations **data management and intra-agency coordination systems
**inter-agency coordination

1409

Need to work with numerous conservation groups to set aside lands for public use. Improve habitat for species,
especially those facing those facing decreasing population. Improve the image of the Department.

1410

Urban sprawl (habitat conservation) White nose-syndrome, loss of bat species which will increase agricultural
pests. Education and public outreach

1411

Protect current populations of species to ensure growth and or recovery for future generations. Remove gill
netting on the Columbia river.

1412

Hunter access to hunting areas is becoming harder and harder for those with limited incomes now. I believe
keeping hunter/angler interest and recruiting new fishing and hunting individuals will continue to be an issue.
Predator issues will continue to be a strong voice from our public as well.

1413

Access for hunting and fishing, habitat protection for fish and wildlife species, reduced budgets, and increasing
population.

1414

Wolves in Oregon

1415

The agency and new director need to address longstanding issues such as habitat destruction with management
plans that seek to promote conservation rather than be an ephemeral quick fix.

1416

Logging, fracking, mining, special interests

82 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1417

Gill nets in mainstem CR Improving hatchery practices to minimize impacts to wild runs, while providing
expanding consumptive opportunities for sports, commercials and tribes Grow participation of sports anglers,
especially younger generations

1418

The population will continue to grow and that will put great strain on the state's fish and wildlife and their habitats.
Funding will continue to be a challenge as well.

1419

Theybwill be challenged with making the decision to either act now when predation is high or sit on their hands
and watch our elk and deer herds deteriorate due to a lack of control of wolves, cougars, coyotes, ect. Its a
problem that will only get worse if we don't do something about it and in the long run, you will lose money
because no one will want to buy tags when there's nothing to hunt. Good luck!

1420

Wolves

1421

Gill net lobby. Competing water interests. Extending the riparian & no log zone around our rivers and streams.

1422

Managing for the long term benefits of ecosystems when challenged with short term considerations often
promoted through political and corporate agenda. Uncertainties of impacts of Climate change.

1423

Public land use, and predator control

1424

Preserving land access and opportunities for future generations to fish and hunt.

1425

Continued fish and game management and realistic and fair predator control.

1426

Over population of wolves that we are not allowed to hunt the predators need to be managed too, not just
protected by an agency that is all warm fuzzy about them. They will decimate our populations of elk, deer,
moose, big horn.

1427

(1) eliminating lower Columbia gillnetting from the mainstem river (2) balancing the budget to include contribution
from non hunter/anglers and state general fund (3) controlling the influence of anti-hatchery wild fish advocates

1428

Get up to date on new equipment and techniques, like above!

1429

Adequate financing to meet Dept. needs. A commitment to support hatchery programs to keep fishing
opportunities available to the public.

1430

Simplify all regulations and state areas. The hunting and fishing public should getr the highest priority
consideration. Base all management techniques on good science. Stay out of politics

1431

Balancing commercial and sport fishing interests. Banning gill nets.

1432

Columbia River Gillnet Fishery, Predatory animal control, commercial and recreational angler relations.

1433

mule deer recovery in Eastern Oregon #1 this means cutting tag numbers or even cancelling seasons. It is about
the deer not about the money. Cougar management- this needs to be a focus as cougars are a huge problem.
Wolf management- they are here but need to be eliminated. nothing good will come from having wolves in
Oregon. The director needs to have fortitude to do the right thing on this issue in the face of anti hunter pressure.
use common sense on equipment regulations particularly in the bow hunting sector.

1434

Toxic sprays on managed forests Decline in commercial fish stock - conflict between California and Oregon fish
quotas Return of wolves and conflicts between them and livestock ranchers Fire danger Preserving rivers and
streams that serve as spawning grounds

1435

Rising costs of licenses and tags together with a declining number of people fishing and hunting. People are
becoming out of touch with where food comes from, which makes people less interested in conservation.
Balancing rural and urban values.

1436

Hunter access vs Private timber companies!

1437

Budget, employee morale, and job training.

1438

Emphasizing science in the conservation of fish and wildlife and their habitats to move beyond the 'duck, deer,
and fish' emphasis many view as the Dept's current emphasis. Responding to climate change and associated
human social/cultural changes that will influence the habitats of fish and wildlife resources.

1439

Not prepared to address this.

1440

Remove gill nets from all rivers in the main rivers and tributaries. Strengthen salmon/steelhead hatchery runs.
Listen and lead for the Oregon sports fisherman.

83 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1441

1. The increase in predator population needs to be addressed. 2. More research needs to go into the impact of
herbicides and other chemicals have on big game, fisheries, and other wildlife. This includes chemicals used on
timber lands, agricultural lands, and roadways. 3. Addressing "choose your weapon" for archery deer hunters and
limiting more/all archery deer hunts to draw only. 4. Adding additional methods for predator population control by
sport hunters, like night hunting with artificial light on public land (with rimfire or shotgun only, like other states,
and--possibly--during restricted seasons). 5. Offering a bounty on coyotes in all counties. 6. Offering incentives
for hunters to pursue cougars, black bears, bobcats, coyotes, and other predators. 7. Offering more adult hunter
education opportunities for new adult hunters, and big game hunting seminars or education courses offered by
species.

1442

Wolves Mtn lions Bears Habitat loss Poaching

1443

Wolves, mt lions, Bears. need to be better controlled, We need to make some decisions about units. Example:
heppner unit. 3200 tags for deer. the population is down , half the unit burned. tags should be about 400. But
every year they still issue 3000 plus. there are other units like this. I believe the tags issued are to appease the
masses of hunters and are not in the best interest of the unit as a whole. We need to stop the spread of
Canadian wolves that were never native to Oregon.

1444

Growing Big Game Populations. Reinvesting in the Upland Game Bird Raising and planting in suitable Habitat.

1445

Hatchery vs wild fish, wolves and the impact that they will have on big game populations, and other predator
control (bear and cougar).

1446

Sustaining a budget that will accomplish the mission and needs of ODFW and those that hunt and fish.

1447

Balancing the needs of both fish and wildlife resources with increasing demand for extraction. Also, of course,
facing the budget issues.

1448

Oregon big game herds and critical challenges facing them. Predators, habitat, and poaching.

1449

All we ever hear is deer and elk are at the current management objective. After residing in this state for over 50
years. I have witnessed a continual decline of deer elk and antelope .

1450

Balance the needs of sportsmen (the current base of funds) with the needs of non-consumptive users (a
potentially large base of funding). Conservation must extend beyond adequate management of game species
and move toward a more holistic approach of species conservation. Engage with the USFWS on potential
species reintroductions (e.g., condors) and modify policy (if needed) to accomplish the overall goals. Education of
hunters & fishermen on topics such as lead exposure to wildlife will be critical to building effective policy in the
future.

1451

Predator control has to be a top priority, specifically cougars as a first step. Secondly wolves, by delisting in 2015
and putting a season or control program in place before Oregon suffers an "Idaho like" loss of ungulates, hunters,
and the resulting loss of hunters dollars. The other disgustingly out of control problem is poaching, arrests of
poachers and in to many instances soft penalties and fines.

1452

With the decline of those that hunt and fish, I think it is key to gain and surpass the necessary level needed for
people to carry on a tradition that we as an Agency seem to be okay with the current downward trend. I think that
if we believe that what we do is important, and have a passion for protecting fish and wildlife and their habitats,
then we should start embracing it. It should be okay to give field staff some level of decision making, and have
input when dealing with community level concerns or issues. I realize that politics are a reality for success, and
finding an avenue that allows science to support the political support needed for ensuring that we continue to
meet our mission, and do it with pride and confidence. Invasive species have the potential to do damage that
warrants continued support for R & D. Manage to gain a solid seat at the table of Fish and Wildlife related policy
making or issues that are made in Oregon when dealing with Federal, State, and Tribal entities. Create the
environment needed to allow ODFW to have a voice that is solid and confident, and creates a public image with
the perception of making sound decisions, using science and experience to reinforce policy and direction set by
our trusted leadership that is inclusive of all Agency staff.

1453

I believe a key challenge the Director is going to have to deal with is how best to manage the incoming wolf
population. In my opinion, how that particular animal is managed will reflect on how the public will trust ODFW
with other important management issues.

1454

Will have to convince the state that issues regarding wildlife management and conservation are not and should
not be based on emotion.

1455

A even bigger decline in license and tag sales due to the ever increasing tag prices a lot of lower class people
cannot afford these costs and this will continue to cause people that cannot afford these costs to quit all together
or do things illegally

84 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1456

Budget constraints Education of the general public Resistance to management changes (eg. tag fees, lead shot)

1457

Ensuring that ODFW has highly trained staff and adequate budget to critical resource management issues.
Declining hunter and fisher participation Fostering support from emerging non-consumptive users Balancing
energy development and impacts to fish and wildlife Wolves Columbia River Salmon Recovery Fishery Reform
Sturgeon

1458

There are a few issues. Predator management seems to be a big topic on the online forums along with out in the
field. I think that fish and wildlife should re-evaluate the various ways to hunt cougars and bears. While I have
never hunted by the means of bait of by hounds, I do see the advantage of being able to harvest a mature animal
along with being able to make a better decision on the sex of the animal. The way it is set up now most people
see a bear or cougar in the field and just shoot it. It's impossible to tell if they have cubs or kittens unless they
are in plain sight. Rules on elk and deer hunting have changed over the last few years in certain areas due to a
decline. Hunters took a lot of the blame for shooting cows or does. The new director should form a committee to
look into a few different options. First being to eliminate late season cow hunts that take place when the cow is
could be pregnant. Second would be to adopt a three point or better rule. I feel this is one of the biggest problems
with the decline in bulls and bucks. Too many people go out and take multiple spikes out of one herd or shoot a
fork buck that is not wise enough to realize he should run.

1459

Improving the population of blacktail deer in Oregon. Too many doe tags has severely hurt the population.

1460

Finding alternative sources of revenue (non-license) to meet the organization's expenses. Ensure that the
organization is addressing and communicating about climate change impacts on fish/wildlife habitat.

1461

Declining funding, and increased pressure by the public on destroying habitat (housing, roads, strip malls, etc.).

1462

Funding, ESA listings Reduction in hunters and fishers Continued declines in habitat quality and quantity
Increased Tribal demands for hunting and fishing rights Climate change Reduction in quality of employees due to
lack of competitive salaries and benefits Water demands

1463

Wolf Management Issues / Delisting Providing the same level or more services for less cost

1464

Keeping angling and hunting a viable and affordable pastime that Oregonians and Out of State people WANT to
participate in.

1465

Being paid off by political pinheads to meet the needs of animal rights activist instead of our wildlife their
resources.

1466

Lack of funding - Outdoors enthusiast pay for all the functions but yet get shafted by the caving in to the anti
outdoors group. Hunters are getting fed up and funding will be a huge issue when they will not volunteer or
participate any more. If ODFW is giving OSP 28 million a year for enforcement then they need to be enforcement
only to help deal with the huge poaching problem. Predator management = Angry Hunters! Fix the problem or
there will be no future generations of hunters

1467

Protecting the best and working with private and public landowners to enhance a variety of habitat types

1468

Columbia river fishery

1469

1. Budget 2. Politics: Anti hunting, organizational pressure, regulations 3. Predators 4. Research, surveys, etc.
and making decisions on what is best for the resource! 5. Linking people back to nature, hunting, and fishing. It is
important for the director to consider new ways for the department to gain money besides raising tag sales.
Hunting and fishing is becoming a thing of the past and prices of tags are causing this to only get worse. The
director needs to consider new regulations not based on who is supporting/against them but for what is best for
the resource.

1470

RE-establish trust in the agency and truly become a resource manager that not only generates income, but
protects the fish and wildlife values of the state of Oregon.

1471

Columbia River fish management policies, conservation of wildlife, wolf predation, water.

1472

ESA Species and Candidate Species (Sage Grouse) Obtaining and maintaining a budget for habitat conservation
for all managed species (mule deer, bighorn, sage grouse, etc)

1473

Declining funding and reliance on the general fund

1474

The obvious challenge is our budget.

85 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1475

The numbers speak for themselves, in the last 30 years the state population has doubled in this state while
hunting licences have dropped almost in half. The reason is fewer animals, without even throwing wolfs in the
mix, if the cougar and bear problem is not aggressively addressed, there will be nothing to manage. Sense 1994
cougar population has increased 96%, address issues like this and stop letting the north west (Portland,Salem)
decide what is best for the remaining 3/4's of the state.The new Director will have a hard time managing a funds
that are not there because of loss in licences sales and raising the prices will not work because the amount of
game animals to hunt is not there so fix the cougar and bear problem and the rest will fix itself.

1476

Budget Keeping people interested in fishing and hunting Making sure there the resources are protected with
limited funding

1477

Do what is right by the Oregon Hunters and Fisherman. As outdoorsman, we supply a large majority of the
revenue that is supporting this flawed agency.

1478

Predators and habitat

1479

We need a leader that can focus on the key issues related to fish and wildlife management. doing this while
understanding the source of the agencies revenue and to critically important role and anglers and hunters play in
fish and wildlife management and conservation and have for nearly 100 yrs. The agency can't take fishing and
hunting dollars and use them on programs that limit opportunity for the average Oregonian.

1480

The political pressure to impose social/moral rather than biological management principals on Oregon fish and
wildlife.

1481

climate change and its affect on aquatic habitats, water quantity and quality, population growth, urbanization's
and the built environment's affect on fish and wildlife, management of hatcheries in areas that are trying to
recover wild populations of salmonids

1482

Deer and elk populations and wolves

1483

These are not new, but declining revenue, declining participation in those activities that have typically funded the
department, a public increasingly detached from fish and wildlife and as a result less of an appreciation for and
understanding of fish and wildlife, a growing human population and increased pressure on fish and wildlife and
their habitats, a highly polarized political and social environment. The department continues to attempt to
increase participation by demonstrating or encouraging consumptive use. Although this will continue to be
important, I believe there is overall a declining interest in harvest.

1484

The public has a distrust of our agency, we have pandered to environmental groups and not supported our user
base. We need a director that doesn't remain neutral on controversial issues like predators and gill nets and says
what needs to be said. If our agency offends someone, so be it, we need to stand up for science based
management and not emotion based.

1485

Being able to listen to/help groups with different interests and stakes while at the same time holding conservation
and scientific methods to the highest standards

1486

The continued atacts by organizations like the NFS on hatchery salmon and steelhead programs. Atacts from
organizations like HSUS,and PETA over Preditor management coyote,bear,cougar and WOLFS! They need to
make tough calls and cut the fat in the Salem office and get more guys and gals out in the field where they
belong. Deep cuts in administration are needed!

1487

Broaden base for financial support so not solely reliant on hunting and fishing licenses. Nongame species are
important to far more people than those who want big antlers on the wall. Balanced approach to managing
natural resources is long overdue. Protecting nonnative species should end if native species suffer. Seal
management in the Columbia River is unprofessional as it is done at present. Management of bird predators
needs a more creative response, and funding from the dredging agencies should be forthcoming to finance
solutions created by manmade islands. Predator depletion to increase deer and elk is treating wild game like
domestic livestock. Support a lead ban in ammunition and fishing weights.

1488

The agency is looking at many problems in the next 10 years. 1. Wolf policy and other predator impact on game
and cattle ranching. 2. Anti - Hunting groups. 3. Reduced revenues due to loss of license purchases, from loss of
opportunity. 4. Timber company closures and permits to hunt on a given tract of land. 5. Revamping land owner
preference. 6. Revamp disabled permit to distinguish between temporary disability and permanent disability, and
when temporary disability has been corrected. 7. Do away with antler less hunts and change these to disabled
hunts only.

1489

The new Director will face issues with climate change, hatchery fish interactions with wild fish, increased
development pressure, and the need to delist salmon and steelhead stocks that have been on the ESA list for too
long.

86 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1490

Must figure out a way to fund non-game wildlife management.

1491

Declining public participation and license sales Wolves Lead ban Global warming

1492

With a large percent of the budget coming from fishing and hunting licenses, the emphasis in regional offices and
with regional staff has been pretty heavy on fishry and game wildlife issues and resources. It seems like there
needs to be alternative sources of funding that can be used to manage and protect other non-game wildlife and
their habitats. With fishing (and hunting?) licenses on the decline, it seems like this will be a critical issue and key
challenge for the new director.

1493

Budget constraints and declining hunter fisher participants. Current system of raising costs for existing hunters,
and fishers is compounding the problem. Commercial operations need to share in the burden as well as the
private sportsman. Competition for budget dollars from non consumptive users, an example of this is ODFW
managing all cougar issues in the cities and town's, and the non hunter fisher recipeints of this service are not
contributing to the budget. Working to foster conservation in an environment where voters and special interest
groups act on emotional feel good basis instead of true conservation. Managing Oregons Fish and Game
resources in a way which creates a bountiful and sustainable harvest and creates opportunities for more
consumptive use, rather than declining use. Rework and revitalize the anti poaching system of reporting and
follow up. Reports appear to go without follow up in too many cases, yet we're being told that poachers are our
biggest consumer of fish and game.

1494

Predator control/Poachers We need better ways to control predators or we aint gonna have any Game to protect

1495

Balancing the need to sell fishing and hunting licenses with the costs of 1) conservation and recovery 2) costs of
running a large, unionized agency. Critical issues include: -generating money from non-consumptive uses -other
sources of funding i.e. more state dollars? -employee moral- the 11-1 employee to supervisor ratio is impacting
moral and work place efficiency -dwindling budgets increasing work loads

1496

Declining budget Controversy over hatcheries

1497

Wolves.

1498

Bring our herds back.Regardless of upsetting a few hunters with tag cutbacks.

1499

Overcome democrat state spending policies

1500

Budget. Need to find some way for the general public to help pay for management of the state's wildlife
resources.

1501

Columbia River fisheries, and ODFW's management role, are setup for disaster. Prioritization of the allocation of
agency funds needs a significant face-lift. The ODFW workforce is in transition at the moment--there are several
older, expensive employees that are not motivated to go above and beyond what is expected of them. The
problem is that when these employees retire, their positions are often being absorbed for budgetary reasons,
leaving the younger generation with no upward mobility. Ultimately this will lead to the agency losing many
promising young employees. Recruitment and retention of employees within the agency--as well as development
opportunities for employees--needs to be addressed.

1502

Poachers

1503

Climate change, re-negotiation of the Columbia River Treaty with Canada, resolution of pending federal district
court litigation regarding the Snake River dams / fish passage barriers, stronger public support for agency
priorities and greater commitment to diversity & equity for underrepresented & underserved demographic groups
.

1504

how to compensate family farmers who are tasked with feeding the wildlife for the present and future Generations
which have no idea how much present-day farmers are contributing to the wildlife. People pay gladly to see a
movie, drink a cup of coffee at Starbucks, but are unwilling to help farmers who actually have to feed wildlife
without any compensation.

1505

Finding alternative funding stream(s) to contribute to a sustainable agency budget User Pays model to help fund
staff biologists and/or get staff biologist time back on resource mgmt Energy development Predator
conservation/management

87 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1506

1. Don't compromise away Oregon's fish, wildlife and their habitats in order to appease some politician that is not
going to support ODFW's budget and key interests anyway. Have the guts to take a stand for the resources
ODFW is charged with being the steward for. 2. Place additional focus on protecting and enhancing key habitats.
Based on their actions, recent administrations have not always seemed to understand that managing fish and
wildlife is not possible without sufficient habitat to sustain populations. 3. Seek new and innovative funding
sources for fish, wildlife and habitat conservation. ODFW created a new position in the Director's Office several
years ago that was supposed to do this as one of its primary responsibilities. To date, that position has raised $0
to accomplish this goal. This issue needs serious emphasis. 4. Dramatically improve communication from the top
down, so that employees feel connected to ODFW leadership's vision for the agency. Currently, employees do
not feel like they are part of a team working toward a unified set of goals. Therefore, support for leadership is
mostly lacking. 5. Get ODFW's fiscal house in order. Rein in those managers that purposely overspend & ask for
forgiveness later. Hold managers accountable for their budgets. Let there be consequences. 6. ODFW has a set
of Agency Principles. Take them seriously and live by them.

1507

Budget Shrinking number of licensed hunters and fishers Gaining public interest Employee morale Increasing
number of retirements of key employees that have a long standing history of the agency

1508

the increase in hunting cost with less timberlands to hunt, like weyerhauser. the lack of quility hunts.

1509

Continue Oregon 's 30 day archery season.

1510

The challenge of getting license and tag money back from the general fund and reallocated to fish and wildlife
conservation. The dwindling deer and elk populations.

1511

Open and close management units to get MO's where they belong! Or drastically cut tag sales to do the same
thing!'

1512

the constant struggle to maintain access to great hunting and fishing while maintaining a flourishing wildlife
environment.

1513

Declinining license sales and youth particpation Cost controls / Diversified Funding - This is not the deaprtment
of hunting and fishing. License fee increases are going to be increasingly difficult to obtain and the general public
needs to pay for the services delivered. Public trust- increasingly diffiuclt to build trust for management practives
especially among non-consumptive users and environmetalists. Special Species Management Issues / Federal
Oversight - Way too mich time and money is spent trying to deal with a few special status species (pinnipeds,
coromorants, sage grouse, wolves etc).

1514

Budget Employee satisfaction Hunter/angler retention Conservation

1515

Finding other funding sources for the agency that don't rely on hunting and angling license sales and hunting and
fishing equipment sales. Cooperating with other agencies in terms of conserving critical fish and wildlife habitats
now (and connectivity between habitats) so that they are still there 50 years from now. Figuring out how to
operate the agency more efficiently and possibly with staff reductions.

1516

Predators Budget false conservationists (anti-law suits) working with BIG private land owners We have to find
other means to fund the agency outside of sportsman and the general fund. Sportsman can't continue to bear the
load of the expense and not get true scientific results. There has to be a way to find supplemental federal dollars
and private dollars, or this agency will continue to fail.

1517

Management of dams. Wells fish restoration. Control of predator populations. Publi access to forests.

1518

We have a very misinformed public concerning salmon restoration, enhancement, and management. It hurts me
to see what local biologists have to put up with at our public meetings concerning fisheries, and habitat
management. These people definitely need to be educated so policies and decisions can be based on sound
science and not an angry appeal to their local politician. A director and anyone informing the public needs to be
able to talk at their level so they feel informed, not confused. A good leader can't let mislead individuals with
dominant "A" type personalities get the upper hand on decision making. I'm sick of seeing good money, hard
work, and time being spent on programs that are counterproductive just to get somebody off our back.

1519

Generating enough revenue to maintain and improve our fish and wildlife monitoring workforce for both game and
non-game species and populations. Building stronger relationships with stakeholders essential to generating new
sources of revenue.

1520

Trying to manage the ever-increasing issues between the commercial, recreational and conservation
stakeholders, while still maintaining our mission to protect it all.

1521

Wolves/cougar/coyote population growth into human interaction

88 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1522

Poaching is a huge issue in Oregon, and although the laws are enforced by OSP, I think there is opportunity for
ODFW to take a leadership role in developing programs that deter this activity.

1523

Mimimize rate increase in tag a liscense, offer "Life time" liscense.

1524

Overfishing, gillnets, dams and many other environmental factors.

1525

Preserve Oregon's long hunting and fishing heritage.

1526

Poaching

1527

Too much predation and too many doe/cow hunts.

1528

The mission of ODFW has been driven by hunting and fishing. With addition of the BPA Wildlife Mitigation
Funding and the adoption of the Oregon Conservation Strategy, there has been a policy shift to focus on
ecosystem management and include a broader suite of species and their habitats. Despite these policy shifts, the
culture among staff and funding of ODFW remain focused on hunted and fished species needs. The new director
will be challenged to steer the ODFW culture to embrace this more holistic direction.

1529

Issues with predation.

1530

High predator population, urbanization/ big cities voting to ban things, and wolves

1531

Habitat degradation and loss due to human development. There are more of course, but I believe this one ranks
far above any other.

1532

managing limited resources with an expanding population with multiple often competing goals (i.e. conservation
vs. tribal vs. recreational vs. commercial) in an uncertain budget climate

1533

Predator Management - Wolves Cougars Bears etc New Hunter Recrutement/Hunter opportunity and available
areas to hunt Poaching Financial cost of hunting

1534

Find new sources of funding for ODFW mission other than State general funds and/or licensing fees. Connect
urbanities with wildlife other than through hunting & fishing (encourage through programs/classes providing
wildlife habitat, observation. OSU Extension Woodland Manager course is a good example that includes a wildlife
component). Ability to move agency to a pro-active stance, to be "ahead of the curve."

1535

Budget building.

1536

Less dollars to continue the business of natural resource management. There will need to be cuts in field
programs, and the Director will need to make those tough calls.

1537

Declining participation (per capita) in hunting and fishing. Declining revenues from hunters and anglers.

1538

I feel like a big issue will be budget, it seems unlikely that economic conditions will improve drastically in a few
years. Also, another big issue is the transitioning of the agency toward more conservation and viewing. If license
sales continue to drop, we will need creative and innovative leadership. Because of budget issues I also feel
communication between management and employees in a positive form will be important. It costs the agency too
much in time and quality to lose good employees.

1539

Wolf conservation Greater sage-grouse conservation especially in light of potential ESA listing Working to obtain
more funding for ODFW from additional sources such as taxes on more diverse recreational equipment instead of
reliance on license fees which encourages focus on game species Working to increase prominence of ODFW in
urban areas to increase public awareness and appreciation of fish and wildlife in cooperation with local park and
recreation providers

1540

Building natural fish production to sustainably harvestable levels, including advanced research, monitoring, and
prediction field work to ensure populations are healthy, to reduce the reliance on hatchery subsidies for harvest.

1541

In my opinion, a key issue is that the agency is catering to special interest groups namely the sport fishing groups
on the Columbia River. Another key issue that is an internal one is the data system that involves the coded-wire
fish and the sampling of those fish. It is being developed by ISD and it's a mess. The manager overseeing that
project needs to be replaced. It's a classic case of the emperor has no clothes. The past director and the
managers directly below him showed no interest in this vital tool and naively assumed the system is working well.

1542

Keeping predators in check such as Cougars, Wolves, and Bears. Balancing the budget and ensuring fiscal
responsibility. Finding other means of revenue than license and tag dollars to keep hunting and fishing affordable.

1543

Simplify hunting and fishing regulations, there is too much micro management. Also, utilize the department more
proactively in habitat / land management arenas.

89 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1544

The agency needs to give more emphasis to implementing and adjusting to long term climate change plans, the
agencies Wildlife Action Plan, and Wildlife Diversity issues. Funding will always be a key issue. Taking bolder
steps in addressing salmon recovery. Partnering more with conservation organizations and agencies and
maintaining those with hunter and angler interests. Getting ahead of the "good ol boy" way business is perceived
and focus on professionalism in the ranks with a science based approach to policy and program implementation.

1545

Conservation is very important; in order to hunt and fish you must conserve and protect our native species and
their environments. Invasive species (plants and animals), climate change, land use/development will further
impact Oregon's native species and habitats.

1546

Planning programs around climate change will save us taxpayers in the long run. Over the next ten years, this
reality is going to become more apparent to the general public, so the Director needs to be prepared for this
eventuality and have already integrated appropriate measures, policies and programs.

1547

Many of the same ones that have been present in the past, such as the various, and sometimes conflicting,
interests of different users; and the balance between protecting and carefully utilizing natural resources. The new
challenge I can think of is climate change resilience.

1548

Loss of revenue from loss of fishing and hunting license sales, and general less interest in fishing and hunting.

1549

Wildlife and fish are dependent on their habitats. We are seeing habitat loss and degradation at an everincreasing rate. Our constituents expect us to manage the fish and wildlife resources for their enjoyment; without
land and water for habitat, there will be no resources for our publics to enjoy. One critical issue for this Director
will be planning and conservation of a wildlife habitat network. Secondly, as public participation in hunting and
fishing continues to decline, we need to get serious about finding other revenue streams. Political advocacy for a
sales tax, or a joint permit with State Parks, or some share of the royalties from energy development, etc..; we
need to pursue these options aggressively. A Director that is willing to take this head on as her/his top priority will
be a 21st century champion for Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

1550

Dealing with entities, like the Nez Perce Tribe - we seem to want them to be our ally, but they take advantage of
that and stab us in the back every chance they get. And we do nothing about it. ODFW needs to develop some
balls when it comes to dealing with the tribes - we roll over and piss on ourselves every time they squawk. We're
supposed to be co-managers, not lap dogs. And we are endangering the natural resource that we are supposed
to be protecting when we simply go along with the tribes. They only care about the numbers of salmon returning,
not increasing the numbers of natural salmon. Hatcheries need to be reformed and the tribes (and many other
entities) are uninterested in making any changes.

1551

Budget! Declining license sales, need for diverse revenue streams. Vision to position ODFW in the state of
Oregon to be more than just "huntin' & fishin'" agency - premier natural resource agency in the state. Bring
together diverse viewpoints and maybe agree to disagree, but gain respect of different perspectives.

1552

I think the number one challenge is maintaining consistent funding and relevance in a changing world. We will not
be able to reverse the long time trend of declining hunters and static or declining anglers. To stay viable, ODFW
must make themselves important and relevant to the general population and conservation community. In Oregon,
the conservation community is a huge untapped resource. Increasing our participation in fish and wildlife
educational pursuits, data sharing, etc. would raise our profile and increase support amongst the general public.

1553

finding alternate funding sources. hunters and fishers can't afford to fund the agency that does so much more that
just manage huntable and fishable wildlife. Example dealing with nuisance wildlife in an urban environment. could
the county fund such a position?.

1554

Emerging climate impacts (e.g. ocean acidification, water cycle changes) on fish and wildlife resources

1555

Climate change, climate change, climate change. With this will come uninhibited growth to the Valley. In no way
is Oregon ready to face a massive influx of new citizens without a strong conservation ideal. We have limited to
no land use laws to guide development, little data to help direct decisions, and a weak to nonexistent
conservation program which is minimally staffed and funded. Revenue from fishing and hunting licensing will
continue to decline. The new Director MUST be willing to push the envelope, creatively seeking new models for
revenue, and be willing to break away from some of the older constituents if necessary. Again, look to other
states for examples of how it can be done.

1556

How to keep it afloat financially.

1557

Wolves will continue to be a contentious issue. Continued need to bring in a new generation of hunters and
fishers. Loss of institutional knowledge due to higher than normal attrition (largely from the move to Salem).

90 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1558

In no particular order: 1: Changing demographics. How is the Director going to reach out to women, minorities,
and urban dwellers to enjoy conservation and consumptive uses (fishing and hunting) to purchase licenses to
continue to help fund wildlife and fisheries conservation. 2. Habitat loss. We are continually losing habitat for fish
and wildlife. How will the Director address this? 3. Climate change. How does Oregon adapt to climate change
and its effect on ecosytems and fish and wildlife habitat? 4. Trust. Many in Oregon simply do not trust ODFW (I'm
certainly not one of them). How will the Director instill trust?

1559

Figuring out and mitigating threats to the mission. Balancing need for productive Ecosystems with outside
interests. Being able to see the big picture even when interest groups are lobbying heavily

1560

Greatly simplifying the fishing regulations so that the people of our great state of Oregon can enjoy fishing again.
Make the physical license and tags a more manageable size. Possibly go to a "credit card" system similar to
Colorado.

1561

Not in order of importance- Blacktail populations should be better in a lot of units. - Extend spring bear season
more into June - when the bears are more call able, because they're eating the most fawns/calves in June-JulyAugust. Should bring success ratios up - especially in white river. Plus, should help yearling deer/elk survival
rates. Cougars!!!!!! this guy has to be willing to stand up. Make a fuss, and do what we all know NEEDS to be
done. And if the lady at the tag counter asks me if I want to donate to the predator fund again... I'm gonna lose
my damn mind. You don't need more money to manage cougars. You need to let the ppl take care of it the way
they always have.

1562

The critical issue is how to fund the agency going forward. If it's going to rest squarely on the backs of hunters
and anglers then the director and commission need to understand that opportunity drives participation and license
sales. While "opportunity" may be discussed little has been done to meet the market which is shown in per capita
declines in license sales across the board. Simply raising fees will continue the downward trend in license sales
which will ultimately (as fees continue to increase) be the chief obstacle to participation. Fundamentally, neither
the agency leadership or the commission believes that Oregon can be the sportfishing capital of the country. The
agency continues to talk about trends that are unavoidable as other states in the midwest and east see growth in
their license sales. There are answers but it's going to take real leadership and vision to push ODFW in a muchneeded different direction than it's headed today.

1563

The budget is a mess right now. Raising fees in order to balance the budget while still needing General Fund to
balance the budget will not sit well with Legislators. Wolves - Need to get ahandle on the issue Coho Salmon
Listing - need to get it delisted as they have recovered Regualtions - So many rules and regulations that people
are confused more and more.

1564

Declining hunter and fisher participation will amplify the budget shortfall. So one of the largest challenges will be
to find other funding sources for the agency. With out adequate field staff the mission is useless.

1565

At best, my wife has only mild interest in fishing and hunting. She and I refused to buy her a license this year due
to the license fee increase. The biggest challenge facing ODFW looking forward, is sportsman participation and
retention especially considering ODFW's philosophy and record pertaining to increasing license fees. I would like
the new director to understand that the resources of Oregon are those of the people and that hunting and fishing
should be affordable to even the poorest Oregonians. I grew up in a state that charged $40 for a Sports Pac,
today that same Sports Pac costs $40. I would like to see the next Director focus more on increasing sportsman
participation and retention, rather than adopting programs/projects the agency can't fund only to raise fees and
create new fees to facilitate those programs/projects, and then expect the dwindling sportsman pool to absorb the
budgetary gap.

1566

1. Reduced budgets, reduced staff and few allies championing the Department 2. Predator management and
public perception: wolves, sea lions, cormorants, etc 3. ESA listing reviews: coho (delist?), Pacific Fishers (list?),
wolves (de-list?), Greater Sage Grouse (list?) 4. Pacific Salmon Treaty negotiations with reduced monitoring of
salmonid species due to program reductions 3. Modifying ODFW's role in the regulatory processes by reducing
the expectation that ODFW will take the lead for other agencies in their enforcement actions; fill/removal permits,
water quality, dredging, etc.

1567

Budget issues Getting more of the public involved (wildlife viewing, conservation, hunting, fishing, etc.)

1568

climate change, public disappointment and distrust of the agency, loss of angling and hunting license purchases,
employee morale

1569

Declining interest in outdoors/hunting/fishing activities. The key challenge to the agency is youth who are more
interested in smart phones and video games than the challenge of hunting or fishing.

91 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1570

Achieving science-based management while protecting local interests and economic viability. Earning public
trust. Working within a diminishing budget while concurrently meeting additional responsibilities assigned to the
Department. Facing new or changing public perceptions on long-standing fish and wildlife issues (e.g. marine
reserves, wolves, ocean energy, invasive species management).

1571

Management based on good sense and not politics.

1572

Convincing Oregonians to behave in ways that counteract overall habitat loss due to the "death by a 1000 cuts"
problem. Even with Oregon land use laws, there is a degree of sprawl and low intensity/high area human use of
lands that is not likely to decrease. This results from everything from grazing to renewable energy development
(wind/solar) to pesticide use and water diversions. Our regulations are set up to protect individual species, but we
rarely have all the tools needed to protect the habitat complexity and diversity that supports even individual
species, let alone entire floral/faunal communities.

1573

Employee morale - with the budget issues, position elimination, and state employee bashing by the general
public, media and politicians, employees will need someone who will champion ODFW employees and keep
employees interested in their work when it seems like we do nothing right or no matter how well we do our jobs,
it's just not good enough for those outside ODFW.

1574

The loss of wildlife in the past decades must be addressed. Better conservation management of non game
species, habitat fragmentation, climate change, pollution, fishery health.

1575

Balancing human population with the needs of the natural world.

1576

Loss of habitat to support biodiversity, demoralized staff, declining permit-based revenue.

1577

Obtaining reliable funding will be critical in fulfilling the mission.

1578

Not having the money that is needed to conduct critical marine species research while maintaining the current
monitoring projects.

1579

Stabilize agency funding without unduly putting the burden on hunters and anglers. Maintain hatchery production
and work to improve hatchery facilities. Put more emphasis on access or property acquisition that provide fishing
and/or hunting opportunity and habitat values for fish and wildlife. Improve communication between Salem and
the field staff Boost employee morale

1580

Successfully shifting back to a portion of general fund revenue. Maintaining or increasing hunter/angler
participation. Being flexible with seasons and opportunities in response to changing environmental conditions and
biological patterns of activity.

1581

Controlling the performance of Division administrators; having oversight of political decisions by deputy
administrators; allowing biologists and area managers to have input on staff decision making. In other words,
allowing professional field staff to have a say in staff decisions which means re-establishing some scientific
credibility to the decision making process.

1582

Wildlife conservation is much more critical than "use & enjoyment" where ESA listed species are concerned. The
new Director should operate with this understanding and move the agency towards more of a stewardship role
than the "hook & bullet/opportunity/$$$" modus operandi that presently drives ODFW.

1583

While acknowledging importance of habitat, the the department is consistently working more (and spending a lot
of money) on the end product for a consumer (i.e. hatchery fish). The habitat component is the key to
sustainability and without sustainability the opportunity for a consumer are limited or comes at an expense. The
department needs to look into having a habitat component as the third leg to our fish and wildlife divisions found
within each watershed. While there are many habitat programs, they could be better organized and there could
be consistency across watersheds. Any biologist will tell you that habitat is the most critical component for fish
and wildlife, yet it is back seat to management/harvest. Oh, and there is this funding issue.

1584

Wolf population expansions and the resulting consequences of limited game populations. There will be not
enough tags to issue to appease the hunting community.

1585

Budget crisis. Selling more hunting and fishing licenses. Balanced fisheries between sport and commercial and
conservation. Involvement of youth for the future. How to become more proactive rather than reactive agency
especially with budget issues. How to build a savings account so we can be more balanced in the future. Get rid
of the lazy employees and hold individuals more accountable for their actions and create incentive programs for
employees.

1586

The Columbia gillnet fishery

1587

The declining number of sportsman applying for hunting/fishing licenses.

92 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1588

Budget, Budget, Budget! I want our new Director to be able to help us out of our mess and come up with a long
term solution to our funding issues.

1589

Balancing a budget with declining f&w users and funding enforcement.

1590

Continuing to provide fishing and hunting opportunities that everyone can afford. Finding a balance with hatchery
fish and wild fish that continues to allow harvest of the hatchery component while providing realistic protection of
the wild fish. Finding other funds to help ODFW's budget problems without having the states fishing and hunting
communities folks continue to pay more. Other user groups of our natural resources have to step up and help
with funding.

1591

Declining license sales and declining hunting lands. Too many hunters in to small an area. It is unsafe for
humans and unfair for the animals.

1592

Calm, steady leadership in the face of roller-coaster politics and loud special interest groups will be the biggest
challenge.

1593

understanding loss in revenue is likely to continue declining fish and wildlife populations which result in less
opportunity, which relates to less hunters and fishers. loss of habitat the increased listing of T&E species all
regulations to complicated for general public to understand causing many to quit hunting and fishing working with
tribal governments

1594

The biggest challenge the new Director will face is balancing management of species on the the threatened and
endangered list, and the whole issue of wolf management. The fact that our society is leaving the rural roots and
moving to urban areas, forgetting that food does not originate from the grocery store, but from plants and animals
we raise or harvest by hunting. Any time we euthanize an animal (say a sea lion or predator), the public is
outraged, not wanting to accept any reasoning behind the decision. It is hard to explain to the public that reality is
not a Disney movie.

1595

The declining interest in fish and wildlife will be a key challenge. Oregon as a state is highly conservative and I
believe that people don't always understand the need to manage wildlife populations to avoid an imbalance. How
this message is shared and the ability of the department to make inroads with the next generations of citizens will
be critical in my opinion.

1596

Adapting to climate change is one of our biggest future challenges in the short and long term. We need someone
who is serious about conservation of what we have left and creative about how to improve our resilience at such
a critical juncture.

1597

1. funding. 2. funding. 3. funding. 4. the increasing urban/rural interface and the impacts to wildlife as urban areas
grow. 5. the increasing disconnect of urban Oregonians in hunting and fishing activities and to the work that
ODFW does. 6. growing dissatisfaction of hunters and fishers regarding access and opportunities and the
increased cost of licenses/tags.

1598

Funding diversification, habitat conservation, fiscal responsibility, agency infrastructure

1599

Declining participation in fishing and hunting is the #1 challenge until such time as an alternate funding model is
enacted. You can not have a stable conservation effort without stable funding, the Department needs someone
who is forward thinking (in terms of pursuing alternate funding) yet pragmatic enough to be pro-active within the
current environment.

1600

The new director faces some serious budgetary issues as well as implementing conservation/management
needs. I see the fish divisions upper management practicing reckless leadership. They need to put management
practices into play. The fish division is a sinking ship and the new director needs to be able to address the issue.
Fixing fish divisions mess is mission critical for ODFW.

1601

The critical issue is defining the Agency's vision for fish and wildlife management. The challenge this and other
government agencies have is balancing the divergent needs and desires of customers and constituents while
adhering to the vision. Without a clear vision, it is easy for an agency to chase whims.

1602

Alternative energy development and its effects on fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Managing deer and elk for
sustainable populations and hunting opportunities. Alternative funding sources. Agency budget management.
Managing non-game species/Conservation Strategy. Hunter/Angler recruitment and retention, especially younger
Oregonians.

93 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1603

Declining license sales (men, women, youth, disabled), complicated rules that are difficult to understand for most
individuals (fishing and hunting), building up a trust between the director's office and employees in the field,
reevaluate employee termination decisions made with regard to the 2015-17 budget (i.e., EBA and District
Biologists) when these individuals hold the key to protecting and enhancing Oregon's fish and wildlife along with
their habitats for present and future generations.

1604

This question illustrates the need for fresh thinking as I suggest under question 2, above. Specifically, as I
explain in my thesis, when implemented through species-based land-use regulation (such as by imposing
species-based mitigation requirements under the Oregon and US Endangered Species Acts), ODFW's mission
"to protect" wildlife and their habitats is potentially counterproductive to ODFW's mission of "to enhance" wildlife
and their habitats, and potentially counterproductive to the survival of maintenance-dependent species on private
land. In this regard, I find the framing of ODFW's mission ("to protect and enhance") potentially incoherent. I also
find this framing at odds with contemporary ecology, by erroneously implying that species populations generally
persist in the absence of disturbance by humans; in contrast (as I'm sure ODFW knows better than most), the
survival of many of Oregon's at-risk species now depends on actively managing land, such as to control invasive
exotic vegetation or simulate burning historically practiced by Native Americans.

1605

The loss of primary habitat for fish and wildlife through over-development. This coupled with the associated
decrease in populations will only make the license buying population decrease. Ultimately this will reduce budgets
and potentially put the agency in a position to continue raising license fees which will alienate more users.

1606

Developing and implementing a strategic science vision within the Oregon legislative political environment.

1607

Though some decisions are a matter of social values, I believe that science should have a greater role in the
decision making process. This means that staff and our leaders should seek scientific advice and know how to
interpret it.

1608

wolf management, threatened and endangered species management, interior salmon managment

1609

Budget Issues

1610

I believe that the new director should promote new hunting and fishing opportunities across the state of Oregon.

1611

A shrinking budget along with widening responsibilities to protect natural resources. Lawsuits from organizations
that are pushing their own agenda. Industrial industry efforts to shrink natural resource quality and chip away at
natural resource protections.

1612

Budget constraints, we need someone who understands the financial piece of the puzzle. The current Deputy
directors have no idea of how to manage money and Director #######El really had no interest in it. They really
need to bring in their own deputy director for Administration our current deputy director is ineffective.

1613

I believe one of the largest critical issues will be the agency's strategy on acquiring funding to replace ODFW's
aging infrastructure.

1614

Fish and Wildlife Agency Funding Model Meeting Conservation and Recovery Goals Climate Change adaptions

1615

Trying to balance the importance of conservation and non-game wildlife/habitat priorities with the realities of
budget issues and revenue sources. Trying to maintain adequate compensation for employees in order to attract
high quality employees and retain them. Adapting to changes in management pressure brought about by climate
change and other stressors.

1616

I think that in terms of hunting they will have to address a few main issues. One being access to private land for
hunting, as more land such as timber ground changes to fee hunting I feel that there will be a big decline in
participation due to lack of hunting areas. Another is that it seems the agency as a whole ignores big game
habitat improvements. We talk about improving game numbers but very little is done improve habitat on a large
scale. I know that it is hard to manage habitat across, private, state, and federal land but I feel that it is one of the
biggest factors limiting game numbers and that in turn limits hunters and hunter success. Deer and elk move to
private crop land and no longer utilize the public land like they use too, hunters realize this and are very
discouraged.

1617

Inadequate budget and a lack of support by the Oregon legislature for the mission of the agency.

1618

Having employees that are making decisions for personal agenda's and not using data or science to base their
decisions.

94 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1619

skill and determination to lead on the subject of climate change. it is the single biggest long-term issue facing our
fish and wildlife. Oregon should be a positive example for the rest of the country in leadership and conservation
and restoration actions that reduce the projected impact of climate change. ODFW should at the forefront of that
leadership and smart long-term conservation and restoration actions. We need a strategic long-term plan for
conserving core habitat and restoring habit adjacent to these cores. No more monitoring for the sake of
monitoring. If monitoring is not tied directly to conservation and restoration actions then it is wasted time and
money.

1620

Balancing public interest in game species management as well as balancing the interest in conservation of nongmae species and their ecosystems.

1621

Communicating the science behind management decisions and the status of fish and wildlife populations and
species (e.g.: have wolves REALLY killed all the elk?). Preparing the agency for the effects of climate change in a
world where some deny climate change.

1622

Issues with public relations: I think if we spent more time talking with the public about what we are doing the
public will be more receptive to the agency Issues with hunter/angler recruitment: The public needs to know what
the fee increases are going toward

1623

Adequate budget and political/public support to allow ODFW to implement its mission.

1624

Keeping a balance between the agency mission and available funding

1625

Declining budgets - a large percentage of Oregon's "income" is generated from natural resources, yet a small
fraction of the State budget is dedicated to natural resource management. Increasingly divergent demands on
our Resources The age of "misinformation" - junk science and groups that are not interested in finding out the real
facts Polarizing publics that are not interested in compromise or win-win solutions. Invasive species impacts to the
resources the agency manages

1626

Shrinking angler and hunter numbers. Need to find alternative revenue sources that don't rely on hunters and
anglers to foot the bill for non-hunter/angler programs (conservation and habitat for non-game species). Hold the
legislature responsible to fully fund the agency for non-game programs that protect Oregon's natural resources for
everyone.

1627

wolves

1628

Changing demographics of Oregon's Population and addressing the decline of Anglers and Hunters.

1629

declining hunter/angler participaton, ability to find alternate funding resources gaining confidence of the agencies
constituent's back

1630

Declining participation in fishing and hunting by the residents of Oregon. Managing the Wolf population.
Managing cougar predation of cervids. Getting more General Fund revenues to promote conservation issues.

1631

Budget - the agency cannot rely on raising the cost of license and tags, we will loose money not gain. Look at
lowering the cost to encourage more sales and retaining customers as well as recruiting new customers.

1632

Need to reduce dependence on license fee revenues, develop alternative funding sources, realign agency
operations to fit available resources. Develop credibility as a conservation agency, not just administrator and
promoter of hunting and fishing opportunities.

1633

Broadening the funding base, habitat loss, retaining and recruiting new users

1634

The most obvious issue is of course obtaining and maintain funding for the various programs within ODFW.
Another major issue is of course the Columbia River management - commercial gillnets vs sports fishing.

1635

1. Funding. 2. Dereasing access to habitats both through conversion to urban/suburban land and large private
landowners (timber companies primarily) restricting access.

1636

Unreasonable Public Employee Union demands Lack of adequate resources to do what is mandated by
regulations

1637

Budget. The department has been downsized to the point service is suffering. Particularly getting fish passage
plans and other things related to acomplishing construction projects approved. Hiring more people is critical and I
believe should be the #1 priority.

95 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1638

The overriding obligation of the commission and the department is to prevent the serious depletion of any
indigenous species (ORS 496.012), The director therefore embraces the direction of state law and agency
mission to protect and conserve native species of fish and wildlife. In doing that the director and his leadership
staff apply the best available science to agency decisions and policy. This commitment is needed to improve fish
and wildlife management in the state and provide direction to resolving conservation issues and provide public
confidence in the agency.

1639

Develop a predator management policy in a holistic fish and wildlife management system. Manage the risk to
naturally produced salmon and steelhead from hatchery produced fish. Propose an agency funding plan which
generates revenue from all fish and wildlife users. Develop agency fiscal policies that ensure revenue is balanced
with spending. Develop confidence in all sectors of fish and wildlife users that the agency is based in science and
is truly considering input from all those users.

1640

Finding ways to increase participation.

1641

Declining hunting/angling numbers and a disconnect from the natural world. We have to engage the public in the
outdoors in a variety of ways, and manage for a variety of interests.

1642

Fish culture and changes in technology to minimize impacts of hatcheries on the environment.

1643

Challenging the industrial logging methods and the forest practices act.

1644

Federal Endangered Species Act Growing human population Declining budgets and resources

1645

Making fish and wildlife available for fishers and hunters and to attract younger people to be licensed fishers and
hunters. Stop the decline in licensed participants. Improve enforcement of ODFW regulations. Keep the volunteer
base involved. Hatchery management and getting along with the "WILD Only" groups. Dealing with the Columbia
River Commercial fleet.

1646

1) Changing revenue streams & demographics of hunters/fishers. 2) Need to upgrade technologies to become
more efficient and assist field staff so they can travel less and have actual work time at their job. 3) Managing the
decision regarding sage grouse and other potential new endangered species decisions as well as our current
species. 4) Addressing climate change issues, such as more water shortages while demand is there for humans,
agriculture & other industries while fish and animal species also need the limited water. Will need staff to address
storage projects being considered. 5) Dealing with invasive species, especially aquatic species that may invade
Oregon.

1647

conservation and protection of wildlife implementation of the state conservation strategy developing sustainable
funding that isn't dependent on hunting and fishing shifting from a perceived urban-rural divide to recognition of
the common ground and values we share as Oregonians

1648

climate change, declining biodiversity, lead ammo, shifting funding sources

1649

Sage grouse Climate Change Removing lead from the environment to protect wildlife and fish Supporting a
robust non-game wildlife management program

1650

1. Shifting budget priorities to managing for non-consumptive wildlife uses, which are a large part of outdoor
recreation activity, but a small part of ODFW's management priority; 2. Managing for sensitive/threatened
species, especially leading the way in conflict management for species like wolves and sea otters, where there is
habitat conflict with ranchers and crabbers respectively; 3. Focusing salmon recovery and management on wild
salmon habitat, and taking the lead in this. The hatchery programs clearly have only a very limited secondary role
to play in salmon recovery, and ODFW should not focus its resources there.

1651

Working more closely with Bonneville Power Administration and regional organizations, both public and private.
Bringing hatcheries up to date with the most recent science Fiscal responsibility

1652

Money is key. Getting state police off the ODFW budget is key. Thinking about other funding mechanisms would
be key as well. ODFW needs someone more or in rated towards conservation rather than the usual sportsman
advocate.

1653

Employee morale and public trust. Without public (and thus Legislative) support, we will never receive the state
funding we need to supplement our other sources of revenue. Without truly recognizing the importance of
employee contributions to the successful functioning of the agency, we will continue this precipitous descent.
Increasing demands on our fish and wildlife resources due to human population growth, encroachment of critical
areas, and environmental changes (ocean acidification, warming rivers and drier habitats).

96 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


1654

Addressing changing public interests in wildlife and conservation. for example, the decline of fishing hunting
interest and increase in wildlife observing and enjoyment of natural areas. Hunting/fishing play important roles
but neglected in terms of funding is the growing interest in protection for all species for their intrinsic value and
growing population of folks that enjoy opportunities to observe species - they are spending money and are a
potential source to diversify ODFW funding base. A very important role ODFW play is in the consultation on
development permits. This needs to be strengthened so there is adequate staff to thoroughly evaluate impacts
and the agency needs to have the political will to hold firm to their findings. Climate change is forcing adaptation,
there will be winners and losers - it is important to err of the side of conservation and protection of biodiversity.

1655

Shrinking hunter and fisherman numbers and the dollars they bring

1656

Hatchery vs wild fish interaction, especially on the coast. Wolf management

1657

Declining funding due to declining hunting and angling opportunities and participation. A comprehensive and
broad conservation program for the complete range of Oregon species. Long-range strategic and adaptive
management with measurable goals and objectives.

1658

The particular issue of the day is not the important thing. How the agency responds to the various and changing
issues will be what matters. (Follow the law and tell the truth)

1659

1. Diminishing resources 2. Diminishing public participation 3. Mission in transition (futures analysis) 4. Changing
demographics 5. Enhanced challenges to effective communication with the publics.

1660

I believe the agency will face a deficit in being able to continue to collect scientifically sound data to help
adequately and accurately monitor our fish and wildlife populations due to the staffing restrictions and reductions
imposed by the increasing budget costs. Many programs are already stretched thin. Additionally, the current
hiring system does not encourage retention of highly experienced individuals who have spent many years
working within the agency and developing interagency and public connections on behalf of the agency.

1661

Impact of climate change on fish, wildlife and habitats in Oregon growing movement to privatize government
organizations

1662

Changing from an agency that has been focused on consumptive use to an agency focused on conservation is
the biggest challenge for the new director.

1663

The most important decision is to figure out what our agency is. Are we hear to provide a product to our
customers ( hunters and fishermen) or are we and extension of some environmental group. Its not fair to degrade
fishing and hunting opportunities while continuing to rely on sportsmen to foot the bill.

1664

changes in finances, needs for more grants, more general funds, more money! looking at all species, not simply
those caught on hook, trap, spear, bullet, etc. providing more opportunities to work with USFS, USFWS, etc. in
joint capacities in order to foster impact and change bolstering research and district personnel and budgets

1665

blah blah

97 / 97

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

Q4 Is there anything else you would like to


share with us that will be helpful in our
selection process?
Answered: 1,054

Skipped: 1,342

Responses

Hire someone with the experience to do the job well, but someone who is still ambitious in solving problems. This
person needs to be highly motivated to make any much-needed changes within the agency.

Look for a Director that has either worked or run a successful dept, not some political cronie that lands on the
board, example ################.....lobbyist

Please, select a director that understands the sportsman/women fund this department and have a greater
understanding and love for the fish and wildlife than most; therefore, should have more input into solutions and
allocation of money then the pencil pushers and environmentalists. . . If you really care about the future of the fish
and wildlife and not government bureaucracy!

I have been fishing for virtually my entire life (many decades) and currently hold a pioneer license. To me,
recognizing that fish and wildife is an important part of Oregon's past and future, not merely a commodity to be
exploited, is very important, as is the need to protect non-game fish and wildlife and their habitat.

I THINK IT WOULD BE HELPFUL TO HIRE A DIRECTOR WHO IS FROM OREGON OR OTHER STATES
HAVING A SIMILAR RESOURCE MIX.

Keep politics out.

The agency needs to hire a Director that can modernize and refine its focus to one that reflects the value of
recreation in the places your manage, the value of wildlife tourism, the local and global value of keeping our
forests intact and protected - for people and wildlife. The agency needs to become more conservation-minded,
less focused on extraction/harvesting of animals - please hire a new Director who embodies these kinds of
modern values of science-based conservation. Thank you for the chance to comment on this.

Thank you, no.

Yes, get people from the field to do the selection. Keep all office types, politicians out of it.

10

Just please stop killing anything that moves. Let's be concerned about what we are doing to our ecology system
as a whole. Nature wasn't put here or intended to become so degraded that it's going to become difficult to
survive. Extinction of many of our species is a real threat, and man is the one who will ultimately pay.

11

A true environmentalist with a resume revealing a history of volunteerism and advocating for wildlife.

12

Keep Oregon for Oregonians, and protect our natural resources!

13

ODFW staff are a valuable asset to the agency and other entities. The new director should value human resource
and the services and technical assistance ODFW staff provide around the state and strive to maintain those
partnerships.

14

1.The director will certainly face many challenges, but I believe that it would greatly benefit the agency and the
people of Oregon to have a director that is willing to be strong on difficult, long standing issues affecting fish and
wildlife management.

15

We have good deputy directors who would be bale to perform the job. I can see a good future having either one
of them directing our agency. I hope they applied for this challenging job.

16

Not now.

17

The agency needs someone who can listen, who has no fear, who can build support for critical conservation
issues, even in the face of massive support for economic gains, and who has a deep appreciation of all the
incredible natural resource treasures in Oregon (on land, in the lakes and rivers, in the ocean). Good luck!

18

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

1 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


19

ODFW needs a good housecleaning. Many at the top should be fired and replaced with people with honesty and
integrity. I have worked with ODFW for over 15 years, tired of their lies. Too many pro-bass (an invasive,
predatory species) employees at the top of the Fisheries Division.

20

Please protect our state's wild animals and stop the unnecessary killing. Wild animals continue to face difficult
living situations due to habitat loss. It is not up to the state to artificially "manage" wildlife populations to benefit
the special interests of those who only want to kill them. Thank you for providing the opportunity for feedback.

21

N/A

22

Let the public comment on selection

23

Bring in some new blood. ODFW is a good ole boys club with very little new ideas

24

No

25

Choose someone who is committed to keeping the wild creatures and forests safe for future generations.

26

Your budget/human capitol expenditure is quite disturbing, inefficient and seems a waste of license sales dollars-your job is not to employ people (which you seem to have done quite nicely over the past several years).
Washington and other states have do more with less full time employee head count which is better stewardship
of your budget---and my hard earned dollars!! You need to become an innovative thinker and create (or adopt)
new ways of management and process. But I suspect they will hire a Director that is steeped in the political
process and butt kissing of the old regime. Good luck.

27

Consider the job forHunters &Fishers NOT the Politician.

28

I would like to see a worthy local person, with long-term interest to be Director.

29

No

30

It is important to maintain and foster relationships with private citizens, other governmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and private landowners in order to manage fish and wildlife in a way that is
beneficial to all. There are a number of staff positions on the line whose loss will hinder ODFW in maintaining the
degree of work which is expected and be a step backward for the agency. If these positions are cut as planned,
the new director will need to be very committed to finding new ways of maintaining these relationships and
working towards building new partnerships.

31

Look for a long term person, not someone you is looking for a stepping stone in their career path

32

I do wish you all good luck in your endeavors, and being in our state's outdoors is a very, very large part of what
makes me happy and proud to call myself an Oregonian.

33

Encourage a focus on conservation. ODFW needs a new direction away from the hook and bullet mentality. We
need to focus on conservation and partnerships. We need to not be afraid for being an advocate of the resource.
If we don't preserve habitat, Oregonians will no longer have sustainable fish or wildlife to harvest and enjoy.
Many of the natural resource agencies are not being held accountable for implementing their rules-ODFW needs
to raise these issues for long term sustainability of our natural resources. The new Director needs to be able to
communicate the importance of being proactive, integrating the best available science into decision making and
not be afraid of being an advocate for natural resource protections. Of course, we need a balance, but per our
mission, we need to be the agency speaking for fish, wildlife and habitat.

34

Please select someone who will put time into the full range of fish & wildlife issues facing Oregon. East side
issues are important. With climate change coming, high desert trout and native fish may become increasingly
important to restock warmer stream in the future. Someone with highly developed creative problem-solving as
opposed to a career bureaucrat will make a significant difference. Less emphasis on fancy policies and more
attention to on-the-ground needs would be a refreshing change. Currently, way too much effort on politics. Select
a candidate from outside the Agency as fresh perspectives are needed at this time. Hiring from within will bring
the risk of the same approach that has hurt and weakened the effectiveness of the agency in the past.

35

no

36

Find someone who's willing to show up at staff gatherings and provide leadership and encouragement to
implement the agency mission.

37

This person should have a stake in Oregon. Management of Oregon resources must benefit Oregonians, not
outside corporate interests.

38

Pick someone who can stand up to corporations and developers who want to destroy our state's natural
resources for their own greedy pockets.

2 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


39

The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

40

A lot of agencies have lost sight of the importance of their staff. When management fails to appreciate and listen
to those in the trenches, then fail on all levels. Too many agency heads make decisions based on managers, who
in turn, to not consider the experience of the staff that are actually doing the work and know the resource.

41

The new Director needs to have a ecological approach to managing the resources. This includes bring all the
divisions together. This agency sometimes works in "bubbles" does not work well with coming together to solve
emerging issues. Furthermore, there is a distinct seperation from HQ and the field, not much trust from the field
towards HQ. Finally, the new Director needs to have open mind toward recruitment and retention of new hunters
and anglers; much effort needs to be explored to help increase or stop the decline in hunters and anglers. This
real problem with an aging target market will cause long term issues for the Director and the Agency. Finally, we
need a Director with a strong background in running a business. The agency needs to become more efficient in
it's operations and procedures. Some of the systems at ODFW are a like stepping back into the 1960's.

42

I encourage you to consider applicants that have qualifications beyond regulating hunting and fishing.

43

Please select someone who places the actual environment before politics and favoritism. This is vital for the long
term health of our lands, wildlife, and for future generations. Thank you.

44

Remove personal interests please and respect natural processes which benefit us most

45

The director should not have any ties with corporations that might have interests in ANY natural or naturally
derived resource.

46

Keep Nestle out. No corporations. PROTECT OUR RESOURCES.

47

Good luck and may success and survival be our goal.

48

Keep nestle out of oregon waters

49

Thank you for putting the survey invitation on your website.

50

Protect old growth forest to ensure abundant habitats

51

It is crucial that the new director is a scientist. Too often administrators, due to lack of understanding or for other
reasons, make decisions based on what would be nice instead of what is actually true.

52

Habit brings beauty included is the wildlife and it's presevasion let all work to protect and preserve it

53

Do not select anyone with past interests by prior employment, family ties, investment that would sway
management towards private entrepreneurships goals.

54

The person selected should be a scientist, not a bureaucrat or a political appointee.

55

Please do not allow Nestle to succeed in setting up a bottling plant for water that is now a public resource in
Cascade Locks. This is a bad precedent in times when water, a First Need, is becoming so scare. My friends in
Mosier have to bring in 300 gallons of water per day by truck because their well went dry. Fish and wildlife cannot
drive trucks, and we need fish and wildlife because we cannot eat Nestle.

56

Your web site needs to include dates that all lakes and rivers are open to fish!

57

No, thank you.

58

Look for someone that can simplify and reduce costs in the system. This would help encourage families to get
back in the woods.

59

I think that's about it. I appreciate being given the chance to express my views on this incredibly important
subject. Thank you.

60

I feel that stream rehabilitation, fishery rehabilitation, and the protection of our waters is of immense importance.
Not allowing the rights to water which the ODFW holds to be sold or traded in any way to outside interests who
will only profit and further degrade our environment in many ways.

3 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


61

Please make sure this person cares about the waters and lands of Oregon with an eye for sustainability through
the years, and that our greatest assets are those that hold beauty, support the quality of life, that draw
employment opportunities through expanding how to use these resources might be used for tourists and other
ways that draw on what we have. I hope this person will look closely at how employment opportunities can be
enhanced with new, visionary and long-term goals. Our old-growth forests help mitigate climate change....our
salmon need the waters to flourish, our incredible lands and waters can draw many here, and thus many jobs can
be focused on supporting a tourist industry among other related employment directions. Monoculture forests and
clear cut lands do not offer ongoing quality in bounty and benefit to Oregon. Jobs are very important...let's look at
the ones that enhance our Oregon while providing sustainable job opportunities for many folks.

62

Please look outside around you. No Snow, Little water, Major decline of species, people over population, pushing
back wild lands, pressure on small farmers, and corporations taking over. Even private land owners need help
regulating to stop total distruction of forests. Folks come out from the city, buy land and destroy it, spray it, fear
predators and kill them, they don't understand, help them. Please help us all through changing old outdated
ways.

63

no

64

preservation - if we don't protect it, the legacy we leave for future generations will be death and destruction.

65

Find someone who has experience, knowledge and compassion. This agency is about "fish & wildlife," not
business, not special interests, and not good ol boy politics. It's time to work some diversity into this organization
and dump the machismo.

66

just that maintaining our environment for future generations is of the utmost importance.

67

Natural resource and wildlife conservation and protection should be of highest priority.

68

I think you should select someone who is an independent thinker who is not likely to cave into commercial
interests.

69

This service needs to have leadership with the political savvy and will to do its job despite resistance from rural
landowners and industry. A leader who will invite first nations cooperation and leadership. A leader who will
defend the inheritances of future generations and advocate for repair of ongoing damage.

70

Please help to save Oregon's wildlife.

71

I am retired and would help you if you ask and I have the ability to contribute.

72

STOP discriminating against warm water fishermen. There IS so ne thing other than Salmon steelhead and trout.

73

Good luck!

74

Conserving our beleaguered wild spaces, keeping them wild and free of corporate greed is of the utmost
importance.

75

The director should meet with all qualified people in the dept in a round table type discussion once a month to
know what's going on and have once a month public meeting to maintain pubic input and trust.

76

Hunters and fisherman, sportsmen and women, are getting very frustrated with the department. There are huge
trust issues. It seems other political factors and interest groups are more of a factor in deciding policy than actual
facts. Take the wolves. Everyone thinks they are a bad idea, and wonder why they were even reintroduced.
There is so much good information out there against them, it is falling on deaf ears. Not to mention taking away
hunting cougar with dogs. Again, surrendering to special interest groups. It needs to be understood that you only
have control over certain parts of a decision, like reintroducing wolves, but not other factors, as to how fast they
will populate, where they will go, and what they will decide their prey will be (ie, ranch animals). We need
someone who is a leader in the field, that doesn't shy away from new things, but not at the expense of common
sense and throwing away all we have learned over the years. That is just foolishness and makes the department
out to be ridiculed as it is today.

77

Consider that ranchers, hunters and fishermen, while a part of the department's constituency, are not the majority
of its constituency.

78

Your first question includes choices which, though well written, overlap so consistently that "ranking" them is not
actually useful .......

79

Please do not allow an outsider who does not understand and deeply value the treasure that is Oregon or who
does not want to preserve the wilderness for future generations to take this position.

80

Oregon is a beautiful, richly diverse state. I think Oregon's conservation department should be a top priority.

4 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


81

Someone tough, and committed to wildlife.

82

Find out if they're republican. If so RUN.

83

Making sure that this department can withstand the challenges it faces in the future. Maintaining the departments
integrity and an understanding that the existence of one species definitely effects all others species. Looking at
the big picture before making decisions that will dramatically effect the entire ecosystem.

84

Do not vilify warmwater fish.

85

If I were selecting the new director, I would do my best to pick a person who is honest and who does not assign
top priority to the ODFW bureaucracy. The person should emphasize protection of wildlife habitat versus the
traditional over use by resource extraction interests such as miners, loggers and commercial livestock grazers.

86

Public input is very important and should not be ignored.

87

Someone who is not afraid to make the hard decisions and do the right thing

88

Fisheries specialist on the forestry board.

89

I feel not enough has been done to protect wildlife, fish and their living space. I would like a stronger and more
conservation minding director who has the courage to help protect wildlife. thank you

90

No

91

The new Director must be a person of integrity. She must know herself well enough to stand firm in the face of
difficult conflicts and come out always on the side of the mission of the Department which is conservation (not
sale!)of resources.

92

Look for somebody that understands the significance of global warming and the impacts on fish and wildlife, who
supports the ESA and rehabilitation programs and even whistle-blowers.

93

I would prefer someone born and raised in Oregon.

94

This person should view the environment as a system working together and not protecting one part could affect
the whole. They should also know and understand the impact of allowing big corporations to have control and
access to the people's land and resources. For example, the nestle company should not own our water.

95

The person filling this role needs to be a strong individual willing to stand up for fish and wildlife. Conservation
and restoration need to be priorities in order to get things back into balance. There are enough forces working for
the utilization of fish and wildlife as resources at a time when fish and wildlife are dwindling in numbers and
geographic dispersement.

96

Please choose someone that is best for fish and wildlife conservation and can find other ways to generate income
for the department other than compromising the goals of the department.

97

A new Director MUST be conservation minded and not willing to give away our public water for companies that
want to profit from selling it.

98

A need for strength and endurance. Not just in a physical sense, but an ability to tackle difficult objectives, and not
give up major objectives to protect our resources.

99

I sincerely hope whoever is chosen will keep our beloved Gorge safe from development and keep our water safe
and unbottled!

100

The essentials have been covered.

101

That about covers it, thanks.

102

No pesticides should be sprayed on forests.

103

"The new director should protect our public water resources by withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow
Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestle." Yep this is the boiler plate statement that BARK suggested that I use
but the main thing here is I agree with it. No corporation should be allowed to have this kind of latitude no matter
what they offer.

104

We need to keep our public water for public use and NOT sell it off to private companies that don't give a hoot
about our resources.

105

Do the right thing.

5 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


106

Please hire someone that will work with biologists/scientists from an ecosystem perspective on habitat
degradation so that we may "heal" the planet instead of blaming predators because they are the easiest to attack
and avoids blaming the humans that are overfishing and killing natives.

107

not at this time.

108

Non-consumptive ecotourism is already important to the Oregon economy and society, and will only be gaining in
importance as new generations choose their own preferred forms of outdoor recreation.

109

Thank you!

110

Hire someone who has an close relationship with nature not some CEO that see only number on a page and laws
in a book. The real world doesnt work that away.

111

Try to choose someone who had done field work, or someone who enjoys outdoor recreation.

112

No

113

At the current state of the fisheries dept. and the policies they have continued to adopt that Further depletes our
opportunities as sportsmen. ODFW continues to put emphasis on continuing Their failed attempts at restoring
native runs over balancing a combination of hatchery and native fish To provide a catchable quarry in our rivers.

114

Do not select a fisheries manager from the US Fish and Wildlife Service. Consider a fisheries manager from
NOAA-Fisheries specifically their NW Science Center. Or recruit from Academia. Select a scientist as a priority
over an administrator.

115

It is important that the person understands all of the major issues. I would be great if that person could work well
with the stake holders too. We want more than a look good politician.

116

This agency serves the public

117

Use Sceince and the public good before caving to corporations.

118

Good luck with the search!

119

I think being a consensus builder is critical, as well as being a strong leader when tough decisions have to be
made.

120

We want you to protect the animals.

121

perhaps procuring a strong leader from the private sector who has proven success in business and personnel
development already.

122

Offer a bribe to the prospective candidates; if he/she takes it, move on to the next candidate to find who has
moral aptitude for the post.

123

Try not to look so much outside Oregon. What about Native Americans?

124

Please pick a person who has scientific credentials over someone who is politically well-connected. The job
requires an objective mind with long-term outlook in preventing further degradation of our natural systems and
preserving and bolstering the viability of the resources we enjoy in Oregon, which are essential to our identity and
well-being.

125

Allowing the water to flow free, keeps the interest of nature first and foremost, and by doing so allows us to be
conservationists, preservationists and sustainable resource allocation perfectionists. We have already used
plenty of earths 'natural' and unnatural sustained and not so much sustained resources. We must continue to
work with what we have already done, and not abuse the powers of nature any further than we have already done
so.

126

Public outreach -- the "Information & Education" charge -- is essential for the agency to remain relevant. Efforts
appear to be stalled in the mindset that the only value of Fish and Wildlife is their consumption. We need to
advance a vision showing the value of outdoor experiences to people. Connect with outdoor interest groups,
conservation organizations, community organizers, parks and open space advocates. Build a vision of outdoor
experience that is appealing to families. Work with State Parks, watershed councils, 4H, and others to offer
different kinds of family events and workshops.

127

Tell Nestle to go home!

128

Please consider someone with a strong belief in protecting and restoring our forest and water resources over a
person with a 'human' management background. Finding a director from outside the government system could
bring a fresh approach to existing issues.

6 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


129

Current management is wildly outdated. It is geared toward the benefit of hunters, whose population is on the
wane and represents less than five percent of Oregonians. Experience as a hunting and game manager should
NOT be the first priority for selection. Clean water and healthy habit, migration routes and land for wildlife should
be the focus... it's disappearing rapidly - and it should NOT open to motorized destruction and harassment.

130

A person that has empathy and compassion for our wildlife and environment

131

Keep public water sources public. Privatized water sources as Nestl is trying to do in the Gorge is antithetical to
Oregonian principles

132

Until now ODFW has been narrowly focused on hunters and anglers, as if they are the only constituents who
matter. All taxpayers support the department; hunters comprise only 5% of them. Listen to the rest of us. Ban
trapping. Ban killing contests. Fight development that threatens habitat.

133

Conservation and protection of our shared, public, natural resources, should be the very first priority of the new
director.

134

Thank you for the opportunity to share my views. I for one am certainly willing to step forward and help to
brainstorm ways to get nonpolitical, fixed funding for ODFW. My advice is to follow the money. The money,
overwhelmingly, lies with conservationists in Oregon. By denying Nestle, and WIDELY publicizing why ODFW
has done so, ODFW will start the process of engaging its funders. It is so far past time to do this. The current
director's long and great tenure, I believe, is an anomaly. Any daring, effective state wildlife director's political
career could be counted in weeks. Therefore I STRONGLY urge the Commission to make a 5-year commitment
to whoever they hire. That will allow the new hire to take the risks that must be taken if ODFW's future is ever to
be different than its dismal, political fear-based past.

135

There has been a big shift in Oregon in most peoples thinking in the last 15 years to preserving and enhancing
our rivers, the water in them, and their natural habitat for fish and wildlife as well as recreational opportunities.
Allowing Nestle, a private company to bottle and sell our water does not come close to satisfying any of the
ODF&W's or the people of this state's stated goals.

136

Thank you for asking, and for putting this survey out there.

137

Consensus is not always a valuable goal when some groups, sometimes powerful groups, are at odds with
wildlife and fisheries protection. Strength of conviction is more valuable, though harder to find. Also, long-time
residents of Oregon, or at least of the Pacific NW, are more likely to bring a deeper understanding of the issues in
our state than would candidates from elsewhere regardless of how well they and their curriculum vitae may
appear.

138

No... thank you for considering my comments.

139

Better management of critical species and subsequent lands/watersheds

140

Increased gun safety and hunting practices.

141

Good luck and I am hoping Oregon will lead the way with a change to these issues and violations within the
DFW. Thank you for allowing me to be included in this survey.

142

Someone who is unafraid of standing strong for our wildlife and who understands how crucial the preservation of
our wild environments are. If someone is coming from a anthropocentric perspective and not fully aware of
nature's design, complexity and attributes of our region we will not be aiding in its recovery or stabilization. Nature
deserves our humblest and highest respect.

143

The Department of Fish & Wildlife should be an agency that has the best interests of FISH & WILDLIFE as a
priority, not the appeasement of a consumptive minority that thinks animals are there only to be killed for sport,
eaten, or trapped, poisoned, drowned and tortured as "pests". America's wildlife is hanging in by a thread and still
you work with an agency that kills four million animals every year. The Department is in desperate need of
someone with ETHICS.

144

Wildlife and environment is key, is priority...is the reason for this organization's existence

145

Just verify that candidates have no hidden loyalties to counterproductive actors, with criteria for impeachment and
authority to intervene if leadership strays out of the lane.

146

I value Oregon's wildlife and natural resources. Thank you!

147

no

148

Do not cut trees from public land. Restore water sheds. Spend money locally. Employ local workers. Orient every
effort and task to conserve and support the public lands tithe highest environmental standards.

7 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


149

Yes, the people need to feel that the person holding this position is truly about Fish and Wildlife and not just
another bureaucrat that has given up their own power to think about the facts and make good decisions.

150

n/a

151

I appreciate the departments recognition that watchable wildlife important, just like harvestable wildlife. Please
keep access open in as many areas as possible.

152

I'm a fisherman, I value our wilderness, and I also think a sustainably harvested natural bounty is doable and
good for our state.

153

Please choose someone that is wise enough to know that preservation IS the best form of management.

154

ODFW is a public agency that serves the people of Oregon. ODFW does not serve business. You can't drink
money. You can't eat money. Because our current political and economic system equates growth with success
the role of ODFW, as a conservation agency, will continually face growing conflict with that system. The Director
needs to understand that and be willing to take politically unpopular positions, explain them well, rally allies and
convert skeptics. Or we will end up with no wilderness, no wildlife and no fish.

155

This is a unique position because the director has an opportunity to be a voice for the fish and wildlife that
otherwise are at our mercy. Where are the questions of morality in this survey?

156

I want to emphasize that the new director should first and foremost protect our water and not make deals to hand
it over to private enterprise, like Nestle. The new director should protect our public water resources by
withdrawing ODF&W's application to give Oxbow Springs in the Columbia Gorge to Nestl.

157

I would like to think that this individual would come from Oregon or the northwest at least and would have the
backbone to stand up to the powers that be when necessary and that those same powers that be would also have
that individual's back.

158

Think outside the box and let current employees know that embracing new ideas can make them successful as
well.

159

Oregon's resources belong to the people of Oregon. Please select someone who is committed to this value.

160

No

161

Try not to hire a completely political creature. Or if you feel you must, hire one that has a keen respect for and
supports science as a basis for decision making. And did I mention a good sense of humor?

162

Thanks for providing this opportunity for comment

163

Scrutinize candidates for bias in favor of business, whether non profit or for profit, use of our natural resources.

164

No.

165

He or she should understand that they are serving in public trust and that conservation of our precious natural
resources is paramount.

166

""stay ever vigilant to your mission" and work with Integrity

167

Hunting is a tradition in my family but none of the youngest generation are involved. I think this is emblematic of
the vast change in perspective in our society. This new director has to look at how best to translate the values of
the natural environment in ways that ensure Oregon will have clean water and a landscape that supports a
thriving state -- and that doesn't mean extraction, mining, and extensiie logging. We all know those times have
passed and do not hold the most promsing future for the people of Oregon.

168

the new director should take a firm stand for the sustainability of our fish and wildlife, and protect our public
resources

169

No.

170

Please hire someone who is more interested in protecting fish and wildlife for their intrinsic value, rather than for
hunting purposes.

171

I advocate for wild fish versus hatchery program depleting native stock

172

Please return to your mission.... protect and preserve for the entire public, for the environment.

8 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


173

A seriously unclouded view of meeting the department's mission statement: "to protect and enhance Oregon's fish
and wildlife and their habitats for use and enjoyment by present and future generations." Decisions made with
radical conservation in mind, never financial profit.

174

Do good.

175

I hope that the new director will represent all Oregonians and not just hunters. I hope that he or she understands
the value of native predators, bans trapping as incredibly barbaric and outdated and promotes nonlethal
strategies in dealing with predator/livestock competition. Please remember those of us who love wildlife and the
forest for the beauty they offer - and not the pelt.

176

Make this survey more visible to the public before the selection process takes place ! Thank you!

177

No. ########### did a nice job. Science not politics should guide policy. The Agency should work with
Agriculture and Forestry to allow more timber harvests to increase ungulate habitat. This should be a combined
governmental agency mission and would help Oregon with increased jobs, income and ultimately, habitat. Better
crackdown on landowner tags. Landowners are, at times, abusing their depredation rights. And finally, and not
really within your control, but worth my last rant: Coyote hunting ought to be allowed in certain urban areas,
where safe, for predator and nuisance control reasons.

178

I believe there has been a longstanding favoritism for the commercial gill nets on the lower Columbia river system.
I believe we need to get nets off the Columbia altogether and promote a sports fishing industry that will bring more
tourist dollars to the state. The recreational fisherman is significantly more lucrative to the economy in Oregon than
the small remaining pocket of commercial fisherman. Its pure economics look at how successful the great
lakes have been in managing the resource. Concerned Oregonian

179

your drop down options did not work

180

Put heavy emphasis on filling the position with a woman.

181

Be fair in our choice. If you truly want to help protect our wildlife and their habitats, please be open to public
comment and include them in your decisions. This is not a war. We are all in this together......hopefully. To
protect, not just to kill.

182

More money is spent by those who wish to view nature rather than hunting it, tearing through it with destructive
ATVs and snowmobiles. Their voices are not heard over those of the hunting and ranching lobby. Remember all
those whom you serve. Especially the natural world. They cannot lobby on their behalf.

183

Make sure the person you select has the right values to care for the wildlife and not someone who has an ulterior
motive. Make them accountable for their actions.

184

Please choose a strong leader who has the backbone to stand up to industry and stakeholders who don't have
the best interest of wildlife or wild habitat in mind. We need a leader who will be uncompromising in doing what is
best for the wild animals they are sworn to protect and serve no matter what the profit margins say. Thank you.

185

The image of Canada as a whole in the world is becoming one of revolting cruelty to animals and total disregard
for their welfare. Hopefully you will pick someone who will go some way to changing this

186

Please, choose wisely and make your choice a person who will fight to protect all wildlife from the greed of those
for whom money has more value than life.

187

Although it is not a requirement, it would be ideal if the person who gets the job has first hand knowledge on all
aspects of the job, including hunting and fishing. I will keep you in my prayers as you go through the selection
process. Thank you for all you do.

188

It is not as critical that the director be a biologist. Rely on staff for the biological expertise. He or she must be an
effective manager able to work with a number of diverse interests

189

Please find a director with a degree in wildlife biology, ecology or conservation. Oregon's wilderness is critical for
the health of everyone and for too long, the focus has been on logging, mining, fishing and hunting. We need
someone with real vision who will protect and conserve the wild lands, plants and animals that make Oregon so
special.

190

No more aerial shooting of wolves. Farmers get compensated for their loss. No excuse. Farmers and ranchers
should keep land free of dead animals and stay off public lands.

191

Thank you for the ODFW opportunity to comment.

192

Choose a leader who appeals to science and logic in making choices regarding land use. And someone who gets
that the resources don't just belong to those who pay for a hunting license.

9 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


193

Someone like ########### would be very good, but #### is needed by the wolves. Please select someone who
values all of Oregon's wildlife species and balanced ecosystems, not someone who just thinks of our wildlife as
targets in a shooting gallery, or expendable for profit. Oregon needs someone who has evolved through
education.

194

Please don't allow any traps. They are cruel.

195

That person selected needs to be capable of speaking to diverse groups in the state.

196

I just want the person to have a clear background and not be on the payroll of this or that group !!!

197

I hope the department will select someone who is really concerned with resource conservation in the true sense
of the word. Just because there are loud voices demanding that their political view be the only thing considered, I
hope the department hires someone strong enough to stand with science and policies that truly conserve
resources, and protect wildlife.

198

I think you need to find someone who truly loves animals and nature. Only with that kind of personal passion will
the director be truly effective.

199

Get new leadership that listens to staff instead of telling them to shut up. Would not support interim director as
new director. Not a critical or strategic thinker.

200

Hire someone who ran a public sector corporation and know what its like to try and meet a budget, motivate
people and get results.

201

I'm opposed to lead based ammunition I'm for closing and reclaiming old, obsolete logging roads in our state and
national forests I'm for protection of wolves and am excited that they are returning to our Oregonian ecosystem

202

The emphasis on hunting and fishing has always been the number one priority of ODFW, but times are changing,
and ODFW needs to change as well. Promoting non-game wildlife activities can more than make up for the
economic losses due to the decline of hunting and fishing. ODFW needs to step up to the plate and address this
issue head-on. Any ODFW employees that don't want to be part of this should look for other employment.

203

Conservation, conservation, conservation... Science, science, science...

204

Choose someone who wants to see animals thrive, not die.

205

We need a person who has a strong background and education in biology and how the current climate change is
destroying our wild life.

206

Why asking us, you already make your choice. This is just a formality, so you don't get sue.

207

The Director needs to ensure that policy across the Districts are consistent and do not operate as fiefdoms.

208

I would like to express the need for a director with the interests of hunters and anglers in mind. Second only to
populations of our wildlife and habitat for them. True sportsmen are also key conservationists. The director must
realize the importance that sportsmen play. Also, rising costs are limiting many avid sportsmen to minimal
activities involving odfw. Can we come up with ways to cut fees for residents and reward the support of those
individuals?

209

Today's workforce likes to be part of the conversation and able to manage their goals and careers. Moving from a
top down style of management to more of a consensus style of management will be helpful.

210

This must be a unique individual. More than anything else, this person must have a passion for the conservation
and protection of fish and wildlife, with a wholistic concept of ecosystems. He or she must be suitably educated in
the biological sciences, with an acumen and successful administrative and leadership background. He or she
must be able to develop a department, a team, responsible to the State of OR's fish and wildlife policies and
public confidence.

211

We need another proponent of " what can we do?" like we need another hole in a bucket. We need proactive and
passionate people who are willing to actively participate in the preservation of apex predators which are key to
any efforts to maintain a healthy ecosystem.

212

Thank you for allowing for public comment in such an easy and available method. I sincerely hope that the
changes in attitude in the general public towards wildlife is allowed to override the selfish desires of an everdecreasing, but vocal and well-funded minority of persons that want to exploit our wildlife through hunting.

213

Listen to the people, not just beaurocratics

10 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


214

This is a pivotal position at a pivotal time in Oregon's management. Thank you for asking for input. I hope that
your request is widely announced. I am cognizant that we must speak for those who cannot speak for
themselves. This land doesn't just belong to the people who live here. Thank you for acting responsibly.

215

Not really.

216

Someone who defends wildlife from the pro-hunt lobby. Someone who realizes that wolves and bears are
ESSENTIAL to a healthy ecosystem!

217

Oregon is nearly split 50/50, public versus private land. I believe it is essential the agency be decentralized, and
maintain the current network of dispersed, grassroots level fish and wildlife district and field level offices,
hatcheries, and WMA's. Avoid closing down and consolidating district and field offices. One of ODFW's strengths
has been it's strong core of knowledgeable professionals that know the resources, people, landowners, and other
agencies in their respective work areas.

218

As a member of the watershed council community, I greatly value ODFW staff as partners and technical experts,
who contribute to restoration project development and education.

219

Use this opportunity to seek candidates who are visionaries, good administrators, smart thinkers, good science
background and not just a good ole' boy from some traditional fish and game background.

220

The Director should be mindful of what local ODF&W wildlife biologists are doing and should be accountable to
the public for their actions. He/she should truly care about and be the spokesperson for our wildlife. If not, then
who will? Of course, there are many citizens who are wildlife advocates, but the Director should be a strong
wildlife advocate.

221

A person with a biology or zoology background in science who is sympathetic to all the nature lovers and wildlife
watchers whose experience is often ruined by gunshots, frightened animals, injured animals , hunting dogs, gut
piles and vultures. Someone who can think outside the hunters box, create refuge for wildlife and when it is
abundant again you can charge to gain access to view it you will make 10 times the money as you do from
hunters. Take a look at how Costa Rica did it.

222

Can you pick someone who encourages/directs employees to partner with NMFS with regard to the recognition
and the use of their science? ODFW seems to "create" their science as they go along, basing it observation only
without regard to bonafide reserach results.

223

A scientific background would be veery effective in understanding the issues.

224

Want to see a director that will have the vision to consider all of its constituents desires including those that
promote a more scientific and diverse approach to wildlife management. To consider conservation as a real goal
by including some refuges from hunting. To develop and implement regulations that include products that were
created by working with multiple stakeholders including conservationists. Ensure that all wild animals are
provided fair seasons, bag limits, and that predators receive protections more in line with other species. To
implement and maintain predator plans in advance that will require non lethal strategies as a first response, to
consider no hunting of wolves when they are delisted, an outright ban of killing contests, to eliminate trapping and
snaring as outdated, inhumane and ecologically destructive forms of hunting.

225

You will need to deal with the fact that ODFW employees are highly motivated, but suffer from a 'not invented
here' complex. They will be suspicious of any director brought in from outside, but at the same time, sometimes
an outsider can see the big picture more clearly than someone steeped in agency tradition. If considering an
insider, make sure that the person can see a long term strategy and know how to deal with growing conservatism
in the political arena; this is critical given that most fish and wildlife habitat is in rural, conservative portions of the
state. If considering an outsider, make sure that he/she has a realistic grasp of how suspicious employees will be
and has a functional plan for developing trust within the department while dealing with political realities. We have
already seen how badly this can go!

226

Get someone with some common sense not just a degree. ODFW is in bad shape, need a change of direction to
get our state outdoor resources back to where they should be

227

I'd love to see someone with a strong background in Conservation Biology and Ecology.

228

Not at this time. Thank you.

229

Hunting isn't how the majority of people experience wilderness, and the prospective director should have spent
the majority of his/her time in the wild unarmed.

230

Thanks for surveying opinion on this topic.

231

No

11 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


232

I hope the Director will consider an outright ban on killing contests. These contests are an affront to the vast
majority of people who want to visit and passively interact with our amazing wildlife, by fighting to see who can
slaughter more animals.

233

Thank you for your wonderful work. Oregon is such a treasure, and I really appreciate you working to maintain
our gem.

234

dedication to the job and wildlife of the north west.

235

Find a person that participates ethically in hunting and fishing activities but has a strong understanding of wildlife
and habitat management beyond game animals (non game wildlife) Someone that will intelligently stand up to
political pressure from the Executive and Legislative branches of our State and Federal government when
necessary and scientifically supported. Not a political hack. A good understanding of of state and political
process. Good interpersonal communicator and debater. A person who has the ability to find and hire or select
food staff and advisors. Someone who then listens to advisors and then use them to help him make decisions.
(Not yes men (persons).

236

DO NOT hire someone with past employment with the Cattlemen's Association, the NRA, or any kind of prohunting or pro-ranching group! These are special interest organizations in clear conflict with the majority of the
public on conservation and wildlife, who expect the government to "take care" of their predator "problem" without
investing any time or money in a scientific method of understanding or cooperating with them. Don't hand over
our tax dollars to those who would destroy our environment for profit.

237

No, but thanks for the opportunity to comment.

238

We need someone who understands and values the science of long term sustainability. Someone who does not
have any conflicts of interest when making difficult descisions.

239

The nation watches the State of Oregon for guidance into the proper way to protect and enhance wildlife... The
Director should reflect the future of human wildlife interactions from those of "using wildlife" to those of "living with
wildlife".

240

The dept is not supportive of Wildlife Rehabilitation services which save 1,000's of phone calls to the dept asking
for help when the public finds an injured or orphaned wild animal - because that service is available. The US
Humane Society supports Wildlife Rehabilitation and I'd like to see coalition with them by the dept to better
understand what they do. ODFW is using rehabilitators as animal control instead of letting them fulfill their mission
of animal welfare, expecting rehabilitators to kill non-native species that enter their center. This should NOT be
the burden of rehabilitators. The impact of non-native releases by rehabilitators is minimal and does not impact
the population enough to make that a reasonable expectation. If ODFW could eradicate a species it is plausible
but that will never happen. Most states consider a wild animal native if they have been here so many years and
Oregon should follow suit.

241

please pick somebody good:)

242

Thank you for taking comments, I hope they're helpful for your selection process. ########################

243

Please try and lower the cost of tags between the tags and fuel cost hunting used to be a great outdoor recreation
for my family, now its a burden with the cost of participation and never getting a animal hope we can keep these
cost low so our children can contunue a heritage we have all grown up to love Thank you

244

Good luck, this is a tough job.

245

Please know there are many who have been very frustrated with current and past policies of management which
provide hatchery fish instead of habitat for native runs, the corporatization of hunting in the state and the huge
increase in user fees. It seems you mission is to provide a playground for the rich, not a place where all
Oregonian can participate

246

We must let nature be nature. Please hire someone who will protect the wilderness and the animals who live
there. The days of of FWS being a killing machine MUST end.

247

no

248

Stand firm on science based wolf management, which seems to suggest up to 20-25% annual reduction once a
viable genetic connectivity has been established as in the NRM. Lethal removal of problems wolves needs to be
a priority consistent with the state management plan.

249

Just please don't hire some government employee drone. We need someone with guts and passion.

12 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


250

The new Director must be an outdoor lover, NOT a hunter, must care totally about the environment and the
habitats of the animals living in Oregon, must be open to new scientific studies and be approachable and to be
able to listen to all points of view given to him/her.

251

someone that can see past the constraints of a resource bound economy

252

I was pleased to learn of the recent agreement with ODOT regarding culvert improvement vs. new bridges. This
is the kind of cooperation a new director should pursue.

253

NO

254

Hiring someone with a conservation background would be a much needed change from years of 'managing'
wildlife to mainly benefit hunting interests. It's time to modernize F&W agencies so that they reflect the interests
of the vast majority of Americans, which is to treat, protect and recognize all species (including predators and non
game species) as valuable parts of a healthy ecosystem.

255

Legitimate traditional hunters and anglers, hikers, campers, rafters, bird watchers, non-motorized boaters, and
lovers of all things wild, of which there are many in our state, will be the Director's best allies. He or she needs to
communicate with them, and be able to do that. He or she needs to understand that Oregonians want to be able to
sit down to a wild salmon dinner for generations into infinity. We want to see all types of our wildlife flourish. We
want to be surrounded by intact ecosystems, with wolves and wolverines, lots of salmon, sage grouse, wild horses,
coastal birds, all of it! Someone who is excited by the prospect of wildlife management in such a place
and has the strength and competence and intelligence to do it well is who we want.

256

Someone who can see what we all have in common and not just how we differ.

257

Someone that is pro wildlife and not just a desk to occupy and collect a paycheck. Someone truly dedicated to
highest good for wildlife.

258

Think outside of the box instead of internal promotion through attrition.

259

Finding someone who finds non-lethal methods to control species population.

260

Did I mention forestry practices?

261

Please don't depend only on experience, We have seen so many people in our country in charge that have tons
of experience. That doesn't seem to make a good keeper of our Earth. Education is important. This person needs
to be aware of the issues and has experience in helping to develop creative solutions and being able to reach out
to other concerned persons with similar goals of diversity, balance and cooperation between life forms.

262

find someone who knows how to get things done efficiently, and can take action before a problem happens.

263

You need someone who is not afraid to say "no" to big-monied interests.

264

Make sure they're not a hunter!

265

I and most of my friends and family try to protect all wild life and especially have a love for wolves. There is a lot
of hate for them and need to be protected more, I believe, than most other animals. That means going after
farmers, land owners, and hunters that use ANY excuse they can to kill them. Most of them get away with a slap
on the hand and some not at all. They all need to get investigated and charged just like any other criminal. Fines
and jail time go a long way as a deterrent.

266

Distance yourselves from the rogue federal killing machine, FDFWS, which is responsible for killing millions of
animals in the US every year mostly without justification. Set a good example that at the state level you can be
responsible managers of the land and its wildlife.

267

Hope it is fair and just and not politically motivated

268

A strong independence from industry is essential. A broad thinking and questioning orientation will give the future
director the tools to work with all Oregonians to maintain the health and welfare of fish and wildlife - human
welfare is no more important than the health and welfare of our wildlife.

269

Allow the biologists to be biologists without forcing the politics into their decisions. This agency hires biologists
because they understand the science behind the ecosystem etc. Do not muzzle them.

270

I feel very strongly that the next director should be selected from within. Oregon has challenges specific to
Oregon.

271

Pick a fair and unbiased person.

272

Someone who strongly wants to protect the planet from destruction.

13 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


273

What is his/ her vision for a future that is inclusive for everyone to have opportunities to enjoy oregon's natural
resources? How will he/ she help create and implement a more equitable future?. How will he/ she engage
communities of color ? What is her/ his track record in this area?

274

Hire someone who cares more about fish & wildlife than politics.

275

From what I have seen, the DFW has been doing a dismal job and does not have a good reputation. They (you)
have killed millions of animals. Stop giving in the the meat industry and hunters. Stop the use of herbicides on
conserved land. Block any genetic engineering in fish and/ or wildlife (I'm thinking fish farming here) before GMO
fish contaminate wild stocks. Support much stiffer penalties for poaching and animal abuse.

276

Listen to you local sustainable, organic farmers, gardeners, wildlands and watershed restoration groups; they are
the ones tending the earth in a responsible manner. They are setting an example for others to follow successfully.
Not to sound like a broken record, but the bottom line is that we need to partner with nature. Humans have been
fighting nature for ten thousand years now and look at what the results have been. It's time for a fundamental
structural change in our relationship to the planet. Earth is a haven of life in the dead vacuum of space and we
need to care for our Space Ship Earth if we want our Life Support System to continue functioning.

277

Primarily just to prioritize the environment over noise, money and other exploitation.

278

Maintain PROTECTIONS FOR ALL WILDLIFE, do NOT allow hunting/fish on PUBLIC land! PROTECT
ENDANGERED SPECIES and follow a SCIENCE based program to PROTECT Wildlife AND the Environment!

279

I think the future director not only should be a biologist but experienced with wildlife, conservation and ecology...
As well as predator-prey knowledge would be good. Management skills, but excellent negotiating and working
with controversial issues between parties involved. We do not need anyone to past the buck.

280

Must have the backbone and wit to say no to Energy utilities and developers

281

They must have an extreme sense of ethics and love of all wildlife and a need to defend the environment from all
those who will destroy it. I want my grandchildren (not born yet) to grow up in a place that treasures all things in a
place where there are still forests, wildlife and rivers and all that wonderful scenery that goes along with it.

282

We have trust in ODFW's professional standards. Thank you!.

283

Nope

284

DIDN'T LIKE THE 1ST QUESTION AND THEN HAVING ALL THE OTHER NUMBERS FILLED IN.

285

A candidate must have a knowledge of the science of fish biology, climate change, water protection and Ocean
protection.

286

Please ensure that the new director is a person with scientific integrity and a desire to see wild animals protected
instead of endlessly exploited.

287

Vet thoroughly while keeping this process operating at a "realistic" level in the realisation that you are looking at
human beings.

288

First and foremost, the position requires A TRAINED SCIENTIST, NOT A POLITICIAN. Science-based decisions
and management is absolutely critical for the agency.

289

Also consider limiting the amount of bears killed in Oregon. While biologists might deem the population healthy
enough to withstand a fair amount taken each season, it is sad to walk through the forest in Oregon and never
see a bear, whereas in CA, I have seen 23 in the wild- just this summer working in a national park. Even at
Crater Lake, bears are seldom seen because they are scared of the hunts that occur outside the park. In Oregon
I have seen scat and tree scars from bears, but no bears. Also, please create a ban on killing any radio-collared
animals, as one of the bears that was collared at Crater Lake was killed by a hunter.

290

This state needs a leader who will place, above all else, sound scientific principals. The evidence upon which the
decisions to which he has been delegated by the Commission should be peer reviewed and produced by
researchers who have no industry ties that may influence their conclusions. When there is conflicting science
with respect to an issue, the Director should err on the side of precaution. It is better to overprotect than to under
protect. The Director should also not be biased in favor of wildlife valued by hunters and fishers in such a manner
that impairs his or her ability to maintain healthy ecosystems, not just healthy game populations.

14 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


291

I think that it is absolutely time, and likely past time, to implement forward-looking policies. The current systems,
at least for anadramous and some freshwater fish, are ineffective and a poor use of taxpayer money. Please
increase focus on habitat restoration, improvement in water quality, and overall ecosystem 'health'. While there
will always be a very vocal opposition to such efforts, please be assured that while loud this opposition is the
minority by far. The great majority of Oregonians would prefer to see their lands managed responsibly, with
healthy, self-sustaining populations of native plants and animals.

292

Ranchers who are using public lands for cattle grazing should be thankful they get to use these lands at such a
discounted rate. I want to use public land to dig up precious stones but I can't, yet I am a taxpayer too. I want to
enjoy wildlife on "my" public land too but there seems to be this inequality in treatment that prevents my voice
from being heard, while the ranchers and hunters' voices are heard loud and clear: kill the mountain lions, kill the
bears, kill the wolves, kill the coyotes, trap the bobcats, etc... For once I think we should have a Director who is
FOR wildlife. That would be my fervent wish. I am foreign born (from Vietnam) and I saw the effect of too eager
development pace: bare forests, I saw few birds there than anywhere else I've been too. I've always thought
Americans are benevolent to animals. It really breaks my heart to find out the truth: your agency slaughters so
many wild animals to help those ranchers who take their sheep or cattle to BLM lands, leave them there to graze
then come pick them up at the end of the day and they expect their workday to be this easy, never mind that there
ARE other animals around there and some of them are predators. They have it so good here; the government is
benevolent to special interest groups, because wild animals can't speak for themselves.

293

I have generally been disappointed by ODFW's approach to management - especially when it comes to predator
control. It is time that your science and priorities caught up with the times, and you appreciated the important role
of top predators in regulating our wildlife populations and ecosystems.

294

No career politicians. We need environment people.

295

That about covers it.

296

Most important among the many wildlife issues is restoring balance to predator populations. Wildlife Services and
ODFW have done a real disservice to Oregonians through their aggressive predator control policies. That must
stop and predators must be given the chance to come into balance at natural population levels, even if it means
less deer and elk for hunters.

297

This is great that you are actually taking a survey! Wonderful and I hope that people acknowledge this move for
feedback and that the Dept finds it helpful.

298

Check the background , education , and political leanings . Make sure there are no big oil, pharma , gas or money
involved in choosing this candidate

299

It is time to hire someone who is more a conservationist than a manager. You should hire someone who lives and
breathes enhancing fish and wildlife, not someone whose goal is to keep all sides happy. I want a leader more
than a conciliator.

300

There are very good reasons why science and policy are divided. Science is often far from finite. ODFW needs a
leader, not a tool for the legislature to manipulate.

301

Yes. Please think in the long-term. Short-term fears will not serve us.

302

Involve the tribes honor the precautionary principle. Fight the corporate infiltration of the ODFW.

303

You need someone that is passionate about wolves just to keep them left alone

304

We should strive for Oregon's ODFW to set the standard for all other states. Priorities should be fish and wildlife
first, public second, corporate BS last. :)

305

This person needs to reflect that Oregon does what coexistence with all wildlife including the apex predators and
educating the pubic in non lethal management of wildlife.

306

I hope that a wide net is made for candidates and that all views, types of relevant experience, and potentials are
considered.

307

Do the right thing to get and keep sustainable populations that are right for NATURE - not man...

308

Please hire someone with a broader vision, who can pass that vision to staff. I realize that I have dealt only with
the middle management folks, but across the board, they were focused on micromanaging the policies that they
had defined, even when science and years of experience showed that the policies were, at best, ineffective, and,
at worst, harmful to wildlife. Resource management for a healthy ecosystem, not for hunters and sheep farmers,
is what Oregon needs. thank you.

15 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


309

Good luck and I know you will make a wonderful choice!

310

Choose wisely!

311

Oregon has been at the forefront of animal protection. It recently became the only state that has a dedicated
animal cruelty prosecutor on staff. This deputy DA recently successfully convicted an abuser to more than 100
separate counts of animal cruelty to livestock. Oregon courts have taken the lead to distinguish that animal cruelty
against each animal should count as separate counts of cruelty. Let us not drop the ball when it comes to wildlife
in this state. Please appoint someone that will further the cause for animals above commercial (e.g. industrial
agriculture, paper, and other industries) and private interests. Thank you.

312

A person with a scientific background and understanding of all wildlife and the role wildlife plays in our lives.

313

I really really really hope that you spend time on this process to be sure that the woman or man that you hire really
fits the bill....ODFW has such a huge role in the health and well-being of the wild ones and wild places in our
state.

314

Check the candidates backgrounds for political affiliations. KNOW who you're hiring.

315

Don't hire anyone who thinks of living beings as a "resource".

316

broaden the scope of stake holders in decision making so that a variety of interests are included.

317

Pick someone with boots in the field and a true first hand knowledge of Oregon's remaining wilderness.

318

I support conservation and protection of animal & fish habitat & species. Thanks & good luck.

319

Ethical, can't be bought

320

Please no more "good old boy". Find somebody who won't allow another shortfall like this one. If that means
going outside of the fish and wildlife bubble, then do it. Find us somebody who can really manage the
department, not run around putting out fires. We won't survive another mess like this one.

321

Seek candidates who are not already part of the current wildlife management system. Seek candidates who are
not hunters or fishers or engaged in businesses that support those interests. Individuals with strong background
in ecology, conservation, sociology should be considered for the position.

322

The fact that the department is asking for our input is a great step forward I hope our thoughts are truly
considered. Thanks for the opportunity.

323

Yes, while restrictions do good for protecting populations, they sometimes are too restrictive. Example, gear
restrictions were put in place to protect salmon from snagging on the Salmon river. The snagging problem was
confined to tidewater and the bay in September & October, but the gear restriction goes all the way up to mile
post 12 on the river and through the month of November. You can't drift fish corkies, eggs or spin glows in
November for steelhead in the river. Access for anglers is critical, most rivers with hatcheries are open to fishing
but there is very little access. ODFW could take a close look at what's available for access and shift it's focus for
stocking to those rivers. I want to see you get a Director that has common sense and processes all information
before making decisions.

324

no.

325

Make sure the new person stays a decent amount of time, unlike the recent Education guy Crew.

326

get someone in there that will help this department, Not hurt it. there is alot of poeple disappointed in ODFW.

327

Thank you for this opportunity to share my thoughts.

328

Go for the long game. Oregon is well ahead of most states in protecting and appreciating its natural areas and
wildlife. It's not going to get any easier. In the balance between conservation and usage, lean toward
conservation.

329

Truly conserve by never killing!

16 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


330

Our last person had great potential. It is too bad he did not do things like save our habitat, explain the Oregon law
ORS 496.012 is the same as the common law ferae naturae. That statute also states that wildllife policy of our
state is to prevent the depletion of indigenious species and maintain optimum levels of wildlife for all citizens
present and future to enjoy. That means standing up to politics of out of state corporations. That means having
the guts and ethics to do the right thing. That has not been accomplished by ODFW. It means answering hunters
letters. It means recognizing the 30 year study of Blacktail Deer instead of starting another study which is not
necessary and not doing anything to get it going to avoid dealing with outside money interests who do not care
about our wildlife and their habitat.

331

Hire someone who isn't beholden to outdated strategies, and get somebody with new ideas. The Governor
shouldn't be able to order policies rejected by the votes of the people in a General Election. We need a new
leadership style, and a Director with some backbone to implement alternative approaches.

332

Thank you for the opportunity to give my opinion.

333

Increase the quantity of hatchery smolts and planting programs.

334

Get a biologist/manager who can make significant changes to help Oregon become a leader in fish and wildlife
management again. Please hire someone who will stand up for staff, not roll over, and make a difference for
Oregon's fish, wildlife, and biologists' who work hard everyday to make a difference.

335

I think you should reach outside the agency and get someone from a completely different culture.

336

To right the agency's listing ship, ODFW will need a director that people like but that is not afraid to speak hard
truths and make hard changes.

337

Please look outside the agency for candidates.

338

Wolves are re-establishing in Oregon. I hope that the state will recognize the vast opportunity for tourism as a
source of revenue and balance this with ranching, agriculture and hunting interests. Plainly said, I would hate to
see wolves eradicated again because of fear and misunderstanding. It is my opinion that deer herds especially,
and specifically west of the cascades can only benefit by the natural predator and perhaps when they move
around in natural historic ranges we will see a decline in the disease rates that have affected deer that are
densely populated. I base my opinion on the success story of yellowstone and the resulting health of deer, elk
and even salmon populations that were improved after reintroduction. Thank you for the opportunity to voice my
opinion.

339

The department has become increasingly difficult to work with in recent years. New director needs to change
culture in ODFW to one that works with the public versus against them.

340

No

341

The emerging demographic in Oregon are those that appreciate wildlife alive (rather than dead), are extremely
concerned about the loss of biodiversity and extinction and view much of what ODFW promotes as preferencial to
sport-hunters/firearms culture, rather than overall conservation. Many independent scientists believe that
past/current ODFW management (predator hunting/trapping/lethal control) is ecologically risky and may
exacerbate species decline and extinction.

342

I want someone who stands up to the enviromental groups and works to provide a better wildlife ecosystem than
we currently have.

343

Sometimes I'm concerned the department focuses too much on game species management. A director who can
balance the focus on game and nongame species management will best serve Oregonians. It will take someone
who believes in the value of nongame wildlife and conservation even if that area doesn't bring in revenue. And
again, we can't forget about people and how their behavior is a key factor in natural resources management.
Think about social science applications as well.

344

Sometimes I feel that as a nature lover, I am divorced from the main tenet of ODFW which seems to exist to
nurture game animals and target fish in order to sell licenses. I think our issues are much bigger than that.
Climate change MUST be anticipated and accounted for as it affects all of us. I can only hope that we can break
the old same old same old role and find an enthusiastic candidate who is willing to effect change on every level of
ODFW. How wonderful it would be if we could become a true role model for the world in sensible and humane
management of all our wildlife creatures!

345

I would prefer someone with "hands on" experience with Pacific Northwest issues.

346

Yes, be upfront about what your intentions are. Don't hide facts from the public. Don't participate in hunting
contests or frivolous killing such as killing bears during cub season. Ideally trapping should be banned. It is
extremely cruel to trap an animal in steel jawed traps and leave them there to suffer until a hunter gets there.

17 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


347

The director needs to consider the views of ALL Oregonians, not just a narrow sampling of hunters and anglers.
Thank you for the opportunity to express my views.

348

MOVE FORWARD. Get out of the death for profit business.

349

HAVING MORE AREAS OPEN TO DISABLED HUNTERS. I CAN'T WALK VERY FAR OR BEND AND LIFT SO I
NEED TO USE MY QUAD TO DO THESE THINGS. I HAD TO DRAG A BUCK OVER A HALF MILE BECAUSE
I COULDN'T USE MY QUAD TO RETRIEVE IT. I WOULDN'T RIDE OVER BUSHES OR TEAR UP THE
GROUND TO DO THIS.

350

I would like to see a director who is transparent and open to public discussion of policies.

351

A true conservationist please with humane intentions.

352

I suggest looking at the qualities of the directors in States like Idaho who are doing a good job managing wildlife
and seek an applicant with those skills. Wildlife management in Oregon is a mess and it will take a very strong
person to take on the challenge of fixing it.

353

He or she should be from Oregon Period

354

Please select a conservation minded individual with a strong environmental background.

355

I wish very much that there were a good many game wardens throughout the state. There really too much
poaching going on. Overall, on a scale of 1 to 10, I would rate ODFW operation and the result of it in the real
world, as a 6.5. Thank you for letting me have opportunity to give input.

356

Thank you for the opportunity to comment. I was pleased by many of the decisions the ODFW Commission
made at their last meeting. Keep up the good work.

357

The best person will be the one with true passion for the mission and the state. They should also exhibit strong
but fair leadership. Look for that above past experience and credentials.

358

yes, believe that the Director should be looking to promote animal welfare, protection of all animal species, and
not immediately look to culling wildlife. I think they should promote the ban of trapping on public lands, and other
humane ways to protect livestock. thank you

359

I would hope that the new Director possess, and use, common sense in the administration of his/her duties.
She/he needs a strong educational and experiential background in wildlife "management". I would hope that this
person would know that nature's way is far superior to man's in most instances. So many time well intentioned
actions have resulted in very serious negative consequences. I would like to see this person truly believe in the
mission statement of the ODFW. I would want the Director to Protect and Restore wildlife habitat. And, in order,
to do all this he would need to have excellent people skills to elicit cooperation and partnership in reaching these
goals.

360

Please don't select a person who only is beholding to the consumptive users and businesses.

361

Some one with some backbone willing to take some heat right or wrong.

362

Please appoint a director who will consider the views of ALL Oregonians, not just the hunting/trapping/angling
constituency. I do not hunt or trap or fish but I love wildlife. I love hiking and photography of wildlife and just
knowing the animals still have a place to thrive and serve their role in our natural world without always coming in
last to the diverse and ever-present demands of man. Thank you so much, ODFW, for asking for my thoughts on
this important matter.

363

Understanding that the DIRECTOR position is filled by the Governor with no outside interference, also
understanding that, based on actions since his most recent tenure, Oregon's current Governor has no real
knowledge or concern for most functional "on the ground" workings for Oregon's future AND having worked
fulltime alongside many, many of the "workers" within ODFW, I would HAVE to say that ODFW with NEED to
redirect it's way of thinking AWAY from the "many chiefs, ignore the Indians" mindset to treating the BACKBONE
of the organization, the "boots on the ground" force like they REALLY MEANT SOMETHING to ODFW'S
successes rather than merely a "RESOURCE" !!

364

No, thank you for allowing public input.

365

Wildlife policy has emerged as a major animal welfare concern in Oregon. I am hoping for a compassionate and
efficient leader that values our wildlife, who doesn't sell out to trophy hunters and trappers for the sake of their
financial gain, at the price of the wildlife that belongs to all of us.

18 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


366

I am disapointed right now in the removal of the wild horses in Bly from their natural habitat .. seems we should be
grazing cattle on public land only if there is room for them and that doesn't infringe on our wildlife .. Our wildlife is
important to everybody .. So it would be important for that person to share that view ..

367

Someone that is not detached and cold towards the environment, but heavily emotionally and logically attached to
working towards the goal of protecting our wildlife.

368

Please let this new director be open to new ways of thinking. There are probably already too many people on this
planet to always strive for the way things have always been done in the past.

369

Thank you for creating this opportunity for public input!

370

Good Luck on picking someone. Wrong person could bring chaos.

371

Get rid of the union!! They have created two separate internal departments that are at odds with one another and
not focusing on the actual work of ODFW and the goal made to each stakeholder in the state of Oregon.

372

Please select someone who understands the interests of outdoorsman. Someone who will guide us in the right
direction while bettering fishing/hunting opportunities.

373

Not a bureaucrat, please.

374

Again, I would like to reiterate the importance of wildlife rehabilitator knowledge to be of use as to how ODFW
can help protect Oregon's wildlife from human/natural reasons. With this knowledge prevention and education
courses can thus be implemented.

375

We need a leader who can move beyond bureaucratic practices enacted by the Commission that don't serve the
public fairly. Ie, the new parking permit is called an "annual" permit, which is annual only one day of the year
(January 1); if it is purchased on January 2, it is only valid for 364 days, since it runs out Dec 1, no matter when it
is purchased. No other agency permit is "calendar" based, (in the words of the ODFW Commissioners).

376

The next leader of ODFW must look beyond hunting and fishing as their primary priority. While these are some of
the stakeholders, they do not represent all Oregonians.

377

Yes Get off your asses and get something done before we have nothing left!

378

Require the NFL's Rooney Rule. There must be at least one person of color in the finalist pool in order to
complete the hire. If there is not a candidate of color, re-open the search and hire a firm that can find a qualified
candidate of color.

379

Look outside of the current top level managers within the Department. New blood with new ideas is critical. For
example, look at the success of Montana and use that as a model for leading ODFW and the state of Oregon in a
new direction.

380

PLEASE DO NOT HIRE A LIBERAL POLITICIAN - YOU CAN SEE HOW LIBERAL POLITICIANS LIKE GOV.
KITZHAUBER HAVE RUINED OUR STATE AND SPENT MILLIONS UNNECCESARILY - IE.: COVER
OREGON.

381

Please consider a Director that truly represents all Oregonians.

382

I think ######### fits my ideas of a great leader for ODFW. I do not know if he is interested, but he has
demonstrated a keen ability to protect the resource, yet work with stakeholders. He is well respected and admired
by staff. When I think back to previous directors, a few did not have the respect and admiration of staff. In fact,
one in particular was down-right mean, rude, and broke our collective spirit for years until he left. The department
and staff function much more effectively under leadership that is keenly plugged in to the resource, is formally
educated in natural resource science, and has a calm, thoughtful approach to challenges. Must be free-thinking
(does not mean 'renegade') and not committed to just doing business as usual. Big picture approach is whats
needed at this time, to set the course for the future. Few that I have seen have this type of vision.

383

I just hope that "politics" can take a side seat during this process. This choice is of great importance. It seems like
the hunting, and fishing as of late have been quite poor. With the costs always going up, up, and up, and the
decline of success rates overall it will be imperative to get someone in here that can help to turn it around. If not,
I'm afraid that generations to come will not have as many, or any possibly, opportunities. Good luck, and I wish
you the best.

19 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


384

What the public wants in Diamond Lake is more fish, and ODFW wants to produce them by stocking fingerlings
(more than 300,000 each year). Fingerlings grow cheaply into catchable trout, at the expense of the lake's
ecology. Only 4 years after treating Tui Chub in Diamond Lake, algae blooms were back and persist every year.
What more clear example of the need to be honest with the public that they can't have everything they want (lots
of fish, clear and safe water, all for the price of a boat and a fishing license). Begin by stocking fewer fish, of
catchable size, and educate the public to enjoy the outdoors by being there, not by the "free fish" you take home.
Fish stocking is, and always has been, mining our waters to grow fish now by borrowing off the future. If the
Director you select doesn't want to consider a viewpoint like this one, he or she is talking to a minority of
Oregonians.

385

I'd like to see someone who who will work with, and value the views of environmentalists and people who want to
protect wild animals instead of shooting them.

386

Find someone with the ability to foster good relations between private landowners and the ethical hunters of
Oregon.

387

OH, where to begin? First and foremost, this survey. This will most likely be just like every other public forum
ODFW has ever had, not heard and not cared about. I think it would be very helpful if we had a director that
actually mandated the department to take the opinions of the license holders into account when they are making
decisions, I have attended public forums where the entire crowd is saying one thing as if it were a united front
and then of course we always find out later that ODFW had no intention of listening. For instance, I drove 180
miles to the public forum in Newport a few years back to disguise the ridiculous idea of making people throw back
bottom fish caught while fishing for halibut or salmon in the ocean. The license holders in the room were all in
agreement that a simple limit of each species makes it worth while to make an ocean fishing trip. But ODFW had
already made that decision and now on the rare occasion I go halibut fishing I get to watch good lingcod and rock
bass float by dead with blown air sacks because if you want to get a halibut you cant keep a bottom fish. How
does this even happen? It happens because we had a director that refuses to care about the license holder or
even the species conservation. He only cared about what the special interest groups where willing to pay for. I
also believe we need a director that hunts and fishes here in Oregon. How will a politician who knows nothing
about what it feels like to plan a trip to the lower Columbia for spring salmon only to have it shut down early again
because the return was chowed up by the sea lions. Or someone who can not see that the deer bucks have
moved onto private property in towns because they are way safer there and now they are not migrating to
wintering grounds to breed a future generation. We need someone that lives this, an Oregonian that hunts and
fishes, not someone with lots of government management experience. We can train that to a monkey.

388

In addition to having a sound business mind for all things fiscal and management related - and a commitment to
trusting sound science - the Director should have an unwavered lifetime of hunting and fishing experience. Only
then will he or she know truly what the interests and issues are. He or she needs to be more than just fair weather
hunter / fisher. He or she must be one whose friends all say "dang, all that person cares about is hunting and
fishing".

389

Agency has major issues with lack of public support. Director should have skills and vision to lead department
staff with interactions with public through education, not lecturing. A background of high interest and involvement
with outdoor education programs would be a much needed leadership change that would help gain support for
programs over time, not knee-jerk reactions to day-to-day crisis. This is a much higher priority than selecting
someone who is a good "lobbyist" at the legislature.

390

If the person has not hunted or fished on their own (guided or pay to hunt/fish dosn't count) then they don't know
what the challenges are for the ODFW. They should also be a Oregon resident. They should know that boots on
the ground knowledge is a higher education then what is in books, Combined books and boots are excellent
pardners.

391

Don't pick an environmental nut job. Pick someone that actually hunts and fishes. Someone who actually knows
what to do. Not a mouthpiece for environmental groups...

392

Look to experienced leadership from other states where they have had multiple successes with Fish and Wildlife
management. Even though Oregon may have unique issues, the policies and process of getting the job done in
other states might be a model to follow.

393

394

please go for a person who has experience in fish and game management and not just conservation. someone
who knows about the outdoors and not just putting wildlife in parks

395

A people person who's willing to travel the state to hunt and fish with all walks of people from every county in the
state.

396

Let the commission do their job

20 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

397

Managing people, which is part of managing wildlife, is an important part of this agency. I want someone who has
the skills to do both. I would like to see a new visionary approach to this dilemma.

398

Pick someone who is interested in more than just hunting and fishing! There is more to our ecosystem than trout
or deer, and I have felt that too much attention is paid to what we can gain from the environment, rather than
what we are doing to harm the ecosystem. (I am not a vegetarian or vegan, by the way, I am an avid hunter, but
more needs to be done to help the ecosystem than what we do now, partly because we focus so much on the
species that we hunt and fish for). Whoever you select should have a strong interest in educating the public
about the entire ecosystem, from microscopic to macroscopic. Much, much more can be done to help the natural
world than what ODFW is doing now. A big part of that is teaching people to respect and love nature for what it is,
not for what it can give us (like trout). By understanding the beauty and place in the environment that the great
blue heron occupies, (or the bear, or the cougar, or the lynx, or the great-horned owl, or the barn owl, or the
northern pygmy owl) people can begin to understand why there should be conservation and why some areas
should have restricted hunting and restricted development. Without education as to why certain laws and
regulations are required, people just become frustrated and angry with the regulatory agency(ies) in question.
Healthy forests in the future come from healthy and well-educated minds today, and that includes more than just
elementary students.

399

The new director must be a leader. The person's resume must show demonstrated successful personal
leadership at top management level in a fish and wildlife agency. The person must show they have been willing
to personally step out in front and show how to get the job done and motivate their subordinates to excel.

400

Thank you for the opportunity to participate

401

Approachable, hire someone approachable and someone that truly appreciates the outdoors. It's not just a job!!

402

Accessible education to and for the public is instrumental for the success of conservation. The more people can
understand our connection to the land and wildlife, the more they will care and choose to be allies of Oregon's
wildlife.

403

No

404

Please select someone with knowledge of and respect for the work and contributions of wildlife rehabilitators. they
provide a powerful educational service and work diligently to mediate human/wildlfie conflict. they field many
thousands upon thousands of calls from the general public that otherwise would be directed to F&W.

405

you need someone who realizes hunting is not the only activity. There are other people who use wildlife
management areas who do not harm wildlife with their activities. Wildlife refuges should be open to horseback
riding, and more welcoming to hikers. Also, trapping needs to be regulated to protect the non-trapping public and
to protect animals. Traps should be clearly marked and there should be bag limits as with hunting and fishing.
The days of the wild west are long gone.

406

I was unable to reorganize your seven areas. Maybe a different way of organizing that section would make it
work for all citizens, thanks.

407

I would love to see a director that understands the importance education has on our wildlife. Working to educate
the public about the work ODFW does, and how they can help their mission succeed, would be wonderful.

408

A good leader creates and fosters a strong team to accomplish goals and make ambitious, do-able plans. Good
luck!

409

Look for someone that truly recognizes the need to have a balance strong team. A team that include strong
pragmatic and idealist employees from the top down.

410

It is important that the new director care about current and future employee job satisfaction.

411

Dont pick a pencil pusher. Pick somebody that loves fish, birds, wolves, all of it.

412

no. good luck

21 / 52

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


413

ODFW is no longer just an old boys network of hunters and fishers, though that population is clearly still an
important part of the department's stakeholders. I would like to see the department working with the public,
encouraging conservation easements, encouraging nature education, citizen science, nature-scaping, watchable
wildlife programs, and wildlife rehabilitation. The citizens of Oregon are deeply committed to the natural heritage
of their state, including its wildlife, but in recent years, the department has placed a rather low priority on wildlife
rehabilitation, which doesn't make sense, as the public insists on something being done when they find an animal
in need. The department should also take better advantage of the opportunities for positive public relations that
rehabilitation can present.

414

Please prepare and publish some actual facts on how much this Wolf Reintroduction Program is costing and also
list who is now contributing to these funds.

415

The new director should have experience managing fish and wildlife in the western U.S.

416

no

417

someone who is outspoken and understands the value of public relations.

418

A NEW DIRECTOR SHOULD BE TOLD THAT HE/SHE WILL STILL BE TAKING ORDERS FROM THE
GOVERNORS OFFICE AND IT WILL BE TOUGH TO KEEP FROM GETTING FIRED IF THEY DON'T TOW
THE LINE.

419

The Director must be from outside the agency in order to get to the bottom of what went horribly wrong with the
budget, to change culture, and to make sure our dire fiscal situation doesn't happen again.

420

Support restoration of the PERMANENT pioneer license with no annual (non permanent) component

421

Please find a person who has looked at successes and failures of the other states. Someone who can network
with other agencies and build a coalition that will ensure our hunting heritage for all the future generations. Our
hunting heritage is slipping in Oregon. Kids are being looked down upon for not buying meat in the store where it
"made". We can turn it around with a strong leader who believes hunting is conservation.

422

I suggest looking into history and future. Remember that hunting and fishing is a family tradition that is both
remembered and taught through stories. Limiting people to have experiences that they can pass on by banning
cameras and having memories through ethical tactics to manage animal numbers erases these traditions. Taking
a hunt to five days that used to be 14 days also drastically limits those experiences. In recent times the director
and board have put their own agendas in front of the greater whole. By not providing good habitat animals
diminish, by not managing predators animals diminish, and by continually restricting law abiding hunters to take
their families out and learn these ethics diminishes ethics. The board and the director need to rethink their
agendas.

423

Hunting and fishing are important parts of our cultural heritage here in Oregon. I would like to share these with
my kids and generations beyond. Our director must understand and value these as I do. He/she must have the
mindset to preserve hunting and fishing forever.

424

Yes, please pick someone who is visionary and cares about the future of wildlife in Oregon!

425

The agency needs to develop the backbone necessary to get out front on fish and wildlife protection and
enhancement issues, making a public presentation in rule making hearings of its own and other state agencies of
what should be done in the best interest of fish and wildlife. For much to long, ODFW has been the weak sister
and unwilling advocate for fish and wildlife conservation when faced with action by other state agencies that will
be detrimental to such a goal. Recent example: ODFW's failure to testify in the Oregon Department of Forestry's
rule making procedure in support of the rule proposal to increase the riparian stream setback requirement on
private timberlands in order to help protect cold water temperatures for streams important to fish spawning or
rearing. This is an area where the scientific based benefit is clear, but ODFW stays in the background.

426

TRAPPING: I would like a director that will push back on the cruel practice of trapping of any species (other than
for scientific study). KILLING CONTESTS: The director should also speak forcefully against and work for banning
any wildlife killing "contests" -- such as ones for coyotes (but any species) -- and commit to eradicating this kind of
inhumane practice regarding our wildlife in Oregon. HUNTING: The new director should review the list of
species that are allowed to be hunted -- and should remove species. For example: Mourning Doves and Crows
should not be on the list of species that can be hunted - there is no reason for that. Hunting cougars or bears with
dogs should not be allowed. WILDLIFE AREAS AND HABITAT: The new director should be committed to
enhancing the wildlife refuge aspect of wildlife areas. Wildlife habitat preservation and expansion should be a top
priority. KILLING SPECIES: ODFW should push back on killing one species to "save" another, but should
examine such situations for the human disturbance that underlies this kind of problem and address it from this
angle. For example, cormorants should not be killed to "save" salmon.

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Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife


427

The single thing I care most about is having our next director be a person who values ethical hunting and the
hunting tradition over all else.

428

The parking sticker for the state wildlife areas is printed on cheap fax type paper and fades in the sun in just a
few days of exposure. Find a better way to manage that. Be aware of impact of ORV on fragile habitat. I know
there is a huge lobby of them however they are tearing up habitat that takes decades to recover. Wildlife safety
and habitat should be priority.

429

430

The time has come to diversify sources of funding for this agency. The license sales model has become
unsustainable because of economic and demographic changes to the state. Funding changes must be made
within the department and among other state agencies.

431

Unbiased knowledge is imparative. Be willing to recruite world wide and not just domestically .

432

Hire a hunter, farmer background.

433

I feel like our open spaces are being taken over by the need of humans and hope this new person can help slow
down or stop that process.

434

Like I mentioned before this person needs to be a Hunter and fisherman. In regards to hunting they specifically
need to be a big game hunter as this is where Oregon is having the biggest issues with management. Person
should also have experience working with in a state that is having success with it's big game populations. Person
needs to be able to think outside the box on how to fund ODFW and best manage big game populations. Current
system is broke and no leadership has been shown in fixing it.

435

I should hope that the next director will participate in all aspects of this department. From youth activities to
protecting the rights, and helping to enforce those rights, of all public members who engage in any activity.

436

Increase fines for commercial fisherman violations.

437

At times I've heard both directors and commissioners talk about how much they love to hunt and fish themselves.
Inevitably, I always have to wonder how much time they spend scouting on public land or timber land (open to
the public). There is a really big difference between putting in the time to find game on public land versus hopping
on a plane, flying to the Midwest, and paying a few thousand dollars to shoot stocked pheasants on a private
farm/ranch. ODFW's director should be able to connect with and possess the perspective of an AVERAGE
hunter/angler. The experience of hunting on public land is totally different from that of a guided/catered trip.
Please ensure that the new director has the skill set for the position. I previously worked at another conservation
agency where a biologist was promoted to a director position. The person had no vision, seemed to worry to
much about tipping the apple cart, and unfortunately depressed employees with their doom and gloom speeches.